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Sample records for burst slug monitors

  1. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Hoover, Andrew S; van der Horst, Alexander J; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, R Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McBreen, Sheila; Paciesas, W S; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wallace, Mark S; Wilson, Robert B; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) will significantly augment the science return from the Fermi Observatory in the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). The primary objective of GBM is to extend the energy range over which bursts are observed downward from the energy range of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi into the hard X-ray range where extensive previous data exist. A secondary objective is to compute burst locations on-board to allow re-orientiong the spacecraft so that the LAT can observe delayed emission from bright bursts. GBM uses an array of twelve sodium iodide scintillators and two bismuth germanate scintillators to detect gamma rays from ~8 keV to ~40 MeV over the full unocculted sky. The on-board trigger threshold is ~0.7 photons/cm2/s (50-300 keV, 1 s peak). GBM generates on-board triggers for ~250 GRBs per year.

  2. Detecting pipe bursts by monitoring water demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Van der Roer, M.; Sperber, V.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm which compares measured and predicted water demands to detect pipe bursts was developed and tested on three data sets of water demand and reported pipe bursts of three years. The algorithm proved to be able to detect bursts where the water loss exceeds 30% of the average water demand in

  3. Long X-ray burst monitoring with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binary systems. In the frame of the INTEGRAL observational Key Programme over the Galactic Center a good number of the known X-ray bursters are frequently being monitored. An international....... Of special interest are low luminosity bursting sources that exhibit X-ray bursts of very different durations allowing to study the transition from a hydrogen-rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime and from helium burning to carbon burning. I will present results obtained from INTEGRAL archive...

  4. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thermonuclear bursts on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries have been studied for many years and have in a few cases confirmed theoretical models of nuclear ignition and burning mechanisms. The large majority of X-ray bursts last less than 100s. A good number of the...... known X-ray bursters are frequently observed by INTEGRAL, in particular in the frame of the Key Programmes. Taking advantage of the INTEGRAL instrumentation, an international collaboration led by the JEM-X team at the Danish National Space Institute has been monitoring the occurrence of uncommon burst...... events lasting more than a few minutes. Of special interest are exceptional X-ray bursts which duration about a few tens of minutes is intermediate between usual short bursts and hour long superbursts. The processes driving such long bursts are not yet fully understood: depending on the composition of...

  5. Part 1: The detection of criticality accidents in the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. Part 2: The Burst Slug Detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In all installations where fissionable materials are handled in quantities virtually greater than the critical mass, there exists permanent risk of accidental nuclear excursion entailing a serious irradiation hazard to the personnel, in spite of all the precautions that might be taken. Immediate detection followed by rapid evacuation greatly limits the risks of irradiation due to the fission products or to the sustained nuclear reaction. The necessity for a suitable equipment for the detection of accidents of criticality is imposed by the fact that the physical phenomena accompanying a nuclear, excursion are insufficient to follow the alarm, and may lead to confusion. Taking into account the accidents which have occurred and the role expected from a detector, we choose a dose integration device for the detecting probe proper, and a system based on the coincidence of several information to trigger the alarm. At the demand of the Commission des Masses Critiques, the minimal physical and electronic features required to obtain a very reliable system with minimal risk of false alarm has been established. These features are described in some detail. The equipment constructed at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique on the basis of these recommendations has been tested systematically under actual conditions of nuclear excursions at the Health Physics Research Reactor of the National Laboratory at Oak Ridge. These tests have served to determine two types of detection probes which will be described: a photomultiplier and a semiconductor probe. Finally the authors present an example of a complete unit for the detection of criticality accidents in an installation for the processing of fissile material. B - The evolution of the installations for burst slug detection (BSD) in french reactors. The main part of the effort in the field of the Burst Slug Detection has been orientated on the large gas-cooled reactors where the problem of bursts slugs is associated with the economics

  6. Earth Occultation Monitoring with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT). Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors for daily monitoring. Light curves, updated daily, are available on our website http://heastro.phys.lsu.edu/gbm. Our software is also capable of performing the Earth occultation monitoring using up to 128 energy bands, or any combination of those bands, using our 128-channel, 4-s CSPEC data. The GBM BGO detectors, sensitive from about 200 keV to 40 keV, can also be used with this technique. In our standard application of the EOT, we use a catalog of sources to drive the measurements. To ensure that our catalog is complete, our team has developed an Earth occultation imaging method. In this talk, I will describe both techniques and the current data products available. I will highlight recent and important results from the GBM EOT, including the current status of our observations of hard X-ray variations in the Crab Nebula.

  7. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.;

    2008-01-01

    exceptional burst events lasting more than ~10 minutes. Half of the dozen so-called intermediate long bursts registered so far have been observed by INTEGRAL. The goal is to derive a comprehensive picture of the relationship between the nuclear ignition processes and the accretion states of the system leading......X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting neutron stars in X-ray binaries. As most of the known X-ray bursters are frequently observed by INTEGRAL, an international collaboration have been taking advantage of its instrumentation to specifically monitor the occurrence of...

  8. Multi-Index Monitoring and Evaluation on Rock Burst in Yangcheng Mine

    OpenAIRE

    Yunliang Tan; Yanchun Yin; Shitan Gu; Zhiwei Tian

    2015-01-01

    Based on the foreboding information monitoring of the energy released in the developing process of rock burst, prediction system for rock burst can be established. By using microseismic method, electromagnetic radiation method, and drilling bits method, rock burst in Yangcheng Mine was monitored, and a system of multi-index monitoring and evaluation on rock burst was established. Microseismic monitoring and electromagnetic radiation monitoring were early warning method, and drilling bits moni...

  9. Fermi/GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR OBSERVATIONS OF SGR J0501+4516 BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGR J0501+4516, detected with the gamma-ray burst monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during 13 days of the source's activation in 2008 (August 22- September 3). We find that the T90 durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T90 values estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two blackbody functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that Epeak decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of ∼30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10-6 erg cm-2 s-1, increasing steadily afterward. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550-5418 and 1806-20. The isotropic luminosity, Liso, corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4-1.5 x 1040 erg s-1).

  10. THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, NL-1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Beklen, E. [Physics Department, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey); Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 {+-} 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  11. The Fermi-GBM X-Ray Burst Monitor: Thermonuclear Bursts from 4U 0614+09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; van der Horst, A. J.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Chakrabarty, D.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 ± 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  12. Monitoring burst (M-burst) — A novel framework of failure localization in all-optical mesh networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Mohammed L.

    2011-10-10

    Achieving instantaneous and precise failure localization in all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks has been an attractive feature of network fault management systems, and is particularly important when failure-dependent protection is employed. The paper introduces a novel framework of real-time failure localization in all-optical WDM mesh networks, called monitoring-burst (m-burst), which aims to initiate a graceful compromise between consumed monitoring resources and monitoring delay. Different from any previously reported solution, the proposed m-burst framework has a single monitoring node (MN) which launches optical bursts along a set of pre-defined close-loop routes, called monitoring cycles (m-cycles), to probe the links along the m-cycles. Bursts along different m-cycles are kept non-overlapping through any link of the network. By identifying the lost bursts due to single link failure events only, the MN can unambiguously localize the failed link in at least 3-connected networks. We will justify the feasibility and applicability of the proposed m-burst framework in the scenario of interest. To avoid possible collision among optical bursts launched by the MN, we define the problem of collision-free scheduling and formulate it into an integer linear program (ILP) in order to minimize the monitoring delay. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework and the proposed solution.

  13. The Fermi-GBM X-ray burst monitor: thermonuclear bursts from 4U 0614+09

    CERN Document Server

    Linares, M; Jenke, P; van der Horst, A J; Camero-Arranz, A; Kouveliotou, C; Chakrabarty, D; Beklen, E; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Finger, M; Paciesas, W; Preece, R; von Kienlin, A; Wilson-Hodge, C A

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the neutron star interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09, when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12+/-3 d (68% confidence interval) between March 2010 and March 2011, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 d (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations, and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bu...

  14. Validation of the GLAST Burst Monitor Instrument Response Simulation Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises 12 NaI and 2 BGO detectors dispersed about the GLAST spacecraft. The GBM instrument simulation software must generate an accurate response function database for all detectors in their flight configuration to optimize the mission science return. Before science analysis codes use the response database, we must confirm that our simulation codes and models can reproduce laboratory observations. To validate the simulation effort, Monte Carlo results are compared to calibrated laboratory measurements collected with a variety of radiation sources

  15. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H.-F.; Bhat, P. N.; Burgess, J. M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M. M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  16. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Goldstein, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Meegan, C. A.; Jenke, P.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL (United States); Preece, R. D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Greiner, J.; Yu, H.-F. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Kippen, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States); Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S., E-mail: valerie@nasa.gov [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); and others

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  17. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, V; Goldstein, A; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Gibby, M H; Greiner, J; Gruber, D; Jenke, P; Kippen, R M; Pelassa, V; Xiong, S; Yu, H -F; Bhat, P N; Burgess, J M; Byrne, D; Fitzpatrick, G; Foley, S; Giles, M M; Guiriec, S; van der Horst, A J; von Kienlin, A; McBreen, S; McGlynn, S; Tierney, D; Zhang, B -B

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in July, 2008. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network (IPN), to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1 degree, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.7 degree Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14 degrees. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y-axis better l...

  18. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis

  19. SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during Its Most Prolific Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderHorst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Gorgone, N. M.; Kaneko, Y.; Baring, M. G.; Guiriec, S.; Gogus, E,; Granot, J.; Watts, A. L.; Lin, L.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Chaplin, V. L.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M.; Goldstein, A.; Gruber, D.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2012-01-01

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties.We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J15505418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E(sub peak) and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BBfits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature.We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  20. SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS DETECTED WITH THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR DURING ITS MOST PROLIFIC ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Horst, A. J.; Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gorgone, N. M. [Connecticut College, New London, CT 06320 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Goegues, E.; Lin, L. [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Guiriec, S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, V. L.; Goldstein, A. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, CSPAR, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Granot, J. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Watts, A. L. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissaldi, E.; Gruber, D. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M., E-mail: A.J.VanDerHorst@uva.nl [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

    2012-04-20

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E{sub peak} and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BB fits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high-temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature. We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  1. The CALET Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM)

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Sakamoto, Takanori; Takahashi, Ichiro; Hara, Takumi; Yamamoto, Tatsuma; Kawakubo, Yuta; Inoue, Ry ota; Terazawa, Shunsuke; Fujioka, Rie; Senuma, Kazumasa; Nakahira, Satoshi; Tomida, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Torii, Shoji; Cherry, Michael L; Ricciarini, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The CALET Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM) is the secondary scientific instrument of the CALET mission on the International Space Station (ISS), which is scheduled for launch by H-IIB/HTV in 2014. The CGBM provides a broadband energy coverage from 7 keV to 20 MeV, and simultaneous observations with the primary instrument Calorimeter (CAL) in the GeV - TeV gamma-ray range and Advanced Star Camera (ASC) in the optical for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and other X-gamma-ray transients. The CGBM consists of two kinds of scintillators: two LaBr$_3$(Ce) (7 keV - 1 MeV) and one BGO (100 keV - 20 MeV) each read by a single photomultiplier. The LaBr$_3$(Ce) crystal, used in space for the first time here for celestial gamma-ray observations, enables GRB observations over a broad energy range from low energy X-ray emissions to gamma rays. The detector performance and structures have been verified using the bread-board model (BBM) via vibration and thermal vacuum tests. The CALET is currently in the development phase of the prot...

  2. Initiation of slug flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanratty, T.J.; Woods, B.D. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The initiation of slug flow in a horizontal pipe can be predicted either by considering the stability of a slug or by considering the stability of a stratified flow. Measurements of the shedding rate of slugs are used to define necessary conditions for the existence of a slug. Recent results show that slugs develop from an unstable stratified flow through the evolution of small wavelength waves into large wavelength waves that have the possibility of growing to form a slug. The mechanism appears to be quite different for fluids with viscosities close to water than for fluids with large viscosities (20 centipoise).

  3. FERMI/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor upper limits assuming a magnetar origin for the repeating Fast Radio Burst source, FRB 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, George; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Gogus, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Spitler et al. (2016, 10.1038/nature17168) reported a repeating Fast Radio Burst source, FRB 121102, with a rate of about 3 bursts/hr. We searched the FERMI/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) for possible gamma-ray counterparts for these events.

  4. SGR J1550-5418 bursts detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its most prolific activity

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, A J; Gorgone, N M; Kaneko, Y; Baring, M G; Guiriec, S; Gogus, E; Granot, J; Watts, A L; Lin, L; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Chaplin, V L; Connaughton, V; Finger, M H; Gehrels, N; Gibby, M H; Giles, M M; Goldstein, A; Gruber, D; Harding, A K; Kaper, L; von Kienlin, A; van der Klis, M; McBreen, S; Mcenery, J; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Pe'er, A; Preece, R D; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rau, A; Wachter, S; Wilson-Hodge, C; Woods, P M; Wijers, R A M J

    2012-01-01

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in January 2009, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two black-body functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model we find a mean power-law index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlati...

  5. The Fermi-GBM X-ray burst monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, M.; Fermi GBM X-ray Burst Collaboration

    2010-12-01

    We discuss the first results of the Fermi-GBM all-sky search for X-ray bursts. The very large field of view and X-ray response of the Fermi-GBM make it a unique instrument to study rare, bright and short-lived X-ray bursts. We are performing a systematic search that exploits such capabilities. We present results on long/intermediate type I X-ray bursts, an unusual kind of thermonuclear bursts from accreting neutron stars, and show how Fermi-GBM is giving for the first time robust measurements of their recurrence time.

  6. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor as a Transient Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Fermi GBM Team

    2016-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) performs well as a transient monitor in the 8 keV to 1 MeV range using the publicly available continuous data products. With GBM, we use the Earth occultation technique successfully monitor long-term hard X-ray variations in the Crab Nebula, bright transients such as the black hole binary V404 Cyg, which flared brightly in Jun 2015, and a catalog of 200+ sources. The catalog includes X-ray binaries, active galaxies, and the Sun which we monitor for variations on timescales from days to years, supporting multi wavelength campaigns and triggering other instruments. We monitor the pulse frequency and pulsed flux for 37 accreting pulsars with a high (~50% duty cycle), including Be/X-ray binaries such as V0332+53, which underwent a giant outburst in summer 2015. Through daily searches, we detect X-ray bursts from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries. I will present highlights of these transient monitoring efforts, demonstrating significant science gains using GBM continuous data products.

  7. Real-Time Supernova Neutrino Burst Monitor at Super-Kamiokande

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.(University of Tokyo, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, Kamioka Observatory, Kamioka, Japan); Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y

    2016-01-01

    We present a real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande (SK). Detecting supernova explosions by neutrinos in real time is crucial for giving a clear picture of the explosion mechanism. Since the neutrinos are expected to come earlier than light, a fast broadcasting of the detection may give astronomers a chance to make electromagnetic radiation observations of the explosions right at the onset. The role of the monitor includes a fast announcement of the neutrino burst dete...

  8. Real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, H.; Tomura, T.; Ueno, K.; Wendell, R. A.; Yokozawa, T.; Irvine, T.; Kajita, T.; Kametani, I.; Kaneyuki, K.; Lee, K. P.; McLachlan, T.; Nishimura, Y.; Richard, E.; Okumura, K.; Labarga, L.; Fernandez, P.; Berkman, S.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tobayama, S.; Gustafson, J.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Goldhaber, M.; Carminati, G.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Weatherly, P.; Renshaw, A.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Takhistov, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Hill, J.; Keig, W. E.; Hong, N.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Akiri, T.; Himmel, A.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Jang, J. S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Bronner, C.; Hirota, S.; Huang, K.; Ieki, K.; Kikawa, T.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takahashi, S.; Tateishi, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Mitsuka, G.; Mijakowski, P.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Wilking, M. J.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Yamaguchi, R.; Yano, T.; Kuno, Y.; Tacik, R.; Kim, S. B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Suda, Y.; Totsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; de Perio, P.; Konaka, A.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Connolly, K.; Wilkes, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande (SK). Detecting supernova explosions by neutrinos in real time is crucial for giving a clear picture of the explosion mechanism. Since the neutrinos are expected to come earlier than light, a fast broadcasting of the detection may give astronomers a chance to make electromagnetic radiation observations of the explosions right at the onset. The role of the monitor includes a fast announcement of the neutrino burst detection to the world and a determination of the supernova direction. We present the online neutrino burst detection system and studies of the direction determination accuracy based on simulations at SK.

  9. Real-Time Supernova Neutrino Burst Monitor at Super-Kamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Hayato, Y; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Tanaka, H; Tomura, T; Ueno, K; Wendell, R A; Yokozawa, T; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kametani, I; Kaneyuki, K; Lee, K P; McLachlan, T; Nishimura, Y; Richard, E; Okumura, K; Labarga, L; Fernandez, P; Berkman, S; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Gustafson, J; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Carminati, G; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Weatherly, P; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Takhistov, V; Ganezer, K S; Hartfiel, B L; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Akiri, T; Himmel, A; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Bronner, C; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Ieki, K; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Murakami, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Takahashi, S; Tateishi, K; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Mijakowski, P; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Yanagisawa, C; Wilking, M J; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Yamaguchi, R; Yano, T; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Suda, Y; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; de Perio, P; Konaka, A; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Connolly, K; Wilkes, R J

    2016-01-01

    We present a real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande (SK). Detecting supernova explosions by neutrinos in real time is crucial for giving a clear picture of the explosion mechanism. Since the neutrinos are expected to come earlier than light, a fast broadcasting of the detection may give astronomers a chance to make electromagnetic radiation observations of the explosions right at the onset. The role of the monitor includes a fast announcement of the neutrino burst detection to the world and a determination of the supernova direction. We present the online neutrino burst detection system and studies of the direction determination accuracy based on simulations at SK.

  10. Multi-Impairment WDM Optical Performance Monitoring for Burst Switched Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Baker-Meflah, L.; Thomsen, B.C.; Mitchell, J. E.; Bayvel, P.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analytical investigation of a performance monitoring scheme capable of simultaneously monitoring Chromatic Dispersion, Polarization Mode Dispersion and Optical Signal to Noise Ratio at 40 Gbit/s on timescales that are appropriate to optical burst switched networks. This analysis supports previously published experimental results which showed that this technique is scalable to WDM network monitoring.

  11. Anomalies in low-energy Gamma-Ray Burst spectra with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tierney, Dave; Preece, Robert D; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Guiriec, Sylvain; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Burgess, J Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McGlynn, Sinead; Paciesas, William S; Pelassa, Veronique; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A Band function has become the standard spectral function used to describe the prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, deviations from this function have previously been observed in GRBs detected by BATSE and in individual GRBs from the \\textit{Fermi} era. We present a systematic and rigorous search for spectral deviations from a Band function at low energies in a sample of the first two years of high fluence, long bursts detected by the \\textit{Fermi} Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The sample contains 45 bursts with a fluence greater than 2$\\times10^{-5}$ erg / cm$^{2}$ (10 - 1000 keV). An extrapolated fit method is used to search for low-energy spectral anomalies, whereby a Band function is fit above a variable low-energy threshold and then the best fit function is extrapolated to lower energy data. Deviations are quantified by examining residuals derived from the extrapolated function and the data and their significance is determined via comprehensive simulations which account for the ...

  12. Time resolved spectroscopy of SGR J1550–5418 bursts detected with Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550–5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E peak, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ∼ – 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10–5 erg s–1 cm–2. Above this flux value, the E peak–flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ∼1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area–kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R 2∝kT –4, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10–5.5 erg s–1 cm–2). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R max ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R max as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550–5418, B int ≳ 4.5 × 1015 G.

  13. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Baring, M. G.; Granot, J.; Watts, A. L.; Bhat, P. N.; Collazzi, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gorgone, N.; Göğüş, E.; Gruber, D.; Grunblatt, S.; Huppenkothen, D.; Kaneko, Y.; von Kienlin, A.; van der Klis, M.; Lin, L.; Mcenery, J.; van Putten, T.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2014-04-01

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550-5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E peak, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ~ - 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10-5 erg s-1 cm-2. Above this flux value, the E peak-flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ~1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area-kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R 2vpropkT -4, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10-5.5 erg s-1 cm-2). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R max ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R max as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418, B int >~ 4.5 × 1015 G.

  14. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor: Results from the first two years

    OpenAIRE

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Collaboration, for the Fermi GBM

    2011-01-01

    In the first two years since the launch of the Fermi Observatory, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 500 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), of which 18 were confidently detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) above 100 MeV. Besides GRBs, GBM has triggered on other transient sources, such as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs), Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) and solar flares. Here we present the science highlights of the GBM observations.

  15. Do the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and Swift Burst Alert Telescope see the Same Short Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Eric; Connaughton, Valerie; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Lien, Amy; Briggs, Michael S.; Goldstein, Adam; Pelassa, Veronique; Troja, Eleonora

    2016-02-01

    Compact binary system mergers are expected to generate gravitational radiation detectable by ground-based interferometers. A subset of these, the merger of a neutron star with another neutron star or a black hole, are also the most popular model for the production of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) trigger on short GRBs (SGRBs) at rates that reflect their relative sky exposures, with the BAT detecting 10 per year compared to about 45 for GBM. We examine the SGRB populations detected by Swift BAT and Fermi GBM. We find that the Swift BAT triggers on weaker SGRBs than Fermi GBM, providing they occur close to the center of the BAT field of view, and that the Fermi GBM SGRB detection threshold remains flatter across its field of view. Overall, these effects combine to give the instruments the same average sensitivity, and account for the SGRBs that trigger one instrument but not the other. We do not find any evidence that the BAT and GBM are detecting significantly different populations of SGRBs. Both instruments can detect untriggered SGRBs using ground searches seeded with time and position. The detection of SGRBs below the on-board triggering sensitivities of Swift BAT and Fermi GBM increases the possibility of detecting and localizing the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) events seen by the new generation of GW detectors.

  16. Do the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and Swift Burst Alert Telescope see the Same Short Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, Eric; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Lien, Amy; Briggs, Michael S; Goldstein, Adam; Pelassa, Veronique; Troja, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Compact binary system mergers are expected to generate gravitational radiation detectable by ground-based interferometers. A subset of these, the merger of a neutron star with another neutron star or a black hole, are also the most popular model for the production of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) trigger on short GRBs (SGRBs) at rates that reflect their relative sky exposures, with the BAT detecting 10 per year compared to about 45 for GBM. We examine the SGRB populations detected by Swift BAT and Fermi GBM. We find that the Swift BAT triggers on weaker SGRBs than Fermi GBM, providing they occur close to the center of the BAT field-of-view, and that the Fermi GBM SGRB detection threshold remains flatter across its field-of-view. Overall, these effects combine to give the instruments the same average sensitivity, and account for the SGRBs that trigger one instrument but not the other. We do not find any evidence that the BAT and...

  17. Continued Radio Monitoring of the Gamma Ray Burst 991208

    CERN Document Server

    Galama, T J; Sari, R; Berger, E; Taylor, G B; Kulkarni, S R

    2003-01-01

    We present radio observations of the afterglow of the bright gamma-ray burst GRB 991208 at frequencies of 1.4, 4.9 and 8.5 GHz, taken between two weeks and 300 days after the burst. The well-sampled radio light curve at 8.5 GHz shows that the peak flux density peaked about 10 days after the burst and decayed thereafter as a power-law t^-1.07. This decay rate is more shallow than the optical afterglow with t^-2.2, which was measured during the first week. These late-time data are combined with extensive optical, millimeter and centimeter measurements and fitted to the standard relativistic blast wave model. In agreement with previous findings, we find that an isotropic explosion in a constant density or wind-blown medium cannot explain these broadband data without modifying the assumption of a single power-law slope for the electron energy distribution. A jet-like expansion provides a reasonable fit to the data. In this case, the flatter radio light curve compared to the optical may be due to emission from an ...

  18. Time resolved spectroscopy of SGR J1550–5418 bursts detected with Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, G. [Universities Space Research Association, 6767 Old Madison Pike, Suite 450, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); Kouveliotou, C.; Collazzi, A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J.; Watts, A. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Van der Klis, M.; Van Putten, T. [Astronomical Institute " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Raánana 43537 (Israel); Bhat, P. N.; Gorgone, N. [University of Alabama in Huntsville CSPAR, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, N.; Mcenery, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y.; Lin, L. [Sabancı University, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Gruber, D.; Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Grunblatt, S. [University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2500 Campus Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2014-04-10

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550–5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E {sub peak}, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ∼ – 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10{sup –5} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. Above this flux value, the E {sub peak}–flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ∼1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area–kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R {sup 2}∝kT {sup –4}, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10{sup –5.5} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R {sub max} ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R {sub max} as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550–5418, B {sub int} ≳ 4.5 × 10{sup 15} G.

  19. An assessment of burst strength distribution data for monitoring quality of condom stocks in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, M J; Hutchings, J; Lubis, F; Natakusumah, R

    1986-03-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted on condoms to examine the changes that occur over time in indicators of condom burst strength, and to determine the relationship between laboratory-assessed condom burst strength and breakage during use in a developing country setting. Three groups of unaged condoms purchased directly from the manufacturer were used: one group exposed to UV light for 10 hours; one group exposed for five hours; and one group unexposed. A sample of each of these groups was tested according to ISO condom air burst test protocols. The remaining condoms were individually packaged in coded polyethylene bags for shipment to the developing country study site. Also used in the study was a group of condoms that had been aged for over 40 months under field conditions in a tropical climate; a sample from this group was tested by the ISO air burst test protocol and the remainder distributed to the study site. One-hundred-thirty Indonesian urban males participated in the double-blind study. Volunteers were not relying on the condom for contraceptive purposes. Each volunteer was given one individually packaged untreated condom, one condom from each treatment group, and four condoms aged in the field. Study participants were instructed to return all used condoms. Each condom that was returned after use was examined for breakage, and the unbroken condoms were subjected to an air inflation test to determine volume and pressure at burst. A comparison of the air burst volume data for a sample of unused and used condoms from the same treatment group indicates that most of the condoms that broke during use had air burst volumes below 11 liters. Therefore, a significant downward shift in the burst strength distribution as measured in the laboratory is likely to result in an increased breakage rate during use. A Condom Deterioration Index calculated from regular periodic testing of stored condom stocks is a convenient and sensitive means of monitoring trends in the

  20. Meteor Burst Remote Monitoring System Deployment at US DOE Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper details the efforts associated with the design and installation of a Meteor Burst system at the 200-BP-1 Prototype Barrier located at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The existing monitoring data collection and transmission system at the 200-BP-1 location is cellular phone-based. This system required manual data retrieval and was faced with costly upgrades due to ongoing changes in cellular phone technology. The Meteor Burst system on the other hand offers automated transmission of large amounts of monitoring data with minimal infrastructure and easy real-time access to data by facility personnel via user-friendly web pages. Under this project, a meteor burst data collection and transmission system was successfully designed and installed. This system collects and transmits data from 4 water balance monitoring stations and 13 time-domain reflectometry probes located atop the 200-BP-1 Prototype Barrier. The field system employs several data-loggers plus meteor burst components and 900-megahertz radios. In addition to the field design and installation, system programming was performed to successfully interface the components of the field system and to facilitate communication with the Internet server. Lastly, user-friendly web pages were developed to facilitate real-time access to data. (authors)

  1. Bubble, Burp, Bang! Self-organizing Cyclicity in Slug-driven Eruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellin, E. W.; Del Bello, E.; Mathias, S.; Taddeucci, J.; Lane, S. J.; Scarlato, P.

    2011-12-01

    Strombolian volcanic activity is generally thought to be driven by the ascent and bursting of large slugs of magmatic gas; a similar slug-drive mechanism is likely to operate in geysers and some mud volcanoes. We present the results of field measurements, laboratory experiments and numerical modelling of the ascent and bursting of gas slugs. Our results quantify the physical controls on the development of overpressure in slug-driven eruptions and demonstrate that rhythmic eruptions - commonly observed in strombolian activity - can emerge as a consequence of the complex interplay between the evolving pressure in the slug, and the conditions at the vent and in the subsurface reservoir. We have conducted analogue experiments in which gas slugs ascend vertical pipes filled with various liquids. Our analogue conduits range in scale from 2cm diameter, 2m height, to 25cm diameter, 13m height, allowing us to investigate slug Reynolds numbers in the range 10-4 < Re < 104, encompassing the natural range for igneous volcanoes, mud volcanoes, and geysers. Our results show that the volume of the gas slug and the rheology of the liquid phase are the most influential parameters in controlling slug overpressure at bursting: larger slugs and higher liquid viscosity lead to more energetic eruptions. Based on our results, we develop a dimensionless analytical treatment which allows burst overpressure to be determined for slug-driven eruptions of all kinds. We compare our model predictions with field data from Stromboli volcano and find that our model can explain the entire spectrum of observed eruptive behaviour - from low-energy puffing, through normal strombolian eruptions, up to paroxysmal explosions - as manifestations of a single underlying physical process. We also develop a numerical model which determines the evolution, over time, of slug overpressure during ascent. We find that, when the vent is either constricted, or filled with a liquid possessing a yield stress, the

  2. Indication of radio frequency interference (RFI) sources for solar burst monitoring in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Z. S.; Abidin, Z. Z.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Shariff, N. N. M.

    2012-06-01

    Apart of monitoring the Sun project, the Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) surveying in the region of (1-1200) MHz has been conducted. The main objective of this surveying is to test and qualify the potential of monitoring a continuous radio emission of Solar in Malaysia. This work is also an initiative of International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) project where Malaysia is one of the country that participate a e-Callisto Spectrometer network in order to study the behavior of Solar radio burst in frequency of (45-800) MHz region which will be install in this October. Detail results will indicate the potential of monitoring a solar in Malaysia.

  3. Probing the Nature of Short Swift Bursts via Deep INTEGRAL Monitoring of GRB 050925

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barbier, L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from Swift, XMM-Newton, and deep INTEGRAL monitoring in the region of GRB 050925. This short Swift burst is a candidate for a newly discovered soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) with the following observational burst properties: 1) galactic plane (b=-0.1 deg) localization, 2) 150 msec duration, and 3) a blackbody rather than a simple power-law spectral shape (with a significance level of 97%). We found two possible X-ray counterparts of GRB 050925 by comparing the X-ray images from Swift XRT and XMM-Newton. Both X-ray sources show the transient behavior with a power-law decay index shallower than -1. We found no hard X-ray emission nor any additional burst from the location of GRB 050925 in approximately 5 Ms of INTEGRAL data. We discuss about the three BATSE short bursts which might be associated with GRB 050925, based on their location and the duration. Assuming GRB 050925 is associated with the H(sub II), regions (W 58) at the galactic longitude of 1=70 deg, we also discuss the source frame properties of GRB 050925.

  4. Rest-frame properties of gamma-ray bursts observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, David

    2012-01-01

    In this talk I present the main spectral and temporal properties of Fermi/GBM gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshift. Key properties of these GRBs in the rest-frame of the progenitor are investigated to better understand the intrinsic nature of these events. The sample comprises 47 GRBs with measured redshift that were observed by GBM until May 2012. 39 sources belong to the long-duration population and 8 events were classified as short bursts. For all of these events we derive, where possible, the intrinsic peak energy in the {\

  5. Rest-frame properties of 32 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, D; von Kienlin, A; Rau, A; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Goldstein, A; van der Horst, A J; Nardini, M; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Burgess, J M; Chaplin, V L; Diehl, R; Fishman, G J; Fitzpatrick, G; Foley, S; Gibby, M H; Giles, M M; Guiriec, S; Kippen, R M; Kouveliotou, C; Lin, L; McBreen, S; Meegan, C A; E., F Olivares; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Tierney, D; Wilson-Hodge, C

    2011-01-01

    Aims: In this paper we study the main spectral and temporal properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by Fermi/GBM. We investigate these key properties of GRBs in the rest-frame of the progenitor and test for possible intra-parameter correlations to better understand the intrinsic nature of these events. Methods: Our sample comprises 32 GRBs with measured redshift that were observed by GBM until August 2010. 28 of them belong to the long-duration population and 4 events were classified as short/hard bursts. For all of these events we derive, where possible, the intrinsic peak energy in the $\

  6. Slug control system; Sistema de controle de golfadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges Filho, Alvaro de Miranda; Meira, Marco Antonio Alves de; Vaz, Celio Eduardo Martins [PETROBRAS, Macae, RJ (Brazil). Unidade de Negocios da Bacia de Campos

    2004-07-01

    Due to the characteristics of flow, gas can separate from oil in the pipelines and risers that link subsea manifolds to production offshore platforms, forming liquid and gas slugs in the production separator. Liquid slugs can cause overflow in the separators. Gas slugs can cause burning in the flare due to the limitation in the turbo-compressors acceleration. In both cases the consequences are loss of production or shut-downs. This paper presents a Slug Control System designed to attenuate severe gas and liquid flow variations. The system consist of a control valve installed in the separator inlet, transmitters, a controller, control algorithm and a monitoring station. This system is operating since October 2003 in a production offshore platform, in Campus Basin, Brazil, with excellent results, reducing the gas burning in 45% without oil production loss. (author)

  7. All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Chaplin, V; Connaughton, V; Camero-Arranz, A; Case, G; Cherry, M; Rodi, J; Finger, M H; Jenke, P; Haynes, R H

    2009-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog enters or exits occultation by the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. In addition, to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels. We will present early results. Regularly updated results can be found on our website http://gammaray.nsstc.nasa.gov/gbm/science/occultation

  8. Passive slug mitigation by applying wavy pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Lanchang

    2011-01-01

    This work is to develop a passive slug mitigation technique based on a novel flow conditioner, wavy pipe, through laboratory experiment and numerical simulation. The wavy pipe has been applied to two types of slug flows: severe slugging in pipeline/riser systems and hydrodynamic slug flow in horizontal pipelines. The experiment of severe slugging mitigation was conducted on the 2” and 4” pipeline/riser systems in the Three-Phase Test Facility in PSE (Process Systems Engineer...

  9. The First Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Zhang, Binbin; Bhat, Narayana; Fishman, Gerald; Roberts, Oliver; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Shelia; Grove, Eric; Chekhtman, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We present summary results from the first catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Space Telescope. The catalog reports parameters for over 2700 TGFs. Since the launch of Fermi in 2008 the TGF detection sensitivity of GBM has been improved several times, both in the flight software and in ground analysis. Starting in 2010 July individual photons were downloaded for portions of the orbits, enabling an off-line search that found weaker and shorter TGFs. Since 2012 November 26 this telemetry mode has been extended to continuous coverage. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs).

  10. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of the 3 Brightest and Hardest Short Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with the FGST Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Guiriec, Sylvain; Connaugthon, Valerie; Kara, Erin; Daigne, Frederic; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; van der Horst, Alexander J; Paciesas, William; Meegan, Charles A; Bhat, P N; Foley, Suzanne; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2010-01-01

    From July 2008 to October 2009, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST) has detected 320 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). About 20% of these events are classified as short based on their T90 duration below 2 s. We present here for the first time time-resolved spectroscopy at timescales as short as 2 ms for the three brightest short GRBs observed with GBM. The time-integrated spectra of the events deviate from the Band function, indicating the existence of an additional spectral component, which can be fit by a power-law with index ~-1.5. The time-integrated Epeak values exceed 2 MeV for two of the bursts, and are well above the values observed in the brightest long GRBs. Their Epeak values and their low-energy power-law indices ({\\alpha}) confirm that short GRBs are harder than long ones. We find that short GRBs are very similar to long ones, but with light curves contracted in time and with harder spectra stretched towards higher energies. In our time-resolved spectrosco...

  11. Improved limits on sterile neutrino dark matter using full-sky Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.C.Y. Ng; S. Horiuchi; J.M. Gaskins; M. Smith; R. Preece

    2015-01-01

    A sterile neutrino of similar to keV mass is a well-motivated dark matter candidate. Its decay generates an x-ray line that offers a unique target for x-ray telescopes. For the first time, we use the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to search for sterile neut

  12. Characterization of the Relationship between Intracranial Pressure and Electroencephalographic Monitoring in Burst Suppressed Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Mark; Vespa, Paul; Pouratian, Nader; Gonzalez, Nestor R.; Hu, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize the relationship between ICP and EEG Methods Simultaneous ICP and EEG data were obtained from burst-suppressed patients and segmented by EEG bursts. Segments were categorized as increasing/decreasing and peak/valley to investigate relationship between ICP changes and EEG burst duration. A generalized ICP response was obtained by averaging all segments time-aligned at burst onsets. A vasodilatation index (VDI) was derived from the ICP pulse waveform and calculated on a sliding interval to investigate cerebrovascular changes post-burst. Results Data from two patients contained 309 bursts. 246 ICP segments initially increased, of which 154 peaked. 63 ICP segments decreased, and zero reached a valley. The change in ICP (0.54±0.85mmHg) was significantly correlated with the burst duration (pVDI for increasing segments was significantly elevated (median 0.56, IQR 0.31, p<0.001) and correlated with burst duration (p<0.001). Conclusions Changes in the ICP and pulse-waveform shape after EEG burst suggest that these signals can be related within the context of neurovascular coupling. Significance Existence of a physiological relationship between ICP and EEG may allow the study of neurovascular coupling in acute brain injury patients. PMID:25142827

  13. Quasi -Periodic Pulsations in Solar Flares: new clues from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, D; Bissaldi, E; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Greiner, J; van der Horst, A J; Kanbach, G; Rau, A; Bhat, P N; Diehl, R; von Kienlin, A; Kippen, R M; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Wilson-Hodge, C

    2011-01-01

    In the last four decades it has been observed that solar flares show quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) from the lowest, i.e. radio, to the highest, i.e. gamma-ray, part of the electromagnetic spectrum. To this day, it is still unclear which mechanism creates such QPPs. In this paper, we analyze four bright solar flares which show compelling signatures of quasi-periodic behavior and were observed with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (\\gbm) onboard the Fermi satellite. Because GBM covers over 3 decades in energy (8 keV to 40 MeV) it can be a key instrument to understand the physical processes which drive solar flares. We tested for periodicity in the time series of the solar flares observed by GBM by applying a classical periodogram analysis. However, contrary to previous authors, we did not detrend the raw light curve before creating the power spectral density spectrum (PSD). To assess the significance of the frequencies we made use of a method which is commonly applied for X-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. This...

  14. ALFABURST: A realtime fast radio burst monitor for the Arecibo telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth; MacMahon, David; Armour, Wes; Cobb, Jeff; Lorimer, Duncan; Rajwade, Kaustubh; Siemion, Andrew; Werthimer, Dan; Williams, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) constitute an emerging class of fast radio transient whose origin continues to be a mystery. Realizing the importance of increasing coverage of the search parameter space, we have designed, built, and deployed a realtime monitor for FRBs at the 305-m Arecibo radio telescope. Named 'ALFABURST', it is a commensal instrument that is triggered whenever the 1.4 GHz seven-beam Arecibo $L$-Band Feed Array (ALFA) receiver commences operation. The ongoing commensal survey we are conducting using ALFABURST has an instantaneous field of view of 0.02 sq. deg. within the FWHM of the beams, with the realtime software configurable to use up to 300 MHz of bandwidth. We search for FRBs with dispersion measure up to 2560 cm$^{-3}$ pc and pulse widths ranging from 0.128 ms to 16.384 ms. Commissioning observations performed over the past few months have demonstrated the capability of the instrument in detecting single pulses from known pulsars. In this paper, I describe the instrument and the associated ...

  15. A Glue from Slug Slime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttemer, Helen A.

    2009-01-01

    "Yuuuck!" "Gross!" "Cool!" The response to slugs is never indifference. These slimy creatures are perfect for captivating students' imagination and curiosity, and they are ideal subjects to introduce investigative science. This article describes a classroom activity in which students design a research investigation to answer the question: "Is slug…

  16. Gas slug ascent in a stratified magma: Implications of flow organisation and instability for Strombolian eruption dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capponi, A.; James, M. R.; Lane, S. J.

    2016-02-01

    The canonical Strombolian paradigm of a gas slug ascending and bursting in a homogeneous low-viscosity magma cannot explain the complex details in eruptive dynamics recently revealed by field measurements and textural and geochemical analyses. Evidence points to the existence of high-viscosity magma at the top of the conduit of Strombolian-type volcanoes, acting as a plug. Here, new experiments detail the range of flow configurations that develop during the ascent and burst of a slug through rheologically stratified magma within a conduit. End-member scenarios of a tube fully filled with either high- or low-viscosity liquid bracket three main flow configurations: (1) a plug sufficiently large to fully accommodate an ascending gas slug; (2) A plug that can accommodate the intrusion of low-viscosity liquid driven by the gas expansion, but not all the slug volume, so the slug bursts with the nose in the plug whilst the base is still in the low-viscosity liquid; (3) Gas expansion is sufficient to drive the intrusion of low-viscosity liquid through the plug, with the slug bursting in the low-viscosity layer emplaced dynamically above the plug. We show that the same flow configurations are viable at volcanic-scale through a new experimentally-validated 1D model and 3D computational fluid dynamic simulations. Applied to Stromboli, our results demonstrate that the key parameters controlling the transition between each configuration are gas volume, plug thickness and plug viscosity. The flow processes identified include effective dynamic narrowing and widening of the conduit, instabilities within the falling magma film, transient partial and complete blockage of the conduit, and slug disruption. These complexities influence eruption dynamics and vigour, promoting magma mingling and resulting in pulsatory release of gas.

  17. Modeling cross-hole slug tests in an unconfined aquifer

    CERN Document Server

    Malama, Bwalya; Brauchler, Ralf; Bayer, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A modified version of a published slug test model for unconfined aquifers is applied to cross-hole slug test data collected in field tests conducted at the Widen site in Switzerland. The model accounts for water-table effects using the linearised kinematic condition. The model also accounts for inertial effects in source and observation wells. The primary objective of this work is to demonstrate applicability of this semi-analytical model to multi-well and multi-level pneumatic slug tests. The pneumatic perturbation was applied at discrete intervals in a source well and monitored at discrete vertical intervals in observation wells. The source and observation well pairs were separated by distances of up to 4 m. The analysis yielded vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, and specific yield at observation well locations. The hydraulic parameter estimates are compared to results from prior pumping and single-well slug tests conducted at the site, as well as to estimates from particle size ...

  18. Modeling cross-hole slug tests in an unconfined aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malama, Bwalya; Kuhlman, Kristopher L.; Brauchler, Ralf; Bayer, Peter

    2016-09-01

    A modified version of a published slug test model for unconfined aquifers is applied to cross-hole slug test data collected in field tests conducted at the Widen site in Switzerland. The model accounts for water-table effects using the linearized kinematic condition. The model also accounts for inertial effects in source and observation wells. The primary objective of this work is to demonstrate applicability of this semi-analytical model to multi-well and multi-level pneumatic slug tests. The pneumatic perturbation was applied at discrete intervals in a source well and monitored at discrete vertical intervals in observation wells. The source and observation well pairs were separated by distances of up to 4 m. The analysis yielded vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity, specific storage, and specific yield at observation well locations. The hydraulic parameter estimates are compared to results from prior pumping and single-well slug tests conducted at the site, as well as to estimates from particle size analyses of sediment collected from boreholes during well installation. The results are in general agreement with results from prior tests and are indicative of a sand and gravel aquifer. Sensitivity analysis show that model identification of specific yield is strongest at late-time. However, the usefulness of late-time data is limited due to the low signal-to-noise ratios.

  19. Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detection of SGR J1550-5418

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Y; Kouveliotou, C; Granot, J; Ramirez-Ruiz, E

    2010-01-01

    SGR J1550-5418 exhibited three active bursting episodes in 2008 October and in 2009 January and March, emitting hundreds of typical Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in soft gamma-rays. The second episode was especially intense, and our untriggered burst search on Fermi/GBM data (8-1000 keV) revealed ~450 bursts emitted over 24 hours during the peak of this activity. Using the GBM data, we identified a ~150-s-long enhanced persistent emission during 2009 January 22 that exhibited intriguing timing and spectral properties: (i) clear pulsations up to ~110 keV at the spin period of the neutron star, (ii) an additional (to a power-law) blackbody component required for the enhanced emission spectra with kT ~ 17 keV, (iii) pulsed fraction that is strongly energy dependent and highest in the 50-74 keV energy band. A total isotropic-equivalent energy emitted during this enhanced emission is estimated to be 2.9 x 10^{40}(D/5 kpc)^2 erg. The estimated area of the blackbody emitting region of ~0.046(D/5 kpc)^2 km^2 is th...

  20. Magnetar Twists: Fermi/Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detection of SGR 1550-5418

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Y; Kouveliotou, C; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Granot, J; van der Horst, A J; Watts, A L; Finger, M H; Gehrels, N; Pe'er, A; van der Klis, M; von Kienlin, A; Wachter, S; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Woods, P M

    2009-01-01

    SGR 1550-5418 (previously known as AXP 1E 1547.0-5408) went into three active bursting episodes in 2008 October and in 2009 January and March, emitting hundreds of typical Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in soft gamma rays. The second episode was especially intense, and our untriggered burst search on Fermi/GBM data (8-1000 keV) revealed ~450 bursts emitted over 24 hours during the peak of this activity. Using the GBM data, we identified a ~150-s-long enhanced persistent emission during 2009 January 22 that exhibited intriguing timing and spectral properties: (i) clear pulsations up to ~110 keV at the spin period of the neutron star (P ~2.07 s, the fastest of all magnetars), (ii) an additional (to a power-law) blackbody component required for the enhanced emission spectra with kT ~17 keV, (iii) pulsed fraction that is strongly energy dependent and highest in the 50-74 keV energy band. A total isotropic-equivalent energy emitted during this enhanced emission is estimated to be 4.3 x 10^{40} ergs. We conclude ...

  1. Part 1: The detection of criticality accidents in the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. Part 2: The Burst Slug Detection; 1. partie: la detection des accidents de criticite au Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique. 2. partie.: la detection des ruptures de gaines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debrie, G.; Lavie, J.; Planque, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    In all installations where fissionable materials are handled in quantities virtually greater than the critical mass, there exists permanent risk of accidental nuclear excursion entailing a serious irradiation hazard to the personnel, in spite of all the precautions that might be taken. Immediate detection followed by rapid evacuation greatly limits the risks of irradiation due to the fission products or to the sustained nuclear reaction. The necessity for a suitable equipment for the detection of accidents of criticality is imposed by the fact that the physical phenomena accompanying a nuclear, excursion are insufficient to follow the alarm, and may lead to confusion. Taking into account the accidents which have occurred and the role expected from a detector, we choose a dose integration device for the detecting probe proper, and a system based on the coincidence of several information to trigger the alarm. At the demand of the Commission des Masses Critiques, the minimal physical and electronic features required to obtain a very reliable system with minimal risk of false alarm has been established. These features are described in some detail. The equipment constructed at the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique on the basis of these recommendations has been tested systematically under actual conditions of nuclear excursions at the Health Physics Research Reactor of the National Laboratory at Oak Ridge. These tests have served to determine two types of detection probes which will be described: a photomultiplier and a semiconductor probe. Finally the authors present an example of a complete unit for the detection of criticality accidents in an installation for the processing of fissile material. B - The evolution of the installations for burst slug detection (BSD) in french reactors. The main part of the effort in the field of the Burst Slug Detection has been orientated on the large gas-cooled reactors where the problem of bursts slugs is associated with the

  2. Burst slug detection system in french power reactors (1961)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas samples are taken from the channels of the reactor and the short lived fission products are electrostatically collected to be analysed by a phosphor and photomultiplier system. The electrostatic collection and rotating electrode detector is described and its main uses exposed. Experience has shown the interest of measuring the evolution of fission products activities and not their absolute value only. In this way, data processing equipment have been designed and adapted to the detection apparatus. The system developed and realized for the G-l - G-2 - G-3 - EDF-1 - EDF-2 reactors are compared. (authors)

  3. Compton scattering in terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected with the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Sheila; Briggs, Michael S; Foley, Suzanne; Tierney, David; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Xiong, Shaolin; Dwyer, Joseph; Fishman, Gerald J; Roberts, Oliver J; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are short intense flashes of gamma rays associated with lightning activity in thunderstorms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) process, theoretical predictions for the temporal and spectral evolution of TGFs are compared to observations made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Assuming a single source altitude of 15 km, a comparison of simulations to data is performed for a range of empirically chosen source electron variation time scales. The data exhibit a clear softening with increased source distance, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The simulated spectra follow this trend in the data, but tend to underestimate the observed hardness. Such a discrepancy may imply that the basic RREA model is not sufficient. Alternatively, a TGF beam that is tilted with respect to the zenith could produce an evolution with source distance that is compatible with the da...

  4. Shell tension forces propel Dictyostelium slugs forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dictyostelium slug is an excellent model system for studying collective movements, as it is comprised of about 105 cells all moving together in the same direction. It still remains unclear how this movement occurs and what the physical mechanisms behind it are. By applying our recently developed 3D traction force microscopy, we propose a simple explanation for slug propulsion. Most of the forces are exerted by the sheath surrounding the slug. This secreted shell is under a rather uniform tension (around 50 mN m−1) and will give rise to a tissue under pressure. Finally, we propose that this pressure will naturally push the slug tip forwards if a gradient of shell mechanical properties takes place in the very anterior part of the raised tip. (paper)

  5. Burst Detector Sensitivity: Past, Present & Future

    OpenAIRE

    Band, David L.

    2006-01-01

    I compare the burst detection sensitivity of CGRO's BATSE, Swift's BAT, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and EXIST as a function of a burst's spectrum and duration. A detector's overall burst sensitivity depends on its energy sensitivity and set of accumulations times Delta t; these two factors shape the detected burst population. For example, relative to BATSE, the BAT's softer energy band decreases the detection rate of short, hard bursts, while the BAT's longer accumulation times increase the...

  6. Monitoring the burst-out of Enteromorpha prolifera in the Yellow Sea of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiying; Peng, Hongchun; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Chunlin

    2012-10-01

    In the eve of the Beijing Olympics Games, Qingdao in China, as the host city of OSC of Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, was surrounded by Enteromorpha prolifera, which was followed with interest by whole China and the world. The Enteromorpha often comes from other ocean, monitoring the drifting path of the Enteromorpha will become very important.The Study area is mainly the Yellow Sea. And the data sources are Terra MODIS 1B images from 2000-2010 years. The data preprocessing include BOW-TIE processing, image registration, clip, merge, and masking. And the NDVI was selected as the index of derived Enteromorpha prolifera information, to get the range of Enteromorpha prolifera, and get that of dynamic change with time, and monitor the drifting path of the Enteromorpha.

  7. Improved limits on sterile neutrino dark matter using full-sky Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kenny C. Y.; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Gaskins, Jennifer M.; Smith, Miles; Preece, Robert

    2015-08-01

    A sterile neutrino of ˜keV mass is a well-motivated dark matter candidate. Its decay generates an x-ray line that offers a unique target for x-ray telescopes. For the first time, we use the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to search for sterile neutrino decay lines; our analysis covers the energy range 10-25 keV (sterile neutrino mass 20-50 keV), which is inaccessible to x-ray and gamma-ray satellites such as Chandra, Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and INTEGRAL. The extremely wide field of view of the GBM enables a large fraction of the Milky Way dark matter halo to be probed. After implementing careful data cuts, we obtain ˜53 days of full-sky observational data. We observe an excess of photons towards the Galactic center, as expected from astrophysical emission. We search for sterile neutrino decay lines in the energy spectrum, and find no significant signal. From this, we obtain upper limits on the sterile neutrino mixing angle as a function of mass. In the sterile neutrino mass range 25-40 keV, we improve upon previous upper limits by approximately an order of magnitude. Better understanding of detector and astrophysical backgrounds, as well as detector response, will further improve the sensitivity of a search with the GBM.

  8. Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) Observed with the Fermi-Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor: The First Hundred TGFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, G J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.

    2010-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi) is now detecting 2.1 TGFs per week. At this rate, nearly a hundred TGFs will have been detected by the time of this Meeting. This rate has increased by a factor of 8 since new flight software was uploaded to the spacecraft in November 2009 in order to increase the sensitivity of GBM to TGFs. The high time resolution (2 microseconds) allows temporal features to be resolved so that some insight may be gained on the origin and transport of the gamma-ray photons through the atmosphere. The absolute time of the TGFs, known to several microseconds, also allows accurate correlations of TGFs with lightning networks and other lightning-related phenomena. The thick bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM system have observed photon energies from TGFs at energies above 40 MeV. New results on the some temporal aspects of TGFs will be presented.

  9. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) Observed with the Fermi-Gamma-ray Burst Monitor: Temporal and Spectral Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, G. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, W.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Bhat, P. N.

    2010-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi) was detecting 2.1 TGFs per week. This rate has increased by a factor of 8 since new flight software was uploaded to the spacecraft in November 2009 in order to increase the sensitivity of GBM to TGFs. Further upgrades to Fermi-GBM to allow observations of weaker TGFs are in progress. The high time resolution (2 s) allows temporal features to be resolved so that some insight may be gained on the origin and transport of the gamma-ray photons through the atmosphere. The absolute time of the TGFs, known to several microseconds, also allows accurate correlations of TGFs with lightning networks and other lightning-related phenomena. The thick bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM system have observed photon energies from TGFs at energies above 40 MeV. New results on the some temporal aspects of TGFs will be presented along with spectral characteristics and properties of several electron-positron TGF events that have been identified.

  10. Pulse properties of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Suzanne; Briggs, Michael S; Connaughton, Valerie; Tierney, David; McBreen, Sheila; Dwyer, Joseph; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Bhat, P Narayana; Byrne, David; Cramer, Eric; Fishman, Gerald J; Xiong, Shaolin; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R Marc; Meegan, Charles A; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D; von Kienlin, Andreas; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has triggered on over 300 terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) since its launch in June 2008. With 14 detectors, GBM collects on average ~100 counts per triggered TGF, enabling unprecedented studies of the time profiles of TGFs. Here we present the first rigorous analysis of the temporal properties of a large sample of TGFs (278), including the distributions of the rise and fall times of the individual pulses and their durations. A variety of time profiles are observed with 19 of TGFs having multiple pulses separated in time and 31 clear cases of partially overlapping pulses. The effect of instrumental dead time and pulse pileup on the temporal properties are also presented. As the observed gamma ray pulse structure is representative of the electron flux at the source, TGF pulse parameters are critical to distinguish between relativistic feedback discharge and lightning leader models. We show that at least 67% of TGFs at satellite ...

  11. Determination of slug permeability factor for pressure drop prediction of slug flow pneumatic conveying

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shengming Tan; Kenneth C.Williams; Mark G.Jones; Tobias Krull

    2008-01-01

    Current models for pressure drop prediction of slug flow pneumatic conveying in a horizontal pipeline system assume some type of steady state conditions for prediction,which limits their capability for increased predictive accuracy relative to experimental data.This is partly because of the nature of slug flow pneumatic conveying system,which,as a dynamic system,never becomes stable.By utilising conservation of mass (airflow),a dynamic pressure analysis model is proposed on the basis of the derivative of the upstream pressure behaviour.The rate of air permeation through slug,one of the important factors in the conservation model,is expressed as a function of a slug permeability factor.Other factors such as slug velocity,slug length and the fraction of stationary layer were also considered.Several test materials were conveyed in single-slug tests to verify the proposed pressure drop model,showing good agreement between the model and experimental results.

  12. Modeling of two-phase slug flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When gas and liquid flow in a pipe, over a range of flow rates, a flow pattern results in which sequences of long bubbles, almost filling the pipe cross section, are successively followed by liquid slugs that may contain small bubbles. This flow pattern, usually called slug flow, is encountered in numerous practical situations, such as in the production of hydrocarbons in wells and their transportation in pipelines; the production of steam and water in geothermal power plants; the boiling and condensation in liquid-vapor systems of thermal power plants; emergency core cooling of nuclear reactors; heat and mass transfer between gas and liquid in chemical reactors. This paper provides a review of two phase slug flow modeling

  13. Lagrangian-Eulerian simulation of slugging fluidized bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guorong Wu; Jie Ouyang; Binxin Yang; Qiang Li; Fang Wang

    2012-01-01

    This work studies gas-solid slugging fluidized beds with Type-D particles,using two-dimensional simulations based on discrete element model (DEM).DEM performance is quantitatively validated by two commonly accepted correlations for determining slugging behavior.The voidage profiles simulated with bed height corresponding to Baeyens and Geldart (1974) correlation for onset of slugging demonstrate a transitional flow pattern from free bubbling to slugging.The present calculated values for the maximum slugging bed height are in good agreement with the correlation from Matsen et al.(1969).Simulations show that fluidized beds with Type-D particles can operate in the round-nosed slugging regime and also shows that wall slugs and square-nosed slugs tend to be formed with increase in superficial gas velocity and in bed height,respectively.

  14. Shotgun slug injuries: case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gestring, M L; Geller, E R; Akkad, N; Bongiovanni, P J

    1996-04-01

    Shotguns are usually used to fire multiple pellets; however, they are capable of firing a single projectile in the form of a slug. Although rare, shotgun slug injuries are severe, producing wounds comparable to those inflicted by high-velocity weapons with the potential for even more tissue destruction because of the slug's size and mass. We report the first survivor of a close range shotgun slug injury, with a review of this weapon's unique projectile ballistics and the relevant literature. PMID:8614051

  15. Mitigation of terrain induced slugging using mixer devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brasjen, B.J.; Veltin, J.; Hansen, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    The present work focuses on experimental evidence of slug mitigation via various devices. The slug mitigation potential of a number of mixers was tested using a laboratory scale air/water setup to compare their effect on the incoming slugs just upstream of the separator inlet. Dedicated methods and

  16. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  17. Separation of iodine from an uranium slug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article studies the separation and determination of fission-product iodine from uranium fuel samples. The different steps of the process are shown: dissolution of the slugs, distillation and iodine determination. A simple apparatus for the dissolution and distillation is described. The emphasis is placed on the knowledge of the whole operation yield and its reproducibility. (authors)

  18. Terrain slugging in near horizontal oilwells

    OpenAIRE

    Fozard, J.

    2001-01-01

    In this thesis we consider the problem of terrain slugging in near horizontal producing wells. We formulate a simple model for stratified two-phase flow, and consider the linear stability of steady states. We then study the possibility of the formation of roll waves, and make a tentative attempt at a resolution of the problem.

  19. Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor measurements of duration distributions of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Norisuke; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Ohno, Masanori; Sugita, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Ryuuji; Nishioka, Yusuke; Hurley, Kevin; Hanabata, Yoshitaka; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Enomoto, Junichi; Fujinuma, Takeshi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Iwakiri, Wataru; Kawano, Takafumi; Kokubun, Motohide; Makishima, Kazuo; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Yujin E.; Nakaya, Souhei; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Sawako; Terada, Yukikatsu; Urata, Yuji; Yabe, Seiya; Yasuda, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    We report on the T90 and T50 duration distributions and their relations with spectral hardness using 1464 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which were observed by the Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) from 2005 August 4 to 2010 December 29. The duration distribution is clearly bimodal in three energy ranges (50-120, 120-250, and 250-550 keV), but is unclear in the 550-5000 keV range, probably because of the limited sample size. The WAM durations decrease with energy according to a power-law index of -0.058(-0.034, +0.033). The hardness-duration relation reveals the presence of short-hard and long-soft GRBs. The short:long event ratio tends to be higher with increasing energy. We compared the WAM distribution with ones measured by eight other GRB instruments. The WAM T90 distribution is very similar to those of INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS and Granat/PHEBUS, and least likely to match the Swift/BAT distribution. The WAM short:long event ratio (0.25:0.75) is much different from Swift/BAT (0.08:0.92), but is almost the same as CGRO/BATSE (0.25:0.75). To explain this difference for BAT, we examined three effects: BAT trigger types, energy dependence of the duration, and detection sensitivity differences between BAT and WAM. As a result, we found that the ratio difference could be explained mainly by energy dependence including soft extended emissions for short GRBs and much better sensitivity for BAT which can detect weak/long GRBs. The reason for the same short:long event ratio for BATSE and WAM was confirmed by calculation using the trigger efficiency curve.

  20. Clinicopathologic significance of slug expression in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To explore the expression and function of slug,a transcriptional repressor,in human intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma(IHCC)and identify its role in IHCC progression.METHODS:Expression of slug was detected in 36 cases of IHCC and 12 cases of normal intrahepatic bile ducts and liver parenchyma by immunohistochemistry.The patients were divided into low slug expression group(< 20%of carcinoma cells stained)and high slug expression group(≥20%of carcinoma cells stained).Slug expression was correlated with clini...

  1. Computational modelling of slug flow in a capillary microreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashid, M. N.; Platte, F.; Agar, D. W.; Turek, S.

    2007-06-01

    The benefits of slug flow capillary microreactor exhibit the ability to adjust two individual transport mechanisms, i.e., convection inside the slug and diffusion between two consecutive slugs. The mass transfer rate is enhanced by internal circulation, which arises due to the shear between slug axis and continuous phase or capillary wall. The knowledge of circulation patterns within the slug plays an important role in the design of a capillary microreactor. Apart from this, well defined slug flow generation is a key activity in the development of methodology to study hydrodynamics and mass transfer. In the present paper we discuss computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modelling aspects of internal circulations (single phase) and slug flow generation (two-phase).

  2. Slug modeling with 1D two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulations of condensation-induced water hammer with one-dimensional two-fluid model requires explicit modeling of slug formation, slug propagation, and in some cases slug decay. Stratified flow correlations that are more or less well known in 1D two-fluid models, are crucial for accurate description of the initial phase of the slug formation and slug propagation. Slug formation means transition to other flow regime that requires different set of correlations. To use such two-fluid model for condensation induced water hammer simulations, a single slug must be explicitly recognized and captured. In the present work two cases of condensation-induced water hammer simulations performed with WAHA code, are described and discussed: injection of cold liquid into horizontal pipe filled with steam and injection of hot steam into horizontal pipe partially filled with cold liquid. (author)

  3. Heat transfer during intermittent/slug flow in horizontal tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heat transfer characteristics for two-phase gas-liquid slug flow in a horizontal pipe have been measured. The time variation of temperature, heat transfer coefficients, and heat flux is reported for the different zones of slug flow: the mixing region at the nose, the body of the slug, the liquid film, and the gas bubble behind the slug. Substantial differences in heat transfer coefficient exist between the bottom and top of the slug. This results from the fact that each slug is effectively a thermally developing entry region caused by the presence of a hot upper wall just upstream of each slug. A qualitative theory is presented which explains this behavior. 18 refs

  4. Exploring Event and Status Based Phenological Monitoring in Citizen Science Projects: Lessons Learned from Project BudBurst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D.; Henderson, S.; Newman, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Citizen science projects in ecology are in a unique position to address the needs of both the science and education communities. Such projects can provide needed data to further understanding of ecological processes at multiple spatial scales while also increasing public understanding of the importance of the ecological sciences. Balancing the needs of both communities, it is important that citizen science programs also provide different 'entry' points to appeal to diverse segments of society. In the case of NEON's Project BudBurst, a national plant phenology citizen science program, two approaches were developed to address the ongoing challenge to recruitment and retention of participants. Initially, Project BudBurst was designed to be an event-based phenology program. Participants were asked to identify a plant and report on the timing of specific phenoevents throughout the year. This approach requires a certain level of participation, which while yielding useful results, is not going to appeal to the broadest audience possible. To broaden participation, in 2011 and 2012, Project BudBurst added campaigns targeted at engaging individuals in making simple status-based reports of a plant they chose. Three targeted field campaigns were identified to take advantage of times when people notice changes to plants in their environment, using simple status-based protocols: Fall Into Phenology, Cherry Blossom Blitz, and Summer Solstice Snapshot. The interest and participation in these single report phenological status-based campaigns exceeded initial expectations. For example, Fall Into Phenology attracted individuals who otherwise had not considered participating in an ongoing field campaign. In the past, observations of fall phenology events submitted to Project BudBurst had been limited. By providing the opportunity for submitting simple, single reports, the number of both new participants and submitted observations increased significantly.

  5. Gamma bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vela satellite series has recently detected gamma bursts in the 0.2-1.5MeV energy range. These bursts last an average of from 0.1 to 10s and have a fine time structure, with pulses lasting less than several tens of milliseconds. With simultaneous observations from different satellites it has been possible to determine the spatial origin of some of the bursts. No correlation, however, has been made with known objects. In spite of the fragmentary character of the information received to date, several theories have already been proposed to account for these phenomena

  6. Conducting Slug Tests in Mini-Piezometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Arntzen, Evan V.

    2016-03-18

    Slug tests performed using mini-piezometers with diameters as small as 0.43 cm can provide a cost effective tool for hydraulic characterization. We evaluated the hydraulic properties of the apparatus in an infinite hydraulic conductivity environment and compared those results with field tests of mini-piezometers installed into locations with varying hydraulic properties. Based on our evaluation, slug tests conducted in mini-piezometers using the fabrication and installation approach described here are effective within formations where the hydraulic conductivity is less than 1 x 10-3 cm/s. While these constraints limit the potential application of this method, the benefits to this approach are that the installation, measurement and analysis is extremely cost effective, and the installation can be completed in areas where other (larger diameter) methods might not be possible. Additionally, this methodology could be applied to existing mini-piezometers previously installed for other purposes. Such analysis of existing installations could be beneficial in interpreting previously collected data (e.g. water quality data or hydraulic head data).

  7. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal experiment control and monitor software maintenance manual, version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    The Experiment Control and Monitor (EC&M) software was developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenter's terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various investigations by government agencies, universities, and industry. The EC&M software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitoring (C&PM) software system of the HBR-LET. The EC&M software allows users to initialize, control, and monitor the instrumentation within the HBR-LET using a predefined sequence of commands. Besides instrument control, the C&PM software system is also responsible for computer communication between the HBR-LET and the ACTS NASA Ground Station and for uplink power control of the HBR-LET to demonstrate power augmentation during rain fade events. The EC&M Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 (NASA-CR-189160) outlines the commands required to install and operate the EC&M software. Input and output file descriptions, operator commands, and error recovery procedures are discussed in the document. The EC&M Software Maintenance Manual, Version 1.0 (NASA-CR-189161) is a programmer's guide that describes current implementation of the EC&M software from a technical perspective. An overview of the EC&M software, computer algorithms, format representation, and computer hardware configuration are included in the manual.

  8. Advanced communications technology satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal experiment control and monitor software user's guide, version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    The Experiment Control and Monitor (EC&M) software was developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenter's terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various investigations by government agencies, universities, and industry. The EC&M software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitoring (C&PM) software system of the HBR-LET. The EC&M software allows users to initialize, control, and monitor the instrumentation within the HBR-LET using a predefined sequence of commands. Besides instrument control, the C&PM software system is also responsible for computer communication between the HBR-LET and the ACTS NASA Ground Station and for uplink power control of the HBR-LET to demonstrate power augmentation during rain fade events. The EC&M Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 (NASA-CR-189160) outlines the commands required to install and operate the EC&M software. Input and output file descriptions, operator commands, and error recovery procedures are discussed in the document.

  9. Slug flooding in air-water countercurrent vertical flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is to study slug flooding in the vertical air-water countercurrent flow loop with a porous liquid injector in the upper plenum. More water penetration into the bottom plenum in slug flooding is observed than the annular flooding because the flow regime changes from the slug flow regime or periodic slug/annular flow regime to annular flow regime due to the hysteresis between the onset of flooding and the bridging film. Experiments were made tubes of 0.995 cm, 2.07 cm, and 5.08 cm in diameter. A mechanistic model for the slug flooding with the solitary wave whose height is four time of the mean film thickness is developed to produce relations of the critical liquid flow rate and the mean film thickness. After fitting the critical liquid flow rate with the experimental data as a function of the Bond number, the gas flow rate for the slug flooding is obtained by substituting the critical liquid flow rate to the annular flooding criteria. The present experimental data evaluate the slug flooding condition developed here by substituting the correlations for mean film thickness models in the literature. The best prediction was made by the correlation for the mean film thickness of the present study which is same as Feind's correlation multiplied by 1.35. (author)

  10. Toward A 3-D Picture of Hydraulic Conductivity With Multilevel Slug Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElwee, C. D.; McElwee, C. D.; Ross, H. C.

    2001-12-01

    The GEMS (Geohydrologic Experiment and Monitoring Site) field area has been established (in the Kansas River valley near Lawrence, Kansas) for a variety of reasons relating to research and teaching in hydrogeology at the University of Kansas. Over 70 wells have been installed for various purposes. The site overlies an alluvial aquifer with a total thickness of about 70 feet. The water table is typically about 20 feet below the surface, giving a total saturated thickness of about 50 feet. The upper part of the aquifer is finer material consisting of silt and clay. Typically, the lower 35 feet of the aquifer is sand and gravel. A number of wells through out the site are fully screened through the sand and gravel aquifer. Some of these fully screened wells are larger diameters; however, most wells are constructed of 2 inch PVC casing. Slug tests are widely used in hydrogeology to measure hydraulic conductivity. Over the last several years we have been conducting research to improve the slug test method. We have previously reported the detailed structure of hydraulic conductivity that can be seen in a 5 inch well (McElwee and Zemansky, EOS, v. 80, no. 46, p. F397, 1999) at this site, using multilevel slug tests. The existing 2 inch, fully screened wells are spread out over the site and offer the opportunity for developing a 3-D picture of the hydraulic conductivity distribution. However, it is difficult to develop a system that allows multilevel slug tests to be done accurately and efficiently in a 2 inch well. This is especially true in regions of very high hydraulic conductivity, where the water velocity in the casing will be relatively high. The resistance caused by frictional forces in the equipment must be minimized and a model taking account of these forces must be used. We have developed a system (equipment, software, and technique) for performing multilevel slug tests in 2 inch wells. Some equipment configurations work better than others. The data that we have

  11. Two-phase slug flow in vertical and inclined tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1996-01-01

    Gas-liquid slug flow is investigated experimentally in vertical and inclined tubes.The non-invasive measuremnts of the gas-liquid slug flow are taken by using the EKTAPRO 1000 High Speed Motion Analyzer.The information on the velocity of the Talyor bubble,the size distribution of the dispersed bubbles in the liquid slugs and some characteristics of the liquid film around the Taylor bubble are obtained.The experimental results are in good agreement with the available data.

  12. EMT transcription factors snail and slug directly contribute to cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haslehurst Alexandria M

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT is a molecular process through which an epithelial cell undergoes transdifferentiation into a mesenchymal phenotype. The role of EMT in embryogenesis is well-characterized and increasing evidence suggests that elements of the transition may be important in other processes, including metastasis and drug resistance in various different cancers. Methods Agilent 4 × 44 K whole human genome arrays and selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry were used to investigate mRNA and protein expression in A2780 cisplatin sensitive and resistant cell lines. Invasion and migration were assessed using Boyden chamber assays. Gene knockdown of snail and slug was done using targeted siRNA. Clinical relevance of the EMT pathway was assessed in a cohort of primary ovarian tumours using data from Affymetrix GeneChip Human Genome U133 plus 2.0 arrays. Results Morphological and phenotypic hallmarks of EMT were identified in the chemoresistant cells. Subsequent gene expression profiling revealed upregulation of EMT-related transcription factors including snail, slug, twist2 and zeb2. Proteomic analysis demonstrated up regulation of Snail and Slug as well as the mesenchymal marker Vimentin, and down regulation of E-cadherin, an epithelial marker. By reducing expression of snail and slug, the mesenchymal phenotype was largely reversed and cells were resensitized to cisplatin. Finally, gene expression data from primary tumours mirrored the finding that an EMT-like pathway is activated in resistant tumours relative to sensitive tumours, suggesting that the involvement of this transition may not be limited to in vitro drug effects. Conclusions This work strongly suggests that genes associated with EMT may play a significant role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer, therefore potentially leading to the development of predictive biomarkers of drug response or novel therapeutic strategies for

  13. An artificial neural network strategy for monitoring of gas/oil systems in slug flow pattern; Aplicacao de redes neurais artificiais no monitoramento do escoamento de sistemas gas/oleo em regime de golfadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Fernando H.B. [Universidade Tiradentes (UNIT), Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Instituto de Tecnologia e Pesquisa; Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Silva, Rosivania P.; Fortuny, Montserrat; Santos, Alexandre F. [Universidade Tiradentes (UNIT), Aracaju, (Brazil). Instituto de Tecnologia e Pesquisa; Nunes, Giovani C. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas (CENPES)

    2008-07-01

    In the petroleum industry, the design of multiphase production systems requires an accurate estimation of the gas-oil ratio (GOR) in the transporting pipelines. However, existing GOR estimation methods are often inadequate in terms of desired accuracy and application range, due to the complex phase distributions and the wide range of fluid properties encountered in production operations. In this paper, the effectiveness of using artificial neural networks in determining GOR values is evaluated, proving to be a reasonable way to monitor this property during oil transportation. (author)

  14. Two-Phase Slug Flow Experiments with Viscous Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Diaz, Mariana J.C.

    2016-01-01

    The challenges behind the multiphase transport of oil and gas mixtures are increasing as the oil and gas industry is moving towards production from non-conventional reservoirs and in remote locations. Transport of high viscosity fluids in long multiphase pipelines is a particular challenge. Previous experiments have shown that gas-liquid slug flow is a frequent two-phase flow pattern at high liquid viscosities. The slug flow regime is an unstable flow, which may lead to operati...

  15. Severe Slugging in Air-Water Hybrid Riser System

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Jing; Yang, Zhiyuan; Ma, Liang; Ping WANG

    2014-01-01

    In the subsea pipeline gathering system, severe slugging flow is prone to occur. Severe slugging flow brings major threat to production and flow assurance in oil and gas industry due to periodical pressure oscillation and large liquid volume. Currently many researchers pay much more attention on L-shaped riser, catenaries, and S-shaped riser; little research has been made on hybrid riser, which is applied in the Africa West and Gulf of Mexico oil fields. Flow characteristics simulation for hy...

  16. Numerical Simulation of slug flow in a micro-channel

    OpenAIRE

    Carlson, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Multiphase dynamics and characteristics of slug flow in micro channels are investigated computationally by means of advanced numerical simulation methods. Although, due to its importance in many engineering and biomedical applications, the topic has been studied previously, methods for robust and accurate simulation of slug flow remain elusive. Evaluation of current state-of-the-art Computational Multi Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) technology depicts deficiency with advanced computational methods (Vo...

  17. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  18. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels;

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  19. Follow the BAT: Monitoring Swift BAT FoV for Prompt Optical Emission from Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ukwatta, T N; Dhuga, K S; Gehrels, N

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of implementing a system called 'Follow the BAT' that will coordinate ground-based robotic optical and near infrared (NIR) telescopes to monitor the Swift BAT field-of-view (FoV). The system will optimize the monitoring locations in the BAT FoV based on individual robotic telescopes' location, FoV, sensitivity and local weather conditions. The aim is to perform coordinated BAT FoV monitoring by professional as well as amateur astronomers around the world. The scientific goal of the proposed system is to facilitate detection of prompt optical and NIR emission from GRBs, especially from short duration GRBs. We have performed a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the feasibility of the project.

  20. Slug catcher conceptual design as separator for heavy oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquez, J.G.; Manzanilla, C.L.; Trujillo, J.N. [PDVSA Petroleos de Venezuela SA, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2009-07-01

    Gas-liquid separation processes in heavy and extra heavy oil fields are typically performed using gravity conventional separators. However, the separation efficiency of the equipment depends on the operating conditions, appropriate design and properties of the fluids. Therefore, the separation efficiency is influenced by the liquid's high viscosity, low pressures and low gas flow rate that are present in heavy and extra heavy oil fields. These conditions increase the probability of slug flow formation through pipelines that cause operational problems, primarily in the separation process. Therefore, there is a need to design a gas-liquid separator that can handle viscous liquid, reduce the effects of slug flow and perform an efficient separation. The finger type slug catcher is a technology that can help to improve the gas-liquid separation. This paper presented an improvement in the methodology of Sarica et al. (1990), predicting the dimensions of finger type slug catcher for heavy oil fields. It was derived from the effect of the transition of stratified flow to non-stratified flow when the liquid phase was viscous and only considered slug flow characteristics under normal flow. Based on the improvement the required diameter and length of the finger were determined. This improvement was used to design a finger type slug catcher for heavy oil fields in Venezuela's Orinoco belt and an economic comparison against conventional separators was presented, demonstrating the finger type slug catcher to be more economical than the conventional separator. 17 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs.

  1. Film thickness measurements in liquid–liquid slug flow regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A direct measure of film thickness in liquid–liquid flows was taken. • A region of constant film thickness is presents in slugs where LD⁎⩾1.86. • Experimental data shows the dependency of film thickness on Capillary number. • Expressions are presented to predict the magnitude of the film. -- Abstract: At present there is significant interest in the development of small scale medical diagnostic equipment. These devices offer faster processing times and require smaller sample volumes than equivalent macro scale systems. Although significant attention has been focused upon their outputs, little attention has been devoted to the detailed fluid mechanics that govern the flow mechanisms within these devices. Conventionally, the samples in these small scale devices are segmented into distinct discrete droplets or slugs which are suspended in an organic carrier phase. Separating these slugs from the channel wall is a very thin film of the organic carrier phase. The magnitude of this film is the focus of the present study and the effects of sample slug length and carrier phase fluidic properties on the film are examined over a range of Capillary numbers. A non-intrusive optical technique was used to capture images of the flow from which the magnitude of the film was determined. The experimental results show that the film is not constant along the length of the slug; however above a threshold value for slug length, a region of constant film thickness exists. When compared with existing correlations in the literature, the experimental data showed reasonable agreement with the Bretherton model when the Capillary number was calculated based on the mean two phase flow velocity. However, significant differences were observed when the Capillary number was redefined to account for the mean velocity at the liquid interface, i.e., the mean slug velocity. Analysis of the experimental data revealed that it fell into two distinct flow regimes; a visco

  2. Experiments in a combined up stream downstream slug flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toledo-Velázquez M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Slug flow induced by the combination of a downstream and an upstream two phase flow is very common in the oil industry, mainly when the pipelines are installed on hilly terrains. This phenomenon can be dangerous for the equipment operation because it induces vibrations due to the slugs intermittent movement into the separators. A loop, where it is possible to change the flow conditions and the loop geometrical parameters as the length and inclination angle of the pipe sections was built. Instruments for slug detection and for measuring their characteristic parameters as hold up, frequency, length, and velocity were installed. Three conductive probes were used for the hold-up measurement in different points; all of them were designed, constructed, tested andcalibrated. Experimental runs for a set of four alternated sections upstream downstream W shaped pipe have been undertaken. The gas and liquid flow rates were selected in order to obtain stratified flow at the inlet, which is the condition to induce the severe slugging. The main conclusions of the experimental results analysis are presented in this paper. The Barnea's criterion has been compared against our experimental results, three slugging regions have been found.

  3. An invasive slug exploits an ant-seed dispersal mutualism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadley Dunphy, Shannon A; Prior, Kirsten M; Frederickson, Megan E

    2016-05-01

    Plant-animal mutualisms, such as seed dispersal, are often vulnerable to disruption by invasive species. Here, we show for the first time how a non-ant invasive species negatively affects seed dispersal by ants. We examined the effects of several animal species that co-occur in a temperate deciduous forest-including native and invasive seed-dispersing ants (Aphaenogaster rudis and Myrmica rubra, respectively), an invasive slug (Arion subfuscus), and native rodents-on a native myrmecochorous plant, Asarum canadense. We experimentally manipulated ant, slug, and rodent access to seed depots and measured seed removal. We also video-recorded depots to determine which other taxa interact with seeds. We found that A. rudis was the main disperser of seeds and that A. subfuscus consumed elaiosomes without dispersing seeds. Rodent visitation was rare, and rodent exclusion had no significant effect on seed or elaiosome removal. We then used data obtained from laboratory and field mesocosm experiments to determine how elaiosome robbing by A. subfuscus affects seed dispersal by A. rudis and M. rubra. We found that elaiosome robbing by slugs reduced seed dispersal by ants, especially in mesocosms with A. rudis, which picks up seeds more slowly than M. rubra. Taken together, our results show that elaiosome robbing by an invasive slug reduces seed dispersal by ants, suggesting that invasive slugs can have profound negative effects on seed dispersal mutualisms. PMID:26830293

  4. Slug down-regulation by RNA interference inhibits invasion growth in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shaoyan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC is one of the most aggressive carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract. We assessed the relevance of Slug in measuring the invasive potential of ESCC cells in vitro and in vivo in immunodeficient mice. Methods We utilized RNA interference to knockdown Slug gene expression, and effects on survival and invasive carcinoma were evaluated using a Boyden chamber transwell assay in vitro. We evaluated the effect of Slug siRNA-transfection and Slug cDNA-transfection on E-cadherin and Bcl-2 expression in ESCC cells. A pseudometastatic model of ESCC in immunodeficient mice was used to assess the effects of Slug siRNA transfection on tumor metastasis development. Results The EC109 cell line was transfected with Slug-siRNA to knockdown Slug expression. The TE13 cell line was transfected with Slug-cDNA to increase Slug expression. EC109 and TE13 cell lines were tested for the expression of apoptosis-related genes bcl-2 and metastasis-related gene E-cadherin identified previously as Slug targets. Bcl-2 expression was increased and E-cadherin was decreased in Slug siRNA-transfected EC109 cells. Bcl-2 expression was increased and E-cadherin was decreased in Slug cDNA-transfected TE13 cells. Invasion of Slug siRNA-transfected EC109 cells was reduced and apoptosis was increased whereas invasion was greater in Slug cDNA-transfected cells. Animals injected with Slug siRNA-transfected EC109 cells exhihited fewer seeded nodes and demonstrated more apoptosis. Conclusions Slug down-regulation promotes cell apoptosis and decreases invasion capability in vitro and in vivo. Slug inhibition may represent a novel strategy for treatment of metastatic ESCC.

  5. Stability of void fraction waves and bubble-slug transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The propagation of natural void fraction disturbances in a nitrogen-water flow has been studied, through the statistical analysis of conductivity probe signals, for void fractions ranging from .1 to .5 and including the bubble slug transition. The power spectral density function and the standard deviation of the void fraction signal have been computed for each probe, as well as the phase factor (wave velocity), the coherence function and the gain factor between each pair of consecutive probes as a function of frequency. For bubble flows, the results are in agreement with the results obtained by other authors. The transition from bubble to slug flow is related to void fraction wave instabilities, two kinds of instabilities occurring simultaneously: amplitude increase (gain factor > 1) and wave-breaking. A criterion for the flow-pattern transition between bubble and slug flow (maximum of standard deviation) is proposed

  6. Simulation of horizontal slug-flow pneumatic conveying with kinetic theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Zhengmeng; GUO Liejin

    2007-01-01

    Wavelike slug-flow is a representative flow type in horizontal pneumatic conveying.Kinetic theory was introduced to establish a 3D kinetic numerical model for wavelike slug gas-solid flow in this paper.Wavelike motion of particulate slugs in horizontal pipes was numerically investigated.The formation and motion process of slugs and settled layer were simulated.The characteristics of the flow,such as pressure drop,air velocity distribution,slug length and settled layer thickness,and the detailed changing characteristics of slug length and settled layer thickness with air velocity were obtained.The results indicate that kinetic theory can represent the physical characteristics of the non-suspension dense phase flow of wavelike slug pneumatic conveying.The experiment in this paper introduced a new idea for the numerical calculation of slug-flow pneumatic conveying.

  7. Treatment of Uranium Slugs at the CEA Marcoule site - 12026

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decladding units on the Marcoule nuclear site in southeast France were commissioned in the early 1960's to receive spent fuel cartridge for interim storage in pools and to prepare them for dissolution. After decladding, the uranium slugs were sent to the reprocessing plant for dissolution. The units were shut down in 1997. All the operational and process equipment was dismantled and transferred to the ANDRA waste repository between 1998 and 2001. During cleanup of the G2-G3 interim storage pool all the internal components (baskets and machinery) mounted on the civil engineering structures were cut up. In November 2007, a UNGG fuel slug in its aluminum cartridge was found at the bottom of the pool. Similarly, while iron slugs (used to control plutonium-producing reactors) were being sorted, five de-cladded uranium slugs were found between 2006 and 2008. As the processing facilities had already been dismantled, it was decided to send these fuel cartridges to a laboratory for dissolution. The project was to recover and condition the cartridge and slugs and transport them safely to the laboratory. This required the design of dedicated equipment due in particular to the high dose rate and pyro-phoricity hazard. The procedure also required safety clearance by the regulatory authorities for the operations within the facility and for the transport of radioactive materials. The cartridge was dissolved in May 2009, 18 months after it was discovered. Based on the experience acquired, the retrieval of the uranium slugs was completed in March 2011 after a year of preparation. (authors)

  8. Structure of two-phase slug flow in vertical channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a suggested model of two-phase slug flow in a wide range of varying regime parameters the available literary data and experimental data obtained by the authors on the intensity of void fraction fluctuations, lengths of slugs and liquid plugs are generalized. It is shown that the magnitude of the void fraction is the determining parameter in the formation of the flow regime and structure. The technique for calculating the characteristic frequency of fluctuations of a two-phase flow is suggested

  9. Long liquid slugs in stratified gas/liquid flow in horizontal and slightly inclined pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Kadri, U.

    2009-01-01

    Long liquid slugs reaching several hundreds pipe diameter may appear when transporting gas and liquid in horizontal and near horizontal pipes. The long slugs cause system vibration and separation difficulties that may lead to operational failures. Identifying and predicting the time and length scales of slugging is important for gas and oil production technologies (e.g. for the design of offshore gas and oil pipelines and process facilities). Although mainly short hydrodynamic slugs (40 pipe ...

  10. Internal Representation and Memory Formation of Odor Preference Based on Oscillatory Activities in a Terrestrial Slug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Tatsuhiko; Furudate, Hiroyuki; Kimura, Tetsuya

    2010-01-01

    The terrestrial slug "Limax" exhibits a highly developed ability to learn odors with a small nervous system. When a fluorescent dye, Lucifer Yellow (LY), is injected into the slug's body cavity after odor-taste associative conditioning, a group of neurons in the procerebral (PC) lobe, an olfactory center of the slug, is labeled by LY. We examined…

  11. SNAI2/Slug promotes growth and invasion in human gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous factors that contribute to malignant glioma invasion have been identified, but the upstream genes coordinating this process are poorly known. To identify genes controlling glioma invasion, we used genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of primary human glioblastomas to develop an expression-based rank ordering of 30 transcription factors that have previously been implicated in the regulation of invasion and metastasis in cancer. Using this approach, we identified the oncogenic transcriptional repressor, SNAI2/Slug, among the upper tenth percentile of invasion-related transcription factors overexpressed in glioblastomas. SNAI2 mRNA expression correlated with histologic grade and invasive phenotype in primary human glioma specimens, and was induced by EGF receptor activation in human glioblastoma cells. Overexpression of SNAI2/Slug increased glioblastoma cell proliferation and invasion in vitro and promoted angiogenesis and glioblastoma growth in vivo. Importantly, knockdown of endogenous SNAI2/Slug in glioblastoma cells decreased invasion and increased survival in a mouse intracranial human glioblastoma transplantation model. This genome-scale approach has thus identified SNAI2/Slug as a regulator of growth and invasion in human gliomas

  12. Modelling Morphogenesis: From Single Cells to Crawling Slugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Savill, N.J.; Hogeweg, P.

    2002-01-01

    We present a three-dimensional hybrid cellular automata (CA)/partial differential equation (PDE) model that allows for the study of morphogenesis in simple cellular systems. We apply the model to the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum "from single cells to crawling slug". Using simple loca

  13. SLUG promotes prostate cancer cell migration and invasion via CXCR4/CXCL12 axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uygur Berna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SLUG is a zinc-finger transcription factor of the Snail/Slug zinc-finger family that plays a role in migration and invasion of tumor cells. Mechanisms by which SLUG promotes migration and invasion in prostate cancers remain elusive. Methods Expression level of CXCR4 and CXCL12 was examined by Western blot, RT-PCR, and qPCR analyses. Forced expression of SLUG was mediated by retroviruses, and SLUG and CXCL12 was downregulated by shRNAs-expressing lentiviruses. Migration and invasion of prostate cancer were measured by scratch-wound assay and invasion assay, respectively. Research We demonstrated that forced expression of SLUG elevated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression in human prostate cancer cell lines PC3, DU145, 22RV1, and LNCaP; conversely, reduced expression of SLUG by shRNA downregulated CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression at RNA and protein levels in prostate cancer cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of SLUG increased MMP9 expression and activity in PC3, 22RV1, and DU-145 cells, and SLUG knockdown by shRNA downregulated MMP9 expression. We showed that CXCL12 is required for SLUG-mediated MMP9 expression in prostate cancer cells. Moreover, we found that migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells was increased by ectopic expression of SLUG and decreased by SLUG knockdown. Notably, knockdown of CXCL12 by shRNA impaired SLUG-mediated migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells. Lastly, our data suggest that CXCL12 and SLUG regulate migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells independent of cell growth. Conclusion We provide the first compelling evidence that upregulation of autocrine CXCL12 is a major mechanism underlying SLUG-mediated migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells. Our findings suggest that CXCL12 is a therapeutic target for prostate cancer metastasis.

  14. On technology of electromagnetic radiation monitoring and treatment on rock burst in island working face%孤岛工作面冲击地压电磁辐射监测与治理技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈杨

    2014-01-01

    Taking the 1304 island working face in Yangcheng Mine as the example,based on the principle of electromagnetic radiation predicting rock burst and combining with support pres-sure distribution law in island working face,the paper analyzes the electromagnetic radiation mo-nitoring method and layout of measuring points.By using a variety of monitoring and treatment means centered on the electromagnetic radiation monitoring technology,a new technical method of monitoring and controlling for rock burst in island working face is established,including elec-tromagnetic radiation warning,rock burst hazard identification by drilling cuttings method,un-loading pressure by deep-hole blasting in coal and electromagnetic radiation testing the stress re-lease effect,which has obtained good effectiveness.%以阳城煤矿1304孤岛工作面为例,基于电磁辐射预测冲击地压原理,结合孤岛工作面支承压力分布规律,分析了电磁辐射监测方法及测点布置方式,通过采用以电磁辐射监测技术为核心的多种监测与治理手段,建立了电磁辐射预警→钻屑法危险识别→煤体深孔爆破卸压→电磁辐射卸压效果检验的孤岛工作面冲击地压危险监测与治理技术,并取得了良好的效果。

  15. Characterisation and monitoring of the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) in fractured gneisses of the Roselend underground laboratory: permeability measurements, transport property changes and related radon bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, Jérôme; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe; Richon, Patrick; Pontreau, Sébastien; Guillon, Sophie; Pili, Eric

    2010-05-01

    pressure measurements between an obturated borehole and the tunnel is conducted to monitor the possible modifications of the transport properties of the EDZ due to hydraulical and/or mechanical sollicitations of the nearby Roselend reservoir lake. As radon level is controlled by emanation and transport path through the medium. The observed bursts of radon should be due to changes of the radon transport properties (Trique et al. 1999) of the EDZ. A correlation between the differential pressure variations and radon bursts is clearly observed. Radon bursts seem to be related to overpressure events that take place in the instrumented borehole. Which external sollicitations, hydraulical or mechanical, or both, induce such a behaviour? References Bossart, P., Meier, P. M., Moeri, A., Trick, T., and J.-C. Mayor (2002). Geological and hydraulic characterisation of the excavation disturbed zone in the Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Engineering Geology, 66, 19-38. Dezayes, C., and T. Villemin (2002). Etat de la fracturation dans la galerie CEA de Roselend et analyse de la déformation cassante dans le massif du Méraillet, technical report, Lab. de Geodyn. de Chaisnes Alp., Univ. de Savoie, Savoie, France. Jakubick, A. T., and T. Franz (1993). Vacuum testing of the permeability of the excavation damaged zone, Rock Mech. Rock Engng., 26(2), 165-182. Patriarche, D., Pili, E., Adler, P. M., and J.-F. Thovert (2007). Stereological analysis of fractures in the Roselend tunnel and permeability determination, Water Resour. Res., 43, W09421. Richon, P., Perrier, F., Sabroux, J.-C., Trique, M., Ferry, C., Voisin, V., and E. Pili (2004). Spatial and time variations of radon-222 concentration in the atmosphere of a dead-end horizontal tunnel, J. Environ. Radioact., 78, 179-198. Richon, P., Perrier, F., Pili, E., and J.-C. Sabroux (2009). Detectability and significance of the 12hr barometric tide in radon-222 signal, dripwater flow rate, air temperature and carbon dioxide

  16. Simulation of horizontal pipe two-phase slug flows using the two-fluid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega Malca, Arturo J. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica. Nucleo de Simulacao Termohidraulica de Dutos (SIMDUT); Nieckele, Angela O. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica

    2005-07-01

    Slug flow occurs in many engineering applications, mainly in the transport of hydrocarbon fluids in pipelines. The intermittency of slug flow causes severe unsteady loading on the pipelines carrying the fluids, which gives rise to design problems. Therefore, it is important to be able to predict the onset and development of slug flow as well as slug characteristics. The present work consists in the simulation of two-phase flow in slug pattern through horizontal pipes using the two-fluid model in its transient and one-dimensional form. The advantage of this model is that the flow field is allowed to develop naturally from a given initial conditions as part of the transient calculation; the slug evolves automatically as a product of the computed flow development. Simulations are then carried out for a large number of flow conditions that lead a slug flow. (author)

  17. New Results on the Spectral Evolution of Magnetar Bright Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, George A.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A.; GBM Magnetar Team

    2013-04-01

    Magnetars are isolated neutron stars characterized by long spin periods (2-12 s) and large spin down rates, implying a very strong magnetic field, B>10E14 G. Magnetars exhibit short bursts of hard X-/soft gamma-rays with luminosities ranging from 10E37 to 10E41 erg/s. The magnetar SGR J1550-5418 entered an extremely active bursting episode, starting on 2008 October 03 until 2009 April 17, during which Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) observed several hundred bursts from this source. Such wealth of bursts resulted in the largest catalog of detailed temporal and spectral results for SGR J1550-5418. Here, we discuss new results from time-resolved spectral analysis of the brightest bursts from this source. Our analysis, together with the comparison of our results with other magnetar bursts, enabled us to put strong constraints on the theories underlying the magnetar bursts emission mechanism.

  18. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazzi, A. C.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Younes, G. A.; Kaneko, Y.; Göğüş, E.; Lin, L.; Granot, J.; Finger, M. H.; Chaplin, V. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Watts, A. L.; von Kienlin, A.; Baring, M. G.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Gibby, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.; van der Klis, M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2015-05-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550-5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  19. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Collazzi, A C; van der Horst, A J; Younes, G A; Kaneko, Y; Gogus, E; Lin, L; Granot, J; Finger, M H; Chaplin, V L; Huppenkothen, D; Watts, A L; von Kienlin, A; Baring, M G; Gruber, D; Bhat, P N; Gibby, M H; Gehrels, N; McEnery, J; van der Klis, M; Wijers, R A M J

    2015-01-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, giving the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from July 2008 to June 2013. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550-5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  20. Burst investigation on zircaloy-4 claddings in inert environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Burst investigations on zircaloy-4 cladding in argon environment. • Clad wall displacement measurement. • Effect of internal overpressure and heating rate on burst parameters. • Semi-empirical correlation for burst stress has been proposed. - Abstract: An extensive burst investigation has been carried out on the zircaloy-4 claddings in an inert environment to simulate clad burst during a postulated loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) conditions. The parameters varied during the burst experiments were heating rate and internal overpressure. The temperature, internal overpressure and ballooning data were monitored online and recorded during the heating process of burst specimen. In addition, post-experiment measurements were also conducted on the burst specimen to determine various burst parameters–burst strains and burst stress. A semi-empirical correlation was developed to predict the burst stress for a given burst temperature. A reasonable agreement between the predicted and experimental data has been observed. The proposed correlation was also compared with available established correlation for steam environment

  1. Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH‐EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    The WATCH wide field x‐ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence of...

  2. Experimental investigation of the effect of liquid viscosity on slug flow in small diameter bubble column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzopardi Barry John

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of liquid viscosity on slug flow in a 50 mm diameter bubble column was investigated experimentally using air-silicone oil as operating fluid with silicone oil of viscosities 5, 100, 1000 and 5000 mPa.s. Data was collected using Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT, a non-intrusive advanced instrumentation measuring technique and the high Speed Video Camera, through which the slug parameters such as length of Taylor bubbles and liquid slug, void fraction in Taylor bubbles and liquid slug, slug frequency, film thickness and pressure gradient in the slug, were measured and analyzed. The analysis was done using the void fraction time series, probability density function and power spectral density plots. Superficial gas velocities of 0.02≤Ugs≤0.361 m/s were used in the experiment. It was also observed that as viscosity increases, slug frequency, structure velocity, length of liquid slug, void fraction in liquid slug and void fraction in Taylor bubbles decreases; while the length of Taylor bubble, film thickness and pressure gradient in the slug increases.

  3. Role of the Slug Transcription Factor in Chemically-Induced Skin Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine von Maltzan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The Slug transcription factor plays an important role in ultraviolet radiation (UVR-induced skin carcinogenesis, particularly in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT occurring during tumor progression. In the present studies, we investigated the role of Slug in two-stage chemical skin carcinogenesis. Slug and the related transcription factor Snail were expressed at high levels in skin tumors induced by 7,12-dimethylbenz[α]anthracene application followed by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA treatment. TPA-induced transient elevation of Slug and Snail proteins in normal mouse epidermis and studies in Slug transgenic mice indicated that Slug modulates TPA-induced epidermal hyperplasia and cutaneous inflammation. Although Snail family factors have been linked to inflammation via interactions with the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 pathway, a pathway that also plays an important role in skin carcinogenesis, transient TPA induction of Slug and Snail appeared unrelated to COX-2 expression. In cultured human keratinocytes, TPA induced Snail mRNA expression while suppressing Slug expression, and this differential regulation was due specifically to activation of the TPA receptor. These studies show that Slug and Snail exhibit similar patterns of expression during both UVR and chemical skin carcinogenesis, that Slug and Snail can be differentially regulated under some conditions and that in vitro findings may not recapitulate in vivo results.

  4. Slug flow model for infiltration into fractured porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for transient infiltration into a periodically fractured porous layer is presented. The fracture is treated as a permeable-walled slot and the moisture distribution is in the form of a slug being an advancing meniscus. The wicking of moisture from the fracture to the unsaturated porous matrix is a nonlinear diffusion process and is approximately by self-similar solutions. The resulting model is a nonlinear Volterra integral equation with a weakly singular kernel. Numerical analysis provides solutions over a wide range of the parameter space and reveals the asymptotic forms of the penetration of this slug in terms of dimensionless variables arising in the model. The numerical solutions corroborate asymptotic results given earlier by Nitao and Buscheck (1991), and by Martinez (1988). Some implications for the transport of liquid in fractured rock are discussed

  5. Propylene polymerization in a circulating slugging fluidized bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Putten, van, J.P.M.

    2004-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is concerned with research on the riser of a circulating fluidized bed system for olefin polymerization. In the riser section, fluidization takes place in the transporting slugging mode and polymer particles are produced in the riser in a non-isothermal way. Properties of the polymerization reaction and of the hydrodynamics were studied and their behavior with respect to conditions in the reactor were described. A reactor model was constructed that accurately...

  6. PIV Investigations on Secondary Flow Structures in Horizontal Slug Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Aguas Fernández, Pedro José

    2011-01-01

    Liquid and gas phases circulate horizontally through the same channel in many industrial processes. They can do it following different patterns of so-called two-phase flow. Depending on the superficial velocity of each one of the phases, the flow can vary. The different types of flows observed in horizontal pipes are bubbly flow, stratified flow,wavy flow, slug flowand annular flow. The first formal classification of flow patterns was carried out by Taitel and Dukler during the...

  7. Understanding the Long-Term Spectral Variability of Cygnus X-1 with Burst and Transient Source Experiment and All-Sky Monitor Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Poutanen, Juri; Paciesas, William S.; Wen, Lin-Qing

    2002-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of all observations of Cyg X-1 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE; 20-300 keV) and by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer all-sky monitor (ASM; 1.5-12 keV) until 2002 June, including approximately 1200 days of simultaneous data. We find a number of correlations between fluxes and hardnesses in different energy bands. In the hard (low) spectral state, there is a negative correlation between the ASM 1.5-12 keV flux and the hardness at any energy. In the soft (high) spectral state, the ASM flux is positively correlated with the ASM hardness but uncorrelated with the BATSE hardness. In both spectral states, the BATSE hardness correlates with the flux above 100 keV, while it shows no correlation with the 20-100 keV flux. At the same time, there is clear correlation between the BATSE fluxes below and above 100 keV. In the hard state, most of the variability can be explained by softening the overall spectrum with a pivot at approximately 50 keV. There is also another, independent variability pattern of lower amplitude where the spectral shape does not change when the luminosity changes. In the soft state, the variability is mostly caused by a variable hard (Comptonized) spectral component of a constant shape superposed on a constant soft blackbody component. These variability patterns are in agreement with the dependencies of the rms variability on the photon energy in the two states. We also study in detail recent soft states from late 2000 until 2002. The last of them has lasted thus far for more than 200 days. Their spectra are generally harder in the 1.5-5 keV band and similar or softer in the 3-12 keV band than the spectra of the 1996 soft state, whereas the rms variability is stronger in all the ASM bands. On the other hand, the 1994 soft state transition observed by BATSE appears very similar to the 1996 one. We interpret the variability patterns in terms of theoretical Comptonization

  8. How Long does a Burst Burst?

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Murase, Kohta; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (~ hours) in gamma-rays than typical long GRBs (~ minutes), and recently it was proposed that these "ultra-long GRBs" may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g. blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations have suggested that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with XRT observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to check whether ultra-long GRBs are special. We define burst duration t_{burst} based on both gamma-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using gamma-ray observations only. We show that the distribution of t_{burst} peaks at ~ 320s for the entire sample, with 17.6% GRBs having t_{burst} > 10^3 s and 5.4% GRBs having t_{burst} > 10^4 s. The distribution shows a tail at the long t_{burst} end. The existence of a separate population is not ruled ou...

  9. 300 Area VOC Program Slug Test Characterization Results for Selected Test/Depth Intervals for Wells 399-2-5, 399-3-22, and 399-4-14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple, stress-level slug tests were performed at selected test/depth intervals within wells 399-2-5, 399-3-22, and 399-4-14 as part of the 300 Area volatile organic compound characterization program at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The temporary test screen lengths were characterized as the boreholes were advanced to their final drill depths and before their completion as monitor-well facilities. Following well completion, slug tests were performed in the final, completed well-screen sections. The objectives of the slug tests were to provide the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at these locations and to support selection of the final well screen-depth interval for each of these monitor-well facilities.

  10. 300 Area VOC Program Slug Test Characterization Results for Selected Test/Depth Intervals for Wells 399-2-5, 399-3-22, and 399-4-14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2008-03-01

    Multiple, stress-level slug tests were performed at selected test/depth intervals within wells 399-2-5, 399-3-22, and 399-4-14 as part of the 300 Area volatile organic compound characterization program at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The temporary test screen lengths were characterized as the boreholes were advanced to their final drill depths and before their completion as monitor-well facilities. Following well completion, slug tests were performed in the final, completed well-screen sections. The objectives of the slug tests were to provide the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at these locations and to support selection of the final well screen-depth interval for each of these monitor-well facilities.

  11. Severe slugging in gas-liquid two-phase pipe flow

    OpenAIRE

    Malekzadeh, R.

    2012-01-01

    transportation facilities. In an offshore oil and gas production facility, pipeline-riser systems are required to transport two-phase hydrocarbons from subsurface oil and gas wells to a central production platform. Severe slugs reaching several thousands pipe diameters may occur when transporting gas and liquid in these pipeline-riser systems. Severe slugging creates potential problems in the platform facilities, e.g. separators, pumps, and compressors. Severe slugging may cause flooding and ...

  12. Evaluation of local tolerance of a plant extract by the slug mucosal irritation (SMI) assay

    OpenAIRE

    Veryser, Lieselotte; Lenoir, Joke; Boonen, Jente; Bracke, Nathalie; Wynendaele, Evelien; ADRIAENS, Els; Nelis, Hans; Wever, Bram De; Remon, Jean Paul; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the performance of a laboratory exercise, the Slug Mucosal Irritation (SMI) assay, carried out by third year undergraduate students, to investigate the local tolerance of an ethanolic plant extract. The plant extract, Spilanthes acmella, contains various bio-active compounds, such as the N-alkylamide spilanthol. After administration of the plant extract to the slugs, they were observed for possible discomfort and tissue damage. When slugs are exposed to a substance with...

  13. Slug inhibits pancreatic cancer initiation by blocking Kras-induced acinar-ductal metaplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Kazumi Ebine; Chow, Christina R.; DeCant, Brian T.; Hattaway, Holly Z.; Grippo, Paul J.; Krishan Kumar; Munshi, Hidayatullah G.

    2016-01-01

    Cells in the pancreas that have undergone acinar-ductal metaplasia (ADM) can transform into premalignant cells that can eventually become cancerous. Although the epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulator Snail (Snai1) can cooperate with Kras in acinar cells to enhance ADM development, the contribution of Snail-related protein Slug (Snai2) to ADM development is not known. Thus, transgenic mice expressing Slug and Kras in acinar cells were generated. Surprisingly, Slug attenuated Kras-induced...

  14. Stabilising slug flow at large valve opening using an intermittent absorber

    OpenAIRE

    Ehinmowo, Adegboyega Bolu

    2015-01-01

    Slugging is one of the challenges usually encountered in multiphase transportation of oil and gas. It is an intermittent flow of liquid and gas which manifests in pressure and flow fluctuations capable of causing upset in topside process facilities. It can also induce structural defects in pipeline-riser system. The threat of slugging to oil and gas facilities has been known since the early 1970s. This study investigated a new method for slug flow stability analysis and proposed the use of...

  15. Stability of stratified flow and slugging in horizontal gas-liquid flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Hanyang; GUO Liejin

    2005-01-01

    A transient one-dimensional two-fluid model is proposed to investigate numerically the interfacial instability and the onset of slugging for liquid-gas flow in a horizontal duct. In the present model, the effects of surface tension and transverse variations in dynamic pressure are taken into account. The evolution of interfacial disturbances is displayed and compared with the linear viscous KelvinHelmholtz stability analyses. It shows that interfacial wave is more instable due to the non-linear effect. The model predicts well the stability limit of stratified flow in comparison with the experimental data, and also automatically tracks the onset of slugging. The results show that the initiation of hydrodynamic slugging is related to local interfacial instability. Based on the cycle of slugging, a model for slug frequency is presented, which predicts the trends of slug frequencies with gas/liquid flow rate well in comparison with the available data. The effects of physical properties on slugging have been examined. It is found that with the increase in the gas viscosity and liquid density the slugging would be inhibited, whereas, with the increase in liquid viscosity and gas density, the slugging can be promoted.

  16. A Probabilistic Approach for Predicting Average Slug Frequency in Horizontal Gas/Liquid Pipe Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadri U.

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a model for predicting the average slug frequency in horizontal gas/liquid pipe flow. The model considers the probability of slug formation if slugs are triggered at the antinodes of a sinusoidal perturbation, along the pipe at the frequency of oscillation of the interface. A slug is assumed to form if and only if triggered at a space-time far enough from existing slugs. The probability of forming slugs is found to decrease with distance from the inlet, since the downstream passage of existing slugs prevents the formation of new slugs. Predictions by the model are compared with air/water, freon/water and air/oil measurements found in literature, with a satisfactory agreement. However, a deviation from measurements is observed when considering high viscosity liquid. The model contributes to the prediction of slug flow regime and can act as a guideline toward the design of gas/liquid horizontal pipe flow.

  17. Experiments on slug impact loading of the reactor vessel head during a postulated steam explosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A steam explosion in a reactor pressure vessel could cause a strong molten fuel slug impact on the vessel head, whose failure would question the integrity of the reactor containment. The capacity of a typical pressurized water reactor vessel head to carry slug impacts is therefore investigated. The slug interaction with the complex upper internal structures is taken into account. This interaction increases the capacity of the head and reduces its parameter sensitivity. Rough theoretical assessments are presented in this paper. Model experiments are being prepared to obtain reliable results. The similarity conditions for slug-structure impact problems are discussed. (orig.)

  18. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of three-phase slug flows in horizontal pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar

    2015-11-01

    One of the most common flow regimes in pipelines is that of slug flow: slug bodies corresponding to alternating blocks of aerated liquid which bridge the pipe, separated by elongated bubbles; the latter ride atop a liquid layer. The slugs travel at velocities that exceed the mixture superficial velocity; this can potentially cause structural damage, particularly at pipe bends and junctions. Two-phase slug flows have received considerable attention in the literature both experimentally and computationally but there has been very little work carried out on three-phase slugging. In the present work, the evolution of oil-water-air three-phase slug flow in a horizontal cylindrical pipe is investigated using two-dimensional and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations. The parameters characterising three-phase slug flow, e.g. slug length, propagation velocity, and slug formation frequency, are determined for various gas and liquid superficial velocities for a given pipe geometry. The results of this work are compared to available experimental data and numerical solutions based on approximate, one-dimensional models relying on the use of empirical correlations. EPSRC Programme Grant, MEMPHIS, EP/K0039761/1.

  19. How long does a burst burst?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (∼hours) in γ-rays than typical long GRBs (∼minutes), and it has recently been proposed that these 'ultra-long GRBs' may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g., blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations suggest that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with X-Ray Telescope observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to determine whether ultra-long GRBs are unusual events. We define burst duration t burst based on both γ-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using γ-ray observations alone. We find that t burst can be reliably measured in 343 GRBs. Within this 'good' sample, 21.9% GRBs have t burst ≳ 103 s and 11.5% GRBs have t burst ≳ 104 s. There is an apparent bimodal distribution of t burst in this sample. However, when we consider an 'undetermined' sample (304 GRBs) with t burst possibly falling in the gap between GRB duration T 90 and the first X-ray observational time, as well as a selection effect against t burst falling into the first Swift orbital 'dead zone' due to observation constraints, the intrinsic underlying t burst distribution is consistent with being a single component distribution. We found that the existing evidence for a separate ultra-long GRB population is inconclusive, and further multi-wavelength observations are needed to draw a firmer conclusion. We also discuss the theoretical implications of our results. In particular, the central engine activity duration of GRBs is generally much longer than the γ-ray T 90 duration and it does not even correlate with T 90. It would be premature to make a direct connection between T 90 and the size of the progenitor star.

  20. Bibliographic overview of German and French works about slug impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robbe, M.F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Mecanique et de Technologie, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2001-07-01

    The most severe mechanical consequence of an in-vessel steam explosion is the impact of a slug of molten core material against the head of the reactor pressure vessel. This matter has been mainly studied b y the german and french research centers FZK and CEA-Saclay for many years. FKZ aims at the quantification of the maximum mechanical energy that the upper head would be able to resist without failing. The investigation work is largely based on the german experiments BERDA which consist in simulating the impact of a slug on a reduced-scale replica models of the upper part of reactor pressure vessel. Besides this important experimental effort on refined mock-ups of the reactor, complementary experimental data have been acquired to help the interpretation of the BERDA tests. The transfer of the BERDA reduced-scale results to reactor dimensions is done by using scale factors based on similarity laws whose validity is checked thanks to the german test-facilities FLIPPER. As the BERDA tests are performed with a material different from corium because of the difficulties introduced by manipulating radioactive materials, the understanding of the slug material influence and the extrapolation to the corium is investigated with the french test-facilities SKIPPY. In order to deepen the understanding of the impact process and to extrapolate the experimental results to other combinations of parameters, corresponding theoretical work has been performed, mainly with the finite element code CASTEM-PLEXUS developed by CEA-Saclay. In this code, a specific model was implemented to represent a liquid splash against a solid structure. As this model suits well to the impacts investigated here, computations of the tests BERDA and SKIPPY were carried out by both german and french teams. The following chapters give a description of the experimental and numerical tools and summarize the main results obtained. (author)

  1. Bibliographic overview of German and French works about slug impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most severe mechanical consequence of an in-vessel steam explosion is the impact of a slug of molten core material against the head of the reactor pressure vessel. This matter has been mainly studied b y the german and french research centers FZK and CEA-Saclay for many years. FKZ aims at the quantification of the maximum mechanical energy that the upper head would be able to resist without failing. The investigation work is largely based on the german experiments BERDA which consist in simulating the impact of a slug on a reduced-scale replica models of the upper part of reactor pressure vessel. Besides this important experimental effort on refined mock-ups of the reactor, complementary experimental data have been acquired to help the interpretation of the BERDA tests. The transfer of the BERDA reduced-scale results to reactor dimensions is done by using scale factors based on similarity laws whose validity is checked thanks to the german test-facilities FLIPPER. As the BERDA tests are performed with a material different from corium because of the difficulties introduced by manipulating radioactive materials, the understanding of the slug material influence and the extrapolation to the corium is investigated with the french test-facilities SKIPPY. In order to deepen the understanding of the impact process and to extrapolate the experimental results to other combinations of parameters, corresponding theoretical work has been performed, mainly with the finite element code CASTEM-PLEXUS developed by CEA-Saclay. In this code, a specific model was implemented to represent a liquid splash against a solid structure. As this model suits well to the impacts investigated here, computations of the tests BERDA and SKIPPY were carried out by both german and french teams. The following chapters give a description of the experimental and numerical tools and summarize the main results obtained. (author)

  2. The E-cadherin repressor slug and progression of human extrahepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin-sheng

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study explored the expression and function of Slug in human extrahepatic hilar cholangiocarcinoma (EHC to identify its role in tumor progression. Methods The expression of Snail and Slug mRNA in 52 human tissue samples of EHC was investigated. The mRNA of Snail and Slug were quantified using reverse transcriptase-PCR, and correlations with E-cadherin expression and clinicopathological factors were investigated. We then investigated transfection of Slug cDNA in endogenous E-cadherin-positive human EHC FRH0201 cells, selectively induced the loss of E-cadherin protein expression, and then small interfering RNA (siRNA for inhibition of Slug expression in endogenous Slug-positive human EHC QBC939 cells, selectively induced the loss of Slug protein expression. A Boyden chamber transwell assay was used for invasion. Results Slug mRNA was overexpressed in 18 cases (34.6% of EHC compared with adjacent noncancerous tissue. E-Cadherin protein expression determined in the same 52 cases by immunohistochemistry was significantly down-regulated in those cases with Slug mRNA overexpression (P = 0.0001. The tumor and nontumor ratio of Slug mRNA was correlated with nodal metastasis(p = 0.0102, distant metastasis (p = 0.0001and Survival time(p = 0.0443. However, Snail mRNA correlated with neither E-cadherin expression nor tumor invasiveness. By inhibiting Slug expression by RNA interference, we found that reduced Slug levels upregulated E-cadherin and decreased invasion in QBC939 cell. When the QBC939 cells was infected with Slug cDNA,, significant E-cadherin was downregulated and increased invasion in QBC939 cell. Conclusions The results suggested that Slug expression plays an important role in both the regulation of E-cadherin expression and in the acquisition of invasive potential in human EHC. Slug is possibly a potential target for an antitumor therapy blocking the functions of invasion and metastasis in human EHCs.

  3. Anti-Slug Control with Non-Linear State Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Syre, Terese Vardenær

    2012-01-01

    In offshore production, the two-phase mixture of oil and gas is transported from the seabed oil wells to the surface facilities by pipelines and risers. The two-phase flow can have different flow regimes, where severe slugging is one undesirable flow regime and an effective solution is needed to prevent it. The recommended solution is active control of the top-side choke valve. Previously, controllability analysis is done of two-phase flow in a 4-state pipeline-riser model. This analyze concl...

  4. SDSS Pre-Burst Observations of Recent Gamma-Ray Burst Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Cool, R J; Brinkmann, J; Eisenstein, D J; Hogg, D W; Schlegel, D J; Schneider, D P; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hogg, David W.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry and spectroscopy in the fields of 24 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by Swift, including bursts localized by Swift, HETE-2, and INTEGRAL, after December 2004. After this bulk release, we plan to provide individual releases of similar data shortly after the localization of future bursts falling in the SDSS survey area. These data provide a solid basis for the astrometric and photometric calibration of follow-up afterglow searches and monitoring. Furthermore, the images provided with this release will allow observers to find transient objects up to a magnitude fainter than possible with Digitized Sky Survey image comparisons.

  5. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy, trap...

  6. Experimental investigation of terrain slugging: formation mechanism and potential mitigation methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiferli, W.; Hansen, J.H.; Brasjen, B.J.; Belfroid, S.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental study on terrain-induced slugging on shallow inclines (typically less than 3°) has been conducted, using three setups with a pipe diameter of around 1”, with incline lengths of 1 m, 3 m and 24 m. In addition to an extensive characterization of the formation and evolution of slugs as

  7. Long liquid slugs in stratified gas/liquid flow in horizontal and slightly inclined pipes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadri, U.

    2009-01-01

    Long liquid slugs reaching several hundreds pipe diameter may appear when transporting gas and liquid in horizontal and near horizontal pipes. The long slugs cause system vibration and separation difficulties that may lead to operational failures. Identifying and predicting the time and length scale

  8. Slug inhibition increases radiosensitivity of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells by upregulating PUMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fangfang; Zhou, Lijie; Wei, Changbo; Zhao, Wei; Yu, Dongsheng

    2016-08-01

    As a new strategy, radio-gene therapy was widely used for the treatment of cancer patients in recent few years. Slug was involved in the radioresistance of various cancers and has been found to have an anti-apoptotic effect. This study aims to investigate whether the modulation of Slug expression by siRNA affects oral squamous cell carcinoma sensitivity to X-ray irradiation through upregulating PUMA. Two oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (HSC3 and HSC6) were transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Slug and subjected to radiotherapy in vitro. After transfection with Slug siRNA, both HSC3 and HSC6 cells showed relatively lower expression of Slug and higher expression of PUMA. The Slug siRNA transfected cells showed decreased survival and proliferation rates, an increased apoptosis rate and enhanced radiosensitivity to X-ray irradiation. Our results revealed that Slug siRNA transfection in combination with radiation increased the expression of PUMA, which contributed to radiosensitivity of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. Thus, controlling the expression of Slug might contribute to enhance sensitivity of HSC3 and HSC6 cells toward X-ray irradiation in vitro by upregulating PUMA. PMID:27277529

  9. An Experimental Study of the Flowrate Transients in Slug Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HELimin; CHENZhenyu; 等

    2002-01-01

    An investigation of the characteristics of flowrate transients within slug flow was conducted in a largescale outdoor testing facility.The test section consisted of a 378m long,7.62cm diameter stainless steel pipe. Air and water were used as the test fluids.The response to a change of flowrate o either phase or two phases was measured using a series of pressure transducers and differential pressure transducers.An increase or decrease in gas flowrate caused a pressure overshoot above the value at new steady state or led to a pressure undershoot to form a temporary stratified flow.Pressure waves existed in the pipeline,spreading from the entrance to the exit.The magnitude of pressure overshoot in “up-gas”transient or of pressure undershoot and period of the temporary stratified flow in “Down-gas” transient are related to the change of gas flowrate and the distance away from the entrance.In contrast,the change in liquid flowrate was accommodated by smooth transitions between the corresponding steady states,and only one obvious change was found in the slug frequency.According to experimental results,the pressure overshoot,pressure undershoot and the pressure wave propagation were analyzed,and the phenomena were explained reasonably.Some correlations for the calculation of the pressure overshoot and undershoot were proposed.

  10. Relationships Between Aphids (Insecta: Homoptera: Aphididae) and Slugs (Gastropoda: Stylommatophora: Agriolimacidae) Pests of Legumes (Fabaceae: Lupinus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozłowski, Jan; Strażyński, Przemysław; Jaskulska, Monika; Kozłowska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Lupin plants are frequently damaged by various herbivorous invertebrates. Significant among these are slugs and aphids, which sometimes attack the same plants. Relationships between aphids, slugs and food plant are very interesting. Grazing by these pests on young plants can lead to significant yield losses. There is evidence that the alkaloids present in some lupin plants may reduce grazing by slugs, aphids and other invertebrates. In laboratory study was analyzed the relationships between aphid Aphis craccivora and slug Deroceras reticulatum pests of legumes Lupinus angustifolius. It was found that the presence of aphids significantly reduced slug grazing on the plants. The lupin cultivars with high alkaloid content were found to be less heavily damaged by D. reticulatum, and the development of A. craccivora was found to be inhibited on such plants. PMID:27324580

  11. Fabrication of rare-earth bearing fuel slug by injection casting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herein, U.10wt%Zr fuel slugs containing 0, 3, and 7 wt%RE were prepared by an injection casting method and their characteristics were evaluated. The as-cast fuel slugs were generally sound and fabricated to the full length of the mold. However, the increased amount of the charged RE noticeably deteriorated the quality of the casting components such as melting crucible. Chemical analysis of the U.10Zr and U.10Zr.3RE slugs showed that the target composition was matched to within 1.0 wt%. In contrast, the composition of the U.10Zr.7RE fuel slug differed by as much as 4.6 wt% from the target. Therefore, more protective casting variables should be considered, when casting high RE-bearing fuel slugs. KAERI seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products

  12. Recreating Riser Slugging Flow Based on an Economic Lab-sized Setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lasse; Pedersen, Simon; Yang, Zhenyu;

    2013-01-01

    As a kind of periodic phenomenon, the slugging flow in the offshore oil & gas production addresses a lot of attentions, due to its limitation of production rate, periodic overload processing facilities, and even direct cause of emergent shutdown. This work studies the emulation of the riser...... slugging flow in the offshore oil & gas production, by constructing an economical lab-sized setup in the university campus. Firstly, the construction and used components for the lab setup are illustrated; then, the constructed setup is validated by checking the consistency with some existing typical riser...... slug model, besides extensive experimental tests. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that this simple setup can recreate the key features of slugging flow phenomenon reasonably precise, and it serves as a good platform for further slug control study....

  13. Laboratory Tests for Group and Individual Exposures of Arion lusitanicus Mabille Slugs to Different Molluscicide Baits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Stojnić

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Molluscicide baits based on different active ingredients were tested in a seven-day laboratory trial on juveniles and young adults of Arion lusitanicus Mabille slug collected in ruderal sites during June and July of 2008. Before setting the trial, the slugs were adapted to laboratory conditions. The testing was conducted using a modified version of the method proposed by Godan (1983 and Wiktor (1989. The slugs were kept in arenas under controlled conditions (20-24oC temperature, 80-90% relative air humidity, no air stream, diffuse daylight. Smaller(15.5 x 15.5 x 7 cm and larger (28 x 17.5 x 7 cm arenas were used, depending on slug numbers, and different rates of food and bait were administered. Plastic boxes with perforated coverage, lined with multi-ply paper moistened on a daily basis, were used as arenas. The slugs were fed on fresh salad daily, while baits were administered in open 35 mm petri dishes once for the duration of experiment. The first trial involved single-slug exposures to bait in 20 arenas per each of four treatments with two replicates and a total of 160 slugs. The second trial, group exposure, involved four treatments of five slugs per arena in six replicates with a total of 120 slugs. The products Arion and Pužomor demonstrated the highest efficacy (77.5% in the single-slug trial. The average efficacy of the product Carakol after seven days of exposure was 60.0%. Regarding group exposure, Pužomor pellets achieved 79.3% efficacy after three days and this efficacy rate remained for the rest of the experiment. On the seventh day ofexposure, Arion and Carakol had 33.3% and 40.0% efficacy, respectively.

  14. Thermonuclear burst oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Watts, Anna L

    2012-01-01

    Burst oscillations, a phenomenon observed in a significant fraction of Type I (thermonuclear) X-ray bursts, involve the development of highly asymmetric brightness patches in the burning surface layers of accreting neutron stars. Intrinsically interesting as nuclear phenomena, they are also important as probes of dense matter physics and the strong gravity, high magnetic field environment of the neutron star surface. Burst oscillation frequency is also used to measure stellar spin, and doubles the sample of rapidly rotating (above 10 Hz) accreting neutron stars with known spins. Although the mechanism remains mysterious, burst oscillation models must take into account thermonuclear flame spread, nuclear processes, rapid rotation, and the dynamical role of the magnetic field. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the observational properties of burst oscillations, an assessment of the status of the theoretical models that are being developed to explain them, and an overview of how they can be used to...

  15. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy......, trapped particle streams. These background events may simulate the count rate increases characteristic of cosmic gamma bursts. For 12 of the detected events, their true cosmic nature have been confirmed through consistent localizations of the burst sources based on several independent WATCH data sets. The...... derived positions of the bursts are reported. Additionally, most of the events have been confirmed by coincident detections with instruments on other spacecrafts. The features of two of the bursts and the results of searches for related events in the optical are described....

  16. Study On Burst Location Technology under Steady-state in Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianpin; Li, Shuping; Wang, Shaowei; He, Fang; He, Zhixun; Cao, Guodong

    2010-11-01

    According to the characteristics of hydraulic information under the state of burst in water distribution system, to get the correlation of monitoring values and burst location and locate the position of burst on time by mathematical fitting. This method can effectively make use of the information of SCADA in water distribution system to active locating burst position. A new idea of burst location in water distribution systems to shorten the burst time, reduce the impact on urban water supply, economic losses and waste of water resources.

  17. Linking burst-only X-ray binary sources to faint X-ray transients

    OpenAIRE

    Campana, S.

    2009-01-01

    Burst-only sources are X-ray sources showing up only during short bursts but with no persistent emission (at least with the monitoring instrument which led to their discovery). These bursts have spectral characteristics consistent with thermonuclear (type I) burst from the neutron star surface, linking burst-only sources to neutron star X-ray binary transients. We have carried out a series of snapshot observations of the entire sample of burst-only sources with the Swift satellite. We found a...

  18. Experimental study on the driving mechanism of geysering. The coalescence mechanism of slug bubbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept of natural circulation BWRs such as the SBWR has been proposed and seems to be promising in that the primary cooling system can be simplified. The authors have been investigating geysering phenomena. Geysering is one of the thermo-hydraulic instabilities, which may occur during start-up of the natural circulation in SBWRs. In the previous works, geysering was experimentally investigated under several conditions. As a result, the following phenomena could be considered as important factors for the occurrence of geysering: (1) Existence of a slug bubble which covers the entire channel, (2) Condensation rate of a slug bubble induced by subcooled water in the upper tank. In present work, a coalescence mechanism of slug bubbles was investigated experimentally. Steam/water mixture flow were used as working fluid. It can be clarified from the experiments that the coalescence mechanism of slug bubbles was greatly affected by the wake flow induced by the following slug bubble. In case the distance between preceding and following slug bubbles was shorter than 5 time channel diameter, the following slug bubble increased the rise velocity with the deformation of the shape of bubble head. Consequently, the bubbles coalesced each other rapidly. (author)

  19. Influence of the initial conditions for the numerical simulation of two-phase slug flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pachas Napa, Alex A.; Morales, Rigoberto E.M.; Medina, Cesar D. Perea

    2010-07-01

    Multiphase flows in pipelines commonly show several patterns depending on the flow rate, geometry and physical properties of the phases. In oil production, the slug flow pattern is the most common among the others. This flow pattern is characterized by an intermittent succession in space and time of an aerated liquid slug and an elongated gas bubble with a liquid film. Slug flow is studied through the slug tracking model described as one-dimensional and Lagrangian frame referenced. In the model, the mass and the momentum balance equations are applied in control volumes constituted by the gas bubble and the liquid slug. Initial conditions must be determined, which need to reproduce the intermittence of the flow pattern. These initial conditions are given by a sequence of flow properties for each unit cell. Properties of the unit cell in initial conditions should reflect the intermittence, for which they can be analyzed in statistical terms. Therefore, statistical distributions should be obtained for the slug flow variables. Distributions are complemented with the mass balance and the bubble design model. The objective of the present work is to obtain initial conditions for the slug tracking model that reproduce a better adjustment of the fluctuating properties for different pipe inclinations (horizontal, vertical or inclined). The numerical results are compared with experimental data obtained by PFG/FEM/UNICAMP for air-water flow at 0 deg, 45 deg and 90 deg and good agreement is observed. (author)

  20. A Hydrodynamic Model for Slug Frequency in Horizontal Gas-Liquid Two-Phase Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘磊; 孙贺东; 胡志华; 周芳德

    2003-01-01

    The prediction of slug frequency has important significance on gas-liquid two-phase flow. A hydrodynamic model was put forward to evaluate slug frequency for horizontal two-phase flow, based on the dependence of slug frequency on the frequency of unstable interfacial wave. Using air and water, experimental verification of the model was carried out in a large range of flow parameters. Six electrical probes were installed at different positions of a horizontal plexiglass pipe to detect slug frequency development. The pipe is 30 m long and its inner diameter is 24 ram. It is observed experimentally that the interracial wave frequency at the inlet is about i to 3 times the frequency of stable slug. The slug frequencies predicted by the model fit well with Tronconi (1990) model and the experimental data. The combination of the hydrodynamic model and the experimental data results in a conclusion that the frequency of equilibrium liquid slug is approximately half the minimum frequency of interfacial wave.

  1. Snails and slugs damaging the cut foliage, Cordyline fruticosa and use of biorationals towards their management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthiga, S; Jegathambigai, V; Karunarathne, M D S D; Svinningen, A; Mikunthan, G

    2012-01-01

    Snails and slugs became a serious molluscan pests and damaging leaves of purple compacta, Cordyline fruticosa extensively grown for export at Green Farm Ltd, Sri Lanka. The export quality of leaves of C. fruticosa is lowered due to feeding of snails, Achantina fulica (Bowditch), Opeas pyrgula Schmacker and Boettgerx and Helix aspersa Muller and slugs incurring great loss to cut foliage industry. Paucity of information is available to understand snails and slugs damage and their host range that limits to develop suitable management practices. Therefore this study was aimed to determine damage, alternate hosts and to develop possible management practices. Snails and slugs damaged mainly fresh leaves of C. fruticosa. The severity of damage was 44.5% in infested field based on the visual rating method. Leaves of cassava, sting bean, okra, cucumber, passion fruit, papaya, Glyricidia and shoe flower were identified as alternate hosts and neem, Ixora and Dracaena spp were not served as alternate hosts. Among the plant materials tested for their repellence against snails and slugs revealed that neem seed powder was an irritant; neem leaves, mint leaves and Lantana leaves were acted as anti-feedant and Salt as chemical repellent. Among the barrier and bait experiments Bordeaux mixture exhibited a significant barrier effect against horizontal movement of snails. Baits made out of Metaldehyde bait, vegetables bait and jaggery had a strong effect in repelling the snails and slugs. Mulching with Madhuca longifolia punnac was the best to reduce the snails and slugs population compared to M. longifolia seed kernel powder. Oil from M. longifolia failed to reduce their population. Hence the results revealed that saponin containing M. longifolia punnac helped to eliminate snails and slugs when used as mulch. Metaldehyde, vegetable and jaggery baits are also useful to minimize their colonization further. Hence combination of these methods will help to prevent snails and slugs from

  2. Laboratory tests for group and individual exposures of Arion lusitanicus Mabille slugs to different molluscicide baits

    OpenAIRE

    Bojan Stojnić; Marina Vukša; Goran Jokić

    2008-01-01

    Molluscicide baits based on different active ingredients were tested in a seven-day laboratory trial on juveniles and young adults of Arion lusitanicus Mabille slug collected in ruderal sites during June and July of 2008. Before setting the trial, the slugs were adapted to laboratory conditions. The testing was conducted using a modified version of the method proposed by Godan (1983) and Wiktor (1989). The slugs were kept in arenas under controlled conditions (20-24oC temperature, 80-90% rela...

  3. Thevetia peruviana (Family: Apocynaceae) in the control of slug and snail pests

    OpenAIRE

    Panigrahi, A; S. K. Raut

    1994-01-01

    An aqueous extract prepared from Kernels of the fruit of Thevetia peruviana (Pers.) Schumann (Family : Apocynaceae) was found under experimental conditions, to be toxic ti the slug Laevicaulis alte (Férussac) and the snail Achatina fulica Bowdich, the important agrihorticultural pests of Indo-Pacific countries. Concentrations as low as 1% (w/v) killed all the slugs exposed in less than 981.00 (± SD 22.76) min, and 2% of the extract killed 100% of the slugs L. alte and 50%, 50% and 30% of the ...

  4. Experimental Study of Stable Surfaces for Anti-Slug Control in Multi-phase Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon; Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Stampe, Kasper;

    2016-01-01

    Severe slugging flow is always challenging in oil & gas production, especially for the current offshore based production. The slugging flow can cause a lot of problems, such as those relevant to production safety, fatigue as well as capability. As one typical phenomenon in multi-phase flow dynamics...... with severe slugging flows. These correlations are reflected through an obtained stable surface in the parameter space, which is a natural extension of the bifurcation plot. The maximal production opportunity without compromising the stability is also studied. Relevant studies have already showed that...

  5. Online Slug Detection in Multi-phase Transportation Pipelines Using Electrical Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon; Mai, Christian; Hansen, Leif;

    2015-01-01

    Slugging flow in offshore oil & gas multi-phase transportation pipelines cause big challenges as the flow regime induces flow and pressure oscillations in the multi-phase pipelines. The negative impacts of the most severe slugs are significant and thus the elimination of slugging flow in the......) has been examined as an alternative to the traditional pressure transmitters. A lab-scaled testing facility has been constructed in order to obtain test data from a ERT transmitter with 12 probes. Different flow regimes have been generated by a pump and a compressor where 2-phase flow can be tested...

  6. Cold tolerance and freeze-induced glucose accumulation in three terrestrial slugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slotsbo, Stine; Hansen, Lars Monrad; Jordaens, Kurt;

    2012-01-01

    Cold tolerance and metabolic responses to freezing of three slug species common in Scandinavia (Arion ater, Arion rufus and Arion lusitanicus) are reported. Autumn collected slugs were cold acclimated in the laboratory and subjected to freezing conditions simulating likely winter temperatures in....... Glucose increased from about 6 to 22 µg/mg dry tissue upon freezing in A. rufus, but less so in A. ater and A. lusitanicus. Glucose may thus act as a cryoprotectant in these slugs, although the concentrations are not as high as reported for other freeze tolerant invertebrates....

  7. Review of Slug Detection, Modeling and Control Techniques for Offshore Oil & Gas Production Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon; Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Yang, Zhenyu

    2015-01-01

    The current offshore oil & gas multi-phase production and transportation installations have big challenges related with the slugging flow: An unstable multi-phase flow regime where the flow rates, pressures and temperatures oscillate in the considered processes. Slug can be caused by different...... these methods can simultaneously reduce the oil & gas production, which is a very big concern as the production rate is the key evaluation parameter for offshore production. We conclude that the slugging flow is a well-defined phenomenon, even though this subject has been extensively investigated in the...... operating conditions and installation structures. The most severe slugs are often induced in long vertical risers or production wells, where liquid blocks gas at the riser/well base and correspondingly it causes the pressure to accumulate and hence originates the oscillating performance. There are many...

  8. Experimental Study of Stable Surfaces for Anti-Slug Control in Multi-phase Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon; Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Yang, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    The severe slugging flow is always challenging in oil & gas production, especially for the current offshore based production. The slugging flow can cause a lot of potential problems, such as those relevant to production safety, fatigue as well as capability. As one typical phenomenon in multi-phase...... flow dynamics, the slug can be avoided or eliminated by proper facility design and control of operational conditions. Based on a testing facility which can emulate a pipeline-riser or a gas-lifted production well in a scaled-down manner, this paper experimentally studies the correlations of key...... operational parameters with severe slugging flows. These correlations are reflected through an obtained stable surface in the parameter space, which is a natural extension of the bifurcation plot. The maximal production opportunity without compromising the stability is also studied. Relevant studies have...

  9. A semi-analytical solution for slug tests in an unconfined aquifer considering unsaturated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    A semi-analytical solution considering the vertical unsaturated flow is developed for groundwater flow in response to a slug test in an unconfined aquifer in Laplace space. The new solution incorporates the effects of partial penetrating, anisotropy, vertical unsaturated flow, and a moving water table boundary. Compared to the Kansas Geological Survey (KGS) model, the new solution can significantly improve the fittings of the modeled to the measured hydraulic heads at the late stage of slug tests in an unconfined aquifer, particularly when the slug well has a partially submerged screen and moisture drainage above the water table is significant. The radial hydraulic conductivities estimated with the new solution are comparable to those from the KGS, Bouwer and Rice, and Hvorslev methods. In addition, the new solution also can be used to examine the vertical conductivity, specific storage, specific yield, and the moisture retention parameters in an unconfined aquifer based on slug test data.

  10. Analysis of water slug impact (water hammer) in steam pipes of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A severe water hammer can happen by water entrapped in steam pipe. Consequently, pipe or its components and restraints can be damaged and its function can be lost. This kind of water hammer is a potential danger for safety operation of power plants, especially nuclear power plants. This paper briefly describes generating of water slug and the calculation method for water slug impact force on piping bend, and gives a practical example of the calculation

  11. Photoprotection in sequestered plastids of sea slugs and respective algal sources

    OpenAIRE

    Cruz, Sónia; Cartaxana, Paulo; Newcomer, Rebecca; Dionísio, Gisela; Calado, Ricardo; Serôdio, João; Pelletreau, Karen N.; Rumpho, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Some sea slugs are capable of retaining functional sequestered chloroplasts (kleptoplasts) for variable periods of time. The mechanisms supporting the maintenance of these organelles in animal hosts are still largely unknown. Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) and the occurrence of a xanthophyll cycle were investigated in the sea slugs Elysia viridis and E. chlorotica using chlorophyll fluorescence measurements and pigment analysis. The photoprotective capacity of kleptoplasts was compared to ...

  12. Observation of the huge neutron bursts in Tien-Shan neutron super monitor in the cores of extensive air showers with energy above 3 PeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Investigations being carried out at the NM64 type neutron supermonitor [1] based on the shower installation of the Tien-Shan mountain station of the Lebedev Physical Institute, have led to the discovery of an anomalous delay of the neutron signals in EAS cores [2]. The essence of this phenomenon consists of the following. The NM64 monitor (just as all other types of neutron monitors) registers the evaporation neutrons from nuclear fission produced by high energy hadrons (with energies above 100 MeV) within the lead monitor's generator. Before detection, these evaporation neutrons, created with energies of a few MeV, are thermalized to the energies about 10-2 eV) diffusing inside the monitor. The diffusion process results in an exponential time distribution of the neutron signals with a characteristic relaxation time of about 360-400 μs. Such a picture is reproduced with high accuracy when EAS with an energy below 3 PeV passes through the monitor. However, at energies above 3 PeV a small part of the showers (of about 2-3% of the whole) has a prolonged shape of the intensity of neutron signals. The fraction of such anomalous showers rapidly increases with increasing energy, and reaches about 20-30% at an EAS energy of about 10 PeV. An attempt to explain this effect as a result of neutron signal losses in registration channels [3] leads to a contradiction with the existing models of EAS development in the atmosphere, because the hadron multiplicities, necessary for an explanation of the experimental time distribution of the intensity of neutron signals, prove to be two to three orders of magnitude higher than the values predicted by the models. It should be noted that the observed effect has a threshold character: it starts to become apparent in the energy region above 3 PeV, where a characteristic knee in primary cosmic ray spectrum, of still unknown nature, is present. In the same energy region, a wide range of unexplained phenomena are also observed in

  13. Distribution of void fraction for gas-liquid slug flow in an inclined pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the effect of inclination angle on the spatial distribution of phases, experiments on gas-liquid two-phase slug flow in an inclined pipe were carried out by using the optical probe and an EKTAPRO 1000 high speed motion analyzer. It has been demonstrated that the inclination angle and the mixture velocity are important parameters to influence the distribution of void fraction for upward slug flow in the inclined pipe. At high mixture velocity, the gas phase profile is axial symmetry in the cross-section of the pipe. This is similar to that for vertical slug flow. In contrast, most of the gas phase is located near the upper pipe wall at low mixture velocity. By measuring the axial variation of void fraction along the liquid slug, it can be concluded that there is a high void fraction wake region with length of 3~4D in the front of liquid slug. In the fully developed zone of liquid slug, the peak value of the void fraction is near the upper wall.

  14. Thermal Capacitance (Slug) Calorimeter Theory Including Heat Losses and Other Decaying Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hightower, T. Mark; Olivares, Ricardo A.; Philippidis, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model, termed the Slug Loss Model, has been developed for describing thermal capacitance (slug) calorimeter behavior when heat losses and other decaying processes are not negligible. This model results in the temperature time slope taking the mathematical form of exponential decay. When data is found to fit well to this model, it allows a heat flux value to be calculated that corrects for the losses and may be a better estimate of the cold wall fully catalytic heat flux, as is desired in arc jet testing. The model was applied to the data from a copper slug calorimeter inserted during a particularly severe high heating rate arc jet run to illustrate its use. The Slug Loss Model gave a cold wall heat flux 15% higher than the value of 2,250 W/sq cm obtained from the conventional approach to processing the data (where no correction is made for losses). For comparison, a Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model was created and applied to the same data, where conduction heat losses from the slug were simulated. The heat flux determined by the FEA model was found to be in close agreement with the heat flux determined by the Slug Loss Model.

  15. Why It Is Time to Look Beyond Algal Genes in Photosynthetic Slugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, Cessa; Vries, Jan de; Rommel, Sophie; Rose, Laura E; Woehle, Christian; Christa, Gregor; Laetz, Elise M; Wägele, Heike; Tielens, Aloysius G M; Nickelsen, Jörg; Schumann, Tobias; Jahns, Peter; Gould, Sven B

    2015-09-01

    Eukaryotic organelles depend on nuclear genes to perpetuate their biochemical integrity. This is true for mitochondria in all eukaryotes and plastids in plants and algae. Then how do kleptoplasts, plastids that are sequestered by some sacoglossan sea slugs, survive in the animals' digestive gland cells in the absence of the algal nucleus encoding the vast majority of organellar proteins? For almost two decades, lateral gene transfer (LGT) from algae to slugs appeared to offer a solution, but RNA-seq analysis, later supported by genome sequencing of slug DNA, failed to find any evidence for such LGT events. Yet, isolated reports continue to be published and are readily discussed by the popular press and social media, making the data on LGT and its support for kleptoplast longevity appear controversial. However, when we take a sober look at the methods used, we realize that caution is warranted in how the results are interpreted. There is no evidence that the evolution of kleptoplasty in sea slugs involves LGT events. Based on what we know about photosystem maintenance in embryophyte plastids, we assume kleptoplasts depend on nuclear genes. However, studies have shown that some isolated algal plastids are, by nature, more robust than those of land plants. The evolution of kleptoplasty in green sea slugs involves many promising and unexplored phenomena, but there is no evidence that any of these require the expression of slug genes of algal origin. PMID:26319575

  16. University Loaned Normal Uranium Slug Disposition Study: University survey responses. Predecisional draft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, G.W. Jr.

    1992-09-01

    During the 1950`s and 1960`s, the Atomic Energy Commission loaned rejected natural uranium slugs from the Savannah River Site to United States universities for use in subcritical assemblies. Currently, there are sixty-two universities holding 91,798 slugs, containing about 167 metric tons of natural uranium. It was originally planned that the universities would return the material to Fernald when they no longer required it. Fernald has not received slugs since it was shut down in 1988. The Department of Energy`s Office of Weapons and Materials Planning requested that the Planning Support Group develop information to assist them in facilitating the return of the unwanted slugs to one or more of their facilities and develop alternatives for the ultimate disposition of this material. This supplemental report to the University Loaned Normal Uranium Slug Disposition Study documents responses to and summarizes the results of a survey of fifty-eight universities. University contacts and survey responses covering loaned slug descriptions, historical information, radiological data, current status, and plans and schedules are documented.

  17. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  18. Stability Analysis of Reactive Multiphase Slug Flows in Microchannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro A. Munera Parra

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Conducting multiphase reactions in micro-reactors is a promising strategy for intensifying chemical and biochemical processes. A major unresolved challenge is to exploit the considerable benefits offered by micro-scale operation for industrial scale throughputs by numbering-up whilst retaining the underlying advantageous flow characteristics of the single channel system in multiple parallel channels. Fabrication and installation tolerances in the individual micro-channels result in different pressure losses and, thus, a fluid maldistribution. In this work, an additional source of maldistribution, namely the flow multiplicities, which can arise in a multiphase reactive or extractive flow in otherwise identical micro-channels, was investigated. A detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of the flow stability with and without reaction for both gas-liquid and liquid-liquid slug flow has been developed. The model has been validated using the extraction of acetic acid from n-heptane with the ionic liquid 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethyl sulfate. The results clearly demonstrate that the coupling between flow structure, the extent of reaction/extraction and pressure drop can result in multiple operating states, thus, necessitating an active measurement and control concept to ensure uniform behavior and optimal performance.

  19. Photocontrol of fluid slugs in liquid crystal polymer microactuators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jiu-An; Liu, Yuyun; Wei, Jia; Chen, Erqiang; Qin, Lang; Yu, Yanlei

    2016-01-01

    The manipulation of small amounts of liquids has applications ranging from biomedical devices to liquid transfer. Direct light-driven manipulation of liquids, especially when triggered by light-induced capillary forces, is of particular interest because light can provide contactless spatial and temporal control. However, existing light-driven technologies suffer from an inherent limitation in that liquid motion is strongly resisted by the effect of contact-line pinning. Here we report a strategy to manipulate fluid slugs by photo-induced asymmetric deformation of tubular microactuators, which induces capillary forces for liquid propulsion. Microactuators with various shapes (straight, 'Y'-shaped, serpentine and helical) are fabricated from a mechanically robust linear liquid crystal polymer. These microactuators are able to exert photocontrol of a wide diversity of liquids over a long distance with controllable velocity and direction, and hence to mix multiphase liquids, to combine liquids and even to make liquids run uphill. We anticipate that this photodeformable microactuator will find use in micro-reactors, in laboratory-on-a-chip settings and in micro-optomechanical systems. PMID:27604946

  20. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  1. A simple model for two-phase slug flow induced damping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-phase flows are prevalent in various industrial fields such as nuclear engineering, chemical engineering and the petroleum industry. At high speeds, flows through piping may generate significant excitation forces, particularly at joints and bends in piping systems. Interestingly, the flows may also generate significant damping forces which can be desirable from a vibration damping point of view. The question of exactly how internal two-phase flows generate damping remains largely unanswered. Indeed so is the question for external two-phase flows, which are even more complex. The problem addressed in this study is related to the behavior of tubular structures subjected to internal two-phase slug flow or nearly slug flow. The observation of slug flow subjected to transverse vibration led to consideration of the effects of sloshing liquid slugs due to the external vibration. Indeed, in flow visualization tests, the upper free surface of the slugs in vertical flow was found to deform significantly as the tube vibrated. This suggested a possible mechanism for energy transfer from the structure to the fluid which could be (at least partially) responsible for the observed two-phase flow-induced damping. An analytical model is developed aimed at incorporating the most basic sloshing effects of liquid slugs travelling through a tube at low speed. The first part of the work demonstrates that considering slugs as as simple points masses travelling through the tube leads only to low energy transfer from the tube to the flow and thus cannot explain the level of energy transfer observed in experimental damping tests. In the second part of the work, the flow dynamics within the slug are modeled to account for linear order free surface oscillations related to first mode sloshing. Numerical solution of the resulting equations shows that the energy transfer is much higher and results in damping levels of the same order as found in experimental measurements. The results

  2. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  3. The Etiology and Outcome Analysis of Neonatal Burst Suppression EEG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lian; ZHOU Yanxia; XU Sanqing

    2007-01-01

    The neonatal burst suppression is a severe EEG pattern and always demonstrates serious damage of nerve system. But the outcome of these patients depends on the different etiology. A total of 256 cases of video EEG recordings were analyzed in order to summarize the etiology and outcome of burst suppression. The results showed that some patients in all 17 cases of burst suppression showed EEG improvement. The etiology was the dominant factor in long term outcome. It was sug-gested that effective video EEG monitoring is helpful for etiologic study and prognosis evaluation.

  4. Mixed Burst Error Correcting Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Sethi, Amita

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we construct codes which are an improvement on the previously known block wise burst error correcting codes in terms of their error correcting capabilities. Along with different bursts in different sub-blocks, the given codes also correct overlapping bursts of a given length in two consecutive sub-blocks of a code word. Such codes are called mixed burst correcting (mbc) codes.

  5. Slug responses to grassland cutting and fertilizer application under plant functional group removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everwand, Georg; Scherber, Christoph; Tscharntke, Teja

    2013-04-01

    Current studies on trophic interactions in biodiversity experiments have largely relied on artificially sown gradients in plant diversity, but removal experiments with their more natural plant community composition are more realistic. Slugs are a major part of the invertebrate herbivore community, with some species being common pests in agriculture. We therefore investigated how strongly slugs are influenced by grassland management, plant biodiversity and composition. Here we analysed the effects of cutting frequency, fertilizer application and plant functional group composition on slug densities and their contribution to herbivory on Rumex acetosa in a removal experiment within a >100-year old grassland in Northern Germany. The experiment was laid out as a Latin rectangle with full factorial combinations of (i) plant functional group removal (3 levels) using herbicides, (ii) fertilizer application (2 levels) and (iii) cutting frequency (2 levels). The resulting 12 treatment combinations were replicated 6 times, resulting in 72 plots. We collected a total of 1020 individuals belonging to three species Arion distinctus (60.4% of individuals), Deroceras reticulatum (34.7%) and Arion lusitanicus (4.9%) using a cover board technique and additionally measured herbivore damage to R. acetosa. We found the highest slug abundance on plots with a low cutting frequency and high food resource availability (increased cover of forbs and taller vegetation). Fertilizer application had no significant effect on slug abundance, but caused higher herbivore damage to on R. acetosa, possibly as a result of increased tissue quality. The negative effect of higher cutting frequency on slug abundance was lowest in control plots with their naturally developed graminoid-forb communities (cutting reduced slug density by 6% in the control vs. 29% in herbicide plots). Our experiments therefore support the idea that more natural plant species compositions reduce the impact of disturbances (e

  6. Experimental studies of the pressures generated by a liquid oxygen slug in a magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulware, Jeffrey C.; Ban, Heng; Jensen, Scott; Wassom, Steve

    2010-07-01

    The strong paramagnetic susceptibility of liquid oxygen (LOX) has established it as a good candidate for a cryogenic magnetic fluid system. While its properties have been known for several decades, a fundamental understanding of the behavior of LOX in a magnetically controlled fluid system is needed for the development of a suitable space application that can operate reliably and efficiently. This study conducted quantitative experiments on the dynamics of a LOX slug in a tube when subjected to electrically-induced magnetic fields within a solenoid. The experiments used a quartz tube with an inner diameter of 1.9 mm and LOX slugs of 0.6, 1.3, 1.9, 2.5, and 3.2 mm length at various initial positions relative to the solenoid. The pressures generated by the motion of the LOX slug under the magnetic force were recorded to characterize the pressure differential generated and the breakdown of the slug. The highest attainable pressure differential was found to be 1.45 kPa, which correlated well to theoretical predictions once the analysis accounted for the resistance heating of the solenoid. The noted differences between experimental results and theory could also be attributed to impeded slug motion from shear and mass forces. Within the workable pressure range, however, an optimal slug length was found which appropriately balances the pressure, shear, and magnetic forces in the system. This paper presents the experimental data on the dynamics and the maximum pressure differential generated by a LOX slug in a magnetic field and discusses the viability of LOX in a magnetic fluid management system intended for space applications.

  7. Oscillatory Motion of a Bi-Phasic Slug in a Teflon Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolhasani, Milad; Jensen, Klavs

    2015-11-01

    Bi-phasic physical/chemical processes require transfer of solute/reagent molecules across the interface. Continuous multi-phase flow approaches (using gas as the continuous phase), usually fail in providing sufficient interfacial area for transfer of molecules between the aqueous and organic phases. In continuous segmented flow platforms (with a fluorinated polymer-based reactor), the higher surface tension of the aqueous phase compared to the organic phase of a bi-phasic slug, in combination with the low surface energy of the reactor wall result in a more facile motion of the aqueous phase. Thus, upon applying a pressure gradient across the bi-phasic slug, the aqueous phase of the slug moves through the organic phase and leads the bi-phasic slug, thereby limiting the available interfacial area for the bi-phasic mass transfer only to the semi-spherical interface between the two phases. Disrupting the quasi-equilibrium state of the bi-phasic slug through reversing the pressure gradient across the bi-phasic slug causes the aqueous phase to move back through the organic phase. In this work, we experimentally investigate the dynamics of periodic alteration of the pressure gradient across a bi-phasic slug, and characterize the resulting enhanced interfacial area on the bi-phasic mass transfer rate. We demonstrate the enhanced mass transfer rate of the oscillatory flow strategy compared to the continuous multi-phase approach using bi-phasic Pd catalyzed carbon-carbon and carbon-nitrogen cross coupling reactions. NSERC Postdoctoral Fellowship, Novartis Center for Continuous Manufacturing.

  8. Soliton wave model for simulating the slug formation in vertical-to-horizontal partially blocked pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: In CANDU reactors the fuel channels are connected to inlet and outlet headers by feeder-pipes that consist of vertical and horizontal legs. In some feeders, orifices are installed for flow adjustment. During a postulated Loss of Coolant Accidents, the emergency cooling water injected into the inlet and outlet headers enters the fuel channels through the feeder pipes. Steam produced in the feeders and in the fuel channels may flow in the direction opposite to that of the water, thereby creating vertical to horizontal Counter-Current Flow (CCF). The rate at which the cooling water enters the fuel channel may be substantially limited by the flooding phenomena that entrains the water in the same direction as the steam flow. Steam flowing in the direction opposite to the cooling water can bring about the formation of slug flow. Long slugs of liquid moving at relatively high speed are transported back towards the headers by the steam. This phenomenon substantially reduces the amount of cooling water that can reach the reactor core. We conducted CCF experiments using a vertical-to-horizontal test section connected by 90 deg. elbows, with an orifice installed in the horizontal leg. Four different orifices were used to carry out the experiments. We have observed that soliton-type waves generated close to the elbow propagate in the horizontal leg towards the orifice, where a partial reflection takes place. Without an orifice, the soliton waves are reflected from the second elbow. The reflected waves move in the opposite direction to that of the incident wave. Since soliton-type waves are periodically generated, the incident and reflected waves interfere at some place in the horizontal leg. If the amplitude of the interference wave is high enough, the bridging of the tubes occur, which generates the slugs. During the experiments the water and air flow rates, pressures and void fraction distributions were measured. The slug propagation

  9. The Swift Gamna-Ray Burst Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Swift is a NASA Explorer mission that will be launched in late 2004. It is a multiwavelength observatory for transient astronomy. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. The mission will also perform a hard x-ray survey at the 1 milliCrab level and will continuously monitor the sky for transients. A wide-field gamma-ray camera will detect more than a hundred GRBs per year to 3 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 70 sec by an autonomously controlled "swift" spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions will be determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. The instrumentation is a combination of existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (-0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. The ground station in Malindi is contributed by the Italian Space Agency. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift.

  10. Influence of Catalysis and Oxidation on Slug Calorimeter Measurements in Arc Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Anuscheh; Driver, Dave; TerrazasSalinas, Imelda

    2012-01-01

    Arc jet tests play a critical role in the characterization and certification of thermal protection materials and systems (TPS). The results from these arc jet tests feed directly into computational models of material response and aerothermodynamics to predict the performance of the TPS in flight. Thus the precise knowledge of the plasma environment to which the test material is subjected, is invaluable. As one of the environmental parameters, the heat flux is commonly measured. The measured heat flux is used to determine the plasma enthalpy through analytical or computational models. At NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), slug calorimeters of a geometrically similar body to the test article are routinely used to determine the heat flux. A slug calorimeter is a thermal capacitance-type calorimeter that uses the temperature rise in a thermally insulated slug to determine the heat transfer rate, see Figure 1(left). Current best practices for measuring the heat flux with a slug calorimeter are described in ASTM E457 - 96. Both the calorimeter body and slug are made of Oxygen Free High Conductivity Copper, and are cleaned before each run.

  11. An Investigation on the Void Fraction for upward Gas-Liquid Slug Flow in Vertical Pipe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏国栋; 周芳德; 胡明胜

    2001-01-01

    In order to investigate the influence of the entrance effect on the spatial distribution of phases, the experiments on gas-liquid two-phase slug flow in a vertical pipe of 0.03m ID were carried out by using optical probes and an EKTAPRO 1000 high speed motion analyzer. It demonstrates that the radial profile of slug flow void fraction is parabolic. Influenced by the falling liquid film, the radial profile curve of liquid slug void fraction in the wake region is also parabolic. Since fully turbulent velocity distribution is built up in the developed region,the void fraction profile in this region is the saddle type. At given superficial liquid velocity, the liquid slug void fraction increases with gas velocity. The radial profiles of liquid slug void fraction at different axial locations are all saddle curves, but void fraction is obviously high around the centerline in the entrance region. The nearer the measuring station is from the entrance, the farther the peak location is away from the wall.

  12. Modelling and control of growing slugs in horizontal multiphase pipe flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinar M. Elgsæter

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of active control to restrict the length of growing slugs in horizontal pipelines is investigated. Specifically, the paper attempts to determine if such control can be attained with realistic measurements and actuators. Simulations in OLGA2000 show that a feedback controller can use measurements or estimates of slug length to control the growth of a slug in a horizontal pipeline by partially closing inlet or outlet chokes. A control-volume approach is used to develop a low-order model of inlet choke-slug growth dynamics based on mass- and impulse balances. The resulting model is a system of nonlinear differential-algebraic equations, which is suitable for observer-design. The tuned model is found to be in good agreement with experiments and OLGA2000-simulations. Linearizations of the model are found to be observable around realistic trajectories when rates and pressures at the inlet and outlet are measured. An extended Luenberger-observer is shown to give good estimates of slug length and -position in simulations even under model uncertainty.

  13. Cell-State Transitions Regulated by SLUG Are Critical for Tissue Regeneration and Tumor Initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Phillips

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Perturbations in stem cell activity and differentiation can lead to developmental defects and cancer. We use an approach involving a quantitative model of cell-state transitions in vitro to gain insights into how SLUG/SNAI2, a key developmental transcription factor, modulates mammary epithelial stem cell activity and differentiation in vivo. In the absence of SLUG, stem cells fail to transition into basal progenitor cells, while existing basal progenitor cells undergo luminal differentiation; together, these changes result in abnormal mammary architecture and defects in tissue function. Furthermore, we show that in the absence of SLUG, mammary stem cell activity necessary for tissue regeneration and cancer initiation is lost. Mechanistically, SLUG regulates differentiation and cellular plasticity by recruiting the chromatin modifier lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1 to promoters of lineage-specific genes to repress transcription. Together, these results demonstrate that SLUG plays a dual role in repressing luminal epithelial differentiation while unlocking stem cell transitions necessary for tumorigenesis.

  14. AC electric sensing of slug-flow properties with exposed gold microelectrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new method for slug-flow (segmented flow) characterization by means of ac electric sensing is proposed. Water segments regularly dispersed in kerosene are used as an experimental system. The sensing procedure is carried out in a plexiglass microchip with embedded gold microelectrodes. The presence of passing slugs over a measurement spot is determined from impedance variations. A square-shaped signal resulting from the slug flow is acquired and flow properties such as the mean velocity and length of the slugs are calculated. Complex behaviour of the corresponding electrochemical system is studied. Dependence of the impedance signal on the flow rate, ion concentration in the dispersed water slug and electric field strength are discussed and explained in detail. Advantages and disadvantages of the suggested method, in comparison with existing capacitive noncontact methods, are also clarified. Unlike the noncontact methods of electric sensing, with the insulation dielectric layer over the electrodes, our electrodes are in a direct contact with the carrier phase. The results show that the method is promising for process applications and will be further improved. (paper)

  15. A repeating fast radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  16. A repeating fast radio burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  17. Observation of solar radio bursts using swept-frequency radiospectrograph in 20 - 40 MHz band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new station for the observation of solar decametric radio bursts has been developed at Miyagi Vocational Training College in Tsukidate, Miyagi, Japan. Using the swept frequency radiospectrograph covering a frequency range from 20 MHz to 40 MHz within 200 msec, with bandwidth of 30 kHz, the radio outbursts from the sun have been currently monitored with colored dynamic spectrum display. After July 1982, successful observations provide the data which include all types of solar radio bursts such as type I, II, III, IV and V in the decametric wavelength range. In addition to these typical radio bursts, rising tone bursts with fast drift rate followed by strong type III bursts and a series of bursts repeating rising and falling tone bursts with slow drift rate have been observed. (author)

  18. Production test number 105-634-A in-pile cocked slug tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, P.B.; VanWormer, F.W.

    1956-05-29

    Slug ruptures characterized by intergranular corrosion failure of the aluminum can (Hot Spot Ruptures) have been a major cause for loss of reactor production, particularly during the past year. Although the cause for these failures is not definitely known, it is suspected that fuel elements when cocked in the process tube will sufficiently distort the neutron flux and the heat transfer characteristics in a localized area that very high local temperatures will exist and the corrosion rate of the aluminum can in these areas will be accelerated. It is the purpose of this test to introduce slugs that are known to be cocked and compare their resistance to rupture with slugs that are known to be uncocked when initially charged.

  19. Heat transfer during intermittent/slug flow in horizontal tubes: experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time varying temperatures, heat flux and transfer coefficients have been measured during slug flow in a horizontal pipe. Oscillations in wall temperature and heat flux occur in a general way consistent with the model developed by Niu from a hydrodynamic model. Liquid and gas temperatures are shown to be substantially different. Furthermore, at high heat fluxes and thin walled tubes the amplitude of the wall temperature oscillations can be very large. The wall temperature and the flux are substantially different between the top and bottom of the pipe. The heat transfer coefficients in the liquid slugs are extremely large with the peak value occurring in the mixing zone at the front of the slug. Furthermore, substantial peripheral variations in coefficients exist. This is shown to be related to the drastically different boundary conditions which exist at the top and bottom of the pipe as a result of intermittent passage of the gas phase there

  20. BP-5 Remedial Investigation Slug-Test Characterization Results for Well 699-52-55A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2008-07-21

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted slug-test characterization at the final, completed BP-5 Remedial Investigation well 699-52-55A near the 200-East Area at the Hanford Site on April 22, 2008. The slug-test characterization was in support of the BP-5 Remedial Investigation. The portion of the unconfined aquifer tested is composed of sediments of the lower Ringold Formation and the underlying Elephant Mountain basalt flowtop. The basalt flowtop unit was included as part of the effective test-interval length for the slug-test analysis because the flowtop unit is hydraulically communicative with the unconfined aquifer. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity for the effective test-interval length represent composite values for the lower Ringold Formation and the underlying Elephant Mountain basalt flow top.

  1. Naturally-Forced Slug Flow Expander for Application in a Waste-Heat Recovery Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben de Witt

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates a slug-flow expander (SFE for conversion of high-pressure gas/vapor into kinetic energy of liquid slugs. The energy transfer from high-pressure to kinetic energy is quantified using thrust plate measurements. Non-dimensional thrust data is used to quantify performance by normalizing measured thrust by thrust for the same water flow rate at zero air flow rate. A total of 13 expander configurations are investigated and geometries with the shortest cavity length and the smallest exit diameter are found to result in the largest non-dimensional thrust increase. Results show that thrust augmentation increases with the initiation of slug flow in the SFE. The analysis performed on the normalized thrust readings suggested that as the water and air flow were increased to critical conditions, the liquid slugs produced by the SFE augmented the thrust measurements. The final performance evaluation was based on linear regression of the normalized thrust measurements where slug flow was generated for each SFE architecture. Greater magnitudes of the slope from the linear regression indicated the propensity of the SFE to augment thrust. This analysis confirmed that for the SFE configurations over the range of values investigated, the SFE increased thrust up to three times its original value at no air flow. Given the inherent multiphase nature of the slug-flow expander, application to systems involving expansion of wetting fluids (water as part of a waste-heat recovery system or air with water droplet formation (as part of a compressed-air energy storage system could be considered.

  2. The Gastropod Menace: Slugs on Brassica Plants Affect Caterpillar Survival through Consumption and Interference with Parasitoid Attraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desurmont, Gaylord A; Zemanova, Miriam A; Turlings, Ted C J

    2016-03-01

    Terrestrial molluscs and insect herbivores play a major role as plant consumers in a number of ecosystems, but their direct and indirect interactions have hardly been explored. The omnivorous nature of slugs makes them potential disrupters of predator-prey relationships, as a direct threat to small insects and through indirect, plant-mediated effects. Here, we examined the effects of the presence of two species of slugs, Arion rufus (native) and A. vulgaris (invasive) on the survivorship of young Pieris brassicae caterpillars when feeding on Brassica rapa plants, and on plant attractiveness to the main natural enemy of P. brassicae, the parasitoid Cotesia glomerata. In two separate predation experiments, caterpillar mortality was significantly higher on plants co-infested with A. rufus or A. vulgaris. Moreover, caterpillar mortality correlated positively with slug mass and leaf consumption by A. vulgaris. At the third trophic level, plants infested with slugs and plants co-infested with slugs and caterpillars were far less attractive to parasitoids than plants damaged by caterpillars only, independently of slug species. Chemical analyses confirmed that volatile emissions, which provide foraging cues for parasitoids, were strongly reduced in co-infested plants. Our study shows that the presence of slugs has the potential to affect insect populations, directly via consumptive effects, and indirectly via changes in plant volatiles that result in a reduced attraction of natural enemies. The fitness cost for P. brassicae imposed by increased mortality in presence of slugs may be counterbalanced by the benefit of escaping its parasitoids. PMID:27002323

  3. Image processing analysis on the air-water slug two-phase flow in a horizontal pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinaryanto, Okto; Widyatama, Arif; Majid, Akmal Irfan; Deendarlianto, Indarto

    2016-06-01

    Slug flow is a part of intermittent flow which is avoided in industrial application because of its irregularity and high pressure fluctuation. Those characteristics cause some problems such as internal corrosion and the damage of the pipeline construction. In order to understand the slug characteristics, some of the measurement techniques can be applied such as wire-mesh sensors, CECM, and high speed camera. The present study was aimed to determine slug characteristics by using image processing techniques. Experiment has been carried out in 26 mm i.d. acrylic horizontal pipe with 9 m long. Air-water flow was recorded 5 m from the air-water mixer using high speed video camera. Each of image sequence was processed using MATLAB. There are some steps including image complement, background subtraction, and image filtering that used in this algorithm to produce binary images. Special treatments also were applied to reduce the disturbance effect of dispersed bubble around the bubble. Furthermore, binary images were used to describe bubble contour and calculate slug parameter such as gas slug length, gas slug velocity, and slug frequency. As a result the effect of superficial gas velocity and superficial liquid velocity on the fundamental parameters can be understood. After comparing the results to the previous experimental results, the image processing techniques is a useful and potential technique to explain the slug characteristics.

  4. Analysis of water slug (water hammer) impact in steam pipes of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A severe water hammer may be happened if water entrapped in steam pipe. Consequently, pipe or its components and restraints could be damaged and its function may be lost. This kind of water hammer is a potential danger to safe operation of power plants, especially to nuclear power plants. The process of forming a water slug and calculating method of impact force for water slug on the piping bend are presented, and an example is also given by using this calculating method. (2 refs., 4 figs.)

  5. A localized differentiation-inducing-factor sink in the front of the Dictyostelium slug.

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, R R; Large, S.; Traynor, D.; Nayler, O

    1993-01-01

    Differentiation-inducing factor 1 [DIF-1; 1-(3,5-dichloro-2,6-dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-hexan-1-one] induces stalk cell differentiation during Dictyostelium development. It is present as a gradient in the multicellular slug, its lowest concentration being in the anterior. Here we demonstrate the existence of a localized sink for DIF-1, also in the anterior of the slug, which could be responsible for generating the DIF-1 gradient. DIF-1 is metabolized extensively by developing cells, initiall...

  6. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE BeppoSAX GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1996 July and 2002 April, one or more spacecraft of the interplanetary network detected 786 cosmic gamma-ray bursts that were also detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and/or Wide-Field X-Ray Camera experiments aboard the BeppoSAX spacecraft. During this period, the network consisted of up to six spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 475 bursts were obtained. We present the localization data for these events.

  7. The Fermi–GBM Three-year X-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, P. A.; Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Beklen, E.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M. H.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all-sky gamma-ray monitor well known in the gamma-ray burst (GRB) community. Although GBM excels in detecting the hard, bright extragalactic GRBs, its sensitivity above 8 keV and its all-sky view make it an excellent instrument for the detection of rare, short-lived Galactic transients. In 2010 March, we initiated a systematic search for transients using GBM data. We conclude this phase of the search by presenting a three-year catalog of 1084 X-ray bursts. Using spectral analysis, location, and spatial distributions we classified the 1084 events into 752 thermonuclear X-ray bursts, 267 transient events from accretion flares and X-ray pulses, and 65 untriggered gamma-ray bursts. All thermonuclear bursts have peak blackbody temperatures broadly consistent with photospheric radius expansion (PRE) bursts. We find an average rate of 1.4 PRE bursts per day, integrated over all Galactic bursters within about 10 kpc. These include 33 and 10 bursts from the ultra-compact X-ray binaries 4U 0614+09 and 2S 0918-549, respectively. We discuss these recurrence times and estimate the total mass ejected by PRE bursts in our Galaxy.

  8. Risk evaluation of rock burst through theory of static and dynamic stresses superposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振雷; 蔡武; 窦林名; 何江; 王桂峰; 丁言露

    2015-01-01

    Rock burst is one of the most catastrophic dynamic hazards in coal mining. A static and dynamic stresses superposition-based (SDSS-based) risk evaluation method of rock burst was proposed to pre-evaluate rock burst risk. Theoretical basis of this method is the stress criterion incurring rock burst and rock burst risk is evaluated according to the closeness degree of the total stress (due to the superposition of static stress in the coal and dynamic stress induced by tremors) with the critical stress. In addition, risk evaluation criterion of rock burst was established by defining the “Satisfaction Degree” of static stress. Furthermore, the method was used to pre-evaluate rock burst risk degree and prejudge endangered area of an insular longwall face in Nanshan Coal Mine in China. Results show that rock burst risk is moderate at advance extent of 97 m, strong at advance extent of 97−131 m, and extremely strong (i.e. inevitable to occur) when advance extent exceeds 131 m (mining is prohibited in this case). The section of two gateways whose floor abuts 15−3 coal seam is a susceptible area prone to rock burst. Evaluation results were further compared with rock bursts and tremors detected by microseismic monitoring. Comparison results indicate that evaluation results are consistent with microseismic monitoring, which proves the method’s feasibility.

  9. BROADBAND SPECTRAL INVESTIGATIONS OF SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander; Watts, Anna L. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gruber, David; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Younes, George [USRA, National Space Science and Technology Center, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, Neil, E-mail: linlin@sabanciuniv.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  10. Broadband Spectral Investigations of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Baring, Matthew G.; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Younes, George; Watts, Anna L.; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  11. Introduction to Optical Burst Switching

    OpenAIRE

    KERNÁCS János; SZILÁGYI Szabolcs

    2010-01-01

    Optical Burst Switching (OBS) isconsidered a popular switching paradigm for therealization of all-optical networks due to the balance itoffers between the coarse-grained Optical CircuitSwitching (OSC) and fine-grained Optical PacketSwitching (OPS). Given that the data are switched allopticallyat the burst level, Optical Burst Switchingcombines the transparency of Optical CircuitSwitching with the benefits of statistical multiplexingin Optical Packet Switching.

  12. Sky Coverage and Burst Repetition

    OpenAIRE

    Band, David L.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the repeater content of gamma ray burst samples I develop two models where sources burst at a constant average rate. I find that the sky coverage affects the number of repeaters in a sample predominantly through the detector livetime, and that the number of bursts in the sample is the primary parameter. Thus the repeater content of burst samples should be compared within the context of a repetition model; a direct comparison between two samples is possible only if the samples h...

  13. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Zumstein, James M.; Vigars, Mark L.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  14. NEW BURST ASSEMBLY AND SCHEDULING TECHNIQUE FOR OPTICAL BURST SWITCHING NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    V.KAVITHA; Palanisamy, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Optical Burst Switching is a new switching technology that efficiently utilizes the bandwidth in the optical layer. The key areas to be concentrated in Optical Burst Switching (OBS) networks are the burst assembly and burst scheduling i.e., assignment of wavelengths to the incoming bursts. This study presents a New Burst Assembly and Scheduling (NBAS) technique in a simultaneous multipath transmission for burst loss recovery in OBS networks. A Redundant Burst Segmentation (RBS) is used fo...

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The five year Fermi/GBM magnetar burst catalog (Collazzi+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazzi, A. C.; Kouveliotou, C.; van den Horst, A. J.; Younes, G. A.; Kaneko, Y.; Gogus, E.; Lin, L.; Granot, J.; Finger, M. H.; Chaplin, V. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Watts, A. L.; Kienlin, A. V.; Baring, M. G.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Gibby, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.; van der Klis, M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2015-07-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550-5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7. (3 data files).

  16. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  17. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  18. Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, Neil; 10.1126/science.1216793

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, last typically 10s of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  19. Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stell...

  20. Thevetia peruviana (Family: Apocynaceae in the control of slug and snail pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Panigrahi

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available An aqueous extract prepared from Kernels of the fruit of Thevetia peruviana (Pers. Schumann (Family : Apocynaceae was found under experimental conditions, to be toxic ti the slug Laevicaulis alte (Férussac and the snail Achatina fulica Bowdich, the important agrihorticultural pests of Indo-Pacific countries. Concentrations as low as 1% (w/v killed all the slugs exposed in less than 981.00 (± SD 22.76 min, and 2% of the extract killed 100% of the slugs L. alte and 50%, 50% and 30% of the snail A. fulica in between 92.34 (± SD 6.63 - 321.33 (± SD 4.14 and 271.20 (± SD 17.54 - 298.26 (± SD 16.69 min respectively. The most effective concentration of the extract was 20%; it killed 100% of exposed slugs and snails within a short time (40-50 and 90-1440 min respectively when the extract was exposed on the soil in experimental trays or when it was applied to potato slices offered as food to the gastropods.

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Hawaiian Sea Slug Symbiont Vibrio sp. Strain ER1A

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jeanette; Hill, Russell T.

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Vibrio are prevalent in the marine environment and are known for forming symbiotic relationships with hosts. Vibrio sp. strain ER1A is a dominant symbiont of the Hawaiian sea slug, Elysia rufescens. Here we report the draft genome sequence of Vibrio sp. ER1A.

  2. On the hydrodynamics of liquid–liquid slug flow capillary microreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kashid, M.N.; Fernandez Rivas, D.; Agar, D.W.; Turek, S.

    2008-01-01

    Microreactor technology is an important method of process intensification. Liquid–liquid slug flow capillary microreactors have been used to intensify the reactions with heat and mass transfer limitations. In this type of reactor, either two liquids flow alternate to each other in a capillary or one

  3. Experimental investigation of terrain slugging formation, evolution and potential for mitigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brasjen, B.J.; Hansen, J.H.; Schiferli, W.; Belfroid, S.P.C.

    2013-01-01

    The formation and evolution of slugs formed in air/water mixture in inclined pipes has been characterized as a function of flow conditions, pipe length and inclination angle. Good agreement was found with model predictions and experimental observations available from literature. Two regimes were ide

  4. Lactic Acid Extraction and Mass Transfer Characteristics in Slug Flow Capillary Microreactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanti,; Winkelman, Jozef G.M.; Schuur, Boelo; Heeres, Hero J.; Yue, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Capillary microreactors operated under the slug flow regime were investigated for the separation of lactic acid from the aqueous phase using liquid–liquid reactive extraction. The experiments were performed at a 1:1 flow ratio of the aqueous to organic phases in a setup consisting of an inlet Y-type

  5. Acquired phototrophy through retention of functional chloroplasts increases growth efficiency of the sea slug Elysia viridis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn A Baumgartner

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is a fundamental process sustaining heterotrophic organisms at all trophic levels. Some mixotrophs can retain functional chloroplasts from food (kleptoplasty, and it is hypothesized that carbon acquired through kleptoplasty may enhance trophic energy transfer through increased host growth efficiency. Sacoglossan sea slugs are the only known metazoans capable of kleptoplasty, but the relative fitness contributions of heterotrophy through grazing, and phototrophy via kleptoplasts, are not well understood. Fitness benefits (i.e. increased survival or growth of kleptoplasty in sacoglossans are commonly studied in ecologically unrealistic conditions under extended periods of complete darkness and/or starvation. We compared the growth efficiency of the sacoglossan Elysia viridis with access to algal diets providing kleptoplasts of differing functionality under ecologically relevant light conditions. Individuals fed Codium fragile, which provide highly functional kleptoplasts, nearly doubled their growth efficiency under high compared to low light. In contrast, individuals fed Cladophora rupestris, which provided kleptoplasts of limited functionality, showed no difference in growth efficiency between light treatments. Slugs feeding on Codium, but not on Cladophora, showed higher relative electron transport rates (rETR in high compared to low light. Furthermore, there were no differences in the consumption rates of the slugs between different light treatments, and only small differences in nutritional traits of algal diets, indicating that the increased growth efficiency of E. viridis feeding on Codium was due to retention of functional kleptoplasts. Our results show that functional kleptoplasts from Codium can provide sacoglossan sea slugs with fitness advantages through photosynthesis.

  6. Severe slugging in gas-liquid two-phase pipe flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malekzadeh, R.

    2012-01-01

    transportation facilities. In an offshore oil and gas production facility, pipeline-riser systems are required to transport two-phase hydrocarbons from subsurface oil and gas wells to a central production platform. Severe slugs reaching several thousands pipe diameters may occur when transporting g

  7. Development of Liquid Slug Length in Gas-Liquid Slug Flow along Horizontal Pipeline: Experiment and Simulation%水平管内气液段塞流液塞长度发展规律的实验和模拟研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王鑫; 郭烈锦; 张西民

    2006-01-01

    The liquid slug length distribution is crucial for designing the downstream processing system with multiphase pipeline. Experiments were conducted in a 133m long horizontal test loop. The measurements were performed by conductivity probes to determine the liquid slug length distribution. The data covered both the slug and plug flow regimes. From experimental results, the mean liquid slug lengths were relatively insensitive to gas and liquid flow rates in the higher mixture velocity range. But in the lower mixture velocity range, the mean liquid slug length decreased and then increased with mixture velocity. It shows that the development length of slug flow was longer than χ/D=1157. A slug tracking model was adapted to study the evolution of liquid slug length distribution in a horizontal pipeline. In the present model, the wake effect of elongated bubble and the pressure drop due to acceleration are taken into account and random slug lengths are introduced at the entrance. The results of the model are compared with the measured slug length distributions of slug flow regime. It shows that the predicted mean and maximum slug lengths are in agreement with the experimental data at x/D=1157 and the form of the slug length distributions is also predicted well by the model.

  8. Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Brdar, Vedran; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a p-wave process than for s-wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to Standard Model particles later, the annihilation bu...

  9. Severe slugging in a flexible S-shaped riser system: Experimental studies and transient simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wensheng; Guo, Liejin; Li, Nailiang

    2013-07-01

    Severe slugging, which could induce large-amplitude pressure and flow rate fluctuations, is a major and expensive problem in multiphase transportation systems of offshore oil production system. To avoid such problem is a basic requirement for flow assurance management. This study is an experimental and numerical investigation of severe slugging in a relatively long pipeline-riser system. A series of experiments on two-phase, air-water flow in a flexible Sshaped riser were carried out. The experimental system has a 114m long horizontal pipeline connected to a 19m long pipe which is inclined to -2degree from horizontal, followed by a 15.3m high riser operating at atmospheric end pressure. Four types of flow patterns were found and characterized by the pressure fluctuations at the bottom of the riser. A flow patter map for the prediction of severe slugging was developed based on the experimental results. The detailed characteristics of severe slugging such as pressure fluctuations, liquid holdup, under different gas-liquid superficial velocities were provided. A transient model to predict the flow behavior in the pipeline-S-shaped riser system was developed based on an existing model (OLGA). The modified model, which was tested against new experimental results obtained in this study, showed that the four types of flow patterns observed in the experiment were predicted with acceptable discrepancies. The flow pattern map was obtained using present model, as well as the detailed characteristics of severe slugging. In addition, the reasons for the difference between experimental and numerical results were analysed in this article. The motive of the numerical studies was to identify the areas that could not be reproduced by the present model and to give some suggestions for future models.

  10. Monitor

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — A custom-built, dual-language (English and Spanish) system (http://www.monitor.net.co/) developed by DevTech that debuted in January 2011. It features a central PMP...

  11. Fermi/GBM and BATSE Gamma-Ray Bursts: comparison of the spectral properties

    OpenAIRE

    Nava, Lara; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Celotti, Annalisa

    2010-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board Fermi allows to study the spectra of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) over an unprecedented wide energy range (8 keV - 35 MeV). We compare the spectral properties of short and long GRBs detected by the GBM (up to March 2010) with those of GRBs detected by the BATSE instrument on board the CGRO. GBM and BATSE long bursts have similar distributions of fluence (F), Epeak and peak flux (P) but GBM bursts have a slightly harder low-energy spectral index \\alpha wit...

  12. Comparison of WATCH and IPN Locations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, K.; Lund, Niels; Brandt, Søren; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Sommer, M.; Lapshov, I.; Laros, J.; Klebesadel, R.; Fishman, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.

    The WATCH all sky monitors aboard the Granat and EURECA spacecraft have the capability of independently localizing gamma‐ray bursts to error circles whose 3 sigma radii are 1 degree or less. These are the most accurate single‐experiment localizations currently achievable. In those cases where both...... WATCH and one or more experiments from the IPN detect a burst, the localizations may be refined considerably. We have identified approximately 35 bursts between 1991 and 1993 in this category. Some were detected by WATCH, Ulysses, PVO, and BATSE, and so on. We present and compare the locations of some...... of these bursts....

  13. Gas6 induces cancer cell migration and epithelial–mesenchymal transition through upregulation of MAPK and Slug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yunhee [Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mira [Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Semi, E-mail: semikim@kribb.re.kr [Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Immunotherapy Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying Gas6-mediated cancer cell migration. •Gas6 treatment and subsequent Axl activation induce cell migration and EMT via upregulation of Slug. •Slug expression mediated by Gas6 is mainly through c-Jun and ATF-2 in an ERK1/2 and JNK-dependent manner. •The Gas6/Axl-Slug axis may be exploited as a target for anti-cancer metastasis therapy. -- Abstract: Binding of Gas6 to Axl (Gas6/Axl axis) alters cellular functions, including migration, invasion, proliferation, and survival. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Gas6-mediated cell migration remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that Gas6 induced the activation of JNK and ERK1/2 signaling in cancer cells expressing Axl, resulting in the phosphorylation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factors c-Jun and ATF-2, and induction of Slug. Depletion of c-Jun or ATF-2 by siRNA attenuated the Gas6-induced expression of Slug. Slug expression was required for cell migration and E-cadherin reduction/vimentin induction induced by Gas6. These results suggest that Gas6 induced cell migration via Slug upregulation in JNK- and ERK1/2-dependent mechanisms. These data provide an important insight into the molecular mechanisms mediating Gas6-induced cell migration.

  14. Burst propagation in Texas Helimak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, F. A. C.; Toufen, D. L.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We present investigations of extreme events (bursts) propagating in the Texas Helimak, a toroidal plasma device in which the radial electric field can be changed by application of bias. In the experiments analyzed, a large grid of Langmuir probes measuring ion saturation current fluctuations is used to study the burst propagation and its dependence on the applied bias voltage. We confirm previous results reported on the turbulence intermittency in the Texas Helimak, extending them to a larger radial interval with a density ranging from a uniform decay to an almost uniform value. For our analysis, we introduce an improved procedure, based on a multiprobe bidimensional conditional averaging method, to assure precise determination of burst statistical properties and their spatial profiles. We verify that intermittent bursts have properties that vary in the radial direction. The number of bursts depends on the radial position and on the applied bias voltage. On the other hand, the burst characteristic time and size do not depend on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage modifies the vertical and radial burst velocity profiles differently. The burst velocity is smaller than the turbulence phase velocity in almost all the analyzed region.

  15. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  16. Burst Mode Transmission in GPON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Liang-chuan; ZHANG Yan-gan; LI Ling; XU Da-xiong

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a newly approved standard G.984 for Gigabit-capable Passive Optical Networks (GPON) is introduced. Technical challenges about high-speed burst-mode data transmission in GPON are discussed and key issues such as Forward Error Correction (FEC), timing to uplink performance of burst mode are high-lighted.

  17. Gamma-Ray Burst Physics with GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omodei, N.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-10-06

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV, the upper end of which is one of the last poorly observed region of the celestial electromagnetic spectrum. The ancestor of the GLAST/LAT was the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector, which flew onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). The amount of information and the step forward that the high energy astrophysics made thanks to its 9 years of observations are impressive. Nevertheless, EGRET uncovered the tip of the iceberg, raising many questions, and it is in the light of EGRET's results that the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) vastly more capable than instruments own previously, as well as a secondary instrument, the GLAST Bursts Monitor, or GBM, to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) science is one of the most exciting challenges for the GLAST mission, exploring the high energy emission of one of the most intense phenomena in the sky, shading light on various problems: from the acceleration of particles to the emission processes, to more exotic physics like Quantum Gravity effect. In this paper we report the work done so far in the simulation development as well as the study of the LAT sensitivity to GRB.

  18. Scheduling start time in CDMA burst admission

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuge, L; Li, VOK

    2002-01-01

    Burst transmission protocols have been proposed in the next generation CDMA cellular systems to support short-time high-speed data communications. The existing burst admission algorithm considers only the current interference condition in the system. The burst transmission request will be rejected if the interference in the system will exceed the acceptable level with the burst admitted. In this paper we propose a new burst admission algorithm where a currently-unacceptable burst request can ...

  19. Thermonuclear bursts from slowly and rapidly accreting neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Manuel

    2012-07-01

    Models of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars predict different ignition regimes, depending mainly on the mass accretion rate per unit area. For more than three decades, testing these regimes observationally has met with only partial success. I will present recent results from the Fermi-GBM all-sky X-ray burst monitor, which is yielding robust measurements of recurrence time of rare and highly energetic thermonuclear bursts at the lowest mass accretion rates. I will also present RXTE observations of thermonuclear bursts at high mass accretion rates, including the discovery of millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations and several bursting regimes in a neutron star transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar. This unusual neutron star, with higher magnetic field and slower rotation than any other known burster, showed copious bursting activity when the mass accretion rate varied between 10% and 50% of the Eddington rate. I will discuss the role of fuel composition and neutron star spin in setting the burst properties of this system, and the possible implications for the rest of thermonuclear bursters.

  20. Learning control for riser-slug elimination and production-rate optimization for an offshore oil and gas production process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Simon; Løhndorf, Petar Durdevic; Yang, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Slugging flow in the offshore oil & gas production attracts lot of attention due to it's limitation of production rate, periodic overload on processing facilities, and even direct cause of emergency shutdown. This work aims at two correlated objectives: (i) Preventing slugging flow; and meanwhile......, (ii) maximizing the production rate at the riser of an offshore production platform, by manipulating a topside choke valve through a learning switching model-free PID controller. The results show good steady-state performance, though a long settling time due to the unknown reference for no slugging...

  1. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  2. The Fermi GBM gamma-ray burst time-resolved spectral catalog: brightest bursts in the first four years

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Greiner, Jochen; Bhat, P Narayana; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Cleveland, William H; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Mailyan, Bagrat; Meegan, Charles A; Paciesas, William S; Rau, Arne; Roberts, Oliver J; Veres, Péter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Zhang, Bin-Bin; van Eerten, Hendrik J

    2016-01-01

    We aim to obtain high-quality time-resolved spectral fits of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We perform time-resolved spectral analysis with high temporal and spectral resolution of the brightest bursts observed by Fermi GBM in its first 4 years of mission. We present the complete catalog containing 1,491 spectra from 81 bursts with high spectral and temporal resolution. Distributions of parameters, statistics of the parameter populations, parameter-parameter and parameter-uncertainty correlations, and their exact values are obtained and presented as main results in this catalog. We report a criterion that is robust enough to automatically distinguish between different spectral evolutionary trends between bursts. We also search for plausible blackbody emission components and find that only 3 bursts (36 spectra in total) show evidence of a pure Planck function. It is observed that the averaged time-resolved low-energy power-law...

  3. The Fermi GBM gamma-ray burst time-resolved spectral catalog: brightest bursts in the first four years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Preece, Robert D.; Greiner, Jochen; Narayana Bhat, P.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S.; Cleveland, William H.; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Mailyan, Bagrat; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Rau, Arne; Roberts, Oliver J.; Veres, Péter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Zhang, Bin-Bin; van Eerten, Hendrik J.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We aim to obtain high-quality time-resolved spectral fits of gamma-ray bursts observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Methods: We performed time-resolved spectral analysis with high temporal and spectral resolution of the brightest bursts observed by Fermi GBM in its first four years of mission. Results: We present the complete catalog containing 1491 spectra from 81 bursts with high spectral and temporal resolution. Distributions of parameters, statistics of the parameter populations, parameter-parameter and parameter-uncertainty correlations, and their exact values are obtained and presented as main results in this catalog. We report a criterion that is robust enough to automatically distinguish between different spectral evolutionary trends between bursts. We also search for plausible blackbody emission components and find that only three bursts (36 spectra in total) show evidence of a pure Planck function. It is observed that peak energy and the averaged, time-resolved power-law index at low energy are slightly harder than the time-integrated values. Time-resolved spectroscopic results should be used instead of time-integrated results when interpreting physics from the observed spectra. Tables A.1 and B.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A135

  4. A Study of Bubble and Slug Gas-Liquid Flow in a Microgravity Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The influence of gravity on the two-phase flow dynamics is obvious.As the gravity level is reduced,there is a new balance between inertial and interfacial forces, altering the behavior of the flow. In bubbly flow,the absence of drift velocity leads to spherical-shaped bubbles with a rectilinear trajectory.Slug flow is a succession of long bubbles and liquid slug carrying a few bubbles. There is no flow reversal in the thin liquid film as the long bubble and liquid slug pass over the film. Although the flow structure seems to be simpler than in normal gravity conditions,the models developed for the prediction of flow behavior in normal gravity and extended to reduced gravity flow are unable to predict the flow behavior correctly.An additional benefit of conducting studies in microgravity flows is that these studies aide the development of understanding for normal gravity flow behavior by removing the effects of buoyancy on the shape of the interface and density driven shear flows between the gas and the liquid phases. The proposal calls to study specifically the following: 1) The dynamics of isolated bubbles in microgravity liquid flows will be analyzed: Both the dynamics of spherical isolated bubbles and their dispersion by turbulence, their interaction with the pipe wall,the behavior of the bubbles in accelerated or decelerated flows,and the dynamics of isolated cylindrical bubbles, their deformation in accelerated/decelerated flows (in converging or diverging channels), and bubble/bubble interaction. Experiments will consist of the use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Laser Doppler Velocimeters (LDV) to study single spherical bubble and single and two cylindrical bubble behavior with respect to their influence on the turbulence of the surrounding liquid and on the wall 2) The dynamics of bubbly and slug flow in microgravity will be analyzed especially for the role of the coalescence in the transition from bubbly to slug flow (effect of fluid properties and

  5. Monitoring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ložek, Vojen; Němec, J.

    Praha : Consult, 2003 - (Němec, J.), s. 111-115 ISBN 80-902132-4-3 Grant ostatní: Magistrát hlavního města Prahy(CZ) DAG/67/04/000176/2001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : monitoring * environmental quality * Prague Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  6. Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its main source of fuel. To keep your blood sugar level on target and avoid problems with your eyes, kidneys, heart and feet, you should eat right ... better. And monitoring doesn’t stop at measuring blood sugar levels. Because ... blood testing) Eye health (eye exams) Foot health (foot exams and ...

  7. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  8. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  9. A mini slug test method for determination of a local hydraulic conductivity of an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinsby, Klaus; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Andersen, Lars J.;

    1992-01-01

    A new and efficient mini slug test method for the determination of local hydraulic conductivities in unconfined sandy aquifers is developed. The slug test is performed in a small-diameter (1 inch) driven well with a 0.25 m screen just above the drive point. The screened drive point can be driven...... distributed measurements of a local hydraulic conductivity at a tracer test site at Vejen, Denmark. The mini slug test results calculated by a modified Dax slug test analysing method, applying the elastic storativity in the Dax equations instead of the specific yield, are in good accordance with the results...... spherical flow model of Karasaki et al. overestimated the results of the tracer tests by approximately a factor 1.4. The Dax and the Cooper et al. methods, assuming only radial flow to the partially screened well, yielded a better approximation of the horizontal hydraulic conductivity, than the Chirlin...

  10. Testing for Nonlinearity in Dynamic Characteristics of Vertical Upward Oil-Gas-Water Three-phase Bubble and Slug Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱雷; 金宁德; 高忠科; 杜萌; 王振亚

    2012-01-01

    Based on the conductance fluctuation signals measured from vertical upward oil-gas-water three-phase flow experiment, time frequency representation and surrogate data method were used to investigate dynamical characteristics of oil-in-water type bubble and slug flows. The results indicate that oil-in-water type bubble flow will turn to deterministic motion with the increase of oil phase fraction f o and superficial gas velocity U sg under fixed flowrate of oil-water mixture Q mix . The dynamics of oil-in-water type slug flow becomes more complex with the increase of U sg under fixed flowrate of oil-water mixture. The change of f o leads to irregular influence on the dynamics of slug flow. These interesting findings suggest that the surrogate data method can be a faithful tool for characterizing dynamic characteristics of oil-in-water type bubble and slug flows.

  11. A mini slug test method for determination of a local hydraulic conductivity of an unconfined sandy aquifer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinsby, Klaus; Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Andersen, Lars J.; Skov, Bent Henning; Clausen, Erik V.

    A new and efficient mini slug test method for the determination of local hydraulic conductivities in unconfined sandy aquifers is developed. The slug test is performed in a small-diameter (1 inch) driven well with a 0.25 m screen just above the drive point. The screened drive point can be driven...... from level to level and thereby establish vertical profiles of the hydraulic conductivity. The head data from the test well are recorded with a 10 mm pressure transducer, and the initial head difference required is established by a small vacuum pump. The method described has provided 274 spatially...... distributed measurements of a local hydraulic conductivity at a tracer test site at Vejen, Denmark. The mini slug test results calculated by a modified Dax slug test analysing method, applying the elastic storativity in the Dax equations instead of the specific yield, are in good accordance with the results...

  12. Interference Resilience of Burst-by-burst Adaptive Modems

    OpenAIRE

    Torrance, J.M.; Hanzo, L.; Keller, T

    1997-01-01

    Adaptive modulation can achieve channel capacity gains by adapting t h e number of bits per transmission symbol on a burst-by-burst basis, in harmony with channel quality fluctuations. In this treatise their interference resilience is quantified and the modem mode switching levels are determined under interfered conditions. The associated performance curves are portrayed in Figures 6, 7 and 8 for target bit error rates of 1 and 0.01 %, respectively. The corresponding modem mode switching leve...

  13. Analysis of Burst Assembly Modeling for Optical Burst Switched Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhumika Patel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have study the current state of the technology, the Optical burst Switched (OBS network is the most practical in all-optical architecture. Here we define how Burst Assembly will carried out and also here in the network architecture each node is consist of Core router and Edge router. Moreover we define challenges faced at practical implementation of OBS and proposed its unique solution at the node as Delay model.

  14. Combination of rapamycin, CI-1040, and 17-AAG inhibits metastatic capacity of prostate cancer via Slug inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanxiong Ding

    Full Text Available Though prostate cancer (PCa has slow progression, the hormone refractory (HRCP and metastatic entities are substantially lethal and lack effective treatments. Transcription factor Slug is critical in regulating metastases of various tumors including PCa. Here we studied targeted therapy against Slug using combination of 3 drugs targeting 3 pathways respectively converging via Slug and further regulating PCa metastasis. Using in vitro assays we confirmed that Slug up-regulation incurred inhibition of E-cadherin that was anti-metastatic, and inhibited Bim-regulated cell apoptosis in PCa. Upstream PTEN/Akt, mTOR, Erk, and AR/Hsp90 pathways were responsible for Slug up-regulation and each of these could be targeted by rapamycin, CI-1040, and 17-AAG respectively. In 4 PCa cell lines with different traits in terms of PTEN loss and androgen sensitivity we tested the efficacy of mono- and combined therapy with the drugs. We found that metastatic capacity of the cells was maximally inhibited only when all 3 drugs were combined, due to the crosstalk between the pathways. 17-AAG decreases Slug expression via blockade of HSP90-dependent AR stability. Combination of rapamycin and CI-1040 diminishes invasiveness more potently in PCa cells that are androgen insensitive and with PTEN loss. Slug inhibited Bim-mediated apoptosis that could be rescued by mTOR/Erk/HSP90 inhibitors. Using mouse models for circulating PCa DNA quantification, we found that combination of mTOR/Erk/HSP90 inhibitors reduced circulating PCa cells in vivo significantly more potently than combination of 2 or monotherapy. Conclusively, combination of mTOR/Erk/Hsp90 inhibits metastatic capacity of prostate cancer via Slug inhibition.

  15. Slug Test in a Large Dip Angle Fracture Zone: Model and Field Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu and Chia-Shyun Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A single-porosity model is developed to deal with a fracture zone slug test in a large dip angle by assuming the fracture zone causes a downward regional flow. For the oscillatory response, a larger dip angle causes larger amplitude while introduces little impact on period. The effective water length, an important parameter necessary for analyzing the oscillatory response, is proven to be independent of the dip angle and can be evaluated using the available horizontal formation methods. The dip angle effect is more pronounced for a larger storage coefficient. An empirical relationship is developed to evaluate the limiting dip angle, below which the dip angle effect is negligible. Field data analysis of a slug test in a _ dip angle fracture zone indicates that neglecting the dip angle can result in a 27% transmissivity over estimation and a 53% storage coefficient under estimation.

  16. Antifeedant compounds from three species of Apiaceae active against the field slug, Deroceras reticulatum (Muller).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkett, Michael A; Dodds, Catherine J; Henderson, Ian F; Leake, Lucy D; Pickett, John A; Selby, Martin J; Watson, Peter

    2004-03-01

    Extracts of volatiles from foliage of three plants in the Apiaceae, Conium maculatum L. (hemlock), Coriandrum sativum L. (coriander), and Petroselinum crispum Mill. (Nym.) (parsley), previously shown to exhibit antifeedant activity in assays with the field slug, Deroceras reticulatum (Muller) (Limacidae: Pulmonata), were studied further to identify the active components. Coupled gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and neurophysiological assays using tentacle nerve preparations resulted in the identification of 11 active compounds from the three extracts. Wheat flour feeding bioassays were used to determine which of these compounds had the highest antifeedant activity. One of the most active compounds was the alkaloid gamma-coniceine, from C. maculatum. The role of potentially toxic alkaloids as semiochemicals and the potential for using such compounds as crop protection agents to prevent slug feeding damage is discussed. PMID:15139308

  17. The analysis of fuel constituent redistribution for ternary metallic fuel slug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    U-TRU-Zr metallic alloy is being considered as the fuel slug for the proliferation resistance core of KALIMER. The radial fuel constituent migration is a general phenomenon in the metallic alloys. This phenomenon may affect the in-reactor performance of metallic fuel rods, influencing such factors as melting temperature, thermal conductivity, power generation rate, phase boundaries and eutectic melting of the fuel slug. Thus, constituent redistribution modeling is essential when developing a metallic fuel performance code. The constituent migration model adopted in this report was based on the Ishida's model and Hofman's theory. A subroutine program has been made and installed into the MACSIS code to simulate constituent redistribution. The radial profile of Zr redistribution was calculated for the ternary metallic fuel, and compared with the measured data

  18. INFLUENCE OF INCLINATION ANGLE ON THE MOTION OF TAYLOR BUBBLES IN UPWARD SLUG FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The motion of the Taylor bubbles in vertical and near-vertical tubes was investigated. The non-invasive measurements were conducted by using a high-speed motion analyzer. For the vertical slug flow, the coefficient C1 was found to be very close to the ratio of the maximum velocity to the average velocity in the profile. For the inclined slug flow, the value of C1 is smaller than that for the vbertical case because the nose tip of the Taylor bubble usually deviates from the centerline. The drift velocity is increased with the decrease of inclination angle. Based on the theoretical analysis and experimental data, the bubble velocity correlations were obtained. The results are in good agreement with the available data.

  19. A criterion for the onset of slugging in horizontal stratified air-water countercurrent flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Byung-Ryung; Kim, Yang-Seok [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of wave height and transition criterion from wavy to slug flow in horizontal air-water countercurrent stratified flow conditions. A theoretical formula for the wave height in a stratified wavy flow regime has been developed using the concept of total energy balance over a wave crest to consider the shear stress acting on the interface of two fluids. From the limiting condition of the formula for the wave height, a necessary criterion for transition from a stratified wavy flow to a slug flow has been derived. A series of experiments have been conducted changing the non-dimensional water depth and the flow rates of air in a horizontal pipe and a duct. Comparisons between the measured data and the predictions of the present theory show that the agreement is within {plus_minus}8%.

  20. Drift-flux model for downward two-phase slug flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behavior of a single large bubble was experimentally studied in circular tubes of seven different diameters ranging from 9 to 38 mm for vertically downward flows of water and water solution of glycerin. The bubble velocity for co-current and counter-current flows was measured and correlated on the basis of the one-dimensional drift-flux model. Bubbles in the downward flow were unstable and asymmetrically located in the tube. This asymmetrical behavior was especially promoted in a turbulent flow. Consequently, values of distribution parameter and drift velocity differed from those of an upward flow. Comparison of parameters obtained in this study with those for the downward slug flow regime confirmed the applicability of the parameters to the slug flow. (author)

  1. FERMIGBRST - Fermi GBM Burst Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by a subset of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO) which have been classified as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Note...

  2. SWIFT and BATSE bursts' classification

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, I; Balazs, L G; Tusnady, G; Veres, P

    2009-01-01

    Two classes of gamma-ray bursts were identified in the BATSE catalogs characterized by their durations. There were also some indications for the existence of a third type of gamma-ray bursts. Swift satellite detectors have different spectral sensitivity than pre-Swift ones for GRBs. Therefore in this paper we analyze the bursts' duration distribution and also the duration-hardness bivariate distribution, published in The First BAT Catalog. Similarly to the BATSE data, to explain the BAT GRBs' duration distribution three components are needed. Although, the relative frequencies of the groups are different than they were in the BATSE GRB sample, the difference in the instrument spectral sensitivities can explain this bias in a natural way. This means theoretical models may have to explain three different type of gamma-ray bursts.

  3. Suppression of Invasion and Metastasis of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Lines by Pharmacological or Genetic Inhibition of Slug Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Ferrari-Amorotti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Most triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs exhibit gene expression patterns associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a feature that correlates with a propensity for metastatic spread. Overexpression of the EMT regulator Slug is detected in basal and mesenchymal-type TNBCs and is associated with reduced E-cadherin expression and aggressive disease. The effects of Slug depend, in part, on the interaction of its N-terminal SNAG repressor domain with the chromatin-modifying protein lysine demethylase 1 (LSD1; thus, we investigated whether tranylcypromine [also known as trans-2-phenylcyclopropylamine hydrochloride (PCPA or Parnate], an inhibitor of LSD1 that blocks its interaction with Slug, suppresses the migration, invasion, and metastatic spread of TNBC cell lines. We show here that PCPA treatment induces the expression of E-cadherin and other epithelial markers and markedly suppresses migration and invasion of TNBC cell lines MDA-MB-231 and BT-549. These effects were phenocopied by Slug or LSD1 silencing. In two models of orthotopic breast cancer, PCPA treatment reduced local tumor growth and the number of lung metastases. In mice injected directly in the blood circulation with MDA-MB-231 cells, PCPA treatment or Slug silencing markedly inhibited bone metastases but had no effect on lung infiltration. Thus, blocking Slug activity may suppress the metastatic spread of TNBC and, perhaps, specifically inhibit homing/colonization to the bone.

  4. Slug, mammalian homologue gene of Drosophila escargot, promotes neuronal-differentiation through suppression of HEB/daughterless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dong-Jin; Chung, Ji-Yun; Lee, Su-Jin; Park, So-Young; Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Ha, Nam-Chul; Yoo, Mi-Ae; Park, Bum-Joon

    2010-07-15

    At the neuron developmental stage, neuron-precursor cells can be differentiated into neuron or glia cells. However, precise molecular mechanism to determine the cell fate has not been clearly demonstrated. In this study, we reveal that Drosophila esgarcot and its mammalian homologue genes, Snail and Slug, play a key role in neuronal differentiation. In Drosophila model system, overexpression of Esg, like as Wingless, suppresses the bristle formation. In contrast, elimination of Esg though RNAi promotes double bristle phenotype. We can also observe the similar phenotype in Snail-overexpression system. In mammalian system, overexpression of Slug or Snail can induce neuronal differentiation. Esg and its mammalian homologue gene Slug directly interact with Daughtherless and its mammalian homologue HEB and eliminate them through siah-1 mediated protein degradation. Thus, overexpression of siah-1 can promote neuron cell differentiation, whereas si-siah-1 blocks the Slug-induced HEB suppression. In fact, Drosophila SINA, Siah-1 homologue, has been also known to be involved in bristle formation and Neuronal differentiation. In addition, it has been revealed that CK1 is involved in Esg or Snail stability and Neuronal differentiation. However, Snail is regulated only by CK1 but not by Siah. Considering the fact that Slug mutations have been found in human genetic disease, waardenberg syndrome, major symptoms of which is loss of hearing neuron and odd eye, our result implies that slug/Snail system is required for proper neuronal differentiation, like as Esg in Drosophila. PMID:20647756

  5. Slug-annular transition with particular reference to narrow rectangular ducts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transition from slug-flow to annular-flow in two-phase, gas-liquid mixtures is analyzed. A transition equation is derived which agrees well when compared with objective data determined from the disappearance of the low-void peak in the void fluctuation probability density in a rectangular duct. Application to other geometries is suggested and tabular recommendations given for determination of the drift flux coefficient, K, based on results in the literature

  6. Slug initiation and prediction using high accuracy methods - applications with field data

    OpenAIRE

    Kalogerakos, Stamatis

    2011-01-01

    The sponsoring company of the project is BP. The framework within which the research is placed is that of the Transient Multiphase Flow Programme (TMF-4), a consortium of companies that are interested in phenomena related to flow of liquids and gases, in particular with relevance to oil, water and air. The deliverables agreed for the project were: • validating EMAPS through simulations of known problems and experimental and field data concerning slug flow • introducing numer...

  7. Flow near the meniscus of a pressure-driven water slug in microchannels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro-PIV system with a high speed CCD camera is used to measure the flow field near the advancing meniscus of a water slug in microchannels. Image shifting technique combined with meniscus detecting technique is proposed to measure the relative velocity of the liquid near the meniscus in a moving reference frame. The proposed method is applied to an advancing front of a slug in microchannels with rectangular cross section. In the case of hydrophilic channel, strong flow from the center to the side wall along the meniscus occurs, while in the case of the hydrophobic channel, the fluid flows in the opposite direction. Further, the velocity near the side wall is higher than the center region velocity, exhibiting the characteristics of a strong shear-driven flow. This phenomenon is explained to be due to the existence of small gaps between the slug and the channel wall at each capillary corner so that the gas flows through the gaps inducing high shear on the slug surface. Simulation of the shape of a static droplet inside a cubic cell obtained by using the Surface Evolver program is supportive of the existence of the gap at the rectangular capillary corners. The flow fields in the circular capillary, in which no such gap exists, are also measured. The results show that a similar flow pattern to that of the hydrophilic rectangular capillary (i.e., center-to-wall flow) is always exhibited regardless of the wettability of the channel wall, which is also indicative of the validity of the above-mentioned assertion

  8. CFD modelling of liquid–liquid multiphase microstructured reactor: Slug flow generation

    OpenAIRE

    Kashid, Madhvanand Namadeo; Renken, Albert; Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov

    2010-01-01

    Microreactor technology, an important method of process intensification, offers numerous potential benefits for the process industries. Fluid–fluid reactions with mass transfer limitations have already been advantageously carried out in small-scale geometries. In liquid–liquid microstructured reactors (MSR), alternating uniform slugs of the twophase reaction mixture exhibit well-defined interfacial mass transfer areas and flow patterns. The improved control of highly exothermic and hazardous ...

  9. Experimental and modelling studies on liquid-liquid slug flow capillary microreactors

    OpenAIRE

    Kashid, Madhvanand N.

    2008-01-01

    Microreactor technology, an important method of process intensification, offers potential benefits to the chemical process industries due to the well-defined high specific interfacial area available for heat and mass transfer, which increases transfer rates, and enhances safety resulting from low hold-ups. The liquid-liquid slug flow capillary microreactor intensifies the mass transfer in biphasic systems through internal circulation caused by the shear between continuous phase/wall surface a...

  10. Liquid-liquid Slug Flow in a Microchannel Reactor and its Mass Transfer Properties - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Antony

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Mass transfer is a basic phenomenon behind many processes like reaction, absorption, extraction etc. Mass transfer plays a significant role in microfluidic systems where the chemical / biological process systems are shrinkened down to a micro scale. Micro reactor system, with its high compatibility and performance, gains a wide interest among the researchers in the recent years. Micro structured reac-tors holds advantages over the conventional types in chemical processes. The significance of micro re-actor not limited to its scalability but to energy efficiency, on-site / on-demand production, reliability, safety, highly controlled outputs, etc. Liquid-liquid two phase reaction in a microreactor system is highly demandable when both reactants are liquids or when air medium cannot be suitable. This arti-cle overviews various liquid-liquid flow regimes in a microchannel. Discussions on the hydrodynamics of flow in micro scale are made. Considering the importance of mass transfer in liquid-liquid systems and the advantage of slug regime over other regimes, the article focuses especially on the mass trans-fer between two liquid phases in slug flow and the details of experimental studies carried out in this area. The advantages of slug flow over other flow regimes in micro structured reactor applications are showcased. © 2014 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 31st May 2014; Revised: 6th August 2014; Accepted: 14th August 2014How to Cite: Antony, R., Giri Nandagopal, M.S., Sreekumar, N., Rangabhashiyam, S., Selvaraju, N. (2014. Liquid-liquid Slug Flow in a Microchannel Reactor and its Mass Transfer Properties - A Review. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis,9(3: 207-223. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.9.3.6977.207-223Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.9.3.6977.207-223

  11. The spontaneous motion of a slug of miscible liquids in a capillary tube

    OpenAIRE

    Sellier, Mathieu; Verdier, Claude; Nock, Volker

    2015-01-01

    This contribution explores a droplet actuation mechanism which involves mixing two different liquids slugs in a glass capillary. The resulting contrast in surface tension which arises provides the necessary propulsive power for the droplet. The conceptual idea is demonstrated for an ethanol-water system. The droplet is observed to rapidly reach a peak velocity which then gradually decreases with time as the two miscible liquids mix. A model is proposed based on Newton’s second law which is ab...

  12. A field proof-of-concept of tomographic slug tests in an anisotropic littoral aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Daniel; Gloaguen, Erwan; Lefebvre, René; Giroux, Bernard

    2016-05-01

    Hydraulic tomography is increasingly recognized as a characterization approach that can image pathways or barriers to flow as well as their connectivity. In this study, we assess the performance of a transient analysis of tomographic slug test head data in estimating heterogeneity in horizontal hydraulic conductivity (Kh), hydraulic conductivity anisotropy (the ratio between vertical and horizontal hydraulic conductivity - Kv/Kh) and specific storage (Ss) under actual field conditions. The tomographic experiment was carried out between two wells in a moderately heterogeneous and highly anisotropic silt and sand littoral aquifer. In this field proof-of-concept, the inversion of the two-dimensional (2D) head dataset was computed with a 2D radial flow algorithm that considers Kh, Kv/Kh, Ss and wellbore storage effects. This study demonstrated that a transient analysis of tomographic slug tests is able to capture the key features of the littoral environment of the test: the vertical profiles of Kh and Kv are indeed in agreement with those from other field and laboratory tests, and Ss values exhibit physically plausible profiles. Furthermore, the simulation of independent inter-well hydraulic tests (slug and pumping tests screened over the entire aquifer) using resolved Kh, Kv/Kh and Ss tomograms produce responses very close to field observations. This study demonstrates that the effects of fine scale heterogeneity that induces K-anisotropy at larger scales can be captured through a transient analysis of tomographic slug tests, which are very difficult to quantify otherwise with conventional hydraulic tests, thus allowing a better representation of properties controlling flow and transport in aquifer systems.

  13. Disinhibition Bursting of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin J Lobb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc dopaminergic neurons receive strong tonic inputs from GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr and globus pallidus (GP, and glutamatergic neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. The presence of these tonic inputs raises the possibility that phasic disinhibition may trigger phasic bursts in dopaminergic neurons. We first applied constant NMDA and GABAA conductances onto a two-compartment single cell model of the dopaminergic neuron (Kuznetsov et al., 2006. The model exhibited disinhibition bursting upon stepwise removal of inhibition. A further bifurcation analysis suggests that disinhibition may be more robust than excitation alone in that for most levels of NMDA conductance, the cell remains capable of bursting even after a complete removal of inhibition, whereas too much excitatory input will drive the cell into depolarization block. To investigate the network dynamics of disinhibition, we used a modified version of an integrate-and-fire based model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al., 2006. Synaptic activity generated in the network was delivered to the two-compartment single cell dopaminergic neuron. Phasic activation of the D1-expressing medium spiny neurons in the striatum (D1STR produced disinhibition bursts in dopaminergic neurons through the direct pathway (D1STR to SNpr to SNpc. Anatomical studies have shown that D1STR neurons have collaterals that terminate in GP. Adding these collaterals to the model, we found that striatal activation increased the intra-burst firing frequency of the disinhibition burst as the weight of this connection was increased. Our studies suggest that striatal activation is a robust means by which disinhibition bursts can be generated by SNpc dopaminergic neurons, and that recruitment of the indirect pathway via collaterals may enhance disinhibition bursting.

  14. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2015-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of stability function in the incoherent (i.e. disorder), coherent, chimera and multi-chimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multi-chimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is i...

  15. Effects of Agroecological and Conventional Handling in Slug Populations in Lettuce in Tenjo, Cundinamarca (Colombia)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an organic (FE) and a conventional (FC) farm system the population behavior of slugs and their relationship with some carabids predators was compared, as well as, the presence of weeds, agricultural practices and productivity of four varieties of lettuce. Weekly catches of slugs were made and the damage level, height and the number of leaves in ten plants was measured. Weeds and carabids were collected in both farms. The total number of slugs in the FE was statistically higher and four species (D. reticulatum, Milax gagates, D. and L. laev maximux) were collected compared with two found in FC. With the exception of the variety Morada Lisa, there were no significant differences in the level of damage in the other varieties between the two farms. There were significant differences in the dry weight variable in favour of the organic farm. In FE, 5 carabids species and 25 weeds were presented compared to none in FC and 6, respectively. The data above are explained in terms of the agronomic practices of each management system.

  16. Analysis of transition from bubble flow to slug flow in rolling vertical tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of the transition from bubble flow to slug flow with co-current gas and liquid flowing through vertical tubes under rolling condition is studied. According to the experimental observation, it is found that the dispersed bubble flow pattern is periodically changed with the rolling motion. When the test section is deviated from the vertical condition, bubbles tend to flow at the upper part of the tube, and the bubble density reaches its maximum while test section rolling to the place with maximum incline angle. Besides, through the analysis of forces acted on moving bubbles under rolling condition, it is also found that the radial components of forces keeping dispersed bubbles at the upper part of the tube reach their maximums at maximum incline angle. Therefore, the transition from bubble flow to slug flow is most likely to take place at this moment. Based on the experimental data, a new correlation for predicting the transition from bubble flow to slug flow is proposed. The results show that the model predictions coincide well with the experimental data when gas superficial velocity is larger than 0.4 m/s. (author)

  17. Interfacial area, velocity and void fraction in two-phase slug flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojasoy, G. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Riznic, J.R. [Atomic Energy Control Board, Ottawa (Canada)

    1997-12-31

    The internal flow structure of air-water plug/slug flow in a 50.3 mm dia transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a four-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 0.55 to 2.20 m/s and 0.27 to 2.20 m/s, respectively, and area-averaged void fractions ranged from about 10 to 70%. The local distributions of void fractions, interfacial area concentration and interface velocity were measured. Contributions from small spherical bubbles and large elongated slug bubbles toward the total void fraction and interfacial area concentration were differentiated. It was observed that the small bubble void contribution to the overall void fraction was small indicating that the large slug bubble void fraction was a dominant factor in determining the total void fraction. However, the small bubble interfacial area contribution was significant in the lower and upper portions of the pipe cross sections.

  18. Burst Suppression: A Review and New Insights

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Dillon Kenny; M. Brandon Westover; ShiNung Ching; Brown, Emery N.; Ken Solt

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is a pattern of brain electrical activity characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude bursts and electrical silence. Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the...

  19. Mining Gamma-Ray Burst Data

    OpenAIRE

    Hakkila, Jon; Roiger, Richard J.; Haglin, David J.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts provide what is probably one of the messiest of all astrophysical data sets. Burst class properties are indistinct, as overlapping characteristics of individual bursts are convolved with effects of instrumental and sampling biases. Despite these complexities, data mining techniques have allowed new insights to be made about gamma-ray burst data. We demonstrate how data mining techniques have simultaneously allowed us to learn about gamma-ray burst detectors and data collectio...

  20. Numerical simulation of slug flow regime for an air water two-phase flow in horizontal pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slug flow is a quite common multiphase flow regime in horizontal pipelines and channels, which can be potentially hazardous to the structure of the pipe system or to apparatus and processes following the slug flow pipe section due to the strong oscillating pressure levels formed behind liquid slugs. Areas of application are in the chemical and process industry as well as in safety research and thermo-hydraulic engineering for nuclear power plants. The intended paper deals with the feasibility and accuracy of CFD simulations for an air-water slug flow in a horizontal circular pipe of diameter D = 0.054 m and a pipe length of up to 8 m. In the past most investigations of the slug flow regime in horizontal pipelines and channels have been carried out on experimental test rigs. Due to the transient and three-dimensional character of slug flow regime and the resulting numerical effort only a few attempts of numerical simulation have been made. In principal three different computational approaches can be applied for the simulation of horizontal slug flows: - 'frozen slug' in a domain with moving wall boundaries, where the absolute value of the prescribed wall velocity is equal to the slug propagation velocity in the pipe. The slug propagation velocity and the slug length/period has to be known in advance. - Transient 3-D simulation in a short computational domain with periodic boundary conditions. A driving pressure force has to be prescribed to compensate the kinetic energy losses due to wall friction. Furthermore it has to be ensured, that the geometrical dimensions of the computational domain do not affect the computed slug flow length and time scales. - Transient 3. simulation of slug flow in a long pipe segment with inlet/outlet boundary conditions. The later of the three computational approaches provides the highest predictive capability, also it is the most computational intensive approach. The presented paper will discuss the general aspects of feasibility

  1. Activity from Magnetar Candidate 4U 0142+61: Bursts and Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Gavriil, Fotis P; Kaspi, Victoria M

    2007-01-01

    After 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months. During the active phase, several bursts were detected, and many aspects of the X-ray emission changed. We report on the discovery of six X-ray bursts, the first ever seen from this AXP in ~10 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) monitoring. All the bursts occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The bursts had the canonical fast rise slow decay profiles characteristic of SGR/AXP bursts. The burst durations ranged from 8-3x10^3 s as characterized by T90,these are very long durations even when compared to the broad T90 distributions of other bursts from SGRs and AXPs. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by simple blackbodies, with temperature kT ~2-6 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum consisting of at least three emission lines with possible additional emission and absorption lines. The most significant feature was...

  2. Swift-BAT: The First Year of Gamma-Ray Burst Detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimm, Hans A.

    2006-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift has been detecting gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since Dec. 17,2004 and automated burst alerts have been distributed since Feb. 14,2005. Since commissioning the BAT has triggered on more than 100 GRBs, nearly all of which have been followed up by the narrow-field instruments on Swift through automatic repointing, and by ground and other satellite telescopes after rapid notification. Within seconds of a trigger the BAT produces and relays to the ground a position good to three arc minutes and a four channel light curve. A full ten minutes of event data follows on subsequent ground station passes. The burst archive has allowed us to determine ensemble burst parameters such as fluence, peak flux and duration. An overview of the properties of BAT bursts and BAT'S performance as a burst monitor will be presented in this talk. BAT is a coded aperture imaging system with a wide (approx.2 sr) field of view consisting of a large coded mask located 1 m above a 5200 cm2 array of 32.768 CdZnTe detectors. All electronics and other hardware systems on the BAT have been operating well since commissioning and there is no sign of any degradation on orbit. The flight and ground software have proven similarly robust and allow the real time localization of all bursts and the rapid derivation of burst light curves, spectra and spectral fits on the ground.

  3. Creep Burst Testing of a Woven Inflatable Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, Molly M.; Valle, Gerard D.; James, George H.; Oliveras, Ovidio M.; Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.

    2015-01-01

    A woven Vectran inflatable module 88 inches in diameter and 10 feet long was tested at the NASA Johnson Space Center until failure from creep. The module was pressurized pneumatically to an internal pressure of 145 psig, and was held at pressure until burst. The external environment remained at standard atmospheric temperature and pressure. The module burst occurred after 49 minutes at the target pressure. The test article pressure and temperature were monitored, and video footage of the burst was captured at 60 FPS. Photogrammetry was used to obtain strain measurements of some of the webbing. Accelerometers on the test article measured the dynamic response. This paper discusses the test article, test setup, predictions, observations, photogrammetry technique and strain results, structural dynamics methods and quick-look results, and a comparison of the module level creep behavior to the strap level creep behavior.

  4. Fermi/GBM Observations of SGRJ0501 + 4516 Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Baring, Matthew G.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Woods, Peter M.; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Scargle, Jeffrey; Granot, Jonathan; Preece, Robert; von Kienlin, Andreas; Chaplin, Vandiver; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Zhang, Shuang Nan; Bhat, Narayan; Finger, Mark H.; Gehrels. Neil; Harding, Alice; Kaper, Lex; Kaspi, Victoria; Mcenery, Julie; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGRJ0501+4516, detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during the 13 days of the source activation in 2008 (August 22 to September 3). We find that the T(sub 90) durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of approx. 123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T(sub 90)s estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of approx. 124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two black body functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that E(sub peak) decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of approx. 30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10(exp -6)erg/sq cm/s, increasing steadily afterwards. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550 - 5418 and 1806 - 20. The isotropic luminosity, L(sub iso), corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4 - l.5 x 10(exp 40) erg/s.

  5. A Novel Experimental Technique to Simulate Pillar Burst in Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, M. C.; Zhao, F.; Cai, M.; Du, S.

    2015-09-01

    Pillar burst is one type of rockburst that occurs in underground mines. Simulating the stress change and obtaining insight into the pillar burst phenomenon under laboratory conditions are essential for studying the rock behavior during pillar burst in situ. To study the failure mechanism, a novel experimental technique was proposed and a series of tests were conducted on some granite specimens using a true-triaxial strainburst test system. Acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used to monitor the rock fracturing process. The damage evolution process was investigated using techniques such as macro and micro fracture characteristics observation, AE energy evolution, and b value analysis and fractal dimension analysis of cracks on fragments. The obtained results indicate that stepped loading and unloading simulated the pillar burst phenomenon well. Four deformation stages are divided as initial stress state, unloading step I, unloading step II, and final burst. It is observed that AE energy has a sharp increase at the initial stress state, accumulates slowly at unloading steps I and II, and increases dramatically at peak stress. Meanwhile, the mean b values fluctuate around 3.50 for the first three deformation stages and then decrease to 2.86 at the final stage, indicating the generation of a large amount of macro fractures. Before the test, the fractal dimension values are discrete and mainly vary between 1.10 and 1.25, whereas after failure the values concentrate around 1.25-1.35.

  6. Broadband Spectral Investigations of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lin; Baring, Matthew G; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Younes, George; Watts, Anna L; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT Windowed Timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5 - 200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT/GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbo...

  7. Evaluation of Burst Loss Rate of an Optical Burst Switching (OBS) Network with Wavelength Conversion Capability

    OpenAIRE

    Reza, Md. Shamim; Hossain, Md. Maruf; Majumder, Satya Prasad

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new analytical model for calculating burst loss rate (BLR) in a slotted optical burst switched network. The analytical result leads to a framework which provides guidelines for optical burst switched networks. Wavelength converter is used for burst contention resolution. The effect of several design parameters such as burst arrival probability, wavelength conversion capability, number of slots per burst and number of wavelengths is incorporated on the above performance m...

  8. Signal processing of macro pulse monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam current signal processing system for long burst beam is now under development at JAERI FEL superconducting linac. The system utilizes core current monitors already installed and enables simultaneous monitoring of the long burst beam current along the linac. (author)

  9. Slug length evolution of gas-liquid slug flow in combined riser pipe with small length-diameter ratio%小长径比组合立管内液塞长度演化规律

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王立满; 何利民; 罗小明

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of slug length distribution was investigated in a combined riser pipe, which is the pipe in front of the inlet of gas-liquid cylindrical cyclone separator ( GLCC) with small length-diameter ratio. It is found that the slug velocity decreases as the slug flows from horizontal inlet to vertical section and increases as it passes through the vertical section. This phenomenon affects the calculation of slug length. The slug length distributions of the inlet, vertical pipe and outlet all con-form to log-normal distribution. With the increase of gas superficial velocity, the mean slug length of the inlet section firstly increases then decreases, and the mean slug length of outlet section decreases. With the increase of gas superficial velocity, the mean slug length of the vertical section decreases at low liquid superficial velocity, and firstly increases then decreases at high liquid superficial velocity. The mean slug length firstly increases then decreases from inlet to outlet of the combined riser pipe.%以气液柱状旋流分离器( GLCC)入口管之前的小长径比组合立管为对象,建立一套气液两相流试验系统,实验研究组合立管内不同位置的液塞长度统计分布规律。结果表明:液塞从水平入口段进入立管段直至排出的过程中存在液塞减速与加速现象,计算液塞长度时必须考虑。水平入口段、立管段及水平出口段的液塞长度分布均符合对数正态分布;随折算气速增大,入口段平均液塞长度先增大后减小,出口段平均液塞长度则呈减小趋势。在低折算液速下,立管段平均液塞长度随折算气速增大而减小;高折算液速时,平均液塞长度随折算气速增大先增大后减小。液塞通过整个组合立管的过程中,平均液塞长度先增大后减小。

  10. Slit burst test of tubes for evaluation of J-R curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work evaluates the J-R curves obtained from the slit burst tests and small compact tension specimens from medium carbon steel (A106 Gr C) seamless tubes. The slit burst tests were carried out using a custom-built test setup with unloading compliance as the crack growth monitoring method. The results from these two types of tests and the relation between them is used to examine the issue of transferability of specimen J-R curve to the burst test conditions in the tubes. The J-R curves obtained from small specimen and burst tests of tubes agree with each other over a very small crack growth region (Δa ∼ 0.7 mm). The internal pressure predicted by the J initiation value obtained from the curved compact tension specimens agree well with the burst data. The fracture morphology and nature of crack growth front is different for these two cases. (author)

  11. Modeling and simulation of two-phase horizontal and vertical slug flow patterns with a slug tracking numerical model; Modelagem e simulacao do escoamento bifasico no padrao de golfadas na horizontal e vertical atraves de um modelo numerico de slug tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Hendy Tisserant; Morales, Rigoberto Eleazar Melgarejo [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UTFPR). Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica e de Materiais (PPGEM) (Brazil)], e-mails: hendy@petrobras.com.br, rmorales@utfpr.edu.br; Rosa, Eugenio Spano; Mazza, Ricardo Augusto [Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. (FEM). Unicamp (Brazil)], e-mails: erosa@fem.unicamp.br, mazza@fem.unicamp.br

    2009-06-15

    Multiphase mixtures are a common occurrence in oil and gas production and transportation pipelines. This mixture flow can be modeled as the biphasic flow of liquid and gas. The simultaneous flow of liquid and gas in pipelines is characterized by the pattern in which the phases are arranged. Over a wide range of flows of the phases, including the flows common to the oil industry, the flow is arranged in an intermittent pattern known as slug flows. This flow pattern is characterized by a random repetition in time and space of liquid slugs and elongated bubbles of gas. This paper presents the mathematical and numerical modeling of intermittent slug flows. Mathematical modeling is based on the application of mass conservation equations and the quantity of bubble and slug momentum. The numerical model is the dynamic tracking of slugs, in which the bubbles and slugs are spread along the pipe and can interact through the exchange of mass and the quantity of momentum. A model for the random input of the bubbles and slugs at the pipe entrance is also proposed, to capture the inherent intermittency of the flow. Numerical results obtained from the simulations are presented and they are compared with experimental data for the vertical and horizontal flow of air and water. The results show the average values and the distribution of variables along the pipeline. Furthermore, the simulation results are compared using the random and periodic boundary conditions. There is a good comparison between the numerical and experimental results, and the intermittent flow is captured. (author)

  12. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  13. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  14. Comparison of constant-rate pumping test and slug interference test results at the Hanford Site B pond multilevel test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, is responsible for monitoring the movement and fate of contamination within the unconfined aquifer to ensure that public health and the environment are protected. To support the monitoring and assessment of contamination migration on the Hanford Site, a sitewide 3-dimensional groundwater flow model is being developed. Providing quantitative hydrologic property data is instrumental in development of the 3-dimensional model. Multilevel monitoring facilities have been installed to provide detailed, vertically distributed hydrologic characterization information for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer. In previous reports, vertically distributed water-level and hydrochemical data obtained over time from these multi-level monitoring facilities have been evaluated and reported. This report describes the B pond facility in Section 2.0. It also provides analysis results for a constant-rate pumping test (Section 3.0) and slug interference test (Section 4.0) that were conducted at a multilevel test facility located near B Pond (see Figure 1. 1) in the central part of the Hanford Site. A hydraulic test summary (Section 5.0) that focuses on the comparison of hydraulic property estimates obtained using the two test methods is also presented. Reference materials are listed in Section 6.0

  15. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxham, Amanda

    central engine activity and compare the model results with the observational data. We show that the observed X-ray flare phenomenology can be explained within the internal shock model. The number, width and occurring time of flares are then used to diagnose the central engine activity, putting constraints on the energy, ejection time, width and number of ejected shells. We find that the observed X-ray flare time history generally reflects the time history of the central engine, which reactivates multiple times after the prompt emission phase with progressively reduced energy. This shell model code can be used to constrain broadband observations of GRB 090926A, which showed two flares in both the Swift UVOT and XRT bands. Using the prompt emission fluence to constrain the total energy contained in the blastwave, the internal shock model requires that Lorentz factors of the shells causing flares must be less than the Lorentz factor of the blastwave when the shells are ejected. Recent observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) revealed a power law decay feature of the high energy emission (above 100 MeV), which led to the suggestion that it originates from an external shock. We analyze four GRBs (080916C, 090510, 090902B and 090926A) jointly detected by Fermi LAT and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), which have high quality lightcurves in both instrument energy bands. Using the MeV prompt emission (GBM) data, we can record the energy output from the central engine as a function of time. Assuming a constant radiative efficiency, we are able to track energy accumulation in the external shock using our internal/external shell model code and show that the late time lightcurves fit well within the external shock model, but the early time lightcurves are dominated by the internal shock component which has a shallow decay phase due to the initial pile-up of shells onto the blast wave.

  16. MULTIPHASE DROPLET/SLUG BREAK-UP MECHANISM IN MICROFLUIDIC T-JUNCTIONS AT VARIOUS WEBER NUMBERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Leng (Dawn Leow

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-MY X-NONE X-NONE The formation of immiscible liquid droplets, or slugs, in microchannels features the advantages of volume control and mixing enhancement over single-phase microflows. Although the applications of droplet-based microfluidics have been widely demonstrated, the fundamental physics governing droplet break-up remains an area of active research. This study defines an effective Weber (Weeff number that characterizes the interplay of interfacial tension, shear stress and channel pressure drop in driving slug formation in T-junction microchannel for a relative range of low, intermediate and high flow rates. The immiscible fluid system in this study consists of Tetradecane slug formation in Acetonitrile. The progressive deformation of slug interfaces during break-up events is observed. Experimental results indicate that, at a relatively low Weeff, clean slug break-up occurs at the intersection of the side and main channels. At intermediate Weeff, the connecting neck of the dispersed phase is stretched to a short and thin trail of laminar flow prior to breaking up a short distance downstream of the T-junction. At a relatively high Weeff, the connecting neck develops into a longer and thicker trail of laminar flow that breaks up further downstream of the main channel.

  17. Off-take and slug transition at T-junction of vertical-up branch in the horizontal pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The off-take and the slug transition on air-water interface are experimentally investigated at the T-junction of the horizontal pipe with a vertical upward branch to simulate the loss-of-residual-heat-removal during a mid-loop operation in the Korea standard nuclear power plant. Scaling analysis is performed to scale down the experimental facility to the reference nuclear power plant. Two different diameters of branch pipes are used to verify the scaling laws and their scale effects. Air is used as working gaseous fluid and no water flow exists. Off-take behavior on horizontal stratified and slug flows is visually observed in the horizontal pipe. The experimental data are divided into three categories; onset of liquid entrainment at T-junctions, onset of slug transition in the horizontal pipe, and discharge quality in the branch pipe. It is found out that the scale effect of the branch diameter on the onset of liquid entrainment is small and the existing correlations for it are applicable. Also, the onset of slug transition shows a discrepancy with Taitel-Dukler's correlation and has a strong influence on the discharge quality. New correlations for discharge quality are developed considering the critical dependency of the onset of slugging. (author)

  18. Palatability of weeds from different European origins to the slugs Deroceras reticulatum Müller and Arion lusitanicus Mabille

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Michael; Kollmann, Johannes; Edwards, Peter J.

    1999-04-01

    As part of a study on the significance of seed provenances in schemes to enhance biodiversity in agricultural habitats, juvenile plants of Cichorium intybus, Daucus carota, Leucanthemum vulgare and Silene alba of different European origins were exposed to grazing by two slug species, Deroceras reticulatum and Arion lusitanicus. Living plants were offered in trays, either in a glasshouse ( Deroceras) or outdoors ( Arion). The amount of herbivory was origin-dependent, with higher losses for all four species from German and Hungarian provenances compared with English and Swiss plants. The main trend was similar for both slug species except in the case of Daucus, and there was a significant 'origin × plant species' interaction. We found strong correlations between provenance-specific herbivory and certain climatic characteristics of the corresponding regions, i.e. winter minimum temperatures, and dryness in spring and late summer, which are crucial for the development of slugs. The results can be interpreted in terms of a SW-NE European climatic gradient and may be a consequence of differences in the need for plant defences against herbivory by slugs. Additionally, the data on palatability were compared with susceptibility towards two parasites which occurred in a field experiment, a leaf miner on Leucanthemum vulgare and a rust fungus on Silene alba. While specific leaf mining frequencies on Leucanthemum contrasted with the palatability of the different provenances to slugs, the rust infection on Silene was low on local and German plants, and higher on the more distant provenances from England and Hungary.

  19. Comparison of hydraulic conductivities by grain-size analysis pumping, and slug tests in Quaternary gravels, NE Slovenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucko, Tatjana; Verbovšek, Timotej

    2015-08-01

    Hydraulic conductivities (K) can be obtained from pumping and slug tests as well as grain size analysis. Although empirical methods for such estimations are longstanding, there is still insufficient comparison of K values among the various approaches. Six grain-size analysis methods were tested on coarse-grained alluvial sediments from 12 water wells in NE Slovenia. Values of K from grainsize methods were compared to those of pumping tests and slug tests. Six grain-size methods (USBR, Slichter, Hazen, Beyer, Kozeny-Carman, and Terzaghi) were used for comparison with the Theis and Neuman pumping test method and the Bouwer-Rice method for slug tests. The results show that the USBR (US Bureau of Reclamation) method overestimates K values and there is no correlation with other results, so its use is not advised. Conversely, whilst the Slichter method gives much lower estimates of K, it is the only one to completely fulfill the grain size requirements. Other methods (Hazen, Beyer, Kozeny- Carman, and Terzaghi) result in intermediate values and are similar to the Slichter method; however they should be used for smaller-sized sediments. Due to their high transmissivity and small radius of inffiuence, slug tests should be avoided in the analysis of gravels, as they only test a small portion of the aquifer compared to pumping tests. This is confirmed by the low correlation coefficients between hydraulic conductivities obtained from pumping tests and slug tests.

  20. The distributed-order fractional diffusion-wave equation of groundwater flow: Theory and application to pumping and slug tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Ninghu; Nelson, Paul N.; Connor, Sarah

    2015-10-01

    We present a distributed-order fractional diffusion-wave equation (dofDWE) to describe radial groundwater flow to or from a well, and three sets of solutions of the dofDWE for flow from a well for aquifer tests: one for pumping tests, and two for slug tests. The dofDWE is featured by two temporal orders of fractional derivatives, β1 and β2, which characterise small and large pores, respectively. By fitting the approximate solutions of the dofDWE to data from slug tests in the field, we determined the effective saturated hydraulic conductivity, Ke, transmissivity, Tf, and the order of fractional derivatives, β2 in one test and β2 and β1 in the second test. We found that the patterns of groundwater flow from a well during the slug tests at this site belong to the class of sub-diffusion with β2 concept of the critical time to link Ke as a function of β2 and β1. The importance of the orders of fractional derivatives is obvious in the approximate solutions: for short time slug tests only the parameter β2 for flow in large pores is present while for long time slug tests the parameters β2 and β1 are present indicating both large and small pores are functioning.

  1. Slugs' last meals: molecular identification of sequestered chloroplasts from different algal origins in Sacoglossa (Opisthobranchia, Gastropoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Händeler, Katharina; Wägele, Heike; Wahrmund, Ute; Rüdinger, Mareike; Knoop, Volker

    2010-11-01

    Some sacoglossan sea slugs have become famous for their unique capability to extract and incorporate functional chloroplasts from algal food organisms (mainly Ulvophyceae) into their gut cells. The functional incorporation of the so-called kleptoplasts allows the slugs to rely on photosynthetic products for weeks to months, enabling them to survive long periods of food shortage over most of their life-span. The algal food spectrum providing kleptoplasts as temporary, non-inherited endosymbionts appears to vary among sacoglossan slugs, but detailed knowledge is sketchy or unavailable. Accurate identification of algal donor species, which provide the chloroplasts for long-term retention is of primary importance to elucidate the biochemical mechanisms allowing long-term functionality of the captured chloroplast in the foreign animal cell environment. Whereas some sacoglossans forage on a variety of algal species, (e.g. Elysia crispata and E. viridis) others are more selective. Hence, characterizing the range of functional sacoglossan-chloroplast associations in nature is a prerequisite to understand the basis of this enigmatic endosymbiosis. Here, we present a suitable chloroplast gene (tufA) as a marker, which allows identification of the respective algal kleptoplast donor taxa by analysing DNA from whole animals. This novel approach allows identification of donor algae on genus or even species level, thus providing evidence for the taxonomic range of food organisms. We report molecular evidence that chloroplasts from different algal sources are simultaneously incorporated in some species of Elysia. NeigborNet analyses for species assignments are preferred over tree reconstruction methods because the former allow more reliable statements on species identification via barcoding, or rather visualize alternative allocations not to be seen in the latter. PMID:21565106

  2. US Army Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS) was developed to meet the Army requirements of an unattended, automatic nuclear burst reporting system. It provides pertinent data for battlefield commanders on a timely basis with high reliability

  3. Preemption window for burst differentiation in OBS

    OpenAIRE

    Klinkowski, Miroslaw; Careglio, Davide; Morató, Daniel; Solé Pareta, Josep

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel control architecture for optical burst switching networks to efficiently apply burst preemption without the resources overbooking, which is specific to conventional OBS. Simulation results prove the effectiveness of this proposal.

  4. The Fermi-GBM 3-year X-ray Burst Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Jenke, P A; Connaughton, V; Beklen, E; Camero-Arranz, A; Finger, M H; Wilson-Hodge, C A

    2016-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all sky gamma-ray monitor well known in the gamma-ray burst community. Although GBM excels in detecting the hard, bright extragalactic GRBs, its sensitivity above 8 keV and all-sky view make it an excellent instrument for the detection of rare, short-lived Galactic transients. In March 2010, we initiated a systematic search for transients using GBM data. We conclude this phase of the search by presenting a 3 year catalog of 1084 non-solar events. Using spectral analysis, location and spatial distributions we subdivided the 1084 events into 752 thermonuclear X-ray bursts, 267 transient events from accretion flares and X-ray pulses, and 65 untriggered gamma-ray bursts.

  5. Directed percolation describes lifetime and growth of turbulent puffs and slugs

    CERN Document Server

    Sipos, Maksim

    2011-01-01

    The phenomenology of pipe flow is characterized by complex turbulent structures, puffs and slugs, whose behavior is still not fully understood. In this Letter, we show that transitional turbulence in a pipe can be quantitatively modeled by directed percolation (DP). The active (turbulent) states in subcritical DP exhibit superexponentially diverging characteristic lifetime, similar to that observed of turbulent puffs. Above the percolation threshold, active (turbulent) clusters expand into the inactive (laminar) phase with a well-defined velocity whose scaling with control parameter (Reynolds number or percolation probability) is consistent with experimental results.

  6. 3-D slug flow heat transfer analysis of coupled coolant cells in finite LMFBR bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional single region slug flow heat transfer analysis for finite LMFBR rod bundles using a classical analytical solution method has been performed. According to the isolated single cell analysis, the results show that the peripheral clad temperature variation as well as the thermal entrance length are strongly dependent upon the degree of irregularity displayed by various coolant geometries. Since under the present LMFBR conditions, fully-developed temperature fields may hardly be established in such characteristic rod bundle regions, a 3-D heat transfer analysis seems to be mandatory. This implies that the results of fully developed heat transfer analyses are by far too conservative

  7. Implementation of a new bubbly-slug interphase drag model in RELAP5/MOD2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implementation of a new bubbly-slug interphase drag model in the RELAP5/MOD2 code is described. The model is based on the determination of an effective interphase drag coefficient from a set of best-estimate void fraction correlations covering the full range of geometries and flow conditions encountered in PWR safety analysis. Calculations are reported which show that the new model leads to a much better prediction of void fraction profile for low flows in rod bundles than the standard model. Further work is necessary to derive a model formulation which can be guaranteed to produce physical drag coefficients in all flow situations. (author)

  8. Long Type I X-ray Bursts and Neutron Star Interior Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Cumming, Andrew; Macbeth, Jared; Zand, J. J. M. in't; Page, Dany

    2005-01-01

    Superbursts are very energetic Type I X-ray bursts discovered in recent years by long term monitoring of X-ray bursters, believed to be due to unstable ignition of carbon in the deep ocean of the neutron star. A number of "intermediate duration" bursts have also been observed, probably associated with ignition of a thick helium layer. We investigate the sensitivity of these long X-ray bursts to the thermal profile of the neutron star crust and core. We first compare cooling models of superbur...

  9. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered

  10. An Analytical-Numerical Model for Two-Phase Slug Flow through a Sudden Area Change in Microchannels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mehdizadeh Momen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two new analytical models have been developed to calculate two-phase slug flow pressure drop in microchannels through a sudden contraction. Even though many studies have been reported on two-phase flow in microchannels, considerable discrepancies still exist, mainly due to the difficulties in experimental setup and measurements. Numerical simulations were performed to support the new analytical models and to explore in more detail the physics of the flow in microchannels with a sudden contraction. Both analytical and numerical results were compared to the available experimental data and other empirical correlations. Results show that models, which were developed based on the slug and semi-slug assumptions, agree well with experiments in microchannels. Moreover, in contrast to the previous empirical correlations which were tuned for a specific geometry, the new analytical models are capable of taking geometrical parameters as well as flow conditions into account.

  11. Drift flux model as approximation of two fluid model for two phase dispersed and slug flow in tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigmatulin, R.I.

    1995-09-01

    The analysis of one-dimensional schematizing for non-steady two-phase dispersed and slug flow in tube is presented. Quasi-static approximation, when inertia forces because of the accelerations of the phases may be neglected, is considered. Gas-liquid bubbly and slug vertical upward flows are analyzed. Non-trivial theoretical equations for slip velocity for these flows are derived. Juxtaposition of the derived equations for slip velocity with the famous Zuber-Findlay correlation as cross correlation coefficients is criticized. The generalization of non-steady drift flux Wallis theory taking into account influence of wall friction on the bubbly or slug flows for kinematical waves is considered.

  12. A PHYSICAL MODEL FOR PREDICTING THE PRESSURE DROP OF GAS-LIQUID SLUG FLOW IN HORIZONTAL PIPES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive treatment of all sources of pressure drop within intermittent gas-liquid flow is presented. A slug unit is divided into three parts and the pressure gradient of each part is calculated separately. In the mixing zone the momentum theory is employed and the mixing process between the film and slug is simulated by a two-dimensional wall jet entering a large reservoir to calculate the mixing length. The boundary layer theory is utilized to calculate the pressure drop for the slug body and the momentum equation of the film zone is integrated to calculate the pressure drop for the film zone. The pressure drop predicted in present model is in good agreement with all the measurements.

  13. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG: THE FIRST TWO YEARS

    OpenAIRE

    Paciesas, W. S.; Meegan, C. A.; Kienlin, von, A.; Bhat, P.N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M S; Burgess, M; Chaplin, V.; Connaughton, V.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G. J.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Gibby, H., M.; Giles, M

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to enhance the scientific return from Fermi in studying gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In its first two years of operation GBM triggered on 491 GRBs. We summarize the criteria used for triggering and quantify the general characteristics of the triggered GRBs, including their locations, durations, peak flux, and fluence. This catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are availab...

  14. Periodicities in gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma ray burst models based on magnetic neutron stars face a problem of account for the scarcity of observed periods. Both this scarcity and the typical period found when any is detected are explained if the neutron stars are accreting in binary systems

  15. Analysis of Slug Flow in Multiphase Subsea Pipeline%混输管线段塞流分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鞠朋朋; 秦家钧; 刘培林

    2012-01-01

    段塞流是混输管线流动保障中遇到的最严重问题之一.随着水深加大,其严重性也随之增加,影响到下游工艺设备的正常操作,甚至引起生产关断,因而在制定油气田前期开发方案时须要统筹考虑.分析了段塞流的产生机理,并分项阐明生产段塞、地形段塞和清管段塞等管线的段塞流情况,以及为降低段塞流对生产设备的影响而采取的措施.根据南海某项目具体情况,利用OLGA软件进行分析,对各种工况下的段塞流提出了解决方案.%Slug flow is a severe problem for multiphase subsea pipeline flow assurance, and becomes more import with the increase of water depth. It can result in unsmooth operation of process equipment, and serious shut-down of process flow. Therefore, it is import to ensure solving methods of slug flow at feed design stage. In the article, forming theory of slug flow is expatiated, and production slug flow, terrain slug flow and pigging slug flow are explained respectively. Simultaneously, defend measures are introduced in order to keep reliable operation. For a NanHai deepwater project, resolving concept is discussed with software OLGA.

  16. Fuzzy-Based Adaptive Hybrid Burst Assembly Technique for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakar Muhammad Umaru; Muhammad Shafie Abd Latiff; Yahaya Coulibaly

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) paradigm is perceived as an intermediate switching technology for future all-optical networks. Burst assembly that is the first process in OBS is the focus of this paper. In this paper, an intelligent hybrid burst assembly algorithm that is based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The new algorithm is evaluated against the traditional hybrid burst assembly algorithm and the fuzzy adaptive threshold (FAT) burst assembly algorithm via simulation. Simulation results sh...

  17. Two-dimensional burst identification codes and their use in burst correction

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    A new class of codes, called burst identification codes, is defined and studied. These codes can be used to determine the patterns of burst errors. Two-dimensional burst correcting codes can be easily constructed from burst identification codes. The resulting class of codes is simple to implement and has lower redundancy than other comparable codes. The results are pertinent to the study of radiation effects on VLSI RAM chips, which can cause two-dimensional bursts of errors.

  18. In vivo binding to and functional repression of the VDR gene promoter by SLUG in human breast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mittal, Mukul K; Myers, Jeremy N.; Misra, Smita; Bailey, Charvann K.; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2008-01-01

    The regulation of vitamin D receptor (VDR), a key mediator in the vitamin D pathway, in breast cancer etiology has long been of interest. We have shown here that the transcriptional repressor protein SLUG inhibits the expression of VDR in human breast cancer cells. To explore the possibility that SLUG regulates the VDR gene promoter, we cloned a 628 bp fragment (−613 to +15) of the human VDR gene promoter. This region contains three E2-box sequences (CAGGTG/CACCTG), the classical binding site...

  19. Closest Gamma Ray Burst Providing Scientists With Crucial Test for Burst Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    -ray observations, visible light from GRB 030329 was observed by 65 telescopes around the world. At its brightest, the visible light from this burst was detectable with moderate-sized amateur telescopes. Gamma Ray Bursts were first detected in 1967 by a satellite monitoring compliance with the 1963 atmospheric nuclear test-ban treaty. For three decades thereafter, astronomers were unable to determine their distances from Earth, and thus were unable to begin understanding the physics underlying the explosions. In 1997, the first distance measurements were made to GRBs, and the NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) detected the first radio emission from a GRB afterglow. Once scientists determined that GRBs originate in distant galaxies and that they probably occur in regions of those galaxies where stars are actively forming, some 200 proposed models for what causes GRBs were reduced to a handful of viable models. Most scientists now believe that GRBs arise from a violent explosion that ends the life of a star much more massive than the Sun. Whereas such an explosion as a typical supernova leaves a dense neutron star, a GRB explosion leaves a black hole, a concentration of mass with gravitational pull so strong that not even light can escape it. The VLBA is a continent-wide system of ten radio- telescope antennas, ranging from Hawaii in the west to the U.S. Virgin Islands in the east, providing the greatest resolving power, or ability to see fine detail, in astronomy. Dedicated in 1993, the VLBA is operated from the NRAO's Array Operations Center in Socorro, New Mexico. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  20. Proposals for improving interphase drag modelling for the bubbly and slug regimes in RELAP5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposal is put forward that the effective interphase drag coefficient for the bubbly and slug regimes in RELAP5 should be calculated using best-estimate void fraction correlations. It is argued that this will lead to improvements in the code's modelling of interphase drag and evidence is given to corroborate this. The need for such improvements has been prompted by the poor performance of the current models in simulating rod bundle experiments. There is also concern that the models do not account for profile slip effects, which could be important in a variety of geometries, and that the slug flow equations may not be appropriate for large diameter vertical pipes. To support the proposal, a set of void fraction correlations is identified which is believed to cover the full range of geometries and flow conditions encountered in PWR safety analysis including the analysis of small-scale experimental facilities. This set is selected from a detailed appraisal of the most appropriate correlations found in the literature which takes account of comparisons with experimental data and physical considerations. This Report forms part of the UK's commitment to the ICAP Code Improvement Plan. The recommendations will now be implemented in a development version of RELAP5/MOD3 and a preliminary assessment made. The interphase drag models used in the annular-mist regime will also be examined and, if necessary, appropriate improvements will be proposed. (author)

  1. CFD Analysis of a Slug Mixing Experiment Conducted on a VVER-1000 Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Moretti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A commercial CFD code was applied, for validation purposes, to the simulation of a slug mixing experiment carried out at OKB “Gidropress” scaled facility in the framework of EC TACIS project R2.02/02: “Development of safety analysis capabilities for VVER-1000 transients involving spatial variations of coolant properties (temperature or boron concentration at core inlet.” Such experimental model reproduces a VVER-1000 nuclear reactor and is aimed at investigating the in-vessel mixing phenomena. The addressed experiment involves the start-up of one of the four reactor coolant pumps (the other three remaining idle, and the presence of a tracer slug on the starting loop, which is thus transported to the reactor pressure vessel where it mixes with the clear water. Such conditions may occur in a boron dilution scenario, hence the relevance of the addressed phenomena for nuclear reactor safety. Both a pretest and a posttest CFD simulations of the mentioned experiment were performed, which differ in the definition of the boundary conditions (based either on nominal quantities or on measured quantities, resp.. The numerical results are qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed and compared against the measured data in terms of space and time tracer distribution at the core inlet. The improvement of the results due to the optimization of the boundary conditions is evidenced, and a quantification of the simulation accuracy is proposed.

  2. A Review of the Multilevel Slug Test for Characterizing Aquifer Heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Shyun Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available All aquifers are heterogeneous to a certain degree. The spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity K(x, y, z, or aquifer heterogeneity, significantly influences the groundwater flow movement and associated solute transport. Of particular importance in designing an in-situ remediation plan is a knowledge of low-K layers because they are less accessible to remedial agents and form a bottleneck in remediation. The characterization of aquifer heterogeneity is essential to the solution of many practical and scientific groundwater problems. This article reviews the field technique using the multilevel slug test (MLST, which determines a series of K estimates at depths of interest in a well by making use of a double-packer system. The K(z obtained manifests the vertical variation of hydraulic conductivity in the vicinity of the test well, and the combination of K(z from different wells gives rise to a three-dimensional description of K(x, y, z. The MLST response is rather sensitive to hydraulic conductivity variation; e.g., it is oscillatory for highly permeable conditions (K > 5 × 10-4 m s-1 and a nonoscillatory for K < 5 × 10-4 m s-1. In this article we discuss the instrumentation of the double-packer system, the implementation of the depth-specific slug test, the data analysis methods for a spectrum of response characteristics usually observed in the field, and field applications of the MLST.

  3. Experimental investigations and modelling on the transition from bubble to slug flow in vertical pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To qualify CFD codes for two-phase flows, they have to be equipped with constitutive laws describing the interaction between the gaseous and the liquid phases. In the case of bubble flow this particularly concerns the forces acting on the bubbles and bubble coalescence and break-up. To obtain detailed experimental data, an electrode wire-mesh sensor was used, which enables the measurement of the phase distribution with a very high resolution in space and in time. Air-water flow at ambient conditions in a vertical pipe (51.2 mm inner diameter) is investigated to have well defined boundary conditions. Local bubble size distributions are calculated from the data. The measurements were done in different distances from the gas injection device. As a result the development of bubble size distributions as well as the development of the radial gas fraction profiles can be studied. It was found, that the bubble size distribution as well as local effects determine the transition from bubble flow to slug flow. The data are used for the development of a model, which predicts the development of the bubble size distribution and the transition from bubble flow to slug flow in case of stationary flow in a vertical pipe. (orig.)

  4. Wire-mesh and ultrasound techniques applied for the characterization of gas-liquid slug flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ofuchi, Cesar Y.; Sieczkowski, Wytila Chagas; Neves Junior, Flavio; Arruda, Lucia V.R.; Morales, Rigoberto E.M.; Amaral, Carlos E.F.; Silva, Marco J. da [Federal University of Technology of Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)], e-mails: ofuchi@utfpr.edu.br, wytila@utfpr.edu.br, neves@utfpr.edu.br, lvrarruda@utfpr.edu.br, rmorales@utfpr.edu.br, camaral@utfpr.edu.br, mdasilva@utfpr.edu.br

    2010-07-01

    Gas-liquid two-phase flows are found in a broad range of industrial applications, such as chemical, petrochemical and nuclear industries and quite often determine the efficiency and safety of process and plants. Several experimental techniques have been proposed and applied to measure and quantify two-phase flows so far. In this experimental study the wire-mesh sensor and an ultrasound technique are used and comparatively evaluated to study two-phase slug flows in horizontal pipes. The wire-mesh is an imaging technique and thus appropriated for scientific studies while ultrasound-based technique is robust and non-intrusive and hence well suited for industrial applications. Based on the measured raw data it is possible to extract some specific slug flow parameters of interest such as mean void fraction and characteristic frequency. The experiments were performed in the Thermal Sciences Laboratory (LACIT) at UTFPR, Brazil, in which an experimental two-phase flow loop is available. The experimental flow loop comprises a horizontal acrylic pipe of 26 mm diameter and 9 m length. Water and air were used to produce the two phase flow under controlled conditions. The results show good agreement between the techniques. (author)

  5. Maxi observations of long X-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Serino, Motoko; Tamagawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Takanori; Nakahira, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Negoro, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We report nine long X-ray bursts from neutron stars, detected with Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). Some of these bursts lasted for hours, and hence are qualified as superbursts, which are prolonged thermonuclear flashes on neutron stars and are relatively rare events. MAXI observes roughly 85% of the whole sky every 92 minutes in the 2-20 keV energy band, and has detected nine bursts with a long e-folding decay time, ranging from 0.27 to 5.2 hours, since its launch in 2009 August until 2015 August. The majority of the nine events were found to originate from transient X-ray sources. The persistent luminosities of the sources, when these prolonged bursts were observed, were lower than 1% of the Eddington luminosity for five of them and lower than 20% for the rest. This trend is contrastive to the 18 superbursts observed before MAXI, all but two of which originated from bright persistent sources. The distribution of the total emitted energy, i.e., the product of e-folding time and luminosity, of these bu...

  6. Online recognition of the multiphase flow regime and study of slug flow in pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo Liejin; Bai Bofeng; Zhao Liang; Wang Xin; Gu Hanyang, E-mail: lj-guo@mail.xjtu.edu.c [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2009-02-01

    sensor performance. Among various flow patterns of gas-liquid flow, slug flow occurs frequently in the petroleum, chemical, civil and nuclear industries. In the offshore oil and gas field, the maximum slug length and its statistical distribution are very important for the design of separator and downstream processing facility at steady state operations. However transient conditions may be encountered in the production, such as operational upsets, start-up, shut-down, pigging and blowdown, which are key operational and safety issues related to oil field development. So it is necessary to have an understanding the flow parameters under transient conditions. In this paper, the evolution of slug length along a horizontal pipe in gas-liquid flow is also studied in details and then an experimental study of flowrate transients in slug flow is provided. Also, the special gas-liquid flow phenomena easily encountered in the life span of offshore oil fields, called severe slugging, is studied experimentally and some results are presented.

  7. Online recognition of the multiphase flow regime and study of slug flow in pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liejin, Guo; Bofeng, Bai; Liang, Zhao; Xin, Wang; Hanyang, Gu

    2009-02-01

    single sensor performance. Among various flow patterns of gas-liquid flow, slug flow occurs frequently in the petroleum, chemical, civil and nuclear industries. In the offshore oil and gas field, the maximum slug length and its statistical distribution are very important for the design of separator and downstream processing facility at steady state operations. However transient conditions may be encountered in the production, such as operational upsets, start-up, shut-down, pigging and blowdown, which are key operational and safety issues related to oil field development. So it is necessary to have an understanding the flow parameters under transient conditions. In this paper, the evolution of slug length along a horizontal pipe in gas-liquid flow is also studied in details and then an experimental study of flowrate transients in slug flow is provided. Also, the special gas-liquid flow phenomena easily encountered in the life span of offshore oil fields, called severe slugging, is studied experimentally and some results are presented.

  8. Banana Slug

    Science.gov (United States)

    First, Lucas

    2009-01-01

    Everyone insists that a person should go to a college that is right for him/her, somewhere that fits who he/she is, a place where a they belong. There are more than 4,000 colleges and universities in this country; how will a person find the one that is right for them? In this article, the author suggests that one should follow the mascot when…

  9. Gamma-Ray Bursts: The End Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Don

    1997-11-01

    The nature of gamma-ray bursts has been one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in astrophysics for more than a quarter century. A major reason for this is that no definite counterparts to the bursts could be found at other wavelengths, despite intense efforts spanning more than two decades. Consequently, the study of gamma-ray bursts has been isolated from the rest of astronomy. Scientists studying them have had only the laws of physics and the bursts themselves to guide them in attempting to solve the burst mystery. All of this changed dramatically with the discovery earlier this year of fading X-ray and optical sources in the arcminute-sized positional error boxes of several gamma-ray bursts. For the first time, temporal, as well as spatial, coincidence could be used to associate these X-ray and optical sources with the gamma-ray bursts. As a result, the odds are great that the fading X-ray and optical sources are counterparts of the bursts, and that the study of gamma-ray bursts has finally been connected with the rest of astronomy. In this talk, we describe the dramatic new information about the nature of gamma-ray bursts that the X-ray, optical, and radio observations of the fading sources have provided, and emphasize the implications that this information has for the distance scale to the bursts.

  10. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Balamurugan, A. M.; A. Sivasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The...

  11. Bubbles and Monetary Policy: To Burst or not to Burst?

    OpenAIRE

    König, Philipp; POTHIER, David

    2015-01-01

    The question of whether monetary policy should target asset prices remains a contentious issue. Prior to the 2007/08 financial crisis, central banks opted for a wait-and-see approach, remaining passive during the build-up of asset price bubbles but actively seeking to stabilize prices and output after they burst. The macroeconomic and financial turbulence that followed the subprime housing bubble has led to a renewed debate concerning monetary policy’s role in maintaining financial stability....

  12. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  13. 微通道内气-液弹状流动及传质特性研究进展 (Review on flow and mass transfer characteristics of gas-liquid slug flow in microchannels)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yao, Chaoqun; Yue, Jun; Zhao, Yuchao; Chen, Guangwen; Yuan, Quan

    2015-01-01

    Gas-liquid slug flow (also termed as Taylor flow) is a flow pattern characterized by the alternate movement of elongated bubbles and liquid slugs. Gas-liquid slug flow operation in microchannels has been found important implications in the enhancement of gas-liquid reactions due to its advantages su

  14. The effect of climate manipulations on the herbivory of the pest slug Deroceras reticulatum (Müller, 1774) (Pulmonata: Agriolimacidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Danasoury, H.; Iglesias-Piñeiro, J.; Córdoba, M.

    2016-01-01

    The pestiferous status of the terrestrial slug Deroceras reticulatum and the strong dependence of its biology and ecology on climatic factors have driven research on the potential responses of the slug to predicted scenarios of climate change. Here, we report two short-term experiments performed outdoors, under seminatural conditions, to assess the behavioural response of D. reticulatum to different climate manipulations in terms of herbivory, by measuring over 7 days the damage inflicted by slug populations to lettuce seedlings. The climate manipulations tested emulate predicted climatic conditions for northwest Spain, specifically winter warming and increased summer rainfall, in contrast respectively with normal winter conditions and summer without rain conditions. In a winter experiment, we compared a normal winter treatment with a winter warming treatment; with respect to the normal winter treatment, the winter warming treatment was characterised by higher temperature, lower relative humidity and the absence of rainfall. In a summer experiment, we compared a summer drought treatment with an increased summer rainfall treatment; with respect to the summer drought treatment, the increased summer rainfall treatment was characterised by the presence of rainfall, while the conditions of temperature and relative humidity were similar in both treatments. Neither winter warming nor increased summer rainfall did lead to a significant increase on the number of seedlings damaged by the slugs. However, with both treatments, we found a moderate increase on the amount of damage suffered by the seedlings. The results are discussed in the context of the potential responses of D. reticulatum to future climatic conditions.

  15. Effect of slug grazing on biomass production of a plant community during a short-term biodiversity experiment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lanta, Vojtěch

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 32, - (2007), s. 145-151. ISSN 1146-609X R&D Projects: GA ČR GD206/03/H034 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : biodiverzity * preference grazing * slugs Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.306, year: 2007

  16. Terrestrial Slugs as a Model Organism for Inquiry-Based Experimentation in a Majors General Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Brenda J.; Blair, Amy C.

    2013-01-01

    Many biology educators at the undergraduate level are revamping their laboratory curricula to incorporate inquiry-based research experiences so that students can directly participate in the process of science and improve their scientific reasoning skills. Slugs are an ideal organism for use in such a student-directed, hypothesis-driven experience.…

  17. Field experiments using the rhabditid nematode Phasmarhabditis hermaphrodita or salt as control measures against slugs in green asparagus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ester, A.; Rozen, van K.; Molendijk, L.P.G.

    2003-01-01

    Green asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) crops are frequently damaged by the grey field slug (Deroceras reticulatum). Most damage occurs in the soil, although some asparagus spears are attacked above ground. In the Netherlands damage occurs especially during the first 5 weeks of harvesting, from t

  18. Detection of Spectral Evolution in the Bursts Emitted During the 2008-2009 Active Episode of SGR J1550 - 5418

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Gruber, David; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Granot, Jonathan; Baring, Matthew G.; Gogus, Ersin; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Kaneko, Yuki; Lin, Lin; Watts, Anna L.; Bhat, Narayana; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Greiner, Jochen; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.; Rau, Arne

    2012-01-01

    In early October 2008, the Soft Gamma Repeater SGRJ1550 - 5418 (1E1547.0 - 5408, AXJ155052 - 5418, PSR J1550 - 5418) became active, emitting a series of bursts which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) after which a second especially intense activity period commenced in 2009 January and a third, less active period was detected in 2009 March-April. Here we analyze the GBM data of all the bursts from the first and last active episodes. We performed temporal and spectral analysis for all events and found that their temporal characteristics are very similar to the ones of other SGR bursts, as well the ones reported for the bursts of the main episode (average burst durations 170ms). In addition, we used our sample of bursts to quantify the systematic uncertainties of the GBM location algorithm for soft gamma-ray transients to less than or equal to 8 degrees. Our spectral analysis indicates significant spectral evolution between the first and last set of events. Although the 2008 October events are best fit with a single blackbody function, for the 2009 bursts an Optically Thin Thermal Bremsstrahlung (OTTB) is clearly preferred. We attribute this evolution to changes in the magnetic field topology of the source, possibly due to effects following the very energetic main bursting episode.

  19. The 2006-2007 Active Phase of Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts, and Burst Spectral Features

    CERN Document Server

    Gavriil, Fotis P; Kaspi, Victoria M

    2009-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in >11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 8-3x10^3 s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT ~ 2-6 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus three emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of 1.9+/-0.4 x 10^-7 Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a n...

  20. 水平管内油气两相弹状流的产生%AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON ONSET OF SLUGGING IN HORIZONTAL OIL-GAS PIPE FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡继勇; 罗毓珊; 陈听宽

    1999-01-01

    In this paper,the method of linear stability analysis is used to study the onset of slugging for oil-gas two-phase flow in a horizontal tube.The relation between the appearance of wavy stratified flow,the formation of slugs and the transition to stable slug flow is quantitatively investigated.A criterion for the transition to stable slug flow is derived from an initial condition of slug growth.The results analysed by the theoretical method compare well with the experimental results.

  1. Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression through suppressing E-cadherin expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yi; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yaqin; Wang, Nan; Liang, Hongwei; Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Zen, Ke; Gu, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    It is generally regarded that E-cadherin is downregulated during tumorigenesis via Snail/Slug-mediated E-cadherin transcriptional reduction. However, this transcriptional suppressive mechanism cannot explain the failure of producing E-cadherin protein in metastatic breast cancer cells after overexpressing E-cadherin mRNA. Here we reveal a novel mechanism that E-cadherin is post-transcriptionally regulated by Slug-promoted miR-221, which serves as an additional blocker for E-cadherin expression in metastatic tumor cells. Profiling the predicted E-cadherin-targeting miRNAs in breast cancer tissues and cells showed that miR-221 was abundantly expressed in breast tumor and metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells and its level was significantly higher in breast tumor or MDA-MB-231 cells than in distal non-tumor tissue and low-metastatic MCF-7 cells, respectively. MiR-221, which level inversely correlated with E-cadherin level in breast cancer cells, targeted E-cadherin mRNA open reading frame (ORF) and suppressed E-cadherin protein expression. Depleting or increasing miR-221 level in breast cancer cells induced or decreased E-cadherin protein level, leading to suppressing or promoting tumor cell progression, respectively. Moreover, miR-221 was specifically upregulated by Slug but not Snail. TGF-β treatment enhanced Slug activity and thus increased miR-221 level in MCF-7 cells. In summary, our results provide the first evidence that Slug-upregulated miR-221 promotes breast cancer progression via reducing E-cadherin expression. PMID:27174021

  2. Expression analysis of E-cadherin, Slug and GSK3β in invasive ductal carcinoma of breast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatnagar Dinesh

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer progression is linked to a partially dedifferentiated epithelial cell phenotype. The signaling pathways Wnt, Hedgehog, TGF-β and Notch have been implicated in experimental and developmental epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT. Recent findings from our laboratory confirm that active Wnt/β-catenin signaling is critically involved in invasive ductal carcinomas (IDCs of breast. Methods In the current study, we analyzed the expression patterns and relationships between the key Wnt/β-catenin signaling components- E-cadherin, Slug and GSK3β in IDCs of breast. Results Of the 98 IDCs analyzed, 53 (54% showed loss/or reduced membranous staining of E-cadherin in tumor cells. Nuclear accumulation of Slug was observed in 33 (34% IDCs examined. Loss or reduced level of cytoplasmic GSK3β expression was observed in 52/98 (53% cases; while 34/98 (35% tumors showed nuclear accumulation of GSK3β. Statistical analysis revealed associations of nuclear Slug expression with loss of membranous E-cadherin (p = 0.001; nuclear β-catenin (p = 0.001, and cytoplasmic β-catenin (p = 0.005, suggesting Slug mediated E-cadherin suppression via the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in IDCs. Our study also demonstrated significant correlation between GSK3β nuclear localization and tumor grade (p = 0.02, suggesting its association with tumor progression. Conclusion The present study for the first time provided the clinical evidence in support of Wnt/β-catenin signaling upregulation in IDCs and key components of this pathway - E-cadherin, Slug and GSK3β with β-catenin in implementing EMT in these cells.

  3. The Fermi view of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Fermi/LAT Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The Fermi mission has brought great advances in the study of GRBs. Over 1500 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and more than 100 of these are also detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) above 30 MeV. These high-energy detections have revealed previously unknown features in GRB spectra, including additional components and spectral cut-offs, as well as delayed and long-lived GeV emission. Interpretation of these new features has proven to be a source of vigorous debate within the GRB community. I will review recent Fermi-LAT observations of GRBs, ranging from the detection of the long-lived GRB 130427A to the broad-band fits of simultaneous X-ray and gamma-ray data, and what they reveal about the origin of the high-energy emission from GRBs.

  4. Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts in the Fermi era

    CERN Document Server

    Vianello, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    The Fermi observatory, with its Gamma-Ray Bursts monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT), is observing Gamma-ray Bursts with unprecedented spectral coverage and sensitivity, from ~10 keV to > 300 GeV. In the first 3 years of the mission it observed emission above 100 MeV from 35 GRBs, an order of magnitude gain with respect to previous observations in this energy range. In this paper we review the main results obtained on such sample, highlighting also the relationships with the low-energy features (as measured by the GBM), and with measurements from observatories at other wavelengths. We also briefly discuss prospects for detection of GRBs by future Very-High Energy observatories such as HAWC and CTA, and by Gravitational Wave experiments.

  5. Distribution and spread of the invasive slug Arion vulgaris Moquin-Tandon in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bjørn Arild Hatteland

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present distribution of the invasive slug Arion vulgaris Moquin-Tandon was studied in Norway. This important pest species has spread to many parts of Europe during the last decades, inflicting damage to agriculture and domestic gardens. It was first recorded in Norway in 1988, and has since spread to many parts of the country and is now recorded in 192 municipalities. We surveyed the current distribution by sampling and gathering species records in cooperation with garden societies and local authorities. Based on these records, we present distributional data as well as relative predictions of future distributions based on geoclimatic parameters. Currently, A. vulgaris covers most of coastal southern Norway while it shows a patchy distribution in northern Norway, recorded as far north as Finnsnes in Troms County.

  6. Directed percolation describes lifetime and growth of turbulent puffs and slugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Maksim; Goldenfeld, Nigel

    2011-09-01

    We show that directed percolation (DP) simulations in a pipe geometry in 3+1 dimensions capture the observed complex phenomenology of the transition to turbulence. At low Reynolds numbers (Re), turbulent puffs form and spontaneously relaminarize. At high Re, turbulent slugs expand uniformly into the laminar regions. In a spatiotemporally intermittent state between these two regimes of Re, puffs split and turbulent regions exhibit laminar patches. DP also captures some of the quantitative features of the transition, with a superexponentially diverging characteristic lifetime below the transition. Above the percolation threshold, active (turbulent) clusters expand into the inactive (laminar) phase with a well-defined velocity whose scaling with control parameter (Reynolds number or percolation probability) is consistent with experimental results. Our results provide strong evidence in favor of a conjecture of Pomeau. PMID:22060447

  7. Spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity of an unconfined sandy aquifer determined by a mini slug test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Poul Løgstrup; Hinsby, Klaus; Christensen, Thomas Højlund; Gravesen, Peter

    The spatial variability of the hydraulic conductivity in a sandy aquifer has been determined by a mini slug test method. The hydraulic conductivity (K) of the aquifer has a geometric mean of 5.05 × 10−4 m s−1, and an overall variance of 1n K equal to 0.37 which corresponds quite well to the results...... obtained by two large scale tracer experiments performed in the aquifer. A geological model of the aquifer based on 31 sediment cores, proposed three hydrogeological layers in the aquifer concurrent with the vertical variations observed with respect to hydraulic conductivity. The horizontal correlation...... length of the hydraulic conductivity has been determined for each of the three hydrogeological layers and is found to be small (1–2.5 m). The asymptotic longitudinal dispersivity of the aquifer has been estimated from the variance in hydraulic conductivity and the horizontal correlation length, to be in...

  8. Transition from slug to annular flow in horizontal air-water flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transition from slug to annular flow in horizontal air-water and steam-water flow was investigated. Test sections of 50; 66.6 and 80 mm ID were used. The system pressure was 0.2 and 0.5 MPa in the air-water experiments and 2.5; 5; 7.5 and 10 MPa in the steam-water experiments. For flow pattern detection local impedance probes were used. This method was compared in a part of the experiments with differential pressure and gamma-beam measurements. The flow regime boundary is shifting strongly to smaller values of the superficial gas velocity with increasing pressure. Correlations from literature fit unsatisfactorily the experimental results. A new correlation is presented. (orig.)

  9. Slug-tests in PP- and PVP-holes at Olkiluoto in 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the program for the final disposal of the nuclear fuel waste, Posiva Oy investigates the hydrological conditions at the Olkiluoto island. The hydraulic conductivity in the shallow holes OL-PP5, OL-PP9, OL-PP36, OL-PP39, OL-PVP4A, OL-PVP4B, OL-PVP6A, OL-PVP6B and OL-PVP14 was measured in summer 2006. The length of PP-holes varies between 12 and 15 m, and the test sections (1 m) are located in the bedrock. PVP-tubes have a length up to 10 m, and the test sections (2 m) are located in the overburden. The measurements were done using the slug-test technique. In the slug-test, the hydraulic head in the borehole is abruptly changed either by pouring water into the borehole or by lowering the pressure sensor. The conductivity is interpreted based on the recovery of the water level. This report presents the field measurements and their interpretation. The interpretation has been done using the Hvorslev's method, and for reference, conductivity has also been calculated according to Thiem's equation. According to the results, hydraulic conductivity in PP-holes ranges from 10-9 m/s to 10-6 m/s and in PVP-tubes from 10-8 m/s to 10-5 m/s. The range is similar as observed in measurements of years 2002, 2004 and 2005. In general the results are consistent with the results obtained in earlier measurements. Some exceptions exist in OL-PP9, where the conductivity is lower than in the 2005 measurements, but still at the same level as in the 2002 measurements. Also, the results agree with hydraulic conductivity interpreted from the pre-pumping done in connection with the groundwater sampling. (orig.)

  10. Regulation of Membrane-Type 4 Matrix Metalloproteinase by SLUG Contributes to Hypoxia-Mediated Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hung Huang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypoxic tumor environment has been shown to be critical to cancer metastasis through the promotion of angiogenesis, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, and acquisition of invasive potential. However, the impact of hypoxia on the expression profile of the proteolytic enzymes involved in invasiveness is relatively unknown. Membrane-type 4 matrix metalloproteinase (MT4-MMP is a glycosyl-phosphatidyl inositol-anchored protease that has been shown to be overexpressed in human cancers. However, detailed mechanisms regarding the regulation and function of MT4-MMP expression in tumor cells remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia or overexpression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α induced MT4-MMP expression in human cancer cells. Activation of SLUG, a transcriptional factor regulating the EMT process of human cancers, by HIF-1α was critical for the induction of MT4-MMP under hypoxia. SLUG regulated the transcription of MT4-MMP through direct binding to the E-box located in its proximal promoter. Short-interference RNA-mediated knockdown of MT4-MMP attenuated in vitro invasiveness and in vivo pulmonary colonization of tumor cells without affecting cell migratory ability. MT4-MMP promoted invasiveness and pulmonary colonization through modulation of the expression profile of MMPs and angiogenic factors. Finally, coexpression of HIF-1α and MT4-MMP in human head and neck cancer was predictive of a worse clinical outcome. These findings establish a novel signaling pathway for hypoxia-mediated metastasis and elucidate the underlying regulatory mechanism and functional significance of MT4-MMP in cancer metastasis.

  11. Pulse Phase Dependence of the Magnetar Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chetana Jain; Anjan Dutta; Biswajit Paul

    2007-12-01

    We report here results from a study of X-ray bursts from 3 magnetar candidates (SGR 1806–20, SGR 1900+14 and AXP 1E 2259+586). We have searched for a pulse phase dependence of the X-ray burst rate from these sources. X-ray light curves were obtained with the Proportional Counter Array on-board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the periods of intense burst activity in these sources. On detailed analysis of the three sources, we found a very significant burst rate for all pulsar phases. However, some locations appear to produce bursts slightly more often, rendering the non-isotropic distribution. Only in the case of SGR 1900+14, there is a clear pulse phase dependence of burst rate.

  12. Bursting for enhanced ablation of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendow, Sami; Rea, Edward; Kosa, Nadhir; Bengtsson, Magnus; Shakir, Sami

    2014-03-01

    A significant enhancement in the rate of material removal is demonstrated using a nanosecond-pulsed UV fiber laser in multi-pulsing burst mode, as compared to the case without bursting. Percussion drilling and scribing of thin-film and bulk material tests show that, in general, laser bursts with increased pulse count and reduced pulse spacing show higher rates of material removal. A considerable improvement in removal rate is demonstrated, when bursting is applied to scribing of mono-crystalline silicon (m-Si) and up to 30% in percussion drilling speed. Likewise, improved material removal is demonstrated for scribing of thin film of indium tin oxide (ITO) on glass or metal film on sapphire. Examples of material processing are given with and without bursting at similar experimental conditions of average power, scan speed, and burst/pulse energies. Experimental results included are for m-Si, ITO thin films on glass, and metal films on sapphire.

  13. Which Epeak? The Characteristic Energy of Gamma-ray Burst Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Robert; Goldstein, Adam; Bhat, Narayana; Stanbro, Matthew; Hakkila, Jon; Blalock, Dylan

    2016-04-01

    A characteristic energy of individual gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra can in most cases be determined from the peak energy of the energy density spectra (ν {{ F }}ν ), called “{E}{{peak}}.” Distributions of {E}{{peak}} have been compiled for time-resolved spectra from bright GRBs, as well as time-averaged spectra and peak flux spectra for nearly every burst observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Burst And Transient Source Experiment and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Even when determined by an instrument with a broad energy band, such as GBM (8 keV to 40 MeV), the distributions themselves peak at around 240 keV in the observer’s frame, with a spread of roughly a decade in energy. {E}{{peak}} can have considerable evolution (sometimes greater than one decade) within any given burst, as amply demonstrated by single pulses in GRB 110721A and GRB 130427A. Meanwhile, several luminosity or energy relations have been proposed to correlate with either the time-integrated or peak flux {E}{{peak}}. Thus, when discussing correlations with {E}{{peak}}, the question arises, “Which {E}{{peak}}?” A single burst may be characterized by any of a number of values for {E}{{peak}} that are associated with it. Using a single-pulse simulation model with spectral evolution as a proxy for the type of spectral evolution observed in many bursts, we investigate how the time-averaged {E}{{peak}} emerges from the spectral evolution within a single pulse, how this average naturally correlates with the peak flux derived {E}{{peak}} in a burst, and how the distribution in {E}{{peak}} values from many bursts derives its surprisingly narrow width.

  14. United assembly algorithm for optical burst switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhui Yu(于金辉); Yijun Yang(杨教军); Yuehua Chen(陈月华); Ge Fan(范戈)

    2003-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising optical switching technology. The burst assembly algorithm controls burst assembly, which significantly impacts performance of OBS network. This paper provides a new assembly algorithm, united assembly algorithm, which has more practicability than conventional algorithms. In addition, some factors impacting selections of parameters of this algorithm are discussed and the performance of this algorithm is studied by computer simulation.

  15. Ballerina - pirouettes in search of gamma bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Lund, Niels; Pedersen, Henrik; Hjorth, J.

    1999-01-01

    The cosmological origin of gamma ray bursts has now been established with reasonable certainty, Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large diversity in properties which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We are...... proposing Ballerina, a small satellite to provide accurate positions and new data on the gamma-ray bursts. We anticipate a detection rate an order of magnitude larger than obtained from Beppo-SAX....

  16. Bubble burst as jamming phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Saito, Yukiko Umeno; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    Recently research on bubble and its burst attract much interest of researchers in various field such as economics and physics. Economists have been regarding bubble as a disorder in prices. However, this research strategy has overlooked an importance of the volume of transactions. In this paper, we have proposed a bubble burst model by focusing the transactions incorporating a traffic model that represents spontaneous traffic jam. We find that the phenomenon of bubble burst shares many similar properties with traffic jam formation by comparing data taken from US housing market. Our result suggests that the transaction could be a driving force of bursting phenomenon.

  17. Bursting behaviour in coupled Josephson junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, J; Dana, Syamal K

    2015-12-01

    We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting behaviour in a certain parameter regime of two resistive-capacitative shunted Josephson junctions, one in the oscillatory and the other in the excitable mode and coupled together resistively. The burst emerges in both the junctions and they show near-complete synchronization for strong enough couplings. We discuss a possible bifurcation scenario to explain the origin of the burst. An exhaustive study on the parameter space of the system is performed, demarcating the regions of bursting from other solutions. PMID:26723143

  18. Burst Fragmentation Model Based on Sequential Burst Allocation Algorithm for Mobile WiMAX

    OpenAIRE

    Zaid G. Ali; Prof. R. B. Ahmad; Dr. Abid Yahya

    2013-01-01

    the downlink Bandwidth resources of WiMAX are allocated by the burst allocation algorithm. The algorithm is responsible for calculating the appropriate location of a number of the smallest unit of bandwidth which is called the slot for all users within the downlink subframe in the form of bursts. Resource wastage in the form of unused and unallocated slots is a real common problem accompanies resource management in the burst allocation algorithms. This paper investigates the Sequential Burst ...

  19. Gamma-Ray Bursts 2012 Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is a pleasure to announce the next combined Fermi/Swift GRB conference covering recent advances in all aspects of gamma-ray burst observations and theory. This conference will be held in Munich, Germany, on 7-11 May 2012, and follows similar previous combined Fermi/Swift meetings in Huntsville (Oct. 2008) and Annapolis (Nov. 2010). Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe and are thought to be the birth signatures of black holes. This is an exciting time in the GRB field as various missions provide a wealth of new data on this still puzzling phenomenon. The Fermi misson provides unprecedented spectral coverage over 7 decades in energy, and among others discovered new spectral components which challenge our standard picture of the prompt emission. The Swift mission continuous to swiftly monitor and locate GRBs in multiple wavebands, providing the basis for all ground-based follow-up observations towards redshift measurements and afterglow and host property investigations. AGILE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Konus continue to provide crucial information on GRB properties, and the MAXI mission provides an all sky X-ray monitoring of transients. There is also growing capability for follow-up observations by ground-based telescopes at basically all wavelengths. Besides the classical optical/infrared/radio observations, searches are underway for TeV emission, neutrinos and gravitational waves. Moreover, new experiments are expected to have returned first data, among others POGO on the prompt polarization properties, UFFO on very early optical emission, or ALMA on sub-millimeter properties. And last but not least, the unexpected is bringing us child-like astonishments at least once per year with a "GRB-trigger" which turns out to be not related to GRBs. Complementing all these new observational results, a huge theoretical effort is underway to understand the GRB phenomenon and keep up with the constant new puzzles coming from the data. This conference

  20. Fast radio burst/gamma-ray burst cosmography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, both theoretical arguments and observational evidence suggested that a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) could be associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). If such FRB/GRB association systems are commonly detected in the future, the combination of dispersion measures (DM) derived from FRBs and redshifts derived from GRBs makes these systems a plausible tool to conduct cosmography. We quantify uncertainties in deriving the redshift-dependent DMIGM as a function of z and test how well dark energy models can be constrained with Monte Carlo simulations. We show that with several tens of FRB/GRB systems potentially detected in a decade or so, one may reach reasonable constraints on wCDM models. When combined with Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, unprecedented constraints on the dark energy equation of state may be achieved, thanks to the prospects of detecting FRB/GRB systems at relatively high redshifts. The ratio between the mean value and luminosity distance (D L(z)) is insensitive to dark energy models. This gives the prospect of applying SN Ia data to calibrate using a relatively small sample of FRB/GRB systems, allowing a reliable constraint on the baryon inhomogeneity distribution as a function of redshift. The methodology developed in this paper can also be applied if the FRB redshifts can be measured by other means. Some caveats of putting this method into practice are also discussed.

  1. 应用拱顶沉降监测技术预报软弱围岩隧道突泥突水%The Application of the Monitoring Techniques for Vault Settlement to the Forecast of Water and. Mud Burst from the Soft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史付生

    2011-01-01

    In soft-rocked tunnels, water will build up pressure which may lead to the deformation of the surrounding rock of the tunnel, as a result of which the possibility of water and mud burst may be predicted by monitoring the displacement rate of the vault nea%在隧道软弱岩层中存在具有一定压力的水体会使周边围岩产生变形,因此可通过监测临近掌子面的拱顶位移速率来推测前方是否可能发生突水突泥。具体过程为通过统计已有测量的拱顶下沉速率量与突水突泥的事件发生的相关度,得出一个阈值。然后,根据这个阈值来推测前方是否可能发生突泥突水。石林软岩隧道的应用实例说明此方法具体可行,为超前地质预报提供了一个新的途径。

  2. Real burst traffic amplification in optically gain clamped amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Ennser, Karin; Taccheo, Stefano; Careglio, Davide; Solé Pareta, Josep; Aracil Rico, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Optical burst amplification in a gain-stabilized amplifier is theoretically investigated using real burst traffic data. The results show that excellent performance are obtained for WDM transmission with negligible interplay due to burst arrival statistics.

  3. Cost-based burst dropping strategy in optical burst switching networks

    OpenAIRE

    Klusek, Bartlomiej; Murphy, John; Barry, Liam P.

    2005-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is a new paradigm for future all-optical networks. Intentional burst dropping is one of techniques used to achieve desired quality of service. In this paper we note that some bursts are more likely to cause contention. We propose a cost function that can be used to predict the likelihood that a given burst will interfere with other traffic, then we explain how, by using this information a new burst dropping strategy can be designed. We compare our method with a r...

  4. Coding Bounds for Multiple Phased-Burst Correction and Single Burst Correction Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Wai Han

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, two upper bounds on the achievable code rate of linear block codes for multiple phased-burst correction (MPBC) are presented. One bound is constrained to a maximum correctable cyclic burst length within every subblock, or equivalently a constraint on the minimum error free length or gap within every phased-burst. This bound, when reduced to the special case of a bound for single burst correction (SBC), is shown to be the Abramson bound when the cyclic burst length is less than ...

  5. AIRSLUG: A fortran program for the computation of type curves to estimate transmissivity and storativity from prematurely terminated air-pressurized slug tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, E.A.; Shapiro, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Fortran code AIRSLUG can be used to generate the type curves needed to analyze the recovery data from prematurely terminated air-pressurized slug tests. These type curves, when used with a graphical software package, enable the engineer or scientist to analyze field tests to estimate transmissivity and storativity. Prematurely terminating the slug test can significantly reduce the overall time needed to conduct the test, especially at low-permeability sites, thus saving time and money.The Fortran code AIRSLUG can be used to generate the type curves needed to analyze the recovery data from prematurely terminated air-pressurized slug tests. These type curves, when used with a graphical software package, enable the engineer or scientist to analyze field tests to estimate transmissivity and storativity. Prematurely terminating the slug test can significantly reduce the overall time needed to conduct the test, especially at low-permeability sites, thus saving time and money.

  6. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10-15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches-and their associated spindle bursts-occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  7. Rock Burst Intensity Classification Based on the Radiated Energy with Damage Intensity at Jinping II Hydropower Station, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Rui; Feng, Xia-Ting; Li, Qing-Peng; Luo, Ru-Zhou; Li, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Based on the radiated energy of 133 rock bursts monitored by a microseismic technique at the Jinping II hydropower station, in Sichuan province, China, we analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of qualitative classification methods for the rock burst intensity. Then, we investigated the characteristics, magnitude, and laws of the radiated energy, as well as the relationship between the rock burst radiated energy and intensity. Then, we selected the energy as an evaluation index for the rock burst intensity classification, and proposed a new rock burst intensity quantitative classification method, which utilized the hierarchical clustering analysis technique with the complete-linkage method. Next, we created a new set of criteria for the quantitative classification of the rock burst intensity based on radiated energy and surrounding rock damage severity. The new criteria classified the rock burst intensity into five levels: extremely intense, intense, moderate, weak, and none, and the common logarithms of the radiated energy of each level were >7 lg( E/J), >4 lg( E/J) and 2 lg( E/J) and 1 lg( E/J) and <2 lg( E/J), and <1 lg( E/J), respectively. Finally, we investigated the factors influencing the classification, and verified its feasibility and applicability via several practical rock burst examples.

  8. CT Burst Error Weight Enumerator of Array Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Irfan Siap

    2008-01-01

    Recently, CT burst errors originally dened for block codes havebeen generalized to CT burst errors for array codes [6]. In order to establish aRieger's type bound for array codes with respect to CT burst errors. Here, weintroduce a CT burst error weight enumerator whose coecients represent thenumber of CT burst errors of a particular weight. The method of obtainingthe CT burst error weight enumerator is obtained by generating function likeapproach and it does not involve solving equations as ...

  9. The SVOM gamma-ray burst mission

    CERN Document Server

    Cordier, B; Atteia, J -L; Basa, S; Claret, A; Daigne, F; Deng, J; Dong, Y; Godet, O; Goldwurm, A; Götz, D; Han, X; Klotz, A; Lachaud, C; Osborne, J; Qiu, Y; Schanne, S; Wu, B; Wang, J; Wu, C; Xin, L; Zhang, B; Zhang, S -N

    2015-01-01

    We briefly present the science capabilities, the instruments, the operations, and the expected performance of the SVOM mission. SVOM (Space-based multiband astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) is a Chinese-French space mission dedicated to the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the next decade. The SVOM mission encompasses a satellite carrying four instruments to detect and localize the prompt GRB emission and measure the evolution of the afterglow in the visible band and in X-rays, a VHF communication system enabling the fast transmission of SVOM alerts to the ground, and a ground segment including a wide angle camera and two follow-up telescopes. The pointing strategy of the satellite has been optimized to favor the detection of GRBs located in the night hemisphere. This strategy enables the study of the optical emission in the first minutes after the GRB with robotic observatories and the early spectroscopy of the optical afterglow with large telescopes to measure the redshifts. The study of GRBs in the...

  10. Quasi-periodic Oscillations and Broadband Variability in Short Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L.; Uttley, Phil; van der Horst, Alexander J.; van der Klis, Michiel; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Göǧüş, Ersin; Granot, Jonathan; Vaughan, Simon; Finger, Mark H.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. However, with only three giant flares ever recorded, and only two with data of sufficient quality to search for QPOs, such analysis is seriously data limited. We set out a procedure for doing QPO searches in the far more numerous, short, less energetic magnetar bursts. The short, transient nature of these bursts requires the implementation of sophisticated statistical techniques to make reliable inferences. Using Bayesian statistics, we model the periodogram as a combination of red noise at low frequencies and white noise at high frequencies, which we show is a conservative approach to the problem. We use empirical models to make inferences about the potential signature of periodic and QPOs at these frequencies. We compare our method with previously used techniques and find that although it is on the whole more conservative, it is also more reliable in ruling out false positives. We illustrate our Bayesian method by applying it to a sample of 27 bursts from the magnetar SGR J0501+4516 observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and we find no evidence for the presence of QPOs in any of the bursts in the unbinned spectra, but do find a candidate detection in the binned spectra of one burst. However, whether this signal is due to a genuine quasi-periodic process, or can be attributed to unmodeled effects in the noise is at this point a matter of interpretation.

  11. QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND BROADBAND VARIABILITY IN SHORT MAGNETAR BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L.; Uttley, Phil; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Van der Klis, Michiel [Astronomical Institute ' ' Anton Pannekoek' ' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Office of Science and Technology, ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goegues, Ersin [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Granot, Jonathan [The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra' anana 43537 (Israel); Vaughan, Simon [X-Ray and Observational Astronomy Group, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Finger, Mark H., E-mail: D.Huppenkothen@uva.nl [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. However, with only three giant flares ever recorded, and only two with data of sufficient quality to search for QPOs, such analysis is seriously data limited. We set out a procedure for doing QPO searches in the far more numerous, short, less energetic magnetar bursts. The short, transient nature of these bursts requires the implementation of sophisticated statistical techniques to make reliable inferences. Using Bayesian statistics, we model the periodogram as a combination of red noise at low frequencies and white noise at high frequencies, which we show is a conservative approach to the problem. We use empirical models to make inferences about the potential signature of periodic and QPOs at these frequencies. We compare our method with previously used techniques and find that although it is on the whole more conservative, it is also more reliable in ruling out false positives. We illustrate our Bayesian method by applying it to a sample of 27 bursts from the magnetar SGR J0501+4516 observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and we find no evidence for the presence of QPOs in any of the bursts in the unbinned spectra, but do find a candidate detection in the binned spectra of one burst. However, whether this signal is due to a genuine quasi-periodic process, or can be attributed to unmodeled effects in the noise is at this point a matter of interpretation.

  12. Load carrying capacity of the reactor pressure vessel head in case of a molten fuel slug impact caused by a steam explosion. Discussion of different solution methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive research work is being carried out at KfK on slug impact on the reactor pressure vessel head. Important considerations on and possible solutions to this problem are discussed. In order to separate the work from the parallel investigations of steam explosions, the tasks were modified. The speeds of impinging slug are determined, which the reactor pressure vessel head can reliably withstand. (orig./HP)

  13. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-yang Dai

    2004-01-01

    Objective To review imaging use in the diagnosis ofthoracolumbar burst fractures and to determine the diagnostic value of different imaging methods.Methods One hundred and fourteen patients with 120 thoracolumbar burst fractures were retrospectively reviewed. Plain radiographs were available in all cases; CT scans and MRI were obtained in 96 and 74 cases, respectively.Results A total of 27 burst fractures were misdiagnosed as other types of fractures on radiographs alone, and accounted for 22.5% of all fractures. The results indicated that plain radiographs often fail to delineate the pathological features of thoracolumbar burst fractures, leading to delay in diagnosis.Conclusion In regard to thoracolumbar injury diagnosis, burst fractures should be differentiated from compression fractures. CT should be routinely indicated and MRI examination, when necessary, may be simultaneously considered.

  14. Bright 30 THz Impulsive Solar Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, P; Marcon, R; Kudaka, A S; Cabezas, D P; Cassiano, M M; Francile, C; Fernandes, L O T; Ramirez, R F Hidalgo; Luoni, M; Marun, A; Pereyra, P; de Souza, R V

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive 30 THz continuum bursts have been recently observed in solar flares, utilizing small telescopes with a unique and relatively simple optical setup concept. The most intense burst was observed together with a GOES X2 class event on October 27, 2014, also detected at two sub-THz frequencies, RHESSI X-rays and SDO/HMI and EUV. It exhibits strikingly good correlation in time and in space with white light flare emission. It is likely that this association may prove to be very common. All three 30 THz events recently observed exhibited intense fluxes in the range of 104 solar flux units, considerably larger than those measured for the same events at microwave and sub-mm wavelengths. The 30 THz burst emission might be part of the same spectral burst component found at sub-THz frequencies. The 30 THz solar bursts open a promising new window for the study of flares at their origin

  15. The 2006-2007 Active Phase of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts,and Burst Spectral Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in > 11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 0.4 - 1.8 x 10(exp 3) s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx 2 - 9 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus two emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4) x 10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. Within the framework of the magnetar model, the net spin-down of the star could be explained by regions of the superfluid that rotate. slower than the rest. The bursts, flux enhancements, and pulse morphology changes can be explained as arising from crustal deformations due to stresses imposed by the highly twisted internal magnetic field. However, unlike other AXP outbursts, we cannot account for a major twist being implanted in the magnetosphere.

  16. Evolution of transitional structures from puff to slug through multiple splitting in a pipe flow at low Reynolds number

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During laminar-to-turbulent transition in low Reynolds pipe flows, three main types of flow structures occur: traveling waves and the turbulent flow structures, namely puffs and slugs. In the present work, detailed experiments on the probability of occurrence and propagation speed of puffs, splitting puffs and slugs were conducted with the transition pipe-flow facility of LSTM-Erlangen. During the investigations, fully developed laminar pipe flow was triggered by an iris diaphragm with a pre-defined amplitude and lapse time. Different types of single and multiple puffs are classified and the probability of their occurrence as well as their propagation speed at the end of pipes with different lengths are evaluated.

  17. Evolution of transitional structures from puff to slug through multiple splitting in a pipe flow at low Reynolds number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, J; Ertunc, Oe; Ostwald, Ch; Lienhart, H; Delgado, A, E-mail: jens.krauss@lstm.uni-erlangen.de [Institute of Fluid Mechanics, FAU Erlangen-Nuremberg (Germany)

    2011-12-22

    During laminar-to-turbulent transition in low Reynolds pipe flows, three main types of flow structures occur: traveling waves and the turbulent flow structures, namely puffs and slugs. In the present work, detailed experiments on the probability of occurrence and propagation speed of puffs, splitting puffs and slugs were conducted with the transition pipe-flow facility of LSTM-Erlangen. During the investigations, fully developed laminar pipe flow was triggered by an iris diaphragm with a pre-defined amplitude and lapse time. Different types of single and multiple puffs are classified and the probability of their occurrence as well as their propagation speed at the end of pipes with different lengths are evaluated.

  18. Evolution of transitional structures from puff to slug through multiple splitting in a pipe flow at low Reynolds number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, J.; Ertunç, Ö.; Ostwald, Ch; Lienhart, H.; Delgado, A.

    2011-12-01

    During laminar-to-turbulent transition in low Reynolds pipe flows, three main types of flow structures occur: traveling waves and the turbulent flow structures, namely puffs and slugs. In the present work, detailed experiments on the probability of occurrence and propagation speed of puffs, splitting puffs and slugs were conducted with the transition pipe-flow facility of LSTM-Erlangen. During the investigations, fully developed laminar pipe flow was triggered by an iris diaphragm with a pre-defined amplitude and lapse time. Different types of single and multiple puffs are classified and the probability of their occurrence as well as their propagation speed at the end of pipes with different lengths are evaluated.

  19. Assessment of Mass Transfer Coefficients in Coalescing Slug Flow in Vertical Pipes and Applications to Tubular Airlift Membrane Bioreactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Berube, P.R.; Nopens, I.

    2011-01-01

    One of the operational challenges associated with membrane bioreactors (MBRs) is the fouling of the membranes. In tubular side-stream MBRs, fouling reduction can be achieved through controlling the hydrodynamics of the two-phase slug flow near the membrane surface. The two-phase slug flow induces......) cannot be applied directly. As an alternative, in this work, a multidisciplinary approach was selected, by exploiting dimensionless analysis using the Sherwood number. Mass transfer coefficients were measured at various superficial velocities of gas and liquid flow in a tubular system. Due to the...... variability of the mass transfer coefficient obtained for each experimental condition, the results were compiled into, mass transfer coefficient histograms (MTH) for analysis. A bimodal MTH was observed, with one peak corresponding to the mass transfer induced by the liquid flow, and the other peak induced by...

  20. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Slug analysis of star clusters in NGC 628 & 7793 (Krumholz+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumholz, M. R.; Adamo, A.; Fumagalli, M.; Wofford, A.; Calzetti, D.; Lee, J. C.; Whitmore, B. C.; Bright, S. N.; Grasha, K.; Gouliermis, D. A.; Kim, H.; Nair, P.; Ryon, J. E.; Smith, L. J.; Thilker, D.; Ubeda, L.; Zackrisson, E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we use slug, the Stochastically Lighting Up Galaxies code (da Silva et al. 2012ApJ...745..145D, 2014MNRAS.444.3275D; Krumholz et al. 2015MNRAS.452.1447K), and its post-processing tool for analysis of star cluster properties, cluster_slug, to analyze an initial sample of clusters from the LEGUS (Calzetti et al. 2015AJ....149...51C). A description of the steps required to produce final cluster catalogs of the Legacy Extragalactic UV Survey (LEGUS) targets can be found in Calzetti et al. (2015AJ....149...51C), and in A. Adamo et al. (2015, in preparation). LEGUS is an HST Cycle 21 Treasury program that is imaging 50 nearby galaxies in five broadbands with the WFC3/UVIS, from the NUV to the I band. (1 data file).

  1. Ecoulements Diphasiques à poches en conduite horizontale Horizontal Slug Flow in Pipes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferré D.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cette étude a eu pour objectif de préciser certains phénomènes caractéristiques des écoulements diphasiques rencontrés lors du transport par oléoducs des bruts pétroliers à teneur en gaz faible ou moyenne. Des expériences ont été réalisées à basse pression sur une boucle diphasique eau-air de diamètre 0,045 m et de longueur 50 m. Les mesures de présence de phase locale et de pression effectuées à la paroi pour des vitesses débitantes du liquide et du gaz variant respectivement entre 0,5 et 2 m/s et 0,3 et 10 m/s, ont permis d'accéder aux principales grandeurs cinématiques des écoulements à poches. A l'aide des méthodes classiques de l'analyse statistique, on a caractérisé l'aspect aléatoire de ces écoulements, la longueur d'établissement des régimes, la coalescence des poches. Enfin, en appliquant les équations diphasiques générales intégrées, on a précisé les ordres de grandeur et les tendances d'évolution de quelques lois phénoménologiques, pour en déduire une loi approchée du gradient de pression. The aim of this study is to describe various characteristic phenomena of two-phase flow encountered in the pipelining of crude oil with a love or medium gas content. Love-pressure experiments were performed with a two-phase water-air loop 0.045 mm in diameter and 50 m long. Measurements at the wall of local phase and pressure for liquid and gas flowrates varying between 0.5 and 2 m/s and 0.3 and 10 m/s revealed the leading kinematic magnitudes of slug flow. Conventional statistical-analysis methods were used ta characterize the random aspect of such flows, the length required for flow conditions ta be established and thé coalescence of slugs. General integrated two-phase équations were used to determine the orders of magnitude and variation tendencies of various phenomenological laves so as to deduce on approximate lave for the pressure gradient.

  2. Slug tests in PP- and PVP-holes at Olkiluoto in 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pentti, E. [Poeyry Finland Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2014-12-15

    As part of the program for the final disposal of the nuclear fuel waste, Posiva Oy investigates the hydrological conditions at the Olkiluoto Island. The hydraulic conductivity in the shallow investigation holes OL-PP36, -PP39, -PVP4A, -PVP4B, PVP6A, -PVP6B, -PVP14, -PVP30, -PVP31A, -PVP31B, -PVP32, -PVP33, -PVP34A, -PVP34B, -PVP36, -PVP37A, -PVP37B, -PVP37C, -PVP38A, -PVP38B, -PVP38C, and -PVP38D was measured in summer 2013. The length of PP-holes is between 12 m and 14 m, and the test sections (1 m) are located in the bedrock. PVP-tubes have an average length between 4-15 m, and the test sections (usually 2 m) are located in the overburden. The measurements were carried out using the slug test technique with equipment renewed in 2010. In the slug test, the hydraulic head in the borehole is abruptly changed either by pouring water into the hole or by lowering the pressure sensor. The hydraulic conductivity is interpreted from the recovery of the water level. This report presents the field measurements and their interpretation. The interpretation has been done using the Hvorslev's method, and for reference, conductivity has also been calculated according to the Thiem's equation. According to the results, hydraulic conductivity in the PP-holes ranges from 10{sup -8} m/s to 4x10{sup -6} and in the PVP-tubes from 10{sup -7} m/s to 8x10{sup -5} m/s. The observed range is quite similar to the preceding measurements in 2002 and 2004-2012. In general, the results are consistent with the results obtained in the earlier measurements, whereas some significant changes were also observed. In the groundwater tubes, this may have resulted from low groundwater table during the tests. In OL-PP36, an increase of conductivity was observed in sections 5.22-6.22 m and 6.22-7.22 m, while in section 8.22-9.22 m, the result decreased slightly. In OL-PP39, the results from sections 6.5-7.5 m and 8.5-9.5 m agree with earlier data, but in section 5.5-6.5 m the conductivity was

  3. Slug-tests in PP- and PVP-holes at Olkiluoto in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammisto, E. [Poeyry Finland Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    2014-02-15

    As part of the program for the final disposal of the nuclear fuel waste, Posiva Oy investigates the hydrological conditions at the Olkiluoto Island. The hydraulic conductivity in the shallow investigation holes OL-PP36, -PP39, -PVP4A, -PVP4B, -PVP6A, -PVP6B, -PVP14, -PVP36, -PVP37A, -PVP37B, -PVP37C, -PVP38A, -PVP38B, -PVP38C, -PVP38D, -HP1, -HP2, -HP3 and -HP4 was measured in summer 2012. The length of PP-holes is between 12 m and 14 m, and the test sections (1 m) are located in the bedrock. PVP-tubes have an average length between 4 - 15 m, and the test sections (2 m) are located in the overburden. The length of HP-tubes is 3 m or 5 m and the test sections (1 m) are located in the overburden. The measurements were carried out using the slug-test technique with 2010 renewed equipment. In the slug-test, the hydraulic head in the borehole is abruptly changed either by pouring water into the hole or by lowering the pressure sensor. The hydraulic conductivity is interpreted from the recovery of the water level. This report presents the field measurements and their interpretation. The interpretation has been done using the Hvorslev's method, and for reference, conductivity has also been calculated according to the Thiem's equation. According to the results, hydraulic conductivity in the PP-holes ranges from 10{sup -8} m/s to 10{sup -6} m/s and in the PVP- and the HP-tubes from 10{sup -8} m/s to 10{sup -5} m/s. The observed range is quite similar as in the previous measurements in 2002 and 2004-2011. In general, the results are consistent with the results obtained in the earlier measurements. In OL-PP36, the results from 2012 agree very well with the earlier results except section 8.17 - 9.17 m, in which K-values from 2007, 2008 and 2009 differ from the other years. In OL-PP39, the results agree well. There is more difference in low K-values than in higher ones. In the PVP-tubes, the variations are small. In the HP-tubes, the K-values clearly differ from the

  4. Slug-tests in PP- and PVP-holes at Olkiluoto in 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the program for the final disposal of the nuclear fuel waste, Posiva Oy investigates the hydrological conditions at the Olkiluoto Island. The hydraulic conductivity in the shallow investigation holes OL-PP36, -PP39, -PVP4A, -PVP4B, -PVP6A, -PVP6B, -PVP14, -PVP36, -PVP37A, -PVP37B, -PVP37C, -PVP38A, -PVP38B, -PVP38C, -PVP38D, -HP1, -HP2, -HP3 and -HP4 was measured in summer 2012. The length of PP-holes is between 12 m and 14 m, and the test sections (1 m) are located in the bedrock. PVP-tubes have an average length between 4 - 15 m, and the test sections (2 m) are located in the overburden. The length of HP-tubes is 3 m or 5 m and the test sections (1 m) are located in the overburden. The measurements were carried out using the slug-test technique with 2010 renewed equipment. In the slug-test, the hydraulic head in the borehole is abruptly changed either by pouring water into the hole or by lowering the pressure sensor. The hydraulic conductivity is interpreted from the recovery of the water level. This report presents the field measurements and their interpretation. The interpretation has been done using the Hvorslev's method, and for reference, conductivity has also been calculated according to the Thiem's equation. According to the results, hydraulic conductivity in the PP-holes ranges from 10-8 m/s to 10-6 m/s and in the PVP- and the HP-tubes from 10-8 m/s to 10-5 m/s. The observed range is quite similar as in the previous measurements in 2002 and 2004-2011. In general, the results are consistent with the results obtained in the earlier measurements. In OL-PP36, the results from 2012 agree very well with the earlier results except section 8.17 - 9.17 m, in which K-values from 2007, 2008 and 2009 differ from the other years. In OL-PP39, the results agree well. There is more difference in low K-values than in higher ones. In the PVP-tubes, the variations are small. In the HP-tubes, the K-values clearly differ from the earlier K-values from

  5. Closed-analytical mixing model describing the slug transport from the inlet nozzle to the reactor core in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A closed-analytical model describing the slug transport from the inlet nozzle to the reactor core is presented. For the time being, it is applicable only to steady flow and probably only for symmetrical flow conditions. Using an analytical solution of the 1D diffusion equation for linear time-variable diffusion coefficients found by the authors, mixing in a transient flow may be modelled as well. (orig.)

  6. Chloroplast genes are expressed during intracellular symbiotic association of Vaucheria litorea plastids with the sea slug Elysia chlorotica.

    OpenAIRE

    Mujer, C V; Andrews, D L; Manhart, J R; Pierce, S K; Rumpho, M E

    1996-01-01

    The marine slug Elysia chlorotica (Gould) forms an intracellular symbiosis with photosynthetically active chloroplasts from the chromophytic alga Vaucheria litorea (C. Agardh). This symbiotic association was characterized over a period of 8 months during which E. chlorotica was deprived of V. litorea but provided with light and CO2. The fine structure of the symbiotic chloroplasts remained intact in E. chlorotica even after 8 months of starvation as revealed by electron microscopy. Southern b...

  7. RELAP5/MOD3 modeling of water column rejoining and a water slug propelled by noncondensable gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capability of the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code to analyze water hammer transients due to water column rejoining and a water slug propelled by noncondensable gas is investigated. The code-calculated results have been compared with those obtained from simple ideal analytical models. Good agreement is obtained between the calculation and analytical results in the initial period of the transient during which the water column or slug retains its sharp interface and suffers from little breakup or dissipation. As the transient proceeds, the code-calculated hydrodynamic loads are generally less than those implied by the analytical models. This is most likely due to the breakup of the water phase, which is not taken into account in the analytical models. Effects of time step and mesh sizes have also been studied. The results show that the usual Courant time limit applies. Finally, a sample calculation, corresponding to a water hammer transient in a typical Westinghouse four-loop reactor head vent system piping, is presented. The transient is induced by the opening of a relief valve and accelerating a trapped water slug through the pipeline. Hydrodynamic loads (i.e., force-time curves) on various pipe segments have been evaluated by appropriate postprocessing of the transient results. The calculated peak forces at selected pipe segments compare favorably with those estimated from the analytical models

  8. An extension of theoretical analysis for the onset of slugging criterion in horizontal stratified air-water countercurrent flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an experimental and theoretical investigation of interfacial friction factor, wave height and transition criterion from wavy to slug flow in a long horizontal air-water countercurrent stratified flow condition. A series of experiments have been conducted in adiabatic countercurrent stratified flow with the round pipe and rectangular duct test section to develop the interfacial friction factor and the criterion of onset of slugging in horizontal air-water countercurrent stratified flow. An adiabatic semi-empirical correlation for interfacial friction factor has been developed based on the surface roughness concept. A comparison of the measured data in this study and of other investigators with the predictions of the present correlation shows that the agreement is within ±30% error, and that the present correlation is applicable to a broader range of water flow rate than the correlations of previous investigators. The theories which can calculate the wave height and criteria of onset of slug flow in a stratified wavy flow regime have been developed based on the concept of total energy conservation and also wave theory. This theoretical criteria agree better with the measured data than the other criteria available in the literature, but the criteria range about 92∼107% of the measured data. An empirical formula for the criterion has been also developed and compared with the formula in the literatures. Comparison between the measured data and the predictions of the present theory shows that the agreement is within ±8%

  9. Opisthobranchia (Mollusca, Gastropoda) - more than just slimy slugs. Shell reduction and its implications on defence and foraging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wägele, Heike; Klussmann-Kolb, Annette

    2005-02-16

    BACKGROUND: In general shell-less slugs are considered to be slimy animals with a rather dull appearance and a pest to garden plants. But marine slugs usually are beautifully coloured animals belonging to the less-known Opisthobranchia. They are characterized by a large array of interesting biological phenomena, usually related to foraging and/or defence. In this paper our knowledge of shell reduction, correlated with the evolution of different defensive and foraging strategies is reviewed, and new results on histology of different glandular systems are included. RESULTS: Based on a phylogeny obtained by morphological and histological data, the parallel reduction of the shell within the different groups is outlined. Major food sources are given and glandular structures are described as possible defensive structures in the external epithelia, and as internal glands. CONCLUSION: According to phylogenetic analyses, the reduction of the shell correlates with the evolution of defensive strategies. Many different kinds of defence structures, like cleptocnides, mantle dermal formations (MDFs), and acid glands, are only present in shell-less slugs. In several cases, it is not clear whether the defensive devices were a prerequisite for the reduction of the shell, or reduction occurred before. Reduction of the shell and acquisition of different defensive structures had an implication on exploration of new food sources and therefore likely enhanced adaptive radiation of several groups. PMID:15715915

  10. Opisthobranchia (Mollusca, Gastropoda – more than just slimy slugs. Shell reduction and its implications on defence and foraging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wägele Heike

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In general shell-less slugs are considered to be slimy animals with a rather dull appearance and a pest to garden plants. But marine slugs usually are beautifully coloured animals belonging to the less-known Opisthobranchia. They are characterized by a large array of interesting biological phenomena, usually related to foraging and/or defence. In this paper our knowledge of shell reduction, correlated with the evolution of different defensive and foraging strategies is reviewed, and new results on histology of different glandular systems are included. Results Based on a phylogeny obtained by morphological and histological data, the parallel reduction of the shell within the different groups is outlined. Major food sources are given and glandular structures are described as possible defensive structures in the external epithelia, and as internal glands. Conclusion According to phylogenetic analyses, the reduction of the shell correlates with the evolution of defensive strategies. Many different kinds of defence structures, like cleptocnides, mantle dermal formations (MDFs, and acid glands, are only present in shell-less slugs. In several cases, it is not clear whether the defensive devices were a prerequisite for the reduction of the shell, or reduction occurred before. Reduction of the shell and acquisition of different defensive structures had an implication on exploration of new food sources and therefore likely enhanced adaptive radiation of several groups.

  11. Spatiotemporal chaos from bursting dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenstein, Igal; De Decker, Yannick [Nonlinear Physical Chemistry Unit and Interdisciplinary Center for Nonlinear Phenomena and Complex Systems (CENOLI), Faculté des Sciences, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Campus Plaine, C.P. 231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-08-14

    In this paper, we study the emergence of spatiotemporal chaos from mixed-mode oscillations, by using an extended Oregonator model. We show that bursting dynamics consisting of fast/slow mixed mode oscillations along a single attractor can lead to spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics, although the spatially homogeneous solution is itself non-chaotic. This behavior is observed far from the Hopf bifurcation and takes the form of a spatiotemporal intermittency where the system locally alternates between the fast and the slow phases of the mixed mode oscillations. We expect this form of spatiotemporal chaos to be generic for models in which one or several slow variables are coupled to activator-inhibitor type of oscillators.

  12. Posttranslationally caused bioluminescence burst of the Escherichia coli luciferase reporter strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideguchi, Yamato; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Ryo, Masashi; Motoki, Shogo; Kuwano, Takashi; Tezuka, Takafumi; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We continuously monitored bioluminescence from a wild-type reporter strain of Escherichia coli (lacp::luc+/WT), which carries the promoter of the lac operon (lacp) fused with the firefly luciferase gene (luc+). This strain showed a bioluminescence burst when shifted into the stationary growth phase. Bioluminescence profiles of other wild-type reporter strains (rpsPp::luc+ and argAp::luc+) and gene-deletion reporter strains (lacp::luc+/crp- and lacp::luc+/lacI-) indicate that transcriptional regulation is not responsible for generation of the burst. Consistently, changes in the luciferase protein levels did not recapitulate the profile of the burst. On the other hand, dissolved oxygen levels increased over the period across the burst, suggesting that the burst is, at least partially, caused by an increase in intracellular oxygen levels. We discuss limits of the firefly luciferase when used as a reporter for gene expression and its potential utility for monitoring metabolic changes in cells. PMID:26506945

  13. Slug Test Characterization Results for Multi-Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of CERCLA Operable Unit OU UP-1 Wells 299-W19-48, 699-30-66, and 699-36-70B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2010-06-15

    This report presents test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress-level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within three Operable Unit (OU) UP-1 wells: 299-W19-48 (C4300/Well K), 699-30-66 (C4298/Well R), and 699-36-70B (C4299/Well P). These wells are located within, adjacent to, and to the southeast of the Hanford Site 200-West Area. The test intervals were characterized as the individual boreholes were advanced to their final drill depths. The primary objective of the hydrologic tests was to provide information pertaining to the areal variability and vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at these locations within the OU UP-1 area. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor well strategies for OU and Waste Management Area locations.

  14. Slug Test Characterization Results for Multi-Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of CERCLA Operable Unit OU ZP-1 Wells 299-W11-43, 299-W15-50, and 299-W18-16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spane, Frank A.; Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2010-06-21

    The following report presents test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within three Operable Unit (OU) ZP-1 wells: 299-W11-43 (C4694/Well H), 299-W15-50 (C4302/Well E), and 299-W18-16 (C4303/Well D). These wells are located within south-central region of the Hanford Site 200-West Area (Figure 1.1). The test intervals were characterized as the individual boreholes were advanced to their final drill depths. The primary objective of the hydrologic tests was to provide information pertaining to the areal variability and vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at these locations within the OU ZP-1 area. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor well strategies for OU and Waste Management Area locations.

  15. Double-network gels and the toughness of terrestrial slug glue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, Alex M; Rabice, Sarah R; Garbacz, Holland S; Harro, Cailin C; Smith, Andrew M

    2015-10-01

    The terrestrial slug Arion subfuscus produces a defensive secretion that is sticky and tough, despite being a dilute gel. It is unusual in having high stiffness for a gel, yet retaining the high extensibility typical of mucus. In tensile tests, it sustains an average peak stress of 101 kPa, and fails at an average strain of 9.5. This gives the gel toughness; it requires much greater strain energy to fracture than most gels. This toughness may arise from a double-network type mechanism. In this mechanism, two separate, interpenetrating networks of polymers with different properties combine to give toughness that can be several orders of magnitude greater than either network individually. Native gel electrophoresis suggests that A. subfuscus glue consists of two networks: a network of negatively charged proteins ranging in Mr from 40×10(3) to 220×10(3) that can be dissociated by hydroxylamine and a network of heparan sulfate-like proteoglycans. The two networks are not tightly linked, though proteins of Mr 40×10(3) and 165×10(3) may associate with the carbohydrates. Targeted disruption of either network separately, using enzymatic hydrolysis, disulfide bond breakage or imine bond disruption completely disrupted the glue, resulting in no measurable toughness. Thus, the two networks separately provide little toughness, but together they work synergistically to create a tough material, as predicted in the double-network mechanism. PMID:26276864

  16. Neuronal Responses to Water Flow in the Marine Slug Tritonia diomedea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Murray

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The marine slug Tritonia diomedea mustrely on its ability to touch and smell in order to navigate because it is blind. The primaryfactor that influences its crawling direction is the direction of water flow (caused bytides in nature. The sensory cells that detect flow and determine flow directionhave not been identified. The lateral branch of Cerebral Nerve 2 (latCeN2 has beenidentified as the nerve that carries sensory axons to the brain from the flow receptors inthe oral tentacles. Backfilling this nerve to the brain resulted in the labeling of a numberof cells located throughout the brain. Most of the labeled cells are concentrated in the cerebral ganglion where the nerve enters thebrain. The medial and lateral branches of CeN2 were backfilled for comparison of thepattern of cells from each nerve. A map of the cells innervated by latCeN2 reveals thelocation of the stained cells. Extracellular recording from latCeN2 revealed itsinvolvement in the detection of water flow and orientation. The nerve becomes activein response to water flow stimulation. Intracellular recordings of the electricalactivity of these cells in a live animal will be the next step to determine if these cells arethe flow receptors.

  17. Neuronal responses to water flow in the marine slug tritonia diomedea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Blackwell

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The marine slug Tritonia diomedea must rely on its ability to touch and smell in order to navigate because it is blind. The primary factor that influences its crawling direction is the direction of water flow (caused by tides in nature. The sensory cells that detect flow and determine flow direction have not been identified. The lateral branch of Cerebral Nerve 2 (latCeN2 has been identified as the nerve that carries sensory axons to the brain from the flow receptors inthe oral tentacles. Backfilling this nerve to the brain resulted in the labeling of a number of cells located throughout the brain. Most of the labeled cells are concentrated in the cerebral ganglion where the nerve enters the brain. The medial and lateral branches of CeN2 were backfilled for comparison of the pattern of cells from each nerve. A map of the cells innervated by latCeN2 reveals the location of the stained cells. Extracellular recording from latCeN2 revealed its involvement in the detection of water flow and orientation. The nerve becomes active in response to water flow stimulation. Intracellular recordings of the electrical activity of these cells in a live animal will be the next step to determine if these cells are the flow receptors.

  18. Two-fluid model for transient analysis of slug flow in oil wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work it is presented a transient, one-dimensional, adiabatic model for slug flow simulation, which appears when liquid (mixture of oil and water) and gas flow simultaneously through pipes. The model is formed by space and time averaged conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy for each phase, the numerical solution is based on the finite difference technique in the implicit scheme. Velocity, pressure, volumetric fraction and temperature profiles for both phases were predicted for inclination angles from the horizontal to the vertical position (unified model) and ascendant flow. Predictions from the model were validated using field data and ten correlations commonly used in the oil industry. The effects of gas heating or cooling, due to compression and expansion processes, on the predictions and numerical stability, were studied. It was found that when these effects are taken into account, a good behavior of temperature predictions and numerical stability are obtained. The model presents deviations lower than 14% regarding field data and it presents better predictions than most of the correlations.

  19. Two-fluid model for transient analysis of slug flow in oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cazarez-Candia, O., E-mail: ocazarez@imp.mx [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico D.F. 07730 (Mexico); Instituto Tecnologico de Zacatepec, Depto. de Metal-Mecanica, Calzada Tecnologico, No. 27, Zacatepec, Morelos 62780 (Mexico); Benitez-Centeno, O.C. [Centro Nacional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico, Depto. de Mecanica, Interior Internado Palmira s/n, Col. Palmira, Cuernavaca, Morelos 62490 (Mexico); Espinosa-Paredes, G. [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av San Rafael Atlixco No 186, Col. Vicentina 55-534, Mexico D.F. 09340 (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    In this work it is presented a transient, one-dimensional, adiabatic model for slug flow simulation, which appears when liquid (mixture of oil and water) and gas flow simultaneously through pipes. The model is formed by space and time averaged conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy for each phase, the numerical solution is based on the finite difference technique in the implicit scheme. Velocity, pressure, volumetric fraction and temperature profiles for both phases were predicted for inclination angles from the horizontal to the vertical position (unified model) and ascendant flow. Predictions from the model were validated using field data and ten correlations commonly used in the oil industry. The effects of gas heating or cooling, due to compression and expansion processes, on the predictions and numerical stability, were studied. It was found that when these effects are taken into account, a good behavior of temperature predictions and numerical stability are obtained. The model presents deviations lower than 14% regarding field data and it presents better predictions than most of the correlations.

  20. Coupled fluid/structure response of a reactor cover to slug impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of an LMFBR roof structure to slug impact loads is investigated using a combined 2D and 3D approach based on the containment code SEURBNUK and the finite element structure code ADINA. A specimen roof design of box-type construction with concrete infill is adopted for the study, with dimensions appropriate to a commercial-sized fast reactor of the 'pool' type. Provision is made in the model for the location of the major roof penetrations, and the roof annulus is closed in the central section by a rigid, but movable plug concentric with the axis of symmetry. An interface between the codes SEURBNUK and ADINA is made possible by defining a 2D substitute roof model with material properties chosen to match the principal response characteristics of the detailed model. The SEURBNUK code, recently extended to account for coupling of roof loading and roof response, uses the 2D model, incorporated in an appropriate reactor geometry, to examine the fluid-structure interactions and to supply roof pressure loadings for the ADINA runs. A strategy for cross-checking the structural equivalence of the 2D and 3D roof models is developed, and this operates in parallel with the loading and response computations. The first exploratory SEURBNUK calculations are described in which the roof is represented by a simple homogeneous plate. (Auth.)

  1. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Unique Five-Week VLT Study of the Polarisation of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow "Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)" are certainly amongst the most dramatic events known in astrophysics. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays, first detected in the late 1960's by military satellites, last from less than one second to several minutes. GRBs have been found to be situated at extremely large ("cosmological") distances. The energy released in a few seconds during such an event is larger than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are indeed the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe, cf. ESO PR 08/99 and ESO PR 20/00. During the past years circumstantial evidence has mounted that GRBs signal the collapse of extremely massive stars, the so-called hypernovae. This was finally demonstrated some months ago when astronomers, using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), documented in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the light source ("the optical afterglow") of the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 (cf. ESO PR 16/03). A conclusive and direct link between cosmological gamma-ray bursts and explosions of very massive stars was provided on this occasion. Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030329 was discovered on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer spacecraft. Follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) showed the burst to have a redshift of 0.1685 [1]. This corresponds to a distance of about 2,650 million light-years, making GRB 030329 the second-nearest long-duration GRB ever detected. The proximity of GRB 030329 resulted in very bright afterglow emission, permitting the most extensive follow-up observations of any afterglow to date. A team of astronomers [2] led by Jochen Greiner of the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany) decided to make use of this unique opportunity to study the

  2. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Tiriac

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10–15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves; accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches—and their associated spindle bursts—occur exclusively during REM (active sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems.

  3. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  4. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Jets and Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Frail, D A

    2003-01-01

    The relativistic outflows from gamma-ray bursts are now thought to be narrowly collimated into jets. After correcting for this jet geometry there is a remarkable constancy of both the energy radiated by the burst and the kinetic energy carried by the outflow. Gamma-ray bursts are still the most luminous explosions in the Universe, but they release energies that are comparable to supernovae. The diversity of cosmic explosions appears to be governed by the fraction of energy that is coupled to ultra-relativistic ejecta.

  5. EXIST's Gamma-Ray Burst Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Band, D. L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Hong, J.; Fishman, G.; Hartmann, D. H.; Garson III, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Skinner, G.

    2007-01-01

    We use semi-analytic techniques to evaluate the burst sensitivity of designs for the EXIST hard X-ray survey mission. Applying these techniques to the mission design proposed for the Beyond Einstein program, we find that with its very large field-of-view and faint gamma-ray burst detection threshold, EXIST will detect and localize approximately two bursts per day, a large fraction of which may be at high redshift. We estimate that EXIST's maximum sensitivity will be ~4 times greater than that...

  6. The Arecibo Fast Radio Burst: Dense Circum-burst Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, S R; Neill, J D

    2015-01-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRB) has been extensively debated. Here we investigate FRB121102, detected at Arecibo telescope and remarkable for its unusually large spectral index. After extensive study we conclude that the spectral index is caused by a nebula with free-free absorption. We find that putative nebula must lie beyond the Milky Way. We conclude that FRBs are of extra-galactic origin and that they arise in dense star-forming regions. The challenge with extra-galactic models is the the high volumetric rate of FRBs. This high rate allows us to eliminate all models of catastrophic stellar deaths. Hyper-giant flares from young magnetars emerge as the most likely progenitors. Some of the consequences are: (i) Intergalactic FRB models can be safely ignored. (ii) The rich ISM environment of young magnetars can result in significant contribution to DM, Rotation Measure (RM) and in some cases to significant free-free optical depth. (iii) The star-forming regions in the host galaxies can contribute signi...

  7. ESTIMATE OF BURSTING PRESSURE OF MILD STEEL PRESSURE VESSEL AND PRESENTATION OF BURSTING FORMULA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Chuanxiang

    2006-01-01

    In order to get more precise bursting pressure formula of mild steel, hundreds of bursting experiments of mild steel pressure vessels such as Q235(Gr.D) and 20R(1020) are done. Based on statistical data of bursting pressure and modification of Faupel formula, a more precise modified formula is given out according to the experimental data. It is proved to be more accurate after examining other bursting pressure value presented in many references. This bursting formula is very accurate in these experiments using pressure vessels with different diameter and shell thickness.Obviously, this modified bursting formula can be used in mild steel pressure vessels with different diameter and thickness of shell.

  8. SROSS C-2 Detections of Gamma Ray Bursts and the SGR 1627-41

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Sinha; P. Sreekumar; K. Kasturirangan

    2002-03-01

    The GRB monitor (GRBM) on board the Indian SROSS C-2 satellite has detected 53 classical gamma ray bursts since its launch in May, 1994 till its re-entry in July, 2001. For a subset of 26 events, locations were obtained from simultaneous observations by other gamma-ray detectors in space. The sky distribution of these 26 SROSS C-2 bursts is consistent with isotropy. The distribution of event durations shows evidence for bimodality. There is an evidence for a moderate hardness ratio-intensity (HIC) correlation in the data. The SROSS C-2 GRBM has also detected three episodes of emission from the SGR 1627-41.

  9. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG: THE FIRST TWO YEARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paciesas, William S.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Meegan, Charles A.; Van der Horst, Alexander J. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Von Kienlin, Andreas; Diehl, Roland; Foley, Suzanne; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Institute of Astro and Particle Physics, University Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, 6176 Innsbruck (Austria); Fishman, Gerald J. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Fitzpatrick, Gerard [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty [Jacobs Technology, Inc., 1525 Perimeter Pkwy NW, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); and others

    2012-03-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to enhance the scientific return from Fermi in studying gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In its first two years of operation GBM triggered on 491 GRBs. We summarize the criteria used for triggering and quantify the general characteristics of the triggered GRBs, including their locations, durations, peak flux, and fluence. This catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  10. The Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Two Years

    CERN Document Server

    Paciesas, William S; von Kienlin, Andreas; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Burgess, J Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald J; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J; Kippen, R Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Lin, Lin; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert D; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to enhance the scientific return from Fermi in studying gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In its first two years of operation GBM triggered on 491 GRBs. We summarize the criteria used for triggering and quantify the general characteristics of the triggered GRBs, including their locations, durations, peak flux, and fluence. This catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC).

  11. The Second Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Four Years

    OpenAIRE

    Kienlin, von, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Bhat, P.N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M S; Burgess, J. M.; Byrne, D.; Chaplin, V.; Cleveland, W.; Connaughton, V.; Collazzi, A.C.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Gibby, M.

    2014-01-01

    This is the second of a series of catalogs of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). It extends the first two-year catalog by two more years, resulting in an overall list of 953 GBM triggered GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected GRBs. For each GRB the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux and fluence are deri...

  12. A model for cell type localization in the migrating slug of Dictyostelium discoideum based on differential chemotactic sensitivity to cAMP and differential sensitivity to suppression of chemotaxis by ammonia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ira N Feit; Jeffrey Pawlikowski; Caroline Zawilski

    2007-03-01

    The three basic cell types in the migrating slug of Dictyostelium discoideum show differential chemotactic response to cyclic AMP (cAMP) and differential sensitivity to suppression of the chemotaxis by ammonia. The values of these parameters indicate a progressive maturation of chemotactic properties during the transdifferentiation of slug cell types. We present a model that explains the localization of the three cell types within the slug based on these chemotactic differences and on the maturation of their chemotactic properties.

  13. Binary tree-based fault location algorithm for optical burst switching network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ru-yan; LIU Dan; PENG Huan-jia; LV Ke-wei

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes an effective method of fault location based on a binary tree for optical burst switching (OBS) network. To minimize the monitoring cost, we divide the network into several monitor domains by introducing monitoring-cycle algorithms. In order to generate an exclusive code, we modify the monitoring cycle algorithm when two nodes have the same code. Through the binary tree algorithm, a pre-computation of faults in the OBS network can be achieved. When a fault happens, we can locate it immediately and accurately. Examples have proved that the algorithm has general applicability.

  14. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily ident...

  15. Radiosensitivity of AsPC-1 cell to γ-rays enhanced by up-regulation of PUMA induced by targeted Slug gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the influence of PUMA on radiosensitivity of pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells after Slug gene inhibition by transfected short interferencing RNA (siRNA). Methods: The AsPC-1 cells were infected with MOI 10, 50, 100 for 72 h, respectively. The expression of Slug and PUMA was analyzed by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry methods. The transfected and control cells were exposed to 4 Gy γ-rays. The cells inhibition rate was examined by MTT, Hoechst 33342 and IP double staining. DNA ladder and Giemsa staning was used to observe apoptosis. Results: The relative value of Slug expression was 0.831±0.14, 0.546±0.12 and 0.178±0.08 after AsPC-1 was infected with Slug-siRNA (MOI 10, 50, 100) for 72 h, significantly lower than that of control group (F=4.992, P<0.05). The relative value of PUMA was 0.325±0.07, 0.593±0.11 and 0.978±0.12, after AsPC-1 was infected with Slug-siRNA (MOI 10, 50, 100) for 72 h, significantly higher than that of control group (F=4.324, P<0.05). The cell proliferation rate was (78.76±9.36)% in transfection combined with radiosensitivity group, significantly higher than that of transfection group [(43.68±6.71)%] and radiosensitivity group alone [(19.25±3.72)%] (F=5.056, P<0.05). The apoptosis of transfection combined with radiosensitivity group was significantly higher than that of others. Conclusions: Slug gene targeting siRNA could inhibit the expression of Slug, and consequently increase the activation of PUMA expression, and so enhance the radiosensitivity to γ-rays. (authors)

  16. Ling Zhi-8 reduces lung cancer mobility and metastasis through disruption of focal adhesion and induction of MDM2-mediated Slug degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tung-Yi; Hsu, Hsien-Yeh

    2016-06-01

    We recently reported that recombinant Ling Zhi-8 (rLZ-8), a medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum recombinant protein, effectively prevents lung cancer cells proliferation in vivo mice model. In our current study, we demonstrated that rLZ-8 suppressed tumor metastasis and increased the survival rate in Lewis lung carcinoma cell-bearing mice. The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) process is regarded as the critical event in tumor metastasis. Herein, we showed that rLZ-8 effectively induced changes in EMT by interfering with cell adhesion and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) functions in lung cancer cells. Slug, a transcription factor, represses E-cadherin transcription and is regarded as a critical event in EMT and tumor metastasis. Functional studies revealed that downregulation of Slug as a result of rLZ-8-induced FAK inactivation enhanced E-cadherin expression and repressed cancer cell mobility. Moreover, we found that rLZ-8 enhanced the ubiquitination proteasome pathway (UPP)-mediated degradation of Slug in CL1-5 cells. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that rLZ-8 promoted the interaction between MDM2 and Slug, resulting in Slug degradation; however, MDM2-shRNA abolished rLZ-8-enhanced Slug degradation. This study is the first to determine anti-metastatic activity of rLZ-8 and its potential mechanism, with how the regulation of EMT and cell mobility is via the negative modulation of FAK, and thereby leading to the ubiquitination and degradation of Slug. Our findings suggest that the targets of FAK play a key role in metastasis. Moreover, rLZ-8 may be useful as a chemotherapeutic agent for treating lung cancer. PMID:26992741

  17. Directivity of low-frequency solar type 3 radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence rate of type 3 solar bursts in the frequency range 4.9 MHz to 30 kHz was analyzed as a function of burst intensity and burst arrival direction. Results show that the occurrence rate of bursts falls off with increasing flux and the distribution of burst arrival directions at each frequency shows a significantly larger number of bursts observed west of the earth--sun line than east of it. This western excess in occurrence rate appears to be correlated with the direction of the average interplanetary magnetic field, and is interpreted as beaming of the observed burst radiation along the magnetic field direction

  18. Long Burst Error Correcting Codes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long burst error mitigation is an enabling technology for the use of Ka band for high rate commercial and government users. Multiple NASA, government, and...

  19. Relativistic effects in gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to recent models of the sources of gamma-ray bursts the extremely energetic emission is caused by shells expanding with ultrarelativistic velocity. With the recent identification of optical sources at the positions of some gamma-ray bursts these ''fireball'' models have acquired an actuality that invites to use them as a motivating application when teaching special relativity. We demonstrate several relativistic effects associated with these models which are very pronounced due to the great velocity of the shell. For example a burst lasting for a month in the rest frame of an element of the shell lasts for a few seconds only, in the rest frame of our detector. It is shown how the observed properties of a burst are modified by aberration and the Doppler effect. The apparent luminosity as a function of time is calculated. Modifications due to the motion of the star away from the observer are calculated. (Author)

  20. FRBCAT: The Fast Radio Burst Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Jameson, A; Keane, E F; Bailes, M; Kramer, M; Morello, V; Tabbara, D; van Straten, W

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a catalogue of known Fast Radio Burst (FRB) sources in the form of an online catalogue, FRBCAT. The catalogue includes information about the instrumentation used for the observations for each detected burst, the measured quantities from each observation, and model-dependent quantities derived from observed quantities. To aid in consistent comparisons of burst properties such as width and signal-to-noise ratios we have reprocessed all the bursts for which we have access to the raw data, with software which we make available. The originally derived properties are also listed for comparison. The catalogue is hosted online as a MySQL database which can also be downloaded in tabular or plain text format for off-line use. This database will be maintained for use by the community for studies of the FRB population as it grows.

  1. Bursts of intermediate ions in atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hõrrak, U.; Salm, J.; Tammet, H.

    1998-06-01

    The mobility spectrum of air ions has been measured at Tahkuse Observatory in Estonia for several years. The average concentration of intermediate ions with mobilities of 0.05-0.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 in atmospheric air is about 50 cm-3. On the level of this low background, high concentration bursts of intermediate air ions occur occasionally. A burst can be followed by subsequent evolution of intermediate ions into larger ones. To explain the bursts of intermediate air ions, two hypotheses can be advanced: (1)A burst of neutral particles occurs due to homogeneous nucleation, and the particles are charged by the attachment of cluster ions. (2) The cluster ions grow by ion-induced nucleation in proper environmental conditions.

  2. Burst Fragmentation Model Based on Sequential Burst Allocation Algorithm for Mobile WiMAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid G. Ali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available the downlink Bandwidth resources of WiMAX are allocated by the burst allocation algorithm. The algorithm is responsible for calculating the appropriate location of a number of the smallest unit of bandwidth which is called the slot for all users within the downlink subframe in the form of bursts. Resource wastage in the form of unused and unallocated slots is a real common problem accompanies resource management in the burst allocation algorithms. This paper investigates the Sequential Burst Allocation (SBA that based on sequential slot allocation and burst fragmentation. An analytical model of frame utilization has been derived. Moreover, this paper presents criteria of burst fragmentation and investigates the effect of burst fragmentation to the allocation efficiency. It has been observed from the results that the SBA algorithm outperforms the Standard (ST algorithm in term of number of users and resource wastage reduction per frame. The research results illustrates that burst fragmentation can enhance the proportion of frame utilization with minor effect to the overhead size. As well as, the results are useful to be a heuristic guide line for MAC layer scheduler to decide the best burst size that can be used.

  3. Design of assembly control algorithm based on burst-size feedback for optical burst switching network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minglei Fu; Zichun Le

    2009-01-01

    A novel assembly control algorithm named burst-size feedback adaptive assembly period(BFAAP)is proposed.The major difference between BFAAP and other similar adaptive assembly algorithms is that the control curve of BFAAP is dynamically adjusted according to the feedback of outgoing burst size.BFAAP is compared with two typical algorithms fixed assembly period(FAP)aild min-burst length max assembly period(MBMAP)in simulation in terms of burst size distribution and assembly period.Moreover,the transmission control protocol(TCP)performance over BFAAP is also considered and simulated.

  4. A Burst-by-Burst Adaptive Joint-Detection Based CDMA Speech Transceiver

    OpenAIRE

    How, HT; Liew, TH; Kuan, EL; Hanzo, L.

    2001-01-01

    A burst-by-burst adaptive speech transceiver is proposed, which can drop its source coding rate and speech quality under transceiver control in order to invoke a more error resilient modem mode amongst less favourable channel conditions. The novel, high-quality, Adaptive Multi-Rate (AMR) speech codec [5], operated at bit rates of 4.75 and 10.2 kbps and combined with sourcesensitivity-matched Redundant Residue Number Systems (RRNS) based channel codes. Burst-by-burst adaptive Joint-Detection b...

  5. Optimal Codes for the Burst Erasure Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Deep space communications over noisy channels lead to certain packets that are not decodable. These packets leave gaps, or bursts of erasures, in the data stream. Burst erasure correcting codes overcome this problem. These are forward erasure correcting codes that allow one to recover the missing gaps of data. Much of the recent work on this topic concentrated on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. These are more complicated to encode and decode than Single Parity Check (SPC) codes or Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and so far have not been able to achieve the theoretical limit for burst erasure protection. A block interleaved maximum distance separable (MDS) code (e.g., an SPC or RS code) offers near-optimal burst erasure protection, in the sense that no other scheme of equal total transmission length and code rate could improve the guaranteed correctible burst erasure length by more than one symbol. The optimality does not depend on the length of the code, i.e., a short MDS code block interleaved to a given length would perform as well as a longer MDS code interleaved to the same overall length. As a result, this approach offers lower decoding complexity with better burst erasure protection compared to other recent designs for the burst erasure channel (e.g., LDPC codes). A limitation of the design is its lack of robustness to channels that have impairments other than burst erasures (e.g., additive white Gaussian noise), making its application best suited for correcting data erasures in layers above the physical layer. The efficiency of a burst erasure code is the length of its burst erasure correction capability divided by the theoretical upper limit on this length. The inefficiency is one minus the efficiency. The illustration compares the inefficiency of interleaved RS codes to Quasi-Cyclic (QC) LDPC codes, Euclidean Geometry (EG) LDPC codes, extended Irregular Repeat Accumulate (eIRA) codes, array codes, and random LDPC codes previously proposed for burst erasure

  6. From Enigma to Tool: Gamma-Ray Burst Reveals Secrets of Host Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Five years ago, astronomers knew almost nothing about Gamma Ray Bursts. Now, a team of observers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope has used a gamma-ray burst as a powerful tool to unveil the nature of the galaxy in which it occurred, more than 7 billion light-years away. VLA Images of GRB980703 Host Galaxy "We believe that gamma-ray bursts may become one of the best available tools for studying the history of star formation in the universe," said Edo Berger, a graduate student at Caltech. Berger worked with Caltech astronomy professor Shri Kulkarni and Dale Frail, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, to study a gamma-ray burst first seen on July 3, 1998. The astronomers presented their results at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Pasadena, CA. "For the first time, we've seen the host galaxy of a gamma-ray burst with a radio telescope," Berger said. "Previously, gamma-ray-burst host galaxies have been seen with optical telescopes, but detecting this galaxy with a radio telescope has given us new clues about the nature of the galaxy itself -- clues we couldn't have gotten any other way," he added. For example, based on optical-telescope studies, astronomers estimated that new stars are forming in the host galaxy at the rate of about the mass equivalent of 20 suns per year. However, data from the radio observations show that the actual star-formation rate is 25 times greater -- the mass equivalent of 500 suns per year. "With the VLA, we are seeing the entire region of star formation in this galaxy, including the areas so dusty that visible light can't get out," said Frail. Gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions since the Big Bang. First discovered in 1967 by a satellite launched to monitor compliance with the atmospheric nuclear test ban treaty, gamma-ray bursts remained one of astronomy's premier mysteries for 30 years. For three decades

  7. Black Hole Lensing and Wave Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Gogberashvili, Merab

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that close to a black hole horizon wave equations have real-valued exponentially time-dependent solutions and to investigate strong gravitational lensing we need to introduce an effective negative cosmological constant between the Schwarzschild and photon spheres. Then exponentially amplified reflected waves from this effective AdS space could explain properties of some gamma ray bursts, fast radio bursts and gravitational waves.

  8. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Massimo Della [INAF-Napoli, Capodimonte Observatory, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, I-65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  9. Cosmological parametrization of $\\gamma$ ray burst models

    CERN Document Server

    Linder, E V

    1996-01-01

    Using three parametrizations of the gamma ray burst count data comparison is made to cosmological source models. While simple models can fit and faint end slope constraints, the addition of a logarithmic count range variable describing the curvature of the counts shows that models with no evolution or evolution power law in redshift with index less than 10 fail to satisfy simultaneously all three descriptors of the burst data. The cosmological source density that would be required for a fit is illustrated.

  10. Autaptic Connections Shift Network Excitability and Bursting

    OpenAIRE

    Wiles, Laura; Gu, Shi; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Bassett, Danielle S.; Meaney, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Network architecture forms a critical constraint on neuronal function. Here we examine the role of structural autapses, when a neuron synapses onto itself, in driving network-wide bursting behavior. Using a simple spiking model of neuronal activity, we study how autaptic connections affect activity patterns, and evaluate if neuronal degree or controllability are significant factors that affect changes in bursting from these autaptic connections. We observed that adding increasing numbers of a...

  11. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Massimo Della

    2015-12-01

    I'll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ˜ 0.4% - 3%.

  12. MIRAX sensitivity for Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacahui, J. R.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Braga, J.; Castro, M. A.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present the detection capability of the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de RAios-X) experiment for Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). MIRAX is an X-ray astronomy mission designed to perform a wide band hard X-ray (10-200 keV) survey of the sky, especially in the Galactic plane. With a total detection area of 169 cm2, large field of view (FoV, 20 ° × 20 °), angular resolution of 1°45‧ and good spectral and time resolution (∼8% at 60 keV, 10 μs), MIRAX will be optimized for the detection and study of transient sources, such as accreting neutron stars (NS), black holes (BH), Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), and both short and long GRBs. This is especially important because MIRAX is expected to operate in an epoch when probably no other hard X-ray wide-field imager will be active. We have performed detailed simulations of MIRAX GRB observations using the GEANT4 package, including the background spectrum and images of GRB sources in order to provide accurate predictions of the sensitivity for the expected GRB rate to be observed. MIRAX will be capable of detecting ∼44 GRBs per year up to redshifts of ∼4.5. The MIRAX mission will be able to contribute significantly to GRB science by detecting a large number of GRBs per year with wide band spectral response. The observations will contribute mainly to the part of GRB spectra where a thermal emission is predicted by the Fireball model. We also discuss the possibility of detecting GRB afterglows in the X-ray band with MIRAX.

  13. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mannheim, K

    2000-01-01

    The observed fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays are used to infer the maximum allowed high-energy neutrino flux allowed for Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), following Mannheim, Protheroe, and Rachen (2000). It is shown that if GRBs produce the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, they should contribute (a) at least 10% of the extragalactic gamma ray background between 3 MeV and 30 GeV, contrary to their observed energy flux which is only a minute fraction of this flux, and (b) a cumulative neutrino flux a factor of 20 below the AMANDA (Neutrino 2000) limit on isotropic neutrinos. This could have two implications, either GRBs do not produce the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays or that the GRBs are strongly beamed and emit most of their power at energies well above 100 GeV implausibly increasing the energy requirements, but consistent with the marginal detections of a few low-redshift GRBs by MILAGRITO, HEGRA-AIROBICC, and the Tibet-Array. All crucial measurements to test the models will be available in the next few years. Thes...

  14. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  15. Meteor burst communications improvement study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David

    1993-07-01

    Two identical Meteor Burst Radio Terminals were developed, fabricated, and delivered to the Air Force. Each is controlled by a PC computer in a menu driven manner. The mode of operation is full duplex. The RF frequency range is 40 to 60 MHz with tuning increments of 25 KHz. Data rates are 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, and 512 kbps. Modulation is coherent Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) and incoherent Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK). Protocol includes Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) with source and destination addressing, message number, start of message, and end of message. Messages are packetized, and Reed Solomon (R-S) coding is an option. The ARQ is under the control of a Cyclic Redundancy Check Code (CRCC) which detects binary errors within each packet. The terminal is intended to increase meteor trail availability and data throughput by several orders of magnitude--by operating with new antennas that provide much higher gains without sacrificing meteor trail acquisition performance.

  16. Detection of spectral evolution in the bursts emitted during the 2008-2009 active episode of SGR J1550 - 5418

    CERN Document Server

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Granot, Jonathan; Baring, Matthew G; Göğüş, Ersin; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Kaneko, Yuki; Lin, Lin; Watts, Anna L; Bhat, P Narayana; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Greiner, Jochen; Meegan, Charles A; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D; Rau, Arne

    2012-01-01

    In early October 2008, the Soft Gamma Repeater SGRJ1550 - 5418 (1E 1547.0 - 5408, AXJ155052 - 5418, PSR J1550 - 5418) became active, emitting a series of bursts which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) after which a second especially intense activity period commenced in 2009 January and a third, less active period was detected in 2009 March-April. Here we analyze the GBM data all the bursts from the first and last active episodes. We performed temporal and spectral analysis for all events and found that their temporal characteristics are very similar to the ones of other SGR bursts, as well the ones reported for the bursts of the main episode (average burst durations \\sim 170 ms). In addition, we used our sample of bursts to quantify the systematic uncertainties of the GBM location algorithm for soft gamma-ray transients to < 8 deg. Our spectral analysis indicates significant spectral evolution between the first and last set of events. Although the 2008 October events are best fit with a sin...

  17. Propofol and sevoflurane induce distinct burst suppression patterns in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Jonathan D.; Westover, M. Brandon; Ching, ShiNung; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is an EEG pattern characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude activity (bursts) and relatively low amplitude activity (suppressions). Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Final...

  18. First Very Low Frequency detection of short repeated bursts from magnetar SGR J1550-5418

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Y T; Bertoni, F C P; Fagundes, P R; Chau, J; Schuch, N J; Hayakawa, M; Hobara, Y; Terasawa, T; Takahashi, T

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first detection of ionospheric disturbances caused by short repeated gamma-ray bursts from the magnetar SGR J1550-5418. Very low frequency (VLF) radio wave data obtained in South America clearly show sudden amplitude and phase changes at the corresponding times of eight SGR bursts. Maximum amplitude and phase changes of the VLF signals appear to be correlated with the gamma-ray fluence. On the other hand, VLF recovery timescales do not show any significant correlation with the fluence, possibly suggesting that the bursts' spectra are not similar to each other. In summary, the Earth's ionosphere can be used as a very large gamma-ray detector and the VLF observations provide us with a new method to monitor high energy astrophysical phenomena without interruption such as Earth Occultation.

  19. 3-dimensional Simulation of an Air-lift Pump from Bubbly to Slug Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Hongrae; Jo, Daeseong [Kyungpook National Univ, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The air-lift pump has been used in various applications with its merit that it can pump up without any moving parts. E.g. coffee percolator, petroleum industry, suction dredge, OTEC i.e. ocean thermal energy conversion and so on. By the merit, it has high durability for high temperature water or vapor, and fluid-solid mixture like waste water, muddy water and crude, which cause problems when it's pumped up with general pumps. In this regard, the air-lift pump has been one of the most desirable technology. A typical air-lift pump configuration is illustrated in Figure 01. The principle of this pump is very simple. When air is injected from the injector at bottom of a submerged tube, i.e., air bubbles are suspended in the liquid, the average density of the mixture in the tube is less than that of the surrounding fluid in the reservoir. Then hydrostatic pressure over the length of the tube is decreased. This buoyancy force causes a pumping action. The comparison of the simulated results, experimental result, and theoretical result is been able by data shown as Figure 04. They have similar trends but they also have a little differences because there are some limits of simulating the flow regimes. At the different flow condition, different coefficients for friction factor or pressure drop should be used, but this simulation uses a laminar condition and the theoretical equations are valid only for slug regime where the air flow rate is lower than the other regimes. From these causes, the differences has arisen, and difference comes bigger as the air flow rate increases, i.e., becoming annular flow regime or churn flow regime.

  20. The cholinergic system in the olfactory center of the terrestrial slug Limax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Ryota; Kobayashi, Suguru; Wakiya, Kyoko; Yamagishi, Miki; Fukuoka, Masayuki; Ito, Etsuro

    2014-09-01

    Acetylcholine plays various important roles in the central nervous system of invertebrates as well as vertebrates. In the olfactory center of the terrestrial slug Limax, the local field potential (LFP) oscillates, and the change in its oscillatory frequency is thought to correlate with the detection of odor that potentially changes an ongoing behavior of the animal. Acetylcholine is known to upregulate the frequency of the LFP oscillation, and is one of the candidates for the neurotransmitters that are involved in such higher cognitive functions. However, there have been no histological data on the cholinergic system in gastropods, nor are there data on the receptors that are responsible for the upregulation of the oscillatory frequency of LFP due to the lack of analytical tools (such as antibodies or cDNA sequence information on cholinergic system-related genes). Here we cloned the cDNAs of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), acetylcholinesterase, vesicular acetylcholine transporter, and several nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), and investigated their localization in the brain of Limax. We also generated a polyclonal antibody against ChAT to examine its localization, and investigated pharmacologically the involvement of nAChRs in the LFP oscillation. Our data showed: 1) dense distribution of the neurons expressing mRNAs of ChAT and vesicular acetylcholine transporter in the olfactory center; 2) spatially unique expression patterns of different nAChRs in the olfactory center; 3) involvement of nAChRs in the upregulation of the oscillation; 4) localization of ChAT protein in nerve fibers and/or terminals; and 5) the presence of cholinergic nerves in the tentacles. PMID:24523205

  1. Slug impact loading on the vessel head during a postulated in-vessel steam explosion in pressurized water reactors -- Assessments and discussion of the investigation strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most severe consequence of a pressurized water reactor in-vessel steam explosion is a molten fuel slug impact against the head of the reactor pressure vessel that could cause a failure of this head and lead to missiles endangering the reactor containment. An investigation is described that attempts to determine the maximum slug impact that a vessel head is capable of withstanding without failing and, consequently, without impairing the containment safety-related function. Preliminary theoretical assessments are presented that suggest that the head might be able to withstand rather strong impacts and that the shape of the fuel slug will have only a moderate influence on the results, provided the upper internal structures are taken into account. A low sensitivity against the slug shape is an essential prerequisite for a reliable safety proof. However, investigations primarily based on computational models are not sufficient; therefore, an investigation concept is proposed that relies on model experiments in which the geometry is scaled down by factors of 10 and 20, respectively. Theoretical and experimental investigations for liquid-structure impact problems in different scales are discussed to assess the degree of similarity that can be obtained. Finally, model experiments are described in some detail simulating the molten fuel slug impact on the vessel head

  2. TEMPORAL DECONVOLUTION STUDY OF LONG AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, William; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Meegan, Charles A. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Institute of Astro and Particle Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Diehl, Roland; Foley, Suzanne; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fitzpatrick, Gerard [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); and others

    2012-01-10

    The light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to result from internal shocks reflecting the activity of the GRB central engine. Their temporal deconvolution can reveal potential differences in the properties of the central engines in the two populations of GRBs which are believed to originate from the deaths of massive stars (long) and from mergers of compact objects (short). We present here the results of the temporal analysis of 42 GRBs detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We deconvolved the profiles into pulses, which we fit with lognormal functions. The distributions of the pulse shape parameters and intervals between neighboring pulses are distinct for both burst types and also fit with lognormal functions. We have studied the evolution of these parameters in different energy bands and found that they differ between long and short bursts. We discuss the implications of the differences in the temporal properties of long and short bursts within the framework of the internal shock model for GRB prompt emission.

  3. Temporal Deconvolution study of Long and Short Gamma-Ray Burst Light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, P N; Connaughton, Valerie; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; van der Horst, Alexander J; Paciesas, William; Meegan, Charles A; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Guiriec, Sylvain; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    The light curves of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are believed to result from internal shocks reflecting the activity of the GRB central engine. Their temporal deconvolution can reveal potential differences in the properties of the central engines in the two populations of GRBs which are believed to originate from the deaths of massive stars (long) and from mergers of compact objects (short). We present here the results of the temporal analysis of 42 GRBs detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We deconvolved the profiles into pulses, which we fit with lognormal functions. The distributions of the pulse shape parameters and intervals between neighboring pulses are distinct for both burst types and also fit with lognormal functions. We have studied the evolution of these parameters in different energy bands and found that they differ between long and short bursts. We discuss the implications of the differences in the temporal properties of long and short bursts within t...

  4. The Interplanetary Network Supplement to the Fermi GBM Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, K; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Mazets, E P; Svinkin, D S; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Meegan, C; Goldsten, J; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Rau, A; von Kienlin, A; Zhang, X; Yamaoka, K; Fukazawa, Y; Hanabata, Y; Ohno, M; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Barthelmy, S; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Cummings, J; Krimm, H A; Smith, D M; Del Monte, E; Feroci, M; Marisaldi, M

    2013-01-01

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 393 were observed by at least one other instrument in the 9-spacecraft IPN. Of the 393, the localizations of 146 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or "triangulation"). For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.4 arcminutes and 32 degrees, depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1 sigma GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6 degree systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If ...

  5. A biomechanical study on burst mechanisms of plant fruit: stress analysis of pericarps before bursting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Jiro; Kashiwano, Yuki; Yokota, Hideo; Nakamura, Sakiko; Kinoshita, Eichiro

    2010-10-01

    Bursting of fruit is a very interesting biomechanical phenomenon because its mechanism is directly related to the plant's reproduction. A plant that produces fruit that bursts powerfully and spreads the seeds widely has the advantage of reproduction without relying on other mechanisms such as transportation of fruit by insects. The structures of many types of fruit have likely been optimized by evolution, although the structure itself appears rather simplistic. Strain energy is stored in each pericarp because of growth deformation, swelling or desiccation just before bursting. Throughout these changes, the mechanical stress of the pericarps is at equilibrium. At the instant of bursting, the stored strain energy is released very rapidly. Quick and wide motion of the pericarps in a certain direction is advantageous for throwing the seed a long distance. The motion and deformation of bursting pericarps depend on their tissue structure and mechanical stress condition just before the burst. We tracked the bursting motion by using a high-speed camera. Then we calculated the pre-burst stress generated in a pericarp of Impatiens by using the finite-element method. The boundary condition obtained by experiments using a high-speed video camera is given, and the stress was calculated using reverse deformation analysis. The stress distribution of the pericarp is effective in causing the pericarp motion to throw the seeds far away. PMID:20696416

  6. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Sari, R.; Bloom, J. S.; Galama, T. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Price, P. A.; Fox, D.; Reichart, D. E.; Yost, S.; Berger, E.; Diercks, A.; Goodrich, R.; Chaffee, F.

    2002-12-01

    Cosmic γ-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean γ-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 1051 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ( ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host galaxies span a range of luminosities and morphologies, but appear to be broadly typical for the normal, actively star-forming galaxy populations at comparable redshifts and magnitudes. Some of the challenges for the future include: the nature of the short bursts and possibly other types of bursts and transients; use of GRBs to probe the obscured star formation in the universe, and possibly as probes of the very early universe; and their detection as sources of high-energy particles and gravitational waves.

  7. Multi-level slug tests in highly permeable formations: 1. Modification of the Springer-Gelhar (SG) model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlotnik, V.A.; McGuire, V.L.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-level slug test model and a method for the evaluation of vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity in highly permeable formations are developed. A double-packer system is employed to estimate local hydraulic conductivity. Depending on the formation and double-packer system parameters, the water level recovery in the tested well can exhibit a monotonic or oscillatory response. To discern information on aquifer properties from artifacts introduced by the measurement system, the theory of flow in an aquifer and a double-packer system is developed. The mathematical model incorporates features of the Springer and Gelhar (1991) model and reduces to the Bouwer and Rice (1976) model in a special case. The model involves equations of momentum and mass conservation for the double-packer system with quasi-steady well-aquifer interaction equations. The method is uniformly applicable for both monotonic and oscillatory well responses and can produce profiles of hydraulic conductivity for the tested well. The criterion is given to determine the type of well response for given slug test conditions.A multi-level slug test model and a method for the evaluation of vertical profiles of hydraulic conductivity in highly permeable formations are developed. A double-packer system is employed to estimate local hydraulic conductivity. Depending on the formation and double-packer system parameters, the water level recovery in the tested well can exhibit a monotonic or oscillatory response. To discern information on aquifer properties from artifacts introduced by the measurement system, the theory of flow in an aquifer and a double-packer system is developed. The mathematical model incorporates features of the Springer and Gelhar (1991) model and reduces to the Bouwer and Rice (1976) model in a special case. The model involves equations of momentum and mass conservation for the double-packer system with quasi-steady well-aquifer interaction equations. The method is uniformly

  8. An Intelligent Segmented Burst Assembly Mechanism in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi-Yuan; ZHANG Jian-Guo

    2008-01-01

    We focus on the burst assembly mechanism and propose a new intelligent method in which the burst is assembled from several internet protocol (IP) packets in which the number of IP packets is changed according to the traffic load and the burst is segmented into several parts, called the ISOBS mechanism. The average burst assembly time of the ISOBS mechanism decreases as compared with the fixed-assembly-time and fixed-assembly-time-and-length mechanisms. The loss ratio decreases 50% as compared with the general optical burst switching (OBS) mechanism. The last segment can carry high quality of service (QOS) information. We can achieve that the loss ratio of the last segment is almost zero when the traffic load is less than 0.05. When the traffic load is 0.9, the loss ratio of the last segment is 0.0041. The ISOBS can support to transmit different QOS data.

  9. An Intelligent Segmented Burst Assembly Mechanism in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We focus on the burst assembly mechanism and propose a new intelligent method in which the burst is assembled from several internet protocol (IP) packets in which the number of IP packets is changed according to the traffic load and the burst is segmented into several parts, called the ISOBS mechanism. The average burst assembly time of the ISOBS mechanism decreases as compared with the fixed-assembly-time and fixed-assembly-time-and-length mechanisms. The loss ratio decreases 50% as compared with the general optical burst switching (OBS) mechanism. The last segment can carry high quality of service (QOS) information. We can achieve that the loss ratio of the last segment is almost zero when the traffic load is less than 0.05. When the traffic load is 0.9, the loss ratio of the last segment is 0.0041. The ISOBS can support to transmit different QOS data. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  10. QKD-Based Secured Burst Integrity Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2016-03-01

    The field of optical transmission has undergone numerous advancements and is still being researched mainly due to the fact that optical data transmission can be done at enormous speeds. It is quite evident that people prefer optical communication when it comes to large amount of data involving its transmission. The concept of switching in networks has matured enormously with several researches, architecture to implement and methods starting with Optical circuit switching to Optical Burst Switching. Optical burst switching is regarded as viable solution for switching bursts over networks but has several security vulnerabilities. However, this work exploited the security issues associated with Optical Burst Switching with respect to integrity of burst. This proposed Quantum Key based Secure Hash Algorithm (QKBSHA-512) with enhanced compression function design provides better avalanche effect over the conventional integrity algorithms.

  11. SLUG -- Stochastically Lighting Up Galaxies. III: A Suite of Tools for Simulated Photometry, Spectroscopy, and Bayesian Inference with Stochastic Stellar Populations

    CERN Document Server

    Krumholz, Mark R; da Silva, Robert L; Rendahl, Theodore; Parra, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Stellar population synthesis techniques for predicting the observable light emitted by a stellar population have extensive applications in numerous areas of astronomy. However, accurate predictions for small populations of young stars, such as those found in individual star clusters, star-forming dwarf galaxies, and small segments of spiral galaxies, require that the population be treated stochastically. Conversely, accurate deductions of the properties of such objects also requires consideration of stochasticity. Here we describe a comprehensive suite of modular, open-source software tools for tackling these related problems. These include: a greatly-enhanced version of the slug code introduced by da Silva et al. (2012), which computes spectra and photometry for stochastically- or deterministically-sampled stellar populations with nearly-arbitrary star formation histories, clustering properties, and initial mass functions; cloudy_slug, a tool that automatically couples slug-computed spectra with the cloudy r...

  12. Onset of slugging criterion based on characteristics and stability analysis of transient one-dimensional two-phase flow equations of two-fluid model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-step approach has been used to obtain a new onset of slug formation criterion for the stratified and nonstratified flows in horizontal pipes: (1) In the first step, a more general expression than the existing models for the onset of slug flow criterion has been derived from the analysis of singular points and neutral stability conditions of the transient one-dimensional two-phase flow equations of two-fluid model. (2) In the second step, introducing simplifications and incorporating a parameter into the general expression obtained in the first step to satisfy a number of physical conditions a priori specified, a new onset of slug flow criterion for horizontal pipes has been derived. Comparisons of the present model with the experimental data and existing theories show that the present model agrees very closely with the best existing model

  13. Focal mechanism caused by fracture or burst of a coal pillar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO An-ye; DOU Lin-ming; CHEN Guo-xiang; GONG Si-yuan; WANG Yu-gang; LI Zhi-hua

    2008-01-01

    As a regional, real-time and dynamic method, microseismic monitoring technology is quite an appropriate technology for forecasting geological hazards, such as rock bursts, mine tremors, coal and gas outbursts and can even be used to prevent or at least reduce these disasters. The study of the focal mechanisms of different seismic sources is the prerequisite and basis for forecasting rock burst by microseismic monitoring technology. Based on the analysis on the mechanism and fracture course of coal pillars where rock bursts occur mostly, the equivalent point source model of the seismicity caused by a coal pillar was created. Given the model, the seismic displacement equation of a coal pillar was analyzed and the seismic mechanism was pointed out by seismic wave theory. The course of the fracture of the coal pillar was simulated closely in the laboratory and the equivalent microseismic signals of the fractures of the coal pillar were acquired using a TDS-6 experimental system. The results show that, by the pressure and friction of a medium near the seismic source, both a compression wave and a shear wave will be emitted and shear fracture will be induced at the moment of breakage. The results can be used to provide an academic basis to forecast and prevent rock bursts or tremors in a coal pillar.

  14. Sources of type III solar microwave bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, Dmitriy; Lesovoi, Sergey; Tokhchukova, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Microwave fine structures allow us to study plasma evolution in an energy release region. The Siberian Solar Radio Telescope (SSRT) is a unique instrument designed to examine fine structures at 5.7 GHz. A complex analysis of data from RATAN-600, 4-8 GHz spectropolarimeter, and SSRT, simultaneously with extreme UV data, made it possible to localize sources of III type microwave drift bursts in August 10, 2011 event within the entire frequency band of burst occurrences, as well as to determine the most probable region of primary energy release. To localize sources of III type bursts from RATAN-600 data, an original method for data processing has been worked out. At 5.7 GHz, the source of bursts was determined along two coordinates whereas at 4.5, 4.7, 4.9, 5.1, 5.3, 5.5 and 6.0 GHz, their locations were identified along one coordinate. The size of the burst source at 5.1 GHz was found to be maximum as compared to source sizes at other frequencies.

  15. Diagnostics From Three Rising Submillimeter Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Ai-Hua; Wang, Xin-Dong

    2015-01-01

    In the paper we investigate three novel rising submillimeter (THz) bursts occurred sequentially in a super-Active Region NOAA 10486. The average rising rate of the flux density above 200 GHz is only 20 sfu/GHz (corresponding spectral index $\\alpha$ of 1.6) for the THz spectral components of 2003 October 28 and November 4 bursts, while it can attain values of 235 sfu/GHz ($\\alpha$=4.8) for 2003 November 2 burst. The steeply rising THz spectrum can be produced by a population of high relativistic electrons with a low-energy cutoff of 1 MeV , while it only requires a low-energy cutoff of 30 keV for the two slowly rising THz bursts, via gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation based on our numerical simulations of burst spectra in the magnetic dipole field case. The electron density variation is much larger in the THz source than that in microwave (MW) one. It is interesting that the THz source radius decreased by 20--50$\\%$ during the decay phase for the three events, but the MW one increased by 28$\\%$ for the 2003 Novemb...

  16. Swift: A Gamma Ray Bursts Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2003-01-01

    Swift is a NASA gamma-ray burst MIDEX mission that is in development for launch in December 2003. It is a multiwavelength transient observatory for GRB astronomy. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of GRBs and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. It will also.perform a survey of the hard X-ray sky to a sensitivity level of -1 mCrab. A wide-field camera will detect more than a hundred GRBs per year to 5 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 70 sec by an autonomously controlled 'swift' spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions will be determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Measurements of redshift will be made for many of the bursts. The instrumentation is a combination of superb existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (approximately 0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. The hardware is currently in final stages of fabrication and initial stages of integration and test. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift.

  17. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Djorgovski, S G; Kulkarni, S R; Sari, R; Bloom, J S; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; Price, P A; Fox, D; Reichart, D; Yost, S; Berger, E; Diercks, A H; Goodrich, R; Chaffee, F H

    2001-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean gamma-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 10^51 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host gal...

  18. The First FERMI-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guiriec, S.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L.; Thompson, D. J.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy great than (20 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above approximately 20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  19. The First Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buehler, R.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Cecchi, C.; Charles, E.; Chaves, R. C. G.; Chekhtman, A.; Chiang, J.; Chiaro, G.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Cutini, S.; D'Ammando, F.; de Angelis, A.; de Palma, F.; Dermer, C. D.; Desiante, R.; Digel, S. W.; Dingus, B. L.; Di Venere, L.; Drell, P. S.; Drlica-Wagner, A.; Dubois, R.; Favuzzi, C.; Ferrara, E. C.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giommi, P.; Giordano, F.; Giroletti, M.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Goldstein, A.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grove, J. E.; Gruber, D.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Hanabata, Y.; Hayashida, M.; Horan, D.; Hou, X.; Hughes, R. E.; Inoue, Y.; Jackson, M. S.; Jogler, T.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, A. S.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Kataoka, J.; Kawano, T.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Larsson, S.; Latronico, L.; Lee, S.-H.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Massaro, F.; Mayer, M.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McBreen, S.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Michelson, P. F.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Murgia, S.; Nemmen, R.; Nuss, E.; Nymark, T.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orienti, M.; Orlando, E.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Pelassa, V.; Perkins, J. S.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Pivato, G.; Porter, T. A.; Preece, R.; Racusin, J. L.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Rau, A.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Reimer, O.; Reposeur, T.; Ritz, S.; Romoli, C.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Saz Parkinson, P. M.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Sonbas, E.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, Y.; Thayer, J. G.; Thayer, J. B.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Tierney, D.; Tinivella, M.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Troja, E.; Tronconi, V.; Usher, T. L.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vianello, G.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Winer, B. L.; Wood, K. S.; Wood, M.; Xiong, S.; Yang, Z.

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (gsim 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ~20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  20. THE FIRST FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Asano, K. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro City, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhat, P. N. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Bissaldi, E. [Institut für Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut für Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Bonnell, J.; Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bouvier, A., E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu, E-mail: giacomov@slac.stanford.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (∼> 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ∼20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  1. THE FIRST FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (∼> 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ∼20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model

  2. High sensitivity neutron bursts detecting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technique and instrumentation to detect multiplicity of fast neutrons, emitted in sharp bursts, has been developed. A bank of 16 BF3 detectors, in an appropriate thermalising assembly, efficiency ∼ 16%, is used to detect neutron bursts. The output from this setup, through appropriate electronics, is divided into two paths. The first is directly connected to a computer controlled scalar. The second is connected to another similar scalar through a delay time unit (DTU). The DTU design is such that once it is triggered by a count pulse than it does not allow any counts to be recorded for a fixed dead time set at ∼ 100 μs. The difference in counts recorded directly and through DTU gives the total number of neutrons produced in bursts. This setup is being used to study lattice cracking, anomalous effects in solid deuterium systems and various reactor physics experiments. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig

  3. On the bursting of gene products

    CERN Document Server

    Yvinec, Romain

    2011-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate that the so-called bursting production of molecular species during gene expression may be an artifact caused by low time resolution in experimental data collection and not an actual burst in production. We reach this conclusion through an analysis of a two-stage and binary model for gene expression, and demonstrate that in the limit when mRNA degradation is much faster than protein degradation they are equivalent. The negative binomial distribution is shown to be a limiting case of the binary model for fast "on to off" state transitions and high values of the ratio between protein synthesis and degradation rates. The gene products population increases by unity but multiple times in a time interval orders of magnitude smaller than protein half-life or the precision of the experimental apparatus employed in its detection. This rare-and-fast one-by-one protein synthesis has been interpreted as bursting.

  4. Unveiling the Secrets of Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Gomboc, A

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are unpredictable and brief flashes of gamma rays that occur about once a day in random locations in the sky. Since gamma rays do not penetrate the Earth's atmosphere, they are detected by satellites, which automatically trigger ground-based telescopes for follow-up observations at longer wavelengths. In this introduction to Gamma Ray Bursts we review how building a multi-wavelength picture of these events has revealed that they are the most energetic explosions since the Big Bang and are connected with stellar deaths in other galaxies. However, in spite of exceptional observational and theoretical progress in the last 15 years, recent observations raise many questions which challenge our understanding of these elusive phenomena. Gamma Ray Bursts therefore remain one of the hottest topics in modern astrophysics.

  5. A mechanism for fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E; Vieyro, Florencia L

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are mysterious transient sources likely located at cosmological distances. The derived brightness temperatures exceed by many orders of magnitude the self-absorption limit of incoherent synchrotron radiation, implying the operation of a coherent emission process. We propose a radiation mechanism for fast radio bursts where the emission arises from collisionless Bremsstrahlung in strong plasma turbulence excited by relativistic electron beams. We discuss possible astrophysical scenarios in which this process might operate. The emitting region is a turbulent plasma hit by a relativistic jet, where Langmuir plasma waves produce a concentration of intense electrostatic soliton-like regions (cavitons). The resulting radiation is coherent and, under some physical conditions, can be polarised and have a power-law distribution in energy. We obtain radio luminosities in agreement with the inferred values for fast radio bursts. The timescale of the radio flare in some cases can be extremely fast, of t...

  6. Bursting activity spreading through asymmetric interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Onaga, Tomokatsu

    2014-01-01

    People communicate with those who have the same background or share a common interest by using a social networking service (SNS). News or messages propagate through inhomogeneous connections in an SNS by sharing or facilitating additional comments. Such human activity is known to lead to endogenous bursting in the rate of message occurrences. We analyze a multi-dimensional self-exciting process to reveal dependence of the bursting activity on the topology of connections and the distribution of interaction strength on the connections. We determine the critical conditions for the cases where interaction strength is regulated at either the point of input or output for each person. In the input regulation condition, the network may exhibit bursting with infinitesimal interaction strength, if the dispersion of the degrees diverges as in the scale-free networks. In contrast, in the output regulation condition, the critical value of interaction strength, represented by the average number of events added by a single ...

  7. Localised Microwave Bursts During ELMs on MAST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freethy Simon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bursts of microwave emission are observed during ELM events on the Mega Ampère Spherical Tokamak. In agreement with observations on other machines, these bursts are up to 3 orders of magnitude more intense than the thermal background, but are electron cyclotron in nature. The peak in microwave emission is ~20μ before the peak in midplane Dα emission. Using the Synthetic Aperture Microwave Imaging radiometer, we are able to demonstrate that these bursts are often highly spatially localised and preferentially occur at the tokamak midplane. It is hypothesised that the localisation is a result of Doppler resonance broadening for electron Bernstein waves and the high perpendicular electron energies could be the result of pitch angle scattering in high collisionality regions of the plasma.

  8. Variable protostellar accretion with episodic bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, Eduard I

    2015-01-01

    We present the latest development of the disk gravitational instability and fragmentation model, originally introduced by us to explain episodic accretion bursts in the early stages of star formation. Using our numerical hydrodynamics model with improved disk thermal balance and star-disk interaction, we computed the evolution of protostellar disks formed from the gravitational collapse of prestellar cores. In agreement with our previous studies, we find that cores of higher initial mass and angular momentum produce disks that are more favorable to gravitational instability and fragmentation, while a higher background irradiation and magnetic fields moderate the disk tendency to fragment. The protostellar accretion in our models is time-variable, thanks to the nonlinear interaction between different spiral modes in the gravitationally unstable disk, and can undergo episodic bursts when fragments migrate onto the star owing to the gravitational interaction with other fragments or spiral arms. Most bursts occur...

  9. Gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP: GAmma-ray burst Polarimeter), which had been almost handcrafted by scientists, has succeeded in working normally in interplanetary space, and in detecting the polarization of the gamma-ray from a mysterious astronomical object 'gamma-ray burst'. It is the first result of the detectors in the world exclusively aiming at detecting gamma-ray polarization. We mainly describe the hardware of our GAP equipment and show the method of preparing equipment to work in the cosmic space with a tight budget. The mechanical structure, the electronic circuits, the software on the equipment, the data analysis on the earth, and the scientific results gained by the observation just over one year, are presented after explaining the principle of gamma-ray polarization detection. Our design to protect equipment against mechanical shock and cosmic radiation may provide useful information for future preparation of compact satellite. (J.P.N.)

  10. Human cancer cells express Slug-based epithelial-mesenchymal transition gene expression signature obtained in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastassiou Dimitris

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The biological mechanisms underlying cancer cell motility and invasiveness remain unclear, although it has been hypothesized that they involve some type of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT. Methods We used xenograft models of human cancer cells in immunocompromised mice, profiling the harvested tumors separately with species-specific probes and computationally analyzing the results. Results Here we show that human cancer cells express in vivo a precise multi-cancer invasion-associated gene expression signature that prominently includes many EMT markers, among them the transcription factor Slug, fibronectin, and α-SMA. We found that human, but not mouse, cells express the signature and Slug is the only upregulated EMT-inducing transcription factor. The signature is also present in samples from many publicly available cancer gene expression datasets, suggesting that it is produced by the cancer cells themselves in multiple cancer types, including nonepithelial cancers such as neuroblastoma. Furthermore, we found that the presence of the signature in human xenografted cells was associated with a downregulation of adipocyte markers in the mouse tissue adjacent to the invasive tumor, suggesting that the signature is triggered by contextual microenvironmental interactions when the cancer cells encounter adipocytes, as previously reported. Conclusions The known, precise and consistent gene composition of this cancer mesenchymal transition signature, particularly when combined with simultaneous analysis of the adjacent microenvironment, provides unique opportunities for shedding light on the underlying mechanisms of cancer invasiveness as well as identifying potential diagnostic markers and targets for metastasis-inhibiting therapeutics.

  11. Measurment of gas-liquid two-phase slug flow with a Venturi meter based on blind source separation☆

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weiwei Wang; Xiao Liang; Mingzhu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel flow measurement method for gas–liquid two-phase slug flow by using the blind source sep-aration technique. The flow measurement model is established based on the fluctuation characteristics of differ-ential pressure (DP) signals measured from a Venturi meter. It is demonstrated that DP signals of two-phase flow are a linear mixture of DP signals of single phase fluids. The measurement model is a combination of throttle re-lationship and blind source separation model. In addition, we estimate the mixture matrix using the independent component analysis (ICA) technique. The mixture matrix could be described using the variances of two DP sig-nals acquired from two Venturi meters. The validity of the proposed model was tested in the gas–liquid two-phase flow loop facility. Experimental results showed that for most slug flow the relative error is within 10%. We also find that the mixture matrix is beneficial to investigate the flow mechanism of gas–liquid two-phase flow.

  12. Shallow water heterobranch sea slugs (Gastropoda: Heterobranchia) from the Región de Atacama, northern Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, Juan Francisco; Valdés, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The coast of northern Chile has been sparsely studied in regards to its invertebrate fauna, with just a few works reviewing the distribution of local mollusks. This work presents a survey of the shallow water heterobranch sea slugs currently occurring around the port of Caldera (27 °S), in the Región de Atacama, northern Chile. Eight species of sea slugs were found in this study: Aplysiopsis cf. brattstroemi (Marcus, 1959), Baptodoris peruviana (d'Orbigny, 1837), Diaulula variolata (d'Orbigny, 1837), Doris fontainii d'Orbigny, 1837, Onchidella marginata (Couthouy in Gould, 1852), Phidiana lottini (Lesson, 1831), Tyrinna delicata (Abraham, 1877) and the new species Berthella schroedli sp. nov., described herein. All of the species found in the area are endemic to South America, having distributions in the southeastern Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans, from Ancash, Perú to Peninsula Valdés, Argentina, and two of them represent species which are endemic to the Chilean coasts (Aplysiopsis cf. brattstroemi and Berthella schroedli). The finding of a previously undescribed species emphasizes the need of further surveys, particularly in subtidal and deeper waters, in order to improve the knowledge on this neglected fauna in Atacama. PMID:27168975

  13. Shallow water heterobranch sea slugs (Gastropoda: Heterobranchia) from the Región de Atacama, northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The coast of northern Chile has been sparsely studied in regards to its invertebrate fauna, with just a few works reviewing the distribution of local mollusks. This work presents a survey of the shallow water heterobranch sea slugs currently occurring around the port of Caldera (27 °S), in the Región de Atacama, northern Chile. Eight species of sea slugs were found in this study: Aplysiopsis cf. brattstroemi (Marcus, 1959), Baptodoris peruviana (d’Orbigny, 1837), Diaulula variolata (d’Orbigny, 1837), Doris fontainii d’Orbigny, 1837, Onchidella marginata (Couthouy in Gould, 1852), Phidiana lottini (Lesson, 1831), Tyrinna delicata (Abraham, 1877) and the new species Berthella schroedli sp. nov., described herein. All of the species found in the area are endemic to South America, having distributions in the southeastern Pacific and South Atlantic Oceans, from Ancash, Perú to Peninsula Valdés, Argentina, and two of them represent species which are endemic to the Chilean coasts (Aplysiopsis cf. brattstroemi and Berthella schroedli). The finding of a previously undescribed species emphasizes the need of further surveys, particularly in subtidal and deeper waters, in order to improve the knowledge on this neglected fauna in Atacama.

  14. The sharpness of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; van Eerten, Hendrik J.; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Narayana Bhat, P.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. We study the sharpness of the time-resolved prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Aims: We aim to obtain a measure of the curvature of time-resolved spectra that can be compared directly to theory. This tests the ability of models such as synchrotron emission to explain the peaks or breaks of GBM prompt emission spectra. Methods: We take the burst sample from the official Fermi GBM GRB time-resolved spectral catalog. We re-fit all spectra with a measured peak or break energy in the catalog best-fit models in various energy ranges, which cover the curvature around the spectral peak or break, resulting in a total of 1113 spectra being analyzed. We compute the sharpness angles under the peak or break of the triangle constructed under the model fit curves and compare them to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. Results: We find that 35% of the time-resolved spectra are inconsistent with the single-electron synchrotron function, and 91% are inconsistent with the Maxwellian synchrotron function. The single temperature, single emission time, and location blackbody function is found to be sharper than all the spectra. No general evolutionary trend of the sharpness angle is observed, neither per burst nor for the whole population. It is found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to % of the peak flux. Conclusions: Our results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed GRB prompt spectra. Because any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically thin

  15. Investigation of Primordial Black Hole Bursts Using Interplanetary Network Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Hurley, K.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Connaughton, V.; Yamaoka, K.; Ohno, M.; Ohmori, N.; Feroci, M.; Frontera, F.; Guidorzi, C.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; McTiernan, J.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 1013–1018 cm (7–105 au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.

  16. On the bimodal distribution of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Shude; Narayan, Ramesh; Piran, Tsvi

    1994-01-01

    Kouveliotou et al. recently confirmed that gamma-ray bursts are bimodal in duration. In this paper we compute the statistical properties of the short (less than or = 2 s) and long (greater than 2 s) bursts using a method of analysis that makes no assumption regarding the location of the bursts, whether in the Galaxy or at a cosmological distance. We find the 64 ms channel on Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) to be more sensitive to short bursts and the 1024 ms channel to be more sensitive to long bursts. We show that all the currently available data are consistent with the simple hypothesis that both short and long bursts have the same spatial distribution and that within each population the sources are standard candles. The rate of short bursts per unit volume is about 40% of the rate of long bursts. Although the durations of short and long gamma-ray bursts span several orders of magnitude and the total energy of a typical short burst is smaller than that of a typical long burst by a factor of about 20, surprisingly the peak luminosities of the two kinds of bursts are equal to within a factor of about 2.

  17. Bursting Smoke as an Infrared Countermeasure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarjit Singh

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the experimental setup for the evaluation of bursting smoke for anti-infrared role using SR-5000 spectroradiometer and a source of IR radiation (8-13 micrometer using cadmium-mercury-telluride (CMI detector cooled by liquid nitrogen. The particle size and shape of the powders used in the bursting smokes were determined microscopically using Carl Zeiss Jena Neophot- 21. Highest attenuation of 97 -lOO percent was produced for about 12 s using a mixture of bronze flakes and chaff, and for about 8 s using a mixture of bronze copper lined flakes, bronze flakes and chaff.

  18. The short gamma-ray burst revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, a dedicated gamma-ray burst (GRB) satellite with ultrarapid slewing capability, and a suite of ground-based (ESO) telescopes have recently achieved a major breakthrough: detecting the first afterglows of short-duration GRBs. The faintness of these afterglows and the diversity of old and young host galaxies lend support to the emerging 'standard model', in which they are created during the merging of two compact objects. However, the afterglow light-curve properties and possible high-redshift origin of some short bursts suggests that more than one progenitor type may be involved. (orig.)

  19. Threats in Optical Burst Switched Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Siva Subramanian

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Optical network is a viable network for future communication, which transmits data at an average rate of 50Tb/s. Optical Burst Switching is a trusted mechanism used for Optical network. There is a good amount of research done in the area of security in Optical networks. In addition, the issues related to physical network security has been dealt with respect to Optical networks. Our proposed work is intend to find the possible security threats that may happen in Optical Burst Switched Networks and the counter measures are examined separately. The NS-2 simulator with modified OBS patch is used to verify and validate the proposed mechanism

  20. Exploratory depth-of-burst experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichenbach, H.; Behrens, K. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Kurzzeitdynamik - Ernst-Mach-Institut (EMI), Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany); Kuhl, A. [R and D Associates, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1991-12-12

    This report describes the first small-scale explosion experiments with aerated grout (i.e., YTONG). Apart from data referring to crater depth and volume versus depth of burst (DOB), isobaric DOB curves in the range of 1.5 psi {le} p {le} 15 psi were established. The comparison with previous HOB values shows that the ground range to a given overpressure is considerably reduced with increasing depth of burst. The authors plan to continue the airblast investigations with different types of soil materials.

  1. Spike Bursts from an Excitable Optical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Leite, Jose R.; Rosero, Edison J.; Barbosa, Wendson A. S.; Tredicce, Jorge R.

    Diode Lasers with double optical feedback are shown to present power drop spikes with statistical distribution controllable by the ratio of the two feedback times. The average time between spikes and the variance within long time series are studied. The system is shown to be excitable and present bursting of spikes created with specific feedback time ratios and strength. A rate equation model, extending the Lang-Kobayashi single feedback for semiconductor lasers proves to match the experimental observations. Potential applications to construct network to mimic neural systems having controlled bursting properties in each unit will be discussed. Brazilian Agency CNPQ.

  2. A Shotgun Model for $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, S

    1999-01-01

    We propose that gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are produced by a shower of heavy blobs running into circumstellar material at highly relativistic speeds. The gamma ray emission is produced in the shocks these bullets drive into the surrounding medium. The short term variability seen in GRBs is set by the slowing-down time of the bullets while the overall duration of the burst is set by the lifetime of the central engine. A requirement of this model is that the ambient medium be dense, consistent with a strong stellar wind. In contrast to other external shock scenarios, the efficiency of the shock can be close to unity.

  3. Processor Reformats Data For Transmission In Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Glen F.

    1991-01-01

    Data-processor-and-buffer electronic system receives audio signals digitized in first standard format at relatively low data rate, rearranges data for transmission in bursts in second standard format at relatively high rate, stores second-format bursts, and releases them at higher rate upon request. Conceived for asynchronous, one-way transmission of digitized speech in outer-space communications, concept of system applied in other digital communication systems in which data transmitted from low-rate sources to high-rate sinks not synchronized with sources.

  4. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE FERMI GBM CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, K. [University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Pal' shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Svinkin, D. S. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Meegan, C. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Goldsten, J. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K. [University of Arizona, Department of Planetary Sciences, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Rau, A., E-mail: khurley@ssl.berkeley.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2013-08-15

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 427 were observed by at least one other instrument in the nine-spacecraft IPN. Of the 427, the localizations of 149 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or {sup t}riangulation{sup )}. For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.'4 and 32 Degree-Sign , depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1{sigma} GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6 Degree-Sign systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If we then multiply the resulting error radii by a factor of three, the two samples agree in slightly over 98% of the cases, providing a good estimate of the GBM 3{sigma} error radius. The IPN 3{sigma} error boxes have areas between about 1 arcmin{sup 2} and 110 deg{sup 2}, and are, on the average, a factor of 180 smaller than the corresponding GBM localizations. We identify two bursts in the IPN/GBM sample that did not appear in the GBM catalog. In one case, the GBM triggered on a terrestrial gamma flash, and in the other, its origin was given as ''uncertain''. We also discuss the sensitivity and calibration of the IPN.

  5. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE FERMI GBM CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 427 were observed by at least one other instrument in the nine-spacecraft IPN. Of the 427, the localizations of 149 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or triangulation). For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.'4 and 32°, depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1σ GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6° systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If we then multiply the resulting error radii by a factor of three, the two samples agree in slightly over 98% of the cases, providing a good estimate of the GBM 3σ error radius. The IPN 3σ error boxes have areas between about 1 arcmin2 and 110 deg2, and are, on the average, a factor of 180 smaller than the corresponding GBM localizations. We identify two bursts in the IPN/GBM sample that did not appear in the GBM catalog. In one case, the GBM triggered on a terrestrial gamma flash, and in the other, its origin was given as ''uncertain''. We also discuss the sensitivity and calibration of the IPN

  6. Statistical properties of SGR 1806-20 bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Gogus, E; Kouveliotou, C; Van Paradijs, J; Briggs, M S; Duncan, R C; Thompson, C; Gogus, Ersin; Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Paradijs, Jan van; Briggs, Michael S.; Duncan, Robert C.; Thompson, Christopher

    2000-01-01

    We present statistics of SGR 1806-20 bursts, combining 290 events detectedwith RXTE/PCA, 111 events detected with BATSE and 134 events detected with ICE.We find that the fluence distribution of bursts observed with each instrumentare well described by power laws with indices 1.43, 1.76 and 1.67,respectively. The distribution of time intervals between successive bursts fromSGR 1806-20 is described by a lognormal function with a peak at 103 s. There isno correlation between the burst intensity and either the waiting times tillthe next burst or the time elapsed since the previous burst. In all thesestatistical properties, SGR 1806-20 bursts resemble a self-organized criticalsystem, similar to earthquakes and solar flares. Our results thus support thehypothesis that the energy source for SGR bursts is crustquakes due to theevolving, strong magnetic field of the neutron star, rather than any accretionor nuclear power.

  7. ESTIMATION OF THE BURST LENGTH IN OBS NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi S.

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of the optical burst switching (OBS and discusses the major components. In OBS, the length of the burst arriving at a particular node is unknown, and hence, node design is very complex. In OBS first control, packet is transmitted and reserve the path as in circuit switching, thereafter, the data bursts is transmitted. In this paper, a poisson arrival of packets is considered and estimation is made on the size of the burst length. The results presented in the paper clearly reveal that, the very large burst length is un-common. Therefore, most of the times, very short or average length burst is expected. Therefore it is concluded in this paper, buffering of burst at the contending nodes is a good option which increases the throughput and reduces the average delay. Finally, the buffering in conjunction with deflection of bursts will provide very effective solution.

  8. The future Gamma-Ray Burst Mission SVOM

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, S; Wei, J; Zhang, S -N; Basa, S; Atteia, J -L; Barret, D; Claret, A; Cordier, B; Daigne, F; Godet, O; Götz, D; Mandrou, P

    2010-01-01

    We present the Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor (SVOM), a future satellite mission for Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) studies, developed in cooperation between the Chinese National Space Agency (CNSA), the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS), the French Space Agency (CNES) and French research institutes. The scientific objectives of the SVOM GRB studies cover their classification (GRB diversity and unity of the model), their physics (particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms), their progenitors, cosmological studies (host galaxies, star formation history, re-ionization, cosmological parameters), and fundamental physics (origin of cosmic rays, Lorentz invariance, gravitational wave sources). From 2015 on, SVOM will provide fast and accurate localizations of all known types of GRB, and determine the temporal and spectral properties of the GRB emission, thanks to a set of four onboard instruments. The trigger system of the coded-mask telescope ECLAIRs onboard SVOM images the sky in the 4-120 ...

  9. Power Burst Facility Severe Fuel Damage test series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) tests planned for the Power Burst Facility (PBF) are described. Bundles containing 32 zircaloy-clad, PWR-type fuel rods will be subjected to severe overheating transients in a high-pressure, superheated-steam environment. Cladding temperatures are expected to reach 24000K, resulting in cladding ballooning and rupture, severe cladding oxidation, cladding melting, fuel dissolution, fuel rod fragmentation, and possibly, rubble bed formation. An experiment effluent collection system is being installed and the PBF fission product monitoring system is being upgraded to meet the special requirements of the SFD tests. Scoping calculations were performed to evaluate performance of the SFD test design and to establish operational requirements for the PBF loop

  10. The Spectral Sharpness Angle of Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Bhat, P Narayana; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    We explain the results of Yu et al. (2015b) of the novel sharpness angle measurement to a large number of spectra obtained from the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor. The sharpness angle is compared to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. It is found that more than 91% of the high temporally and spectrally resolved spectra are inconsistent with any kind of optically thin synchrotron emission model alone. It is also found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to 58+23 -18% of the peak flux. These results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed spectra. Since any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically...

  11. Hydrate Monitoring using Capacitive Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Bayati, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrates are of particular interest in petroleum industry since their formation during oil-production can be a major risk factor. Gas hydrates can block pipelines, interrupt production, and in worst case even cause bursting flow lines. There are a few strategies available to monitor the hydrocarbon flow in pipelines in order to give an early warning system against hydrate formation. A potential technique is to monitor changes in the dielectric properties of the flow, and relate these to h...

  12. IPN localizations of Konus short gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pal'shin, V D; Svinkin, D S; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Mazets, E P; Oleynik, P P; Ulanov, M V; Cline, T; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Trombka, J; McClanahan, T; Starr, R; Goldsten, J; Gold, R; Rau, A; von Kienlin, A; Savchenko, V; Smith, D M; Hajdas, W; Barthelmy, S D; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Palmer, D; Yamaoka, K; Ohno, M; Fukazawa, Y; Hanabata, Y; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Briggs, M S; Kippen, R M; Kouveliotou, C; Meegan, C; Fishman, G; Connaughton, V; Boer, M; Guidorzi, C; Frontera, F; Montanari, E; Rossi, F; Feroci, M; Amati, L; Nicastro, L; Orlandini, M; Monte, Del; Costa, E; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Pacciani, L; Rapisarda, M; Soffitta, P; Di Cocco, G; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Labanti, C; Marisaldi, M; Atteia, J -L; Vanderspek, R; Ricker, G

    2013-01-01

    Between the launch of the GGS Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 314 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 24 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the IPN consisted of up to eleven spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 276 bursts were obtained. We present the IPN localization data on these events.

  13. Photon burst mass spectrometry for the measurement of Krypton-85 at ambient levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photon Burst Mass Spectrometry has been used to measure 85Kr in a sample with an abundance of 6 x 10-9. Improvements in detection efficiency by the use of avalanche photodiodes cooled to liquid nitrogen temperature are reported, which should make possible measurement of 85Kr at the ambient atmospheric abundance of 10-11. Potential applications include nuclear monitoring, atmospheric transport, and dating young ground water up to 40 years

  14. 47 CFR 90.250 - Meteor burst communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Meteor burst communications. 90.250 Section 90... PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Non-Voice and Other Specialized Operations § 90.250 Meteor burst communications. Meteor burst communications may be authorized for the use of private radio stations subject...

  15. $\\gamma$-ray Burst Positions from the ASM on RXTE

    CERN Document Server

    Bradt, H V; Bradt, Hale V.; Smith, Donald A.

    1999-01-01

    The RXTE/ASM has detected and positioned 14 confirmed GRB bursts (at this writing, Jan. 1999) including six whose positions were comunicated to the community 2 to 32 hours after the burst. Two of these latter bursts led to measurements of optical red shifts but one, despite an easily detected x-ray afterglow, produced no detectable optical or radio afterglow.

  16. The position and polarization of Type III solar bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulk, G. A.; Suzuki, S.

    1980-01-01

    The position and polarization of Type III solar bursts in the range of 24-220 MHz are studied, with emphasis on the bursts continuing to frequencies lower than 24 MHz. Consideration is given to the statistics of burst polarization, the relation between polarization and source position, and brightness temperature, flux densities, and source sizes.

  17. SVOM gamma ray monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor(SVOM) mission is dedicated to the detection,localization and broad-band study of gamma-ray bursts(GRBs) and other high-energy transient phenomena.The gamma ray monitor(GRM) onboard is designed to observe GRBs up to 5 MeV.With this instrument,one of the key GRB parameters,Epeak,can be easily measured in the hard X-ray band.It can achieve a detection rate of 100 GRBs per year which ensures the scientific output of SVOM.

  18. Search for bursts in air shower data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, T. E. G.; Clay, R. W.; Dawson, B. R.; Protheroe, R. J.; Blair, D. G.; Cinquini, P.

    1985-01-01

    There have been reports in recent years of the possible observation of bursts in air shower data. If such events are truly of an astrophysical nature then, they represent an important new class of phemonenon since no other bursts have been observed above the MeV level. The spectra of conventional gamma ray bursts are unknown at higher energies but their observed spectra at MeV energies appear generally to exhibit a steepening in the higher MeV range and are thus unlikely to extrapolate to measurable fluxes at air shower energies. An attempt has been made to look for deviations from randomness in the arrival times of air showers above approx. 10 to the 14th power eV with a number of systems and results so far are presented here. This work will be continued for a substantial period of ime with a system capable of recording bursts with multiple events down to a spacing of 4 microns. Earlier data have also been searched for the possible association of air shower events with a glitch of the Vela pulsar.

  19. Fast Radio Bursts: Searches, Sensitivities & Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration transient signals discovered over the past decade. Here we describe the scientific usefulness of FRBs, consider ongoing work at the Parkes telescope, and examine some relevant search sensitivity and completeness considerations. We also look ahead to the results from ongoing and future planned studies in the field.

  20. PHYSICAL CONSTRAINTS ON FAST RADIO BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are isolated, ms radio pulses with dispersion measure (DM) of order 103 pc cm–3. Galactic candidates for the DM of high latitude bursts detected at GHz frequencies are easily dismissed. DM from bursts emitted in stellar coronas are limited by free-free absorption and those from H II regions are bounded by the nondetection of associated free-free emission at radio wavelengths. Thus, if astronomical, FRBs are probably extragalactic. FRB 110220 has a scattering tail of ∼5.6 ± 0.1 ms. If the electron density fluctuations arise from a turbulent cascade, the scattering is unlikely to be due to propagation through the diffuse intergalactic plasma. A more plausible explanation is that this burst sits in the central region of its host galaxy. Pulse durations of order ms constrain the sizes of FRB sources implying high brightness temperatures that indicates coherent emission. Electric fields near FRBs at cosmological distances would be so strong that they could accelerate free electrons from rest to relativistic energies in a single wave period