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Sample records for burst monitor gbm

  1. The First Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Zhang, Binbin; Bhat, Narayana; Fishman, Gerald; Roberts, Oliver; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Shelia; Grove, Eric; Chekhtman, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We present summary results from the first catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Space Telescope. The catalog reports parameters for over 2700 TGFs. Since the launch of Fermi in 2008 the TGF detection sensitivity of GBM has been improved several times, both in the flight software and in ground analysis. Starting in 2010 July individual photons were downloaded for portions of the orbits, enabling an off-line search that found weaker and shorter TGFs. Since 2012 November 26 this telemetry mode has been extended to continuous coverage. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs).

  2. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanbro, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Roberts, O.; McBreen, S.; Bhat, N.; Fitzpatrick, G.

    2015-12-01

    We present results from the catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. The first release, in January 2015, provided data on 2700 TGFs. Updates are extending the catalog at a rate of ~800 TGFs per year. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and other Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs). In January 2016 additional data will be released online from correlating these TGFs with sferics detected by the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN). Maps of sferics in the vicinity of each TGF will be provided, as will the locations and times of sferics found to be associated with TGFs.

  3. FERMIGBRST - Fermi GBM Burst Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by a subset of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO) which have been classified as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Note that...

  4. Magnetar Twists: Fermi/Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detection of SGR 1550-5418

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Y; Kouveliotou, C; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Granot, J; van der Horst, A J; Watts, A L; Finger, M H; Gehrels, N; Pe'er, A; van der Klis, M; von Kienlin, A; Wachter, S; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Woods, P M

    2009-01-01

    SGR 1550-5418 (previously known as AXP 1E 1547.0-5408) went into three active bursting episodes in 2008 October and in 2009 January and March, emitting hundreds of typical Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in soft gamma rays. The second episode was especially intense, and our untriggered burst search on Fermi/GBM data (8-1000 keV) revealed ~450 bursts emitted over 24 hours during the peak of this activity. Using the GBM data, we identified a ~150-s-long enhanced persistent emission during 2009 January 22 that exhibited intriguing timing and spectral properties: (i) clear pulsations up to ~110 keV at the spin period of the neutron star (P ~2.07 s, the fastest of all magnetars), (ii) an additional (to a power-law) blackbody component required for the enhanced emission spectra with kT ~17 keV, (iii) pulsed fraction that is strongly energy dependent and highest in the 50-74 keV energy band. A total isotropic-equivalent energy emitted during this enhanced emission is estimated to be 4.3 x 10^{40} ergs. We conclude ...

  5. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C. Collazzi; C. Kouveliotou; A.J. van der Horst; G.A. Younes; Y. Kaneko; E. Göğüş; L. Lin; J. Granot; M.H. Finger; V.L. Chaplin; D. Huppenkothen; A.L. Watts; A. von Kienlin; M.G. Baring; D. Gruber; P.N. Bhat; M.H. Gibby; N. Gehrels; J. Mcenery; M. van der Klis; R.A.M.J. Wijers

    2015-01-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present

  6. THE FIVE YEAR FERMI/GBM MAGNETAR BURST CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collazzi, A. C. [SciTec, Inc., 100 Wall Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Kouveliotou, C.; Horst, A. J. van der; Younes, G. A. [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st Street NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Göğüş, E. [Sabancı University, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Lin, L. [François Arago Centre, APC, 10 rue Alice Domon et Léonie Duquet, F-75205 Paris (France); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Raanana 43537 (Israel); Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Chaplin, V. L. [School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, 1161 21st Avenue S, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Huppenkothen, D. [Center for Data Science, New York University, 726 Broadway, 7th Floor, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Watts, A. L. [Anton Pannekoek Institute, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kienlin, A. von [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H., E-mail: acollazzi@scitec.com [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

    2015-05-15

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550–5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  7. All-Sky Monitoring of Variable Sources with Fermi GBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Cherry, Michael L.; Case, Gary L.; Camero-Arranz, Ascension; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Finger, Mark H.; Jenke, Pater; Rodi, James C.; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Beklen, Elif; Bhat, P. Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Gehrels, Neil; Greiner, Jochen; Jahoda, Keith; Kippen, R. Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Krimm, Hans A.; Kuulkers, Erik; Lund, Niels; Meegan, Charles A.; Natalucci, Lorenzo; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the monitoring of variable sources with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). It reviews the use of the Earth Occultation technique, the observations of the Crab Nebula with the GBM, and the comparison with other satellite's observations. The instruments on board the four satellites indicate a decline in the Crab from 2008-2010.

  8. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE FERMI GBM CATALOG OF COSMIC GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, K. [University of California, Berkeley, Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Pal' shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Svinkin, D. S. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Meegan, C. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Goldsten, J. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K. [University of Arizona, Department of Planetary Sciences, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Rau, A., E-mail: khurley@ssl.berkeley.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2013-08-15

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 427 were observed by at least one other instrument in the nine-spacecraft IPN. Of the 427, the localizations of 149 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or {sup t}riangulation{sup )}. For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.'4 and 32 Degree-Sign , depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1{sigma} GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6 Degree-Sign systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If we then multiply the resulting error radii by a factor of three, the two samples agree in slightly over 98% of the cases, providing a good estimate of the GBM 3{sigma} error radius. The IPN 3{sigma} error boxes have areas between about 1 arcmin{sup 2} and 110 deg{sup 2}, and are, on the average, a factor of 180 smaller than the corresponding GBM localizations. We identify two bursts in the IPN/GBM sample that did not appear in the GBM catalog. In one case, the GBM triggered on a terrestrial gamma flash, and in the other, its origin was given as ''uncertain''. We also discuss the sensitivity and calibration of the IPN.

  9. The Glast Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will include a secondary instrument to augment the observatory's capabilities for GRB studies. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBK is a collaboration between Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Huntsville, Alabama, and the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. The purpose of the GBM is to extend energy coverage below the main instrument's lower limit of about 20 MeV, and to provide an on-board burst trigger and approximate location. The instrument consists of twelve NaI detectors and two BGO detectors. This combination provides energy coverage from a few keV up to about 30 MeV.

  10. THE SECOND FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG: THE FIRST FOUR YEARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Kienlin, Andreas; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Meegan, Charles A.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Paciesas, William S.; Cleveland, William [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Byrne, David; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Collazzi, Andrew C. [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); Guiriec, Sylvain [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

    2014-03-01

    This is the second of a series of catalogs of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). It extends the first two-year catalog by two more years, resulting in an overall list of 953 GBM triggered GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected GRBs. For each GRB the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux and fluence are derived. The latter two quantities are calculated for the 50-300 keV energy band, where the maximum energy release of GRBs in the instrument reference system is observed and also for a broader energy band from 10-1000 keV, exploiting the full energy range of GBMs low-energy detectors. Furthermore, information is given on the settings and modifications of the triggering criteria and exceptional operational conditions during years three and four in the mission. This second catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  11. The 2nd Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Four Years

    CERN Document Server

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Burgess, J Michael; Byrne, David; Chaplin, Vandiver; Cleveland, William; Connaughton, Valerie; Collazzi, Andrew C; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Layden, Emily; McBreen, Sheila; McGlynn, Sinead; Pelassa, Veronique; Preece, Robert D; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Xiong, Shaolin; Younes, George; Yu, Hoi-Fung

    2014-01-01

    This is the second of a series of catalogs of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). It extends the first two-year catalog by two more years, resulting in an overall list of 953 GBM triggered GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected GRBs. For each GRB the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux and fluence are derived. The latter two quantities are calculated for the 50 - 300 keV energy band, where the maximum energy release of GRBs in the instrument reference system is observed and also for a broader energy band from 10 - 1000 keV, exploiting the full energy range of GBMs low-energy detectors. Furthermore, information is given on the settings and modifications of the triggering criteria and exceptional operational conditions during years three and four in the mission. This second catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM sci...

  12. The 3rd Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Six Years

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, P Narayana; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S; Briggs, Michael S; Burgess, J Michael; Burns, Eric; Chaplin, Vandiver; Cleveland, William H; Collazzi, Andrew C; Connaughto, Valerie; Diekmann, Anne M; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Gibby, Melissa H; Giles, Misty M; Goldstein, Adam M; Greiner, Jochen; Jenke, Peter A; Kippen, R Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Mailyan, Bagrat; McBreen, Sheila; Pelassa, Veronique; Preece, Robert D; Roberts, Oliver J; Sparke, Linda S; Stanbro, Matthew; Veres, Peter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Xiong, Shaolin; Younes, George; Yu, Hoi-Fung; Zhang, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Since its launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has triggered and located on average approximately two gamma-ray bursts (GRB) every three days. Here we present the third of a series of catalogs of GRBs detected by GBM, extending the second catalog by two more years, through the middle of July 2014. The resulting list includes 1405 triggers identified as GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected GRBs. For each GRB the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux and fluence are derived. The latter two quantities are calculated for the 50-300~keV energy band, where the maximum energy release of GRBs in the instrument reference system is observed, and also for a broader energy band from 10-1000 keV, exploiting the full energy range of GBM's low-energy NaI(Tl) detectors. Using statistical methods to assess clustering, we find that the hardness and duration of GRB...

  13. The Interplanetary Network Supplement to the Fermi GBM Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, K; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Mazets, E P; Svinkin, D S; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Meegan, C; Goldsten, J; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Rau, A; von Kienlin, A; Zhang, X; Yamaoka, K; Fukazawa, Y; Hanabata, Y; Ohno, M; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Barthelmy, S; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Cummings, J; Krimm, H A; Smith, D M; Del Monte, E; Feroci, M; Marisaldi, M

    2013-01-01

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 393 were observed by at least one other instrument in the 9-spacecraft IPN. Of the 393, the localizations of 146 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or "triangulation"). For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.4 arcminutes and 32 degrees, depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1 sigma GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6 degree systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If ...

  14. The Third Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Six Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana Bhat, P.; Meegan, Charles A.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael; Burns, Eric; Chaplin, Vandiver; Cleveland, William H.; Collazzi, Andrew C.; Connaughton, Valerie; Diekmann, Anne M.; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Gibby, Melissa H.; Giles, Misty M.; Goldstein, Adam M.; Greiner, Jochen; Jenke, Peter A.; Kippen, R. Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Mailyan, Bagrat; McBreen, Sheila; Pelassa, Veronique; Preece, Robert D.; Roberts, Oliver J.; Sparke, Linda S.; Stanbro, Matthew; Veres, Péter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Xiong, Shaolin; Younes, George; Yu, Hoi-Fung; Zhang, Binbin

    2016-04-01

    Since its launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has triggered and located on average approximately two γ-ray bursts (GRBs) every three days. Here, we present the third of a series of catalogs of GRBs detected by GBM, extending the second catalog by two more years through the middle of 2014 July. The resulting list includes 1405 triggers identified as GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM-detected GRBs. For each GRB, the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux, and fluence are derived. The latter two quantities are calculated for the 50-300 keV energy band where the maximum energy release of GRBs in the instrument reference system is observed, and also for a broader energy band from 10 to 1000 keV, exploiting the full energy range of GBM's low-energy [Nai[Tl)] detectors. Using statistical methods to assess clustering, we find that the hardness and duration of GRBs are better fit by a two-component model with short-hard and long-soft bursts than by a model with three components. Furthermore, information is provided on the settings and modifications of the triggering criteria and exceptional operational conditions during years five and six in the mission. This third catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  15. The InterPlanetary Network Supplement to the Second Fermi GBM Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, K.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Pal’shin, V. D.; Briggs, M. S.; Meegan, C.; Connaughton, V.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Yamaoka, K.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ohno, M.; Tashiro, M.; Terada, Y.; Barthelmy, S.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Cummings, J.; Krimm, H. A.; Smith, D. M.; Del Monte, E.; Feroci, M.; Marisaldi, M.

    2017-04-01

    InterPlanetary Network (IPN) data are presented for the gamma-ray bursts in the second Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 462 bursts in that catalog between 2010 July 12 and 2012 July 11, 428, or 93%, were observed by at least 1 other instrument in the 9-spacecraft IPN. Of the 428, the localizations of 165 could be improved by triangulation. For these bursts, triangulation gives one or more annuli whose half-widths vary between about 2.‧3° and 16°, depending on the peak flux, fluence, time history, arrival direction, and the distance between the spacecraft. We compare the IPN localizations with the GBM 1σ, 2σ, and 3σ error contours and find good agreement between them. The IPN 3σ error boxes have areas between about 8 square arcminutes and 380 square degrees, and are an average of 2500 times smaller than the corresponding GBM 3σ localizations. We identify four bursts in the IPN/GBM sample whose origins were given as “uncertain,” but may in fact be cosmic. This leads to an estimate of over 99% completeness for the GBM catalog.

  16. Earth Occultation Monitoring of the Hard X-ray/Low-Energy Gamma Ray Sky with GBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Michael L.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Case, G. L.; Chaplin, V.; Finger, M. H.; Jenke, P. A.; Rodi, J. C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; GBM Earth Occultation Team

    2012-01-01

    By utilizing the Earth occultation technique (EOT), the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) instrument aboard Fermi has been used to make nearly continuous full-sky observations in the 8-1000 keV energy range. The GBM EOT analysis program currently monitors an input catalog containing 235 sources. We will present the GBM catalog of sources observed in the first 3 years of the EOT monitoring program, with special emphasis on the high energy (>100 keV) and time-variable sources, in particular the Crab, Cyg X-1, and A0535+26. We will also describe the initial results of an all-sky imaging analysis of the EOT data, with comparisons to the Swift, INTEGRAL, and Fermi LAT catalogs. This work is supported by the NASA Fermi Guest Investigator program, NASA/Louisiana Board of Regents, and Spanish Ministerio de Ciencia de Innovacion.

  17. All-Sky Monitoring with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2010-01-01

    We are currently monitoring the transient hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi. The twelve GBM NaI detectors span 8 keV to 1MeV, while the two GBM BGO detectors span about 150 keV to 40 MeV. With GBM, we detect transient events on multiple timescales. Brief events, such as Gamma Ray Bursts, Solar flares, and magnetar bursts are detected with on-board triggers. On longer timescales, we use the Earth occultation technique to monitor a number of sources, including X-ray binaries, AGN, and solar flaring activity. To date we have detected 7 sources above 100 keV. Transient activity from accretion-powered pulsars is monitored using epoch-folding techniques. With GBM we track the pulsed flux and frequency for a number of pulsars. We will present highlights of GBM observations on various timescales.

  18. GBM Accreting Pulsar Histories

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For each source we plot the history of pulse frequency and pulsed flux measured using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) NaI detectors. For these measurements...

  19. GLAST Burst Monitor Trigger Classification Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, D. J.; Sidman, E. D.; Meegan, C. A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.

    2004-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), currently set for launch in the first quarter of 2007, will consist of two instruments, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and the Large Area Telescope (LAT). One of the goals of the GBM is to identify and locate gamma-ray bursts using on-board software. The GLAST observatory can then be re-oriented to allow observations by the LAT. A Bayesian analysis will be used to distinguish gamma-ray bursts from other triggering events, such as solar flares, magnetospheric particle precipitation, soft gamma repeaters (SGRs), and Cygnus X-1 flaring. The trigger parameters used in the analysis are the burst celestial coordinates, angle from the Earth's horizon, spectral hardness, and the spacecraft geomagnetic latitude. The algorithm will be described and the results of testing will be presented.

  20. Expected Performance of the GLAST Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Charles; Fishman, Gerald; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Paciesas, William; Preece, Robert; Briggs, Michael; Bhat, Narayana; Connaughton, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; vonKienlin, Andreas; Diehl, Roland; Steinle, Helmut; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Kippen, R. Marc

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will enhance LAT observations of GRBs by extending the spectral coverage from the LAT threshold down to approx. 8 kev, and will provide a trigger for re-orienting the spacecraft to observe delayed emission from selected bursts outside the LAT field of view. GBM consists of twelve NaI scintillation detectors operating in the 8 kev to 1 MeV energy range and two BGO scintillation detectors operating in the 150 keV to 30 MeV energy range. Detector resolution, effective area, and angular response have been determined by calibrations. Analyses indicate that the on-board burst threshold will be approx. 0.7 photon/cm2/s and the on-board burst localization accuracy will typically be better than 8 degrees.

  1. Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM observations of SGR J1935+2154 bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin

    2016-07-01

    SGR J1935+2154 is a new member of the magnetar family. It was discovered from a short burst which triggered Swift/BAT on 2014 July 5. In 2015 February, the source was detected in the burst active episode again which lasted for about 11 days. We searched for magnetar burst using Bayesian Blocks method through Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM observations, and totally found 27 events including 3 in 2014 and 24 in 2015. In this talk we will present the result of our detailed analysis of the temporal and spectral properties of these short bursts, and briefly discuss the connection between burst activity and the persistent emission of the source.

  2. The Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog: Four Years Of Data

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, David; von Ahlefeld, Victoria Weller; Bhat, P Narayana; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Byrne, Dave; Cleveland, William H; Connaughton, Valerie; Fishman, Gerald J; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M; Greiner, Jochen; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Layden, Emily; Lin, Lin; Meegan, Charles A; McGlynn, Sinéad; Paciesas, William S; Pelassa, Véronique; Preece, Robert D; Rau, Arne; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Xiong, Shaolin; Yu, Hoi-Fung

    2014-01-01

    In this catalog we present the updated set of spectral analyses of GRBs detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) during its first four years of operation. It contains two types of spectra, time-integrated spectral fits and spectral fits at the brightest time bin, from 943 triggered GRBs. Four different spectral models were fitted to the data, resulting in a compendium of more than 7500 spectra. The analysis was performed similarly, but not identically to Goldstein et al. 2012. All 487 GRBs from the first two years have been re-fitted using the same methodology as that of the 456 GRBs in years three and four. We describe, in detail, our procedure and criteria for the analysis, and present the results in the form of parameter distributions both for the observer-frame and rest-frame quantities. The data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC).

  3. Earth Occultation Monitoring with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT). Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors for daily monitoring. Light curves, updated daily, are available on our website http://heastro.phys.lsu.edu/gbm. Our software is also capable of performing the Earth occultation monitoring using up to 128 energy bands, or any combination of those bands, using our 128-channel, 4-s CSPEC data. The GBM BGO detectors, sensitive from about 200 keV to 40 keV, can also be used with this technique. In our standard application of the EOT, we use a catalog of sources to drive the measurements. To ensure that our catalog is complete, our team has developed an Earth occultation imaging method. In this talk, I will describe both techniques and the current data products available. I will highlight recent and important results from the GBM EOT, including the current status of our observations of hard X-ray variations in the Crab Nebula.

  4. New Methods for Timing Analysis of Transient Events, Applied to Fermi/GBM Magnetar Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Uttley, Phil; van der Horst, Alexander J; van der Klis, Michiel; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; Granot, Jonathan; Vaughan, Simon; Finger, Mark H

    2013-01-01

    In order to discern the physical nature of many gamma-ray sources in the sky, we must look not only in spectral and spatial dimensions, but also understand their temporal variability. However, timing analysis of sources with a highly transient nature, such as magnetar bursts, is difficult: standard Fourier techniques developed for long-term variability generally observed, for example, from AGN often do not apply. Here, we present newly developed timing methods applicable to transient events of all kinds, and show their successful application to magnetar bursts observed with Fermi/GBM. Magnetars are a prime subject for timing studies, thanks to the detection of quasi-periodicities in magnetar Giant Flares and their potential to help shed light on the structure of neutron stars. Using state-of-the art statistical techniques, we search for quasi-periodicities (QPOs) in a sample of bursts from Soft Gamma Repeater SGR J0501+4516 observed with Fermi/GBM and provide upper limits for potential QPO detections. Additio...

  5. The Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Spectral Catalog: Four Years of Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruber, D.; Goldstein, A.; Weller von Ahlefeld, V.; Bhat, N.P.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M.S.; Byrne, D.; Cleveland, W.H.; Connaughton, V.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G.J.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Gibby, M.; Giles, M.M.; Greiner, J.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A.J.; von Kienlin, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Layden, E.; Lin, L.; Meegan, C.A.; McGlynn, S.; Paciesas, W.S.; Pelassa, V.; Preece, R.D.; Rau, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C.A.; Xiong, S.; Younes, G.; Yu, H-F.

    2014-01-01

    In this catalog we present the updated set of spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during its first four years of operation. It contains two types of spectra, time-integrated spectral fits and spectral fits at the brightest time bin, from 943 tri

  6. Gravitational wave observations may constrain gamma-ray burst models: the case of GW 150914 - GBM

    CERN Document Server

    Veres, P; Goldstein, A; Mészáros, P; Burns, E; Connaughton, V

    2016-01-01

    The possible short gamma-ray burst (GRB) observed by {\\it Fermi}/GBM in coincidence with the first gravitational wave (GW) detection, offers new ways to test GRB prompt emission models. Gravitational wave observations provide previously unaccessible physical parameters for the black hole central engine such as its horizon radius and rotation parameter. Using a minimum jet launching radius from the Advanced LIGO measurement of GW~150914, we calculate photospheric and internal shock models and find that they are marginally inconsistent with the GBM data, but cannot be definitely ruled out. Dissipative photosphere models, however have no problem explaining the observations. Based on the peak energy and the observed flux, we find that the external shock model gives a natural explanation, suggesting a low interstellar density ($\\sim 10^{-3}$ cm$^{-3}$) and a high Lorentz factor ($\\sim 2000$). We only speculate on the exact nature of the system producing the gamma-rays, and study the parameter space of a generic Bl...

  7. Gamma-Ray Astrophysics NSSTC Fermi GBM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is not a pointed or imaging instrument. To determine fluxes for known sources, we measure the change in the count rate...

  8. Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was launched in June 2008. During the last five years the instrument has observed several hundreds of bursts from 8 confirmed magnetars and 19 events from unconfirmed sources. I will discuss the results of the GBM magnetar burst catalog, expand on the different properties of their diverse source population, and compare these results with the bursting activity of past sources. I will then conclude with thoughts of how these properties fit the magnetar theoretical models.

  9. Fermi/GBM Observations of SGR J0501+4516 Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lin; Baring, Matthew G; van der Horst, Alexander J; Guiriec, Sylvain; Woods, Peter M; Gogus, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Scargle, Jeffrey; Granot, Jonathan; Preece, Robert; von Kienlin, Andreas; Chaplin, Vandiver; Watts, Anna L; Wijers, Ralph A M J; Zhang, Shuang Nan; Bhat, Narayan; Finger, Mark H; Gehrels, Neil; Harding, Alice; Kaper, Lex; Kaspi, Victoria; Mcenery, Julie; Meegan, Charles A; Paciesas, William S; Pe'er, Asaf; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; van der Klis, Michiel; Wachter, Stefanie; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGR J0501+4516, detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during the 13 days of the source activation in 2008 (August 22 to September 3). We find that the T90 durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ~ 123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T90s estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ~ 124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two black body functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their p...

  10. DO THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR AND SWIFT BURST ALERT TELESCOPE SEE THE SAME SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Eric; Briggs, Michael S. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Connaughton, Valerie [Universities Space Research Association, Science and Technology Institute, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Zhang, Bin-Bin [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Lien, Amy [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Goldstein, Adam [NASA Postdoctoral Program, Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Pelassa, Veronique [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 97, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Troja, Eleonora, E-mail: eb0016@uah.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    Compact binary system mergers are expected to generate gravitational radiation detectable by ground-based interferometers. A subset of these, the merger of a neutron star with another neutron star or a black hole, are also the most popular model for the production of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) trigger on short GRBs (SGRBs) at rates that reflect their relative sky exposures, with the BAT detecting 10 per year compared to about 45 for GBM. We examine the SGRB populations detected by Swift BAT and Fermi GBM. We find that the Swift BAT triggers on weaker SGRBs than Fermi GBM, providing they occur close to the center of the BAT field of view, and that the Fermi GBM SGRB detection threshold remains flatter across its field of view. Overall, these effects combine to give the instruments the same average sensitivity, and account for the SGRBs that trigger one instrument but not the other. We do not find any evidence that the BAT and GBM are detecting significantly different populations of SGRBs. Both instruments can detect untriggered SGRBs using ground searches seeded with time and position. The detection of SGRBs below the on-board triggering sensitivities of Swift BAT and Fermi GBM increases the possibility of detecting and localizing the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) events seen by the new generation of GW detectors.

  11. Fermi Guest Investigator Program Cycle 2 Project Final Report Albedo Polarimetry of Gamma-Ray Bursts and Solar Flares with GBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Richard Marc [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-27

    Several key properties of GRBs remain poorly understood and are difficult or even impossible to infer with the information currently being collected. Polarization measurements will probe the precise nature of the central engine. For solar flares, high-energy polarization measurements are expected to be useful in determining the beaming (or directivity) of solar flare electrons - a quantity that may provide important clues about electron acceleration and transport. We propose to investigate the viability of using the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to measure the polarization of GRBs and solar flares using the albedo photon flux. This approach was previously developed for use with BATSE data. We will conduct a careful study of this technique using a modified version of the GRESS simulation tools developed by the GBM team.

  12. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, V; Goldstein, A; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Gibby, M H; Greiner, J; Gruber, D; Jenke, P; Kippen, R M; Pelassa, V; Xiong, S; Yu, H -F; Bhat, P N; Burgess, J M; Byrne, D; Fitzpatrick, G; Foley, S; Giles, M M; Guiriec, S; van der Horst, A J; von Kienlin, A; McBreen, S; McGlynn, S; Tierney, D; Zhang, B -B

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in July, 2008. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network (IPN), to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1 degree, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.7 degree Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14 degrees. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y-axis better l...

  13. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Goldstein, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Meegan, C. A.; Jenke, P.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL (United States); Preece, R. D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Greiner, J.; Yu, H.-F. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Kippen, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States); Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S., E-mail: valerie@nasa.gov [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); and others

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  14. Testing the anisotropy in the angular distribution of $Fermi$/GBM gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Tarnopolski, Mariusz

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) were confirmed to be of extragalactic origin due to their isotropic angular distribution, combined with the fact that they exhibited an intensity distribution that deviated strongly from the $-3/2$ power law. This finding was later confirmed with the first redshift, equal to at least $z=0.835$, measured for GRB970508. Despite this result, the data from $CGRO$/BATSE and $Swift$/BAT indicate that long GRBs are indeed distributed isotropically, but the distribution of short GRBs is anisotropic. $Fermi$/GBM has detected 1669 GRBs up to date, and their sky distribution is examined in this paper. A number of statistical tests is applied: nearest neighbour analysis, fractal dimension, dipole and quadrupole moments of the distribution function decomposed into spherical harmonics, binomial test, and the two point angular correlation function. Monte Carlo benchmark testing of each test is performed in order to evaluate its reliability. It is found that short GRBs are distributed anisotropically ...

  15. Three years of Fermi GBM Earth Occultation Monitoring: Observations of Hard X-ray/Soft Gamma-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Cherry, Michael L; Rodi, James; Camero-Arranz, Ascension; Jenke, Peter; Chaplin, Vandiver; Beklen, Elif; Finger, Mark; Bhat, Narayan; Briggs, Michael S; Connaughton, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R Marc; Meegan, Charles A; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board Fermi has been providing continuous data to the astronomical community since 2008 August 12. In this paper we present the results of the analysis of the first three years of these continuous data using the Earth occultation technique to monitor a catalog of 209 sources. From this catalog, we detect 102 sources, including 41 low-mass X-ray binary/neutron star systems, 33 high-mass X-ray binary neutron star systems, 12 black hole binaries, 12 active galaxies, 2 other sources, plus the Crab Nebula, and the Sun. Nine of these sources are detected in the 100-300 keV band, including seven black-hole binaries, the active galaxy Cen A, and the Crab. The Crab and Cyg X-1 are also detected in the 300-500 keV band. GBM provides complementary data to other sky-monitors below 100 keV and is the only all-sky monitor above 100 keV. Up-to-date light curves for all of the catalog sources can be found at http://heastro.phys.lsu.edu/gbm/.

  16. Integrating the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor into the 3rd Interplanetary Network

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, K; Connaughton, V; Meegan, C; Cline, T; Mitrofanov, I; Golovin, D; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Starr, R; Golenetskii, S; Aptekar, R; Mazets, E; Pal'shin, V; Frederiks, D; Smith, D M; Wigger, C; Rau, A; von Kienlin, A; Yamaoka, K; Ohno, M; Fukazawa, Y; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Barthelmy, S; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Goldsten, J; Del Monte, E; Feroci, M; Marisaldi, M

    2009-01-01

    We are integrating the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) into the Interplanetary Network (IPN) of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) detectors. With the GBM, the IPN will comprise 9 experiments. This will 1) assist the Fermi team in understanding and reducing their systematic localization uncertainties, 2) reduce the sizes of the GBM and Large Area Telescope (LAT) error circles by 1 to 4 orders of magnitude, 3) facilitate the identification of GRB sources with objects found by ground- and space-based observatories at other wavelengths, from the radio to very high energy gamma-rays, 4) reduce the uncertainties in associating some LAT detections of high energy photons with GBM bursts, and 5) facilitate searches for non-electromagnetic GRB counterparts, particularly neutrinos and gravitational radiation. We present examples and demonstrate the synergy between Fermi and the IPN. This is a Fermi Cycle 2 Guest Investigator project.

  17. GBM Monitoring of Cyg X-1 During the Recent State Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Case, G L; Cherry, M L; Camero-Arranz, A; Finger, M; Jenke, P; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Chaplin, V

    2011-01-01

    Cygnus X-1 is a high-mass x-ray binary with a black hole compact object. It is normally extremely bright in hard x-rays and low energy gamma rays and resides in the canonical hard spectral state. Recently, however, Cyg X-1 made a transition to the canonical soft state, with a rise in the soft x-ray flux and a decrease in the flux in the hard x-ray and low energy gamma-ray energy bands. We have been using the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor on Fermi to monitor the fluxes of a number of sources in the 8--1000 keV energy range, including Cyg X-1. We present light curves of Cyg X-1 showing the flux decrease in hard x-ray and low energy gamma-ray energy bands during the state transition as well as the several long flares observed in these higher energies during the soft state. We also present preliminary spectra from GBM for the pre-transition state, showing the spectral evolution to the soft state, and the post-transition state.

  18. Do the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and Swift Burst Alert Telescope see the Same Short Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, Eric; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Lien, Amy; Briggs, Michael S; Goldstein, Adam; Pelassa, Veronique; Troja, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Compact binary system mergers are expected to generate gravitational radiation detectable by ground-based interferometers. A subset of these, the merger of a neutron star with another neutron star or a black hole, are also the most popular model for the production of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) trigger on short GRBs (SGRBs) at rates that reflect their relative sky exposures, with the BAT detecting 10 per year compared to about 45 for GBM. We examine the SGRB populations detected by Swift BAT and Fermi GBM. We find that the Swift BAT triggers on weaker SGRBs than Fermi GBM, providing they occur close to the center of the BAT field-of-view, and that the Fermi GBM SGRB detection threshold remains flatter across its field-of-view. Overall, these effects combine to give the instruments the same average sensitivity, and account for the SGRBs that trigger one instrument but not the other. We do not find any evidence that the BAT and...

  19. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST SPECTRAL CATALOG: FOUR YEARS OF DATA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, David; Von Ahlefeld, Victoria Weller; Diehl, Roland; Greiner, Jochen; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Goldstein, Adam; Bhat, P. Narayana; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Byrne, Dave; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cleveland, William H. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Fishman, Gerald J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Guiriec, Sylvain [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander J. [Astronomical Institute, University of Amsterdam, Science Park 904, 1098 XH Amsterdam (Netherlands); and others

    2014-03-01

    In this catalog we present the updated set of spectral analyses of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during its first four years of operation. It contains two types of spectra, time-integrated spectral fits and spectral fits at the brightest time bin, from 943 triggered GRBs. Four different spectral models were fitted to the data, resulting in a compendium of more than 7500 spectra. The analysis was performed similarly but not identically to Goldstein et al. All 487 GRBs from the first two years have been re-fitted using the same methodology as that of the 456 GRBs in years three and four. We describe, in detail, our procedure and criteria for the analysis and present the results in the form of parameter distributions both for the observer-frame and rest-frame quantities. The data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  20. THREE YEARS OF FERMI GBM EARTH OCCULTATION MONITORING: OBSERVATIONS OF HARD X-RAY/SOFT GAMMA-RAY SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Jenke, Peter [ZP 12 Astrophysics Office, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Case, Gary L.; Cherry, Michael L.; Rodi, James [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Camero-Arranz, Ascension [Instituto de Ciencias del Espacio (IEEC-CSIC), Campus UAB, Torre C5, 2a planta, 08193 Barcelona (Spain); Chaplin, Vandiver; Bhat, Narayan; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Preece, Robert [Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Beklen, Elif [Physics Department, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey); Finger, Mark; Paciesas, William S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Greiner, Jochen; Meegan, Charles A.; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestische Physik, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kippen, R. Marc [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board Fermi has been providing continuous data to the astronomical community since 2008 August 12. In this paper, we present the results of the analysis of the first three years of these continuous data using the Earth occultation technique to monitor a catalog of 209 sources. From this catalog, we detect 99 sources, including 40 low-mass X-ray binary/neutron star systems, 31 high-mass X-ray binary/neutron star systems, 12 black hole binaries, 12 active galaxies, and 2 other sources, plus the Crab Nebula, and the Sun. Nine of these sources are detected in the 100-300 keV band, including seven black hole binaries, the active galaxy Cen A, and the Crab. The Crab and Cyg X-1 are also detected in the 300-500 keV band. GBM provides complementary data to other sky-monitors below 100 keV and is the only all-sky monitor above 100 keV. Up-to-date light curves for all of the catalog sources can be found online.

  1. More Gamma-ray Bursts from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michael; Fermi GBM Team Team

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Team has developed an offline search for weak gamma-ray bursts which were not already detected in-orbit as ``triggers''. This search is ``untargeted'', searching all of the GBM data without guidance from other observations. The initial version of the search has been operational from January 2016, finding several likely short GRBs per month that are posted to a webpage. The GBM individual photon data are binned to various timescales, a background model is created and the binned data are searched for significant signals above the background that are coincident in two or more detectors. The current search has a latency of several days because several steps require manual intervention. An improved version will be fully automatic so that the latency in detecting candidates will be dominated by the few hours delay in receiving the data. The new version of the search will also include additional detection algorithms to increase the GRB detection rate and will also detect some long GRBs. We will report the candidates via the Gamma-ray Coordinates Network (GCN). These prompt GRB detections and localization should aid multi-messenger observations, in some cases refining localizations on timescales useful for followup observations.

  2. Searching for Coincident Electromagnetic Signals from Advanced LIGO Gravitational-Wave Candidates Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littenberg, Tyson; Fermi GBM Team; LIGO; Virgo Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    With the dawn of gravitational-wave (GW) astronomy, multimessenger observations combining the electromagnetic and GW sky are eagerly anticipated. During Advanced LIGO's first observing run (O1), data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) were analyzed in search of electromagnetic transients coincident with GW candidates. The GBM search employs a coherent analysis over all GBM detectors using the full sky-location-dependent instrument response, and ranks candidate events by a Bayesian likelihood statistic. The GBM analysis was performed on candidate events from a search of LIGO data for merging compact binaries of total mass between 2 and 100 solar masses. The gravitational-wave candidate arrival time and its reconstructed source position were used as priors for the search of GBM data. We describe the GBM search for counterparts of the O1 candidates, and highlight improvements to the analysis made in preparation for future LIGO/Virgo observations.

  3. Three years of Fermi GBM Earth Occultation Monitoring: Observations of Hard X-ray/Soft Gamma-Ray Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Jenke, P; Case, Gary L; Cherry, Michael L; Rodi, James; Camero-Arranz, Ascension; Chaplin, Vandiver; Beklen, Elif; Finger, Mark H; Bhat, Narayana; Briggs, Michael S; Connaughto, Valerie; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R Marc; Meegan, Charles A; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been providing continuous data to the astronomical community since 2008 August 12. We will present the results of the analysis of the first three years of these continuous data using the Earth occultation technique to monitor a catalog of 209 sources. Although the occultation technique is in principle quite simple, in practice there are many complications including the dynamic instrument response, source confusion, and scattering in the Earth's atmosphere, which will be described. We detect 99 sources, including 40 low-mass X-ray binary/neutron star systems, 31 high-mass X-ray binary/neutron star systems, 12 black hole binaries, 12 active galaxies, 2 other sources, plus the Crab Nebula and the Sun. Nine of these sources are detected in the 100-300 keV band, including seven black-hole binaries, the active galaxy Cen A, and the Crab. The Crab and Cyg X-1 are also detected in the 300-500 keV band. GBM provides complementary data to ot...

  4. First Results from Fermi GBM Earth Occultation Monitoring: Observations of Soft Gamma-Ray Sources Above 100 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Case, Gary L; Rodi, James C; Jenke, Peter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Finger, Mark H; Meegan, Charles A; Camero-Arranz, Ascencion; Beklen, Elif; Bhat, P Narayan; Briggs, Michael S; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert; Kippen, R Marc; von Kienlin, Andreas; Griener, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    The NaI and BGO detectors on the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi are now being used for long-term monitoring of the hard X-ray/low energy gamma-ray sky. Using the Earth occultation technique as demonstrated previously by the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory, GBM can be used to produce multiband light curves and spectra for known sources and transient outbursts in the 8 keV to 1 MeV energy range with its NaI detectors and up to 40 MeV with its BGO detectors. Over 85% of the sky is viewed every orbit, and the precession of the Fermi orbit allows the entire sky to be viewed every ~26 days with sensitivity exceeding that of BATSE at energies below ~25 keV and above ~1.5 MeV. We briefly describe the technique and present preliminary results using the NaI detectors after the first two years of observations at energies above 100 keV. Eight sources are detected with a significance greater than 7 sigma: the Crab, Cyg X-1, SWIFT J1753.5-0127, 1E 1740-29, Cen A, GRS 1915+105, and the transien...

  5. All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Chaplin, V; Connaughton, V; Camero-Arranz, A; Case, G; Cherry, M; Rodi, J; Finger, M H; Jenke, P; Haynes, R H

    2009-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog enters or exits occultation by the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. In addition, to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels. We will present early results. Regularly updated results can be found on our website http://gammaray.nsstc.nasa.gov/gbm/science/occultation

  6. Gravitational-wave Observations May Constrain Gamma-Ray Burst Models: The Case of GW150914-GBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veres, P.; Preece, R. D.; Goldstein, A.; Mészáros, P.; Burns, E.; Connaughton, V.

    2016-08-01

    The possible short gamma-ray burst (GRB) observed by Fermi/GBM in coincidence with the first gravitational-wave (GW) detection offers new ways to test GRB prompt emission models. GW observations provide previously inaccessible physical parameters for the black hole central engine such as its horizon radius and rotation parameter. Using a minimum jet launching radius from the Advanced LIGO measurement of GW 150914, we calculate photospheric and internal shock models and find that they are marginally inconsistent with the GBM data, but cannot be definitely ruled out. Dissipative photosphere models, however, have no problem explaining the observations. Based on the peak energy and the observed flux, we find that the external shock model gives a natural explanation, suggesting a low interstellar density (˜10-3 cm-3) and a high Lorentz factor (˜2000). We only speculate on the exact nature of the system producing the gamma-rays, and study the parameter space of a generic Blandford-Znajek model. If future joint observations confirm the GW-short-GRB association we can provide similar but more detailed tests for prompt emission models.

  7. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor as a Transient Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Fermi GBM Team

    2016-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) performs well as a transient monitor in the 8 keV to 1 MeV range using the publicly available continuous data products. With GBM, we use the Earth occultation technique successfully monitor long-term hard X-ray variations in the Crab Nebula, bright transients such as the black hole binary V404 Cyg, which flared brightly in Jun 2015, and a catalog of 200+ sources. The catalog includes X-ray binaries, active galaxies, and the Sun which we monitor for variations on timescales from days to years, supporting multi wavelength campaigns and triggering other instruments. We monitor the pulse frequency and pulsed flux for 37 accreting pulsars with a high (~50% duty cycle), including Be/X-ray binaries such as V0332+53, which underwent a giant outburst in summer 2015. Through daily searches, we detect X-ray bursts from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries. I will present highlights of these transient monitoring efforts, demonstrating significant science gains using GBM continuous data products.

  8. SGR J1550-5418 bursts detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its most prolific activity

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, A J; Gorgone, N M; Kaneko, Y; Baring, M G; Guiriec, S; Gogus, E; Granot, J; Watts, A L; Lin, L; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Chaplin, V L; Connaughton, V; Finger, M H; Gehrels, N; Gibby, M H; Giles, M M; Goldstein, A; Gruber, D; Harding, A K; Kaper, L; von Kienlin, A; van der Klis, M; McBreen, S; Mcenery, J; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Pe'er, A; Preece, R D; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rau, A; Wachter, S; Wilson-Hodge, C; Woods, P M; Wijers, R A M J

    2012-01-01

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in January 2009, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two black-body functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model we find a mean power-law index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlati...

  9. Magnetar Observations in the Swift-Fermi/GBM Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Fermi Observatory was launched June 11, 2008; the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) began normal operations on July 14, about a month after launch, when the trigger algorithms were enabled. Since then, and against all odds, GBM recorded over 600 bursts from 4 SGRs. Of these four sources, only one was an old magnetar: SGR J1806+20. SGR J0501+4516, was discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with GBM. A source originally classified as AXP 1E1547.0-5408 exhibited SGR-like bursting behavior and we reclassified it as SGR J1550-5418. Finally, GBM discovered SGR J0418+5729 on 2009 June. Finally, on March 2010, a third new magnetar was discovered with Swift, SGR J1833-0832. I report below on the current status of the field and on several results combining multi-satellite and ground-based data

  10. All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Case, G.; Jenke, P.; Chaplin, V.; Cherry, M.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M.; Haynes, R. H.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J.

    2009-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/ soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. In addition, to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels.

  11. Three years of Transients with Fermi GBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all-sky monitoring instrument, sensitive between 8 keV and 40 MeV, with a primary objective of supporting the Large Area Telescope (LAT) in observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). Both instruments are part of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Together, the GBM and LAT instruments have provided ground-breaking measurements of GRBs that have, after 10 years of focus on GRB afterglows, inspired renewed interest in the prompt emission phase of GRBs and the physical mechanisms that fuel them. In addition to GRB science, GBM has made significant contributions to the astrophysics of galactic transient sources including long-term variations in the Crab nebula, spin state transitions in accretion powered pulsars, state transitions in black hole X-ray binaries, and unprecedented time-resolved spectral studies of soft gamma-ray repeater bursts. Closer to home, GBM also contributes to solar flare and terrestrial gamma flash science.

  12. Magnetar Observations with Fermi/GBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Fermi Observatory was launched June 11, 2009; the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) began normal operations on July 14, about a month after launch, when the trigger algorithms were enabled. In the first year of operations we recorded emission from four magnetar sources; of these, only one was an old magnetar: SGR 1806+20. The other three detections were: SGR J0501+4516, newly discovered with Swift and extensively monitored with both Swift and GBM, SGR J1550-5418, a source originally classified as an Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) and a very recently discovered new source, SGR 0418+5729. I report below on the current status of the analyses efforts of the GBM data.

  13. Multi-Messenger Time-Domain Astronomy with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Adam; Fermi GBM Team

    2017-01-01

    With exciting new detections of gravitational waves by LIGO and astrophysical neutrinos by IceCube and ANTARES, the era of multi-messenger time-domain astronomy has arrived. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) continuously observes the entire sky that is not occulted by the Earth in gamma-rays from 8 keV - 40 MeV with 2 microsecond temporal resolution, and that continuous data is downlinked every few hours. This wealth of near-real-time all-sky data has lead to the development of continuous data searches for gamma-ray events, such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), in coincidence with astrophysical neutrinos and gravitational wave events. Additionally, GBM has the ability to localize triggered and un-triggered transient events to a few-degree accuracy, rapidly disseminate the alerts and localization sky maps, and there have been several successful follow-up attempts by wide-field optical telescopes, such as the Palomar Transient Factory, to catch the fading optical afterglow of GBM-triggered GRBs. We discuss the current applications and importance of Fermi GBM in leading multi-messenger time-domain astronomy in the gamma-ray regime.

  14. Multi-Messenger Time-Domain Astronomy with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; Fermi GBM - LIGO Group

    2017-01-01

    With exciting new detections of gravitational waves by LIGO and astrophysical neutrinos by IceCube and ANTARES, the era of multi-messenger time-domain astronomy has arrived. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) continuously observes the entire sky that is not occulted by the Earth in gamma-rays from 8 keV - 40 MeV with 2 microsecond temporal resolution, with regular data downlinks every few hours. This wealth of near-realtime all-sky data has lead to the development of continuous data searches for gamma-ray events, such as Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), in coincidence with astrophysical neutrinos and gravitational wave events. Additionally, GBM has the ability to localize triggered and untriggered transient events to a few-degree accuracy, rapidly disseminate the alerts and localization sky maps within tens of seconds, and there have been several successful follow-up attempts by wide-field optical telescopes, such as the Palomar Transient Factory, to catch the fading optical afterglow of GBM-triggered GRBs. We discuss the current applications and importance of Fermi GBM in leading multi-messenger time-domain astronomy in the gamma-ray regime.

  15. All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Case, G.; Chaplin, V.; Cherry, M.; Connaughton, V.; Finger, M.; Jenke, P.; Paciesas, W.; Preece, R.; Rodi, J.

    2010-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. New sources are added to our catalog as they become active or upon request. In addition to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels. We will present early results. Regularly updated results will be found on our website http://gammaray.nsstc.nasa.gov/gbm/science/occultation.

  16. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Observations with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor on the Fermi Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2009-01-01

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) have now been detected with four different orbiting spacecraft. The latest observations are being made with the scintillation detectors of Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi). Although this experiment was designed and optimized for the observation of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), it has unprecedented capabilities for TGF observations, surpassing those of the experiment that discovered TGFs, the BATSE experiment on the Compton Gamma-ray Observatory. Launched in June 2008 from the Kennedy Space Center, the Fermi-GBM has been detecting about one TGF every four weeks. The thick bismuth germinate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM have now observed photon energies from TGFs at energies up to approx.40 MeV. Individual photons are detected with an absolute timing accuracy of 2 microsec. Unlike the BATSE instrument, the GBM data system allows higher counting rates to be recorded and deadtime characteristics are well-known and correctable; thus the saturation effects seen with BATSE are avoided. TGF pulses as narrow as approx.0.1ms have been observed with the GBM. Like BATSE (and unlike RHESSI) an on-board trigger is required to detect TGFs. The minimum time window for this trigger is 16ms. A trigger window this wide greatly reduces the number of detected TGFs, since they most often have a much shorter duration than this window, thus reducing the signal-to-background. New on-board trigger algorithms based on detected photon energies are about to be implemented; this should increase the number of TGF triggers. High-energy spectra from TGFs observed with Fermi-GBM will be described.

  17. Quasi -Periodic Pulsations in Solar Flares: new clues from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, D; Bissaldi, E; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Greiner, J; van der Horst, A J; Kanbach, G; Rau, A; Bhat, P N; Diehl, R; von Kienlin, A; Kippen, R M; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Wilson-Hodge, C

    2011-01-01

    In the last four decades it has been observed that solar flares show quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) from the lowest, i.e. radio, to the highest, i.e. gamma-ray, part of the electromagnetic spectrum. To this day, it is still unclear which mechanism creates such QPPs. In this paper, we analyze four bright solar flares which show compelling signatures of quasi-periodic behavior and were observed with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (\\gbm) onboard the Fermi satellite. Because GBM covers over 3 decades in energy (8 keV to 40 MeV) it can be a key instrument to understand the physical processes which drive solar flares. We tested for periodicity in the time series of the solar flares observed by GBM by applying a classical periodogram analysis. However, contrary to previous authors, we did not detrend the raw light curve before creating the power spectral density spectrum (PSD). To assess the significance of the frequencies we made use of a method which is commonly applied for X-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. This...

  18. A Catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes Observed with the Fermi- Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor: The First Sixteen Months of Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Gerald J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.

    2009-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi) has been detecting on the average about one terrestrial gamma-ray flash every four weeks. This catalog presents the basic characteristics of observed TGFs from the beginning of the Fermi-GBM operation in 2008 July until 2009 October. The thick bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM system have observed photon energies from TGFs at energies above 30 MeV. It is found that the TGF pulses are typically shorter than previously reported, and in several cases less than 0.2ms. Extremely high counting rates are encountered 200kcps or higher per detector during portions of some TGFs. These high rates require considerable corrections (with inherent assumptions) to the observed data in order to derive the true counting rates.

  19. Fermi GBM Observations of LIGO Gravitational Wave event GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, V; Goldstein, A; Briggs, M S; Zhang, B -B; Hui, C M; Jenke, P; Racusin, J; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Bhat, P N; Cleveland, W; Fitzpatrick, G; Giles, M M; Gibby, M H; Greiner, J; von Kienlin, A; Kippen, R M; McBreen, S; Mailyan, B; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Roberts, O; Sparke, L; Stanbro, M; Toelge, K; Veres, P; Yu, H -F; authors, other

    2016-01-01

    With an instantaneous view of 70% of the sky, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an excellent partner in the search for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational wave (GW) events. GBM observations at the time of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)event GW150914 reveal the presence of a weak transient source above 50 keV, 0.4 s after the GW event was detected, with a false alarm probability of 0.0022. This weak transient lasting 1 s does not appear connected with other previously known astrophysical, solar, terrestrial, or magnetospheric activity. Its localization is ill-constrained but consistent with the direction of GW150914. The duration and spectrum of the transient event suggest it is a weak short Gamma-Ray Burst arriving at a large angle to the direction in which Fermi was pointing, where the GBM detector response is not optimal. If the GBM transient is associated with GW150914, this electromagnetic signal from a stellar mass black hole binary merger is unexpected....

  20. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Younes, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A.J.; Baring, M.G.; Granot, J.; Watts, A.L.; Bhat, P.N.; Collazzi, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gorgone, N.; Göğüş, E.; Gruber, D.; Grunblatt, S.; Huppenkothen, D.; Kaneko, Y.; von Kienlin, A.; van der Klis, M.; Lin, L.; Mcenery, J.; van Putten, T.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550-5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a

  1. Fermi/GBM Observations of SGR J0501+4516

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; van der Horst, Alexander J.

    2011-08-01

    The magnetar candidate SGR J0501+4516 was discovered when it became active for about 13 days from August 22 to September 3, 2008. During this period, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard Fermi detected over 30 bursts. We present here our results on the temporal and spectral analysis of the 29 bursts for which high spectral and time resolution data is available. We find that the T90 durations of the bursts follow a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ~123 ms. We fit the time-integrated spectrum of each burst with several models: a black body function, optically thin thermal brehmsstrahlung, a power law with an exponential cut-off, two black body functions, and the combination of a black body and a power law. We discuss our results in the context of the spectral properties of other magnetar bursts and we also present some correlations between the spectral parameters of the best fit models for all bursts. Finally, we present the results of our time-resolved spectral analysis of the five brightest bursts and discuss how they compare with our time-integrated results.

  2. Searching the Gamma-ray Sky for Counterparts to Gravitational Wave Sources: Fermi GBM and LAT Observations of LVT151012 and GW151226

    CERN Document Server

    Racusin, J L; Goldstein, A; Connaughton, V; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Jenke, P; Blackburn, L; Briggs, M S; Broida, J; Camp, J; Christensen, N; Hui, C M; Littenberg, T; Shawhan, P; Singer, L; Veitch, J; Bhat, P N; Cleveland, W; Fitzpatrick, G; Gibby, M H; von Kienlin, A; McBreen, S; Mailyan, B; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Roberts, O J; Stanbro, M; Veres, P; Zhang, B -B; Ackermann, M; Albert, A; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Barbiellini, G; Baring, M G; Bastieri, D; Bellazzini, R; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, E D; Bonino, R; Bregeon, J; Bruel, P; Buson, S; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caputo, R; Caragiulo, M; Caraveo, P A; Cavazzuti, E; Charles, E; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Costanza, F; Cuoco, A; Cutini, S; D'Ammando, F; de Palma, F; Desiante, R; Digel, S W; Di Lalla, N; Di Mauro, M; Di Venere, L; Drell, P S; Favuzzi, C; Ferrara, E C; Focke, W B; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Giglietto, N; Gill, R; Giroletti, M; Glanzman, T; Granot, J; Green, D; Grove, J E; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Harding, A K; Jogler, T; Johannesson, G; Kamae, T; Kensei, S; Kocevski, D; Kuss, M; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Li, J; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lubrano, P; Magill, J D; Maldera, S; Malyshev, D; McEnery, J E; Michelson, P F; Mizuno, T; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, I V; Negro, M; Nuss, E; Omodei, N; Orienti, M; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Paneque, D; Perkins, J S; Pesce-Rollins, M; Piron, F; Pivato, G; Porter, T A; Principe, G; Raino, S; Rando, R; Razzano, M; Razzaque, S; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Parkinson, P M Saz; Scargle, J D; Sgro, C; Simone, D; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Spada, F; Spinelli, P; Suson, D J; Tajima, H; Thayer, J B; Torres, D F; Troja, E; Uchiyama, Y; Vianello, G; Wood, K S; Wood, M

    2016-01-01

    We present the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) observations of the LIGO binary black hole merger event GW151226 and candi- date LVT151012. No candidate electromagnetic counterparts were detected by either the GBM or LAT. We present a detailed analysis of the GBM and LAT data over a range of timescales from seconds to years, using automated pipelines and new techniques for char- acterizing the upper limits across a large area of the sky. Due to the partial GBM and LAT coverage of the large LIGO localization regions at the trigger times for both events, dif- ferences in source distances and masses, as well as the uncertain degree to which emission from these sources could be beamed, these non-detections cannot be used to constrain the variety of theoretical models recently applied to explain the candidate GBM counterpart to GW150914.

  3. On the Fermi-GBM Event 0.4 s after GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, J.; Burgess, J. M.; Savchenko, V.; Yu, H.-F.

    2016-08-01

    In view of the recent report by Connaughton et al., we analyze continuous time-tagged event (TTE) data of Fermi-gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) around the time of the gravitational-wave event GW 150914. We find that after proper accounting for low-count statistics, the GBM transient event at 0.4 s after GW 150914 is likely not due to an astrophysical source, but consistent with a background fluctuation, removing the tension between the INTEGRAL/ACS non-detection and GBM. Additionally, reanalysis of other short GRBs shows that without proper statistical modeling the fluence of faint events is over-predicted, as verified for some joint GBM-ACS detections of short GRBs. We detail the statistical procedure to correct these biases. As a result, faint short GRBs, verified by ACS detections, with significances in the broadband light curve even smaller than that of the GBM-GW150914 event are recovered as proper non-zero source, while the GBM-GW150914 event is consistent with zero fluence.

  4. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of the known X-ray bursters are frequently observed by INTEGRAL, in particular in the frame of the Key Programmes. Taking advantage of the INTEGRAL instrumentation, an international collaboration led by the JEM-X team at the Danish National Space Institute has been monitoring the occurrence of uncommon burst...

  5. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.;

    2008-01-01

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting neutron stars in X-ray binaries. As most of the known X-ray bursters are frequently observed by INTEGRAL, an international collaboration have been taking advantage of its instrumentation to specifically monitor the occurrence...

  6. Long X-ray burst monitoring with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binary systems. In the frame of the INTEGRAL observational Key Programme over the Galactic Center a good number of the known X-ray bursters are frequently being monitored. An international...... collaboration lead by the JEM-X team at the Danish National Space Center has proposed to exploit the improved sensitivity of the INTEGRAL instruments to investigate the observational properties and physics up to high energies of exceptional burst events lasting between a few tens of minutes and several hours...

  7. The Fermi GBM and LAT follow-up of GW150914

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bissaldi E.

    2017-01-01

    Here we present observations by the Fermi Gamma-Ray BurstMonitor (GBM [1] and by the Large Area Telescope (LAT [2] of the LIGO Gravitational Wave event GW150914, which has been associated to the merger of two stellar-mass BHs. We report the presence of a weak transient event in GBM data, close in time to the LIGO one. We discuss the characteristics of this GBM transient, which are consistent with a weak short GRB arriving at a large angle to the direction in which Fermi was pointing. Furthermore, we report LAT upper limits (ULs for GW150914, and we present the strategy for follow-up observations of GW events with the LAT.

  8. Study on Monitoring Rock Burst through Drill Pipe Torque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhonghua Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new method to identify the danger of rock burst from the response of drill pipe torque during drilling process to overcome many defects of the conventional volume of drilled coal rubble method. It is based on the relationship of rock burst with coal stress and coal strength. Through theoretic analysis, the change mechanism of drill pipe torque and the relationship of drill pipe torque with coal stress, coal strength, and drilling speed are investigated. In light of the analysis, a new device for testing drill pipe torque is developed and a series of experiments is performed under different conditions; the results show that drill pipe torque linearly increases with the increase of coal stress and coal strength; the faster the drilling speed, the larger the drill pipe torque, and vice versa. When monitoring rock burst by drill pipe torque method, the index of rock burst is regarded as a function in which coal stress index and coal strength index are principal variables. The results are important for the forecast of rock burst in coal mine.

  9. Monitoring burst (M-burst) — A novel framework of failure localization in all-optical mesh networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Mohammed L.

    2011-10-10

    Achieving instantaneous and precise failure localization in all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks has been an attractive feature of network fault management systems, and is particularly important when failure-dependent protection is employed. The paper introduces a novel framework of real-time failure localization in all-optical WDM mesh networks, called monitoring-burst (m-burst), which aims to initiate a graceful compromise between consumed monitoring resources and monitoring delay. Different from any previously reported solution, the proposed m-burst framework has a single monitoring node (MN) which launches optical bursts along a set of pre-defined close-loop routes, called monitoring cycles (m-cycles), to probe the links along the m-cycles. Bursts along different m-cycles are kept non-overlapping through any link of the network. By identifying the lost bursts due to single link failure events only, the MN can unambiguously localize the failed link in at least 3-connected networks. We will justify the feasibility and applicability of the proposed m-burst framework in the scenario of interest. To avoid possible collision among optical bursts launched by the MN, we define the problem of collision-free scheduling and formulate it into an integer linear program (ILP) in order to minimize the monitoring delay. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework and the proposed solution.

  10. Compton scattering in terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected with the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Sheila; Briggs, Michael S; Foley, Suzanne; Tierney, David; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Xiong, Shaolin; Dwyer, Joseph; Fishman, Gerald J; Roberts, Oliver J; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are short intense flashes of gamma rays associated with lightning activity in thunderstorms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) process, theoretical predictions for the temporal and spectral evolution of TGFs are compared to observations made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Assuming a single source altitude of 15 km, a comparison of simulations to data is performed for a range of empirically chosen source electron variation time scales. The data exhibit a clear softening with increased source distance, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The simulated spectra follow this trend in the data, but tend to underestimate the observed hardness. Such a discrepancy may imply that the basic RREA model is not sufficient. Alternatively, a TGF beam that is tilted with respect to the zenith could produce an evolution with source distance that is compatible with the da...

  11. Pulse properties of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Suzanne; Briggs, Michael S; Connaughton, Valerie; Tierney, David; McBreen, Sheila; Dwyer, Joseph; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Bhat, P Narayana; Byrne, David; Cramer, Eric; Fishman, Gerald J; Xiong, Shaolin; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R Marc; Meegan, Charles A; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D; von Kienlin, Andreas; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has triggered on over 300 terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) since its launch in June 2008. With 14 detectors, GBM collects on average ~100 counts per triggered TGF, enabling unprecedented studies of the time profiles of TGFs. Here we present the first rigorous analysis of the temporal properties of a large sample of TGFs (278), including the distributions of the rise and fall times of the individual pulses and their durations. A variety of time profiles are observed with 19 of TGFs having multiple pulses separated in time and 31 clear cases of partially overlapping pulses. The effect of instrumental dead time and pulse pileup on the temporal properties are also presented. As the observed gamma ray pulse structure is representative of the electron flux at the source, TGF pulse parameters are critical to distinguish between relativistic feedback discharge and lightning leader models. We show that at least 67% of TGFs at satellite ...

  12. The Successful Synergy of Swift and Fermi/GBM in Magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2011-01-01

    The magnetar rate of discovery has increased dramatically in the last decade. Five sources were discovered in the last three years alone as a result of the very efficient synergy among three X- and .gamma-ray instruments on NASA satellites: the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), the Fermi/Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer; RXTE/Proportional Counter Array (PCA). To date, there are approx. 25 magnetar candidates, of which two are (one each) in the Large and Small Magellanic Cloud and the rest reside on the Galactic plane of our Milky Way. I will discuss here the main properties of the Magnetar Population and the common projects that can be achieved with the synergy of Swift and GBM.

  13. Implications of the Tentative Association between GW150914 and a Fermi-GBM Transient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Fu-Wen; Yuan, Qiang; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Liu, Si-Ming; Wei, Da-Ming

    2016-08-01

    The merger-driven gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their associated gravitational-wave (GW) radiation, if both are successfully detected, have some far-reaching implications, including, for instance: (i) the statistical comparison of the physical properties of the short/long-short GRBs with and without GW detection can test the general origin model; (ii) revealing the physical processes taking place at the central engine; (iii) measuring the velocity of the gravitational wave directly/accurately. In this work, we discuss these implications in the case of a possible association of GW150914/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) transient 150914. We compared GBM transient 150914 with other SGRBs and found that such an event may be a distinct outlier in some statistical diagrams, possibly due to its specific binary black hole merger origin. However, the presence of a “new” group of SGRBs with “unusual” physical parameters is also possible. If the outflow of GBM transient 150914 was launched by the accretion onto the nascent black hole, the magnetic activity rather than the neutrino process is likely responsible for the energy extraction, and the accretion disk mass is estimated to be ˜10-5 M ⊙. The GW150914/GBM transient 150914 association, if confirmed, would provide the first opportunity to directly measure the GW velocity, and its departure from the speed of the light should be within a factor of ˜10-17.

  14. Study of luminosity and spin-up relation in X-ray binary pulsars with long-term monitoring by MAXI/GSC and Fermi/GBM

    CERN Document Server

    Sugizaki, Mutsumi; Nakajima, Motoki; Yamaoka, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    We study the relation between luminosity and spin-period change in X-ray binary pulsars using long-term light curve obtained by the MAXI/GSC all-sky survey and pulse period data from the Fermi/GBM pulsar project. X-ray binaries, consisting of a highly magnetized neutron star and a stellar companion, originate X-ray emission according to the energy of the accretion matter onto the neutron star. The accretion matter also transfers the angular momentum at the Alfven radius, and then spin up the neutron star. Therefore, the X-ray luminosity and the spin-up rate are supposed to be well correlated. We analyzed the luminosity and period-change relation using the data taken by continuous monitoring of MAXI/GSC and Fermi/GBM for Be/X-ray binaries, GX 304$-$1, A 0535$+$26, GRO J1008$-$57, KS 1947$+$300, and 2S 1417$-$624, which occurred large outbursts in the last four years. We discuss the results comparing the obtained observed relation with that of the theoretical model by Ghosh \\& Lamb (1979).

  15. The Interplanetary Network Supplement to the Fermi GBM Catalog - An AO-2 and AO-3 Guest Investigator Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, K.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Meegan, C.; von Kienlin, A.; Rau, A.; Zhang, X.; Golenetskii, S.; Aptekar, R.; Mazets, E.; Pal'shin, V.; Fredericks, D.; Barthelmy, S.; Cummings, J.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Starr, R.; Goldsten, J.

    2012-01-01

    In the first two years of operation of the Fermi GBM, the 9-spacecraft Interplanetary Network (IPN) detected 158 GBM bursts with one or two distant spacecraft, and triangulated them to annuli or error boxes. Combining the IPN and GBM localizations leads to error boxes which are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller than those of the GBM alone. These localizations comprise the IPN supplement to the GBM catalog, and they support a wide range of scientific investigations.

  16. The Interplanetary Network Supplement to the Fermi GBM Catalog - An AO-2 and AO-3 Guest Investigator Project

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, K; Connaughton, V; Meegan, C; von Kienlin, A; Rau, A; Zhang, X; Golenetskii, S; Aptekar, R; Mazets, E; Pal'shin, V; Frederiks, D; Barthelmy, S; Cline, T; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H A; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Starr, R; Smith, D M; Hajdas, W; Yamaoka, K; Ohno, M; Fukazawa, Y; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Palmer, D M; Goldsten, J; Del Monte, E; Feroci, M; Marisaldi, M

    2011-01-01

    In the first two years of operation of the Fermi GBM, the 9-spacecraft Interplanetary Network (IPN) detected 158 GBM bursts with one or two distant spacecraft, and triangulated them to annuli or error boxes. Combining the IPN and GBM localizations leads to error boxes which are up to 4 orders of magnitude smaller than those of the GBM alone. These localizations comprise the IPN supplement to the GBM catalog, and they support a wide range of scientific investigations.

  17. High-energy emission from bright gamma-ray bursts using Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta

    2010-05-25

    Among the scientific objectives of one of the present NASA missions, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST), is the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fermi's payload comprises two science instruments, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). GBM was designed to detect and localize bursts for the Fermi mission. By means of an array of 12 NaI(Tl) (8 keV to 1 MeV) and two BGO (0.2 to 40 MeV) scintillation detectors, GBM extends the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the LAT instrument into the traditional range of current GRB databases. The physical detector response of the GBM instrument to GRBs has been determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground individual detector calibration measurements. The GBM detectors have been calibrated from 10 keV to 17.5 MeV using various gamma sources, and the detector response has been derived by simulations over the entire energy range (8 keV to 40 MeV) using GEANT. The GBM instrument has been operating successfully in orbit since June 11, 2008. The total trigger count from the time GBM triggering was enabled in July 2008 through December 2009 is 655, and about 380 of these triggers were classified as GRBs. Moreover, GBM detected several bursts in common with the LAT. These amazing detections mainly fulfill the primary science goal of GBM, which is the joint analysis of spectra and time histories of GRBs observed by both Fermi instruments. For every trigger, GBM provides near-real time on-board burst locations to permit repointing of the spacecraft and to obtain LAT observations of delayed emission from bursts. GBM and LAT refined locations are rapidly disseminated to the scientific community, often permitting extensive multiwavelength follow-up observations by NASA's Swift mission or other space- based observatories, and by numerous ground-based telescopes, thus allowing redshift determinations. Calculations of LAT upper limits are

  18. GBM Spectral Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — For GBM, input is daily or trigger CSPEC or CTIME file from Fermi archive and corresponding response file from our archive. For LAT, input is daily spectrum file and...

  19. Earth Occultation Imaging of the Low Energy Gamma-Ray Sky with GBM

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, J; Case, G L; Camero-Arranz, A; Chaplin, C; Finger, M H; Jenke, P; Wilson-Hodge, C A

    2013-01-01

    The Earth Occultation Technique (EOT) has been applied to Fermi's Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) to perform all-sky monitoring for a predetermined catalog of hard X-ray/soft gamma-ray sources. Imaging with a Differential filter using the Earth Occultation Method (IDEOM) has been developed to search for sources not in the catalog, thus completing the catalog and reducing a source of systematic error in EOT. IDEOM is a tomographic imaging method that takes advantage of the orbital precession of the Fermi satellite. Using IDEOM, all-sky images have been generated for ~4 years of GBM data in the 12-50 keV, 50-100 keV and 100-300 keV energy bands in search of sources otherwise unmodeled by the GBM occultation analysis. Analysis resulted in the detection of 43 sources in the 12-50 keV energy band, 23 sources in the 50-100 keV energy band, and 7 sources in the 100-300 keV energy band. IDEOM analysis has resulted in the addition of 16 sources to the GBM-EOT catalog. We also present the first joined averaged spectra fo...

  20. Fermi GBM Observations of LIGO Gravitational-wave Event GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, V.; Burns, E.; Goldstein, A.; Blackburn, L.; Briggs, M. S.; Zhang, B.-B.; Camp, J.; Christensen, N.; Hui, C. M.; Jenke, P.; Littenberg, T.; McEnery, J. E.; Racusin, J.; Shawhan, P.; Singer, L.; Veitch, J.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Cleveland, W.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Giles, M. M.; Gibby, M. H.; von Kienlin, A.; Kippen, R. M.; McBreen, S.; Mailyan, B.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Roberts, O. J.; Sparke, L.; Stanbro, M.; Toelge, K.; Veres, P.

    2016-07-01

    With an instantaneous view of 70% of the sky, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an excellent partner in the search for electromagnetic counterparts to gravitational-wave (GW) events. GBM observations at the time of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) event GW150914 reveal the presence of a weak transient above 50 keV, 0.4 s after the GW event, with a false-alarm probability of 0.0022 (2.9σ). This weak transient lasting 1 s was not detected by any other instrument and does not appear to be connected with other previously known astrophysical, solar, terrestrial, or magnetospheric activity. Its localization is ill-constrained but consistent with the direction of GW150914. The duration and spectrum of the transient event are consistent with a weak short gamma-ray burst (GRB) arriving at a large angle to the direction in which Fermi was pointing where the GBM detector response is not optimal. If the GBM transient is associated with GW150914, then this electromagnetic signal from a stellar mass black hole binary merger is unexpected. We calculate a luminosity in hard X-ray emission between 1 keV and 10 MeV of {1.8}-1.0+1.5× {10}49 erg s-1. Future joint observations of GW events by LIGO/Virgo and Fermi GBM could reveal whether the weak transient reported here is a plausible counterpart to GW150914 or a chance coincidence, and will further probe the connection between compact binary mergers and short GRBs.

  1. The optical identifcation of events with poorly defined locations: The case of the Fermi GBM GRB140801A

    CERN Document Server

    Lipunov, V M; Pruzhinskaya, M V; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Pelassa, V; Tsvetkova, A E; Sokolov, I V; Kann, D A; Xu, Dong; Gorbovskoy, E S; Krushinski, V V; Kornilov, V G; Balanutsa, P V; Boronina, S V; Budnev, N M; Cano, Z; Castro-Tirado, A J; Chazov, V V; Connaughton, V; Delvaux, C; Frederiks, D D; Fynbo, J F U; Gabovich, A V; Goldstein, A; Greiner, J; Gress, O A; Ivanov, K I; Jakobsson, P; Klose, S; Knust, F; Komarova, V N; Konstantinov, E; Krylov, A V; Kuvshinov, D A; Kuznetsov, A S; Lipunova, G V; Moskvitin, A S; Pal'shin, V D; Pandey, S B; Poleshchuk, V A; Schmidl, S; Sergienko, Yu P; Sinyakov, E V; Schulze, S; Sokolov, V V; Sokolova, T N; Sparre, M; Thone, C C; Tlatov, A G; Tyurina, N V; Ulanov, M V; Yazev, S A; Yurkov, V V

    2015-01-01

    We report the early discovery of the optical afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 140801A in the 137 deg$^2$ 3-$\\sigma$ error-box of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). MASTER is the only observatory that automatically react to all Fermi alerts. GRB 140801A is one of the few GRBs whose optical counterpart was discovered solely from its GBM localization. The optical afterglow of GRB 140801A was found by MASTER Global Robotic Net 53 sec after receiving the alert, making it the fastest optical detection of a GRB from a GBM error-box. Spectroscopy obtained with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 6-m BTA of SAO RAS reveals a redshift of $z=1.32$. We performed optical and near-infrared photometry of GRB 140801A using different telescopes with apertures ranging from 0.4-m to 10.4-m. GRB 140801A is a typical burst in many ways. The rest-frame bolometric isotropic energy release and peak energy of the burst is $E_\\mathrm{iso} = 5.54_{-0.24}^{+0.26} \\times 10^{52}$ erg and $E_\\mathrm{p, rest}\\simeq280$ keV,...

  2. The CALET Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM)

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Sakamoto, Takanori; Takahashi, Ichiro; Hara, Takumi; Yamamoto, Tatsuma; Kawakubo, Yuta; Inoue, Ry ota; Terazawa, Shunsuke; Fujioka, Rie; Senuma, Kazumasa; Nakahira, Satoshi; Tomida, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Torii, Shoji; Cherry, Michael L; Ricciarini, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The CALET Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM) is the secondary scientific instrument of the CALET mission on the International Space Station (ISS), which is scheduled for launch by H-IIB/HTV in 2014. The CGBM provides a broadband energy coverage from 7 keV to 20 MeV, and simultaneous observations with the primary instrument Calorimeter (CAL) in the GeV - TeV gamma-ray range and Advanced Star Camera (ASC) in the optical for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and other X-gamma-ray transients. The CGBM consists of two kinds of scintillators: two LaBr$_3$(Ce) (7 keV - 1 MeV) and one BGO (100 keV - 20 MeV) each read by a single photomultiplier. The LaBr$_3$(Ce) crystal, used in space for the first time here for celestial gamma-ray observations, enables GRB observations over a broad energy range from low energy X-ray emissions to gamma rays. The detector performance and structures have been verified using the bread-board model (BBM) via vibration and thermal vacuum tests. The CALET is currently in the development phase of the prot...

  3. High-energy transients with Fermi/GBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruber, David

    2012-10-09

    For most of mankind's history, astronomy was performed on-ground in the optical energy range. It was only when space-based missions, built more than 50 years ago, detected photons with mind-boggling energies that the exploration of the violent Universe really began. These {gamma}-ray photons still provide us with an unprecedented wealth of information for the most energetic processes taking place in the cosmos. Faithful to the olympic slogan ''higher, faster, further'', an increasing armada of {gamma}-ray satellites was built and launched over the last couple of decades with Fermi being the youngest of its kind. In this thesis, I use data from the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi satellite. The focus of this work lies on three very different classes of high-energy astrophysical transients: Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), solar flares and Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs). In Chapter 2, I present GRB 091024A, a burst of very long duration in {gamma}-rays where optical data could be acquired well during its active phase. The optical light curve shows very intriguing features which I subsequently interpret as the so called ''optical flash'', a fundamental property of the ''fireball'' model. Although predicted by the latter model, only a handful of GRBs show such a behavior, making them interesting transients to study. Furthermore, I present the fundamental temporal and spectral properties of 47 GBM-detected GRBs with known redshifts. As GRBs explode at cosmological distances it is of uttermost importance to study them in their restframe to get a better understanding of their emission mechanisms. I confirm several correlations already found in the past together with an intriguing connection between redshift and the peak energy (E{sub peak}) of GRBs. Although this correlation is heavily influenced by instrumental effects, it is not unexpected from other experimental results, giving it more credibility

  4. Broadband Spectral Investigations of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lin; Baring, Matthew G; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Younes, George; Watts, Anna L; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT Windowed Timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5 - 200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT/GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbo...

  5. GBM Response Matrix FITS Files

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time-dependent detector response matrices for each GBM detector covering the duration of every GBM flare. Needed in the spectral analysis software to relate observed...

  6. FERMIGTRIG - Fermi GBM Trigger Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by one or more of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO). Note that there are two Browse catalogs resulting from GBM...

  7. The gamma-ray burst monitor for Lobster-ISS

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, L; Auricchio, N; Caroli, E; Basili, A; Bogliolo, A; Domenico, G D; Franceschini, T; Guidorzi, C; Landini, G; Masetti, N; Montanari, E; Orlandini, M; Palazzi, E; Silvestri, S; Stephen, J B; Ventura, G

    2006-01-01

    Lobster-ISS is an X-ray all-sky monitor experiment selected by ESA two years ago for a Phase A study (now almost completed) for a future flight (2009) aboard the Columbus Exposed Payload Facility of the International Space Station. The main instrument, based on MCP optics with Lobster-eye geometry, has an energy passband from 0.1 to 3.5 keV, an unprecedented daily sensitivity of 2x10^{-12} erg cm^{-2}s$^{-1}, and it is capable to scan, during each orbit, the entire sky with an angular resolution of 4--6 arcmin. This X-ray telescope is flanked by a Gamma Ray Burst Monitor, with the minimum requirement of recognizing true GRBs from other transient events. In this paper we describe the GRBM. In addition to the minimum requirement, the instrument proposed is capable to roughly localize GRBs which occur in the Lobster FOV (162x22.5 degrees) and to significantly extend the scientific capabilities of the main instrument for the study of GRBs and X-ray transients. The combination of the two instruments will allow an ...

  8. BROADBAND SPECTRAL INVESTIGATIONS OF SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander; Watts, Anna L. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gruber, David; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Younes, George [USRA, National Space Science and Technology Center, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, Neil, E-mail: linlin@sabanciuniv.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  9. Broadband Spectral Investigations of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Baring, Matthew G.; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Younes, George; Watts, Anna L.; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  10. Real-Time Supernova Neutrino Burst Monitor at Super-Kamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Hayato, Y; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Tanaka, H; Tomura, T; Ueno, K; Wendell, R A; Yokozawa, T; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kametani, I; Kaneyuki, K; Lee, K P; McLachlan, T; Nishimura, Y; Richard, E; Okumura, K; Labarga, L; Fernandez, P; Berkman, S; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Gustafson, J; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Carminati, G; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Weatherly, P; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Takhistov, V; Ganezer, K S; Hartfiel, B L; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Akiri, T; Himmel, A; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Bronner, C; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Ieki, K; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Murakami, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Takahashi, S; Tateishi, K; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Mijakowski, P; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Yanagisawa, C; Wilking, M J; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Yamaguchi, R; Yano, T; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Suda, Y; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; de Perio, P; Konaka, A; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Connolly, K; Wilkes, R J

    2016-01-01

    We present a real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande (SK). Detecting supernova explosions by neutrinos in real time is crucial for giving a clear picture of the explosion mechanism. Since the neutrinos are expected to come earlier than light, a fast broadcasting of the detection may give astronomers a chance to make electromagnetic radiation observations of the explosions right at the onset. The role of the monitor includes a fast announcement of the neutrino burst detection to the world and a determination of the supernova direction. We present the online neutrino burst detection system and studies of the direction determination accuracy based on simulations at SK.

  11. Remote monitoring within the framework of rock burst prevention. Fernueberwachung in der Gebirgsschlagverhuetung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahnekamp, H.G.; Koenig, W.; Kuzia, M.

    1991-12-12

    The DMT Institute for Rock Control and Backfilling of Cavities has developed a technically simple remote monitoring system for use within the framwork of rock burst prevention. With this system coal faces can be continuously monitored even under difficult underground conditions without serious operating problems. For the monitoring the variables measured underground, viz. rock pressure, rock movement and deformation of test boreholes, are transmitted via the telecommunication network of the colliery to a computer on the surface, where they are evaluated online with regard to recognition of a rock burst hazard. Display of the actual monitoring situation on the computer screen permits immediate initiation of safety measures in the event of danger. (orig.).

  12. Time resolved spectroscopy of SGR J1550–5418 bursts detected with Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, G. [Universities Space Research Association, 6767 Old Madison Pike, Suite 450, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); Kouveliotou, C.; Collazzi, A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J.; Watts, A. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Van der Klis, M.; Van Putten, T. [Astronomical Institute " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Raánana 43537 (Israel); Bhat, P. N.; Gorgone, N. [University of Alabama in Huntsville CSPAR, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, N.; Mcenery, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y.; Lin, L. [Sabancı University, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Gruber, D.; Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Grunblatt, S. [University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2500 Campus Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2014-04-10

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550–5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E {sub peak}, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ∼ – 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10{sup –5} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. Above this flux value, the E {sub peak}–flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ∼1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area–kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R {sup 2}∝kT {sup –4}, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10{sup –5.5} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R {sub max} ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R {sub max} as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550–5418, B {sub int} ≳ 4.5 × 10{sup 15} G.

  13. Improved limits on sterile neutrino dark matter from full-sky observations by the Fermi-GBM

    CERN Document Server

    Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Gaskins, Jennifer M; Smith, Miles; Preece, Robert

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, we use the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board the Fermi satellite to search for sterile neutrino decay lines in the energy range 10-25 keV corresponding to sterile neutrino mass range 20-50 keV. This energy range has been out of reach of traditional X-ray satellites such as Chandra, Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and gamma-ray satellites such as INTEGRAL. Furthermore, the extremely wide field of view of the GBM opens a large fraction of the Milky Way dark matter halo to be probed. We start with 1601 days worth of GBM data, implement stringent data cuts, and perform two simple line search analyses on the reduced data: in the first, the line flux is limited without background modeling, and in the second, the background is modeled as a power-law. We find no significant excess lines in both our searches. We set new limits on sterile neutrino mixing angles, improving on previous limits by approximately an order of magnitude. Better understanding of detector and astrophysical backgrounds, as well as de...

  14. $Fermi$ GBM Observations of V404 Cyg During its 2015 Outburst

    CERN Document Server

    Jenke, P A; Homan, Jeroen; Veres, P; Briggs, M S; Burns, E; Connaughton, V; Finger, M H; Hui, M

    2016-01-01

    V404 Cygni was discovered in 1989 by the $Ginga$ X-ray satellite during its only previously observed X-ray outburst and soon after confirmed as a black hole binary. On June 15, 2015, the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) triggered on a new outburst of V404 Cygni. We present 13 days of GBM observations of this latest outburst including Earth occultation flux measurements, spectral and temporal analysis. The Earth occultation fluxes reached 30 Crab with detected emission to 100 keV and determined, via hardness ratios, that the source was in a hard state. At high luminosity, spectral analysis between 8 and 300 keV showed that the electron temperature decreased with increasing luminosity. This is expected if the protons and electrons are in thermal equilibrium during an outburst with the electrons cooled by the Compton scattering of softer seed photons from the disk. However, the implied seed photon temperatures are unusually high, suggesting a contribution from another source, such as the jet. No evidence of state t...

  15. Probing the Nature of Short Swift Bursts via Deep INTEGRAL Monitoring of GRB 050925

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barbier, L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from Swift, XMM-Newton, and deep INTEGRAL monitoring in the region of GRB 050925. This short Swift burst is a candidate for a newly discovered soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) with the following observational burst properties: 1) galactic plane (b=-0.1 deg) localization, 2) 150 msec duration, and 3) a blackbody rather than a simple power-law spectral shape (with a significance level of 97%). We found two possible X-ray counterparts of GRB 050925 by comparing the X-ray images from Swift XRT and XMM-Newton. Both X-ray sources show the transient behavior with a power-law decay index shallower than -1. We found no hard X-ray emission nor any additional burst from the location of GRB 050925 in approximately 5 Ms of INTEGRAL data. We discuss about the three BATSE short bursts which might be associated with GRB 050925, based on their location and the duration. Assuming GRB 050925 is associated with the H(sub II), regions (W 58) at the galactic longitude of 1=70 deg, we also discuss the source frame properties of GRB 050925.

  16. Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longo, Francesco, E-mail: francesco.longo@ts.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Trieste and INFN, sezione di Trieste, via Valerio 2, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Vianello, Giacomo; Omodei, Nicola [Stanford University (HEPL), 452 Lomita Mall, Stanford, CA 94205 (United States); Piron, Frederic; Vasilieou, Vlasios [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite de Montpellier II, CNRS/IN2P3, CC72, Place E. Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Razzaque, Soebur [Department of Physics, University of Johannesburg, P.O. Box 524, Auckland Park 2006 (South Africa)

    2014-04-01

    The Fermi observatory, with its Gamma-ray Bursts Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT), is observing Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) with a very large spectral coverage and unprecedented sensitivity, from ∼10keV to >300GeV. In the first 3 years of the mission it observed emission above 100 MeV from 35 GRBs. In this paper we review the main results obtained on such a sample, highlighting also the relationships with the low-energy spectral and temporal features (as measured by the GBM). Some recent results on high energy photons from GRBs obtained with the preliminary Pass 8 new event-level reconstruction will be discussed.

  17. Synchrotron Cooling in Energetic Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; van Eerten, Hendrik; Burgess, J Michael; Bhat, P Narayana; Briggs, Michael S; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Goldstein, Adam; Gruber, David; Jenke, Peter A; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Paciesas, William S; Pelassa, Veronique; Preece, Robert D; Roberts, Oliver J; Zhang, Bin-Bin

    2014-01-01

    We study the time-resolved spectra of eight GRBs observed by Fermi GBM in its first five years of mission, with 1 keV - 1 MeV fluence $f>1.0\\times10^{-4}$ erg cm$^{-2}$ and signal-to-noise level $\\text{S/N}\\geq10.0$ above 900 keV. We aim to constrain in detail the spectral properties of GRB prompt emission on a time-resolved basis and to discuss the theoretical implications of the fitting results in the context of various prompt emission models. We perform time-resolved spectral analysis using a variable temporal binning technique according to optimal S/N criteria, resulting in a total of 299 time-resolved spectra. We fit the Band function to all spectra and obtain the distributions for the low-energy power-law index $\\alpha$, the high-energy power-law index $\\beta$, the peak energy in the observed $\

  18. Analysis of Precursors Prior to Rock Burst in Granite Tunnel Using Acoustic Emission and Far Infrared Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengzhao Liang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To understand the physical mechanism of the anomalous behaviors observed prior to rock burst, the acoustic emission (AE and far infrared (FIR techniques were applied to monitor the progressive failure of a rock tunnel model subjected to biaxial stresses. Images of fracturing process, temperature changes of the tunnel, and spatiotemporal serials of acoustic emission were simultaneously recorded during deformation of the model. The b-value derived from the amplitude distribution data of AE was calculated to predict the tunnel rock burst. The results showed that the vertical stress enhanced the stability of the tunnel, and the tunnels with higher confining pressure demonstrated a more abrupt and strong rock burst. Abnormal temperature changes around the wall were observed prior to the rock burst of the tunnel. Analysis of the AE events showed that a sudden drop and then a quiet period could be considered as the precursors to forecast the rock burst hazard. Statistical analysis indicated that rock fragment spalling occurred earlier than the abnormal temperature changes, and the abnormal temperature occurred earlier than the descent of the AE b-value. The analysis indicated that the temperature changes were more sensitive than the AE b-value changes to predict the tunnel rock bursts.

  19. Awakening the BALROG (BAyesian Location Reconstruction Of GRBs): A new paradigm in spectral and location analysis of gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, J Michael; Greiner, Jochen; Mortlock, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    The accurate spatial location of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is crucial for both producing a detector response matrix (DRM) and follow-up observations by other instruments. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has the largest field of view (FOV) for detecting GRBs as it views the entire unocculted sky, but as a non-imaging instrument it relies on the relative count rates observed in each of its 14 detectors to localize transients. Improving its ability to accurately locate GRBs and other transients is vital to the paradigm of multi-messenger astronomy, including the electromagnetic follow-up of gravitational wave signals. Here we present the BAyesian Location Reconstruction Of GRBs ({\\tt BALROG}) method for localizing and characterising GBM transients. Our approach eliminates the systematics of previous approaches by simultaneously fitting for the location and spectrum of a source. It also correctly incorporates the uncertainties in the location of a transient into the spectral parameters and produces reliable...

  20. Implication of the association between GBM transient 150914 and LIGO Gravitational Wave event GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xiang; Yuan, Qiang; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Liu, Si-Ming; Wei, Da-Ming

    2016-01-01

    On September 14, 2015 the two detectors of LIGO simultaneously detected a transient gravitational-wave signal GW150914 and the Fermi GBM observations found a weak short gamma-ray burst (SGRB)-like transient (i.e., the GBM transient 150914). The time and location coincidences favor the association between GW150904 and GBM transient 150914. We compared GBM transient 150914 with other SGRBs and found that such an event is indeed a distinct outlier in the $E_{\\rm p,rest}-E_{\\rm iso}$ and $E_{\\rm p,rest}-L_{\\gamma}$ diagrams ($E_{\\rm iso}$ is the isotropic-equivalent energy, $L_\\gamma$ is the luminosity and $E_{\\rm p,rest}$ is the rest frame peak energy of the prompt emission), possibly due to its specific binary-black-hole merger origin. However, the presence of a "new" group of SGRBs with "low" $L_\\gamma$ and $E_{\\rm iso}$ but high $E_{\\rm p,rest}$ is also possible. If the outflow of GBM transient 150914 was launched by the accretion onto the nascent black hole, we estimate the accretion disk mass to be $\\sim 10...

  1. ALFABURST: A realtime fast radio burst monitor for the Arecibo telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth; MacMahon, David; Armour, Wes; Cobb, Jeff; Lorimer, Duncan; Rajwade, Kaustubh; Siemion, Andrew; Werthimer, Dan; Williams, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) constitute an emerging class of fast radio transient whose origin continues to be a mystery. Realizing the importance of increasing coverage of the search parameter space, we have designed, built, and deployed a realtime monitor for FRBs at the 305-m Arecibo radio telescope. Named 'ALFABURST', it is a commensal instrument that is triggered whenever the 1.4 GHz seven-beam Arecibo $L$-Band Feed Array (ALFA) receiver commences operation. The ongoing commensal survey we are conducting using ALFABURST has an instantaneous field of view of 0.02 sq. deg. within the FWHM of the beams, with the realtime software configurable to use up to 300 MHz of bandwidth. We search for FRBs with dispersion measure up to 2560 cm$^{-3}$ pc and pulse widths ranging from 0.128 ms to 16.384 ms. Commissioning observations performed over the past few months have demonstrated the capability of the instrument in detecting single pulses from known pulsars. In this paper, I describe the instrument and the associated ...

  2. Expectations for Joint Gravitational Wave-Electromagnetic Detections with Advanced LIGO/Virgo and the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, E.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Hamburg, R.; Littenberg, T.

    2016-10-01

    We estimate the fraction of GBM detected short GRBs that should be detectable by Advanced LIGO/Virgo. We also look at the fraction of GW localizations that should be visible to GBM, as well as area reduction by using joint localizations.

  3. Anti-GBM Disease in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Muqeet Adnan MD

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM disease presenting during pregnancy is uncommon. We present a case of a pregnant female who presented with acute renal failure requiring dialysis due to anti-GBM disease. She responded well to plasma exchange, high-dose steroids, and hemodialysis. Cyclophosphamide was discussed but not given at the patient’s request due to concerns for the well-being of the fetus. Unfortunately, she suffered a spontaneous abortion in her eighth week of pregnancy. Subsequently, she had progressive improvement in her renal function and became hemodialysis independent at 2 weeks after diagnosis. Her renal function returned to baseline 3 months after diagnosis. We present this case in detail and review the literature regarding anti-GBM disease in pregnancy.

  4. Real-time monitoring of oxidative burst from single plant protoplasts using microelectrochemical sensors modified by platinum nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Feng; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Shu-Hui; Liu, Sheng-Yi; Wei, Fang; Dong, Xu-Yan; Cheng, Jie-Ke; Huang, Wei-Hua

    2009-10-15

    Oxidative bursts from plants play significant roles in plant disease defense and signal transduction; however, it has not hitherto been investigated on individual living plant cells. In this article, we fabricated a novel sensitive electrochemical sensor based on electrochemical deposition of Pt nanoparticles on the surface of carbon fiber microdisk electrodes via a nanopores containing polymer matrix, Nafion. The numerous hydrophilic nanochannels in the Nafion clusters coated on the electrode surface served as the molecular template for the deposition and dispersion of Pt, which resulted in the uniform construction of small Pt nanoparticles. The novel sensor displayed a high sensitivity for detection of H(2)O(2) with a detection limit of 5.0 x 10(-9) M. With the use of this microelectrochemical sensor, the oxidative burst from individual living plant protoplasts have been real-time monitored for the first time. The results showed that oxidative burst from single protoplasts triggered by a pathogen analogue were characterized by quanta release with a large number of "transient oxidative microburst" events, and protoplasts from the transgenic plants biologically displayed better disease-resistance and showed a distinguished elevation and longer-lasting oxidative burst.

  5. THE FIRST FERMI-LAT GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M. [Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron DESY, D-15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Ajello, M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, 7 Gauss Way, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Asano, K. [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro City, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baldini, L. [Università di Pisa and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Ballet, J. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Université Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Bastieri, D. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Bechtol, K.; Bloom, E. D. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Bhat, P. N. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Bissaldi, E. [Institut für Astro- und Teilchenphysik and Institut für Theoretische Physik, Leopold-Franzens-Universität Innsbruck, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Bonamente, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Bonnell, J.; Brandt, T. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Bouvier, A., E-mail: nicola.omodei@stanford.edu, E-mail: giacomov@slac.stanford.edu [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); and others

    2013-11-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy (∼> 20 MeV) γ-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above ∼20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  6. The First FERMI-LAT Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Bonnell, J.; Bouvier, A.; Brandt, T. J.; Bregeon, J.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Burgess, J. Michael; Buson, S.; Byrne, D.; Caliandro, G. A.; Ferrara, E. C.; Gehrels, N.; Guiriec, S.; McEnery, J. E.; Nemmen, R.; Perkins, J. S.; Racusin, J. L.; Thompson, D. J.; Kouveliotou, C.

    2013-01-01

    In three years of observations since the beginning of nominal science operations in 2008 August, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope has observed high-energy great than (20 MeV) gamma-ray emission from 35 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Among these, 28 GRBs have been detected above 100 MeV and 7 GRBs above approximately 20 MeV. The first Fermi-LAT catalog of GRBs is a compilation of these detections and provides a systematic study of high-energy emission from GRBs for the first time. To generate the catalog, we examined 733 GRBs detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi and processed each of them using the same analysis sequence. Details of the methodology followed by the LAT collaboration for the GRB analysis are provided. We summarize the temporal and spectral properties of the LAT-detected GRBs. We also discuss characteristics of LAT-detected emission such as its delayed onset and longer duration compared with emission detected by the GBM, its power-law temporal decay at late times, and the fact that it is dominated by a power-law spectral component that appears in addition to the usual Band model.

  7. TCGA Workshop: Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) - TCGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) and National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) held a workshop entitled, “Genomics and Biology of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM),” to review the initial GBM data from the TCGA pilot project.

  8. Methods and results of a search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts using the GEO600, LIGO, and Virgo detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Augustus, H; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castaldi, G; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, J; Hall, E D; Hamilton, W; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Harms, J; 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Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, D Nanda; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Lee, P J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Roux, A Le; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lopez, E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Ma, Y; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Maga\; Magee, R; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N M; Mansell, G; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A H; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Omar, S; Oppermann, P; Oram, R; O'Reilly, B; Ortega, W; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; 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Stebbins, J; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Stops, D; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tao, J; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; Tellez, G; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Tshilumba, D; Tuennermann, H; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wolovick, N; Worden, J; Wu, Y; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J; Cain, J; Fotopoulos, N; Gill, C; Jones, G; Patel, P; Rogstad, S; Trias, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz-1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. We introduce the method of a linear search grid to analyse GRB events with large sky localisation uncertainties such as the localisations provided by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Coherent searches for gravitational waves (GWs) can be computationally intensive when the GRB sky position is not well-localised, due to the corrections required for the difference in arrival time between detectors. Using a linear search grid we are able to reduce the computational cost of the analysis by a factor of O(10) for GBM events. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our analysis pipeline can improve upon the sky localisation of GRBs detected by the GBM, if a high-frequency GW signal is observed in coincidence. We use the linear search grid method in a search for GWs associated with 129 GRBs observed...

  9. Sub-MeV Band Observation of a Hard Burst from AXP 1E 1547.0-5408 with the Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Yasuda, Tetsuya; Tashiro, Makoto S; Terada, Yukikatsu; Kouzu, Tomomi; Enoto, Teruaki; Nakagawa, Yujin E; Bamba, Aya; Urata, Yuji; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Ohno, Masanori; Shibata, Sinpei; Makishima, Kazuo

    2015-01-01

    The 2.1-s anomalous X-ray pulsar 1E 1547.0-5408 exhibited an X-ray outburst on 2009 January 22, emitting a large number of short bursts. The wide-band all- sky monitor (WAM) on-board Suzaku detected at least 254 bursts in the 160keV-6.2MeV band over the period of January 22 00:57-17:02 UT from the direction of 1E 1547.0-5408. One of these bursts, which occurred at 06:45:13, produced the brightest fluence in the 0.5-6.2MeV range, with an averaged 0.16-6.2MeV flux and extrapolated 25 keV-2 MeV fluence of about 3x10-6 erg cm-2 s-1 and about 3x10-4 erg cm-2, respectively. After pile-up corrections, the time-resolved WAM spectra of this burst were well-fitted in the 0.16-6.2MeV range by two-component models; specifically, a blackbody plus an optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung or a combination of a blackbody and a power-law component with an exponential cutoff. These results are compared with previous works reporting the persistent emission and weaker short bursts followed by the same outburst.

  10. Fully automatic GBM segmentation in the TCGA-GBM dataset: Prognosis and correlation with VASARI features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Velazquez, Emmanuel; Meier, Raphael; Dunn, William D; Alexander, Brian; Wiest, Roland; Bauer, Stefan; Gutman, David A; Reyes, Mauricio; Aerts, Hugo J W L

    2015-11-18

    Reproducible definition and quantification of imaging biomarkers is essential. We evaluated a fully automatic MR-based segmentation method by comparing it to manually defined sub-volumes by experienced radiologists in the TCGA-GBM dataset, in terms of sub-volume prognosis and association with VASARI features. MRI sets of 109 GBM patients were downloaded from the Cancer Imaging archive. GBM sub-compartments were defined manually and automatically using the Brain Tumor Image Analysis (BraTumIA). Spearman's correlation was used to evaluate the agreement with VASARI features. Prognostic significance was assessed using the C-index. Auto-segmented sub-volumes showed moderate to high agreement with manually delineated volumes (range (r): 0.4 - 0.86). Also, the auto and manual volumes showed similar correlation with VASARI features (auto r = 0.35, 0.43 and 0.36; manual r = 0.17, 0.67, 0.41, for contrast-enhancing, necrosis and edema, respectively). The auto-segmented contrast-enhancing volume and post-contrast abnormal volume showed the highest AUC (0.66, CI: 0.55-0.77 and 0.65, CI: 0.54-0.76), comparable to manually defined volumes (0.64, CI: 0.53-0.75 and 0.63, CI: 0.52-0.74, respectively). BraTumIA and manual tumor sub-compartments showed comparable performance in terms of prognosis and correlation with VASARI features. This method can enable more reproducible definition and quantification of imaging based biomarkers and has potential in high-throughput medical imaging research.

  11. Comparative analyses of gene copy number and mRNA expression in GBM tumors and GBM xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgson, J. Graeme; Yeh, Ru-Fang; Ray, Amrita; Wang, Nicholas J.; Smirnov, Ivan; Yu, Mamie; Hariono, Sujatmi; Silber, Joachim; Feiler, Heidi S.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.; Vandenberg, Scott R.; Berger, Mitchel S.; James, C. David

    2009-04-03

    Development of model systems that recapitulate the molecular heterogeneity observed among glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) tumors will expedite the testing of targeted molecular therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment. In this study, we profiled DNA copy number and mRNA expression in 21 independent GBM tumor lines maintained as subcutaneous xenografts (GBMX), and compared GBMX molecular signatures to those observed in GBM clinical specimens derived from the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). The predominant copy number signature in both tumor groups was defined by chromosome-7 gain/chromosome-10 loss, a poor-prognosis genetic signature. We also observed, at frequencies similar to that detected in TCGA GBM tumors, genomic amplification and overexpression of known GBM oncogenes, such as EGFR, MDM2, CDK6, and MYCN, and novel genes, including NUP107, SLC35E3, MMP1, MMP13, and DDX1. The transcriptional signature of GBMX tumors, which was stable over multiple subcutaneous passages, was defined by overexpression of genes involved in M phase, DNA replication, and chromosome organization (MRC) and was highly similar to the poor-prognosis mitosis and cell-cycle module (MCM) in GBM. Assessment of gene expression in TCGA-derived GBMs revealed overexpression of MRC cancer genes AURKB, BIRC5, CCNB1, CCNB2, CDC2, CDK2, and FOXM1, which form a transcriptional network important for G2/M progression and/or checkpoint activation. Our study supports propagation of GBM tumors as subcutaneous xenografts as a useful approach for sustaining key molecular characteristics of patient tumors, and highlights therapeutic opportunities conferred by this GBMX tumor panel for testing targeted therapeutic strategies for GBM treatment.

  12. Anti-GBM disease and renal vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Phillippa; Sarfraz, Farook; Ravanan, Rommel

    2011-11-15

    A 23-year-old female who presented with advanced renal failure was subsequently diagnosed with renal vein thrombosis and antiglomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibody disease. A previous case of renal vein thrombosis has been reported in association with anti-GBM disease, but to our knowledge, this is the first reported case in which the presentation of anti-GBM disease and renal vein thrombosis was concurrent. Further study is essential to understand if the association of anti-GBM disease and renal vein thrombosis as seen in our case was pure coincidence or is in fact occurs more frequently. It may be that the dual diagnosis is not made as establishing one sufficient diagnosis for renal failure may halt further investigations for additional diagnoses.

  13. GBM heterogeneity characterization by radiomic analysis of phenotype anatomical planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaddad, Ahmad; Desrosiers, Christian; Toews, Matthew

    2016-03-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common malignant primary tumor of the central nervous system, characterized among other traits by rapid metastatis. Three tissue phenotypes closely associated with GBMs, namely, necrosis (N), contrast enhancement (CE), and edema/invasion (E), exhibit characteristic patterns of texture heterogeneity in magnetic resonance images (MRI). In this study, we propose a novel model to characterize GBM tissue phenotypes using gray level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) in three anatomical planes. The GLCM encodes local image patches in terms of informative, orientation-invariant texture descriptors, which are used here to sub-classify GBM tissue phenotypes. Experiments demonstrate the model on MRI data of 41 GBM patients, obtained from the cancer genome atlas (TCGA). Intensity-based automatic image registration is applied to align corresponding pairs of fixed T1˗weighted (T1˗WI) post-contrast and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. GBM tissue regions are then segmented using the 3D Slicer tool. Texture features are computed from 12 quantifier functions operating on GLCM descriptors, that are generated from MRI intensities within segmented GBM tissue regions. Various classifier models are used to evaluate the effectiveness of texture features for discriminating between GBM phenotypes. Results based on T1-WI scans showed a phenotype classification accuracy of over 88.14%, a sensitivity of 85.37% and a specificity of 96.1%, using the linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. This model has the potential to provide important characteristics of tumors, which can be used for the sub-classification of GBM phenotypes.

  14. Burst and Outburst Characteristics of Magnetar 4U 0142+61

    CERN Document Server

    Gogus, Ersin; Roberts, Oliver J; Chakraborty, Manoneeta; Kaneko, Yuki; Gill, Ramandeep; Granot, Jonathan; van der Horst, Alexander J; Watts, Anna L; Baring, Matthew; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Younes, George

    2016-01-01

    We have compiled the most comprehensive burst sample from magnetar 4U 0142+61, comprising 27 bursts from its three burst-active episodes in 2011, 2012 and the latest one in 2015 observed with Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM. Bursts from 4U 0142+61 morphologically resemble typical short bursts from other magnetars. However, 4U 0142+61 bursts are less energetic compared to the bulk of magnetar bursts. We uncovered an extended tail emission following a burst on 2015 February 28, with a thermal nature, cooling over a time-scale of several minutes. During this tail emission, we also uncovered pulse peak phase aligned X-ray bursts , which could originate from the same underlying mechanism as that of the extended burst tail, or an associated and spatially coincident but different mechanism.

  15. Visualizing molecular profiles of glioblastoma with GBM-BioDP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orieta Celiku

    Full Text Available Validation of clinical biomarkers and response to therapy is a challenging topic in cancer research. An important source of information for virtual validation is the datasets generated from multi-center cancer research projects such as The Cancer Genome Atlas project (TCGA. These data enable investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes responsible for cancer onset and progression, response to cancer therapies, and discovery of the molecular profiles of various cancers. However, these analyses often require bulk download of data and substantial bioinformatics expertise, which can be intimidating for investigators. Here, we report on the development of a new resource available to scientists: a data base called Glioblastoma Bio Discovery Portal (GBM-BioDP. GBM-BioDP is a free web-accessible resource that hosts a subset of the glioblastoma TCGA data and enables an intuitive query and interactive display of the resultant data. This resource provides visualization tools for the exploration of gene, miRNA, and protein expression, differential expression within the subtypes of GBM, and potential associations with clinical outcome, which are useful for virtual biological validation. The tool may also enable generation of hypotheses on how therapies impact GBM molecular profiles, which can help in personalization of treatment for optimal outcome. The resource can be accessed freely at http://gbm-biodp.nci.nih.gov (a tutorial is included.

  16. Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: A Short Hard Gamma-Ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-Law Component from 10 keV to GeV Energies

    CERN Document Server

    LAT, The Fermi

    2010-01-01

    We present detailed observations of the bright short-hard gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi observatory. GRB 090510 is the first burst detected by the LAT that shows strong evidence for a deviation from a Band spectral fitting function during the prompt emission phase. The time-integrated spectrum is fit by the sum of a Band function with $\\Epeak = 3.9\\pm 0.3$\\,MeV, which is the highest yet measured, and a hard power-law component with photon index $-1.62\\pm 0.03$ that dominates the emission below $\\approx$\\,20\\,keV and above $\\approx$\\,100\\,MeV. The onset of the high-energy spectral component appears to be delayed by $\\sim$\\,0.1\\,s with respect to the onset of a component well fit with a single Band function. A faint GBM pulse and a LAT photon are detected 0.5\\,s before the main pulse. During the prompt phase, the LAT detected a photon with energy $30.5^{+5.8}_{-2.6}$ GeV, the highest ever measured from a short GRB. Observ...

  17. Discovery and Monitoring of the likely IR Counterpart of SGR 1806-20 during the 2004 gamma-ray burst-active state

    CERN Document Server

    Israel, G L; Mignani, R; Stella, L; Marconi, G; Testa, V; Mereghetti, S; Campana, S; Rea, N; Gotz, D; Perna, R; Curto, G L; Israel, GianLuca; Covino, Stefano; Mignani, Roberto; Stella, Luigi; Marconi, Gianni; Testa, Vincenzo; Mereghetti, Sandro; Campana, Sergio; Rea, Nanda; Gotz, Diego; Perna, Rosalba; Curto, Gaspare Lo

    2005-01-01

    The sky region including the Chandra position of SGR 1806-20 was monitored in the IR band during 2004, following its increased high energy bursting activity. Observations were performed using NAOS-CONICA, the adaptive optics IR camera mounted on Yepun VLT, which provided images of unprecedented quality (FWHM better than 0.1"). After the 2004 December 27th giant flare, the source position has been nailed by VLA observations of its radio counterpart, reducing the positional uncertainty to 0.04". Using IR data from our monitoring campaign, we discovered the likely IR counterpart to SGR 1806-20 based on positional coincidence with the Chandra and VLA uncertainty regions and flux variability of a factor of about 2 correlated with that at higher energies. We compare our findings with other isolated neutron star classes thought to be related, at some level, with SGRs.

  18. Recruitment of bone marrow derived cells during anti-angiogenic therapy in GBM : Bone marrow derived cell in GBM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, Jennifer C.; Walenkamp, Annemiek M. E.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly vascular tumor characterized by rapid and invasive tumor growth, followed by oxygen depletion, hypoxia and neovascularization, which generate a network of disorganized, tortuous and permeable vessels. Recruitment of bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) is crucial for vascu

  19. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxham, Amanda

    central engine activity and compare the model results with the observational data. We show that the observed X-ray flare phenomenology can be explained within the internal shock model. The number, width and occurring time of flares are then used to diagnose the central engine activity, putting constraints on the energy, ejection time, width and number of ejected shells. We find that the observed X-ray flare time history generally reflects the time history of the central engine, which reactivates multiple times after the prompt emission phase with progressively reduced energy. This shell model code can be used to constrain broadband observations of GRB 090926A, which showed two flares in both the Swift UVOT and XRT bands. Using the prompt emission fluence to constrain the total energy contained in the blastwave, the internal shock model requires that Lorentz factors of the shells causing flares must be less than the Lorentz factor of the blastwave when the shells are ejected. Recent observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) revealed a power law decay feature of the high energy emission (above 100 MeV), which led to the suggestion that it originates from an external shock. We analyze four GRBs (080916C, 090510, 090902B and 090926A) jointly detected by Fermi LAT and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), which have high quality lightcurves in both instrument energy bands. Using the MeV prompt emission (GBM) data, we can record the energy output from the central engine as a function of time. Assuming a constant radiative efficiency, we are able to track energy accumulation in the external shock using our internal/external shell model code and show that the late time lightcurves fit well within the external shock model, but the early time lightcurves are dominated by the internal shock component which has a shallow decay phase due to the initial pile-up of shells onto the blast wave.

  20. Methods and results of a search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts using the GEO 600, LIGO, and Virgo detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Amariutei, D.; Andersen, M.; Anderson, R. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Augustus, H.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Bauer, Th. S.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Beker, M. G.; Belczynski, C.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Bergmann, G.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonelli, L.; Bonnand, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Boschi, V.; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Bridges, D. O.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brückner, F.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Burman, R.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cain, J.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannon, K. C.; Canuel, B.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Carbognani, F.; Carbone, L.; Caride, S.; Castaldi, G.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Celerier, C.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, J. A.; Clayton, J. H.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C.; Colombini, M.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Croce, R. P.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Dattilo, V.; Daveloza, H.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Dayanga, T.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dolique, V.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Endrőczi, G.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Feroz, F.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Finn, L. S.; Fiori, I.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fotopoulos, N.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frede, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S.; Garufi, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, C.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gouaty, R.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grover, K.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guido, C. J.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Ha, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hamilton, W.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Haris, K.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Horrom, T.; Hoske, D.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jaranowski, P.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karlen, J.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, D. Nanda; Kumar, P.; Kumar, R.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, J.; Lee, P. J.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Le Roux, A.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Lodhia, D.; Loew, K.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lopez, E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Ma, Y.; Macdonald, E. P.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R.; Mageswaran, M.; Maglione, C.; Mailand, K.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Manca, G. M.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mangini, N. M.; Mansell, G.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A.; Maros, E.; Marque, J.; Martelli, F.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martinelli, L.; Martynov, D.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; May, G.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McLin, K.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Mehmet, M.; Meidam, J.; Meinders, M.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, M. S.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Minenkov, Y.; Mingarelli, C. M. F.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moe, B.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morgado, N.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nagy, M. F.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, I.; Neri, M.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A. H.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Omar, S.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, R.; O'Reilly, B.; Ortega, W.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Osthelder, C.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Padilla, C.; Pai, A.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Paoletti, F.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Phelps, M.; Pichot, M.; Pickenpack, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poeld, J.; Poggiani, R.; Poteomkin, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Privitera, S.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Rácz, I.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rajalakshmi, G.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramet, C.; Ramirez, K.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Recchia, S.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Reula, O.; Rhoades, E.; Ricci, F.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Roddy, S. B.; Rogstad, S.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Salemi, F.; Sammut, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sanders, J. R.; Sankar, S.; Sannibale, V.; Santiago-Prieto, I.; Saracco, E.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Scheuer, J.; Schilling, R.; Schilman, M.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sidery, T. L.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L.; Singh, R.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith-Lefebvre, N. D.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Souradeep, T.; Staley, A.; Stebbins, J.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Stephens, B. C.; Steplewski, S.; Stevenson, S.; Stone, R.; Stops, D.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Susmithan, S.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tao, J.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taylor, R.; Tellez, G.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trias, M.; Tse, M.; Tshilumba, D.; Tuennermann, H.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; van der Sluys, M. V.; van Heijningen, J.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vincent-Finley, R.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyachanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Ward, R. L.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Wessels, P.; West, M.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Wiesner, K.; Wilkinson, C.; Williams, K.; Williams, L.; Williams, R.; Williams, T. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wiseman, A. G.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Wolovick, N.; Worden, J.; Wu, Y.; Yablon, J.; Yakushin, I.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yang, H.; Yoshida, S.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L.; Zhao, C.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S.; Zweizig, J.; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2014-06-01

    In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz-1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO 600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. We introduce the method of a linear search grid to analyze GRB events with large sky localization uncertainties, for example the localizations provided by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Coherent searches for gravitational waves (GWs) can be computationally intensive when the GRB sky position is not well localized, due to the corrections required for the difference in arrival time between detectors. Using a linear search grid we are able to reduce the computational cost of the analysis by a factor of O(10) for GBM events. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our analysis pipeline can improve upon the sky localization of GRBs detected by the GBM, if a high-frequency GW signal is observed in coincidence. We use the method of the linear grid in a search for GWs associated with 129 GRBs observed satellite-based gamma-ray experiments between 2006 and 2011. The GRBs in our sample had not been previously analyzed for GW counterparts. A fraction of our GRB events are analyzed using data from GEO 600 while the detector was using squeezed-light states to improve its sensitivity; this is the first search for GWs using data from a squeezed-light interferometric observatory. We find no evidence for GW signals, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For each GRB we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, under an assumption of a fixed GW emission energy of 10-2M⊙c2, with a median exclusion distance of 0.8 Mpc for emission at 500 Hz and 0.3 Mpc at 1 kHz. The reduced computational cost associated with a linear search grid will enable rapid searches for GWs associated with Fermi GBM events once the advanced LIGO and Virgo detectors begin operation.

  1. Methods and Results of a Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the GEO 600, LIGO, and Virgo Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; Camp, Jordan B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.; Slutsky, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz-1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. We introduce the method of a linear search grid to analyze GRB events with large sky localization uncertainties such as the localizations provided by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Coherent searches for gravitational waves (GWs) can be computationally intensive when the GRB sky position is not well-localized, due to the corrections required for the difference in arrival time between detectors. Using a linear search grid we are able to reduce the computational cost of the analysis by a factor of O(10) for GBM events. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our analysis pipeline can improve upon the sky localization of GRBs detected by the GBM, if a high-frequency GW signal is observed in coincidence. We use the linear search grid method in a search for GWs associated with 129 GRBs observed satellite-based gamma-ray experiments between 2006 and 2011. The GRBs in our sample had not been previously analyzed for GW counterparts. A fraction of our GRB events are analyzed using data from GEO600 while the detector was using squeezed-light states to improve its sensitivity; this is the first search for GWs using data from a squeezed-light interferometric observatory. We find no evidence for GW signals, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For each GRB we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, assuming a fixed GW emission energy of 10(exp -2)Stellar Mass sq c, with a median exclusion distance of 0.8 Mpc for emission at 500 Hz and 0.3 Mpc at 1 kHz. The reduced computational cost associated with a linear search grid will enable rapid searches for GWs associated with Fermi GBM events in the Advanced detector era.

  2. Classifying Gamma-Ray Bursts with Gaussian Mixture Model

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, En-Bo; Choi, Chul-Sung; Chang, Heon-Young

    2016-01-01

    Using Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) and Expectation Maximization Algorithm, we perform an analysis of time duration ($T_{90}$) for \\textit{CGRO}/BATSE, \\textit{Swift}/BAT and \\textit{Fermi}/GBM Gamma-Ray Bursts. The $T_{90}$ distributions of 298 redshift-known \\textit{Swift}/BAT GRBs have also been studied in both observer and rest frames. Bayesian Information Criterion has been used to compare between different GMM models. We find that two Gaussian components are better to describe the \\textit{CGRO}/BATSE and \\textit{Fermi}/GBM GRBs in the observer frame. Also, we caution that two groups are expected for the \\textit{Swift}/BAT bursts in the rest frame, which is consistent with some previous results. However, \\textit{Swift} GRBs in the observer frame seem to show a trimodal distribution, of which the superficial intermediate class may result from the selection effect of \\textit{Swift}/BAT.

  3. The Synergy of Gamma-Ray Burst Detectors in the GLAST Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous observations by the large number of gamma-ray burst detectors that will operate in the GLAST era will provide the spectra, lightcurves and locations necessary for studying burst physics and testing the putative relations between intrinsic burst properties. I review the burst detection sensitivities, spectral bands, and localization capabilities of the GLAST (GBM and LAT), Swift (BAT), INTEGRAL (ISGRI), Suzaku (wAM), AGILE (Super-AGILE) and wind (Konus) detectors; the detectors' energy band and the accumulation timescale of their trigger system affect their sensitivity to hard vs. soft and long vs. short bursts. In addition, I estimate the rate of simultaneous burst observations. In particular, coordination of the Swift observing plan consistent with Swift's other science objectives could increase the rate of GLAST bursts with redshifts

  4. A Burst to See

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    On 19 March, Nature was particularly generous and provided astronomers with the wealth of four gamma-ray bursts on the same day. But that was not all: one of them is the most luminous object ever observed in the Universe. Despite being located in a distant galaxy, billions of light years away, it was so bright that it could have been seen, for a brief while, with the unaided eye. ESO PR Photo 08a/08 ESO PR Photo 08a/08 The REM Telescope and TORTORA Camera Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. Gamma-ray bursts, which are invisible to our eyes, are discovered by telescopes in space. After releasing their intense burst of high-energy radiation, they become detectable for a short while in the optical and in the near-infrared. This 'afterglow' fades very rapidly, making detailed analysis possible for only a few hours after the gamma-ray detection. This analysis is important in particular in order to determine the GRB's distance and, hence, intrinsic brightness. The gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite. "It was so bright that it almost blinded the Swift instruments for a while," says Guido Chincarini, Italian principal investigator of the mission. A bright optical counterpart was soon identified in the Boötes Constellation (the "Bear Driver" or "Herdsman"). A host of ground-based telescopes reacted promptly to study this new object in the sky. In particular, the optical emission was detected by a few wide-field cameras on telescopes that constantly monitor a large fraction of the sky, including the TORTORA camera in symbiosis with the 0.6-m REM telescope located at La Silla

  5. Follow the BAT: Monitoring Swift BAT FoV for Prompt Optical Emission from Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ukwatta, T N; Dhuga, K S; Gehrels, N

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of implementing a system called 'Follow the BAT' that will coordinate ground-based robotic optical and near infrared (NIR) telescopes to monitor the Swift BAT field-of-view (FoV). The system will optimize the monitoring locations in the BAT FoV based on individual robotic telescopes' location, FoV, sensitivity and local weather conditions. The aim is to perform coordinated BAT FoV monitoring by professional as well as amateur astronomers around the world. The scientific goal of the proposed system is to facilitate detection of prompt optical and NIR emission from GRBs, especially from short duration GRBs. We have performed a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the feasibility of the project.

  6. AI-05IMPACT OF GBM MICROENVIRONMENT ON EXPRESSION PROFILE OF BONE MARROW DERIVED PROGENITOR CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Burrell, Kelly; Singh, Sanjay; Agnihotri, Sameer; Hill, Richard; Aldape, Kenneth; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2014-01-01

    We have recently shown that bone marrow derived cells (BMDC) provide a distinct tumor region dependent contribution to glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) neovascularization. The influence of GBM microenvironment on differentiation and modulation of expression factors by BMDC however remains unknown. In this study we establish the differential expression profile of BMDC as a consequence of recruitment and interaction with the GBM microenvironment and in response to radiation (RTx) and anti-angiogen...

  7. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels;

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  8. X-ray and optical bursts and flares in YSOs: results from a 5-day XMM-Newton monitoring campaign of L1551

    CERN Document Server

    Giardino, G; Micela, G; Reale, F; Sciortino, S; Silva, B

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of a five-day monitoring campaign with XMM-Newton of six X-ray bright young stellar objects (YSOs) in the star-forming complex L1551 in Taurus. All stars present significant variability on the five-day time scale. Modulation of the light curve on time scales comparable with the star's rotational period appeared to be present in the case of one weak-lined T Tauri star. Significant spectral variations between the 2000 and the 2004 observations were detected in the (unresolved) classical T Tauri binary system XZ Tau: a hot plasma component which was present in the X-ray spectrum in 2000 had significantly weakened in 2004. As XZ Tau N was undergoing a strong optical outburst in 2000, which had terminated since then, we speculate on the possible relationship between episodic, burst accretion, and X-ray heating. The transition object HL Tau underwent a strong flare with a complex temperature evolution, which is indicative of an event confined within a very large magnetic structure (few stella...

  9. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Gogus, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Watts, Anna L.; Baring, Matthew G.; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Woods, Peter M.; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D.; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-01-01

    SWift/BAT detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in May 2010 with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least July 2011. Here we present Swift and Fermi/GBM observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T90 durations of the bursts range between 18 - 140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8-25) x 1038 erg, which is in the low side of SGR bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in IE 1841-045 might not involve large scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  10. Burst and Persistent Emission Properties during the Recent Active Episode of the Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 1E 1841-045

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lin; Gogus, Ersin; van der Horst, Alexander J; Watts, Anna L; Baring, Matthew G; Kaneko, Yuki; Wijers, Ralph A M J; Woods, Peter M; Barthelmy, Scott; Burgess, J Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Gehrels, Neil; Goldstein, Adam; Granot, Jonathan; Guiriec, Sylvain; Mcenery, Julie; Preece, Robert D; Tierney, David; van der Klis, Michiel; von Kienlin, Andreas; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2011-01-01

    Swift/BAT detected the first burst from 1E 1841-045 in May 2010 with intermittent burst activity recorded through at least July 2011. Here we present Swift and Fermi/GBM observations of this burst activity and search for correlated changes to the persistent X-ray emission of the source. The T90 durations of the bursts range between 18-140 ms, comparable to other magnetar burst durations, while the energy released in each burst ranges between (0.8 - 25)E38 erg, which is in the low side of SGR bursts. We find that the bursting activity did not have a significant effect on the persistent flux level of the source. We argue that the mechanism leading to this sporadic burst activity in 1E 1841-045 might not involve large scale restructuring (either crustal or magnetospheric) as seen in other magnetar sources.

  11. The Double Firing Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    this nearly head-on alignment to occur is only about once a decade," added his colleague Cristiano Guidorzi. GRB 080319B was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite towards the constellation of Boötes, the "Herdsman". A host of ground-based telescopes reacted promptly to study this new object in the sky, including ESO's Very Large Telescope, which was the first to provide the distance of the object, 7.5 billion light-years. The visible light from the burst was detected by a handful of wide-field cameras worldwide that are mounted on telescopes constantly monitoring a large fraction of the sky. One of these was the TORTORA camera mounted on the 0.6-m REM telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory (ESO 26/07). TORTORA's rapid imaging provides the most detailed look yet at the visible light associated with the initial blast of a gamma-ray burst. "We've been waiting a long time for this one," says TORTORA senior scientist Grigory Beskin of Russia's Special Astrophysical Observatory. The data collected simultaneously by TORTORA and the Swift satellite allowed astronomers to explain the properties of this burst.

  12. Apparent diffusion coefficient in glioblastoma with PNET-like components, a GBM variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Saad; Joseph, Nancy M; Perry, Arie; Barajas, Ramon F; Cha, Soonmee

    2014-09-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) with primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET)-like (GBM-PNET) components is a rare variant of GBM. Recent studies describe PNET-like clinical behavior in these patients-with significantly increased propensity for CSF dissemination and a benefit of "PNET-like" chemotherapy. The imaging appearance of GBM-PNET is not well-described and given areas of marked cellularity in the PNET components one might expect significantly reduced diffusion on MRI. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively evaluate the diffusion characteristics in GBM-PNET and compare them with conventional GBMs. Nine patients with surgical specimens yielding GBM-PNET were identified from the UCSF Pathology files. MR images of these patients were reviewed retrospectively. DWI (diffusion-weighted imaging) sequences were analyzed with multiple regions of interests placed within the tumor, and ADC (apparent diffusion coefficient) values were measured. Results were compared to previously published ADC values in pathology-proven conventional GBM cases from our institution. Reduced ADC was seen in GBM-PNET (mean 581 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s, range 338-817) compared to previously published mean of 1,030 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s in the enhancing components of conventional GBMs. We report substantially reduced ADC values in GBM-PNETs compared to conventional GBMs. If demonstrated in a larger sample, when areas of marked reduced diffusion are seen in a suspected GBM, MRI may appropriately direct tissue sampling and can advocate a thorough search for PNET-like components on histopathology. These patients may have a higher chance of developing CSF dissemination and may benefit from "PNET-like" platinum-based chemotherapy.

  13. Afterglow Observations of Fermi-LAT Gamma-Ray Bursts and the Emerging Class of Hyper-Energetic Events

    CERN Document Server

    Cenko, S B; Harrison, F A; Haislip, J B; Reichart, D E; Butler, N R; Cobb, B E; Cucchiara, A; Berger, E; Bloom, J S; Chandra, P; Fox, D B; Perley, D A; Prochaska, J X; Filippenko, A V; Glazebrook, K; Ivarsen, K M; Kasliwal, M M; Kulkarni, S R; LaCluyze, A P; Lopez, S; Morgan, A N; Pettini, M; Rana, V R

    2010-01-01

    We present broadband (radio, optical, and X-ray) light curves and spectra of the afterglows of four long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs 090323, 090328, 090902B, and 090926A) detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) instruments on the Fermi satellite. With its wide spectral bandpass, extending to GeV energies, Fermi is sensitive to GRBs with very large isotropic energy releases (10e54 erg). Although rare, these events are particularly important for testing GRB central-engine models. When combined with spectroscopic redshifts, our afterglow data for these four events are able to constrain jet collimation angles, the density structure of the circumburst medium, and both the true radiated energy release and the kinetic energy of the outflows. In agreement with our earlier work, we find that the relativistic energy budget of at least one of these events (GRB 090926A) exceeds the canonical value of 10e51 erg by an order of magnitude. Such energies pose a severe challenge for mod...

  14. Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: A Short-Hard Gamma-ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-law Component from 10 keV TO GeV Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Dingus, B. L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Ritz, S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Stecker, F. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present detailed observations of the bright short-hard gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi observatory. GRB 090510 is the first burst detected by the LAT that shows strong evidence for a deviation from a Band spectral fitting function during the prompt emission phase. The time-integrated spectrum is fit by the sum of a Band function with E peak = 3.9 ± 0.3 MeV, which is the highest yet measured, and a hard power-law component with photon index -1.62 ± 0.03 that dominates the emission below ≈20 keV and above ≈100 MeV. The onset of the high-energy spectral component appears to be delayed by ~0.1 s with respect to the onset of a component well fit with a single Band function. A faint GBM pulse and a LAT photon are detected 0.5 s before the main pulse. During the prompt phase, the LAT detected a photon with energy 30.5+5.8 -2.6 GeV, the highest ever measured from a short GRB. Observation of this photon sets a minimum bulk outflow Lorentz factor, Γgsim 1200, using simple γγ opacity arguments for this GRB at redshift z = 0.903 and a variability timescale on the order of tens of ms for the ≈100 keV-few MeV flux. Stricter high confidence estimates imply Γ >~ 1000 and still require that the outflows powering short GRBs are at least as highly relativistic as those of long-duration GRBs. Implications of the temporal behavior and power-law shape of the additional component on synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton, external-shock synchrotron, and hadronic models are considered.

  15. Computer Implementation of a New Therapeutic Model for GBM Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jamali Nazari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the tumor behavior in the host organ as function of time and radiation dose has been a major study in the previous decades. Here the effort in estimation of cancerous and normal cell proliferation and growth in glioblastoma multiform (GBM tumor is presented. This paper introduces a new mathematical model in the form of differential equation of tumor growth. The model contains dose delivery amount in the treatment scheme as an input term. It also can be utilized to optimize the treatment process in order to increase the patient survival period. Gene expression programming (GEP as a new concept is used for estimating this model. The LQ model has also been applied to GEP as an initial value, causing acceleration and improvement of the algorithm estimation. The model shows the number of the tumor and normal brain cells during the treatment process using the status of normal and cancerous cells in the initiation of treatment, the timing and amount of dose delivery to the patient, and a coefficient that describes the brain condition. A critical level is defined for normal cell when the patient’s death occurs. In the end the model has been verified by clinical data obtained from previous accepted formulae and some of our experimental resources. The proposed model helps to predict tumor growth during treatment process in which further treatment processes can be controlled.

  16. Planned search for LIGO-GBM coincidence in the first advanced LIGO data run

    CERN Document Server

    Camp, Jordan; Briggs, Michael; Christensen, Nelson; Connaughton, Valerie; Singer, Leo; Shawhan, Peter; Veitch, John

    2015-01-01

    In the fall of 2015 the first scientific observing run (O1) of the advanced LIGO detectors will be conducted. Based on the recent commissioning progress at the LIGO Hanford and Livingston sites, the gravitational wave detector range for a neutron star binary inspiral is expected to be of order 60 Mpc. We describe here our planning for an O1 search for coincidence between a LIGO gravitational wave detection and a gamma-ray signal from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor. Such a coincidence would constitute measurement of an electromagnetic counterpart to a gravitational wave signal, with significant corresponding scientific benefits, including revealing the central engine powering the gamma-ray burst, enhanced confidence in the event as a genuine astrophysical detection, and a determination of the relative speed of the photon and graviton.

  17. Crescentic Glomerulonephritis with Anti-GBM and p-ANCA Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Javed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We are presenting a case of renal failure with anti-GBM and p-ANCA antibodies positive. Patients with dual antibodies are considered to be a vasculitis-variant of anti-GBM antibody nephritis. These patients may have atypical presentation and it may delay diagnosis and treatment. Recurrence rate is higher in these patients. We reviewed the literature of cases and studies on cresenteric glomerulonephritis with anti-GBM and p-ANCA positive patients. We recommend that patients suspected with pulmonary-renal syndrome should be checked for anti-GBM and p-ANCA antibodies, should undergo renal biopsy and should should have close long term follow up to watch for recurrence.

  18. Demethoxycurcumin Retards Cell Growth and Induces Apoptosis in Human Brain Malignant Glioma GBM 8401 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzuu-Yuan Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Demethoxycurcumin (DMC; a curcumin-related demethoxy compound has been recently shown to display antioxidant and antitumor activities. It has also produced a potent chemopreventive action against cancer. In the present study, the antiproliferation (using the MTT assay, DMC was found to have cytotoxic activities against GBM 8401 cell with IC50 values at 22.71 μM and induced apoptosis effects of DMC have been investigated in human brain malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells. We have studied the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP, DNA fragmentation, caspase activation, and NF-κB transcriptional factor activity. By these approaches, our results indicated that DMC has produced an inhibition of cell proliferation as well as the activation of apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells. Both effects were observed to increase in proportion with the dosage of DMC treatment, and the apoptosis was induced by DMC in human brain malignant glioma GBM 8401 cells via mitochondria- and caspase-dependent pathways.

  19. Dismantling of the EB experiment: Experimental research on the retrieved GBM and bentonite blocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jiang-Feng, E-mail: jeafliu@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory for Geomchanics & Deep Underground Engineering, and School of Mechanics and Civil Engineering, China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China); Laboratoire de Méchanique de Lille (LML), and École Centrale de Lille, BP 48, F-59651 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Skoczylas, Frédéric [Laboratoire de Méchanique de Lille (LML), and École Centrale de Lille, BP 48, F-59651 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Talandier, Jean [ANDRA, 1-7 rue Jean Monnet, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Pu, Hai [State Key Laboratory for Geomchanics & Deep Underground Engineering, and School of Mechanics and Civil Engineering, China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou, Jiangsu 221116 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We present a demonstration of a new concept of HLW (high-level waste) repositories. • The hydro-mechanical characteristics of GBM and blocks were determined. • The water retention curves (WRCs) of GBM and blocks were presented. • The effective gas permeability of the GBM and blocks were measured. • The homogeneity of the GBM and blocks were investigated. - Abstract: The Engineered Barrier Emplacement Experiment in Opalinus Clay (EB experiment) was a full-scale test for the demonstration of a new concept of high-level waste (HLW) repositories in horizontal drifts in the Opalinus Clay formation. After 10.5 years of hydration, the EB experiment was dismantled in autumn 2012. Samples obtained from the granular bentonite material (GBM), and bentonite blocks were sent to a laboratory for further analysis. The bentonite samples analyzed at the Laboratory of Mechanic of Lille (LML) were obtained from the CMT1, CMT2, CMT3 and RW sections. Their physical states were determined, as were their effective gas permeability and swelling capacity at different relative humidity (RH) levels. The results indicate that the water contents of the GBM determined in the laboratory ranged between 25.63% and 44.88% and that the dry densities ranged between 1.13 and 1.44 g/cm{sup 3}. The blocks had water contents similar to (or slightly higher than) those of the GBM, and their dry densities had decreased from an initial value of 1.69 g/cm{sup 3} to values close to 1.30 g/cm{sup 3}, which were similar to the average values found in the GBM. The effective gas permeabilities of the GBM samples were within the range of 1.50 × 10{sup −22} m{sup 2} and 1.03 × 10{sup −17} m{sup 2}, whereas, the corresponding values of the samples obtained from the blocks were between 2.20 × 10{sup −21} m{sup 2} and 5.12 × 10{sup −21} m{sup 2}. The permeability values are primarily related to the dry densities and water contents of the samples. Contact with

  20. Fermi LAT observations of PSR J1119-6127 before and after its recent bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, P. H. Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We report on the Fermi LAT observations of PSR J1119-6127, a rotation-powered pulsar with high magnetic field that showed two magnetar-like bursts on 2016-07-27 13:02:07.91 UT and 2016-07-28 01:27:51 UT, recorded by the Fermi GBM and Swift BAT instruments, respectively (Kennea et al., GCN Circ. 19735/ATel #9274; Younes et al., GCN Circ. 19736).

  1. On the GBM event seen 0.4 sec after GW 150914

    CERN Document Server

    Greiner, J; Savchenko, V; Yu, H -F

    2016-01-01

    In view of the recent report by Connaughton [arXiv:1602.03920.v3] we analyse continuous TTE data of Fermi-GBM around the time of the gravitational wave event GW 150914. We find that after proper accounting for low count statistics, the GBM transient event at 0.4 s after GW 150914 is likely not due to an astrophysical source, but consistent with a background fluctuation, removing the tension between the INTEGRAL/ACS non-detection and GBM. Additionally, reanalysis of other short GRBs shows that without proper statistical modeling the fluence of faint events is over-predicted, as verified for some joint GBM-ACS detections of short GRBs. We detail the statistical procedure to correct these biases. As a result, faint short GRBs, verified by ACS detections, with significances in the broad-band light curve even smaller than that of the GBM-GW150914 event are recovered as proper non-zero source, while the GBM-GW150914 event is consistent with zero fluence.

  2. Investigating a signature of temozolomide resistance in GBM cell lines using metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Coeur, Patrick-Denis; Poitras, Julie J; Cuperlovic-Culf, Miroslava; Touaibia, Mohamed; Morin, Pier

    2015-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common form of malignant glioma. Current therapeutic approach to treat this malignancy involves a combination of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy with temozolomide. Numerous mechanisms contributing to inherent and acquired resistance to this chemotherapeutic agent have been identified and can lead to treatment failure. This study undertook a metabolomics-based approach to characterize the metabolic profiles observed in temozolomide-sensitive and temozolomide-resistant GBM cell lines as well as in a small sub-set of primary GBM tumors. This approach was also utilized to explore the metabolic changes modulated upon cell treatment with temozolomide and lomeguatrib, an MGMT inhibitor with temozolomide-sensitizing potential. Metabolites previously explored for their potential role in chemoresistance including glucose, citrate and isocitrate demonstrated elevated levels in temozolomide-resistant GBM cells. In addition, a signature of metabolites comprising alanine, choline, creatine and phosphorylcholine was identified as up-regulated in sensitive GBM cell line across different treatments. These results present the metabolic profiles associated with temozolomide response in selected GBM models and propose interesting leads that could be leveraged for the development of therapeutic or diagnostic tools to impact temozolomide response in GBMs.

  3. Is the GW150914-GBM really associated with the GW150914?

    CERN Document Server

    Xiong, Shaolin

    2016-01-01

    Finding the electromagnetic (EM) counterpart is critically important for a gravitational wave event. Although many efforts have been made to search for the purported EM counterpart of GW150914, the first gravitational wave event detected by LIGO, only Fermi/GBM reported an excess above background (i.e. GW150914-GBM) at 0.4 s after the LIGO trigger time, that is possibly associated with this GW event (Connaughton et al. 2016). However, since there is no significant detection by the INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS around the time of GW150914-GBM, a great debate has been raised about whether GW150914-GBM is of astrophysical origin and associated with the GW150914 (Savchenko et al. 2016). In order to answer this question, we re-analyzed the GBM data with a straightforward but sophisticated method. We find that the excess of GW150914-GBM mostly comes from those detectors with bad viewing angles to the GW event, whereas the good viewing detectors see nothing significant beyond background fluctuation around the trigger time of GW1...

  4. BeXRB Monitor Data API

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A fully queryable REST API with JSON, XML, and CSV output as well as inline, runable examples. This is a monitor using data from Swift/BAT, MAXI and Fermi/GBM...

  5. Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH‐EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    The WATCH wide field x‐ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence...... of the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1900+14 in 1992 is verified....

  6. Paradox of Migration in Kolkata: A Megacity in GBM Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, S.; Hazra, S.; Ghosh, T.

    2015-12-01

    Contrary to other coastal cities (Mumbai, Chennai, Bhubaneswar etc.) in India, Kolkata, the largest city of India until 1990, has been showing a persistent trend of out-migration over the last decade. The situation is more paradoxical when compared to Dhaka in Bangladesh, the other coastal city in Ganga-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) delta. Exacerbating impacts of Climate Change like accelerated sea level rise, impact of cyclones, rising temperature and high rainfall events and waterlogging, vis-à-vis the density of poor population in slums, Kolkata has been assessed as one of the most vulnerable cities of the world. However, Kolkata has long been a preferred destination for migrants for its port based economy, existence of industrial belt with labour intensive industries. The city and its surrounding districts attracted a massive influx of trans-border migrants when India and Bangladesh gained Independence in 1947 and 1971 respectively. The paper attempts to explore reasons behind the present trend of depopulation in the erstwhile preferred migration destination. This paper distinguishes between 'Kolkata City' (census district) with 4.5 million residents and 'Kolkata Megacity' which encompasses also the peri-urban areas and home to almost 14.1 million people according to Census 2011. Analysing migration as an ongoing research activity under DECCMA project, an overall 'in-migration' pattern can be deciphered in Kolkata 'megacity'. On the contrary, the Kolkata 'city' located right in the heart of the megacity exhibits negative net migration (-5.11%) i.e. high 'out-migration'. Plausible causes can be movement of people from Kolkata 'city' to peri-urban areas and satellite towns (urban to urban migration) probably due to closure of labour intensive industries, comparatively lower land prices, availability of space and accommodation, lower costs of living, development of different modes of commutation and communication. Further growth of population in the Kolkata Megacity

  7. Understanding the Long-Term Spectral Variability of Cygnus X-1 with Burst and Transient Source Experiment and All-Sky Monitor Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Poutanen, Juri; Paciesas, William S.; Wen, Lin-Qing

    2002-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of all observations of Cyg X-1 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE; 20-300 keV) and by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer all-sky monitor (ASM; 1.5-12 keV) until 2002 June, including approximately 1200 days of simultaneous data. We find a number of correlations between fluxes and hardnesses in different energy bands. In the hard (low) spectral state, there is a negative correlation between the ASM 1.5-12 keV flux and the hardness at any energy. In the soft (high) spectral state, the ASM flux is positively correlated with the ASM hardness but uncorrelated with the BATSE hardness. In both spectral states, the BATSE hardness correlates with the flux above 100 keV, while it shows no correlation with the 20-100 keV flux. At the same time, there is clear correlation between the BATSE fluxes below and above 100 keV. In the hard state, most of the variability can be explained by softening the overall spectrum with a pivot at approximately 50 keV. There is also another, independent variability pattern of lower amplitude where the spectral shape does not change when the luminosity changes. In the soft state, the variability is mostly caused by a variable hard (Comptonized) spectral component of a constant shape superposed on a constant soft blackbody component. These variability patterns are in agreement with the dependencies of the rms variability on the photon energy in the two states. We also study in detail recent soft states from late 2000 until 2002. The last of them has lasted thus far for more than 200 days. Their spectra are generally harder in the 1.5-5 keV band and similar or softer in the 3-12 keV band than the spectra of the 1996 soft state, whereas the rms variability is stronger in all the ASM bands. On the other hand, the 1994 soft state transition observed by BATSE appears very similar to the 1996 one. We interpret the variability patterns in terms of theoretical Comptonization

  8. An Unusual Case of Anti-GBM Antibody Elevation in HIV-Associated Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Minocha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The most commonly seen glomerular disease in HIV infected patients is HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN; however, a multitude of other nephropathies can occur in HIV infection with an almost equal cumulative frequency. We report an unusual case of a patient with clinical and histological evidence of HIVAN in which the diagnosis was initially confounded by the finding of an elevated serum anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM antibody. Case Presentation. We present a case of a 27-year-old African American female with a history of schizophrenia, cocaine abuse, and HIV infection who upon admission to our hospital was found to have severe acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis. Urine studies revealed nephrotic range proteinuria and a serological workup was positive for anti-GBM antibody elevation with a value of 91 units (normal: 0–20 units. A renal biopsy revealed HIVAN with no evidence of crescentic glomerulonephritis or anti-GBM disease. Conclusion. This case highlights the need for careful interpretation of anti-GBM antibody tests in HIV infected patients with kidney disease and, in particular, the need for biopsy confirmation of the diagnosis prior to starting therapy. More research is needed to study the prognostic correlation between the degree of anti-GBM antibody elevation in HIVAN and disease severity.

  9. Burst Mechanisms in Hydrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Knobloch, E

    1999-01-01

    Different mechanisms believed to be responsible for the generation of bursts in hydrodynamical systems are reviewed and a new mechanism capable of generating regular or irregular bursts of large dynamic range near threshold is described. The new mechanism is present in the interaction between oscillatory modes of odd and even parity in systems of large but finite aspect ratio, and provides an explanation for the bursting behavior observed in binary fluid convection. Additional applications of the new mechanism are proposed.

  10. Propeller tone bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Succi, G. P.; Munro, D. H.; Ingard, K. U.

    1983-01-01

    Intense high frequency (25-38 kHz) tone bursts have been observed in acoustic tests of a scale model of a general aviation propeller. The amplitude of the tone burst is approximately equal to the amplitude of the propeller noise signature. The conditions necessary for the production of these tone bursts are described. The experiments indicate that the origin of these bursts is a periodic flow oscillation on the suction surface of the propeller blade tips which may be due to the interaction between an oscillating shock wave and a laminar boundary layer.

  11. Performance of two strategies for urgent ANCA and anti-GBM analysis in vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Joode, Anoek A. E.; Roozendaal, Caroline; van der Leij, Marcel J.; Bungener, Laura B.; Sanders, Jan Stephan; Stegeman, Coen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) associated small vessel vasculitis (AAV), rapid testing for ANCA and anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM) antibodies may be beneficial for therapeutic purpose. Objective: We analysed the diagnostic performance of two rapid ANCA and anti

  12. MGMT inactivation and clinical response in newly diagnosed GBM patients treated with Gliadel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Rachel; Burger, Peter; Soudry, Ethan; Tyler, Betty; Chaichana, Kaisorn L; Weingart, Jon; Olivi, Alessandro; Gallia, Gary L; Sidransky, David; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Ye, Xiaobu; Brem, Henry

    2015-12-01

    We examined the relationship between the O(6)-methylguanine-methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation status and clinical outcomes in newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients who were treated with Gliadel wafers (Eisai, Tokyo, Japan). MGMT promoter methylation has been associated with increased survival among patients with GBM who are treated with various alkylating agents. MGMT promoter methylation, in DNA from 122 of 160 newly diagnosed GBM patients treated with Gliadel, was determined by a quantitative methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction, and was correlated with overall survival (OS) and recurrence-free survival (RFS). The MGMT promoter was methylated in 40 (32.7%) of 122 patients. The median OS was 13.5 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 11.0-14.5) and RFS was 9.4 months (95% CI 7.8-10.2). After adjusting for age, Karnofsky performance score, extent of resection, temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), the newly diagnosed GBM patients with MGMT methylation had a 15% reduced mortality risk, compared to patients with unmethylated MGMT (hazard ratio 0.85; 95% CI 0.56-1.31; p=0.46). The patients aged over 70 years with MGMT methylation had a significantly longer median OS of 13.5 months, compared to 7.6 months in patients with unmethylated MGMT (p=0.027). A significant difference was also found in older patients, with a median RFS of 13.1 versus 7.6 months for methylated and unmethylated MGMT groups, respectively (p=0.01). Methylation of the MGMT promoter in newly diagnosed GBM patients treated with Gliadel, RT and TMZ, was associated with significantly improved OS compared to the unmethylated population. In elderly patients, methylation of the MGMT promoter was associated with significantly better OS and RFS.

  13. microRNA expression pattern modulates temozolomide response in GBM tumors with cancer stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezcan, Gulcin; Tunca, Berrin; Bekar, Ahmet; Preusser, Matthias; Berghoff, Anna Sophie; Egeli, Unal; Cecener, Gulsah; Ricken, Gerda; Budak, Ferah; Taskapılıoglu, Mevlut Ozgur; Kocaeli, Hasan; Tolunay, Sahsine

    2014-07-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) is widely used to treat glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Although the MGMT gene methylation status is postulated to correlate with TMZ response, some patients with a methylated MGMT gene still do not benefit from TMZ therapy. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) may be one of the causes of therapeutic resistance, but the molecular mechanism underlying this resistance is unclear. microRNA (miRNA) deregulation has been recognized as another chemoresistance modulating mechanism. Thus, we aimed to evaluate the miRNA expression patterns associated with chemoresistance that is dependent on the CSC status in GBM tumors to identify therapeutic biomarkers. CSCs were identified in 5 of 20 patients' tumor tissues using magnetic separation. CSC (+) tumors displayed a significant induction of CpG island methylation in the MGMT gene promoter (p = 0.009). Using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), 9 miRNAs related to GBM (mir-181b, miR-153, miR-137, miR-145, miR-10a, miR-10b, let-7d, miR-9, and miR-455-3p), which are associated with cell cycle and invasion was analyzed in tumor samples. Low miR-181b and high miR-455-3p expression levels were detected (p = 0.053, p = 0.004; respectively) in CSC (+) tumors. Analysis revealed a significant correlation between miR-455-3p expression and Smad2 protein levels as analyzed by immunohistochemistry in CSC (+) tumors (p = 0.002). Thus, miR-455-3p may be involved in TMZ resistance in MGMT methylated CSC (+) GBM patients. Further studies and evaluations are required, but this miRNA may provide novel therapeutic molecular targets for GBM treatment and new directions for the development of anticancer drugs.

  14. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy......, trapped particle streams. These background events may simulate the count rate increases characteristic of cosmic gamma bursts. For 12 of the detected events, their true cosmic nature have been confirmed through consistent localizations of the burst sources based on several independent WATCH data sets...

  15. TU-AB-BRA-11: Evaluation of Fully Automatic Volumetric GBM Segmentation in the TCGA-GBM Dataset: Prognosis and Correlation with VASARI Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rios Velazquez, E [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Meier, R [Institute for Surgical Technology and Biomechanics, Bern, NA (Switzerland); Dunn, W; Gutman, D [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Alexander, B [Dana- Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Medic, Boston, MA (United States); Wiest, R; Reyes, M [Institute for Surgical Technology and Biomechanics, University of Bern, Bern, NA (Switzerland); Bauer, S [Institute for Surgical Technology and Biomechanics, Support Center for Adva, Bern, NA (Switzerland); Aerts, H [Dana-Farber/Brigham Womens Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Reproducible definition and quantification of imaging biomarkers is essential. We evaluated a fully automatic MR-based segmentation method by comparing it to manually defined sub-volumes by experienced radiologists in the TCGA-GBM dataset, in terms of sub-volume prognosis and association with VASARI features. Methods: MRI sets of 67 GBM patients were downloaded from the Cancer Imaging archive. GBM sub-compartments were defined manually and automatically using the Brain Tumor Image Analysis (BraTumIA), including necrosis, edema, contrast enhancing and non-enhancing tumor. Spearman’s correlation was used to evaluate the agreement with VASARI features. Prognostic significance was assessed using the C-index. Results: Auto-segmented sub-volumes showed high agreement with manually delineated volumes (range (r): 0.65 – 0.91). Also showed higher correlation with VASARI features (auto r = 0.35, 0.60 and 0.59; manual r = 0.29, 0.50, 0.43, for contrast-enhancing, necrosis and edema, respectively). The contrast-enhancing volume and post-contrast abnormal volume showed the highest C-index (0.73 and 0.72), comparable to manually defined volumes (p = 0.22 and p = 0.07, respectively). The non-enhancing region defined by BraTumIA showed a significantly higher prognostic value (CI = 0.71) than the edema (CI = 0.60), both of which could not be distinguished by manual delineation. Conclusion: BraTumIA tumor sub-compartments showed higher correlation with VASARI data, and equivalent performance in terms of prognosis compared to manual sub-volumes. This method can enable more reproducible definition and quantification of imaging based biomarkers and has a large potential in high-throughput medical imaging research.

  16. Method and apparatus for coherent burst ranging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, E.A.; Fisher, W.G.

    1998-04-28

    A high resolution ranging method is described utilizing a novel modulated waveform, hereafter referred to as coherent burst modulation. In the coherent burst method, high frequency modulation of an acoustic or electromagnetic transmitter, such as a laser, is performed at a modulation frequency. This modulation frequency is transmitted quasi-continuously in the form of interrupted bursts of radiation. Energy from the transmitter is directed onto a target, interacts with the target, and the returning energy is collected. The encoded burst pattern contained in the collected return signal is detected coherently by a receiver that is tuned so as to be principally sensitive to the modulation frequency. The receiver signal is processed to determine target range using both time-of-flight of the burst envelope and phase shift of the high frequency modulation. This approach effectively decouples the maximum unambiguous range and range resolution relationship of earlier methods, thereby allowing high precision ranging to be conducted at arbitrarily long distances using at least one burst of encoded energy. The use of a receiver tuned to the high frequency modulation contained within the coherent burst vastly improves both sensitivity in the detection of the target return signal and rejection of background interferences, such as ambient acoustic or electromagnetic noise. Simultaneous transmission at several energies (or wavelengths) is possible by encoding each energy with a separate modulation frequency or pattern; electronic demodulation at the receiver allows the return pattern for each energy to be monitored independently. Radial velocity of a target can also be determined by monitoring change in phase shift of the return signal as a function of time. 12 figs.

  17. The Drift Burst Hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kim; Oomen, Roel; Renò, Roberto

    The Drift Burst Hypothesis postulates the existence of short-lived locally explosive trends in the price paths of financial assets. The recent US equity and Treasury flash crashes can be viewed as two high profile manifestations of such dynamics, but we argue that drift bursts of varying magnitude......, currencies and commodities. We find that the majority of identified drift bursts are accompanied by strong price reversals and these can therefore be regarded as “flash crashes” that span brief periods of severe market disruption without any material longer term price impacts....

  18. SU-C-BRE-03: Dual Compartment Mathematical Modeling of Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Kupelian, P; Kaprealian, T; Selch, M; Low, D; Pajonk, F; Sheng, K [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the aggressive recurrence and radioresistence of GBM with a dual compartment tumor survival mathematical model based on intrinsic tumor heterogeneity, cancer stem cells (CSC) and differentiated cancer cells (DCC). Methods: The repopulation and differentiation responses to radiotherapy of a solid tumor were simulated using an Ordinary Differential Equation (ODE). To obtain the tumor radiobiological parameters, we assumed that a tumor consists of two subpopulations, each with its distinctive linear quadratic parameters. The dual compartment cell survival model was constructed as SF(D)=F × exp(-α{sub 1} D-β{sub 1}D{sup 2}) + (1-F) × exp(-α{sub 2}D-β{sub 2}D{sup 2}) for a single fraction of treatment, with F as the fraction of CSC, and α and β describing the radiological properties of each population. Robust least square fitting was performed on clonogenic survival data from one GBM (U373MG) and one NSCLC (H460) cell line. The fit parameters were then used in the ODE model to predict treatment outcome of various treatment schemes. Results: The fit parameters from GBM cell survival data were (F, α{sub 1}, β{sub 1}, α{sub 2}, β{sub 2})=(0.0396, 0.0801, 0.0006, 0.1363, 0.0279), exhibiting two populations with distinctive radiological properties, CSC more radioresistant than DCC. The GBM cell line exhibited significantly poorer tumor control than its single compartment model prediction and NSCLC, which responded well to hypofrationation. The increased radioresistance was due to rapid regrowth of the DCC compartment triggered by its depletion while maintaining a viable CSC population. The rapid regrowth can be reduced by treating dose fractions ≤ 2 Gy with a prolonged treatment period. Conclusion: The interaction between a radioresistant CSC compartment and DCC compartment can explain the poor clinical outcome of GBM after radiotherapy despite dose escalation and hypofractionation attempts. Lower dose fractions result in better treatment

  19. Searching for Unmodeled Sources Using the Earth Occultation Data from the Fermi GBM

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, James; Cherry, Michael L; Camero-Arranz, Ascension; Finger, Mark H; Jenke, Peter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Chaplin, Vandiver

    2011-01-01

    Employing the 12 NaI detectors in the Fermi GBM, the Earth Occultation Technique (EOT) can be used to measure the fluxes of x-ray and gamma-ray sources. Each time a source passes behind the Earth (or emerges from behind the Earth), a step-like feature is produced in the detector count rate. With a predefined catalog of source positions, the times of the occultation steps can be calculated, the individual steps fit, and the fluxes derived. However, in order to find new sources and generate a complete catalog, a method is needed for generating an image of the sky. An imaging algorithm has been developed to generate all-sky images using the GBM data. Here we present imaging results from ~2.5 years of data in the 12-25 keV and 100-300 keV energy bands.

  20. Arc burst pattern analysis fault detection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, B. Don (Inventor); Aucoin, B. Michael (Inventor); Benner, Carl L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for detecting an arcing fault on a power line carrying a load current. Parameters indicative of power flow and possible fault events on the line, such as voltage and load current, are monitored and analyzed for an arc burst pattern exhibited by arcing faults in a power system. These arcing faults are detected by identifying bursts of each half-cycle of the fundamental current. Bursts occurring at or near a voltage peak indicate arcing on that phase. Once a faulted phase line is identified, a comparison of the current and voltage reveals whether the fault is located in a downstream direction of power flow toward customers, or upstream toward a generation station. If the fault is located downstream, the line is de-energized, and if located upstream, the line may remain energized to prevent unnecessary power outages.

  1. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  2. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  3. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  4. Techniques for Targeted Fermi-GBM Follow-Up of Gravitational-Wave Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, L.; Camp, J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; Christensen, N.; Veitch, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo ground-based gravitational-wave (GW) detectors are projected to come online 2015 2016, reaching a final sensitivity sufficient to observe dozens of binary neutron star mergers per year by 2018. We present a fully-automated, targeted search strategy for prompt gamma-ray counterparts in offline Fermi-GBM data. The multi-detector method makes use of a detailed model response of the instrument, and benefits from time and sky location information derived from the gravitational-wave signal.

  5. Investigation of Non-Linear Dynamics of the Rock Massive,Using Seismological Catalogue data and Induction Electromagnetic Monitoring Data in a Rock Burst Mine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachay, O. A.; Khachay, O. Y.; Klimko, V. K.; Shipeev, O. V.

    2012-04-01

    Geological medium is an open dynamical system, which is influenced on different scales by natural and man-made impacts, which change the medium state and lead as a result to a complicated many ranked hierarchic evolution. That is the subject of geo synergetics. Paradigm of physical mesomechanics, which was advanced by academician Panin V.E. and his scientific school, which includes the synergetic approach is a constructive method for research and changing the state of heterogenic materials [1]. That result had been obtained on specimens of different materials. In our results of research of no stationary geological medium in a frame of natural experiments in real rock massifs, which are under high man-made influence it was shown, that the state dynamics can be revealed with use synergetics in hierarchic medium. Active and passive geophysical monitoring plays a very important role for research of the state of dynamical geological systems. It can be achieved by use electromagnetic and seismic fields. Our experience of that research showed the changing of the system state reveals on the space scales and times in the parameters, which are linked with the peculiarities of the medium of the second or higher ranks [2-5]. Results of seismological and electromagnetic information showed the mutual additional information on different space-time levels of rock massive state, which are energetic influenced by explosions, used in mining technology. It is revealed a change of nonlinearity degree in time of the massive state by active influence on it. The description of massive movement in a frame of linear dynamical system does not satisfy the practical situation. The received results are of great significance because for the first time we could find the coincidences with the mathematical theory of open systems and experimental natural results with very complicated structure. On that base we developed a new processing method for the seismological information which can be used in

  6. The Etiology and Outcome Analysis of Neonatal Burst Suppression EEG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lian; ZHOU Yanxia; XU Sanqing

    2007-01-01

    The neonatal burst suppression is a severe EEG pattern and always demonstrates serious damage of nerve system. But the outcome of these patients depends on the different etiology. A total of 256 cases of video EEG recordings were analyzed in order to summarize the etiology and outcome of burst suppression. The results showed that some patients in all 17 cases of burst suppression showed EEG improvement. The etiology was the dominant factor in long term outcome. It was sug-gested that effective video EEG monitoring is helpful for etiologic study and prognosis evaluation.

  7. Targeting the NG2/CSPG4 proteoglycan retards tumour growth and angiogenesis in preclinical models of GBM and melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Svendsen, Agnete; Kmiecik, Justyna; Immervoll, Heike; Skaftnesmo, Kai Ove; Planagumà, Jesús; Reed, Rolf Kåre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Miletic, Hrvoje; Enger, Per Øyvind; Rygh, Cecilie Brekke; Chekenya, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant expression of the progenitor marker Neuron-glia 2 (NG2/CSPG4) or melanoma proteoglycan on cancer cells and angiogenic vasculature is associated with an aggressive disease course in several malignancies including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and melanoma. Thus, we investigated the mechanism of NG2 mediated malignant progression and its potential as a therapeutic target in clinically relevant GBM and melanoma animal models. Xenografting NG2 overexpressing GBM cell lines resulted in increased growth rate, angiogenesis and vascular permeability compared to control, NG2 negative tumours. The effect of abrogating NG2 function was investigated after intracerebral delivery of lentivirally encoded shRNAs targeting NG2 in patient GBM xenografts as well as in established subcutaneous A375 melanoma tumours. NG2 knockdown reduced melanoma proliferation and increased apoptosis and necrosis. Targeting NG2 in two heterogeneous GBM xenografts significantly reduced tumour growth and oedema levels, angiogenesis and normalised vascular function. Vascular normalisation resulted in increased tumour invasion and decreased apoptosis and necrosis. We conclude that NG2 promotes tumour progression by multiple mechanisms and represents an amenable target for cancer molecular therapy.

  8. Targeting the NG2/CSPG4 proteoglycan retards tumour growth and angiogenesis in preclinical models of GBM and melanoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Wang

    Full Text Available Aberrant expression of the progenitor marker Neuron-glia 2 (NG2/CSPG4 or melanoma proteoglycan on cancer cells and angiogenic vasculature is associated with an aggressive disease course in several malignancies including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM and melanoma. Thus, we investigated the mechanism of NG2 mediated malignant progression and its potential as a therapeutic target in clinically relevant GBM and melanoma animal models. Xenografting NG2 overexpressing GBM cell lines resulted in increased growth rate, angiogenesis and vascular permeability compared to control, NG2 negative tumours. The effect of abrogating NG2 function was investigated after intracerebral delivery of lentivirally encoded shRNAs targeting NG2 in patient GBM xenografts as well as in established subcutaneous A375 melanoma tumours. NG2 knockdown reduced melanoma proliferation and increased apoptosis and necrosis. Targeting NG2 in two heterogeneous GBM xenografts significantly reduced tumour growth and oedema levels, angiogenesis and normalised vascular function. Vascular normalisation resulted in increased tumour invasion and decreased apoptosis and necrosis. We conclude that NG2 promotes tumour progression by multiple mechanisms and represents an amenable target for cancer molecular therapy.

  9. The effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on proliferation and apoptosis of in ovo cultured glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbańska, Kaja; Pająk, Beata; Orzechowski, Arkadiusz; Sokołowska, Justyna; Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Szmidt, Maciej; Sysa, Paweł

    2015-03-01

    Recently, it has been shown that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) provide a unique approach to the treatment of tumors, especially those of neuroepithelial origin. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of AgNPs on proliferation and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells cultured in an in ovo model. Human GBM cells, line U-87, were placed on chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane. After 8 days, the tumors were divided into three groups: control (non-treated), treated with colloidal AgNPs (40 μg/ml), and placebo (tumors supplemented with vehicle only). At the end of the experiment, all tumors were isolated. Assessment of cell proliferation and cell apoptosis was estimated by histological, immunohistochemical, and Western blot analyses. The results show that AgNPs can influence GBM growth. AgNPs inhibit proliferation of GBM cells and seem to have proapoptotic properties. Although there were statistically significant differences between control and AgNP groups in the AI and the levels of active caspase 9 and active caspase 3, the level of these proteins in GBM cells treated with AgNPs seems to be on the border between the spontaneous apoptosis and the induced. Our results indicate that the antiproliferative properties of silver nanoparticles overwhelm proapoptotic ones. Further research focused on the cytotoxic effect of AgNPs on tumor and normal cells should be conducted.

  10. Mergers of Charged Black Holes: Gravitational-wave Events, Short Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing

    2016-08-01

    The discoveries of GW150914, GW151226, and LVT151012 suggest that double black hole (BH-BH) mergers are common in the universe. If at least one of the two merging black holes (BHs) carries a certain amount of charge, possibly retained by a rotating magnetosphere, the inspiral of a BH-BH system would drive a global magnetic dipole normal to the orbital plane. The rapidly evolving magnetic moment during the merging process would drive a Poynting flux with an increasing wind power. The magnetospheric activities during the final phase of the merger would make a fast radio burst (FRB) if the BH charge can be as large as a factor of \\hat{q}˜ ({10}-9{--}{10}-8) of the critical charge Q c of the BH. At large radii, dissipation of the Poynting flux energy in the outflow would power a short-duration high-energy transient, which would appear as a detectable short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) if the charge can be as large as \\hat{q}˜ ({10}-5{--}{10}-4). The putative short GRB coincident with GW150914 recorded by Fermi GBM may be interpreted with this model. Future joint GW/GRB/FRB searches would lead to a measurement or place a constraint on the charges carried by isolate BHs.

  11. Notch- and vitamin D signaling in 1,25(OH)2D3-resistant glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichrath, Sandra; Müller, Cornelia S L; Gleissner, Beate; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Vogt, Thomas; Reichrath, Jörg

    2010-07-01

    Recently, an important role of Notch activation for Ras-induced transformation of glial cells and for glioma growth and survival has been demonstrated. It was concluded that activation of Notch-signaling may represent a new target for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) therapy. We now analyzed five GBM cell lines (Tx3095, Tx3868, U87, U118, U373) for key components of Notch-signaling pathways (Notch-1, Notch-2, Notch-3, Notch-4, Delta-like 1, Delta-like 3, Delta-like 4, Jagged-1, Jagged-2) using conventional RT-PCR. We found that some components (Notch-1, Notch-2, Notch-4, Jagged-1) were consistently expressed in all cell lines analyzed while, in contrast, other key components of Notch-signaling were differentially expressed. Notch-3 was expressed in three out of five cell lines (in U87, U118 and U373), but was missing in Tx3095 and Tx3868 cells. Jagged-2 was expressed in U87, U373 and Tx3868, but not in U118 or Tx3095 cells. Delta-like 1 and Delta-like 3 were not detected in Tx3905 cells, but in all other cell lines. RNA for Delta-like 4 was only found in U373 and Tx3868 GBM cell lines. Treating GBM cell lines with 1,25(OH)2D3 (10(-6), 10(-8), and 10(-10) M), the biologically active form of vitamin D, did not result in significant dose- or time-dependent antiproliferative effects, indicating that GBM cell lines are resistant against the antiproliferative activity of 1,25(OH)2D3. In vitro treatment of GBM cells with 1,25(OH)2D3 did not result in a modulation of the expression of key components of the Notch-signaling pathway. Treatment with HDAC-inhibitor TSA or DNA-methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza exerted dose- and time-dependent antiproliferative effects on GBM cell lines. We asked the question whether the resistance against 1,25(OH)2D3 could be restored by co-treatment with TSA or 5-aza. However, combination therapy with 1,25(OH)2D3 and TSA or 5-aza did not result in enhanced antiproliferative effects as compared to treatment with TSA or 5-aza alone. In contrast

  12. Identification of a novel set of genes reflecting different in vivo invasive patterns of human GBM cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monticone Massimiliano

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most patients affected by Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, grade IV glioma experience a recurrence of the disease because of the spreading of tumor cells beyond surgical boundaries. Unveiling mechanisms causing this process is a logic goal to impair the killing capacity of GBM cells by molecular targeting. We noticed that our long-term GBM cultures, established from different patients, may display two categories/types of growth behavior in an orthotopic xenograft model: expansion of the tumor mass and formation of tumor branches/nodules (nodular like, NL-type or highly diffuse single tumor cell infiltration (HD-type. Methods We determined by DNA microarrays the gene expression profiles of three NL-type and three HD-type long-term GBM cultures. Subsequently, individual genes with different expression levels between the two groups were identified using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM. Real time RT-PCR, immunofluorescence and immunoblot analyses, were performed for a selected subgroup of regulated gene products to confirm the results obtained by the expression analysis. Results Here, we report the identification of a set of 34 differentially expressed genes in the two types of GBM cultures. Twenty-three of these genes encode for proteins localized to the plasma membrane and 9 of these for proteins are involved in the process of cell adhesion. Conclusions This study suggests the participation in the diffuse infiltrative/invasive process of GBM cells within the CNS of a novel set of genes coding for membrane-associated proteins, which should be thus susceptible to an inhibition strategy by specific targeting. Massimiliano Monticone and Antonio Daga contributed equally to this work

  13. The Interplanetary Network Supplement to the BeppoSAX Gamma-Ray Burst Catalogs

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, K; Frontera, F; Montanari, E; Rossi, F; Feroci, M; Mazets, E; Golenetskii, S; Frederiks, D D; Pal'shin, V D; Aptekar, R L; Cline, T; Trombka, J; McClanahan, T; Starr, R; Atteia, J -L; Barraud, C; Pelangeon, A; Boer, M; Vanderspek, R; Ricker, G; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Goldsten, J; Gold, R; Smith, D M; Wigger, C; Hajdas, W

    2010-01-01

    Between 1996 July and 2002 April, one or more spacecraft of the interplanetary network detected 787 cosmic gamma-ray bursts that were also detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and/or Wide-Field X-Ray Camera experiments aboard the BeppoSAX spacecraft. During this period, the network consisted of up to six spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 475 bursts were obtained. We present the localization data for these events.

  14. Solar Partial N-burst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zong-Jun Ning; Yu-Ying Liu; Qi-Jun Fu; Fu-Ying Xu

    2003-01-01

    We present a new sub-class of type III solar radio burst at the highfrequencies around 6.0 GHz. In addition to a descending and an ascending branchon the dynamic spectrum, it has an inverted morphology different from the simpletype U-burst. We call it "partial N-burst" because it is interpreted as the knownN-burst minus its first branch. The partial N-burst presented here was detectedamong a reverse slope type III (RS-III) burst group prior to the type V solar radiocontinuum and was simultaneously recorded by two spectrometers at the NationalAstronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC, 5.20-7.60 GHz)and at Purple Mountain Observatory (PMO, 4.50-7.50 GHz) on 1999 August 25.After the N-burst and M-burst, the partial N-burst is a third piece of evidence for amagnetic mirror effect in solar radio observation, when the same electron is reflectedat a pinched foot of a flare loop.

  15. Gamma-ray burst spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegarden, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of recent results in gamma-ray burst spectroscopy is given. Particular attention is paid to the recent discovery of emission and absorption features in the burst spectra. These lines represent the strongest evidence to date that gamma-ray bursts originate on or near neutron stars. Line parameters give information on the temperature, magnetic field and possibly the gravitational potential of the neutron star. The behavior of the continuum spectrum is also discussed. A remarkably good fit to nearly all bursts is obtained with a thermal-bremsstrahlung-like continuum. Significant evolution is observed of both the continuum and line features within most events.

  16. Risk evaluation of rock burst through theory of static and dynamic stresses superposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振雷; 蔡武; 窦林名; 何江; 王桂峰; 丁言露

    2015-01-01

    Rock burst is one of the most catastrophic dynamic hazards in coal mining. A static and dynamic stresses superposition-based (SDSS-based) risk evaluation method of rock burst was proposed to pre-evaluate rock burst risk. Theoretical basis of this method is the stress criterion incurring rock burst and rock burst risk is evaluated according to the closeness degree of the total stress (due to the superposition of static stress in the coal and dynamic stress induced by tremors) with the critical stress. In addition, risk evaluation criterion of rock burst was established by defining the “Satisfaction Degree” of static stress. Furthermore, the method was used to pre-evaluate rock burst risk degree and prejudge endangered area of an insular longwall face in Nanshan Coal Mine in China. Results show that rock burst risk is moderate at advance extent of 97 m, strong at advance extent of 97−131 m, and extremely strong (i.e. inevitable to occur) when advance extent exceeds 131 m (mining is prohibited in this case). The section of two gateways whose floor abuts 15−3 coal seam is a susceptible area prone to rock burst. Evaluation results were further compared with rock bursts and tremors detected by microseismic monitoring. Comparison results indicate that evaluation results are consistent with microseismic monitoring, which proves the method’s feasibility.

  17. DISTRIBUTION OF GBM HEPARAN-SULFATE PROTEOGLYCAN CORE PROTEIN AND SIDE-CHAINS IN HUMAN GLOMERULAR-DISEASES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENBORN, J; VANDENHEUVEL, LPWJ; BAKKER, MAH; VEERKAMP, JH; ASSMANN, KJM; WEENING, JJ; BERDEN, JHM

    1993-01-01

    Using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing either the core protein or the heparan sulfate (HS) side chain of human GBM heparan sulfate proteoglycan (HSPG), we investigated their glomerular distribution on cryostat sections of human kidney tissues. The study involved 95 biopsies comprising twelve

  18. Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Brdar, Vedran; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a p-wave process than for s-wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to Standard Model particles later, the annihilation bu...

  19. MAXIMIZATION OF DNA DAMAGE TO MGMT(+ EGFR(+ GBM CELLS USING OPTIMAL COMBINATION OF TEMOZOLOMIDE-ANTI EGFR MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY NIMOTUZUMAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. M. Inggas

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive primary brain tumor in adultswith dismal prognosis due to the unavailability of an effective therapy. Up to now, there had been no definitive studies published on EGFR inhibition therapy as a chemosensitizer for GBM therapy using Temozolomide (TMZ. This study aims to reveal the most effective method and timing to administer TMZ-anti EGFR targeted therapy which causes maximal DNA damage on GBM cells.Methods: Various regimens of anti EGFR monoclonal antibody Nimotuzumab (NMZ was administered in different combinations with TMZ, performed on U87MG MGMT(+ EGFR(+ cells. The effectiveness of the combinations were evaluated by measuring yH2AX levels which reflects the degree of DNA damage. One-way Anova and LSD tests were performed to determine the effects of each treatment with p<0.05. Results and discussion: the mean SD of yH2AX of each treatment was: 11,90±1,25 for the control group; 29.33±1.91 for NMZ alone; 28.13±1.58 for TMZ alone; 41.53±3.51 for concurrent use; 35.67 ±2.65 for NMZ after 24 hours TMZ; 31.87±2.94 for NMZ after 48 hours TMZ; 39.57±4.2 for TMZ after 24 hours NMZ; and 35.93 ±3.56 for TMZ after 48 hours NMZ. The administration of TMZ concurrent with or after 24 hours NMZ gives the highest amount of DNA damage to GBM cells. Conclusion: The administration of Nimotuzumab targeted therapy up to 24 hours before Temozolomide chemotherapy has been proven to be effective in maximizing the amount of DNA damage done to GBM cells in vitro. 

  20. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  1. Bursts de raios gama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, J.

    2003-02-01

    Nos últimos anos, graças principalmente aos dados obtidos pelo Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory e pelo satélite ítalo-holandês BeppoSAX, grandes avanços foram obtidos no nosso conhecimento sobre os fascinantes e enigmáticos fenômenos conhecidos por "bursts"de raios gama. Neste trabalho é feita uma revisão sobre a fenomenologia desses misteriosos objetos e são apresentados os desenvolvimentos recentes nessa área palpitante da astrofísica moderna, ressaltando tanto os resultados observacionais obtidos até o momento quanto os modelos teóricos propostos para explixá-los.

  2. MAXI observations of long X-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serino, Motoko; Iwakiri, Wataru; Tamagawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Takanori; Nakahira, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Negoro, Hitoshi

    2016-12-01

    We report nine long X-ray bursts from neutron stars, detected with the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). Some of these bursts lasted for hours, and hence are qualified as superbursts, which are prolonged thermonuclear flashes on neutron stars and are relatively rare events. MAXI observes roughly 85% of the whole sky every 92 minutes in the 2-20 keV energy band, and has detected nine bursts with a long e-folding decay time, ranging from 0.27 to 5.2 hr, since its launch in 2009 August until 2015 August. The majority of the nine events were found to originate from transient X-ray sources. The persistent luminosities of the sources, when these prolonged bursts were observed, were lower than 1% of the Eddington luminosity for five of them and lower than 20% for the rest. This trend is contrastive to the 18 superbursts observed before MAXI, all but two of which originated from bright persistent sources. The distribution of the total emitted energy, i.e., the product of e-folding time and luminosity, of these bursts clusters around 1041-1042 erg, whereas both the e-folding time and luminosity ranges for an order of magnitude. Among the nine events, two were from 4U 1850-086 during phases of relatively low persistent flux, whereas it usually exhibits standard short X-ray bursts during outbursts.

  3. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  4. Restriction spectrum imaging of bevacizumab-related necrosis in a patient with GBM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikdokht eFarid

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Importance:With the increasing use of antiangiogenic agents in the treatment of high grade gliomas, we are becoming increasingly aware of distinctive imaging findings seen in a subset of patients treated with these agents. Of particular interest is the development of regions of marked and persistent restricted diffusion. We describe a case with histopathologic validation, confirming that this region of restricted diffusion represents necrosis and not viable tumor. Observations:We present a case report of a 52-year-old man with GBM treated with temozolomide, radiation, and concurrent bevacizumab following gross total resection. The patient underwent sequential MRI's which included restriction-spectrum imaging (RSI, an advanced diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI technique, and MR perfusion. Following surgery, the patient developed an area of restricted diffusion on RSI which became larger and more confluent over the next several months. Marked signal intensity on RSI and very low cerebral blood volume (CBV on MR perfusion led us to favor bevacizumab-related necrosis over recurrent tumor. Subsequent histopathologic evaluation confirmed coagulative necrosis.Conclusions and Relevance:Our report increases the number of pathologically-proven cases of bevacizumab-related necrosis in the literature from three to four. Furthermore, our case demonstrates this phenomenon on RSI, which has been shown to have good sensitivity to restricted diffusion.

  5. GBM Volumetry using the 3D Slicer Medical Image Computing Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egger, Jan; Kapur, Tina; Fedorov, Andriy; Pieper, Steve; Miller, James V.; Veeraraghavan, Harini; Freisleben, Bernd; Golby, Alexandra J.; Nimsky, Christopher; Kikinis, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Volumetric change in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) over time is a critical factor in treatment decisions. Typically, the tumor volume is computed on a slice-by-slice basis using MRI scans obtained at regular intervals. (3D)Slicer – a free platform for biomedical research – provides an alternative to this manual slice-by-slice segmentation process, which is significantly faster and requires less user interaction. In this study, 4 physicians segmented GBMs in 10 patients, once using the competitive region-growing based GrowCut segmentation module of Slicer, and once purely by drawing boundaries completely manually on a slice-by-slice basis. Furthermore, we provide a variability analysis for three physicians for 12 GBMs. The time required for GrowCut segmentation was on an average 61% of the time required for a pure manual segmentation. A comparison of Slicer-based segmentation with manual slice-by-slice segmentation resulted in a Dice Similarity Coefficient of 88.43 ± 5.23% and a Hausdorff Distance of 2.32 ± 5.23 mm. PMID:23455483

  6. Posttranslationally caused bioluminescence burst of the Escherichia coli luciferase reporter strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideguchi, Yamato; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Ryo, Masashi; Motoki, Shogo; Kuwano, Takashi; Tezuka, Takafumi; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We continuously monitored bioluminescence from a wild-type reporter strain of Escherichia coli (lacp::luc+/WT), which carries the promoter of the lac operon (lacp) fused with the firefly luciferase gene (luc+). This strain showed a bioluminescence burst when shifted into the stationary growth phase. Bioluminescence profiles of other wild-type reporter strains (rpsPp::luc+ and argAp::luc+) and gene-deletion reporter strains (lacp::luc+/crp- and lacp::luc+/lacI-) indicate that transcriptional regulation is not responsible for generation of the burst. Consistently, changes in the luciferase protein levels did not recapitulate the profile of the burst. On the other hand, dissolved oxygen levels increased over the period across the burst, suggesting that the burst is, at least partially, caused by an increase in intracellular oxygen levels. We discuss limits of the firefly luciferase when used as a reporter for gene expression and its potential utility for monitoring metabolic changes in cells.

  7. Prompt thermal emission in gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hascoët, R; Mochkovitch, R

    2013-01-01

    GRB spectra appear non-thermal, but recent observations of a few bursts with Fermi GBM have confirmed previous indications from BATSE of the presence of an underlying thermal component. Photospheric emission is indeed expected when the relativistic outflow emerging from the central engine becomes transparent to its own radiation, with a quasi-blackbody spectrum in absence of additional sub-photospheric dissipation. However, its intensity strongly depends on the acceleration mechanism - thermal or magnetic - of the flow. We aim to compute the thermal and non-thermal emissions produced by an outflow with a variable Lorentz factor, where the power injected at the origin is partially thermal (fraction epsilon_th) and partially magnetic (fraction 1-epsilon_th). The thermal emission is produced at the photosphere, and the non-thermal emission in the optically thin regime. Apart from the value of epsilon_th, we want to test how the other model parameters affect the observed ratio of the thermal to non-thermal emissi...

  8. A search for \\textit{Fermi} bursts associated to supernovae and their frequency of occurrence

    CERN Document Server

    Kovacevic, M; Wang, Y; Muccino, M; Della Valle, M; Amati, L; Barbarino, C; Enderli, M; Pisani, G B; Li, L

    2014-01-01

    Context: Observations suggest that the major fraction of long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are connected with broad-lines supernovae Ib/c, (SNe-Ibc). The presence of GRB-SNe is revealed by rebrightenings emerging from the optical GRB afterglow $10$--$15$ days, in the rest-frame of the source, after the prompt GRB emission. Aims: \\textit{Fermi}-GBM has a field of view (FoV) which is about 6.5 times larger than the FoV of \\textit{Swift}, therefore we expect that a number of GRB-SN connections have been missed due to lack of optical and X-ray instruments on board of \\textit{Fermi}, which are essential to reveal SNe associated with GRBs. This fact has motivated our search in the \\textit{Fermi} catalogue for possible GRB-SN events. Methods: The search for possible GRB-SN associations follows two requirements: (1) SN should fall inside the \\textit{Fermi}-GBM error box of the considered long GRB, and (2) this GRB should occur within $20$ days before the SN event. Results: We have found $5$ cases, within $z<0....

  9. On the sharpness of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Bhat, P Narayana; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D

    2015-01-01

    We aim to obtain a measure of the curvature of time-resolved spectra that can be compared directly to theory. This tests the ability of models such as synchrotron emission to explain the peaks or breaks of GBM prompt emission spectra. We take the burst sample from the official Fermi GBM GRB time-resolved spectral catalog. We re-fit all spectra with a measured peak or break energy in the catalog best-fit models in various energy ranges, which cover the curvature around the spectral peak or break, resulting in a total of 1,113 spectra being analysed. We compute the sharpness angles under the peak or break of the triangle constructed under the model fit curves and compare to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. We find that 35% of the time-resolved spectra are inconsistent with the single-electron synchrotron function, and 91% are inconsistent with the Maxwellian synchrot...

  10. A phase II study of bevacizumab and erlotinib after radiation and temozolomide in MGMT unmethylated GBM patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raizer, J. J.; Giglio, P.; Hu, J.; Groves, M.; Merrell, R.; Conrad, C.; Phuphanich, S.; Puduvalli, V. K.; Loghin, M.; Paleologos, N.; Yuan, Y.; Liu, D.; Rademaker, A.; Yung, W. K.; Vaillant, B.; Rudnick, J.; Chamberlain, M.; Vick, N.; Grimm, S.; Tremont-Lukats, I. W.; De Groot, J.; Aldape, K.; Gilbert, M. R.

    2016-01-01

    Survival for glioblastoma (GBM) patients with an unmethyated MGMT promoter in their tumor is generally worse than methylated MGMT tumors, as temozolomide (TMZ) response is limited. How to better treat patients with unmethylated MGMT is unknown. We performed a trial combining erlotinib and bevacizumab in unmethylated GBM patients after completion of radiation (RT) and TMZ. GBM patients with an unmethylated MGMT promoter were trial eligible. Patient received standard RT (60 Gy) and TMZ (75 mg/m2 × 6 weeks) after surgical resection of their tumor. After completion of RT they started erlotinib 150 mg daily and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks until progression. Imaging evaluations occurred every 8 weeks. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Of the 48 unmethylated patients enrolled, 46 were evaluable (29 men and 17 women); median age was 55.5 years (29–75) and median KPS was 90 (70–100). All patients completed RT with TMZ. The median number of cycles (1 cycle was 4 weeks) was 8 (2–47). Forty-one patients either progressed or died with a median progression free survival of 9.2 months. At a follow up of 33 months the median overall survival was 13.2 months. There were no unexpected toxicities and most observed toxicities were categorized as CTC grade 1 or 2. The combination of erlotinib and bevacizumab is tolerable but did not meet our primary endpoint of increasing survival. Importantly, more trials are needed to find better therapies for GBM patients with an unmethylated MGMT promoter. PMID:26476729

  11. 30 CFR 57.3461 - Rock bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rock bursts. 57.3461 Section 57.3461 Mineral...-Underground Only § 57.3461 Rock bursts. (a) Operators of mines which have experienced a rock burst shall— (1) Within twenty four hours report to the nearest MSHA office each rock burst which: (i) Causes persons...

  12. Disinhibition Bursting of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin J Lobb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc dopaminergic neurons receive strong tonic inputs from GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr and globus pallidus (GP, and glutamatergic neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. The presence of these tonic inputs raises the possibility that phasic disinhibition may trigger phasic bursts in dopaminergic neurons. We first applied constant NMDA and GABAA conductances onto a two-compartment single cell model of the dopaminergic neuron (Kuznetsov et al., 2006. The model exhibited disinhibition bursting upon stepwise removal of inhibition. A further bifurcation analysis suggests that disinhibition may be more robust than excitation alone in that for most levels of NMDA conductance, the cell remains capable of bursting even after a complete removal of inhibition, whereas too much excitatory input will drive the cell into depolarization block. To investigate the network dynamics of disinhibition, we used a modified version of an integrate-and-fire based model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al., 2006. Synaptic activity generated in the network was delivered to the two-compartment single cell dopaminergic neuron. Phasic activation of the D1-expressing medium spiny neurons in the striatum (D1STR produced disinhibition bursts in dopaminergic neurons through the direct pathway (D1STR to SNpr to SNpc. Anatomical studies have shown that D1STR neurons have collaterals that terminate in GP. Adding these collaterals to the model, we found that striatal activation increased the intra-burst firing frequency of the disinhibition burst as the weight of this connection was increased. Our studies suggest that striatal activation is a robust means by which disinhibition bursts can be generated by SNpc dopaminergic neurons, and that recruitment of the indirect pathway via collaterals may enhance disinhibition bursting.

  13. HDAC inhibitors enhance the lethality of low dose salinomycin in parental and stem-like GBM cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L; Conley, Adam; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Ridder, Thomas; Grant, Steven; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2014-03-01

    The present studies determined whether the antibiotic salinomycin interacted with HDAC inhibitors to kill primary human GBM cells. Regardless of PTEN, ERBB1, or p53 mutational status salinomycin interacted with HDAC inhibitors in a synergistic fashion to kill GBM cells. Inhibition of CD95/Caspase 8 or of CD95/RIP-1/AIF signaling suppressed killing by the drug combination. Salinomycin increased the levels of autophagosomes that correlated with increased p62 and LC3II levels; valproate co-treatment correlated with reduced LC3II and p62 expression, and increased caspase 3 cleavage. Molecular inhibition of autophagosome formation was protective against drug exposure. The drug combination enhanced eIF2α phosphorylation and decreased expression of MCL-1 and phosphorylation of mTOR and p70 S6K. Activation of p70 S6K or mTOR promoted cell survival in the face of combined drug exposure. Overexpression of BCL-XL or c-FLIP-s was protective. Collectively our data demonstrate that the lethality of low nanomolar concentrations of salinomycin are enhanced by HDAC inhibitors in GBM cells and that increased death receptor signaling together with reduced mitochondrial function are causal in the combinatorial drug necro-apoptotic killing effect.

  14. Burst Suppression: A Review and New Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Dillon Kenny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression is a pattern of brain electrical activity characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude bursts and electrical silence. Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the results of our new study showing clear electrophysiological differences in burst suppression patterns induced by two common general anesthetics, sevoflurane and propofol. Our data suggest that the circuit mechanisms that generate burst suppression activity may differ between different general anesthetics.

  15. Gamma-ray burst models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew

    2007-05-15

    I consider various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries. In addition to the much-studied neutron star+neutron star and black hole+neutron star cases usually considered good candidates for short-duration bursts, there are also other possibilities. In particular, neutron star+massive white dwarf has several desirable features. These systems are likely to produce long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), in some cases definitely without an accompanying supernova, as observed recently. This class of burst would have a strong correlation with star formation and occur close to the host galaxy. However, rare members of the class need not be near star-forming regions and could have any type of host galaxy. Thus, a long-duration burst far from any star-forming region would also be a signature of this class. Estimates based on the existence of a known progenitor suggest that this type of GRB may be quite common, in agreement with the fact that the absence of a supernova can only be established in nearby bursts.

  16. Fermi-LAT Gamma-ray Bursts and Insight from Swift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racusin, Judith L.

    2011-01-01

    A new revolution in GRB observation and theory has begun over the last 3 years since the launch of the Fermi gamma-ray space telescope. The new window into high energy gamma-rays opened by the Fermi-LAT is providing insight into prompt emission mechanisms and possibly also afterglow physics. The LAT detected GRBs appear to be a new unique subset of extremely energetic and bright bursts. In this talk I will discuss the context and recent discoveries from these LAT GRBs and the large database of broadband observations collected by Swift over the last 7 years and how through comparisons between the Swift, GBM, and LAT GRB samples, we can learn about the unique characteristics and relationships between each population.

  17. Do Gamma-Ray Burst Sources Repeat?

    OpenAIRE

    Meegan, Charles A.; Hartmann, Dieter H.; Brainerd, J. J.; Briggs, Michael S.; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald; Blumenthal, George; Brock, Martin

    1995-01-01

    The demonstration of repeated gamma-ray bursts from an individual source would severely constrain burst source models. Recent reports (Quashnock and Lamb 1993; Wang and Lingenfelter 1993) of evidence for repetition in the first BATSE burst catalog have generated renewed interest in this issue. Here, we analyze the angular distribution of 585 bursts of the second BATSE catalog (Meegan et al. 1994). We search for evidence of burst recurrence using the nearest and farthest neighbor statistic and...

  18. A Novel GBM Saliency Detection Model Using Multi-Channel MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhashis Banerjee

    Full Text Available The automatic computerized detection of regions of interest (ROI is an important step in the process of medical image processing and analysis. The reasons are many, and include an increasing amount of available medical imaging data, existence of inter-observer and inter-scanner variability, and to improve the accuracy in automatic detection in order to assist doctors in diagnosing faster and on time. A novel algorithm, based on visual saliency, is developed here for the identification of tumor regions from MR images of the brain. The GBM saliency detection model is designed by taking cue from the concept of visual saliency in natural scenes. A visually salient region is typically rare in an image, and contains highly discriminating information, with attention getting immediately focused upon it. Although color is typically considered as the most important feature in a bottom-up saliency detection model, we circumvent this issue in the inherently gray scale MR framework. We develop a novel pseudo-coloring scheme, based on the three MRI sequences, viz. FLAIR, T2 and T1C (contrast enhanced with Gadolinium. A bottom-up strategy, based on a new pseudo-color distance and spatial distance between image patches, is defined for highlighting the salient regions in the image. This multi-channel representation of the image and saliency detection model help in automatically and quickly isolating the tumor region, for subsequent delineation, as is necessary in medical diagnosis. The effectiveness of the proposed model is evaluated on MRI of 80 subjects from the BRATS database in terms of the saliency map values. Using ground truth of the tumor regions for both high- and low- grade gliomas, the results are compared with four highly referred saliency detection models from literature. In all cases the AUC scores from the ROC analysis are found to be more than 0.999 ± 0.001 over different tumor grades, sizes and positions.

  19. Burst-properties as a function of mass accretion rate in GX 3+1

    CERN Document Server

    Den Hartog, P; Kuulkers, E; Cornelisse, R; Heisse, J; Bazzano, A; Cocchi, M; Natalucci, L; Ubertini, P

    2003-01-01

    GX 3+1 is a low-mass X-ray binary that is persistently bright since its discovery in 1964. It was found to be an X-ray burster twenty years ago proving that the compact object in this system is a neutron star. The burst rate is so low that only 18 bursts were reported prior to 1996. The Wide Field Cameras on BeppoSAX have, through a dedicated monitoring program on the Galactic center region, increased the number of X-ray bursts from GX 3+1 by 61. Since GX 3+1 exhibits a slow (order of years) modulation in the persistent flux of about 50%, these observations opens up the unique possibility to study burst properties as a function of mass accretion rate for very low burst rates. This is the first time that bursts are detected from GX 3+1 in the high state. From the analysis we learn that all bursts are short with e-folding decay times smaller than 10 s. Therefore, all bursts are due to unstable helium burning. Furthermore, the burst rate drops sixfold in a fairly narrow range of 2-20 keV flux; we discuss possibl...

  20. Broadband Spectral Study of Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirmizibayrak, Demet; Gogus, Ersin; Sasmaz Mus, Sinem; Kaneko, Yuki

    2016-07-01

    Magnetar bursts occur sporadically on random occasions, and every burst-active episode carries unique information about the bursting magnetar. Therefore, in-depth spectral and temporal analyses of each of the magnetar bursts provide new insights into the bursting and radiation mechanisms. There have been a number of studies over the last decade, investigating the spectral and temporal properties of magnetar bursts. The spectra of typical magnetar bursts were generally described with the Comptonized model or the sum of two blackbody functions. However, it was recently shown that the actual spectral nature of these bursts can be conclusively determined if the spectral analysis is performed on a wide energy coverage. We present the results of in-depth systematic broadband (2 - 250 keV) spectral analysis of a large number of bursts originated from three magnetars: SGR 1806-20, SGR 1900+14, and SGR J1550-5418, observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer.

  1. Amplitude-Modulated Bursting: A Novel Class of Bursting Rhythms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Theodore; Kramer, Mark A.; Kaper, Tasso J.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the discovery of a novel class of bursting rhythms, called amplitude-modulated bursting (AMB), in a model for intracellular calcium dynamics. We find that these rhythms are robust and exist on open parameter sets. We develop a new mathematical framework with broad applicability to detect, classify, and rigorously analyze AMB. Here we illustrate this framework in the context of AMB in a model of intracellular calcium dynamics. In the process, we discover a novel family of singularities, called toral folded singularities, which are the organizing centers for the amplitude modulation and exist generically in slow-fast systems with two or more slow variables.

  2. Analytical modeling of pulse-pileup distortion using the true pulse shape, with applications to Fermi-GBM

    CERN Document Server

    Chaplin, Vandiver; Briggs, Michael; Connaughton, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Pulse-pileup affects most photon counting systems and occurs when photon detections occur faster than the detector's registration and recovery time. At high input rates, shaped pulses interfere and the source spectrum, as well as intensity information, get distorted. For instruments using bipolar pulse shaping there are two aspects to consider: `peak' and `tail' pileup effects, which raise and lower the measured energy, respectively. Peak effects have been extensively modeled in the past. Tail effects have garnered less attention due to the increased complexity: bipolar tails mean the tail pulse-height measurement depends on events in more than one time interval. We leverage previous work to derive an accurate, semi-analytical prediction for peak and tail pileup, up to high orders. We use the true pulse shape from the detectors of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor. The measured spectrum is calculated by writing exposure time as a state-space expansion of overlapping pileup states and is valid up to very high ...

  3. Detection of burst suppression patterns in EEG using recurrence rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenhu; Wang, Yinghua; Ren, Yongshao; Li, Duan; Voss, Logan; Sleigh, Jamie; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is a unique electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern commonly seen in cases of severely reduced brain activity such as overdose of general anesthesia. It is important to detect burst suppression reliably during the administration of anesthetic or sedative agents, especially for cerebral-protective treatments in various neurosurgical diseases. This study investigates recurrent plot (RP) analysis for the detection of the burst suppression pattern (BSP) in EEG. The RP analysis is applied to EEG data containing BSPs collected from 14 patients. Firstly we obtain the best selection of parameters for RP analysis. Then, the recurrence rate (RR), determinism (DET), and entropy (ENTR) are calculated. Then RR was selected as the best BSP index one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multiple comparison tests. Finally, the performance of RR analysis is compared with spectral analysis, bispectral analysis, approximate entropy, and the nonlinear energy operator (NLEO). ANOVA and multiple comparison tests showed that the RR could detect BSP and that it was superior to other measures with the highest sensitivity of suppression detection (96.49%, P = 0.03). Tracking BSP patterns is essential for clinical monitoring in critically ill and anesthetized patients. The purposed RR may provide an effective burst suppression detector for developing new patient monitoring systems.

  4. Detection of Burst Suppression Patterns in EEG Using Recurrence Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhu Liang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression is a unique electroencephalogram (EEG pattern commonly seen in cases of severely reduced brain activity such as overdose of general anesthesia. It is important to detect burst suppression reliably during the administration of anesthetic or sedative agents, especially for cerebral-protective treatments in various neurosurgical diseases. This study investigates recurrent plot (RP analysis for the detection of the burst suppression pattern (BSP in EEG. The RP analysis is applied to EEG data containing BSPs collected from 14 patients. Firstly we obtain the best selection of parameters for RP analysis. Then, the recurrence rate (RR, determinism (DET, and entropy (ENTR are calculated. Then RR was selected as the best BSP index one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and multiple comparison tests. Finally, the performance of RR analysis is compared with spectral analysis, bispectral analysis, approximate entropy, and the nonlinear energy operator (NLEO. ANOVA and multiple comparison tests showed that the RR could detect BSP and that it was superior to other measures with the highest sensitivity of suppression detection (96.49%,  P=0.03. Tracking BSP patterns is essential for clinical monitoring in critically ill and anesthetized patients. The purposed RR may provide an effective burst suppression detector for developing new patient monitoring systems.

  5. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  6. Swift observations of gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2007-05-15

    Since its launch on 20 November 2004, the Swift mission has been detecting approximately 100 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) each year, and immediately (within approx. 90s) starting simultaneous X-ray and UV/optical observations of the afterglow. It has already collected an impressive database, including prompt emission to higher sensitivities than BATSE, uniform monitoring of afterglows and a rapid follow-up by other observatories notified through the GCN. Advances in our understanding of short GRBs have been spectacular. The detection of X-ray afterglows has led to accurate localizations and the conclusion that short GRBs can occur in non-star-forming galaxies or regions, whereas long GRBs are strongly concentrated within the star-forming regions. This is consistent with the NS merger model. Swift has greatly increased the redshift range of GRB detection. The highest redshift GRBs, at z approximately 5-6, are approaching the era of reionization. Ground-based deep optical spectroscopy of high redshift bursts is giving metallicity measurements and other information on the source environment to a much greater distance than other techniques. The localization of GRB 060218 to a nearby galaxy, and the association with SN 2006aj, added a valuable member to the class of GRBs with detected supernova.

  7. Comprehensive analysis of MGMT promoter methylation: correlation with MGMT expression and clinical response in GBM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nameeta Shah

    Full Text Available O⁶-methylguanine DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT promoter methylation has been identified as a potential prognostic marker for glioblastoma patients. The relationship between the exact site of promoter methylation and its effect on gene silencing, and the patient's subsequent response to therapy, is still being defined. The aim of this study was to comprehensively characterize cytosine-guanine (CpG dinucleotide methylation across the entire MGMT promoter and to correlate individual CpG site methylation patterns to mRNA expression, protein expression, and progression-free survival. To best identify the specific MGMT promoter region most predictive of gene silencing and response to therapy, we determined the methylation status of all 97 CpG sites in the MGMT promoter in tumor samples from 70 GBM patients using quantitative bisulfite sequencing. We next identified the CpG site specific and regional methylation patterns most predictive of gene silencing and improved progression-free survival. Using this data, we propose a new classification scheme utilizing methylation data from across the entire promoter and show that an analysis based on this approach, which we call 3R classification, is predictive of progression-free survival (HR  = 5.23, 95% CI [2.089-13.097], p<0.0001. To adapt this approach to the clinical setting, we used a methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA test based on the 3R classification and show that this test is both feasible in the clinical setting and predictive of progression free survival (HR  = 3.076, 95% CI [1.301-7.27], p = 0.007. We discuss the potential advantages of a test based on this promoter-wide analysis and compare it to the commonly used methylation-specific PCR test. Further prospective validation of these two methods in a large independent patient cohort will be needed to confirm the added value of promoter wide analysis of MGMT methylation in the clinical

  8. High Redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    The Swift Observatory has been detecting 100 gamma-ray bursts per year for 7 years and has greatly stimulated the field with new findings. Observations are made of the X-ray and optical afterglow from 1 minute after the burst, continuing for days. GRBs are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. Swift has detected several events at z>5 and one at z=9.4 giving information on metallicity, star formation rate and reionization. The talk will present the latest results.

  9. Discovery of a new soft gamma repeater: SGR J0418 + 5729

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. van der Horst; V. Connaughton; C. Kouveliotou; E. Göğüş; Y. Kaneko; S. Wachter; M.S. Briggs; J. Granot; E. Ramirez-Ruiz; P.M. Woods; R.L. Aptekar; S.D. Barthelmy; J.R. Cummings; M.H. Finger; D.D. Frederiks; N. Gehrels; C.R. Gelino; D.M. Gelino; S. Golenetskii; K. Hurley; H.A. Krimm; E.P. Mazets; J.E. McEnery; C.A. Meegan; P.P. Oleynik; D.M. Palmer; V.D. Pal'shin; A. Pe'er; D. Svinkin; M.V. Ulanov; M. van der Klis; A. von Kienlin; A.L. Watts; C.A. Wilson-Hodge

    2010-01-01

    On 2009 June 5, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope triggered on two short and relatively dim bursts with spectral properties similar to soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts. Independent localizations of the bursts by triangulation with the Konus-RF and with the

  10. Millisecond extragalactic radio bursts as magnetar flares

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, S B

    2013-01-01

    Properties of the population of millisecond extragalactic radio bursts discovered by Thornton et al. (2013) are in good correspondence with the hypothesis that such events are related to hyperflares of magnetars, as was proposed by us after the first observation of an extragalactic millisecond radio burst by Lorimer et al. (2007). We also point that some of multiple millisecond radio bursts from M31 discovered by Rubio-Herrera et al. (2013) also can be related to weaker magnetar bursts.

  11. High energy emission of GRB 130821A: Constraining the density profile of the circum-burst medium as well as the initial Lorentz factor of the outflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Bei; He, Hao-Ning; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming [Key laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-01

    GRB 130821A was detected by Fermi-GBM/LAT, Konus-WIND, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, RHESSI and Mars Odyssey-HEND. Although the data of GRB 130821A are very limited, we show in this work that the high energy γ-ray emission (i.e., above 100 MeV) alone imposes tight constraint on the density profile of the circum-burst medium as well as the initial Lorentz factor of the outflow. The temporal behavior of the high energy γ-ray emission is consistent with the forward shock synchrotron radiation model, and the circum-burst medium likely has a constant-density profile. The Lorentz factor is about a few hundred, similar to other bright GRBs.

  12. Bursts from GS 1826-238 a clocked thermonuclear flashes generator

    CERN Document Server

    Ubertini, P; Cocchi, M; Natalucci, L; Heise, J; Müller, J M; in 't Zand, J J M

    1999-01-01

    The transient X-ray source GS 1826-238 was monitored during five different observing periods between August 1996 and October 1998 with the BeppoSAX Wide Field Camera instrument in the framework of a deep observation of the Galactic Center region. A first detection of X-ray bursts from this source occurred, ruling out its previously suggested black hole candidacy and strongly suggesting the compact object to be a weakly magnetized neutron star. During the 2.5 years of monitoring, corresponding to ~2.0 Ms observing time, 70 bursts were detected from the source. We here report a quasi-periodicity of 5.76 h in the burst occurrence time which is present during all observations. This is the first example of quasi-periodic bursting over a period of years. It is in line with the history of a rather constant flux since the turn on in 1988 and points to a very stable accretion.

  13. BC3EE2,9B, a synthetic carbazole derivative, upregulates autophagy and synergistically sensitizes human GBM8901 glioblastoma cells to temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Min; Syu, Jhih-Pu; Way, Tzong-Der; Huang, Li-Jiau; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lin, Chung-Tien; Lin, Chih-Li

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most fatal form of human brain cancer. Although temozolomide (TMZ), an oral alkylating chemotherapeutic agent, improves the survival rate, the prognosis of patients with GBM remains poor. Naturally occurring carbazole alkaloids isolated from curry leaves (Murraya koenigii Spreng.) have been shown to possess a wide range of anticancer properties. However, the effects of carbazole derivatives on glioblastoma cells remain poorly understood. In the present study, anti‑glioblastoma profiles of a series of synthetic carbazole derivatives were evaluated in vitro. The most promising derivative in this series was BC3EE2,9B, which showed significant anti‑proliferative effects in GBM8401 and GBM8901 cells. BC3EE2,9B also triggered cell‑cycle arrest, most prominently at the G1 stage, and suppressed glioblastoma cell invasion and migration. Furthermore, BC3EE2,9B induced autophagy‑mediated cell death and synergistically sensitized GBM cells to TMZ cytotoxicity. The possible mechanism underlying BC3EE2,9B‑induced autophagy may involve activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the attenuation of the Akt and mammalian target of the rapamycin downstream signaling pathway. Taken together, the present results provide molecular evidence for the mode of action governing the ability of BC3EE2,9B to sensitize drug‑resistant glioblastoma cells to the chemotherapeutic agent TMZ.

  14. Phenethyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression and the levels of protein associated with cell cycle regulation in human glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Chang, Shu-Jen; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Shen, Chiung-Chyi; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive primary brain malignancy. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a member of the isothiocyanate family, can induce apoptosis in many human cancer cells. Our previous study disclosed that PEITC induces apoptosis through the extrinsic pathway, dysfunction of mitochondria, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and intrinsic (mitochondrial) pathway in human brain glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) 8401 cells. To the best of our knowledge, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the genetic levels of GBM 8401 cells in vitro. PEITC may induce G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest through affecting the proteins such as cdk2, cyclin E, and p21 in GBM 8401 cells. Many genes associated with cell-cycle regulation of GBM 8401 cells were changed after PEITC treatment: 48 genes were upregulated and 118 were downregulated. The cell-division cycle protein 20 (CDC20), Budding uninhibited by benzimidazole 1 homolog beta (BUB1B), and cyclin B1 were downregulated, and clusterin was upregulated in GBM 8401 cells treated with PEITC. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of PEITC on the genetic levels and potential biomarkers for glioblastoma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 32: 176-187, 2017.

  15. Kepler K2 Observations of Sco X-1: Orbital Modulations and Correlations with Fermi GBM and MAXI

    CERN Document Server

    Hynes, R I; Baum, Z A; Hsu, C -C; Cherry, M L; Scaringi, S

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength study of the low-mass X-ray binary Sco X-1 using Kepler K2 optical data and Fermi GBM and MAXI X-ray data. We recover a clear sinusoidal orbital modulation from the Kepler data. Optical fluxes are distributed bimodally around the mean orbital light curve, with both high and low states showing the same modulation. The high state is broadly consistent with the flaring branch of the Z diagram and the low state with the normal branch. We see both rapid optical flares and slower dips in the high state, and slow brightenings in the low state. High state flares exhibit a narrow range of amplitudes with a striking cut-off at a maximum amplitude. Optical fluxes correlate with X-ray fluxes in the high state, but in the low state they are anti-correlated. These patterns can be seen clearly in both flux-flux diagrams and cross-correlation functions and are consistent between MAXI and GBM. The high state correlation arises promptly with at most a few minutes lag. We attribute this to thermal ...

  16. Is surgical spinal decompression for supratentorial GBM symptomatic drop down metastasis warranted? A case report and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Babar Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic spinal metastasis from an intracranial primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is very rare. Our literature search identified a total of 42 such patients of which 11 were treated with surgical decompression for spinal metastasis with only one such report from the pediatric age group. Previous studies have reported variable outcomes after surgical management. Case Description: We report the case of a 16-year-old boy who underwent surgical spinal decompression for spinal metastasis after intracranial GBM. The patient regained motor and autonomic function following surgery and reported improvement in pain. We also present findings from a literature review using the PubMed database from 1985 to June 2013 on this subject and compare radiation therapy with surgical decompression as palliative modalities in such patients. Conclusion: There are no evidence-based guidelines available on the subject and no treatment regimen has yet demonstrated survival benefit in these patients. Surgical decompression may be a better option for patients with focal resectable lesions and who are medically stable to tolerate the procedure.

  17. SVD identifies transcript length distribution functions from DNA microarray data and reveals evolutionary forces globally affecting GBM metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertagnolli, Nicolas M; Drake, Justin A; Tennessen, Jason M; Alter, Orly

    2013-01-01

    To search for evolutionary forces that might act upon transcript length, we use the singular value decomposition (SVD) to identify the length distribution functions of sets and subsets of human and yeast transcripts from profiles of mRNA abundance levels across gel electrophoresis migration distances that were previously measured by DNA microarrays. We show that the SVD identifies the transcript length distribution functions as "asymmetric generalized coherent states" from the DNA microarray data and with no a-priori assumptions. Comparing subsets of human and yeast transcripts of the same gene ontology annotations, we find that in both disparate eukaryotes, transcripts involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism are significantly shorter than typical, and in particular, significantly shorter than those involved in glucose metabolism. Comparing the subsets of human transcripts that are overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) or normal brain tissue samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we find that GBM maintains normal brain overexpression of significantly short transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism, but suppresses normal overexpression of significantly longer transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in glucose metabolism and brain activity. These global relations among transcript length, cellular metabolism and tumor development suggest a previously unrecognized physical mode for tumor and normal cells to differentially regulate metabolism in a transcript length-dependent manner. The identified distribution functions support a previous hypothesis from mathematical modeling of evolutionary forces that act upon transcript length in the manner of the restoring force of the harmonic oscillator.

  18. Maxi observations of long X-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Serino, Motoko; Tamagawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Takanori; Nakahira, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Negoro, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We report nine long X-ray bursts from neutron stars, detected with Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). Some of these bursts lasted for hours, and hence are qualified as superbursts, which are prolonged thermonuclear flashes on neutron stars and are relatively rare events. MAXI observes roughly 85% of the whole sky every 92 minutes in the 2-20 keV energy band, and has detected nine bursts with a long e-folding decay time, ranging from 0.27 to 5.2 hours, since its launch in 2009 August until 2015 August. The majority of the nine events were found to originate from transient X-ray sources. The persistent luminosities of the sources, when these prolonged bursts were observed, were lower than 1% of the Eddington luminosity for five of them and lower than 20% for the rest. This trend is contrastive to the 18 superbursts observed before MAXI, all but two of which originated from bright persistent sources. The distribution of the total emitted energy, i.e., the product of e-folding time and luminosity, of these bu...

  19. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenq-Wei Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  20. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  1. A New Measurement of the Spectral Lag of Gamma-Ray Bursts and its Implications for Spectral Evolution Behaviors

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Lang; Wang, Fu-Ri; Wu, Xue-Feng; Cheng, Ye-Hao; Zhang, Xi; Yu, Bang-Yao; Xi, Bao-Jia; Wang, Xue; Feng, Huan-Xue; Zhang, Meng; Xu, Dong

    2016-01-01

    We carry out a systematical study of the spectral lag properties of 50 single-pulsed Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by Fermi/GBM. By dividing the light curves into multiple consecutive energy channels we provide a new measurement of the spectral lag which is independent on energy channel selections. We perform a detailed statistical study of our new measurements. We find two similar universal correlations by investigating the correlations between the photon arrival time versus energy and pulse width versus energy, respectively. We also study the spectral evolution behaviors of the GRB pulses and most of them follow neither "hard-to-soft" (HTS) nor "hardness-intensity tracking" (HIT) trends. We find that a GRB pulse with negligible spectral lag would appear to have an HIT behavior and a GRB pulse with significant spectral lag would appear to have an HTS behavior. The HTS might not be a genuinely true behavior.

  2. Gamma-Ray Burst at the extreme: "the naked-eye burst" GRB 080319B

    CERN Document Server

    Wozniak, P R; Panaitescu, A D; Wren, J A; Davis, H R; White, R R

    2008-01-01

    On 19 March 2008, the northern sky was the stage of a spectacular optical transient that for a few seconds remained visible to the naked eye. The transient was associated with GRB 080319B, a gamma-ray burst at a luminosity distance of about 6 Gpc (standard cosmology), making it the most luminous optical object ever recorded by human kind. We present comprehensive sky monitoring and multi-color optical follow-up observations of GRB 080319B collected by the RAPTOR telescope network covering the development of the explosion and the afterglow before, during, and after the burst. The extremely bright prompt optical emission revealed features that are normally not detectable. The optical and gamma-ray variability during the explosion are correlated, but the optical flux is much greater than can be reconciled with single emission mechanism and a flat gamma-ray spectrum. This extreme optical behavior is best understood as synchrotron self-Compton model (SSC). After a gradual onset of the gamma-ray emission, there is ...

  3. Spatial variation in automated burst suppression detection in pharmacologically induced coma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jingzhi; Jonnalagadda, Durga; Moura, Valdery; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N; Westover, M Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Burst suppression is actively studied as a control signal to guide anesthetic dosing in patients undergoing medically induced coma. The ability to automatically identify periods of EEG suppression and compactly summarize the depth of coma using the burst suppression probability (BSP) is crucial to effective and safe monitoring and control of medical coma. Current literature however does not explicitly account for the potential variation in burst suppression parameters across different scalp locations. In this study we analyzed standard 19-channel EEG recordings from 8 patients with refractory status epilepticus who underwent pharmacologically induced burst suppression as medical treatment for refractory seizures. We found that although burst suppression is generally considered a global phenomenon, BSP obtained using a previously validated algorithm varies systematically across different channels. A global representation of information from individual channels is proposed that takes into account the burst suppression characteristics recorded at multiple electrodes. BSP computed from this representative burst suppression pattern may be more resilient to noise and a better representation of the brain state of patients. Multichannel data integration may enhance the reliability of estimates of the depth of medical coma.

  4. Relationship of pre-surgery metabolic and physiological MR imaging parameters to survival for patients with untreated GBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Forrest W.; Khayal, Inas S.; McGue, Colleen; Saraswathy, Suja; Pirzkall, Andrea; Cha, Soonmee; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Chang, Susan M.; Berger, Mitchel S.

    2010-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) are heterogeneous lesions, both in terms of their appearance on anatomic images and their response to therapy. The goal of this study was to evaluate the prognostic value of parameters derived from physiological and metabolic images of these lesions. Fifty-six patients with GBM were scanned immediately before surgical resection using conventional anatomical MR imaging and, where possible, perfusion-weighted imaging, diffusion-weighted imaging, and proton MR spectroscopic imaging. The median survival time was 517 days, with 15 patients censored. Absolute anatomic lesion volumes were not associated with survival but patients for whom the combined volume of contrast enhancement and necrosis was a large percentage of the T2 hyperintense lesion had relatively poor survival. Other volumetric parameters linked with less favorable survival were the volume of the region with elevated choline to N-acetylaspartate index (CNI) and the volume within the T2 lesion that had apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) less than 1.5 times that in white matter. Intensity parameters associated with survival were the maximum and the sum of levels of lactate and of lipid within the CNI lesion, as well as the magnitude of the 10th percentile of the normalized ADC within the contrast-enhancing lesion. Patients whose imaging parameters indicating that lesions with a relatively large percentage with breakdown of the blood brain barrier or necrosis, large regions with abnormal metabolism or areas with restricted diffusion have relatively poor survival. These parameters may provide useful information for predicting outcome and for the stratification of patients into high or low risk groups for clinical trials. PMID:19009235

  5. SVD identifies transcript length distribution functions from DNA microarray data and reveals evolutionary forces globally affecting GBM metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas M Bertagnolli

    Full Text Available To search for evolutionary forces that might act upon transcript length, we use the singular value decomposition (SVD to identify the length distribution functions of sets and subsets of human and yeast transcripts from profiles of mRNA abundance levels across gel electrophoresis migration distances that were previously measured by DNA microarrays. We show that the SVD identifies the transcript length distribution functions as "asymmetric generalized coherent states" from the DNA microarray data and with no a-priori assumptions. Comparing subsets of human and yeast transcripts of the same gene ontology annotations, we find that in both disparate eukaryotes, transcripts involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism are significantly shorter than typical, and in particular, significantly shorter than those involved in glucose metabolism. Comparing the subsets of human transcripts that are overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM or normal brain tissue samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we find that GBM maintains normal brain overexpression of significantly short transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism, but suppresses normal overexpression of significantly longer transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in glucose metabolism and brain activity. These global relations among transcript length, cellular metabolism and tumor development suggest a previously unrecognized physical mode for tumor and normal cells to differentially regulate metabolism in a transcript length-dependent manner. The identified distribution functions support a previous hypothesis from mathematical modeling of evolutionary forces that act upon transcript length in the manner of the restoring force of the harmonic oscillator.

  6. Hardness/intensity correlations among BATSE bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald J.; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conclusions about the nature of gamma-ray bursts derived from the size-frequency distribution may be altered if a significant correlation exists between burst intensity and spectral shape. Moreover, if gamma-ray bursts have a cosmological origin, such a correlation may be expected to result from the expansion of the universe. We have performed a rudimentary search of the BATSE bursts for hardness/intensity correlations. The range of spectral shapes was determined for each burst by computing the ratio of the intensity in the range 100-300 keV to that in 55-300 keV. We find weak evidence for the existence of a correlation, the strongest effect being present when comparing the maximum hardness ratio for each burst with its maximum rate.

  7. Stirling Colgate and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Donald

    2014-10-01

    Even before the discovery of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), Stirling Colgate proposed that bursts of x rays and gamma rays might be produced by a relativistic shock created in the supernova explosion of a massive star. We trace the scientific story of GRBs from their detection to the present, highlighting along the way Stirling's interest in them and his efforts to understand them. We summarize our current understanding that short, soft, repeating bursts are produced by magnetic neutron stars; short, hard bursts are produced by the mergers of neutron star-neutron star binaries; and long, hard bursts are produced by the core collapse of massive stars that have lost their hydrogen and helium envelopes. We then discuss some important open questions about GRBs and how they might be answered. We conclude by describing the recent serendipitous discovery of an x-ray burst of exactly the kind he proposed, and the insights into core collapse supernovae and GRBs that it provided.

  8. Pulse Phase Dependence of the Magnetar Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chetana Jain; Anjan Dutta; Biswajit Paul

    2007-12-01

    We report here results from a study of X-ray bursts from 3 magnetar candidates (SGR 1806–20, SGR 1900+14 and AXP 1E 2259+586). We have searched for a pulse phase dependence of the X-ray burst rate from these sources. X-ray light curves were obtained with the Proportional Counter Array on-board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the periods of intense burst activity in these sources. On detailed analysis of the three sources, we found a very significant burst rate for all pulsar phases. However, some locations appear to produce bursts slightly more often, rendering the non-isotropic distribution. Only in the case of SGR 1900+14, there is a clear pulse phase dependence of burst rate.

  9. Physics of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, D. Q.

    1984-01-01

    Attention is given to the accumulating evidence for the view that gamma-ray bursts come from strongly magnetic neutron stars, discussing the physical properties of the emission region and the radiation processes expected in strong magnetic fields, and emphasizing that the observed burst spectra require that the emission region be optically thin. This entails that the energy of the emitting plasma and/or the plasma itself be continuously replenished during a burst, and that the cooling time scale of the emitting plasma be much shorter than the observed duration of the bursts. This characteristic of the cooling time scale implies that the burst intensity and spectrum can vary on extremely short time scales, and that the burst duration must have a separate explanation. It is emphasized that synchrotron emission is favored as the gamma-ray production mechanism; it is the only mechanism capable of satisfying the optical thinness constraint while producing the observed luminosity.

  10. Statistics of gamma ray burst temporal asymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Link, B; Link, Bennett; Epstein, Richard

    1996-01-01

    We study the temporal asymmetry of over 600 bursts from the BATSE 3B catalog, encompassing a 200-fold range in peak flux. By comparing the rates of rise and fall of the flux near the highest burst peak, we find that about two-thirds of the bursts exhibit a preferred asymmetry in the sense that the flux rises more rapidly than it falls, confirming the conclusions of previous studies employing smaller databases. The statistical significance of the average time asymmetry of the sample is >99.999\\%; therefore, models that predict time symmetry of the burst profile are ruled out. We find no statistically significant correlation between burst temporal asymmetry and peak. This result is consistent with both cosmological and local interpretations of the gamma ray burst phenomenon.

  11. United assembly algorithm for optical burst switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhui Yu(于金辉); Yijun Yang(杨教军); Yuehua Chen(陈月华); Ge Fan(范戈)

    2003-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising optical switching technology. The burst assembly algorithm controls burst assembly, which significantly impacts performance of OBS network. This paper provides a new assembly algorithm, united assembly algorithm, which has more practicability than conventional algorithms. In addition, some factors impacting selections of parameters of this algorithm are discussed and the performance of this algorithm is studied by computer simulation.

  12. Hedgehog signaling pathway is active in GBM with GLI1 mRNA expression showing a single continuous distribution rather than discrete high/low clusters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikas Chandra

    Full Text Available Hedgehog (Hh signaling pathway is a valid therapeutic target in a wide range of malignancies. We focus here on glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, a lethal malignancy of the central nervous system (CNS. By analyzing RNA-sequencing based transcriptomics data on 149 clinical cases of TCGA-GBM database we show here a strong correlation (r = 0.7 between GLI1 and PTCH1 mRNA expression--as a hallmark of the canonical Hh-pathway activity in this malignancy. GLI1 mRNA expression varied in 3 orders of magnitude among the GBM patients of the same cohort showing a single continuous distribution-unlike the discrete high/low-GLI1 mRNA expressing clusters of medulloblastoma (MB. When compared with MB as a reference, the median GLI1 mRNA expression in GBM appeared 14.8 fold lower than that of the "high-Hh" cluster of MB but 5.6 fold higher than that of the "low-Hh" cluster of MB. Next, we demonstrated statistically significant up- and down-regulation of GLI1 mRNA expressions in GBM patient-derived low-passage neurospheres in vitro by sonic hedgehog ligand-enriched conditioned media (shh-CM and by Hh-inhibitor drug vismodegib respectively. We also showed clinically achievable dose (50 μM of vismodegib alone to be sufficient to induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in these low-passage GBM neurospheres in vitro. Vismodegib showed an effect on the neurospheres, both by down-regulating GLI1 mRNA expression and by inducing apoptosis/cell cycle arrest, irrespective of their relative endogenous levels of GLI1 mRNA expression. We conclude from our study that this single continuous distribution pattern of GLI1 mRNA expression technically puts almost all GBM patients in a single group rather than discrete high- or low-clusters in terms of Hh-pathway activity. That is suggestive of therapies with Hh-pathway inhibitor drugs in this malignancy without a need for further stratification of patients on the basis of relative levels of Hh-pathway activity among them.

  13. Bubble burst as jamming phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Saito, Yukiko Umeno; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    Recently research on bubble and its burst attract much interest of researchers in various field such as economics and physics. Economists have been regarding bubble as a disorder in prices. However, this research strategy has overlooked an importance of the volume of transactions. In this paper, we have proposed a bubble burst model by focusing the transactions incorporating a traffic model that represents spontaneous traffic jam. We find that the phenomenon of bubble burst shares many similar properties with traffic jam formation by comparing data taken from US housing market. Our result suggests that the transaction could be a driving force of bursting phenomenon.

  14. Two classes of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    1995-01-01

    Data from the 3B Catalogue suggest that short and long GRB are the results of different classes of events, rather than different parameter values within a single class: Short bursts have harder spectra in the BATSE bands, but chiefly long bursts are detected at photon energies over 1 MeV, implying that their hard photons are radiated by a process not found in short bursts. The values of \\langle V/V_{max} \\rangle for short and long bursts differ by 4.3 \\sigma, implying different spatial distributions. Only the soft gamma-ray radiation mechanisms are the same in both classes.

  15. Microseismic Precursory Characteristics of Rock Burst Hazard in Mining Areas Near a Large Residual Coal Pillar: A Case Study from Xuzhuang Coal Mine, Xuzhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, An-ye; Dou, Lin-ming; Wang, Chang-bin; Yao, Xiao-xiao; Dong, Jing-yuan; Gu, Yu

    2016-11-01

    Identification of precursory characteristics is a key issue for rock burst prevention. The aim of this research is to provide a reference for assessing rock burst risk and determining potential rock burst risk areas in coal mining. In this work, the microseismic multidimensional information for the identification of rock bursts and spatial-temporal pre-warning was investigated in a specific coalface which suffered high rock burst risk in a mining area near a large residual coal pillar. Firstly, microseismicity evolution prior to a disastrous rock burst was qualitatively analysed, and the abnormal clustering of seismic sources, abnormal variations in daily total energy release, and event counts can be regarded as precursors to rock burst. Secondly, passive tomographic imaging has been used to locate high seismic activity zones and assess rock burst hazard when the coalface passes through residual pillar areas. The results show that high-velocity or velocity anomaly regions correlated well with strong seismic activities in future mining periods and that passive tomography has the potential to describe, both quantitatively and periodically, hazardous regions and assess rock burst risk. Finally, the bursting strain energy index was further used for short-term spatial-temporal pre-warning of rock bursts. The temporal sequence curve and spatial contour nephograms indicate that the status of the danger and the specific hazardous zones, and levels of rock burst risk can be quantitatively and rapidly analysed in short time and in space. The multidimensional precursory characteristic identification of rock bursts, including qualitative analysis, intermediate and short-time quantitative predictions, can guide the choice of measures implemented to control rock bursts in the field, and provides a new approach to monitor and forecast rock bursts in space and time.

  16. Transcriptional burst frequency and burst size are equally modulated across the human genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dar, Roy D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Simpson, Michael L [ORNL; Weinberger, Leor S. [University of California, San Diego; Razooky, B [University of California, San Diego; Cox, Chris D. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); McCollum, James M. [Miami University; Trimeloni, Tom [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richland; Singh, A [University of California, San Diego

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression occurs either as an episodic process, characterized by pulsatile bursts or as a constitutive, Poisson-like accumulation of gene products. It is not clear which mode of gene expression (constitutive versus bursty) predominates across a genome or how transcriptional dynamics are influenced by genomic position and promoter sequence. Here, we use time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, building off of theoretical studies that exploit the time-resolved structure of stochastic fluctuations in gene expression, to develop a three-dimensional method for mapping underlying gene-regulatory mechanisms. Over 8,000 individual human genomic loci were analyzed, and at virtually all loci, episodic bursting as opposed to constitutive expression was found to be the predominant mode of expression. Quantitative analysis of the expression dynamics at these 8,000 loci indicates that both frequency and size of transcriptional bursts vary equally across the human genome independent of promoter sequence. Strikingly, weaker expression loci modulate burst frequency to increase activity, while stronger expression loci modulate burst size to increase activity. Transcriptional activators, such as TNF, generate similar patterns of change in burst frequency and burst size. In summary, transcriptional bursting dominates across the human genome, both burst frequency and burst size vary by chromosomal location, and transcriptional activators alter burst frequency and burst size, depending on the expression level of the locus.

  17. Analysis of historic bursts and burst detection in water supply areas of different size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Trietsch, E.A.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in water distribution networks lead to water losses and a risk of damaging the urban environment. We studied hydraulic data and customer contact records of 44 real bursts for a better understanding of the phenomena. We found that most bursts were reported to the water company shortly aft

  18. Magnetars and Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Bucciantini, N

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, evidences for a long-lived and sustained engine in Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) have increased the attention to the so called millisecond-magnetar model, as a competitive alternative to the standard collapsar scenario. I will review here the key aspects of the {\\it millisecond magnetar} model for Long Duration Gamma Ray Bursts (LGRBs). I will briefly describe what constraints, present observations put on any engine model, both in term of energetic, outflow properties, and the relation with the associated Supernova (SN). For each of these I will show how the millisecond magnetar model satisfies the requirements, what are the limits of the model, how can it be further tested, and what observations might be used to discriminate against it. I will also discuss numerical results that show the importance of the confinement by the progenitor star in explaining the formation of a collimated outflow, how a detailed model for the evolution of the central engine can be built, and show that a wide varie...

  19. Coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition in a parabolic bursting model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Lin; Zhang, Jia; Lang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Xiuhui

    2013-03-01

    The transition from tonic spiking to bursting is an important dynamic process that carry physiologically relevant information. In this work, coupling and noise induced spiking-bursting transition is investigated in a parabolic bursting model with specific discussion on their cooperation effects. Fast/slow analysis shows that weak coupling may help to induce the bursting by changing the geometric property of the fast subsystem so that the original unstable periodical solution are stabilized. It turned out that noise can play the similar stabilization role and induce bursting at appropriate moderate intensity. However, their cooperation may either strengthen or weaken the overall effect depending on the choice of noise level.

  20. Coding Bounds for Multiple Phased-Burst Correction and Single Burst Correction Codes

    CERN Document Server

    Fong, Wai Han

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, two upper bounds on the achievable code rate of linear block codes for multiple phased-burst correction (MPBC) are presented. One bound is constrained to a maximum correctable cyclic burst length within every subblock, or equivalently a constraint on the minimum error free length or gap within every phased-burst. This bound, when reduced to the special case of a bound for single burst correction (SBC), is shown to be the Abramson bound when the cyclic burst length is less than half the block length. The second MPBC bound is developed without the minimum error free gap constraint and is used as a comparison to the first bound.

  1. The SVOM gamma-ray burst mission

    CERN Document Server

    Cordier, B; Atteia, J -L; Basa, S; Claret, A; Daigne, F; Deng, J; Dong, Y; Godet, O; Goldwurm, A; Götz, D; Han, X; Klotz, A; Lachaud, C; Osborne, J; Qiu, Y; Schanne, S; Wu, B; Wang, J; Wu, C; Xin, L; Zhang, B; Zhang, S -N

    2015-01-01

    We briefly present the science capabilities, the instruments, the operations, and the expected performance of the SVOM mission. SVOM (Space-based multiband astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) is a Chinese-French space mission dedicated to the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the next decade. The SVOM mission encompasses a satellite carrying four instruments to detect and localize the prompt GRB emission and measure the evolution of the afterglow in the visible band and in X-rays, a VHF communication system enabling the fast transmission of SVOM alerts to the ground, and a ground segment including a wide angle camera and two follow-up telescopes. The pointing strategy of the satellite has been optimized to favor the detection of GRBs located in the night hemisphere. This strategy enables the study of the optical emission in the first minutes after the GRB with robotic observatories and the early spectroscopy of the optical afterglow with large telescopes to measure the redshifts. The study of GRBs in the...

  2. Photospheric radius expansion during magnetar bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.L. Watts; C. Kouveliotou; A.J. van der Horst; E. Göğüş; Y. Kaneko; M. van der Klis; R.A.M.J. Wijers; A.K. Harding; M.G. Baring

    2010-01-01

    On 2008 August 24 the new magnetar SGR 0501+4516 (discovered by Swift) emitted a bright burst with a pronounced double-peaked structure in hard X-rays, reminiscent of the double-peaked temporal structure seen in some bright thermonuclear bursts on accreting neutron stars. In the latter case this is

  3. Astronomy: Radio burst caught red-handed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcke, Heino

    2017-01-01

    For almost a decade, astronomers have observed intense bursts of radio waves from the distant cosmos whose origins were unknown. The source of one such burst has now been identified, but this has only deepened the mystery. See Letter p.58

  4. Using temporal bursts for query modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peetz, M.H.; Meij, E.; de Rijke, M.

    2014-01-01

    We present an approach to query modeling that leverages the temporal distribution of documents in an initially retrieved set of documents. In news-related document collections such distributions tend to exhibit bursts. Here, we define a burst to be a time period where unusually many documents are pu

  5. FRBCAT: The Fast Radio Burst Catalogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroff, E.; Barr, E. D.; Jameson, A.; Keane, E. F.; Bailes, M.; Kramer, M.; Morello, V.; Tabbara, D.; van Straten, W.

    2016-09-01

    Here, we present a catalogue of known Fast Radio Burst sources in the form of an online catalogue, FRBCAT. The catalogue includes information about the instrumentation used for the observations for each detected burst, the measured quantities from each observation, and model-dependent quantities derived from observed quantities. To aid in consistent comparisons of burst properties such as width and signal-to-noise ratios, we have re-processed all the bursts for which we have access to the raw data, with software which we make available. The originally derived properties are also listed for comparison. The catalogue is hosted online as a Mysql database which can also be downloaded in tabular or plain text format for off-line use. This database will be maintained for use by the community for studies of the Fast Radio Burst population as it grows.

  6. Bright 30 THz Impulsive Solar Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, P; Marcon, R; Kudaka, A S; Cabezas, D P; Cassiano, M M; Francile, C; Fernandes, L O T; Ramirez, R F Hidalgo; Luoni, M; Marun, A; Pereyra, P; de Souza, R V

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive 30 THz continuum bursts have been recently observed in solar flares, utilizing small telescopes with a unique and relatively simple optical setup concept. The most intense burst was observed together with a GOES X2 class event on October 27, 2014, also detected at two sub-THz frequencies, RHESSI X-rays and SDO/HMI and EUV. It exhibits strikingly good correlation in time and in space with white light flare emission. It is likely that this association may prove to be very common. All three 30 THz events recently observed exhibited intense fluxes in the range of 104 solar flux units, considerably larger than those measured for the same events at microwave and sub-mm wavelengths. The 30 THz burst emission might be part of the same spectral burst component found at sub-THz frequencies. The 30 THz solar bursts open a promising new window for the study of flares at their origin

  7. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-yang Dai

    2004-01-01

    Objective To review imaging use in the diagnosis ofthoracolumbar burst fractures and to determine the diagnostic value of different imaging methods.Methods One hundred and fourteen patients with 120 thoracolumbar burst fractures were retrospectively reviewed. Plain radiographs were available in all cases; CT scans and MRI were obtained in 96 and 74 cases, respectively.Results A total of 27 burst fractures were misdiagnosed as other types of fractures on radiographs alone, and accounted for 22.5% of all fractures. The results indicated that plain radiographs often fail to delineate the pathological features of thoracolumbar burst fractures, leading to delay in diagnosis.Conclusion In regard to thoracolumbar injury diagnosis, burst fractures should be differentiated from compression fractures. CT should be routinely indicated and MRI examination, when necessary, may be simultaneously considered.

  8. Fluctuation analysis of solar radio bursts associated with geoeffective X-class flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, T. B.; Rosa, R. R.; Bolzan, M. J. A.; Rocha Fernandes, F. C.; Sawant, H. S.; Karlicky`, M.

    2011-07-01

    High temporal resolution solar observations in the decimetric range (1-3 GHz) can provide additional information on solar active regions dynamics and thus contribute to better understanding of solar geoeffective events as flares and coronal mass ejections. The June 6, 2000 flares are a set of remarkable geoeffective eruptive phenomena observed as solar radio bursts (SRB) by means of the 3 GHz Ondrejov Observatory radiometer. We have selected and analyzed, applying detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), three decimetric bursts associated to X1.1, X1.2 and X2.3 flare-classes, respectively. The association with geomagnetic activity is also reported. DFA method is performed in the framework of a radio burst automatic monitoring system. Our results may characterize the SRB evolution, computing the DFA scaling exponent, scanning the SRB time series by a short windowing before the extreme event. For the first time, the importance of DFA in the context of SRB monitoring analysis is presented.

  9. Ultra-high Burst Strength of CVD Graphene Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Luda; Boutilier, Michael; Kidambi, Piran; Karnik, Rohit; Microfluidics; Nanofluidics Research Lab Team

    2015-11-01

    Porous graphene membranes have significant potential in gas separation, water desalination and nanofiltration. Understanding the mechanical strength of porous graphene is crucial because membrane separations can involve high pressures. We studied the burst strength of CVD graphene membrane placed on porous support at applied pressures up to 100 bar by monitoring the gas flow rate across the membrane as a function of pressure. Increase of gas flow rate with pressure allowed for extraction of the burst fraction of graphene as it failed under increasing pressure. We also studied the effect of sub-nanometer pores on the ability of graphene to withstand pressure. The results showed that porous graphene membranes can withstand pressures comparable to or even higher than the >50 bar pressures encountered in water desalination, with non-porous CVD graphene exhibiting even higher mechanical strength. Our study shows that porous polycrystalline CVD graphene has ultra-high burst strength under applied pressure, suggesting the possibility for its use in high-pressure membrane separations. Principal Investigator

  10. TORTORA discovery of Naked-Eye Burst fast optical variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, Grigory; Karpov, Sergey; Bondar, Sergey; Greco, Giuseppe; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Piccioni, Adalberto; Molinari, Emilio; Chincarini, Guido

    2008-10-01

    Features characterizing gamma-ray bursts in the different spectral bands may be a clue for the nature of their inner engine. Up to now, only several bursts have been observed in optical band during the gamma activity, and the only one-GRB080319B-was covered from rise till fall with high temporal resolution. Here we discuss these data, acquired with TORTORA fast wide-field monitoring optical camera, as well as results of its analysis. The camera observed the position of Naked-Eye Burst, GRB080318B, before, during and after the trigger. It detected the fast rise of optical emission, which reached the peak of V 5.3 at the eighteenth second, had a complex evolution till T+43s and monotonously faded then. The brightest part of the light curve contains two 15-20 s segments with different fluxes, each having two clearly-seen peaks of 5-8 s duration; all four peaks look quasi-periodic with separation of 9 s. There is no clear evidence of any sub-second variability. However, there are signs of quasi-periodic variability on 1s time scale at around the last peak (T+40 till T+50). The general properties of the optical light curve and its variability time scales look similar to the gamma one, but there is no clear correlation between them. This raises serious problems in interpretation of mechanisms generating such variability.

  11. TU-CD-BRB-04: Automated Radiomic Features Complement the Prognostic Value of VASARI in the TCGA-GBM Dataset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez, E Rios [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute | Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Narayan, V [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Womens Hospital, Harvard Medic, Boston, MA (United States); Grossmann, P [Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Dunn, W; Gutman, D [Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States); Aerts, H [Dana-Farber/Brigham Womens Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the complementary prognostic value of automated Radiomic features to that of radiologist-annotated VASARI features in TCGA-GBM MRI dataset. Methods: For 96 GBM patients, pre-operative MRI images were obtained from The Cancer Imaging Archive. The abnormal tumor bulks were manually defined on post-contrast T1w images. The contrast-enhancing and necrotic regions were segmented using FAST. From these sub-volumes and the total abnormal tumor bulk, a set of Radiomic features quantifying phenotypic differences based on the tumor intensity, shape and texture, were extracted from the post-contrast T1w images. Minimum-redundancy-maximum-relevance (MRMR) was used to identify the most informative Radiomic, VASARI and combined Radiomic-VASARI features in 70% of the dataset (training-set). Multivariate Cox-proportional hazards models were evaluated in 30% of the dataset (validation-set) using the C-index for OS. A bootstrap procedure was used to assess significance while comparing the C-Indices of the different models. Results: Overall, the Radiomic features showed a moderate correlation with the radiologist-annotated VASARI features (r = −0.37 – 0.49); however that correlation was stronger for the Tumor Diameter and Proportion of Necrosis VASARI features (r = −0.71 – 0.69). After MRMR feature selection, the best-performing Radiomic, VASARI, and Radiomic-VASARI Cox-PH models showed a validation C-index of 0.56 (p = NS), 0.58 (p = NS) and 0.65 (p = 0.01), respectively. The combined Radiomic-VASARI model C-index was significantly higher than that obtained from either the Radiomic or VASARI model alone (p = <0.001). Conclusion: Quantitative volumetric and textural Radiomic features complement the qualitative and semi-quantitative annotated VASARI feature set. The prognostic value of informative qualitative VASARI features such as Eloquent Brain and Multifocality is increased with the addition of quantitative volumetric and textural features from the

  12. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsat, Gary; Pollack, Gerald S

    2012-01-01

    Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes - bursts - that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing - the auditory receptor - already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2's sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  13. Methods of rock burst prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genkin, V.A.; Minin, Yu.Ya.; Morozov, G.D.; Proskuryakov, V.M.; Cmirnov, V.A.

    1979-07-01

    Some methods of predicting rock bursts in underground coal and iron ore mines are evaluated: using BP-18 indenters and the MGD indenter with automatic recording; seismic method consisting in measuring the speed of shock waves travelling through various layers (apparatus SB-20 is designed for use in coal mines); electrometric method (measuring resistance between two electrodes when electric currents flow through coal and rocks). The design of the AEhSSh-1 measuring instrument, used in the electrometric method in coal mines is also described. Each of the methods is described and mathematical fomulae used as their theoretical basis are presented. The calculating process is explained and brief information on the design and use of the measuring instrument is given. The methods are evaluated from the viewpoint of precision. (In Russian)

  14. Delays of optical bursts in simultaneous optical and X-ray observations of MXB 1636-53

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, M.; Mitsuda, K.; Ohashi, T.; Inoue, H.; Koyama, K.; Makino, F.; Makishima, K.; Murakami, T.; Oda, M.; Ogawara, Y.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of simultaneous optical and X-ray bursts from 4U/MXB 1636-53 were made using the Hakucho burst monitor system and optical telescopes at the European Southern Observatory during 1979 and 1980. The six best cases among the 10 coinciding observations are analyzed in terms of a model in which the optical emission is the result of reprocessing of X-rays (through blackbody heating). From this analysis, the temperature (spatially averaged) and size of a reprocessor, and the smearing and delay of the optical bursts are obtained. For the maximum temperatures of the optical reprocessor, the values differ from burst to burst, ranging from about 3 x 10 to the 4th to about 10 to the 5th K. The present analysis suggests that the size of the reprocessor varies by a factor of a few. For the smearing of the optical bursts an upper limit of a few seconds is derived. The most important result of this analysis is that the delay times are not the same for all bursts. The possible constraints which these results put on a low-mass binary model of this burst source are discussed.

  15. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Unique Five-Week VLT Study of the Polarisation of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow "Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)" are certainly amongst the most dramatic events known in astrophysics. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays, first detected in the late 1960's by military satellites, last from less than one second to several minutes. GRBs have been found to be situated at extremely large ("cosmological") distances. The energy released in a few seconds during such an event is larger than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are indeed the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe, cf. ESO PR 08/99 and ESO PR 20/00. During the past years circumstantial evidence has mounted that GRBs signal the collapse of extremely massive stars, the so-called hypernovae. This was finally demonstrated some months ago when astronomers, using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), documented in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the light source ("the optical afterglow") of the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 (cf. ESO PR 16/03). A conclusive and direct link between cosmological gamma-ray bursts and explosions of very massive stars was provided on this occasion. Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030329 was discovered on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer spacecraft. Follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) showed the burst to have a redshift of 0.1685 [1]. This corresponds to a distance of about 2,650 million light-years, making GRB 030329 the second-nearest long-duration GRB ever detected. The proximity of GRB 030329 resulted in very bright afterglow emission, permitting the most extensive follow-up observations of any afterglow to date. A team of astronomers [2] led by Jochen Greiner of the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany) decided to make use of this unique opportunity to study the

  16. X-ray burst-induced spectral variability in 4U 1728-34

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajava, J. J. E.; Sánchez-Fernández, C.; Kuulkers, E.; Poutanen, J.

    2017-03-01

    Aims: INTEGRAL has been monitoring the Galactic center region for more than a decade. Over this time it has detected hundreds of type-I X-ray bursts from the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34, also known as the slow burster. Our aim is to study the connection between the persistent X-ray spectra and the X-ray burst spectra in a broad spectral range. Methods: We performed spectral modeling of the persistent emission and the X-ray burst emission of 4U 1728-34 using data from the INTEGRAL JEM-X and IBIS/ISGRI instruments. Results: We constructed a hardness intensity diagram to track spectral state variations. In the soft state, the energy spectra are characterized by two thermal components likely coming from the accretion disc and the boundary/spreading layer, together with a weak hard X-ray tail that we detect in 4U 1728-34 for the first time in the 40 to 80 keV range. In the hard state, the source is detected up to 200 keV and the spectrum can be described by a thermal Comptonization model plus an additional component: either a powerlaw tail or reflection. By stacking 123 X-ray bursts in the hard state, we detect emission up to 80 keV during the X-ray bursts. We find that during the bursts the emission above 40 keV decreases by a factor of approximately three with respect to the persistent emission level. Conclusions: Our results suggest that the enhanced X-ray burst emission changes the spectral properties of the accretion disc in the hard state. The likely cause is an X-ray burst induced cooling of the electrons in the inner hot flow near the neutron star.

  17. Kallikrein transduced mesenchymal stem cells protect against anti-GBM disease and lupus nephritis by ameliorating inflammation and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajuan Li

    Full Text Available Previously we have shown that kallikreins (klks play a renoprotective role in nephrotoxic serum induced nephritis. In this study, we have used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs as vehicles to deliver klks into the injured kidneys and have measured their therapeutic effect on experimental antibody induced nephritis and lupus nephritis. Human KLK-1 (hKLK1 gene was transduced into murine MSCs using a retroviral vector to generate a stable cell line, hKLK1-MSC, expressing high levels of hKLK1. 129/svj mice subjected to anti-GBM induced nephritis were transplanted with 10(6 hKLK1-MSCs and hKLK1 expression was confirmed in the kidneys. Compared with vector-MSCs injected mice, the hKLK1-MSCs treated mice showed significantly reduced proteinuria, blood urea nitrogen (BUN and ameliorated renal pathology. Using the same strategy, we treated lupus-prone B6.Sle1.Sle3 bicongenic mice with hKLK1-MSCs and demonstrated that hKLK1-MSCs delivery also attenuated lupus nephritis. Mechanistically, hKLK1-MSCs reduced macrophage and T-lymphocyte infiltration into the kidney by suppressing the expression of inflammation cytokines. Moreover, hKLK1 transduced MSCs were more resistant to oxidative stress-induced apoptosis. These findings advance genetically modified MSCs as potential gene delivery tools for targeting therapeutic agents to the kidneys in order to modulate inflammation and oxidative stress in lupus nephritis.

  18. Comparison of WATCH and IPN Locations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, K.; Lund, Niels; Brandt, Søren;

    1994-01-01

    The WATCH all sky monitors aboard the Granat and EURECA spacecraft have the capability of independently localizing gamma‐ray bursts to error circles whose 3 sigma radii are 1 degree or less. These are the most accurate single‐experiment localizations currently achievable. In those cases where bot...

  19. Observational properties of decameter type IV bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Valentin; Brazhenko, Anatoly; Rucker, Helmut; Konovalenko, Alexander; Briand, Carine; Dorovskyy, Vladimir; Zarka, Philippe; Frantzusenko, Anatoly; Panchenko, Michael; Poedts, Stefan; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz; Shergelashvili, Bidzina

    2013-04-01

    Oscillations of decameter type IV bursts were registered during observations of solar radio emission by UTR-2, URAN-2 and NDA in 2011-2012. Large majority of these bursts were accompanied by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), which were observed by SOHO and STEREO in the visible light. Only in some cases decameter type IV bursts were not associated with CMEs. The largest periods of oscillations P were some tens of minutes. There were some modes of long periods of oscillations simultaneously. Periods of oscillations in flux and in polarization profiles were close. Detailed properties of oscillations at different frequencies were analyzed on the example of two type IV bursts. One of them was observed on April 7, 2011 when a CME happened. Another one (August 1, 2011) was registered without any CME. The 7 April type IV burst had two periods in the frames 75-85 and 35-85 minutes. Interesting feature of these oscillations is decreasing periods with time. The observed decreasing rates dP/dt equaled 0.03-0.07. Concerning type IV burst observed on August 1, 2011 the period of its oscillations increases from 17 min. at 30 MHz to 44 min. at 10 MHz. Connection of type IV burst oscillations with oscillations of magnetic arches and CMEs at corresponding altitudes are discussed. The work is fulfilled in the frame of FP7 project "SOLSPANET".

  20. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  1. Investigating signatures of cosmological time dilation in duration measures of prompt gamma-ray burst light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Littlejohns, O M

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution with redshift of three measures of gamma-ray burst (GRB) duration ($T_{\\rm 90}$, $T_{\\rm 50}$ and $T_{\\rm R45}$) in a fixed rest frame energy band for a sample of 232 Swift/BAT detected GRBs. Binning the data in redshift we demonstrate a trend of increasing duration with increasing redshift that can be modelled with a power-law for all three measures. Comparing redshift defined subsets of rest-frame duration reveals that the observed distributions of these durations are broadly consistent with cosmological time dilation. To ascertain if this is an instrumental effect, a similar analysis of Fermi/GBM data for the 57 bursts detected by both instruments is conducted, but inconclusive due to small number statistics. We then investigate under-populated regions of the duration redshift parameter space. We propose that the lack of low-redshift, long duration GRBs is a physical effect due to the sample being volume limited at such redshifts. However, we also find that the high-redshift, short d...

  2. Earth Occultation Imaging Applied to BATSE -- Application to a Combined BATSE-GBM Survey of the Hard X-Ray Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Yuan; Case, Gary; Ling, James; Wheaton, William

    2013-01-01

    A combined BATSE-GBM hard X-ray catalog is presented based on Earth Occultation Imaging applied to a reanalysis of BATSE data. An imaging approach has been developed for the reanalysis of Earth Occultation analysis of BATSE data. The standard occultation analysis depends on a predetermined catalog of potential sources, so that a real source not present in the catalog may induce systematic errors when source counts associated with an uncatalogued source are incorrectly attributed to catalog sources. The goal of the imaging analysis is to find a complete set of hard X-ray sources, including sources not in the original BATSE occultation catalog. Using the imaging technique, we have identified 15 known sources and 17 unidentified sources and added them to the BATSE occultation catalog. The resulting expanded BATSE catalog of sources observed during 1991-2000 is compared to the ongoing GBM survey.

  3. The Arecibo Fast Radio Burst: Dense Circum-burst Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, S R; Neill, J D

    2015-01-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRB) has been extensively debated. Here we investigate FRB121102, detected at Arecibo telescope and remarkable for its unusually large spectral index. After extensive study we conclude that the spectral index is caused by a nebula with free-free absorption. We find that putative nebula must lie beyond the Milky Way. We conclude that FRBs are of extra-galactic origin and that they arise in dense star-forming regions. The challenge with extra-galactic models is the the high volumetric rate of FRBs. This high rate allows us to eliminate all models of catastrophic stellar deaths. Hyper-giant flares from young magnetars emerge as the most likely progenitors. Some of the consequences are: (i) Intergalactic FRB models can be safely ignored. (ii) The rich ISM environment of young magnetars can result in significant contribution to DM, Rotation Measure (RM) and in some cases to significant free-free optical depth. (iii) The star-forming regions in the host galaxies can contribute signi...

  4. The 999th Swift gamma-ray burst: Some like it thermal. A multiwavelength study of GRB 151027A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappo, F.; Pescalli, A.; Oganesyan, G.; Ghirlanda, G.; Giroletti, M.; Melandri, A.; Campana, S.; Ghisellini, G.; Salafia, O. S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Bernardini, M. G.; Covino, S.; Carretti, E.; Celotti, A.; D'Elia, V.; Nava, L.; Palazzi, E.; Poppi, S.; Prandoni, I.; Righini, S.; Rossi, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Testa, V.; Venturi, T.; Vergani, S. D.

    2017-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of GRB 151027A. This is the 999th gamma-ray burst detected by the Swift satellite and it has a densely sampled emission in the X-ray and optical band and has been observed and detected in the radio up to 140 days after the prompt. The multiwavelength light curve from 500 s to 140 days can be modelled through a standard forward shock afterglow, but it requires an additional emission component to reproduce the early X-ray and optical emission. We present optical observations performed with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) 19.6, 33.9, and 92.3 days after the trigger which show a bump with respect to a standard afterglow flux decay and are interpreted as possibly due to the underlying supernova and host galaxy (at a level of 0.4 μJy in the optical R band, RAB 25). Radio observations, performed with the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) and Medicina in single-dish mode and with the European Very Long Baseline Interferometer (VLBI) Network and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), between day 4 and 140 suggest that the burst exploded in an environment characterized by a density profile scaling with the distance from the source (wind profile). A remarkable feature of the prompt emission is the presence of a bright flare 100 s after the trigger, lasting 70 s in the soft X-ray band, which was simultaneously detected from the optical band up to the MeV energy range. By combining Swift-BAT/XRT and Fermi-GBM data, the broadband (0.3-1000 keV) time resolved spectral analysis of the flare reveals the coexistence of a non-thermal (power law) and thermal blackbody components. The blackbody component contributes up to 35% of the luminosity in the 0.3-1000 keV band. The γ-ray emission observed in Swift-BAT and Fermi-GBM anticipates and lasts less than the soft X-ray emission as observed by Swift-XRT, arguing against a Comptonization origin. The blackbody component could either be produced by an outflow

  5. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutation status and Rad51 determine the response of glioblastoma (GBM to multimodality therapy with cetuximab, temozolomide and radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phyllis Rachelle Wachsberger

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: EGFR amplification and mutation (i.e., EGFRvIII are found in 40% of primary GBM tumors and are believed to contribute to tumor development and therapeutic resistance. This study was designed to investigate how EGFR mutational status modulates response to multimodality treatment with cetuximab, an anti-EGFR inhibitor, the chemotherapeutic agent, temozolamide (TMZ and radiation therapy (RT Methods and Materials: In vitro and in vivo experiments were performed on two isogenic U87 GBM cell lines: one overexpressing wildtype EGFR (U87wtEGFR and the other overexpressing EGFRvIII (U87EGFRvIII. Results: Xenografts harboring EGFRvIII were more sensitive to TMZ alone and TMZ in combination with RT and/or cetuximab than xenografts expressing wtEGFR. In vitro experiments demonstrated that U87EGFRvIII-expressing tumors appear to harbor defective DNA homologous recombination repair in the form of Rad51 processing, Conclusions: The difference in sensitivity between EGFR-expressing and EGFRvIII-expressing tumors to combined modality treatment may help in the future tailoring of GBM therapy to subsets of patients expressing more or less of the EGFR mutant.

  6. Disruption of Parallel and Converging Signaling Pathways Contributes to the Synergistic Antitumor Effects of Simultaneous mTOR and EGFR Inhibition in GBM Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi D. Rao

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Elevated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR signaling are known to contribute to the malignant properties of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, which include uncontrolled cell proliferation and evasion of apoptosis. Small molecule inhibitors that target these protein kinases have been evaluated in multiple clinical trials for cancer patients, including those with GBM. Here we have examined the cellular and molecular effects of a combined kinase inhibition of mTOR (rapamycin and EGFR (EKI-785 in U87 and U251 GBM cells. Simultaneous treatment with rapamycin and EKI-785 results in synergistic antiproliferative as well as proapoptotic effects. At a molecular level, rapamycin alone significantly decreases S6 phosphorylation, whereas EKI-785 alone promotes substantially reduced signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3 phosphorylation. Treatment with rapamycin alone also increases Akt phosphorylation on Ser-473, but this effect is blocked by a simultaneous administration of EKI-785. Individually, EKI-785 diminishes while rapamycin promotes the binding of the translation inhibitor eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein (4EBP1 to the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E. In spite of these opposing effects, the highest level of 4EBP1-eIF4E binding occurs with the combination of the two inhibitors. These results indicate that the inhibition of EGFR and mTOR has distinct as well as common signaling consequences and provides a molecular rationale forthe synergistic antitumor effects of EKI-785 and rapamycin administration.

  7. Anti-hLAMP2-antibodies and dual positivity for anti-GBM and MPO-ANCA in a patient with relapsing pulmonary-renal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kistler Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary-renal syndrome associated with anti-glomerular basement membrane (GBM antibodies, also known as Goodpasture's syndrome, is a rare but acute and life-threatening condition. One third of patients presenting as anti-GBM antibody positive pulmonary-renal syndrome or rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis are also tested positive for anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA. Whilst anti-GBM disease is considered a non-relapsing condition, the long-term course of double-positive patients is less predictable. Case Presentation We report a patient with such dual positivity, who presented with pulmonary hemorrhage, crescentic glomerulonephritis and membranous nephropathy. Plasmapheresis in combination with immunosuppresive therapy led to a rapid remission but the disease relapsed after two years. The serum of the patient was tested positive for antibodies to human lysosomal membrane protein 2 (hLAMP2, a novel autoantigen in patients with active small-vessel vasculitis (SVV. The anti-hLAMP2 antibody levels correlated positively with clinical disease activity in this patient. Conclusion We hypothesize that this antibody may indicate a clinical course similar to ANCA-associated vasculitis in double-positive patients. However, this needs to be confirmed on comprehensive patient cohorts.

  8. ESTIMATE OF BURSTING PRESSURE OF MILD STEEL PRESSURE VESSEL AND PRESENTATION OF BURSTING FORMULA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Chuanxiang

    2006-01-01

    In order to get more precise bursting pressure formula of mild steel, hundreds of bursting experiments of mild steel pressure vessels such as Q235(Gr.D) and 20R(1020) are done. Based on statistical data of bursting pressure and modification of Faupel formula, a more precise modified formula is given out according to the experimental data. It is proved to be more accurate after examining other bursting pressure value presented in many references. This bursting formula is very accurate in these experiments using pressure vessels with different diameter and shell thickness.Obviously, this modified bursting formula can be used in mild steel pressure vessels with different diameter and thickness of shell.

  9. GRB 140206A: the most distant polarized Gamma-Ray Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Gotz, D; Antier, S; Covino, S; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; Melandri, A

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the prompt gamma-ray emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) is still far from being completely elucidated. The measure of linear polarization is a powerful tool that can be used to put further constraints on the content and magnetization of the GRB relativistic outflows, as well as on the radiation processes at work. To date only a handful of polarization measurements are available for the prompt emission of GRBs. Here we present the analysis of the prompt emission of GRB 140206A, obtained with INTEGRAL/IBIS, Swift/BAT, and Fermi/GBM. Using INTEGRAL/IBIS as a Compton polarimeter we were able to constrain the linear polarization level of the second peak of this GRB as being larger than 28% at 90% c.l. We also present the GRB afterglow optical spectroscopy obtained at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), which allowed us the measure the distance of this GRB, z=2.739. This distance value together with the polarization measure obtained with IBIS, allowed us to derive the deepest and most reliable li...

  10. A SEARCH FOR PULSATIONS IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS TO CONSTRAIN THEIR PROGENITORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dichiara, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Frontera, F. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Amati, L. [INAF-IASF Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-11-10

    We searched for periodic and quasi-periodic signals in the prompt emission of a sample of 44 bright short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected with Fermi/GBM, Swift/BAT, and CGRO/BATSE. The aim was to look for the observational signature of quasi-periodic jet precession, which is expected from black hole (BH)-neutron star (NS) mergers, but not from double NS systems. Thus, this kind of search holds the key to identifying the progenitor systems of short GRBs and, in the interim before gravitational wave detectors become on-lines, represents the only direct way to constrain the progenitors. We tailored our search to the nature of the expected signal by properly stretching the observed light curves by an increasing factor with time, after calibrating the technique with synthetic curves. None of our GRBs showed evidence for periodic or quasi-periodic signals. In particular, for the seven unambiguously short GRBs with the best signal-to-noise ratios, we obtained significant upper limits to the amplitude of the possible oscillations. This result suggests that BH-NS systems do not dominate the population of short GRB progenitors, as described by the kinematic model of Stone et al.

  11. Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts with ASTRO-H and Fermi

    CERN Document Server

    Ohno, M; Tashiro, M S; Ueno, H; Yonetoku, D; Sameshima, H; Takahashi, T; Seta, H; Mushotzky, R; Yamaoka, K

    2015-01-01

    ASTRO-H, the sixth Japanese X-ray observatory, which is scheduled to be launched by the end of Japanese fiscal year 2015 has a capability to observe the prompt emission from Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) utilizing BGO active shields for the soft gamma-ray detector (SGD). The effective area of the SGD shield detectors is very large and its data acquisition system is optimized for short transients such as short GRBs. Thus, we expect to perform more detailed time-resolved spectral analysis with a combination of ASTRO-H and Fermi LAT/GBM to investigate the gamma-ray emission mechanism of short GRBs. In addition, the environment of the GRB progenitor should be a remarkable objective from the point of view of the chemical evolution of high-z universe. If we can maneuver the spacecraft to the GRBs, we can perform a high-resolution spectroscopy of the X-ray afterglow of GRBs utilizing the onboard micro calorimeter and X-ray CCD camera.

  12. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  13. Gamma-ray burst progenitors

    CERN Document Server

    Levan, Andrew; de Grijs, Richard; Langer, Norbert; Xu, Dong; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-01-01

    We review our current understanding of the progenitors of both long and short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Constraints can be derived from multiple directions, and we use three distinct strands; i) direct observations of GRBs and their host galaxies, ii) parameters derived from modeling, both via population synthesis and direct numerical simulation and iii) our understanding of plausible analog progenitor systems observed in the local Universe. From these joint constraints, we describe the likely routes that can drive massive stars to the creation of long GRBs, and our best estimates of the scenarios that can create compact object binaries which will ultimately form short GRBs, as well as the associated rates of both long and short GRBs. We further discuss how different the progenitors may be in the case of black hole engine or millisecond-magnetar models for the production of GRBs, and how central engines may provide a unifying theme between many classes of extremely luminous transient, from luminous an...

  14. Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, Andrew; Crowther, Paul; de Grijs, Richard; Langer, Norbert; Xu, Dong; Yoon, Sung-Chul

    2016-12-01

    We review our current understanding of the progenitors of both long and short duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Constraints can be derived from multiple directions, and we use three distinct strands; (i) direct observations of GRBs and their host galaxies, (ii) parameters derived from modelling, both via population synthesis and direct numerical simulation and (iii) our understanding of plausible analog progenitor systems observed in the local Universe. From these joint constraints, we describe the likely routes that can drive massive stars to the creation of long GRBs, and our best estimates of the scenarios that can create compact object binaries which will ultimately form short GRBs, as well as the associated rates of both long and short GRBs. We further discuss how different the progenitors may be in the case of black hole engine or millisecond-magnetar models for the production of GRBs, and how central engines may provide a unifying theme between many classes of extremely luminous transient, from luminous and super-luminous supernovae to long and short GRBs.

  15. Long Burst Error Correcting Codes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long burst error mitigation is an enabling technology for the use of Ka band for high rate commercial and government users. Multiple NASA, government, and commercial...

  16. FRBCAT: The Fast Radio Burst Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Jameson, A; Keane, E F; Bailes, M; Kramer, M; Morello, V; Tabbara, D; van Straten, W

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a catalogue of known Fast Radio Burst (FRB) sources in the form of an online catalogue, FRBCAT. The catalogue includes information about the instrumentation used for the observations for each detected burst, the measured quantities from each observation, and model-dependent quantities derived from observed quantities. To aid in consistent comparisons of burst properties such as width and signal-to-noise ratios we have reprocessed all the bursts for which we have access to the raw data, with software which we make available. The originally derived properties are also listed for comparison. The catalogue is hosted online as a MySQL database which can also be downloaded in tabular or plain text format for off-line use. This database will be maintained for use by the community for studies of the FRB population as it grows.

  17. CMEs and frequency cutoff of solar bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, Al.; Konovalenko, Al.; Koval, Ar.; Volvach, Y.; Zarka, P.

    2016-05-01

    Radio observations of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff by the radio telescope UTR-2 (near Kharkiv, Ukraine) at 8-33 MHz on 17-19 August 2012 are presented. Such cutoff may be attributed to the emergence of the burst sources behind limb of the Sun with respect to an observer on the Earth. The events are strongly associated with solar eruptions occurred in a new active region. Ray tracing simulations show that the CMEs play a constructive role for the behind-limb bursts to be detected in ground-based observations. Likely, due to tunnel-like cavities with low density in CMEs, the radio emission of behind-limb solar bursts can be directed towards the Earth.

  18. Bursts from the very early universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silk, J. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Stodolsky, L. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Munich (Germany)]. E-mail: les@mppmu.mpg.de

    2006-07-27

    Bursts of weakly interacting particles such as neutrinos or even more weakly interacting particles such as wimps and gravitons from the very early universe would offer a much deeper 'look back time' to early epochs than is possible with photons. We consider some of the issues related to the existence of such bursts and their detectability. Characterizing the burst rate by a probability P per Hubble four-volume we find, for events in the radiation-dominated era, that the natural unit of description is the present intensity of the CMB times P. The existence of such bursts would make the observation of pheno associated with very early times in cosmology at least conceptually possible. One might even hope to probe the transplanckian epoch if complexes more weakly interacting than the graviton can exist. Other conceivable applications include the potential detectability of the formation of 'pocket universes' in a multiverse.

  19. Plasma Bursts in Deep Penetration Laser Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrňa, L.; Šarbort, M.

    We present an experimental study of the deep penetration laser welding process which aims to analyze the plasma plume oscillations on a short time scale. Using the high-speed camera we show that the plasma comes out of the keyhole in the form of short bursts rather than the continuous flow. We detect these bursts as the short-time intensity oscillations of light emissions coming from the plasma plume. We determine the period of bursts using the statistical signal processing methods and the short-time frequency analysis. Finally, we compare the characteristics of plasma bursts and the geometry of resulting welds carried out on a 2 kW Yb:YAG laser welding machine for the steel workpiece and various welding parameters settings.

  20. Research on experiment and calculation of foam bursting device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    This research presents experimental data on mechanical foam bursting device, based on the high speed of air fluid impinging insidethe foam bursting device, foam bubbles disrupted as a consequence of pressures changed very quickly as shear force and their impact forces. Experimental data on foam-bursting capacity have been presented. Designed device can provide effective foam bursting on collapse foam.

  1. Optimal Codes for the Burst Erasure Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Deep space communications over noisy channels lead to certain packets that are not decodable. These packets leave gaps, or bursts of erasures, in the data stream. Burst erasure correcting codes overcome this problem. These are forward erasure correcting codes that allow one to recover the missing gaps of data. Much of the recent work on this topic concentrated on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. These are more complicated to encode and decode than Single Parity Check (SPC) codes or Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and so far have not been able to achieve the theoretical limit for burst erasure protection. A block interleaved maximum distance separable (MDS) code (e.g., an SPC or RS code) offers near-optimal burst erasure protection, in the sense that no other scheme of equal total transmission length and code rate could improve the guaranteed correctible burst erasure length by more than one symbol. The optimality does not depend on the length of the code, i.e., a short MDS code block interleaved to a given length would perform as well as a longer MDS code interleaved to the same overall length. As a result, this approach offers lower decoding complexity with better burst erasure protection compared to other recent designs for the burst erasure channel (e.g., LDPC codes). A limitation of the design is its lack of robustness to channels that have impairments other than burst erasures (e.g., additive white Gaussian noise), making its application best suited for correcting data erasures in layers above the physical layer. The efficiency of a burst erasure code is the length of its burst erasure correction capability divided by the theoretical upper limit on this length. The inefficiency is one minus the efficiency. The illustration compares the inefficiency of interleaved RS codes to Quasi-Cyclic (QC) LDPC codes, Euclidean Geometry (EG) LDPC codes, extended Irregular Repeat Accumulate (eIRA) codes, array codes, and random LDPC codes previously proposed for burst erasure

  2. Syudy of Token Generation for Burst Traffic Shaping in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Wan; So Won-ho; Lu Ji-guang; Kim Young-chon

    2004-01-01

    Traffic shaping is one of important control operation to guarantee the Quality of Service (QoS) in optical burst switching (OBS) networks. The efficiency of traffic shaping is mainly determined by token generation method. In this paper, token generation methods of traffic shaping are evaluated by using three kinds of probability distribution, and are analyzed in terms of burst blocking probability, throughput and correlation by simulation. The simulation results show that the token generation methods decrease the burst correlation of Label Switched Paths (LSPs), and solve traffic congestion as well. The different burst arrival processes have small impact on the blocking probability for OBS networks.

  3. QoS-guaranteed burst transmission for VoIP service over optical burst switching networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Takuji; Kasahara, Shoji

    2007-08-01

    We propose a burst transmission method that guarantees the voice over Internet protocol (VoIP) service. The proposed method consists of three techniques: round-robin burst assembly with slotted scheduling, priority control with void filling, and hop-based preemption. Each technique is utilized so that the burst loss probability and the burst transmission delay satisfy VoIP quality of service (QoS). We evaluate by simulation the performance of the proposed method in NSFNET with 14 nodes. Numerical examples show that our proposed method is effective for guaranteeing the VoIP QoS while accommodating a large number of VoIP users.

  4. SROSS C-2 Detections of Gamma Ray Bursts and the SGR 1627-41

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Sinha; P. Sreekumar; K. Kasturirangan

    2002-03-01

    The GRB monitor (GRBM) on board the Indian SROSS C-2 satellite has detected 53 classical gamma ray bursts since its launch in May, 1994 till its re-entry in July, 2001. For a subset of 26 events, locations were obtained from simultaneous observations by other gamma-ray detectors in space. The sky distribution of these 26 SROSS C-2 bursts is consistent with isotropy. The distribution of event durations shows evidence for bimodality. There is an evidence for a moderate hardness ratio-intensity (HIC) correlation in the data. The SROSS C-2 GRBM has also detected three episodes of emission from the SGR 1627-41.

  5. MIRAX sensitivity for Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacahui, J. R.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Braga, J.; Castro, M. A.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present the detection capability of the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de RAios-X) experiment for Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). MIRAX is an X-ray astronomy mission designed to perform a wide band hard X-ray (10-200 keV) survey of the sky, especially in the Galactic plane. With a total detection area of 169 cm2, large field of view (FoV, 20 ° × 20 °), angular resolution of 1°45‧ and good spectral and time resolution (∼8% at 60 keV, 10 μs), MIRAX will be optimized for the detection and study of transient sources, such as accreting neutron stars (NS), black holes (BH), Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), and both short and long GRBs. This is especially important because MIRAX is expected to operate in an epoch when probably no other hard X-ray wide-field imager will be active. We have performed detailed simulations of MIRAX GRB observations using the GEANT4 package, including the background spectrum and images of GRB sources in order to provide accurate predictions of the sensitivity for the expected GRB rate to be observed. MIRAX will be capable of detecting ∼44 GRBs per year up to redshifts of ∼4.5. The MIRAX mission will be able to contribute significantly to GRB science by detecting a large number of GRBs per year with wide band spectral response. The observations will contribute mainly to the part of GRB spectra where a thermal emission is predicted by the Fireball model. We also discuss the possibility of detecting GRB afterglows in the X-ray band with MIRAX.

  6. Gamma-Ray Burst Class Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Meegan, Charles A.; Roiger, Richard J.

    2000-01-01

    Guided by the supervised pattern recognition algorithm C4.5 developed by Quinlan in 1986, we examine the three gamma-ray burst classes identified by Mukherjee et al. in 1998. C4.5 provides strong statistical support for this classification. However, with C4.5 and our knowledge of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) instrument, we demonstrate that class 3 (intermediate fluence, intermediate duration, soft) does not have to be a distinct source population: statistical/systematic errors in measuring burst attributes combined with the well-known hardness/intensity correlation can cause low peak flux class 1 (high fluence, long, intermediate hardness) bursts to take on class 3 characteristics naturally. Based on our hypothesis that the third class is not a distinct one, we provide rules so that future events can be placed in either class 1 or class 2 (low fluence, short, hard). We find that the two classes are relatively distinct on the basis of Band's work in 1993 on spectral parameters alpha, beta, and E (sub peak) alone. Although this does not indicate a better basis for classification, it does suggest that different physical conditions exist for class 1 and class 2 bursts. In the process of studying burst class characteristics, we identify a new bias affecting burst fluence and duration measurements. Using a simple model of how burst duration can be underestimated, we show how this fluence duration bias can affect BATSE measurements and demonstrate the type of effect it can have on the BATSE fluence versus peak flux diagram.

  7. Phase analysis method for burst onset prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellino, Flavio; Mazzoni, Alberto; Storace, Marco

    2017-02-01

    The response of bursting neurons to fluctuating inputs is usually hard to predict, due to their strong nonlinearity. For the same reason, decoding the injected stimulus from the activity of a bursting neuron is generally difficult. In this paper we propose a method describing (for neuron models) a mechanism of phase coding relating the burst onsets with the phase profile of the input current. This relation suggests that burst onset may provide a way for postsynaptic neurons to track the input phase. Moreover, we define a method of phase decoding to solve the inverse problem and estimate the likelihood of burst onset given the input state. Both methods are presented here in a unified framework, describing a complete coding-decoding procedure. This procedure is tested by using different neuron models, stimulated with different inputs (stochastic, sinusoidal, up, and down states). The results obtained show the efficacy and broad range of application of the proposed methods. Possible applications range from the study of sensory information processing, in which phase-of-firing codes are known to play a crucial role, to clinical applications such as deep brain stimulation, helping to design stimuli in order to trigger or prevent neural bursting.

  8. Assessing the role of STAT3 in DC differentiation and autologous DC immunotherapy in mouse models of GBM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikmat Assi

    Full Text Available Cellular microenvironments, particularly those found in tumors, elicit a tolerogenic DC phenotype which can attenuate immune responses. Central to this process is the STAT3-mediated signaling cascade. As a transcription factor and oncogene, STAT3 promotes the expression of genes which allow tumor cells to proliferate, migrate and evade apoptosis. More importantly, activation of STAT3 in tumor infiltrating immune cells has been shown to be responsible, in part, for their immune-suppressed phenotype. The ability of STAT3 to orchestrate a diverse set of immunosuppressive instructions has made it an attractive target for cancer vaccines. Using a conditional hematopoietic knockout mouse model of STAT3, we evaluated the impact of STAT3 gene ablation on the differentiation of dendritic cells from bone marrow precursors. We also assessed the impact of STAT3 deletion on phagocytosis, maturation, cytokine secretion and antigen presentation by GM-CSF derived DCs in vitro. In addition to in vitro studies, we compared the therapeutic efficacy of DC vaccination using STAT3 deficient DCs to wild type counterparts in an intracranial mouse model of GBM. Our results indicated the following pleiotropic functions of STAT3: hematopoietic cells which lacked STAT3 were unresponsive to Flt3L and failed to differentiate as DCs. In contrast, STAT3 was not required for GM-CSF induced DC differentiation as both wild type and STAT3 null bone marrow cells gave rise to similar number of DCs. STAT3 also appeared to regulate the response of GM-CSF derived DCs to CpG. STAT3 null DCs expressed high levels of MHC-II, secreted more IL-12p70, IL-10, and TNFα were better antigen presenters in vitro. Although STAT3 deficient DCs displayed an enhanced activated phenotype in culture, they elicited comparable therapeutic efficacy in vivo compared to their wild type counterparts when utilized in vaccination paradigms in mice bearing intracranial glioma tumors.

  9. Efficient inhibition of bursts by bursts in the auditory system of crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsat, G; Pollack, G S

    2007-06-01

    In crickets, auditory information about ultrasound is carried bilaterally to the brain by the AN2 neurons. The ON1 neuron provides contralateral inhibitory input to AN2, thereby enhancing bilateral contrast between the left and right AN2s, an important cue for sound localization. We examine how the structures of the spike trains of these neurons affect this inhibitory interaction. As previously shown for AN2, ON1 responds to salient peaks in stimulus amplitude with bursts of spikes. Spike bursts, but not isolated spikes, reliably signal the occurrence of specific features of the stimulus. ON1 and AN2 burst at similar times relative to the amplitude envelope of the stimulus, and bursts are more tightly time-locked to stimulus feature than the isolated spikes. As a consequence, spikes that, in the absence of contralateral inhibition, would occur within AN2 bursts are more likely to be preceded by spikes in ON1 (mainly also in bursts) than are isolated AN2 spikes. This leads to a large decrease in the burst rate of the inhibited AN2. We conclude that the match in coding properties of ON1 and AN2 allows contralateral inhibition to be most efficient for those portions of the response that carry the behaviourally relevant information, i.e. for bursts.

  10. Fermi GBM Trigger Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fermi is a powerful space observatory that will open a wide window on the universe. Gamma rays are the highest-energy form of light, and the gamma-ray sky is...

  11. Rotational IMRT delivery using a digital linear accelerator in very high dose rate 'burst mode'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Bill J.; Sarkar, Vikren; Wang, Brian; Shukla, Himanshu; Szegedi, Martin; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema

    2011-04-01

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in arc-based IMRT, through the use of 'conventional' multileaf collimator (MLC) systems that can treat large tumor volumes in a single, or very few pass(es) of the gantry. Here we present a novel 'burst mode' modulated arc delivery approach, wherein 2000 monitor units per minute (MU min-1) high dose rate bursts of dose are facilitated by a flattening-filter-free treatment beam on a Siemens Artiste (Oncology Care Systems, Siemens Medical Solutions, Concord, CA, USA) digital linear accelerator in a non-clinical configuration. Burst mode delivery differs from continuous mode delivery, used by Elekta's VMAT (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK) and Varian's RapidArc (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) implementations, in that dose is not delivered while MLC leaves are moving. Instead, dose is delivered in bursts over very short arc angles and only after an MLC segment shape has been completely formed and verified by the controller. The new system was confirmed to be capable of delivering a wide array of clinically relevant treatment plans, without machine fault or other delivery anomalies. Dosimetric accuracy of the modulated arc platform, as well as the Prowess (Prowess Inc., Concord, CA, USA) prototype treatment planning version utilized here, was quantified and confirmed, and delivery times were measured as significantly brief, even with large hypofractionated doses. The burst mode modulated arc approach evaluated here appears to represent a capable, accurate and efficient delivery approach.

  12. HETE-2 Localization and Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 020813

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, R

    2005-01-01

    A bright, long gamma-ray burst (GRB) was detected and localized by the instruments on board the High Energy Transient Explorer 2 satellite (HETE-2) at 02:44:19.17 UTC (9859.17 s UT) on 2002 August 13. The location was reported to the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) about 4 min after the burst. In the prompt emission, the burst had a duration of approximately 125 s, and more than four peaks. We analyzed the time-resolved 2-400 keV energy spectra of the prompt emission of GRB 020813 using the Wide Field X-Ray Monitor (WXM) and the French Gamma Telescope (FREGATE) in detail. We found that the early part of the burst (17-52 s after the burst trigger) shows a depletion of low-energy photons below about 50 keV. It is difficult to explain the depletion with by either synchrotron self-absorption or Comptonization. One possibility is that the low-energy depletion may be understood as a mixture of ``jitter'' radiation the usual synchrotron radiation component.

  13. A new burst assembly technique for supporting QoS in optical burst switching networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaolong Yang(阳小龙); Mingrui Dang(党明瑞); Youju Mao(毛幼菊); Lemin Li(李乐民)

    2003-01-01

    This letter proposes a new burst assembly technique for supporting QoS in optical burst switching (OBS)networks. It consists of the adaptive-threshold burst assembly mechanism and QoS-based random offset-time scheme. The assembly mechanism, which is fit well to multi-class burst assembly, not only matcheswith IP QoS mechanism based on packet classification, and also utilizes fairly and efficiently assemblycapacity. Based on token-bucket model and burst segment selective discard (BSSD), the offset-time schemecan smooth the traffic to support OBS QoS. The simulation results show that the technique can improvethe performance in terms of packet loss probability (PLP).

  14. An Intelligent Segmented Burst Assembly Mechanism in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi-Yuan; ZHANG Jian-Guo

    2008-01-01

    We focus on the burst assembly mechanism and propose a new intelligent method in which the burst is assembled from several internet protocol (IP) packets in which the number of IP packets is changed according to the traffic load and the burst is segmented into several parts, called the ISOBS mechanism. The average burst assembly time of the ISOBS mechanism decreases as compared with the fixed-assembly-time and fixed-assembly-time-and-length mechanisms. The loss ratio decreases 50% as compared with the general optical burst switching (OBS) mechanism. The last segment can carry high quality of service (QOS) information. We can achieve that the loss ratio of the last segment is almost zero when the traffic load is less than 0.05. When the traffic load is 0.9, the loss ratio of the last segment is 0.0041. The ISOBS can support to transmit different QOS data.

  15. Meteor burst in the post 2000 era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, C.; Oduol, V.; Ghosh, A.; Tailor, B.

    In recent years a renewed interest has been shown in the possibility of using meteor burst links in tactical communications, both for networking and covert operations. Some of the applications that recent performance improvements would permit are evaluated. In evaluating the feasibility of a meteor burst implementation, certain technical and physical limitations are addressed. For the success of these applications, interoperability with other communication systems is necessary. The level of interoperability with other media, and the standards necessary to assure this interoperability are examined. Methods of minimizing and combating jamming are proposed. Meteor burst systems can be used in a large number of applications within a tactical environment. The principal disadvantage of the meteor burst medium is the problem of interference to other spectrum users from the probe end, and the interference from other users at the receiver end. The low throughput characteristic of meteor burst compares with some of the channel capacities used in other systems. Interoperability with other networks or communications links is relatively easy if certain straightforward protocols and standards are established.

  16. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Djorgovski, S G; Kulkarni, S R; Sari, R; Bloom, J S; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; Price, P A; Fox, D; Reichart, D; Yost, S; Berger, E; Diercks, A H; Goodrich, R; Chaffee, F H

    2001-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean gamma-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 10^51 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host gal...

  17. Diagnostics From Three Rising Submillimeter Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Ai-Hua; Wang, Xin-Dong

    2015-01-01

    In the paper we investigate three novel rising submillimeter (THz) bursts occurred sequentially in a super-Active Region NOAA 10486. The average rising rate of the flux density above 200 GHz is only 20 sfu/GHz (corresponding spectral index $\\alpha$ of 1.6) for the THz spectral components of 2003 October 28 and November 4 bursts, while it can attain values of 235 sfu/GHz ($\\alpha$=4.8) for 2003 November 2 burst. The steeply rising THz spectrum can be produced by a population of high relativistic electrons with a low-energy cutoff of 1 MeV , while it only requires a low-energy cutoff of 30 keV for the two slowly rising THz bursts, via gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation based on our numerical simulations of burst spectra in the magnetic dipole field case. The electron density variation is much larger in the THz source than that in microwave (MW) one. It is interesting that the THz source radius decreased by 20--50$\\%$ during the decay phase for the three events, but the MW one increased by 28$\\%$ for the 2003 Novemb...

  18. Bursting synchronization in clustered neuronal networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu Hai-Tao; Wang Jiang; Deng Bin; Wei Xi-Le

    2013-01-01

    Neuronal networks in the brain exhibit the modular (clustered) property,i.e.,they are composed of certain subnetworks with differential internal and external connectivity.We investigate bursting synchronization in a clustered neuronal network.A transition to mutual-phase synchronization takes place on the bursting time scale of coupled neurons,while on the spiking time scale,they behave asynchronously.This synchronization transition can be induced by the variations of inter-and intracoupling strengths,as well as the probability of random links between different subnetworks.Considering that some pathological conditions are related with the synchronization of bursting neurons in the brain,we analyze the control of bursting synchronization by using a time-periodic external signal in the clustered neuronal network.Simulation results show a frequency locking tongue in the driving parameter plane,where bursting synchronization is maintained,even in the presence of external driving.Hence,effective synchronization suppression can be realized with the driving parameters outside the frequency locking region.

  19. GRB Catalog: Bursts from Vela to Swift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, L.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma ray burst (GRB) astronomy started when the first event was recorded on July 2, 1967 by Vela 4a and 4b. Since then many missions have flown experiments capable of detecting GRBs. The events collected by these older experiments are mostly available in paper copy, each containing a few ten to a few hundred bursts. No systematic effort in cataloging of these bursts has been available. In some cases the information is unpublished and in others difficult to retrieve. The first major GRB catalog was obtained by GRO with the BATSE experiment. It contains more than 2000 bursts and includes homogeneous information for each of the bursts. With the launch of Swift, the first Gamma-ray/X-ray mission dedicated to the study of GRBs and their afterglows, a wealth of information is collected by the Swift instrument as well as from ground-based telescopes. This talk will describe the efforts to create a comprehensive GRBCAT and its current status and future prospective.

  20. Disruption of Parallel and Converging Signaling Pathways Contributes to the Synergistic Antitumor Effects of Simultaneous mTOR and EGFR Inhibition in GBM Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ravi D; Mladek, Ann C; Lamont, Jeffrey D; Goble, Jennie M; Erlichman, Charles; James, C David; Sarkaria, Jann N

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Elevated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling are known to contribute to the malignant properties of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), which include uncontrolled cell proliferation and evasion of apoptosis. Small molecule inhibitors that target these protein kinases have been evaluated in multiple clinical trials for cancer patients, including those with GBM. Here we have examined the cellular and molecular effects of a combined kinase inhibition of mTOR (rapamycin) and EGFR (EKI-785) in U87 and U251 GBM cells. Simultaneous treatment with rapamycin and EKI-785 results in synergistic antiproliferative as well as proapoptotic effects. At a molecular level, rapamycin alone significantly decreases S6 phosphorylation, whereas EKI-785 alone promotes substantially reduced signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT3) phosphorylation. Treatment with rapamycin alone also increases Akt phosphorylation on Ser-473, but this effect is blocked by a simultaneous administration of EKI-785. Individually, EKI-785 diminishes while rapamycin promotes the binding of the translation inhibitor eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein (4EBP1) to the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E). In spite of these opposing effects, the highest level of 4EBP1-eIF4E binding occurs with the combination of the two inhibitors. These results indicate that the inhibition of EGFR and mTOR has distinct as well as common signaling consequences and provides a molecular rationale for the synergistic antitumor effects of EKI-785 and rapamycin administration. PMID:16242075

  1. Focal mechanism caused by fracture or burst of a coal pillar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO An-ye; DOU Lin-ming; CHEN Guo-xiang; GONG Si-yuan; WANG Yu-gang; LI Zhi-hua

    2008-01-01

    As a regional, real-time and dynamic method, microseismic monitoring technology is quite an appropriate technology for forecasting geological hazards, such as rock bursts, mine tremors, coal and gas outbursts and can even be used to prevent or at least reduce these disasters. The study of the focal mechanisms of different seismic sources is the prerequisite and basis for forecasting rock burst by microseismic monitoring technology. Based on the analysis on the mechanism and fracture course of coal pillars where rock bursts occur mostly, the equivalent point source model of the seismicity caused by a coal pillar was created. Given the model, the seismic displacement equation of a coal pillar was analyzed and the seismic mechanism was pointed out by seismic wave theory. The course of the fracture of the coal pillar was simulated closely in the laboratory and the equivalent microseismic signals of the fractures of the coal pillar were acquired using a TDS-6 experimental system. The results show that, by the pressure and friction of a medium near the seismic source, both a compression wave and a shear wave will be emitted and shear fracture will be induced at the moment of breakage. The results can be used to provide an academic basis to forecast and prevent rock bursts or tremors in a coal pillar.

  2. On the bursting of gene products

    CERN Document Server

    Yvinec, Romain

    2011-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate that the so-called bursting production of molecular species during gene expression may be an artifact caused by low time resolution in experimental data collection and not an actual burst in production. We reach this conclusion through an analysis of a two-stage and binary model for gene expression, and demonstrate that in the limit when mRNA degradation is much faster than protein degradation they are equivalent. The negative binomial distribution is shown to be a limiting case of the binary model for fast "on to off" state transitions and high values of the ratio between protein synthesis and degradation rates. The gene products population increases by unity but multiple times in a time interval orders of magnitude smaller than protein half-life or the precision of the experimental apparatus employed in its detection. This rare-and-fast one-by-one protein synthesis has been interpreted as bursting.

  3. Study on fault induced rock bursts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-hua; DOU Lin-ming; LU Cai-ping; MU Zong-long; CAO An-ye

    2008-01-01

    In order to study the rules of rock bursts caused by faults by means of mechanical analysis of a roof rock-mass balanced structure and numerical simulation about fault slip destabilization, the effect of coal mining operation on fault plane stresses and slip displacement were studied. The results indicate that the slip displacement sharply increases due to the decrease of normal stress and the increase of shear stress at the fault plane when the working face advances from the footwall to the fault itself, which may induce a fault rock burst. However, this slip displacement will be very small due to the increase of normal stress and the decrease of shear stress when the working face advances from the hanging wall to the fault itself, which results in a very small risk of a fault rock burst.

  4. A mechanism for fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E; Vieyro, Florencia L

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are mysterious transient sources likely located at cosmological distances. The derived brightness temperatures exceed by many orders of magnitude the self-absorption limit of incoherent synchrotron radiation, implying the operation of a coherent emission process. We propose a radiation mechanism for fast radio bursts where the emission arises from collisionless Bremsstrahlung in strong plasma turbulence excited by relativistic electron beams. We discuss possible astrophysical scenarios in which this process might operate. The emitting region is a turbulent plasma hit by a relativistic jet, where Langmuir plasma waves produce a concentration of intense electrostatic soliton-like regions (cavitons). The resulting radiation is coherent and, under some physical conditions, can be polarised and have a power-law distribution in energy. We obtain radio luminosities in agreement with the inferred values for fast radio bursts. The timescale of the radio flare in some cases can be extremely fast, of t...

  5. Bursting activity spreading through asymmetric interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Onaga, Tomokatsu

    2014-01-01

    People communicate with those who have the same background or share a common interest by using a social networking service (SNS). News or messages propagate through inhomogeneous connections in an SNS by sharing or facilitating additional comments. Such human activity is known to lead to endogenous bursting in the rate of message occurrences. We analyze a multi-dimensional self-exciting process to reveal dependence of the bursting activity on the topology of connections and the distribution of interaction strength on the connections. We determine the critical conditions for the cases where interaction strength is regulated at either the point of input or output for each person. In the input regulation condition, the network may exhibit bursting with infinitesimal interaction strength, if the dispersion of the degrees diverges as in the scale-free networks. In contrast, in the output regulation condition, the critical value of interaction strength, represented by the average number of events added by a single ...

  6. Gamma-Ray Bursts: A Radio Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Chandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs are extremely energetic events at cosmological distances. They provide unique laboratory to investigate fundamental physical processes under extreme conditions. Due to extreme luminosities, GRBs are detectable at very high redshifts and potential tracers of cosmic star formation rate at early epoch. While the launch of Swift and Fermi has increased our understanding of GRBs tremendously, many new questions have opened up. Radio observations of GRBs uniquely probe the energetics and environments of the explosion. However, currently only 30% of the bursts are detected in radio bands. Radio observations with upcoming sensitive telescopes will potentially increase the sample size significantly and allow one to follow the individual bursts for a much longer duration and be able to answer some of the important issues related to true calorimetry, reverse shock emission, and environments around the massive stars exploding as GRBs in the early Universe.

  7. Variable protostellar accretion with episodic bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, Eduard I

    2015-01-01

    We present the latest development of the disk gravitational instability and fragmentation model, originally introduced by us to explain episodic accretion bursts in the early stages of star formation. Using our numerical hydrodynamics model with improved disk thermal balance and star-disk interaction, we computed the evolution of protostellar disks formed from the gravitational collapse of prestellar cores. In agreement with our previous studies, we find that cores of higher initial mass and angular momentum produce disks that are more favorable to gravitational instability and fragmentation, while a higher background irradiation and magnetic fields moderate the disk tendency to fragment. The protostellar accretion in our models is time-variable, thanks to the nonlinear interaction between different spiral modes in the gravitationally unstable disk, and can undergo episodic bursts when fragments migrate onto the star owing to the gravitational interaction with other fragments or spiral arms. Most bursts occur...

  8. Possible burst-like facet growth mode at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Davorin; Vučić, Zlatko; Gladić, Jadranko

    2008-07-01

    A decade ago, a burst-like growth mode of c-facets of 4He crystals growing at mK temperatures, characterized by the alternation of time intervals during which the facet does not advance with the intervals of its fast advancement, was found [J.P. Ruutu, P.J. Hakonen, A.V. Babkin, A.Y. Parshin, J.S. Penttilä, J.P. Saramäki, G. Tvalashvili, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76 (1996) 4187]. We investigate the possibility that a similar facet growth mode exists for facets at high growth temperatures. We have applied the digital laser interferometry for monitoring facet kinetics of spherical copper selenide single crystals during their growth at constant volume growth rate around 800 K. Our analysis of directly measured (1 1 1) facet advancement curves has revealed that they consist of time intervals during which the facet does not advance vertically alternating with the time intervals of enhanced growth, resembling the burst-like facet growth mode. The results are discussed in terms of the enhancement of the local supersaturation induced by the existence of nucleation barrier.

  9. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  10. The Integral Burst Alert System (IBAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, S; Borkowski, J J; Walter, R; Pedersen, H

    2003-01-01

    We describe the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS): the automatic software for the rapid distribution of the coordinates of the Gamma-Ray Bursts detected by INTEGRAL. IBAS is implemented as a ground based system, working on the near-real time telemetry stream. During the first six months of operations, six GRB have been detected in the field of view of the INTEGRAL instruments and localized by IBAS. Positions with an accuracy of a few arcminutes are currently distributed by IBAS to the community for follow-up observations within a few tens of seconds of the event.

  11. Gamma-Ray Burst Early Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B

    2005-01-01

    The successful launch and operation of NASA's Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer open a new era for the multi-wavelength study of the very early afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GRB early afterglow information is essential to explore the unknown physical composition of GRB jets, the link between the prompt gamma-ray emission and the afterglow emission, the GRB central engine activity, as well as the immediate GRB environment. Here I review some of the recent theoretical efforts to address these problems and describe how the latest Swift data give answers to these outstanding questions.

  12. Distribution of whistler mode bursts at Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarf, F. L.; Jordan, K. F.; Russell, C. T.

    1987-01-01

    Several thousand impulsive whistler mode noise bursts were detected by the Pioneer Venus wave instrument during the first 10 seasons with nightside traversals at low altitudes. The altitude distribution for these events shows that essentially all of the bursts were detected when the orbiter was less than 2000 km above the planet, suggesting that the varying plasma conditions could not maintain coherent whistler mode field-aligned guidance over greater distances. Within the 2000-km range, the distribution of the number of events versus altitude shows that there are two distinct subregions. These results are interpreted in terms of two types of whistler mode propagation from sources below the ionosphere.

  13. A Burst Chasing X-ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the rationale, design, and importance of an X-Ray Polarimeter. There is a brief discussion of Gamma Ray Bursts, followed by a review of the theories of Gamma-Ray Bursts Polarization. This leads to the question of "How do we measure the polarization?" and a discussion of the GRB x-ray emission, the photoelectric effect and photoelectric polarimetry. The requirements for the work, can only be approached using a gas detector. This leads to a discussion of a Micropattern Gas Polarimeter, and the Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) X-ray Polarimeter.

  14. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    Astronomers studying archival data from an Australian radio telescope have discovered a powerful, short-lived burst of radio waves that they say indicates an entirely new type of astronomical phenomenon. Region of Strong Radio Burst Visible-light (negative greyscale) and radio (contours) image of Small Magellanic Cloud and area where burst originated. CREDIT: Lorimer et al., NRAO/AUI/NSF Click on image for high-resolution file ( 114 KB) "This burst appears to have originated from the distant Universe and may have been produced by an exotic event such as the collision of two neutron stars or the death throes of an evaporating black hole," said Duncan Lorimer, Assistant Professor of Physics at West Virginia University (WVU) and the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The research team led by Lorimer consists of Matthew Bailes of Swinburne University in Australia, Maura McLaughlin of WVU and NRAO, David Narkevic of WVU, and Fronefield Crawford of Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The astronomers announced their findings in the September 27 issue of the online journal Science Express. The startling discovery came as WVU undergraduate student David Narkevic re-analyzed data from observations of the Small Magellanic Cloud made by the 210-foot Parkes radio telescope in Australia. The data came from a survey of the Magellanic Clouds that included 480 hours of observations. "This survey had sought to discover new pulsars, and the data already had been searched for the type of pulsating signals they produce," Lorimer said. "We re-examined the data, looking for bursts that, unlike the usual ones from pulsars, are not periodic," he added. The survey had covered the Magellanic Clouds, a pair of small galaxies in orbit around our own Milky Way Galaxy. Some 200,000 light-years from Earth, the Magellanic Clouds are prominent features in the Southern sky. Ironically, the new discovery is not part of these galaxies, but rather is much more distant

  15. The future Gamma-Ray Burst Mission SVOM

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, S; Wei, J; Zhang, S -N; Basa, S; Atteia, J -L; Barret, D; Claret, A; Cordier, B; Daigne, F; Godet, O; Götz, D; Mandrou, P

    2010-01-01

    We present the Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor (SVOM), a future satellite mission for Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) studies, developed in cooperation between the Chinese National Space Agency (CNSA), the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS), the French Space Agency (CNES) and French research institutes. The scientific objectives of the SVOM GRB studies cover their classification (GRB diversity and unity of the model), their physics (particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms), their progenitors, cosmological studies (host galaxies, star formation history, re-ionization, cosmological parameters), and fundamental physics (origin of cosmic rays, Lorentz invariance, gravitational wave sources). From 2015 on, SVOM will provide fast and accurate localizations of all known types of GRB, and determine the temporal and spectral properties of the GRB emission, thanks to a set of four onboard instruments. The trigger system of the coded-mask telescope ECLAIRs onboard SVOM images the sky in the 4-120 ...

  16. The Spectral Sharpness Angle of Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Bhat, P Narayana; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    We explain the results of Yu et al. (2015b) of the novel sharpness angle measurement to a large number of spectra obtained from the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor. The sharpness angle is compared to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. It is found that more than 91% of the high temporally and spectrally resolved spectra are inconsistent with any kind of optically thin synchrotron emission model alone. It is also found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to 58+23 -18% of the peak flux. These results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed spectra. Since any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically...

  17. Power Enhancement Cavity for Burst-Mode Laser Pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel optical cavity scheme and locking method that can realize the power enhancement of picosecond UV laser pulses operating at a burst mode with arbitrary burst (macropulse) lengths and repetition rates.

  18. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M.J. Wijers

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive stars

  19. Ceruloplasmin decreases respiratory burst reaction during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeeva, Elena Y; Semenova, Elena V; Sokolov, Alexey V; Aplin, Kirill D; Timofeeva, Kseniya E; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Filatov, Michael V

    2016-08-01

    Testing of pregnant women reveals weakening of neutrophil-mediated effector functions, such as reactive oxygen species generation. This study provides data confirming the phenomenon, gained through application of the flow cytometry technique. Key factors influencing neutrophil functional activity in blood plasma of pregnant women have not been detected so far. At the same time, concentration of ceruloplasmin - a copper-containing glycoprotein - is known to increase in blood significantly during pregnancy. We observed the negative correlation between ceruloplasmin concentration in blood plasma of pregnant women and the intensity of respiratory burst of neutrophils. Fractionation of plasma using gel-filtration revealed that ceruloplasmin-containing fraction demonstrated suppression of the respiratory burst reaction. Partial elimination of ceruloplasmin from the blood of pregnant women, performed with the help of specific antibodies and followed by immunoprecipitation, leads to an increased respiratory burst reaction. On the contrary, addition of ceruloplasmin to blood samples of healthy donors noticeably decreases the respiratory burst reaction. The results presented prove that change in ceruloplasmin level in plasma is necessary and sufficient for modulating the ability of neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species during pregnancy.

  20. Fast Radio Bursts: Searches, Sensitivities & Implications

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration transient signals discovered over the past decade. Here we describe the scientific usefulness of FRBs, consider ongoing work at the Parkes telescope, and examine some relevant search sensitivity and completeness considerations. We also look ahead to the results from ongoing and future planned studies in the field.

  1. IPN localizations of Konus short gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pal'shin, V D; Svinkin, D S; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Mazets, E P; Oleynik, P P; Ulanov, M V; Cline, T; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Trombka, J; McClanahan, T; Starr, R; Goldsten, J; Gold, R; Rau, A; von Kienlin, A; Savchenko, V; Smith, D M; Hajdas, W; Barthelmy, S D; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Palmer, D; Yamaoka, K; Ohno, M; Fukazawa, Y; Hanabata, Y; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Briggs, M S; Kippen, R M; Kouveliotou, C; Meegan, C; Fishman, G; Connaughton, V; Boer, M; Guidorzi, C; Frontera, F; Montanari, E; Rossi, F; Feroci, M; Amati, L; Nicastro, L; Orlandini, M; Monte, Del; Costa, E; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Pacciani, L; Rapisarda, M; Soffitta, P; Di Cocco, G; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Labanti, C; Marisaldi, M; Atteia, J -L; Vanderspek, R; Ricker, G

    2013-01-01

    Between the launch of the GGS Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 314 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 24 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the IPN consisted of up to eleven spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 276 bursts were obtained. We present the IPN localization data on these events.

  2. BurstMem: A High-Performance Burst Buffer System for Scientific Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Wang, Yandong [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Atchley, Scott [ORNL; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama

    2014-01-01

    The growth of computing power on large-scale sys- tems requires commensurate high-bandwidth I/O system. Many parallel file systems are designed to provide fast sustainable I/O in response to applications soaring requirements. To meet this need, a novel system is imperative to temporarily buffer the bursty I/O and gradually flush datasets to long-term parallel file systems. In this paper, we introduce the design of BurstMem, a high- performance burst buffer system. BurstMem provides a storage framework with efficient storage and communication manage- ment strategies. Our experiments demonstrate that BurstMem is able to speed up the I/O performance of scientific applications by up to 8.5 on leadership computer systems.

  3. X-ray bursts as a probe of the corona: the case of XRB 4U 1636-536

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Long; Chen, YuPeng; Zhang, Shuang-Nan; Torres, Diego F; Kretschmar, Peter; Chernyakova, Masha; Li, Jian; Wang, Jian-Min

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the possible cooling of the corona by soft X-rays bursts, we have studied 114 bursts embedded in the known X-ray evolution of 4U 1636-536. We have grouped these bursts according to the ratio of the flux in the 1.5--12 keV band with respect to that in the 15--50 keV band, as monitored by RXTE/ASM and Swift/BAT, respectively. We have detected a shortage at hard X-rays while bursting. This provides hints for a corona cooling process driven by soft X-rays fed by the bursts that occurred on the surface of neutron star. The flux shortage at 30--50 keV has a time lag of 2.4$\\pm$1.5 seconds with respect to that at 2--10 keV, which is comparable to that of 0.7$\\pm$0.5 seconds reported in bursts of IGR 17473-2721. We comment on the possible origin of these phenomena and on the implications for the models on the location of the corona.

  4. Detecting Pipe Bursts Using Heuristic and CUSUM Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Jung, D.; Vreeburg, J.; Van de Roer, M.; Lansey, K.; Rierveld, L.

    2014-01-01

    Pipe bursts in a drinking water distribution system lead to water losses, interruption of supply, and damage to streets and houses due to the uncontrolled water flow. To minimize the negative consequences of pipe bursts, an early detection is necessary. This paper describes a heuristic burst detecti

  5. Investigation of Primordial Black Hole Bursts using Interplanetary Network Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ukwatta, T N; MacGibbon, J H; Svinkin, D S; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Pal'shin, V D; Goldsten, J; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Rau, A; Kienlin, A; Zhang, X; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Meegan, C; Yamaoka, K; Fukazawa, Y; Ohno, M; Ohmori, N; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Feroci, M; Frontera, F; Guidorzi, C; Barthelmy, S; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Cummings, J; Krimm, H A; Smith, D M; McTiernan, J

    2015-01-01

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating Primordial Black Holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the minimum distance to gamma-ray bursts using detections from widely separated spacecraft. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 10^13-10^18 cm (7-10^5 AU) range, consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate for the first time lower limits ...

  6. A Strange Supernova with a Gamma-Ray Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    1998bw is obviously an unusual supernova. It is therefore of particular significance that a Gamma-Ray Burst was observed from the same sky region just before it was discovered in optical light. It is very unlikely that these two very rare events would happen in the same region of the sky without being somehow related. Most astronomers therefore tend to believe that the gamma-rays do indeed originate in the supernova explosion. But can a single supernova be sufficiently energetic to produce a powerful Gamma-Ray Burst? New theoretical calculations, also published today in Nature, indicate that this may be so. Moreover, if the Gamma-Ray Burst observed on April 25 did originate in this supernova that is located in a relatively nearby galaxy, it was intrinsically much fainter than some of the other Gamma-Ray Bursts that are known to have taken place in extremely distant galaxies. The main idea is that while the centres of most other supernovae collapse into neutron stars at the moment of explosion, a black hole was created in a very massive star consisting mostly of carbon and oxygen. If so, a very strong shockwave may be produced that is capable of generating the observed gamma rays. A comparison of synthetic spectra from such a supernova model, based on a new spectrum-modelling technique developed by Leon Lucy at the ESA/ESO Space Telescope/European Coordinating Facility (ST/ECF), with the spectra of SN 1998bw observed at La Silla, show good agreement, thus lending credibility to the new models. Future work Much data has already been collected at ESO on the strange supernova SN 1998bw . More observations will be obtained by the astronomers at the ESO observatories in the future during a long-term monitoring programme of SN 1998bw . There is a good chance that this effort will ultimately provide fundamental information on the explosion mechanism and the nature of the progenitor star of this exceptional object. This supernova's connection with a Gamma-Ray Burst will

  7. SVOM gamma ray monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor(SVOM) mission is dedicated to the detection,localization and broad-band study of gamma-ray bursts(GRBs) and other high-energy transient phenomena.The gamma ray monitor(GRM) onboard is designed to observe GRBs up to 5 MeV.With this instrument,one of the key GRB parameters,Epeak,can be easily measured in the hard X-ray band.It can achieve a detection rate of 100 GRBs per year which ensures the scientific output of SVOM.

  8. SVOM Gamma Ray Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Yongwei; Li, Yanguo; Zhang, Yongjie; Zhang, Shuangnan

    2009-01-01

    The Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor (SVOM) mission is dedicated to the detection, localization and broad-band study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and other high-energy transient phenomena. The Gamma Ray Monitor (GRM) onboard is designed to observe the GRBs up to 5 MeV. With this instrument one of the key GRB parameter, Epeak, can be easily measured in the hard x-ray band. It can achieve a detection rate of 100 GRBs per year which ensures the scientific output of SVOM.

  9. INTERPLANETARY NETWORK LOCALIZATIONS OF KONUS SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal' shin, V. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, P. P.; Ulanov, M. V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Cline, T.; Trombka, J.; McClanahan, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mitrofanov, I. G.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B. [Space Research Institute, 84/32, Profsoyuznaya, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Boynton, W.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K., E-mail: val@mail.ioffe.ru [Department of Planetary Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); and others

    2013-08-15

    Between the launch of the Global Geospace Science Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 296 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 23 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the Interplanetary Network (IPN) consisted of up to 11 spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 271 bursts were obtained. We present the most comprehensive IPN localization data on these events. The short burst detection rate, {approx}18 yr{sup -1}, exceeds that of many individual experiments.

  10. Long Type I X-ray Bursts and Neutron Star Interior Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Cumming, A; in 't Zand, J J M; Page, D; Cumming, Andrew; Macbeth, Jared; Page, Dany

    2005-01-01

    Superbursts are very energetic Type I X-ray bursts discovered in recent years by long term monitoring of X-ray bursters, believed to be due to unstable ignition of carbon in the deep ocean of the neutron star. A number of "intermediate duration" bursts have also been observed, probably associated with ignition of a thick helium layer. We investigate the sensitivity of these long X-ray bursts to the thermal profile of the neutron star crust and core. We first compare cooling models of superburst lightcurves with observations, and derive constraints on the ignition mass and energy release, and then calculate ignition models for superbursts and pure helium bursts, and compare to observations. The superburst lightcurves and ignition models imply that the carbon mass fraction is approximately 20% or greater in the fuel layer, constraining models of carbon production. However, the most important result is that when Cooper pairing neutrino emission is included in the crust, the temperature is too low to support unst...

  11. Adaptive Kalman Filter Based on Adjustable Sampling Interval in Burst Detection for Water Distribution System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo Yong Choi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid detection of bursts and leaks in water distribution systems (WDSs can reduce the social and economic costs incurred through direct loss of water into the ground, additional energy demand for water supply, and service interruptions. Many real-time burst detection models have been developed in accordance with the use of supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA systems and the establishment of district meter areas (DMAs. Nonetheless, no consideration has been given to how frequently a flow meter measures and transmits data for predicting breaks and leaks in pipes. This paper analyzes the effect of sampling interval when an adaptive Kalman filter is used for detecting bursts in a WDS. A new sampling algorithm is presented that adjusts the sampling interval depending on the normalized residuals of flow after filtering. The proposed algorithm is applied to a virtual sinusoidal flow curve and real DMA flow data obtained from Jeongeup city in South Korea. The simulation results prove that the self-adjusting algorithm for determining the sampling interval is efficient and maintains reasonable accuracy in burst detection. The proposed sampling method has a significant potential for water utilities to build and operate real-time DMA monitoring systems combined with smart customer metering systems.

  12. Molecular analysis of ex-vivo CD133+ GBM cells revealed a common invasive and angiogenic profile but different proliferative signatures among high grade gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia Juan L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumours, and in this group glioblastomas (GBMs are the higher-grade gliomas with fast progression and unfortunate prognosis. Two major aspects of glioma biology that contributes to its awful prognosis are the formation of new blood vessels through the process of angiogenesis and the invasion of glioma cells. Despite of advances, two-year survival for GBM patients with optimal therapy is less than 30%. Even in those patients with low-grade gliomas, that imply a moderately good prognosis, treatment is almost never curative. Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of a small fraction of glioma cells with characteristics of neural stem cells which are able to grow in vitro forming neurospheres and that can be isolated in vivo using surface markers such as CD133. The aim of this study was to define the molecular signature of GBM cells expressing CD133 in comparison with non expressing CD133 cells. This molecular classification could lead to the finding of new potential therapeutic targets for the rationale treatment of high grade GBM. Methods Eight fresh, primary and non cultured GBMs were used in order to study the gene expression signatures from its CD133 positive and negative populations isolated by FACS-sorting. Dataset was generated with Affymetrix U133 Plus 2 arrays and analysed using the software of the Affymetrix Expression Console. In addition, genomic analysis of these tumours was carried out by CGH arrays, FISH studies and MLPA; Results Gene expression analysis of CD133+ vs. CD133- cell population from each tumour showed that CD133+ cells presented common characteristics in all glioblastoma samples (up-regulation of genes involved in angiogenesis, permeability and down-regulation of genes implicated in cell assembly, neural cell organization and neurological disorders. Furthermore, unsupervised clustering of gene expression led us to distinguish between two groups

  13. Are gamma-ray bursts cosmological?

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, I

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst sources are distributed with a high level of isotropy, which is compatible with either a cosmological origin or an extended Galactic halo origin. The brightness distribution is another indicator used to characterize the spatial distribution in distance. In this paper the author discusses detailed fits of the BATSE gamma-ray burst peak-flux distributions with Friedmann models taking into account possible density evolution and standard candle luminosity functions. A chi-square analysis is used to estimate the goodness of the fits and the author derives the significance level of limits on the density evolution and luminosity function parameters. Cosmological models provide a good fit over a range of parameter space which is physically reasonable

  14. Energy bursts in vibrated shallow granular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, N.; Risso, D.; Soto, R.; Cordero, P.

    2011-03-01

    In a mixture of two species of inelastic spheres of equal size but different mass, placed in a vertically vibrated shallow box (large horizontal dimensions and height comparable to the grains' size), there is spontaneous segregation. Once the system is at least partly segregated energy bursts recurrently take place: the horizontal kinetic energy of the heavy particles, that normally is small, suddenly increases an order of magnitude. An explanation of these events is provided based on the existence of a fixed point for an isolated particle bouncing with only vertical motion between the top and bottom plates. Energy bursts occur when clusters of heavy particles start a chain reaction of collisions that transfer vertical energy to horizontal energy producing an expansion of the cluster.

  15. Coherence resonance in bursting neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, June Hoan; Lee, Ho Jun; Min, Cheol Hong; Lee, Kyoung J

    2015-10-01

    Synchronized neural bursts are one of the most noticeable dynamic features of neural networks, being essential for various phenomena in neuroscience, yet their complex dynamics are not well understood. With extrinsic electrical and optical manipulations on cultured neural networks, we demonstrate that the regularity (or randomness) of burst sequences is in many cases determined by a (few) low-dimensional attractor(s) working under strong neural noise. Moreover, there is an optimal level of noise strength at which the regularity of the interburst interval sequence becomes maximal-a phenomenon of coherence resonance. The experimental observations are successfully reproduced through computer simulations on a well-established neural network model, suggesting that the same phenomena may occur in many in vivo as well as in vitro neural networks.

  16. Bursting behaviours in cascaded stimulated Brillouin scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhan-Jun; He Xian-Tu; Zheng Chun-Yang; Wang Yu-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering is studied by numerically solving the Vlasov-Maxwell system.A cascade of stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur when a linearly polarized laser pulse propagates in a plasma.It is found that a stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can reduce the scattering and increase the transmission of light,as well as introduce a bursting behaviour in the evolution of the laser-plasma interaction.The bursting time in the reflectivity is found to be less than half the ion acoustic period.The ion temperature can affect the stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade,which can repeat several times at low ion temperatures and can be completely eliminated at high ion temperatures.For stimulated Brillouin scattering saturation,higher-harmonic generation and wave-wave interaction of the excited ion acoustic waves can restrict the amplitude of the latter.In addition,stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can restrict the amplitude of the scattered light.

  17. On associating Fast Radio Bursts with afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Vedantham, H K; Mooley, K; Frail, D; Hallinan, G; Kulkarni, S R

    2016-01-01

    A radio source that faded over 6 days, with a redshift $z\\approx0.5$ host, has been identified by Keane et al. (2016) as the transient afterglow to a Fast Radio Burst (FRB 150418). We report follow-up radio and optical observations of the afterglow candidate, and find a source that is consistent with an active galactic nucleus (AGN). If the afterglow-candidate is nonetheless a prototypical FRB afterglow, existing surveys limit the fraction of FRBs that produce afterglows to 0.25 for modulation-index $m=\\Delta S/\\bar{S}\\geq0.7$, and 0.07 for $m\\geq1$, at 95\\% confidence. Afterglow associations with the barrage of bursts expected from future FRB surveys must satisfy constraints on the afterglow rate set by state of the art slow-transient surveys.

  18. Burst Detector X-Ray IIR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The Burst Detector X-Ray (BDX) instrument for the Block IIR series of Global Positioning System satellites is described. The BDX instrument can locate and characterize exoatmospheric nuclear detonations by using four sensors consisting of sets of filters over silicon diodes to detect x rays of various energies from the burst. On the BDX-IIR, a fifth sensor with a response spanning those of the other sensors confirms coincidences among the four main channels. The mechanical and electronic features of the BDX-IIR and its sensors are described. The calibrations and the system tests used in flight are presented. The commands for the BDX-IIR are given. The messages sent from the BDX-IIR are described in detail.

  19. Bursts of activity in collective cell migration

    CERN Document Server

    Chepizhko, Oleksandr; Mastrapasqua, Eleonora; Nourazar, Mehdi; Ascagni, Miriam; Sugni, Michela; Fascio, Umberto; Leggio, Livio; Malinverno, Chiara; Scita, Giorgio; Santucci, Stephane; Alava, Mikko J; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A M

    2016-01-01

    Dense monolayers of living cells display intriguing relaxation dynamics, reminiscent of soft and glassy materials close to the jamming transition, and migrate collectively when space is available, as in wound healing or in cancer invasion. Here we show that collective cell migration occurs in bursts that are similar to those recorded in the propagation of cracks, fluid fronts in porous media and ferromagnetic domain walls. In analogy with these systems, the distribution of activity bursts displays scaling laws that are universal in different cell types and for cells moving on different substrates. The main features of the invasion dynamics are quantitatively captured by a model of interacting active particles moving in a disordered landscape. Our results illustrate that collective motion of living cells is analogous to the corresponding dynamics in driven, but inanimate, systems.

  20. Identifying crucial parameter correlations maintaining bursting activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Doloc-Mihu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, [Formula: see text]Leak; a persistent K current, [Formula: see text]K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, [Formula: see text]P that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of [Formula: see text]Leak, [Formula: see text]K2, and [Formula: see text]P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained.

  1. GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, NEW COSMOLOGICAL BEACONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Avila-Reese

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs are the brightest electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, associated to the death of massive stars. As such, GRBs are potential tracers of the evolution of the cosmic massive star formation, metallicity, and Initial Mass Function. GRBs also proved to be appealing cosmological distance indicators. This opens a unique opportunity to constrain the cosmic expansion history up to redshifts 5-6. A brief review on both subjects is presented here.

  2. A Fast Radio Burst Host Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F; Bhandari, S; Barr, E; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Kramer, M; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Eatough, R P; Stappers, B W; Totani, T; Honma, M; Furusawa, H; Hattori, T; Morokuma, T; Niino, Y; Sugai, H; Terai, T; Tominaga, N; Yamasaki, S; Yasuda, N; Allen, R; Cooke, J; Jencson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kaplan, D L; Tingay, S J; Williams, A; Wayth, R; Chandra, P; Perrodin, D; Berezina, M; Mickaliger, M; Bassa, C

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, millisecond duration radio signals originating from distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called Fast Radio Bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. While every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, none before now have had a redshift measurement, due to the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we present the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting $\\sim 6$ days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy's redshift to be $z=0.492\\pm0.008$. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionised baryons in the intergalactic medium of $\\Omega_{\\mathrm{IGM}}=4.9 \\pm 1.3\\%$, in agreement with the expectation from WMAP, and i...

  3. Delayed Nickel Decay in Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlin, G C

    2002-01-01

    Recently observed emission lines in the X-ray afterglow of gamma ray bursts suggest that iron group elements are either produced in the gamma ray burst, or are present nearby. If this material is the product of a thermonuclear burn, then such material would be expected to be rich in Nickel-56. If the nickel remains partially ionized, this prevents the electron capture reaction normally associated with the decay of Nickel-56, dramatically increasing the decay timescale. Here we examine the consequences of rapid ejection of a fraction of a solar mass of iron group material from the center of a collapsar/hypernova. The exact rate of decay then depends on the details of the ionization and therefore the ejection process. Future observations of iron, nickel and cobalt lines can be used to diagnose the origin of these elements and to better understand the astrophysical site of gamma ray bursts. In this model, the X-ray lines of these iron-group elements could be detected in suspected hypernovae that did not produce ...

  4. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Harrison, R. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Guidorzi, C. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: D.Kopac@ljmu.ac.uk [INAF/Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy)

    2015-06-20

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  5. Black Hole Accretion in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Janiuk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the structure and evolution of the hyperaccreting disks and outflows in the gamma ray bursts central engines. The torus around a stellar mass black hole is composed of free nucleons, Helium, electron-positron pairs, and is cooled by neutrino emission. Accretion of matter powers the relativistic jets, responsible for the gamma ray prompt emission. The significant number density of neutrons in the disk and outflowing material will cause subsequent formation of heavier nuclei. We study the process of nucleosynthesis and its possible observational consequences. We also apply our scenario to the recent observation of the gravitational wave signal, detected on 14 September 2015 by the two Advanced LIGO detectors, and related to an inspiral and merger of a binary black hole system. A gamma ray burst that could possibly be related with the GW150914 event was observed by the Fermi satellite. It had a duration of about 1 s and appeared about 0.4 s after the gravitational-wave signal. We propose that a collapsing massive star and a black hole in a close binary could lead to the event. The gamma ray burst was powered by a weak neutrino flux produced in the star remnant’s matter. Low spin and kick velocity of the merged black hole are reproduced in our simulations. Coincident gravitational-wave emission originates from the merger of the collapsed core and the companion black hole.

  6. Dihydroxyoctadecamonoenoate esters inhibit the neutrophil respiratory burst

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    David Alan Thompson; Bruce D Hammock

    2007-03-01

    The leukotoxins [9(10)- and 12(13)-EpOME] are produced by activated inflammatory leukocytes such as neutrophils. High EpOME levels are observed in disorders such as acute respiratory distress syndrome and in patients with extensive burns. Although the physiological significance of the EpOMEs remains poorly understood, in some systems, the EpOMEs act as a protoxin, with their corresponding epoxide hydrolase metabolites, 9,10- and 12,13-DiHOME, specifically exerting toxicity. Both the EpOMEs and the DiHOMEs were also recently shown to have neutrophil chemotactic activity. We evaluated whether the neutrophil respiratory burst, a surge of oxidant production thought to play an important role in limiting certain bacterial and fungal infections, is modulated by members of the EpOME metabolic pathway. We present evidence that the DiHOMEs suppress the neutrophil respiratory burst by a mechanism distinct from that of respiratory burst inhibitors such as cyclosporin H or lipoxin A4, which inhibit multiple aspects of neutrophil activation.

  7. Vibration-induced drop atomization and bursting

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, A. J.; Vukasinovic, B.; Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, A.

    2003-02-01

    A liquid drop placed on a vibrating diaphragm will burst into a fine spray of smaller secondary droplets if it is driven at the proper frequency and amplitude. The process begins when capillary waves appear on the free surface of the drop and then grow in amplitude and complexity as the acceleration amplitude of the diaphragm is slowly increased from zero. When the acceleration of the diaphragm rises above a well-defined critical value, small secondary droplets begin to be ejected from the free-surface wave crests. Then, quite suddenly, the entire volume of the drop is ejected from the vibrating diaphragm in the form of a spray. This event is the result of an interaction between the fluid dynamical process of droplet ejection and the vibrational dynamics of the diaphragm. During droplet ejection, the effective mass of the drop diaphragm system decreases and the resonance frequency of the system increases. If the initial forcing frequency is above the resonance frequency of the system, droplet ejection causes the system to move closer to resonance, which in turn causes more vigorous vibration and faster droplet ejection. This ultimately leads to drop bursting. In this paper, the basic phenomenon of vibration-induced drop atomization and drop bursting will be introduced, demonstrated, and characterized. Experimental results and a simple mathematical model of the process will be presented and used to explain the basic physics of the system.

  8. The CHIME Fast Radio Burst Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaspi, Victoria M.; CHIME/FRB Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are a recently discovered phenomenon consisting of short (few ms) bursts of radio waves that have dispersion measures that strongly suggest an extragalactic and possibly cosmological, but yetunknown, origin. The Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment was designed to study Baryon Acoustic Oscillations through mapping of redshifted hydrogen, in order to constrain the nature of Dark Energy. CHIME, currently under construction in Penticton, BC in Canada, consists of 4 cylindrical paraboloid reflectors having total collecting area 80 m x 100 m, and will be sensitive in the 400-800 MHz band. With 2048 independent feeds hung along the cylinder axes, CHIME is a transit telescope with no moving parts, but is sensitive to the full ~200 sq. degrees overhead in 1024 formed beams, thanks to the largest correlator ever built. Given CHIME's enormous sensitivity, bandwidth and unprecedented field of view for the radio regime, CHIME will be a superb instrument for studying Fast Radio Bursts, with expected detected event rates of several to several dozen per day, hence promising major progress on the origin and nature of FRBs.

  9. Composite-flywheel burst-containment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapowith, A D; Handy, W E

    1982-04-08

    A key component impacting total flywheel energy storage system weight is the containment structure. This report addresses the factors that shape this structure and define its design criteria. In addition, containment weight estimates are made for the several composite flywheel designs of interest so that judgements can be made as to the relative weights of their containment structure. The requirements set down for this program were that all containment weight estimates be based on a 1 kWh burst. It should be noted that typical flywheel requirements for regenerative braking of small automobiles call for deliverable energies of 0.25 kWh. This leads to expected maximum burst energies of 0.5 kWh. The flywheels studied are those considered most likely to be carried further for operational design. These area: The pseudo isotropic disk flywheel, sometimes called the alpha ply; the SMC molded disk; either disk with a carbon ring; the subcircular rim with cruciform hub; and Avco's bi-directional circular weave disk. The flywheel materials for the disk are S-glass; the subcircular rim is Kevlar over S-glass. Test data on flywheel bursts and containment failures were analyzed. Recommendations are made for further testing.

  10. Radio flares from gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kopac, D; Kobayashi, S; Virgili, F J; Harrison, R; Japelj, J; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parametrization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. (2007) and Melandri et al. (2010) in which the typical frequency of the reverse shock was suggested to lie at radio, rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct reverse-shock radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1 -- 1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later opt...

  11. Automatic Cloud Bursting under FermiCloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hao [Fermilab; Shangping, Ren [IIT; Garzoglio, Gabriele [Fermilab; Timm, Steven [Fermilab; Bernabeu, Gerard [Fermilab; Kim, Hyun Woo; Chadwick, Keith; Jang, Haengjin [KISTI, Daejeon; Noh, Seo-Young [KISTI, Daejeon

    1900-01-01

    Cloud computing is changing the infrastructure upon which scientific computing depends from supercomputers and distributed computing clusters to a more elastic cloud-based structure. The service-oriented focus and elasticity of clouds can not only facilitate technology needs of emerging business but also shorten response time and reduce operational costs of traditional scientific applications. Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is currently in the process of building its own private cloud, FermiCloud, which allows the existing grid infrastructure to use dynamically provisioned resources on FermiCloud to accommodate increased but dynamic computation demand from scientists in the domains of High Energy Physics (HEP) and other research areas. Cloud infrastructure also allows to increase a private cloud’s resource capacity through “bursting” by borrowing or renting resources from other community or commercial clouds when needed. This paper introduces a joint project on building a cloud federation to support HEP applications between Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Korea Institution of Science and Technology Information, with technical contributions from the Illinois Institute of Technology. In particular, this paper presents two recent accomplishments of the joint project: (a) cloud bursting automation and (b) load balancer. Automatic cloud bursting allows computer resources to be dynamically reconfigured to meet users’ demands. The load balance algorithm which the cloud bursting depends on decides when and where new resources need to be allocated. Our preliminary prototyping and experiments have shown promising success, yet, they also have opened new challenges to be studied

  12. Dynamic encoding of natural luminance sequences by LGN bursts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A Lesica

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN of the thalamus, visual stimulation produces two distinct types of responses known as tonic and burst. Due to the dynamics of the T-type Ca(2+ channels involved in burst generation, the type of response evoked by a particular stimulus depends on the resting membrane potential, which is controlled by a network of modulatory connections from other brain areas. In this study, we use simulated responses to natural scene movies to describe how modulatory and stimulus-driven changes in LGN membrane potential interact to determine the luminance sequences that trigger burst responses. We find that at low resting potentials, when the T channels are de-inactivated and bursts are relatively frequent, an excitatory stimulus transient alone is sufficient to evoke a burst. However, to evoke a burst at high resting potentials, when the T channels are inactivated and bursts are relatively rare, prolonged inhibitory stimulation followed by an excitatory transient is required. We also observe evidence of these effects in vivo, where analysis of experimental recordings demonstrates that the luminance sequences that trigger bursts can vary dramatically with the overall burst percentage of the response. To characterize the functional consequences of the effects of resting potential on burst generation, we simulate LGN responses to different luminance sequences at a range of resting potentials with and without a mechanism for generating bursts. Using analysis based on signal detection theory, we show that bursts enhance detection of specific luminance sequences, ranging from the onset of excitatory sequences at low resting potentials to the offset of inhibitory sequences at high resting potentials. These results suggest a dynamic role for burst responses during visual processing that may change according to behavioral state.

  13. Characterizing Oscillatory Bursts in Single-Trial EEG Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, K. H.; Shah, A. S.; Lakatos, P.; Schroeder, C. E.

    2004-01-01

    Oscillatory bursts in numerous bands ranging from low (theta) to high frequencies (e.g., gamma) undoubtedly play an important role in cortical dynamics. Largely because of the inadequacy of existing analytic techniques. however, oscillatory bursts and their role in cortical processing remains poorly understood. To study oscillatory bursts effectively one must be able to isolate them and characterize them in the single trial. We describe a series of straightforward analysis techniques that produce useful indices of burst characteristics. First, stimulus-evoked responses are estimated using Differentially Variable Component Analysis (dVCA), and are subtracted from the single-trial. The single-trial characteristics of the evoked responses are stored to identify possible correlations with burst activity. Time-frequency (T-F), or wavelet, analyses are then applied to the single trial residuals. While T-F plots have been used in recent studies to identify and isolate bursts, we go further by fitting each burst in the T-F plot with a two-dimensional Gaussian. This provides a set of burst characteristics, such as, center time. burst duration, center frequency. frequency dispersion. and amplitude, all of which contribute to the accurate characterization of the individual burst. The burst phase can also be estimated. Burst characteristics can be quantified with several standard techniques (e.g.. histogramming and clustering), as well as Bayesian techniques (e.g., blocking) to allow a more parametric description analysis of the characteristics of oscillatory bursts, and the relationships of specific parameters to cortical excitability and stimulus integration.

  14. On the possible gamma-ray burst-gravitational wave association in GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janiuk, Agnieszka; Bejger, M.; Charzyński, S.; Sukova, P.

    2017-02-01

    Data from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor satellite observatory suggested that the recently discovered gravitational wave source, a pair of two coalescing black holes, was related to a gamma-ray burst. The observed high-energy electromagnetic radiation (above 50 keV) originated from a weak transient source and lasted for about 1 s. Its localization is consistent with the direction to GW150914. We speculate about the possible scenario for the formation of a gamma-ray burst accompanied by the gravitational-wave signal. Our model invokes a tight binary system consisting of a massive star and a black hole which leads to the triggering of a collapse of the star's nucleus, the formation of a second black hole, and finally to the binary black hole merger. For the most-likely configuration of the binary spin vectors with respect to the orbital angular momentum in the GW150914 event, the recoil speed (kick velocity) acquired by the final black hole through gravitational wave emission is of the order of a few hundred km/s and this might be sufficient to get it closer to the envelope of surrounding material and capture a small fraction of matter from the remnant of the host star. The gamma-ray burst is produced by the accretion of this remnant matter onto the final black hole. The moderate spin of the final black hole suggests that the gamma-ray burst jet is powered by weak neutrino emission rather than the Blandford-Znajek mechanism, and hence explains the low power available for the observed GRB signal.

  15. Implications for Understanding Short Gamma-Ray Bursts Detected by {\\it Swift}

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Lang; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Zhang, Fu-Wen; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming

    2011-01-01

    In an effort to understand the puzzle of classifying Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), we have a systematic study of {\\it Swift} GRBs and investigate several issues on short GRBs. Though short GRBs have a short ($\\lesssim2$ s) prompt duration as monitored by {\\it Swift} Burst Alert Telescope (BAT), the composite light curves including both the prompt and afterglow emission suggest that most of them have a similar radiative feature as the long GRBs. Besides, some well-studied short GRBs might also have an intrinsically long prompt duration, which renders them a type of short GRB imposters. Genuine short GRBs might be rare so that to discriminate the observed short GRBs is, not surprisingly, troublesome. In particular, the observational biases in the host identification and redshift measurement of GRBs should be taken with great caution. The redshift distribution which has been proposed to be different for long and short GRBs might have been strongly affected by the measurement methods.

  16. Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, N; Fox, D B; 10.1146/annurev.astro.46.060407.145147

    2009-01-01

    With its rapid-response capability and multiwavelength complement of instruments, the Swift satellite has transformed our physical understanding of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Providing high-quality observations of hundreds of bursts, and facilitating a wide range of follow-up observations within seconds of each event, Swift has revealed an unforeseen richness in observed burst properties, shed light on the nature of short-duration bursts, and helped realize the promise of GRBs as probes of the processes and environments of star formation out to the earliest cosmic epochs. These advances have opened new perspectives on the nature and properties of burst central engines, interactions with the burst environment from microparsec to gigaparsec scales, and the possibilities for non-photonic signatures. Our understanding of these extreme cosmic sources has thus advanced substantially; yet more than 40 years after their discovery, GRBs continue to present major challenges on both observational and theoretical fronts.

  17. Generation of burst time plans for the Intelsat TDMA system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trusty, P. A.; King, C. A.; Roach, P. W.

    In the Intelsat time-division multiple-access (TDMA) system, the burst time plan (BTP) contains the assignments of traffic and reference bursts, common acquisition windows, and test slots to time slots within the TDMA frame for a given network. Generation of the BTP involves the processes of sub-burst formation, burst formation, reference burst assignments, and burst scheduling. BTP information is transferred to the individual reference and traffic stations in the form of a master time plan (MTP) and a condensed time plan (CTP). This paper describes algorithms which have been developed for each of the BTP generation processes, as well as those algorithms and procedures used to generate the MTPs and CTPs. A software system which implements these algorithms is also discussed.

  18. Ultrastable bonding of glass with femtosecond laser bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Sören; Zimmermann, Felix; Döring, Sven; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2013-03-01

    We report on the welding of fused silica with bursts of ultrashort laser pulses. The bursts consist of ultrashort laser pulses with a repetition rate of 9.4 MHz. However, the time between the laser bursts is about 10 μs, which reduces the maximal temperature rise. Micrographs and simulations show that the molten structures are enlarged while using laser bursts. In addition, the usage of bursts instead of continuous pulse trains reduces the laser induced stress. By optimizing the burst frequency and repetition rate we were able to achieve a breaking resistance of up to 96% of the bulk material, which is significantly higher than in conventional high repetition rate laser bonding.

  19. The bursting of housing bubble as jamming phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Iwamura, Mitsuru; Umeno Saito, Yukiko; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a bubble burst model by focusing on transaction volume incorporating a traffic model that represents spontaneous traffic jam. We find that the phenomenon of bubble burst shares many similar properties with traffic jam formation on highway by comparing data taken from the U.S. housing market. Our result suggests that transaction volume could be a driving force of bursting phenomenon.

  20. Physical characterization of the Skua fast burst assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paternoster, R.; Bounds, J.; Sanchez, R.; Miko, D.

    1994-08-01

    In this paper we discuss the system design and ongoing efforts to characterize the machine physics and operating properties of the Skua fast burst assembly. The machine is currently operating up to prompt critical while we await approval for super-prompt burst operations. Efforts have centered on characterizing neutron kinetic properties, comparing calculated and measured temperature coefficients and power distributions, improving the burst reproducibility, examining the site-wide dose characteristics, and fitting the machine with cooling and filtration systems.

  1. Extremely long hard bursts observed by Konus-Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Pal'shin, V; Frederiks, D; Golenetskii, S; Il'Inskii, V; Mazets, E; Yamaoka, K; Ohno, M; Hurley, K; Sakamoto, T; Oleynik, P; Ulanov, M; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Shinohara, C; Starr, R; 10.1063/1.2943422

    2013-01-01

    We report the observations of the prompt emission of the extremely long hard burst, GRB 060814B, discovered by Konus-Wind and localized by the IPN. The observations reveal a smooth, hard, ~40-min long pulse followed by weaker emission seen several hours after the burst onset. We also present the Konus-Wind data on similar burst, GRB 971208, localized by BATSE/IPN. And finally we discuss the different possible origins of these unusual events.

  2. Burst error correction extensions for large Reed Solomon codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owsley, P.

    1990-01-01

    Reed Solomon codes are powerful error correcting codes that include some of the best random and burst correcting codes currently known. It is well known that an (n,k) Reed Solomon code can correct up to (n - k)/2 errors. Many applications utilizing Reed Solomon codes require corrections of errors consisting primarily of bursts. In this paper, it is shown that the burst correcting ability of Reed Solomon codes can be increased beyond (n - k)/2 with an acceptable probability of miscorrect.

  3. Emergent synchronous bursting of oxytocin neuronal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Rossoni

    Full Text Available When young suckle, they are rewarded intermittently with a let-down of milk that results from reflex secretion of the hormone oxytocin; without oxytocin, newly born young will die unless they are fostered. Oxytocin is made by magnocellular hypothalamic neurons, and is secreted from their nerve endings in the pituitary in response to action potentials (spikes that are generated in the cell bodies and which are propagated down their axons to the nerve endings. Normally, oxytocin cells discharge asynchronously at 1-3 spikes/s, but during suckling, every 5 min or so, each discharges a brief, intense burst of spikes that release a pulse of oxytocin into the circulation. This reflex was the first, and is perhaps the best, example of a physiological role for peptide-mediated communication within the brain: it is coordinated by the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of oxytocin cells; it can be facilitated by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin into the hypothalamus, and it can be blocked by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin antagonist. Here we show how synchronized bursting can arise in a neuronal network model that incorporates basic observations of the physiology of oxytocin cells. In our model, bursting is an emergent behaviour of a complex system, involving both positive and negative feedbacks, between many sparsely connected cells. The oxytocin cells are regulated by independent afferent inputs, but they interact by local release of oxytocin and endocannabinoids. Oxytocin released from the dendrites of these cells has a positive-feedback effect, while endocannabinoids have an inhibitory effect by suppressing the afferent input to the cells.

  4. Spectral Lag Evolution among -Ray Burst Pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lan-Wei Jia; Yun-Feng Liang; En-Wei Liang

    2014-09-01

    We analyse the spectral lag evolution of -ray burst (GRB) pulses with observations by CGRO/BATSE. No universal spectral lag evolution feature and pulse luminosity-lag relation within a GRB is observed.Our results suggest that the spectral lag would be due to radiation physics and dynamics of a given emission episode, possibly due to the longer lasting emission in a lower energy band, and the spectral lag may not be an intrinsic parameter to discriminate the long and short GRBs.

  5. The Nature of Gamma Ray Burst Supernovae

    OpenAIRE

    Cano, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are among the brightest and most energetic physical processes in the universe. It is known that core-collapse SNe arise from the gravitational collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars (the progen- itors of nearby core-collapse SNe have been imaged and unambiguously identified). It is also believed that the progenitors of long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs) are massive stars, mainly due to the occurrence and detection of very energetic core-collap...

  6. Gamma Ray Bursts in the HAWC Era

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Fox, Derek; Gao, He; Senno, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, and are among the most promising for detecting multiple non-electromagnetic signals, including cosmic rays, high energy neutrinos and gravitational waves. The multi-GeV to TeV gamma-ray range of GRB could have significant contributions from hadronic interactions, mixed with more conventional leptonic contributions. This energy range is important for probing the source physics, including overall energetics, the shock parameters and the Lorentz factor. We discuss some of the latest observational and theoretical developments in the field.

  7. Properties of $\\gamma$-Ray Burst Classes

    CERN Document Server

    Hakkila, J; Roiger, R J; Mallozzi, R S; Pendleton, G N; Meegan, C A; Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    The three gamma-ray burst (GRB) classes identified by statistical clustering analysis (Mukherjee et al. 1998) are examined using the pattern recognition algorithm C4.5 (Quinlan 1986). Although the statistical existence of Class 3 (intermediate duration, intermediate fluence, soft) is supported, the properties of this class do not need to arise from a distinct source population. Class 3 properties can easily be produced from Class 1 (long, high fluence, intermediate hardness) by a combination of measurement error, hardness/intensity correlation, and a newly-identified BATSE bias (the fluence duration bias). Class 2 (short, low fluence, hard) does not appear to be related to Class 1.

  8. Burst-Mode Asynchronous Controllers on FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte L. Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available FPGAs have been mainly used to design synchronous circuits. Asynchronous design on FPGAs is difficult because the resulting circuit may suffer from hazard problems. We propose a method that implements a popular class of asynchronous circuits, known as burst mode, on FPGAs based on look-up table architectures. We present two conditions that, if satisfied, guarantee essential hazard-free implementation on any LUT-based FPGA. By doing that, besides all the intrinsic advantages of asynchronous over synchronous circuits, they also take advantage of the shorter design time and lower cost associated with FPGA designs.

  9. Bursting frequency prediction in turbulent boundary layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LIOU,WILLIAM W.; FANG,YICHUNG

    2000-02-01

    The frequencies of the bursting events associated with the streamwise coherent structures of spatially developing incompressible turbulent boundary layers were predicted using global numerical solution of the Orr-Sommerfeld and the vertical vorticity equations of hydrodynamic stability problems. The structures were modeled as wavelike disturbances associated with the turbulent mean flow. The global method developed here involves the use of second and fourth order accurate finite difference formula for the differential equations as well as the boundary conditions. An automated prediction tool, BURFIT, was developed. The predicted resonance frequencies were found to agree very well with previous results using a local shooting technique and measured data.

  10. Nucleosynthetic Yields from Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rockefeller, Gabriel; Young, Patrick; Bennett, Michael; Diehl, Steven; Herwig, Falk; Hirschi, Raphael; Hungerford, Aimee; Pignatari, Marco; Magkotsios, Georgios; Timmes, Francis X

    2008-01-01

    The "collapsar" engine for gamma-ray bursts invokes as its energy source the failure of a normal supernova and the formation of a black hole. Here we present the results of the first three-dimensional simulation of the collapse of a massive star down to a black hole, including the subsequent accretion and explosion. The explosion differs significantly from the axisymmetric scenario obtained in two-dimensional simulations; this has important consequences for the nucleosynthetic yields. We compare the nucleosynthetic yields to those of hypernovae. Calculating yields from three-dimensional explosions requires new strategies in post-process nucleosynthesis; we discuss NuGrid's plan for three-dimensional yields.

  11. A polarised fast radio burst at low Galactic latitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroff, Emily; SUPERB Collaboration; HESS Collaboration; ANTARES Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are a growing population of transients detected with radio telescopes which are thought to originate outside the Milky Way. Fewer than 20 sources exist in the literature and the majority of bursts have been found away from the plane of the Galaxy or where the Galactic contribution to the total electron column density is low. Here we report on the discovery of a new burst, FRB 150215, discovered with the Parkes radio telescope in real-time in February 2015. The burst was found to be 43±5% linearly polarised with an imprecisely determined rotation measure (RM) consistent with zero. The burst was followed-up with 9 telescopes to search for radio, optical, X-ray, γ-ray and neutrino emission from the location of the burst. No transient or variable emission was found to be associated with the burst and no repeat pulses have been observed in nine hours of Parkes observations. Radio images of the field were obtained following the FRB but would not have been sensitive enough to pick up a signal like the one emanating from WISE J071634.59-190039.2 following FRB150418 if it had been present. The sightline to the burst is close to the Galactic plane and the Galactic RM foreground may approach a null along this sightline, corresponding to a decreased total electron column density from the Milky Way. This might explain why this burst was detectable at low latitude whereas previous searches have been relatively unsuccessful.

  12. Ablation of steel using picosecond laser pulses in burst mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lickschat, Peter; Demba, Alexander; Weissmantel, Steffen

    2017-02-01

    Results obtained in picosecond laser processing of steel applying the burst mode are presented. Using the burst mode, pulse trains, i.e., bursts, consisting of a number of picosecond pulses with an inter-pulse delay of 12.5 ns and 10 ps pulse duration are applied for material processing. Small cavities with sizes in the range of the laser beam diameter made by single-burst ablation are compared to quadratic cavities of 0.5 × 0.5 mm² produced by multiburst ablation and simultaneous scanning of the laser beam across the steel sample surface. The ablated volume per pulse within the burst was calculated either from the ablated volume per burst or from the ablation depth of the quadratic cavities. With the second to fourth pulses in the bursts, a reduction of the ablated volume per pulse in comparison with the first pulse in the bursts (i.e., to the use of single pulses) was found for both single- and multiburst ablation, which is assumed to be due to plasma shielding. By contrast, the ablated volume per pulse within the bursts increases for the fifth to eighth pulses. Heat accumulation effect and the influence of the heated plasma can be assumed to be the reason for these higher ablation rates. SEM micrographs also show that there is a higher melt ejection out of the laser processed area. This is indicated by the formation of bulges about the ablated area.

  13. The long and the short of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    1995-01-01

    We report evidence from the 3B Catalogue that long (T_{90} > 10 s) and short (T_{90} 1 MeV. This implies different spatial origin and physical processes for long and short bursts. Long bursts may be explained by accretion-induced collapse. Short bursts require another mechanism, for which we suggest neutron star collisions. These are capable of producing neutrino bursts as short as a few ms, consistent with the shortest observed time scales in GRB. We briefly investigate the parameters of clusters in which neutron star collisons may occur, and discuss the nuclear evolution of expelled and accelerated matter.

  14. Statistical Properties of SGR 1806-20 Bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göğüş; Woods; Kouveliotou; van Paradijs J; Briggs; Duncan; Thompson

    2000-04-01

    We present statistics of SGR 1806-20 bursts, combining 290 events detected with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array, 111 events detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment, and 134 events detected with the International Cometary Explorer. We find that the fluence distribution of bursts observed with each instrument are well described by power laws with indices 1.43, 1.76, and 1.67, respectively. The distribution of time intervals between successive bursts from SGR 1806-20 is described by a lognormal function with a peak at 103 s. There is no correlation between the burst intensity and either the waiting times until the next burst or the time elapsed since the previous burst. In all these statistical properties, SGR 1806-20 bursts resemble a self-organized critical system, similar to earthquakes and solar flares. Our results thus support the hypothesis that the energy source for soft gamma repeater bursts is crustquakes due to the evolving, strong magnetic field of the neutron star, rather than any accretion or nuclear power.

  15. A behavioral role for feature detection by sensory bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsat, Gary; Pollack, Gerald S

    2006-10-11

    Brief episodes of high-frequency firing of sensory neurons, or bursts, occur in many systems, including mammalian auditory and visual systems, and are believed to signal the occurrence of particularly important stimulus features, i.e., to function as feature detectors. However, the behavioral relevance of sensory bursts has not been established in any system. Here, we show that bursts in an identified auditory interneuron of crickets reliably signal salient stimulus features and reliably predict behavioral responses. Our results thus demonstrate the close link between sensory bursts and behavior.

  16. A Limited Deflection Routing Algorithm Based on Burst Loss Threshold in OBS Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ru-yan; LONG Ke-ping; WU Wei; YANG Xiao-long; ZHU Wei-le

    2005-01-01

    The deflection routing protocol is an effective contention resolution in Optical Burst Switching network. However, it can worsen loss performance of non-deflected burst on the deflection route. To improve the burst loss performance, a limited deflection routing scheme based on burst loss threshold is proposed to prevent injudicious deflection routing. By using threshold check function, it restrainedly allows the deflected burst to preemptive network resource, consequently, improve the QoS performance of non-deflected burst. Simulation results show that the scheme can efficiently prevent deflected burst contending with non-deflected burst on deflection route, and effectively improve the burst loss performance of entire networks.

  17. The repeating Fast Radio Burst FRB 121102: Multi-wavelength observations and additional bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Kaspi, V M; Wharton, R S; Bassa, C G; Bogdanov, S; Camilo, F; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; van Leeuwen, J; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Mickaliger, M; Parent, E; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; Tendulkar, S P

    2016-01-01

    We report on radio and X-ray observations of the only known repeating Fast Radio Burst (FRB) source, FRB 121102. We have detected six additional radio bursts from this source: five with the Green Bank Telescope at 2 GHz, and one at 1.4 GHz at the Arecibo Observatory for a total of 17 bursts from this source. All have dispersion measures consistent with a single value ($\\sim559$ pc cm$^{-3}$) that is three times the predicted maximum Galactic value. The 2-GHz bursts have highly variable spectra like those at 1.4 GHz, indicating that the frequency structure seen across the individual 1.4 and 2-GHz bandpasses is part of a wideband process. X-ray observations of the FRB 121102 field with the Swift and Chandra observatories show at least one possible counterpart; however, the probability of chance superposition is high. A radio imaging observation of the field with the Jansky Very Large Array at 1.6 GHz yields a 5$\\sigma$ upper limit of 0.3 mJy on any point-source continuum emission. This upper limit, combined wit...

  18. The Second SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Zhang, B.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts. (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog (hereafter the BAT2 catalog) presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters and time-resolved spectral parameters measured by the BAT. In the correlation study of various observed parameters extracted from the BAT prompt emission data, we distinguish among long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs), short-duration GRBs (S-GRBs), and short-duration GRBs with extended emission (S-GRBs with E.E.) to investigate differences in the prompt emission properties. The fraction of L-GRBs, S-GRBs and S-GRBs with E.E. in the catalog are 89%, 8% and 2% respectively. We compare the BAT prompt emission properties with the BATSE, BeppoSAX and HETE-2 GRB samples.. We also correlate the observed prompt emission properties with the redshifts for the GRBs with known redshift. The BAT T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) durations peak at 70 s and 30 s, respectively. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT S-GRBs are generally harder than those of the L-GRBs.

  19. Photospheric Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pe'er, Asaf

    2016-01-01

    A major breakthrough in our understanding of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) prompt emission physics occurred in the last few years, with the realization that a thermal component accompanies the over-all non-thermal prompt spectra. This thermal part is important by itself, as it provides direct probe of the physics in the innermost outflow regions. It further has an indirect importance, as a source of seed photons for inverse-Compton scattering, thereby it contributes to the non-thermal part as well. In this short review, we highlight some key recent developments. Observationally, although so far it was clearly identified only in a minority of bursts, there are indirect evidence that thermal component exists in a very large fraction of GRBs, possibly close to 100%. Theoretically, the existence of thermal component have a large number of implications as a probe of underlying GRB physics. Some surprising implications include its use as a probe of the jet dynamics, geometry and magnetization.

  20. Gamma Ray Bursts Cook Book I: Formulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaeepour, Houri

    2008-01-01

    Since the suggestion of relativistic shocks as the origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in early 90's, the mathematical formulation of this process has stayed at phenomenological level. One of the reasons for the slow development of theoretical works in this domain has been the simple power-law behaviour of the afterglows hours or days after the prompt gamma-ray emission. Nowadays with the launch of the Swift satellite, gamma-ray bursts can be observed in multi-wavelength from a few tens of seconds after trigger onward. These observations have leaded to the discovery of features unexplainable by the simple formulation of the shocks and emission processes used up to now. But "devil is in details" and some of these features may be explained with a more detailed formulation of phenomena and without adhoc addition of new processes. Such a formulation is the goal of this work. We present a consistent formulation of the collision between two spherical relativistic shells. The model can be applied to both internal and ...

  1. Short-Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Edo

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) display a bimodal duration distribution, with a separation between the short- and long-duration bursts at about 2 sec. The progenitors of long GRBs have been identified as massive stars based on their association with Type Ic core-collapse supernovae, their exclusive location in star-forming galaxies, and their strong correlation with bright ultraviolet regions within their host galaxies. Short GRBs have long been suspected on theoretical grounds to arise from compact object binary mergers (NS-NS or NS-BH). The discovery of short GRB afterglows in 2005, provided the first insight into their energy scale and environments, established a cosmological origin, a mix of host galaxy types, and an absence of associated supernovae. In this review I summarize nearly a decade of short GRB afterglow and host galaxy observations, and use this information to shed light on the nature and properties of their progenitors, the energy scale and collimation of the relativistic outflow, and the properties ...

  2. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  3. Gamma-ray bursts and collisionless shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E

    2006-01-01

    Particle acceleration in collisionless shocks is believed to be responsible for the production of cosmic-rays over a wide range of energies, from few GeV to >10^{20} eV, as well as for the non-thermal emission of radiation from a wide variety of high energy astrophysical sources. A theory of collisionless shocks based on first principles does not, however, exist. Observations of gamma-ray burst (GRB) "afterglows" provide a unique opportunity for diagnosing the physics of relativistic collisionless shocks. Most GRBs are believed to be associated with explosions of massive stars, and their "afterglows," delayed low energy emission following the prompt burst of gamma-rays, are produced by relativistic collisionless shock waves driven by the explosion into the surrounding plasma. Some of the striking characteristics of these shocks include the generation of downstream magnetic fields with energy density exceeding that of the upstream field by ~8 orders of magnitude, the survival of this strong field at distances ...

  4. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Should cosmologists care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laros, J. G.

    1996-03-01

    Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) locations are distributed isotropically on the sky, but the intensity distribution of the bursts seems clearly incompatible with spatial homogeneity. Of the scenarios that attempt to provide an explanation, there are two that enjoy current popularity: (1) GRBs are produced by high-velocity neutron stars that have formed an extended (˜100 kpc) spherical halo or “corona” around our galaxy. (2) The bursters are at cosmological distances, with redshifts near unity for the weaker events. The major evidence used to argue for or against each of these scenarios remains inconclusive. Assuming, not unreasonably, that the cosmological scenario is correct, one can discuss the advantages and disadvantages of studying GRBs as opposed to other objects at moderate redshift. We find that the advantages of GRBs-high intensity, penetrating radiation, rapid variability, and no expected source evolution-are offset by observational difficulties pertaining to the extraction of cosmological information from GRB data. If the cosmological scenario proves to be correct and if the observational difficulties are overcome, then cosmologists certainly should care.

  5. $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts the Four Crises

    CERN Document Server

    Tavani, M

    1998-01-01

    We discuss some open problems concerning the origin and the emission mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in light of recent developments. If GRBs originate at extragalactic distances, we are facing four crises: (1) an energy crisis, models have to account for more than 10^{53} ergs of energy emitted in the gamma-ray energy band; (2) a spectral crisis, emission models have to account for the surprising `smoothness' of GRB broad-band spectra, with no indication of the predicted spectral `distorsions' caused by inverse Compton scattering in large radiation energy density media, and no evidence for beaming; (3) an afterglow crisis, relativistic shock models have to explain the complexity of the afterglow behavior, the longevity of optical transients detectable up to six months after the burst, the erratic behavior of the radio emission, and the lack of evidence for substantial beaming as indicated by recent searches for GRB afterglows in the X-ray band; (4) a population crisis, from data clearly indicating that ...

  6. CRITICAL HYDROLOGIC CONDITIONS FOR OVERFLOW BURST OF MORAINE LAKE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Zhong-xin; CUI Peng; JIANG Liang-wei

    2004-01-01

    Floodwater and debris flow caused by glacial lake burst is an important land process and a serious mountain disaster in glacial area of Xizang (Tibet) Autonomous Region, and the overflow burst is mainly caused by glacial landslide falling into moraine lake. On the premise that moraine lake is full, instantaneous burst in part of the lake bank happens, as flow velocity at burst mouth caused by overflow head is higher than threshold flow velocity of glacial till. Under some supposes, d90 and d10 of the glacial till in the bank were used as the threshold sizes of coarse and fine grains respectively. Thus, the formula of calculating threshold flow velocity of uniform sand was simplified,and threshold flow velocity of glacial till was calculated with the formula. Then, with synthesis formula calculating flow velocity of instantaneous part burst, flow velocity at overflow burst mouth was calculated, and calculation formula of critical height (H0) of overflow head was derived. Overflow head was caused by volume and surge of glacial landslide falling into moraine lake, calculation formulas of ascendant height (H1) of lake water surface and surge height (H2) on burst mouth caused by glacial landslide falling into moraine lake were derived. To sum up, critical hydrologic conditions of moraine lake burst with overflow form are: the burst is inevitable as H1 >H0; the burst is possible as H1 <H0 and (H1+H2) >H0; the burst is impossible as (H1+H2) <H0. In the factors influencing the burst critical conditions, it is advantageous for the burst that scale of the lake is 105n2 range; terminal glacial till is more fine and is even more uniform; the width of overflow mouth is even smaller than the length of the bank; the landslide haslarge scale and steep slip surface; and glacial end is close to the lake. With burst of Guangxiecuo Lake in Midui Valley of the Polongzanghu River in Xizang as an example, the burst critical conditions were tested.

  7. SU-D-BRB-06: Treating Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) as a Chronic Disease: Implication of Temporal-Spatial Dose Fractionation Optimization Including Cancer Stem Cell Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, V; Nguyen, D; Pajonk, F; Kaprealian, T; Kupelian, P; Steinberg, M; Low, D; Sheng, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the feasibility of improving GBM treatment outcome with temporal-spatial dose optimization of an ordinary differential equation (ODE) that models the differentiation and distinct radiosensitivity between cancer stem cells (CSC) and differentiated cancer cells (DCC). Methods: The ODE was formulated into a non-convex optimization problem with the objective to minimize remaining total cancer cells 500 days from the onset of radiotherapy when the total cancer cell number was 3.5×10{sup 7}, while maintaining normal tissue biological effective dose (BED) of 100Gy resulted from standard prescription of 2Gyx30. Assuming spatially separated CSC and DCC, optimization was also performed to explore the potential benefit from dose-painting the two compartments. Dose escalation to a sub-cell-population in the GTV was also examined assuming that a 2 cm margin around the GTV allows sufficient dose drop-off to 100Gy BED. The recurrence time was determined as the time at which the total cancer cell number regrows to 10{sup 9} cells. Results: The recurrence time with variable fractional doses administered once per week, bi-week and month for one year were found to be 615, 593 and 570 days, superior to the standard-prescription recurrence time of 418 days. The optimal dose-fraction size progression for both uniform and dose-painting to the tumor is low and relatively constant in the beginning and gradually increases to more aggressive fractions at end of the treatment course. Dose escalation to BED of 200Gy to the whole tumor alongside with protracted weekly treatment was found to further delay recurrence to 733 days. Dose-painting of 200 and 500Gy BED to CSC on a year-long weekly schedule further extended recurrence to 736 and 1076 days, respectively. Conclusion: GBM treatment outcome can possibly be improved with a chronic treatment approach. Further dose escalation to the entire tumor or CSC targeted killing is needed to achieve total tumor control. This work

  8. SVOM: a new mission for Gamma-Ray Burst Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Gotz, D; Basa, S; Wei, J; Zhang, S N; Atteia, J -L; Barret, D; Cordier, B; Claret, A; Deng, J; Fan, X; Hu, J Y; Huang, M; Mandrou, P; Mereghetti, S; Qiu, Y; Wu, B

    2009-01-01

    We present the SVOM (Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor) mission, that is being developed in cooperation between the Chinese National Space Agency (CNSA), the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) and the French Space Agency (CNES). Its scientific objectives include the study of the GRB phenomenon, GRB physics and progenitors, cosmology, and fundamental physics. SVOM is designed to detect all known types of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), to provide fast and reliable GRB positions, to measure the broadband spectral characteristics and temporal properties of the GRB prompt emission. This will be obtained in first place thanks to a set of four space flown instruments. A wide field (~2 sr) coded mask telescope (ECLAIRs), operating in the 4-250 keV energy range, will provide the triggers and localizations, while a gamma-ray non-imaging spectrometer (GRM), sensitive in the 50 keV-5 MeV domain, will extend the prompt emission energy coverage. After a satellite slew, in order to place the GRB direction ...

  9. Flares in gamma-ray bursts: disc fragmentation and evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osso, Simone; Perna, Rosalba; Tanaka, Takamitsu L.; Margutti, Raffaella

    2017-02-01

    Flaring activity following gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), observed in both long and short GRBs, signals a long-term activity of the central engine. However, its production mechanism has remained elusive. Here, we develop a quantitative model of the idea proposed by Perna et al. of a disc whose outer regions fragment due to the onset of gravitational instability. The self-gravitating clumps migrate through the disc and begin to evolve viscously when tidal and shearing torques break them apart. Our model consists of two ingredients: theoretical bolometric flare light curves whose shape (width, skewness) is largely insensitive to the model parameters, and a spectral correction to match the bandpass of the available observations, that is calibrated using the observed spectra of the flares. This simple model reproduces, with excellent agreement, the empirical statistical properties of the flares as measured by their width-to-arrival time ratio and skewness (ratio between decay and rise time). We present model fits to the observed light curves of two well-monitored flares, GRB 060418 and GRB 060904B. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first quantitative model able to reproduce the flare light curves and explain their global statistical properties.

  10. Manual evaluation of residual curarization using double burst stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drenck, N E; Ueda, N; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal;

    1989-01-01

    Double burst stimulation (DBS) is a new mode of stimulation developed to reveal residual neuromuscular blockade under clinical conditions. The stimulus consists of two short bursts of 50 Hz tetanic stimulation, separated by 750 ms, and the response to the stimulation is two short muscle contracti...

  11. Gamma-ray bursts observed by the watch experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Niels; Brandt, Søren; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    After two years in orbit the WATCH instruments on the GRANAT space observatory have localized seven gamma burst sources with better than 1° accuracy. In several cases, follow‐up observations with Schmidt telescopes have been made within a few days. Some of the bursts have also been detected...

  12. Dependence of X-ray Burst Models on Nuclear Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Schatz, H

    2016-01-01

    X-ray burst model predictions of light curves and final composition of the nuclear ashes are affected by uncertain nuclear physics. Nuclear masses play an important role. Significant progress has been made in measuring the masses of very neutron deficient rare isotopes along the path of the rapid proton capture process (rp-process) in X-ray bursts. This paper identifies the remaining nuclear mass uncertainties in X-ray burst models using a one zone model that takes into account the changes in temperature and density evolution caused by changes in the nuclear physics. Two types of bursts are investigated - a typical mixed H/He burst with a limited rp-process and an extreme mixed H/He burst with an extended rp-process. Only three remaining nuclear mass uncertainties affect the light curve predictions of a typical H/He burst, and only three additional masses affect the composition strongly. A larger number of mass uncertainties remains to be addressed for the extreme H/He burst. Mass uncertainties of better than...

  13. Statistical properties of SGR 1806-20 bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Göğüş, E.; Woods, P.M.; Kouveliotou, C.; van Paradijs, J.; Briggs, M.S.; Duncan, R.C.; Thompson, C.

    2000-01-01

    We present statistics of SGR 1806-20 bursts, combining 290 events detected with the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer/Proportional Counter Array, 111 events detected with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment, and 134 events detected with the International Cometary Explorer. We find that the fluence d

  14. Supernova sheds light on gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    On 29 March the HETE-II satellite detected the most violent explosion in the universe to date - an enormous burst of gamma rays. Observers across the world recorded and studied the event. It appears to prove that gamma ray bursts originate in supernovae (1 page)

  15. The INTEGRAL view of intermediate long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    CONCLUSIONS Most intermediate bursts are observed from low luminosity sources and are interpreted as long pure He bursts. If no H is accreted, they are consistent with the burning of a slowly accreted, thick He layer, in Ultra Compact X-ray Binaries (UCXB) where the donor star is probably a degen...

  16. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2010-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  17. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H. J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, Ramj; Keppens, R.

    2011-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  18. Jet simulations and gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eerten, H.J.; Meliani, Z.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Keppens, R.

    2012-01-01

    The conventional derivation of the gamma-ray burst afterglow jet break time uses only the blast wave fluid Lorentz factor and therefore leads to an achromatic break. We show that in general gamma-ray burst afterglow jet breaks are chromatic across the self-absorption break. Depending on circumstance

  19. 76 FR 28460 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Rock Burst...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ...; Rock Burst Control Plan--Pertains to Underground Metal and Nonmetal Mines ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The... rock burst plan within 90 days after a rock burst has been experienced. Stress data are...

  20. Do Gamma-Ray Bursts Come from the Oort Cloud?

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, T E; Tremaine, S; Tremaine, adn S.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the possibility that gamma-ray bursts arise from sources in the Oort comet cloud, basing most of our arguments on accepted models for the formation and spatial distribution of the cloud. We identify three severe problems with such models: (1) There is no known mechanism for producing bursts that can explain the observed burst rate and energetics without violating other observational constraints. (2) The bright source counts cannot be reconciled with standard models for the phase-space distribution of objects in the Oort cloud. (3) The observed isotropy of the available burst data is inconsistent with the expected angular distribution of sources in the Oort cloud. We therefore assert that Oort cloud models of gamma-ray bursts are extremely implausible.

  1. Ablation of silicon with bursts of femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiuso, Caterina; Kämmer, Helena; Dreisow, Felix; Ancona, Antonio; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of ultrafast laser ablation of silicon with bursts of pulses. The pristine 1030nm-wavelength 200-fs pulses were split into bursts of up to 16 sub-pulses with time separation ranging from 0.5ps to 4080ps. The total ablation threshold fluence was measured depending on the burst features, finding that it strongly increases with the number of sub-pulses for longer sub-pulse delays, while a slowly increasing trend is observed for shorter separation time. The ablation depth per burst follows two different trends according to the time separation between the sub-pulses, as well as the total threshold fluence. For delays shorter than 4ps it decreases with the number of pulses, while for time separations longer than 510ps, deeper craters were achieved by increasing the number of subpulses in the burst, probably due to a change of the effective penetration depth.

  2. Cosmology and the Subgroups of Gamma-ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mészáros

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Both short and intermediate gamma-ray bursts are distributed anisotropically in the sky (Mészáros, A. et al. ApJ, 539, 98 (2000, Vavrek, R. et al. MNRAS, 391, 1 741 (2008. Hence, in the redshift range, where these bursts take place, the cosmological principle is in doubt. It has already been noted that short bursts should be mainly at redshifts smaller than one (Mészáros, A. et al. Gamma-ray burst: Sixth Huntsville Symp., AIP, Vol. 1 133, 483 (2009; Mészáros, A. et al. Baltic Astron., 18, 293 (2009. Here we show that intermediate bursts should be at redshifts up to three.

  3. Kilometric shock-associated events and microwave bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, M. R.; Macdowall, R. J.; Stone, R. G.

    1990-01-01

    The peak times of impulsive microwaves bursts are compared with those of shock-associated (SA) kilometric radio events. The first peaks in these two frequency regimes are usually well-correlated in time, but the last peaks of the SA events observed at 1 MHz occur an average of 20 min after the last impulsive microwave peaks. In some cases, the SA events overlap in time with the post-burst increases of microwave bursts; sometimes there is general correspondence in their intensity time profiles. These observations suggest that the earlier components of the SA events are usually caused by electrons accelerated in or near the microwave source region. The possibility that the later components of some SA events could be associated with nonthermal electrons responsible for microwave post-burst increases, although they have traditionally been attributed to electrons accelerated at type II burst producing shocks in the upper corona is discussed.

  4. The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-06-13

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general.

  5. High-Frequency Cutoff in Type III Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavsky, A. A.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Volvach, Ya. S.; Koval, A. A.

    In this article we report about a group of solar bursts with high-frequency cutoff, observed on 19 August of 2012 near 8:23 UT, simultaneously by three different radio telescopes: the Ukrainian decameter radio telescope (8-33 MHz), the French Nancay Decametric Array (10-70 MHz) and the Italian San Vito Solar Observatory of RSTN (25-180 MHz). Morphologically the bursts are very similar to the type III bursts. The solar activity is connected with the emergency of a new group of solar spots on the far side of the Sun with respect to observers on Earth. The solar bursts accompany many moderate flares over eastern limb. The refraction of the behind-limb radio bursts towards the Earth is favorable, if CMEs generate low-density cavities in solar corona.

  6. Fast Radio Bursts: Constraints on the Dispersing Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Dennison, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Fast radio bursts appear to exhibit large dispersion measures, typically exceeding any expected galactic interstellar contribution, especially along the moderate to high-galactic-latitude directions in which such events have been most often observed. The dispersions have been therefore interpreted as extragalactic, leading to the inference that the sources of the bursts are at Gpc distances. This then implies that the bursts are extremely energetic events, originating from quite small volumes (due to the millisecond burst durations). To circumvent the energetic difficulties, Loeb, Shvartzvald, & Maoz (2014) propose that the bursts are produced by flares near the surfaces of M stars or contact binaries within a local volume of the galaxy. Most of the dispersion would then occur in the overlying stellar coronae. With the dispersion concentrated in a relatively high density region, the quadratic dispersion approximation breaks down as the plasma frequency is comparable to (although less than) the propagation...

  7. X-ray bursts and superbursts - recent developments

    CERN Document Server

    Zand, Jean in 't

    2011-01-01

    The past decade and a half has seen many interesting new developments in X-ray burst research, both observationally and theoretically. New phenomena were discovered, such as burst oscillations and superbursts, and new regimes of thermonuclear burning identified. An important driver of the research with present and future instrumentation in the coming years is the pursuit of fundamental neutron star parameters. However, several other more direct questions are also in dire need of an answer. For instance, how are superbursts ignited and why do burst oscillations exist in burst tails? We briefly review recent developments and discuss the role that MAXI can play. Thanks to MAXI's large visibility window and large duty cycle, it is particularly well suited to investigate the recurrence of rare long duration bursts such as superbursts. An exploratory study of MAXI data is briefly presented.

  8. Review of GRANAT observations of gamma-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terekhov, O.; Denissenko, D.; Sunyaev, R.;

    1995-01-01

    The GRANAT observatory was launched into a high apogee orbit on 1 December, 1989. Three instruments onboard GRANAT - PHEBUS, WATCH and SIGMA are able to detect gamma-ray bursts in a very broad energy range from 6 keV up to 100 MeV. Over 250 gamma-ray bursts were detected. We discuss the results...... of four differently behaving componenents in gamma-ray burst spectra is discussed. Statistical properties of the gamma-ray burst sources based on the 5 years of observations with (∼ 10−6 erg/cm2) sensitivity as well as the results of high sensitivity (∼ 10−8 erg/cm2) search for Gamma-Ray Bursts within...... the SIGMA telescope field of view are reviewed....

  9. Evaluating the risk of coal bursts in underground coal mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Christopher⇑; Gauna Michael

    2016-01-01

    Coal bursts involve the sudden, violent ejection of coal or rock into the mine workings. They are almost always accompanied by a loud noise, like an explosion, and ground vibration. Bursts are a particular haz-ard for miners because they typically occur without warning. Despite decades of research, the sources and mechanics of these events are not well understood, and therefore they are difficult to predict and control. Experience has shown, however, that certain geologic and mining factors are associated with an increased likelihood of a coal burst. A coal burst risk assessment consists of evaluating the degree to which these risk factors are present, and then identifying appropriate control measures to mitigate the hazard. This paper summarizes the U.S. and international experience with coal bursts, and describes the known risk factors in detail. It includes a framework that can be used to guide the risk assessment process.

  10. Taming desynchronized bursting with delays in the Macaque cortical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qing-Yun; Murks Aleksandra; Perc Matja(z); Lu Qi-Shao

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory coupled bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons are considered as constitutive units of the Macaque cortical network. In the absence of information transmission delay the bursting activity is desynchronized, giving rise to spatiotemporally disordered dynamics. This paper shows that the introduction of finite delays can lead to the synchroization of bursting and thus to the emergence of coherent propagating fronts of excitation in the space-time domain.Moreover, it shows that the type of synchronous bursting is uniquely determined by the delay length, with the transitions from one type to the other occurring in a step-like manner depending on the delay. Interestingly, as the delay is tuned close to the transition points, the synchronization deteriorates, which implies the coexistence of different bursting attractors. These phenomena can be observed be different but fixed coupling strengths, thus indicating a new role for information transmission delays in realistic neuronal networks.

  11. Periodic Lateralized Epileptiform Discharges can Survive Anesthesia and Result in Asymmetric Drug-induced Burst Suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Edward C.; Cannizzaro, Louis A.; Williams, Frank J.; Lalan, Saurabh; Olejniczak, Piotr W.

    2017-01-01

    Drug-induced burst suppression (DIBS) is bihemispheric and bisymmetric in adults and older children. However, asymmetric DIBS may occur if a pathological process is affecting one hemisphere only or both hemispheres disproportionately. The usual suspect is a destructive lesion; an irritative or epileptogenic lesion is usually not invoked to explain DIBS asymmetry. We report the case of a 66-year-old woman with new-onset seizures who was found to have a hemorrhagic cavernoma and periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) in the right temporal region. After levetiracetam and before anesthetic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) were administered, the electroencephalogram (EEG) showed continuous PLEDs over the right hemisphere with maximum voltage in the posterior temporal region. Focal electrographic seizures also occurred occasionally in the same location. Propofol resulted in bihemispheric, but not in bisymmetric, DIBS. Remnants or fragments of PLEDs that survived anesthesia increased the amplitude and complexity of the bursts in the right hemisphere leading to asymmetric DIBS. Phenytoin, lacosamide, ketamine, midazolam, and topiramate were administered at various times in the course of EEG monitoring, resulting in suppression of seizures but not of PLEDs. Ketamine and midazolam reduced the rate, amplitude, and complexity of PLEDs but only after producing substantial attenuation of all burst components. When all anesthetics were discontinued, the EEG reverted to the original preanesthesia pattern with continuous non-fragmented PLEDs. The fact that PLEDs can survive anesthesia and affect DIBS symmetry is a testament to the robustness of the neurodynamic processes underlying PLEDs. PMID:28286626

  12. X-ray burst induced spectral variability in 4U 1728-34

    CERN Document Server

    Kajava, J J E; Kuulkers, E; Poutanen, J

    2016-01-01

    Aims. INTEGRAL has been monitoring the Galactic center region for more than a decade. Over this time INTEGRAL has detected hundreds of type-I X-ray bursts from the neutron star low-mass X-ray binary 4U 1728-34, a.k.a. "the slow burster". Our aim is to study the connection between the persistent X-ray spectra and the X-ray burst spectra in a broad spectral range. Methods. We performed spectral modeling of the persistent emission and the X-ray burst emission of 4U 1728-34 using data from the INTEGRAL JEM-X and IBIS/ISGRI instruments. Results. We constructed a hardness intensity diagram to track spectral state variations. In the soft state the energy spectra are characterized by two thermal components - likely from the accretion disc and the boundary/spreading layer - together with a weak hard X-ray tail that we detect in 4U 1728-34 for the first time in the 40 to 80 keV range. In the hard state the source is detected up to 200 keV and the spectrum can be described by a thermal Comptonization model plus an addit...

  13. An Observer's View of Magnetars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    Magnetar bursts were first recorded in 1979, although mistaken as a subclass of softer Gamma Ray Bursts at the time. Thirty five years later, we have 23 confirmed magnetar sources and 5 more that are awaiting acceptance to this exclusive group. I will give a brief overview of the field today and report on the results of the last 10 years of magnetars, and in particular the successful synergy between Swift and Fermi/Gamma Ray burst Monitor (GBM) in identifying new sources.

  14. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts with Extended Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.

    2005-01-01

    The recent association of several short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with early type galaxies with low star formation rate demonstrates that short bursts arise from a different progenitor mechanism than long bursts. However, since the duration distributions of the two classes overlap, membership is not always easily established. The picture is complicated by the occasional presence of softer, extended emission lasting tens of seconds after the initial spike- like emission comprising an otherwise short burst. Using the large BATSE sample with time-tagged event (TTE) data, we show that the fundamental defining characteristic of the short burst class is that the initial spike exhibits negligible spectral evolution at energies above approx. 25 keV. This is behavior is nearly ubiquitous for the 260 bursts with T(sub 90) less than 2s where the BATSE TTE data type completely included the initial spike: Their spectral lags measured between the 25-50 keV and 100-300 energy ranges are consistent with zero in 90-95% of the cases, with most outliers probably representing the tail of the long burst class. We also analyze a small sample of "short" BATSE bursts - those with the most fluent, intense extended emission. The same lack of evolution on the pulse timescale obtains for the extended emission in the brighter bursts where significant measurements can be made. One possible inference is that both emission components may arise in the same region. We also show that the dynamic range in the ratio of peak intensities, spike : extended, is at least approx. l0(exp 3), and that for some bursts, the extended emission is only a factor of 2-5 lower. However, for our whole sample the total counts fluence of the extended component equals or exceeds that in the spike by a factor of several.

  15. Pine (Pinus morrisonicola Hayata) needle extracts sensitize GBM8901 human glioblastoma cells to temozolomide by downregulating autophagy and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chia-Leng; Chen, Chien-Min; Chang, Yan-Zin; Liu, Guang-Yaw; Hung, Hui-Chih; Hsieh, Tung-Ying; Lin, Chih-Li

    2014-10-29

    Pine needle extracts of Pinus morrisonicola (Hayata) are commonly used as a functional health beverage. However, it remains unclear what the mechanism is underlying the antitumor activity of pine needle extract. The aims of present study were to investigate the anti-glioblastoma effects of pine needle extracts as well as its bioactive compounds. From three different solvent extracts of pine needles, the water extract displayed the strongest cytotoxicity effects on GBM8901 glioblastoma cells. The isolated compounds were identified as pinocembrin, chrysin, and tiliroside. Chrysin was the most active ingredient of pine needle extract for the induction of apoptosis and suppression of migration and invasion. It also markedly inhibited temozolomide (TMZ)-induced autophagy and O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) expression. Because both autophagy and MGMT overexpression have been implicated to TMZ-induced drug resistance in glioblastoma, our results showed that pine needle extract and chrysin may serve as a potential anticancer agent against glioblastoma, especially with regard to sensitizing glioblastoma cells resistant to TMZ.

  16. A Different Cone: Bursting Drops in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuanhe

    2013-03-01

    Drops in fluids tend to be spheres--a shape that minimizes surface energy. In thunderstorm clouds, drops can become unstable and emit thin jets when charged beyond certain limits. The instability of electrified drops in gases and liquids has been widely studied and used in applications including ink-jet printing, electrospinning nano-fibers, microfluidics and electrospray ionization. Here we report a different scenario: drops in solids become unstable and burst under sufficiently high electric fields. We find the instability of drops in solids morphologically resembles that in liquids, but the critical electric field for the instability follows a different scaling due to elasticity of solids. Our observations and theoretical models not only advance the fundamental understanding of electrified drops but also suggest a new failure mechanism of high-energy-density dielectric polymers, which have diverse applications ranging from capacitors for power grids and electric vehicles to muscle-like transducers for soft robots and energy harvesting.

  17. The Gamma Ray Bursts Hubble diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Capozziello, S; Dainotti, M G; De Laurentis, M; Izzo, L; Perillo, M

    2011-01-01

    Thanks to their enormous energy release, Gamma Rays Bursts (GRBs) have recently attracted a lot of interest to probe the Hubble diagram (HD) deep into the matter dominated era and hence complement Type Ia Supernovae (SNeIa). We consider here three different calibration methods based on the use of a fiducial LCDM model, on cosmographic parameters and on the local regression on SNeIa to calibrate the scaling relations proposed as an equivalent to the Phillips law to standardize GRBs finding any significant dependence. We then investigate the evolution of these parameters with the redshift to obtain any statistical improvement. Under this assumption, we then consider possible systematics effects on the HDs introduced by the calibration method, the averaging procedure and the homogeneity of the sample arguing against any significant bias.

  18. Search for Gamma Ray Bursts at Chacaltaya

    CERN Document Server

    Vernetto, S

    2001-01-01

    A search for Gamma Ray Bursts in the GeV-TeV energy range has been performed by INCA, an air shower array working at 5200 m of altitude at the Chacaltaya Laboratory (Bolivia). The altitude of the detector and the use of the "single particle technique" allows to lower the energy threshold up to few GeVs. No significant signals are observed during the occurrence of 125 GRBs detected by BATSE, and the obtained upper limits on the energy fluence in the interval 1-1000(100) GeV range from 3.2(8.6) 10^-5 to 2.6(7.0) 10^-2 erg/cm^2 depending on the zenith angle of the events. These limits, thanks to the extreme altitude of INCA, are the lowest ever obtained in the sub-TeV energy region by a ground based esperiment.

  19. Black Holes, Supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo

    2013-01-01

    We review recent progress in our understanding of the nature of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and in particular, of the relationship between short GRBs and long GRBs. The first example of a short GRB is described. The coincidental occurrence of a GRB with a supernova (SN) is explained within the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm, following the sequence: 1) an initial binary system consists of a compact carbon-oxygen (CO) core star and a neutron star (NS); 2) the CO core explodes as a SN, and part of the SN ejecta accretes onto the NS which reaches its critical mass and collapses to a black hole (BH) giving rise to a GRB; 3) a new NS is generated by the SN as a remnant. The observational consequences of this scenario are outlined.

  20. Synchrotron masers and fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ghisellini, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), with a typical duration of 1 ms and 1 Jy flux density at GHz frequencies, have brightness temperatures exceeding 1e33 K, requiring a coherent emission process. This can be achieved by bunching particles in volumes smaller than the typical wavelength, but this may be challenging. Alternatively, we can have maser emission. Under certain conditions, the synchrotron stimulated emission process can be more important than true absorption, and a synchrotron maser can be created. This occurs when the emitting electrons have a very narrow distribution of pitch angles and energies. This process overcomes the difficulties of having extremely dense bunches of particles and relaxes the light crossing time limits, since there is no simple relation between the actual size of the source and the observed variability timescale.

  1. Relativistic Outflows in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Aloy, M A

    2007-01-01

    The possibility that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) were not isotropic emissions was devised theoretically as a way to ameliorate the huge energetic budget implied by the standard fireball model for these powerful phenomena. However, the mechanism by which after the quasy-isotropic release of a few $10^{50} $erg yields a collimated ejection of plasma could not be satisfactory explained analytically. The reason being that the collimation of an outflow by its progenitor system depends on a very complex and non-linear dynamics. That has made necessary the use of numerical simulations in order to shed some light on the viability of some likely progenitors of GRBs. In this contribution I will review the most relevant features shown by these numerical simulations and how they have been used to validate the collapsar model (for long GRBs) and the model involving the merger of compact binaries (for short GRBs).

  2. Microstructural path analysis of martensite burst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rangel Rios

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Modeling the martensite reaction requires reckoning with spatial aspects of the reaction. For that, we used formal kinetics, more specifically, the microstructural path method (MPM to analyze the microstructure observed in a burst. The microstructural path analysis revealed that the size of the spread cluster in extended space, characterized by the Vandermeer and Juul-Jensen's impingement compensated mean intercept length, λG, remained constant, independently of the parent austenite grain size. Moreover, current analysis introduced a purely formal description of the reaction progress by taking the parent austenite grain size as the progress variable. This description worked very well and resulted in a relationship between the volume fraction of partially transformed austenite, V VG, and austenite grain size, λG. The significance of these findings in the light of the advantages and disadvantages of formal kinetics is discussed.

  3. Critical Test Of Gamma Ray Burst Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Long and precise follow-up measurements of the X-ray afterglow (AG) of very intense gamma ray bursts (GRBs) provide a critical test of GRB afterglow theories. Here we show that the power-law decline with time of X-ray AG of GRB 130427A, the longest measured X-ray AG of an intense GRB with the Swift, Chandra and XMM Newton satellites, and of all other well measured late-time X-ray afterglow of intense GRBs, is that predicted by the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs from their measured spectral index, while it disagrees with that predicted by the widely accepted fireball (FB) models of GRBs.

  4. Synchrotron masers and fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghisellini, G.

    2017-02-01

    Fast radio bursts, with a typical duration of 1 ms and 1 Jy flux density at gigahertz frequencies, have brightness temperatures exceeding 1033 K, requiring a coherent emission process. This can be achieved by bunching particles in volumes smaller than the typical wavelength, but this may be challenging. Maser emission is a possibility. Under certain conditions, the synchrotron-stimulated emission process can be more important than true absorption, and a synchrotron maser can be created. This occurs when the emitting electrons have a very narrow distribution of pitch angles and energies. This process overcomes the difficulties of having extremely dense bunches of particles and relaxes the light-crossing time limits, since there is no simple relation between the actual size of the source and the observed variability time-scale.

  5. Gamma-ray burst afterglow theory

    CERN Document Server

    van Eerten, Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    It is by now fairly well established that gamma-ray burst afterglows result from initially relativistic outflows interacting with the medium surrounding the burster and emitting non-thermal radiation ranging from radio to X-rays. However, beyond that, many big and small questions remain about afterglows, with the accumulating amount of observational data at the various frequencies raising as many questions as they answer. In this review I highlight a number of current theoretical issues and how they fit or do not fit within our basic theoretical framework. In addition to theoretical progress I will also emphasize the increasing role and usefulness of numerical studies of afterglow blast waves and their radiation.

  6. Gamma ray bursts and their afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) were among the greatest mysteries in modern astrophysics. They were first observed 50 years ago but it took three decades before optical counterparts could be found and the underlying physical phenomena studied in detail. GRB research represents currently one of the most rapidly growing areas in extragalactic astronomy. This is due in large part to the numerous connections that GRBs have with other disciplines like cosmology, supernovae, stellar evolution, nuclear physics, astroparticle and gravitational wave astronomy. Therefore, their study is of great importance to understand various astrophysical phenomena such as the formation of the first stars, the chemical evolution and the expansion of the Universe. Since gamma radiation can travel along cosmological distances without being affected by any possible intervening absorption, GRBs can be detected from the most distant universe, reaching redshifts up to z = 10 or more.

  7. Discovery of hard X-ray emission from Type II bursts of the Rapid Burster

    CERN Document Server

    Frontera, F; Orlandini, M; Amati, L; Palazzi, E; Dal Fiume, D; Del Sordo, S; Cusumano, G; Parmar, A N; Pareschi, G; Lapidus, I; Stella, L

    2000-01-01

    We report on results of BeppoSAX Target Of Opportunity (TOO) observations of the source MXB 1730-335, also called the Rapid Burster (RB), made during its outburst of February-March 1998. We monitored the evolution of the spectral properties of the RB from the outburst decay to quiescence. During the first TOO, the X-ray light curve of the RB showed many Type II bursts and its broadband (1-100 keV) spectrum was acceptably fit with a two blackbody plus power law model. Moreover, to our knowledge, this is the first time that this source is detected beyond 30 keV.

  8. Does Twitter trigger bursts in signature collections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Yamaguchi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The quantification of social media impacts on societal and political events is a difficult undertaking. The Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine started a signature-collecting campaign to oppose a medical policy of the Government Revitalization Unit to exclude a traditional Japanese medicine, "Kampo," from the public insurance system. The signature count showed a series of aberrant bursts from November 26 to 29, 2009. In the same interval, the number of messages on Twitter including the keywords "Signature" and "Kampo," increased abruptly. Moreover, the number of messages on an Internet forum that discussed the policy and called for signatures showed a train of spikes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In order to estimate the contributions of social media, we developed a statistical model with state-space modeling framework that distinguishes the contributions of multiple social media in time-series of collected public opinions. We applied the model to the time-series of signature counts of the campaign and quantified contributions of two social media, i.e., Twitter and an Internet forum, by the estimation. We found that a considerable portion (78% of the signatures was affected from either of the social media throughout the campaign and the Twitter effect (26% was smaller than the Forum effect (52% in total, although Twitter probably triggered the initial two bursts of signatures. Comparisons of the estimated profiles of the both effects suggested distinctions between the social media in terms of sustainable impact of messages or tweets. Twitter shows messages on various topics on a time-line; newer messages push out older ones. Twitter may diminish the impact of messages that are tweeted intermittently. CONCLUSIONS: The quantification of social media impacts is beneficial to better understand people's tendency and may promote developing strategies to engage public opinions effectively. Our proposed method is a promising tool to explore

  9. CSI 2264: characterizing accretion-burst dominated light curves for young stars in NGC 2264

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauffer, John; Cody, Ann Marie; Rebull, Luisa; Carey, Sean [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Baglin, Annie [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, 5 place Jules Janssen, F-92195, Meudon (France); Alencar, Silvia [Departamento de Física-ICEx-UFMG, Av. Antônio Carlos, 6627, 30270-901, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Hillenbrand, Lynne A.; Carpenter, John; Findeisen, Krzysztof [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Venuti, Laura; Bouvier, Jerome [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planétologie et d' Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, Grenoble, F-38041 (France); Turner, Neal J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Plavchan, Peter [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Terebey, Susan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 5151 State University Drive, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Morales-Calderón, María [Centro de Astrobiología, Dpto. de Astrofísica, INTA-CSIC, P.O. Box 78, E-28691, ESAC Campus, Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Micela, Giusi; Flaccomio, Ettore [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134, Palermo (Italy); Song, Inseok [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Gutermuth, Rob [Five College Astronomy Department, Smith College, Northampton, MA 01063 (United States); Hartmann, Lee, E-mail: stauffer@ipac.caltech.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48105 (United States); and others

    2014-04-01

    Based on more than four weeks of continuous high-cadence photometric monitoring of several hundred members of the young cluster NGC 2264 with two space telescopes, NASA's Spitzer and the CNES CoRoT (Convection, Rotation, and planetary Transits), we provide high-quality, multi-wavelength light curves for young stellar objects whose optical variability is dominated by short-duration flux bursts, which we infer are due to enhanced mass accretion rates. These light curves show many brief—several hours to one day—brightenings at optical and near-infrared wavelengths with amplitudes generally in the range of 5%-50% of the quiescent value. Typically, a dozen or more of these bursts occur in a 30 day period. We demonstrate that stars exhibiting this type of variability have large ultraviolet (UV) excesses and dominate the portion of the u – g versus g – r color-color diagram with the largest UV excesses. These stars also have large Hα equivalent widths, and either centrally peaked, lumpy Hα emission profiles or profiles with blueshifted absorption dips associated with disk or stellar winds. Light curves of this type have been predicted for stars whose accretion is dominated by Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities at the boundary between their magnetosphere and inner circumstellar disk, or where magneto-rotational instabilities modulate the accretion rate from the inner disk. Among the stars with the largest UV excesses or largest Hα equivalent widths, light curves with this type of variability greatly outnumber light curves with relatively smooth sinusoidal variations associated with long-lived hot spots. We provide quantitative statistics for the average duration and strength of the accretion bursts and for the fraction of the accretion luminosity associated with these bursts.

  10. INTEGRAL detects an X-ray burst from SAX J1747.0-2853 with no detectable persistent emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Brandt, Søren Kristian; Kuulkers, Erik;

    2009-01-01

    A new season of observations for the INTEGRAL Galactic Bulge monitoring (see ATel #438) has started on 2009 Feb. 21st. During the latest observation between 2009 Feb 25 13:21 and 17:02 (UT) a type I X-ray burst from SAX J1747.0-2853 (1A 1743-288, aka GX .2-0.2) was detected by JEM-X at UT 14:50:5...

  11. PEITC inhibits human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cell migration and invasion through the inhibition of uPA, Rho A, and Ras with inhibition of MMP-2, -7 and -9 gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Mei-Jen; Yu, Fu-Shun; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Harnod, Tomor; Hung, Chih-Huang; Lee, Hsu-Tung; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-11-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive primary brain malignancy, and the efficacy of multimodality treatments remains unsatisfactory. Phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), one member of the isothiocyanate family, was found to inhibit the migration and invasion of many types of human cancer cells. In our previous study, PEITC induced the apoptosis of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells through the extrinsic and intrinsic signaling pathways. In the present study, we first investigated the effects of PEITC on the migration and invasion of GBM 8401 cells. PEITC decreased the migration of GBM 8401 cells in a dose-dependent manner as determined from scratch wound healing and Transwell migration assays. The percentage of inhibition ranged from 46.89 to 15.75%, and from 27.80 to 7.31% after a 48-h treatment of PEITC as determined from the Transwell migration assay and invasion assay, respectively. The western blot analysis indicated that PEITC decreased the levels of proteins associated with migration and invasion, Ras, uPA, RhoA, GRB2, p-p38, p-JNK, p-ERK, p65, SOS1, MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-13, in a dose-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analyses revealed that PEITC reduced the mRNA levels of MMP-2, MMP-7, MMP-9 and RhoA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. PEITC exhibited potent anticancer activities through the inhibition of migration and invasion in the GBM 8401 cells. Our findings elucidate the possible molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways of the anti-metastatic effects of PEITC on human brain glioblastoma cells, and PEITC may be considered as a therapeutic agent.

  12. Radio fiber bursts and fast magnetoacoustic wave trains

    CERN Document Server

    Karlický, M; Jelínek, P

    2012-01-01

    We present a model for dm-fiber bursts that is based on assuming fast sausage magnetoacoustic wave trains that propagate along a dense vertical filament or current sheet. Eight groups of dm-fiber bursts that were observed during solar flares were selected and analyzed by the wavelet analysis method. To model these fiber bursts we built a semi-empirical model. We also did magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a propagation of the magnetoacoustic wave train in a vertical and gravitationally stratified current sheet. In the wavelet spectra of the fiber bursts computed at different radio frequencies we found the wavelet tadpoles, whose head maxima have the same frequency drift as the drift of fiber bursts. It indicates that the drift of these fiber bursts can be explained by the propagating fast sausage magnetoacoustic wave train. Using new semi-empirical and magnetohydrodynamic models with a simple radio emission model we generated the artificial radio spectra of the fiber bursts, which are similar to the observed ...

  13. Unusual Solar Radio Burst Observed at Decameter Wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, V. N.; Brazhenko, A. I.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Rucker, H. O.; Frantsuzenko, A. V.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Panchenko, M.; Stanislavskyy, A. A.

    2014-01-01

    An unusual solar burst was observed simultaneously by two decameter radio telescopes UTR-2 (Kharkov, Ukraine) and URAN-2 (Poltava, Ukraine) on 3 June 2011 in the frequency range of 16 - 28 MHz. The observed radio burst had some unusual properties, which are not typical for the other types of solar radio bursts. Its frequency drift rate was positive (about 500 kHz s-1) at frequencies higher than 22 MHz and negative (100 kHz s-1) at lower frequencies. The full duration of this event varied from 50 s up to 80 s, depending on the frequency. The maximum radio flux of the unusual burst reached ≈103 s.f.u. and its polarization did not exceed 10 %. This burst had a fine frequency-time structure of unusual appearance. It consisted of stripes with the frequency bandwidth 300 - 400 kHz. We consider that several accompanied radio and optical events observed by SOHO and STEREO spacecraft were possibly associated with the reported radio burst. A model that may interpret the observed unusual solar radio burst is proposed.

  14. Short Gamma-Ray Bursts with Extended Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, J P; Bonnell, Jerry T.; Norris, Jay P.

    2006-01-01

    The recent association of several short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with early type galaxies with low star formation rate demonstrates that short bursts arise from a different progenitor mechanism than long bursts. However, since the duration distributions of the two classes overlap, membership is not always easily established. The picture is complicated by the occasional presence of softer, extended emission lasting tens of seconds after the initial spike-like emission. We show that the fundamental defining characteristic of the short burst class is that the initial spike exhibits negligible spectral evolution at energies above ~ 25 keV. This behavior is nearly ubiquitous for the 260 bursts with T90 < 2 s, where the BATSE TTE data completely included the initial spike. The same signature obtains for one HETE-2 and six Swift/BAT short bursts. Analysis of a small sample of "short" BATSE bursts with the most intense extended emission shows that the same lack of evolution on the pulse timescale obtains for the ex...

  15. Large Aerial Bursts: An Important Class of Terrestrial Accretionary Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasson, John T.

    2003-01-01

    Large aerial bursts similar to the 1908 Tunguska bolide but much larger in magnitude have surely been responsible for many catastrophic events in the history of the Earth. Because aerial bursts produce shallow (or even negligible) craters, their existence is difficult to document in the geological record. Even aerial bursts as small as Tunguska deposit enough energy to melt ~1mm of dry soil. Silica-rich glass formed in such melts has the potential to survive in the soil for many Ma, thus a potential indicator of large aerial bursts is glass that was formed as thick regions within silicate melt sheets. The layered tektites from Southeast Asia and the Libyan desert glass may have formed by a combination of sedimentation and downslope flow of silicate melt heated by radiation from large aerial bursts. The alternative, formation of layered tektites as crater ejecta, cannot account for observations such as uniformly high 10Be contents, the orientation of the magnetic remanence field, and the absence of splash-form (e.g., teardrop or dumbbell) tektites in regions where layered tektites are common. The largest asteroids or comets make craters no matter what their strength. Recent reviews suggest that, for events in the energy range up to 1019-1020 J (about two orders of magnitude larger than the Meteor Crater impact), aerial bursts are more likely than cratering events, and the layered tektites of Southeast Asia imply the existence of aerial bursts one to two orders of magnitude larger still.

  16. Gamma Ray Bursts and the Birth of Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    Black holes have been predicted since the 1940's from solutions of Einstein's general relativity field equation. There is strong evidence of their existence from astronomical observations, but their origin has remained an open question of great interest. Gamma-ray bursts may the clue. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and appear to be the birth cries of black holes. The Swift and Fermi missions are two powerful NASA observatories currently in orbit that are discovering how gamma-ray bursts work. Evidence is building that the long and short duration subcategories of GRBs have very different origins: massive star core collapse to a black hole for long bursts and binary neutron star coalescence to a black hole for short bursts. The similarity to Type II and Ia supernovae originating from young and old stellar progenitors is striking. Bursts are tremendously luminous and are providing a new tool to study the high redshift universe. One Swift burst at z=8.3 is the most distant object known in the universe. The talk will present the latest gamma-ray burst results from Swift and Fermi and will highlight what they are teaching us about black holes and jet outflows.

  17. Behaviorally relevant burst coding in primary sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabourin, Patrick; Pollack, Gerald S

    2009-08-01

    Bursts of action potentials in sensory interneurons are believed to signal the occurrence of particularly salient stimulus features. Previous work showed that bursts in an identified, ultrasound-tuned interneuron (AN2) of the cricket Teleogryllus oceanicus code for conspicuous increases in amplitude of an ultrasound stimulus, resulting in behavioral responses that are interpreted as avoidance of echolocating bats. We show that the primary sensory neurons that inform AN2 about high-frequency acoustic stimuli also produce bursts. As is the case for AN2, bursts in sensory neurons perform better as feature detectors than isolated, nonburst, spikes. Bursting is temporally correlated between sensory neurons, suggesting that on occurrence of a salient stimulus feature, AN2 will receive strong synaptic input in the form of coincident bursts, from several sensory neurons, and that this might result in bursting in AN2. Our results show that an important feature of the temporal structure of interneuron spike trains can be established at the earliest possible level of sensory processing, i.e., that of the primary sensory neuron.

  18. On the Galactic Distribution of Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Lewin, W H G; Lewin, Robert E. Rutledge \\& Walter H.G.

    1993-01-01

    Quashnock and Lamb (1993) defined a sub-sample of Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) from the publicly available BATSE database which shows clumping toward the galactic plane, and concluded that all GRBs are galactic in origin. The selection of these bursts (duplicated in this work in Sample 1) involved a peak countrate (in counts s-1) uncorrected for aspect. We assert that the peak flux of a burst is physically more meaningful than peak count-rate. Using, as limits, the corresponding peak fluxes (in photons cm-2 s-1) for the bursts in the QL sample, we find an additional 24 bursts, which we include in a new sample (Sample 2). We find that the significance of anisotropy in Sample 2 is much less than that of Sample 1, which does not support QL's interpretation of the anisotropies as being due to a galactic population. To make meaningful statistical statements regarding isotropy, burst samples must have peak fluxes above a minimum flux, set by the requirement that a burst be detectable from any direction (above the horizo...

  19. Temporal Constraints on the Size of Gamma-ray Burst Progenitors and Implications for Gravitational Wave Follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkhou, V. Zach; Butler, Nathaniel; Littlejohns, Owen

    2017-01-01

    Uncovering the intrinsic variability of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the most energetic explosions since the Big Bang, constrains the size of the GRB emission region, and ejecta velocity, in turn providing hints on the nature of GRBs and their progenitors.We develop a novel method which ties together wavelet and structure-function analyses to measure, for the first time, the actual minimum variability timescale, Δtmin, of GRB light curves. Implementing our technique to the largest sample of GRBs collected by Swift and Fermi instruments, reveals that only less than 10% of GRBs exhibit evidence for variability on timescales below 2 ms. Investigation on various energy bands of Fermi/GBM (spanning 8 keV-1 MeV) shows that the tightest constraints on progenitor radii derive from timescales obtained from the hardest energy channel of light curves (299 -1000 keV). Our derivations for the minimum Lorentz factor, Γmin, and the minimum emission radius, R = 2 c Γmin2 Δtmin / (1+z), find Γ ≥ 400 which imply typical emission radii R ≈ 1×1014 cm for long-duration GRBs and R ≈ 3×1013 cm for short-duration GRBs (sGRBs). This information is served in an online, publicly-accessible table which is automatically updated upon a new GRB trigger event.Given the possible linkage between sGRBs and Compact Binary Coalescence events, the practical approach to finally detect the Electromagnetic counterparts of LIGO triggers is to focus our follow-up resources on sGRBs. Our sGRB selection methodology, a direct measure of the emission region size, along with the implemented vetting algorithm of extracted transient candidates found by an image subtraction code could optimize efficiently LIGO follow-up with the Ground-based Telescopes.

  20. Understanding Neutron Stars using Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star = EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts = modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  1. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star approaching EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. +k Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts - modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. +k Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  2. Dissecting the Phase Response of a Model Bursting Neuron

    CERN Document Server

    Sherwood, William Erik

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the phase response properties of the Hindmarsh-Rose model of neuronal bursting using burst phase response curves (BPRCs) computed with an infinitesimal perturbation approximation and by direct simulation of synaptic input. The resulting BPRCs have a significantly more complicated structure than the usual Type I and Type II PRCs of spiking neuronal models, and they exhibit highly timing-sensitive changes in the number of spikes per burst that lead to large magnitude phase responses. We use fast-slow dissection and isochron calculations to analyze the phase response dynamics in both weak and strong perturbation regimes.

  3. Origin of wide-band IP type II bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjolainen, S.; Allawi, H.; Valtonen, E.

    2013-10-01

    Context. Different types of interplanetary (IP) type II bursts have been observed, where the more usual ones show narrow-band and patchy emissions, sometimes with harmonics, and which at intervals may disappear completely from the dynamic spectrum. The more unusual bursts are wide-band and diffuse, show no patches or breaks or harmonic emission, and often have long durations. Type II bursts are thought to be plasma emission, caused by propagating shock waves, but a synchrotron-emitting source has also been proposed as the origin for the wide-band type IIs. Aims: Our aim is to find out where the wide-band IP type II bursts originate and what is their connection to particle acceleration. Methods: We analyzed in detail 25 solar events that produced well-separated, wide-band IP type II bursts in 2001-2011. Their associations to flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and solar energetic particle events (SEPs) were investigated. Results: Of the 25 bursts, 18 were estimated to have heights corresponding to the CME leading fronts, suggesting that they were created by bow shocks ahead of the CMEs. However, seven events were found in which the burst heights were significantly lower and which showed a different type of height-time evolution. Almost all the analyzed wide-band type II bursts were associated with very high-speed CMEs, originating from different parts of the solar hemisphere. In terms of SEP associations, many of the SEP events were weak, had poor connectivity due to the eastern limb source location, or were masked by previous events. Some of the events had precursors in specific energy ranges. These properties and conditions affected the intensity-time profiles and made the injection-time-based associations with the type II bursts difficult to interpret. In several cases where the SEP injection times could be determined, the radio dynamic spectra showed other features (in addition to the wide-band type II bursts) that could be signatures of shock fronts

  4. Efficient estimation of burst-mode LDA power spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Velte, Clara Marika; George, William K

    2010-01-01

    requirements for good statistical convergence due to the random sampling of the data. In the present work, the theory for estimating burst-mode LDA spectra using residence time weighting is discussed and a practical estimator is derived and applied. A brief discussion on the self-noise in spectra...... (axisymmetric turbulent jet). The burst-mode LDA spectra are compared to corresponding spectra from hot-wire data obtained in the same experiments, and to LDA spectra produced by the sample-and-hold methodology. The spectra computed from the residence-time weighted burst-mode algorithm proposed herein compare...

  5. Closest Gamma Ray Burst Providing Scientists With Crucial Test for Burst Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    The closest Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) yet known is providing astronomers with a rare opportunity to gain information vital to understanding these powerful cosmic explosions. Extremely precise radio-telescope observations already have ruled out one proposed mechanism for the bursts. "This is the closest and brightest GRB we've ever seen, and we can use it to decipher the physics of how these bursts work," said Greg Taylor of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Taylor worked with Dale Frail, also of the NRAO, along with Prof. Shri Kulkarni and graduate student Edo Berger of Caltech in studying a GRB detected on March 29, 2003. The scientists presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Nashville, TN. VLBA image of GRB 030329 VLBA IMAGE of GRB 030329 CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on Image for Larger Version) Taylor and Frail used the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and other radio telescopes to study the burst, known as GRB 030329. In a series of observations from April 1 to May 19, they determined the size of the expanding "fireball" from the burst and measured its position in the sky with great precision. At a distance of about 2.6 billion light-years, GRB 030329 is hardly next door. However, compared to other GRBs at typical distances of 8-10 billion light-years, it presents an easier target for study. "We only expect to see one burst per decade this close," said Frail. The precise measurement of the object's position allowed the scientists to show that one theoretical model for GRBs can be ruled out. This model, proposed in 2000, says that the radio-wave energy emitted by the GRB comes from "cannonballs" of material shot from the explosion at extremely high speeds. "The 'cannonball model' predicted that we should see the radio-emitting object move across the sky by a specific amount. We have not seen that motion," Taylor said. The currently standard "fireball model" of GRBs

  6. Monitoring the Crab Nebula with LOFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2012-01-01

    From 2008-2010, the Crab Nebula was found to decline by 7% in the 15-50 keV band, consistently in Fermi GBM, INTEGRAL IBIS, SPI, and JEMX, RXTE PCA, and Swift BAT. From 2001-2010, the 15-50 keV flux from the Crab Nebula typically varied by about 3.5% per year. Analysis of RXTE PCA data suggests possible spectral variations correlated with the flux variations. I will present estimates of the LOFT sensitivity to these variations. Prior to 2001 and since 2010, the observed flux variations have been much smaller. Monitoring the Crab with the LOFT WFM and LAD will provide precise measurements of flux variations in the Crab Nebula if it undergoes a similarly active episode.

  7. A Comprehensive Analysis of Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Data: II. $E_{\\rm p}$-Evolution Patterns and Implications for the Observed Spectrum-Luminosity Relations

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Rui-Jing; Liang, En-Wei; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Lü, Hou-Jun; Lian-Zhong,; Lü,; Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing

    2012-01-01

    We present a time-resolved spectral analysis of 51 long and 11 short bright GRBs observed with the {\\em Femri}/GBM, paying special attention to $E_{\\rm p}$ evolution within a same burst. Among 8 single-pulse long GRBs, 5 show hard-to-soft evolution, while 3 show intensity-tracking. The multi-pulse long GRBs have more complicated patterns. Among the GRBs whose time-resolved spectrum is available for the first pulse, almost half (15/32 GRBs) show clear hard-to-soft evolution, and the other half (17/32 GRBs) show clear intensity-tracking. Later pulses typically show the tracking behavior, although a hard-to-soft evolution pattern was identified in the 2nd pulse of 2 GRBs whose pulses are well separated. Statistically, the hard-to-soft evolution pulses tend to be more asymmetric than the intensity-tracking ones, with a steeper rising wing than the falling wing. Short GRBs have $E_{\\rm p}$ tracking intensity exclusively with the 16ms time resolution analysis. We performed a simulation analysis, and suggest that at...

  8. Neutrino astronomy and gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E

    2007-01-01

    The construction of large volume detectors of high energy, >1 TeV, neutrinos is mainly driven by the search for extra-Galactic neutrino sources. The existence of such sources is implied by observations of ultra-high energy, >10^{19} eV, cosmic-rays, the origin of which is a mystery. In this lecture I briefly discuss the expected extra-Galactic neutrino signal and the current state of the experimental efforts. Neutrino emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are likely sources of both high energy protons and neutrinos, is discussed in some detail. The detection of the predicted GRB neutrino signal, which may become possible in the coming few years, will allow one to identify the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic-rays and to resolve open questions related to the underlying physics of GRB models. Moreover, detection of GRB neutrinos will allow one to test for neutrino properties (e.g. flavor oscillations and coupling to gravity) with an accuracy many orders of magnitude better than is currently possible.

  9. Energy Injections in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y. B.; Wu, X. F.; Huang, Y. F.; Xu, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we will introduce some special events, such as GRBs 081029, 100814A and 111209A. Unexpected features, such as multiple X-ray flares and significant optical rebrightenings, are observed in their afterglow light curves, unveiling the late-time activities of the central engines. Here, we will summarize our previous numerical results of these three bursts by using the energy injection model. Especially, we will focus on GRB 100814A, with an early-time shallow decay phase and a late-time significant rebrightening in its optical afterglow light curve. To explain the complex multi-band afterglow emission of GRB 100814A, we invoke a magnetar with spin evolution as its central engine. We argue that the optical shallow decay phase and the X-ray plateau are due to energy injection from t he magnetar in its early spin-down stage, while the significant optical rebrightening observed at late time naturally comes from the spin-up process of the magnetar, which is caused by subsequent fall back accretion.

  10. The Nature of Gamma Ray Burst Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are among the brightest and most energetic physical processes in the universe. It is known that core-collapse SNe arise from the gravitational collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars (the progen- itors of nearby core-collapse SNe have been imaged and unambiguously identified). It is also believed that the progenitors of long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs) are massive stars, mainly due to the occurrence and detection of very energetic core-collapse su- pernovae that happen both temporally and spatially coincident with most L-GRBs. However many outstanding questions regarding the nature of these events exist: How massive are the progenitors? What evolutionary stage are they at when they explode? Do they exist as single stars or in binary systems (or both, and to what fractions)? The work presented in this thesis attempts to further our understanding at the types of progenitors that give rise to long-duration GRB supernovae (GRB-SNe). This work is based on optical ...

  11. Afterglow Radiation from Gamma Ray Bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desmond, Hugh; /Leuven U. /SLAC

    2006-08-28

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are huge fluxes of gamma rays that appear randomly in the sky about once a day. It is now commonly accepted that GRBs are caused by a stellar object shooting off a powerful plasma jet along its rotation axis. After the initial outburst of gamma rays, a lower intensity radiation remains, called the afterglow. Using the data from a hydrodynamical numerical simulation that models the dynamics of the jet, we calculated the expected light curve of the afterglow radiation that would be observed on earth. We calculated the light curve and spectrum and compared them to the light curves and spectra predicted by two analytical models of the expansion of the jet (which are based on the Blandford and McKee solution of a relativistic isotropic expansion; see Sari's model [1] and Granot's model [2]). We found that the light curve did not decay as fast as predicted by Sari; the predictions by Granot were largely corroborated. Some results, however, did not match Granot's predictions, and more research is needed to explain these discrepancies.

  12. Photon Mass Limits from Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Bonetti, Luca; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E.; Sakharov, Alexander S.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward K.G.; Spallicci, Alessandro D.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    The frequency-dependent time delays in fast radio bursts (FRBs) can be used to constrain the photon mass, if the FRB redshifts are known, but the similarity between the frequency dependences of dispersion due to plasma effects and a photon mass complicates the derivation of a limit on $m_\\gamma$. The redshift of FRB 150418 has been measured to $\\sim 2$% and its dispersion measure (DM) is known to $\\sim 0.1$%, but the strength of the constraint on $m_\\gamma$ is limited by uncertainties in the modelling of the host galaxy and the Milky Way, as well as possible inhomogeneities in the intergalactic medium (IGM). Allowing for these uncertainties, the recent data on FRB 150418 indicate that $m_\\gamma \\lesssim 1.7 \\times 10^{-14}$ eV c$^{-2}$ ($4.6 \\times 10^{-50}$ kg). In the future, the different redshift dependences of the plasma and photon mass contributions to DM can be used to improve the sensitivity to $m_\\gamma$ if more FRB redshifts are measured. For a fixed fractional uncertainty in the extra-galactic cont...

  13. Detecting fast radio bursts at decametric wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Rajwade, Kaustubh

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are highly dispersed, sporadic radio pulses that are likely extragalactic in nature. Here we investigate the constraints on the source population from surveys carried out at frequencies $<1$~GHz. All but one FRB has so far been discovered in the 1--2~GHz band, but new and emerging instruments look set to become valuable probes of the FRB population at sub-GHz frequencies in the near future. In this paper, we consider the impacts of free-free absorption and multi-path scattering in our analysis via a number of different assumptions about the intervening medium. We consider previous low frequency surveys alongwith an ongoing survey with the University of Technology digital backend for the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (UTMOST) as well as future observations with the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) and the Hydrogen Intensity and Real-Time Analysis Experiment (HIRAX). We predict that CHIME and HIRAX will be able to observe $\\sim$ 30 or more FRBs per da...

  14. Photon mass limits from fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Luca; Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E.; Sakharov, Alexander S.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward K.; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The frequency-dependent time delays in fast radio bursts (FRBs) can be used to constrain the photon mass, if the FRB redshifts are known, but the similarity between the frequency dependences of dispersion due to plasma effects and a photon mass complicates the derivation of a limit on mγ. The dispersion measure (DM) of FRB 150418 is known to ∼ 0.1%, and there is a claim to have measured its redshift with an accuracy of ∼ 2%, but the strength of the constraint on mγ is limited by uncertainties in the modelling of the host galaxy and the Milky Way, as well as possible inhomogeneities in the intergalactic medium (IGM). Allowing for these uncertainties, the recent data on FRB 150418 indicate that mγ ≲ 1.8 ×10-14 eVc-2 (3.2 ×10-50 kg), if FRB 150418 indeed has a redshift z = 0.492 as initially reported. In the future, the different redshift dependences of the plasma and photon mass contributions to DM can be used to improve the sensitivity to mγ if more FRB redshifts are measured. For a fixed fractional uncertainty in the extra-galactic contribution to the DM of an FRB, one with a lower redshift would provide greater sensitivity to mγ.

  15. Blueshifting may explain the gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Krasiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the basic observed properties of the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are accounted for if one assumes that the GRBs arise by blueshifting the emission radiation of hydrogen and helium generated during the last scattering epoch. The blueshift generator for a single GRB is a Lema\\^{\\i}tre -- Tolman (L--T) region with a nonconstant bang-time function $t_B(r)$ matched into a Friedmann background. Blueshift visible to the observer arises \\textit{only on radial rays} that are emitted in the L--T region. The paper presents three L--T models with different Big Bang profiles, adapted for the highest and the lowest end of the GRB frequency range. The models account for: (1) The observed frequency range of the GRBs; (2) Their limited duration; (3) The afterglows; (4) Their hypothetical collimation into narrow jets; (5) The large distances to their sources; (6) The multitude of the observed GRBs. Properties (2), (3) and (6) are accounted for only qualitatively. With a small correction of the parameters of the mo...

  16. Studying the WHIM with Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Branchini, E; Corsi, A; Martizzi, D; Amati, L; Herder, J W den; Galeazzi, M; Gendre, B; Kaastra, J; Moscardini, L; Nicastro, F; Ohashi, T; Paerels, F; Piro, L; Roncarelli, M; Takei, Y; Viel, M

    2009-01-01

    We assess the possibility to detect and characterize the physical state of the missing baryons at low redshift by analyzing the X-ray absorption spectra of the Gamma Ray Burst [GRB] afterglows, measured by a micro calorimeters-based detector with 3 eV resolution and 1000 cm2 effective area and capable of fast re-pointing, similar to that on board of the recently proposed X-ray satellites EDGE and XENIA. For this purpose we have analyzed mock absorption spectra extracted from different hydrodynamical simulations used to model the properties of the Warm Hot Intergalactic Medium [WHIM]. These models predict the correct abundance of OVI absorption lines observed in UV and satisfy current X-ray constraints. According to these models space missions like EDGE and XENIA should be able to detect about 60 WHIM absorbers per year through the OVII line. About 45 % of these have at least two more detectable lines in addition to OVII that can be used to determine the density and the temperature of the gas. Systematic error...

  17. Neuronal networks and energy bursts in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y; Liu, D; Song, Z

    2015-02-26

    Epilepsy can be defined as the abnormal activities of neurons. The occurrence, propagation and termination of epileptic seizures rely on the networks of neuronal cells that are connected through both synaptic- and non-synaptic interactions. These complicated interactions contain the modified functions of normal neurons and glias as well as the mediation of excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms with feedback homeostasis. Numerous spread patterns are detected in disparate networks of ictal activities. The cortical-thalamic-cortical loop is present during a general spike wave seizure. The thalamic reticular nucleus (nRT) is the major inhibitory input traversing the region, and the dentate gyrus (DG) controls CA3 excitability. The imbalance between γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibition and glutamatergic excitation is the main disorder in epilepsy. Adjustable negative feedback that mediates both inhibitory and excitatory components affects neuronal networks through neurotransmission fluctuation, receptor and transmitter signaling, and through concomitant influences on ion concentrations and field effects. Within a limited dynamic range, neurons slowly adapt to input levels and have a high sensitivity to synaptic changes. The stability of the adapting network depends on the ratio of the adaptation rates of both the excitatory and inhibitory populations. Thus, therapeutic strategies with multiple effects on seizures are required for the treatment of epilepsy, and the therapeutic functions on networks are reviewed here. Based on the high-energy burst theory of epileptic activity, we propose a potential antiepileptic therapeutic strategy to transfer the high energy and extra electricity out of the foci.

  18. WATCH observations of gamma ray bursts during 1990–1992

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels;

    1994-01-01

    The first WATCH/GRANAT Gamma‐Ray Burst Catalogue comprises 70 events which have been detected by WATCH during the period December 1989–September 1992. 32 GRBs could be localized within a 3σ error radii of 1°. We have found a weak (2.2σ) clustering of these 32 bursts towards the Galactic Center....... However we conclude that there is no strong evidence of concentration of the bursts towards the Galactic Center or Plane. Around ∼10% of the 70 bursts showed x‐ray precursor or/and X‐ray tail. We discuss the possibility that two events, GRB 900126 and GRB 920311, would have been produced by the same...

  19. Model Atmospheres for X-ray Bursting Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Medin, Zach; Calder, Alan C; Fontes, Christopher J; Fryer, Chris L; Hungerford, Aimee L

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen and helium accreted by X-ray bursting neutron stars is periodically consumed in runaway thermonuclear reactions that cause the entire surface to glow brightly in X-rays for a few seconds. With models of the emission, the mass and radius of the neutron star can be inferred from the observations. By simultaneously probing neutron star masses and radii, X-ray bursts are one of the strongest diagnostics of the nature of matter at extremely high densities. Accurate determinations of these parameters are difficult, however, due to the highly non-ideal nature of the atmospheres where X-ray bursts occur. Observations from X-ray telescopes such as RXTE and NuStar can potentially place strong constraints on nuclear matter once uncertainties in atmosphere models have been reduced. Here we discuss current progress on modeling atmospheres of X-ray bursting neutron stars and some of the challenges still to be overcome.

  20. Stationarity of extreme bursts in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moloney, N R; Davidsen, J

    2014-05-01

    Recent results have suggested that the statistics of bursts in the solar wind vary with solar cycle. Here, we show that this variation is basically absent if one considers extreme bursts. These are defined as threshold-exceeding events over the range of high thresholds for which their number decays as a power law. In particular, we find that the distribution of duration times and energies of extreme bursts in the solar wind ε parameter and similar observables are independent of the solar cycle and in this sense stationary, and show robust asymptotic power laws with exponents that are independent of the specific threshold. This is consistent with what has been observed for solar flares and, thus, provides evidence in favor of a link between solar flares and extreme bursts in the solar wind.

  1. Auroral Kilometric Radiation and Type III Solar Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsova, T. V.; Mogilevsky, M. M.; Skalsky, A. A.; Hanasz, J.

    2009-04-01

    Simultaneous wave observations onboard the ISEE-1 and ISEE-3 spacecraft show that onsets of the Auroral Kilometric Radiation frequently coincide with an arrival of type III solar burst (Calvert, 1981). It was supposed that solar burst stimulates maser instability in auroral region and AKR consequently . We present statistical and case studies of events when both type III solar radio bursts and Auroral Kilometric Radiation are recorded simultaneously. AKR was observed onboard the INTERBALL-2 spacecraft orbiting around the Earth by the POLRAD experiment. Wave measurements carried out onboard the Wind, INTEBALL-TAIL and Geotail spacecraft are used to identify unambiguously the type III solar radio bursts. The origin of close relation between onsets of both solar radiation and AKR is discussed and interpreted. Acknowledgements. This work is supported by grant RFBR 06-02-72560.

  2. Fireball and cannonball models of gamma ray bursts confront observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Arnon

    2005-01-01

    The two leading contenders for the theory of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows, the Fireball and Cannonball models, are compared and their predictions are confronted, within space limitations, with key GRB observations, including recent observations with SWIFT

  3. Design and analysis of optical burst-switched networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yijun; Vandenhoute, Marc; Cankaya, Hakki C.

    1999-08-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising solution for building terabit optical routers and realizing IP over D- WDM. In this paper, we describe the basic concept of OBS and a general architecture of optical routers. The key design issues related to the OBS are discussed, notably, burstification, offset-time management and channel scheduling. A simple channel scheduling algorithm called LAUC (Latest Available Unscheduled Channel) algorithm is presented, which is also called Horizon algorithm in the literature. The performance of optical routers under random and self-similar traffic is thoroughly studied via computer simulations. Our study indicates that the distribution of burst length is not exponential any more. For the FDL (fiber delay line) optical buffer, the burst loss ratio is quite sensitive to the traffic characteristic of bursts when using the LAUC algorithm.

  4. Self-similar traffic analysis in optical burst assembly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sui Zhicheng; Zeng Qingji; Xiao Shilin

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates the traffic properties before and after assembly at edge node of Ethernet over optical burst switching (OBS) network for the first time. Burst and inter-arrival time distributions are simulated under time-based and length-based assembly schemes. Self-similar traffic Hurst parameter is compared through R/S and V/T plot. Finally three self-similar traffic generating methods are given. Simulation results demonstrate that, multi-source traffic increases self-similar degree, however after assembly, time-based scheme can decrease self-similar degree, and aggregated burst size is close to Gaussian distribution. Length-based method has no effects on the self-similarity of input traffic. RMD is fit for study of burst network with large self-similarity.

  5. The possible ubiquity of energy injection in Gamma-Ray Burst afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Panaitescu, A

    2012-01-01

    Since its launch in 2004, the Swift satellite has monitored the X-ray afterglows of several hundred Gamma-Ray Bursts, and revealed that their X-ray light-curves are more complex than previously thought, exhibiting up to three power-law segments. Energy injection into the relativistic blast-wave energizing the burst ambient medium has been proposed most often to be the reason for the X-ray afterglow complexity. We examine 117 light-curve breaks of 98 Swift X-ray afterglows, selected for their high-quality monitoring and well-constrained flux decay rates. Thirty percent of afterglows have a break that can be an adiabatic jet-break, in the sense that there is one variant of the forward-shock emission from a collimated outflow model that can account for both the pre- and post-break flux power-law decay indices, given the measured X-ray spectral slope. If allowance is made for a steady energy injection into the forward-shock, then another 56 percent of X-ray afterglows have a light-curve break that can be explaine...

  6. M-Burst: A Framework of SRLG Failure Localization in All-Optical Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Mohammed L.

    2012-07-27

    Fast and unambiguous failure localization for shared risk link groups (SRLGs) with multiple links is essential for building a fully survivable and functional transparent all-optical mesh network. Monitoring trails (m-trails) have been proposed as an effective approach to achieve this goal. However, each m-trail traverses through each link by constantly taking a wavelength channel, causing a significant amount of resource consumption. In this paper, a novel framework of all-optical monitoring for SRLG failure localization is proposed. We investigate the feasibility of periodically launching optical bursts along each m-trail instead of assigning it a dedicated supervisory lightpath to probe the set of fiber segments along the m-trail, aiming to achieve a graceful compromise between resource consumption and failure localization latency. This paper defines the proposed framework and highlights the relevant issues regarding its feasibility. We provide theoretical justifications of the scheme. As a proof of concept, we formulate the optimal burst scheduling problem via an integer linear program (ILP) and implement the method in networks of all possible SRLGs with up to d=3 links. A heuristic method is also proposed and implemented for multiple-link SRLG failure localization, keeping all the assumptions the same as in the ILP method. Numerical results for small networks show that the scheme is able to localize single-link and multiple-link SRLG failures unambiguously with a very small amount of failure localization latency.

  7. The LOFT Burst Alert System and its Burst On-board Trigger

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schanne, Stephane; Götz, Diego; Provost, Herve Le

    2014-01-01

    by the primary instrument LAD (Large Area Detector), sensitive to X-rays from 2 to 50 keV, offering a very large effective area (>10 m 2 ), but a small field of view ({\\o}{\\pi} sr), the WFM actually detects all types of transient sources, including Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), which are of primary interest......The ESA M3 candidate mission LOFT (Large Observatory For x-ray Timing) has been designed to study strong gravitational fields by observing compact objects, such as black-hole binaries or neutron-star systems and supermassive black-holes, based on the temporal analysis of photons collected...

  8. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF BED DEFORMATION IN DIKE BURST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The key point in the numerical simulation of breach growth and bed deformation process in a dike burst is the accurate computation of flow and sediment transport. A numerical model for horizontal 2-D non-uniform sediment was developed to simulate the bed deformation process in the dike burst. The first-order scheme was used in computation. Several simulated results were worked out to demonstrate the applicability of the numerical model.

  9. DETECTING THE SUPERNOVA BREAKOUT BURST IN TERRESTRIAL NEUTRINO DETECTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, Joshua; Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Dolence, Joshua C., E-mail: joshuajw@astro.princeton.edu [Computational Physics Group (CCS-2), MS-K784, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We calculate the distance-dependent performance of a few representative terrestrial neutrino detectors in detecting and measuring the properties of the ν{sub e} breakout burst light curve in a Galactic core-collapse supernova. The breakout burst is a signature phenomenon of core collapse and offers a probe into the stellar core through collapse and bounce. We examine cases of no neutrino oscillations and oscillations due to normal and inverted neutrino-mass hierarchies. For the normal hierarchy, other neutrino flavors emitted by the supernova overwhelm the ν{sub e} signal, making a detection of the breakout burst difficult. For the inverted hierarchy (IH), some detectors at some distances should be able to see the ν{sub e} breakout burst peak and measure its properties. For the IH, the maximum luminosity of the breakout burst can be measured at 10 kpc to accuracies of ∼30% for Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K) and ∼60% for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE). Super-Kamiokande (Super-K) and Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) lack the mass needed to make an accurate measurement. For the IH, the time of the maximum luminosity of the breakout burst can be measured in Hyper-K to an accuracy of ∼3 ms at 7 kpc, in DUNE to ∼2 ms at 4 kpc, and JUNO and Super-K can measure the time of maximum luminosity to an accuracy of ∼2 ms at 1 kpc. Detector backgrounds in IceCube render a measurement of the ν{sub e} breakout burst unlikely. For the IH, a measurement of the maximum luminosity of the breakout burst could be used to differentiate between nuclear equations of state.

  10. Narrow band characteristics of Jovian L-bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, C. H.

    1971-01-01

    Review of some radio observations of Jupiter made during three recent apparitions using several receivers, each tuned to a slightly different frequency close to 18 MHz. Sequences of oppositely polarized bursts have been observed and also differences in polarization mode between channels 400 kHz apart. Occasionally, isolated bursts of durations of 1 to 2 sec have been found to show real drifts in frequency, as distinct from the apparent drifts shown by changing intensity across a group of features.

  11. Emission Patterns of Solar Type III Radio Bursts: Stereoscopic Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thejappa, G.; MacDowall, R.; Bergamo, M.

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of solar type III radio bursts obtained by the STEREO A, B, and WIND spacecraft at low frequencies from different vantage points in the ecliptic plane are used to determine their directivity. The heliolongitudes of the sources of these bursts, estimated at different frequencies by assuming that they are located on the Parker spiral magnetic field lines emerging from the associated active regions into the spherically symmetric solar atmosphere, and the heliolongitudes of the spacecraft are used to estimate the viewing angle, which is the angle between the direction of the magnetic field at the source and the line connecting the source to the spacecraft. The normalized peak intensities at each spacecraft Rj = Ij /[Sigma]Ij (the subscript j corresponds to the spacecraft STEREO A, B, and WIND), which are defined as the directivity factors are determined using the time profiles of the type III bursts. It is shown that the distribution of the viewing angles divides the type III bursts into: (1) bursts emitting into a very narrow cone centered around the tangent to the magnetic field with angular width of approximately 2 deg and (2) bursts emitting into a wider cone with angular width spanning from [approx] -100 deg to approximately 100 deg. The plots of the directivity factors versus the viewing angles of the sources from all three spacecraft indicate that the type III emissions are very intense along the tangent to the spiral magnetic field lines at the source, and steadily fall as the viewing angles increase to higher values. The comparison of these emission patterns with the computed distributions of the ray trajectories indicate that the intense bursts visible in a narrow range of angles around the magnetic field directions probably are emitted in the fundamental mode, whereas the relatively weaker bursts visible to a wide range of angles are probably emitted in the harmonic mode.

  12. X-ray Spectroscopy of Bursts from SGR 1806-20 with RXTE

    CERN Document Server

    Strohmayer, T E; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Ibrahim, Alaa

    1998-01-01

    We report on new RXTE X-ray spectral analysis of bursts from SGR 1806-20, the most prolific SGR source known. Previous studies of bursts from this source revealed a remarkable lack of spectral variability both in single bursts as well as from burst to burst. We present here some of the first evidence for significant spectral evolution within SGR bursts. We find that optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB) spectra including photoelectric absorption provide the best fits to most bursts, however, other models (power law, Band GRB) can also produce statistically acceptable fits. We confirm the existence of a rolloff in the photon number spectrum below 5 keV.

  13. A Retroactive-Burst Framework for Automated Intrusion Response System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Shameli-Sendi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present an adaptive and cost-sensitive model to prevent security intrusions. In most automated intrusion response systems, response selection is performed locally based on current threat without using the knowledge of attacks history. Another challenge is that a group of responses are applied without any feedback mechanism to measure the response effect. We address these problems through retroactive-burst execution of responses and a Response Coordinator (RC mechanism, the main contributions of this work. The retroactive-burst execution consists of several burst executions of responses with, at the end of each burst, a mechanism for measuring the effectiveness of the applied responses by the risk assessment component. The appropriate combination of responses must be considered for each burst execution to mitigate the progress of the attack without necessarily running the next round of responses, because of the impact on legitimate users. In the proposed model, there is a multilevel response mechanism. To indicate which level is appropriate to apply based on the retroactive-burst execution, we get help from a Response Coordinator mechanism. The applied responses can improve the health of Applications, Kernel, Local Services, Network Services, and Physical Status. Based on these indexes, the RC gives a general overview of an attacker’s goal in a distributed environment.

  14. Rock burst prevention based on dissipative structure theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Song Dazhao; Wang Enyuan; Li Nan; Jin Mingyue; Xue Shipeng

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic collapses of deeply mined coal rocks are severe.In order to explore new ideas for rock burst prevention,the relationship between entropy equations and dissipative structure was studied,and a concept-rock burst activity system (RAS) was proposed and its entropy was analyzed.The energy features of RAS were analyzed,and the relationship between electromagnetic radiation (EMR) intensity E and dissipated energy Ud was initially established.We suggest that rock burst normally happens only when d,S<< -des in RAS:RAS is the dissipative structure before collapse,and after which it become a new orderly structure,i.e.,a "dead",a statically orderly structure.We advanced that the effective way to prevent rock burst is to introduce entropy to the system for it keeps the system away from the dissipative structure.E and Ud of RAS are positively related,which is used as a bridge between dissipative structure theory and rock burst prevention engineering applications.Based on this.and using the data of rock burst prevention for working face No.250205up of Yanbei coal mine,an engineering verification for the dissipative structure of RAS was carried out,which showed good results.

  15. Understanding the Continuum Spectra of Short Soft Gamma Repeater Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogus, Ersin; Woods, Peter M.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Finger, Mark H.; Lenter, Geoffrey; Patel, Sandeep K.; Swank, Jean

    2006-01-01

    The spectra of short soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts at photon energies above -15 keV are often well described by an optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung model (i.e., F(E) - E^-1 * exp(-E/kT) ) with kT=20-40 keV. However, the spectral shape burst continuum at lower photon energies (down to -2 keV) is not well established. It is important to better understand the SGR burst spectral properties at lower energies since inadequate description of the burst spectral continuum could lead to incorrect conclusions, such as existence of spectral lines. Here, we present detailed spectral investigations (in 2-200 keV) of 163 bursts from SGR 1806-20, all detected with Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the 2004 active episode that included the giant flare on 27 December 2004. We find that the great majority of burst spectra are well represented by the combination of a blackbody plus a OTTB models.

  16. Gamma-Ray Bursts Above 1 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    1997-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory relating to the study of gamma-ray bursts was the detection by the EGRET instrument of energetic ($>$100 MeV) photons from a handful of bright bursts. The most extreme of these was the single 18 GeV photon from the GRB940217 source. Given EGRET's sensitivity and limited field of view, the detection rate implies that such high energy emission may be ubiquitous in bursts. Hence expectations that bursts emit out to at least TeV energies are quite realistic, and the associated target-of-opportunity activity of the TeV gamma-ray community is well-founded. This review summarizes the observations and a handful of theoretical models for generating GeV--TeV emission in bursts sources, outlining possible ways that future positive detections could discriminate between different scenarios. The power of observations in the GeV--TeV range to distinguish between spectral structure intrinsic to bursts and that due to the intervening medium between sou...

  17. Detection of bursts and pauses in spike trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, D; Wilson, C J; Lobb, C J; Paladini, C A

    2012-10-15

    Midbrain dopaminergic neurons in vivo exhibit a wide range of firing patterns. They normally fire constantly at a low rate, and speed up, firing a phasic burst when reward exceeds prediction, or pause when an expected reward does not occur. Therefore, the detection of bursts and pauses from spike train data is a critical problem when studying the role of phasic dopamine (DA) in reward related learning, and other DA dependent behaviors. However, few statistical methods have been developed that can identify bursts and pauses simultaneously. We propose a new statistical method, the Robust Gaussian Surprise (RGS) method, which performs an exhaustive search of bursts and pauses in spike trains simultaneously. We found that the RGS method is adaptable to various patterns of spike trains recorded in vivo, and is not influenced by baseline firing rate, making it applicable to all in vivo spike trains where baseline firing rates vary over time. We compare the performance of the RGS method to other methods of detecting bursts, such as the Poisson Surprise (PS), Rank Surprise (RS), and Template methods. Analysis of data using the RGS method reveals potential mechanisms underlying how bursts and pauses are controlled in DA neurons.

  18. The host galaxy of a fast radio burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, E F; Johnston, S; Bhandari, S; Barr, E; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Kramer, M; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Eatough, R P; Stappers, B W; Totani, T; Honma, M; Furusawa, H; Hattori, T; Morokuma, T; Niino, Y; Sugai, H; Terai, T; Tominaga, N; Yamasaki, S; Yasuda, N; Allen, R; Cooke, J; Jencson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kaplan, D L; Tingay, S J; Williams, A; Wayth, R; Chandra, P; Perrodin, D; Berezina, M; Mickaliger, M; Bassa, C

    2016-02-25

    In recent years, millisecond-duration radio signals originating in distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called fast radio bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity, which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. Every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, but none before now have had a redshift measurement, because of the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we report the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting ~6 days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy's redshift to be z = 0.492 ± 0.008. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionized baryons in the intergalactic medium of ΩIGM = 4.9 ± 1.3 per cent, in agreement with the expectation from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and including all of the so-called 'missing baryons'. The ~6-day radio transient is largely consistent with the radio afterglow of a short γ-ray burst, and its existence and timescale do not support progenitor models such as giant pulses from pulsars, and supernovae. This contrasts with the interpretation of another recently discovered fast radio burst, suggesting that there are at least two classes of bursts.

  19. Prompt Optical Emission from Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kehoe, R; Balsano, R; Barthelmy, S D; Bloch, J; Butterworth, P S; Casperson, D E; Cline, T; Fletcher, S; Frontera, F; Gisler, G; Heise, J; Hills, J; Hurley, K; Lee, B; Marshall, S; McKay, T; Pawl, A; Piro, L; Priedhorsky, B; Szymanski, J J; Wren, J; Kehoe, Robert; Akerlof, Carl; Balsano, Richard; Barthelmy, Scott; Bloch, Jeff; Butterworth, Paul; Casperson, Don; Cline, Tom; Fletcher, Sandra; Frontera, Fillippo; Gisler, Galen; Heise, John; Hills, Jack; Hurley, Kevin; Lee, Brian; Marshall, Stuart; Kay, Tim Mc; Pawl, Andrew; Piro, Luigi; Priedhorsky, Bill; Szymanski, John; Wren, Jim

    2001-01-01

    The Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) seeks to measure contemporaneous and early afterglow optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The ROTSE-I telescope array has been fully automated and responding to burst alerts from the GRB Coordinates Network since March 1998, taking prompt optical data for 30 bursts in its first year. We will briefly review observations of GRB990123 which revealed the first detection of an optical burst occurring during the gamma-ray emission, reaching 9th magnitude at its peak. In addition, we present here preliminary optical results for seven other gamma-ray bursts. No other optical counterparts were seen in this analysis, and the best limiting sensitivities are m(V) > 13.0 at 14.7 seconds after the gamma-ray rise, and m(V) > 16.4 at 62 minutes. These are the most stringent limits obtained for GRB optical counterpart brightness in the first hour after the burst. This analysis suggests that there is not a strong correlation between optical flux and gamma-ray em...

  20. Hard X-rays and associated weak decimetric bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, H. S.; Lattari, C. J. B.; Benz, A. O.; Dennis, B. R.

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of observations (made with the Hard X-Ray Burst Spectrometer on the SMM and with the Itapetinga antenna) that unambiguously show associations of hard X-ray bursts with RS-type III bursts between 16:46 UT and 16:52 UT on July 9, 1985. The comparison between the hard X-ray and the radio observations shows a clear association, in at least 13 cases, of the hard X-ray and the decimetric RS bursts. On the average, the X-ray peaks were delayed from the peak of the RS bursts at 1.6 Ghz by about 400 msec. It is shown that, if the time comparisons are made between the peak of the radio pulse and the start of the X-ray burst, the delays are consistent with an electron travel time with a velocity of about 0.3 c from the 800 MHz plasma level to the lower corona, assuming that the radio emission is at the second harmonic.

  1. Observation of a Metric Type N Solar Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Xiangliang; Feng, Shiwei; Du, Guohui; Li, Chuanyang; Koval, Artem; Vasanth, V; Wang, Bing; Guo, Fan; Li, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Type III and type-III-like radio bursts are produced by energetic electron beams guided along coronal magnetic fields. As a variant of type III bursts, Type N bursts appear as the letter "N" in the radio dynamic spectrum and reveal a magnetic mirror effect in coronal loops. Here, we report a well-observed N-shaped burst consisting of three successive branches at metric wavelength with both fundamental and harmonic components and a high brightness temperature ($>$10$^9$ K). We verify the burst as a true type N burst generated by the same electron beam from three aspects of the data. First, durations of the three branches at a given frequency increase gradually, may due to the dispersion of the beam along its path. Second, the flare site, as the only possible source of non-thermal electrons, is near the western feet of large-scale closed loops. Third, the first branch and the following two branches are localized at different legs of the loops with opposite sense of polarization. We also find that the sense of p...

  2. Identification of Bursting Water Maser Features in Orion KL

    CERN Document Server

    Hirota, Tomoya; Fujisawa, Kenta; Honma, Mareki; Kawaguchi, Noriyuki; Kim, Mi Kyoung; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Imai, Hiroshi; Omodaka, Toshihiro; Katsunori,; Shibata, M; Shimoikura, Tomomi; Yonekura, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    In February 2011, a burst event of the H$_{2}$O maser in Orion KL (Kleinmann-Low object) has started after 13-year silence. This is the third time to detect such phenomena in Orion KL, followed by those in 1979-1985 and 1998. We have carried out astrometric observations of the bursting H$_{2}$O maser features in Orion KL with VERA (VLBI Exploration of Radio Astrometry), a Japanese VLBI network dedicated for astrometry. The total flux of the bursting feature at the LSR velocity of 7.58 km s$^{-1}$ reaches 4.4$\\times10^{4}$ Jy in March 2011. The intensity of the bursting feature is three orders of magnitudes larger than that of the same velocity feature in the quiescent phase in 2006. Two months later, another new feature appears at the LSR velocity of 6.95 km s$^{-1}$ in May 2011, separated by 12 mas north of the 7.58 km s$^{-1}$ feature. Thus, the current burst occurs at two spatially different features. The bursting masers are elongated along the northwest-southeast direction as reported in the previous burs...

  3. Characteristics of Period-Adding Bursting Bifurcation Without Chaos in the Chay Neuron Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhuo-Qin; LU Qi-Shao

    2004-01-01

    @@ A period-adding bursting sequence without bursting-chaos in the Chay neuron model is studied by bifurcation analysis. The genesis of each periodic bursting is separately evoked by the corresponding periodic spiking patterns through two period-doubling bifurcations, except for the period-1 bursting occurring via Hopf bifurcation. Hence,it is concluded that this period-adding bursting bifurcation without chaos has a compound bifurcation structure closely related to period-doubling bifurcations of periodic spiking in essence.

  4. The Third Swift Burst Alert Telescope Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Lien, Amy; Barthelmy, Scott D; Baumgartner, Wayne H; Cannizzo, John K; Chen, Kevin; Collins, Nicholas R; Cummings, Jay R; Gehrels, Neil; Krimm, Hans A; Markwardt, Craig B; Palmer, David M; Stamatikos, Michael; Troja, Eleonora; Ukwatta, T N

    2016-01-01

    To date, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift has detected ~ 1000 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), of which ~ 360 GRBs have redshift measurements, ranging from z = 0.03 to z = 9.38. We present the analyses of the BAT-detected GRBs for the past ~ 11 years up through GRB151027B. We report summaries of both the temporal and spectral analyses of the GRB characteristics using event data (i.e., data for each photon within approximately 250 s before and 950 s after the BAT trigger time), and discuss the instrumental sensitivity and selection effects of GRB detections. We also explore the GRB properties with redshift when possible. The result summaries and data products are available at http://swift.gsfc.nasa.gov/results/batgrbcat/index.html. In addition, we perform searches for GRB emissions before or after the event data using the BAT survey data. We estimate the false detection rate to be only one false detection in this sample. There are 15 ultra-long GRBs (~ 2% of the BAT GRBs) in this search with confirmed emi...

  5. Bipolar electrosurgical vessel-sealing device with compressive force monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Roland K; Chastagner, Matthew W; Geiger, James D; Shih, Albert J

    2014-06-01

    Bipolar electrosurgical vessel sealing is commonly used in surgery to perform hemostasis. The electrode compressive force is demonstrably an important factor affecting the vessel seal burst pressure, an index of the seal quality. Using a piezoresistive force sensor attached to the handle of a laparoscopic surgical device, applied handle force was measured and used to predict the electrosurgical vessel compressive force and the pressure at the electrode. The sensor enables the monitoring of vessel compressive force during surgery. Four levels of compressive force were applied to seal three types of porcine vessels (carotid artery, femoral artery, and jugular vein). The burst pressure of the vessel seal was tested to evaluate the seal quality. Compressive pressure was found to be a statistically significant factor affecting burst pressure for femoral arteries and jugular veins. Vessels sealed with low compressive pressure (<300 kPa) have a higher failure rate (burst pressure<100 mm Hg) than vessels sealed with high compressive pressure. An adequate compressive force is required to generate the compressive pressure needed to form a seal with high burst pressure. A laparoscopic surgical device with compressive force monitoring capability can help ensure adequate compressive pressure, vessel burst pressure, and quality of seal.

  6. Rotational IMRT delivery using a digital linear accelerator in very high dose rate 'burst mode'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salter, Bill J; Sarkar, Vikren; Wang, Brian; Szegedi, Martin; Rassiah-Szegedi, Prema [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Shukla, Himanshu, E-mail: bill.salter@hci.utah.edu [Oncology Care Systems Group, Siemens Medical Solutions (USA), 4040 Nelson Avenue, Concord, CA (United States)

    2011-04-07

    Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in arc-based IMRT, through the use of 'conventional' multileaf collimator (MLC) systems that can treat large tumor volumes in a single, or very few pass(es) of the gantry. Here we present a novel 'burst mode' modulated arc delivery approach, wherein 2000 monitor units per minute (MU min{sup -1}) high dose rate bursts of dose are facilitated by a flattening-filter-free treatment beam on a Siemens Artiste (Oncology Care Systems, Siemens Medical Solutions, Concord, CA, USA) digital linear accelerator in a non-clinical configuration. Burst mode delivery differs from continuous mode delivery, used by Elekta's VMAT (Elekta Ltd, Crawley, UK) and Varian's RapidArc (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA) implementations, in that dose is not delivered while MLC leaves are moving. Instead, dose is delivered in bursts over very short arc angles and only after an MLC segment shape has been completely formed and verified by the controller. The new system was confirmed to be capable of delivering a wide array of clinically relevant treatment plans, without machine fault or other delivery anomalies. Dosimetric accuracy of the modulated arc platform, as well as the Prowess (Prowess Inc., Concord, CA, USA) prototype treatment planning version utilized here, was quantified and confirmed, and delivery times were measured as significantly brief, even with large hypofractionated doses. The burst mode modulated arc approach evaluated here appears to represent a capable, accurate and efficient delivery approach.

  7. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Pulses and Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Hakkila, J. E.; Broadbent, M.; Wasserman, I. M.; Wolpert, R. L.

    2013-04-01

    We describe ongoing work on two projects that are enabling more thorough and accurate use of archival BATSE data for elucidating the nature of GRB sources; the methods and tools we are developing will also be valuable for analyzing data from other missions. The first project addresses modeling the spectro-temporal behavior of prompt gamma ray emission from GRBs by modeling gamma ray count and event data with a population of pulses, with the population drawn from one or more families of single-pulse kernels. Our approach is built on a multilevel nonparametric probabilistic framework we have dubbed "Bayesian droplets," and offers several important advances over previous pulse decomposition approaches: (1) It works in the pulse-confusion regime, quantifying uncertainty in the number, locations, and shapes of pulses, even when there is strong overlap. (2) It can self-consistently model pulse behavior across multiple spectral bands. (3) It readily handles a variety of spatio-temporal kernel shapes. (4) It reifies the idea of a burst as a population of pulses, enabling explicit modeling and estimation of the pulse population distribution. We describe the framework and present analyses of prototypical simple and complex GRB light curves. The second project aims to enable accurate demographic modeling of GRBs using the BATSE catalog. We present new calculations of the BATSE sky exposure, encompassing the full duration of the BATSE catalog for the first time, with many improvements over the currently available exposure map. A similar calculation of the detection efficiency is in progress. We also describe public Python software enabling access and accurate modeling of BATSE GRB data. The software enables demographic studies (e.g., modeling log N - log S distributions) with accurate accounting of both selection effects and measurement errors. It also enables spectro-temporal modeling of detailed data from individual GRBs. These projects are supported by NASA through the AISR

  8. Detecting fast radio bursts at decametric wavelengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajwade, K. M.; Lorimer, D. R.

    2017-02-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are highly dispersed, sporadic radio pulses which are likely extragalactic in nature. Here, we investigate the constraints on the source population from surveys carried out at frequencies <1 GHz. All but one FRB has so far been discovered in the 1-2 GHz band, but new and emerging instruments look set to become valuable probes of the FRB population at sub-GHz frequencies in the near future. In this paper, we consider the impacts of free-free absorption and multipath scattering in our analysis via a number of different assumptions about the intervening medium. We consider previous low-frequency surveys along with an ongoing survey with University of Technology digital backend for the Molonglo Observatory Synthesis Telescope (UTMOST) as well as future observations with the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) and the Hydrogen Intensity and Real-time Analysis eXperiment (HIRAX). We predict that CHIME and HIRAX will be able to observe ˜30 or more FRBs per day, even in the most extreme scenarios where free-free absorption and scattering can significantly impact the fluxes below 1 GHz. We also show that UTMOST will detect 1-2 FRBs per month of observations. For CHIME and HIRAX, the detection rates also depend greatly on the assumed FRB distance scale. Some of the models we investigated predict an increase in the FRB flux as a function of redshift at low frequencies. If FRBs are truly cosmological sources, this effect may impact future surveys in this band, particularly if the FRB population traces the cosmic star formation rate.

  9. Light Dawns on Dark Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most energetic events in the Universe, but some appear curiously faint in visible light. The biggest study to date of these so-called dark gamma-ray bursts, using the GROND instrument on the 2.2-metre MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla in Chile, has found that these gigantic explosions don't require exotic explanations. Their faintness is now fully explained by a combination of causes, the most important of which is the presence of dust between the Earth and the explosion. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), fleeting events that last from less than a second to several minutes, are detected by orbiting observatories that can pick up their high energy radiation. Thirteen years ago, however, astronomers discovered a longer-lasting stream of less energetic radiation coming from these violent outbursts, which can last for weeks or even years after the initial explosion. Astronomers call this the burst's afterglow. While all gamma-ray bursts [1] have afterglows that give off X-rays, only about half of them were found to give off visible light, with the rest remaining mysteriously dark. Some astronomers suspected that these dark afterglows could be examples of a whole new class of gamma-ray bursts, while others thought that they might all be at very great distances. Previous studies had suggested that obscuring dust between the burst and us might also explain why they were so dim. "Studying afterglows is vital to further our understanding of the objects that become gamma-ray bursts and what they tell us about star formation in the early Universe," says the study's lead author Jochen Greiner from the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching bei München, Germany. NASA launched the Swift satellite at the end of 2004. From its orbit above the Earth's atmosphere it can detect gamma-ray bursts and immediately relay their positions to other observatories so that the afterglows could be studied. In the new study, astronomers combined Swift

  10. Where Is the Site of the "Oxygen Burst" Located During Light Induction in Dark-Adapted Leaves? A Study Using Photoacoustic Techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-Yong FAN; Rong-Fu GAO

    2005-01-01

    The "oxygen burst" phenomenon that appeared during the light-induction period of intact leaves could be monitored using a photoacoustic technique high time resolution. The relationship between oxygen bursts and dark-adapted time, far-red light pretreatment, photothermal signal, and chlorophyll a (Chl a) fluorescence kinetics were investigated in the present study. Using extraneous inhibitors or cofactors of electron transport, a modified vacuum-infiltration method was undertaken to locate directly the site at which oxygen bursts of intact leaves occurred. We found that the photothermal signal showed little evidence of oscillation during the light-induction period. The oxygen burst was resolved into two components if darkadapted time lasted longer than 20 min. Methyl viologen (MV) or far-red light could not eliminate the first component, whereas formate-Na (pH 7.0, 20 μmol/L) eliminated the first component but had no effect on the second one. Furthermore, the photochemical quenching, the electron transport rate of Chl a fluorescence,and the first component of the oxygen bursts approached lowest values simultaneously. This evidence indicates that the site at which the first component of oxygen bursts occurred was located between photosystem (PS)Ⅰ and PSⅡ (i.e. the PQ pool). The formate-Na experiment also showed a linkage between the first component and the S state of oxygen evolution at the donor side of PSⅡ. Furthermore, elimination of the second component by far-red light and absorption of the second component by MV indicated that the site at which the second component of oxygen bursts may be located at the acceptor side of PSⅡ.

  11. Impacts of climate change and socio-economic scenarios on flow and water quality of the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna (GBM) river systems: low flow and flood statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, P G; Barbour, E; Futter, M N; Sarkar, S; Rodda, H; Caesar, J; Butterfield, D; Jin, L; Sinha, R; Nicholls, R; Salehin, M

    2015-06-01

    The potential impacts of climate change and socio-economic change on flow and water quality in rivers worldwide is a key area of interest. The Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna (GBM) is one of the largest river basins in the world serving a population of over 650 million, and is of vital concern to India and Bangladesh as it provides fresh water for people, agriculture, industry, conservation and for the delta system downstream. This paper seeks to assess future changes in flow and water quality utilising a modelling approach as a means of assessment in a very complex system. The INCA-N model has been applied to the Ganges, Brahmaputra and Meghna river systems to simulate flow and water quality along the rivers under a range of future climate conditions. Three model realisations of the Met Office Hadley Centre global and regional climate models were selected from 17 perturbed model runs to evaluate a range of potential futures in climate. In addition, the models have also been evaluated using socio-economic scenarios, comprising (1) a business as usual future, (2) a more sustainable future, and (3) a less sustainable future. Model results for the 2050s and the 2090s indicate a significant increase in monsoon flows under the future climates, with enhanced flood potential. Low flows are predicted to fall with extended drought periods, which could have impacts on water and sediment supply, irrigated agriculture and saline intrusion. In contrast, the socio-economic changes had relatively little impact on flows, except under the low flow regimes where increased irrigation could further reduce water availability. However, should large scale water transfers upstream of Bangladesh be constructed, these have the potential to reduce flows and divert water away from the delta region depending on the volume and timing of the transfers. This could have significant implications for the delta in terms of saline intrusion, water supply, agriculture and maintaining crucial ecosystems such

  12. Bursting and spiking due to additional direct and stochastic currents in neuron models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhuo-Qin; Lu Qi-Shao

    2006-01-01

    Neurons at rest can exhibit diverse firing activities patterns in response to various external deterministic and random stimuli, especially additional currents. In this paper, neuronal firing patterns from bursting to spiking, induced by additional direct and stochastic currents, are explored in rest states Corresponding to two values of the parameter VK in the Chay neuron system. Three cases are considered by numerical simulation and fast/slow dynamic analysis, in which only the direct current or the stochastic current exists, or the direct and stochastic currents coexist. Meanwhile, several important bursting patterns in neuronal experiments, such as the period-1 "circle/homoclinic" bursting and the integer multiple "fold/homoclinic" bursting with one spike per burst, as well as the transition from integer multiple bursting to period-1 "circle/homoclinic" bursting and that from stochastic "Hopf/homoclinic" bursting to "Hopf/homoclinic" bursting, are investigated in detail.

  13. The Identification of Two Different Spectral Types of Pulses in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, G. N. (Editor); Paciesas, W. S. (Editor); Briggs, M. S. (Editor); Preece, R. D. (Editor); Mallozzi, R. S. (Editor); Meegan, C. A. (Editor); Horack, J. M. (Editor); Fishman, G. J. (Editor); Band, D. L. (Editor); Matteson, J. L. (Editor); Skelton, R. T. (Editor); Hakkila, J. (Editor); Ford, L. A. (Editor); Kouveliotou, C. (Editor); Koshut, T. M. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    It is shown in this study that two different types of spectral emission are generally produced in gamma-ray bursts. A subset of bursts is identified that exhibits a marked lack of fluence above 300 keV, and these bursts are shown to have luminosities about an order of magnitude lower than bursts with significant fluence above 300 keV. The bursts lacking emission above 300 keV exhibit an effectively homogeneous intensity distribution. In addition, it is shown that both types of emission are common in many bursts, demonstrating that a single source object is capable of generating both of them. These results strongly favor a gamma-ray burst source object that produces two different types of emission with varying degrees of superposition. The impact of this behavior is strong enough that it affects the properties of the burst intensity distribution, as well as the burst spectral characteristics.

  14. High-Energy Spectral Signatures in $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    1999-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory (CGRO) was the detection of several Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) above 100 MeV. The broad-band spectra obtained for these bursts gave no indication of any high energy spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts by ground-based Cerenkov telescopes (ACTs), thus motivating several TeV observational programs. This paper explores the expectations for the spectral properties in the TeV and sub-TeV bands for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive spectral signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for ACT programs, and strongly impact the observability of bursts in the TeV band.

  15. Prevention and forecasting of rock burst hazards in coal mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU Lin-ming; LU Cai-ping; MU Zong-long; GAO Ming-shi

    2009-01-01

    Rock bursts signify extreme behavior in coal mine strata and severely threaten the safety of the lives of miners, as well as the effectiveness and productivity of miners. In our study, an elastic-plastic-brittle model for the deformation and failure of coal/rock was established through theoretical analyses, laboratory experiments and field testing, simulation and other means, which perfectly predict sudden and delayed rock bursts. Based on electromagnetic emission (EME), acoustic emission (AE) and microseism (MS) effects in the process from deformation until impact rupture of coal-rock combination samples, a multi-parameter identification of premonitory technology was formed, largely depending on these three forms of emission. Thus a system of classification for forecasting rock bursts in space and time was established. We have presented the intensity weakening theory for rock bursts and a strong-soft-strong (3S) structural model for controlling the impact on rock surrounding roadways, with the objective of laying a theoretical foundation and establishing references for parameters for the weakening control of rock bursts. For the purpose of prevention, key technical parameters of directional hydraulic fracturing are revealed. Based on these results, as well as those from deep-hole controlled blasting in coal seams and rock, integrated control techniques were established and anti-impact hydraulic props, suitable for roadways subject to hazards from rockbursts have also been developed. These technologies have been widely used in most coal mines in China, subject to these hazards and have achieved remarkable economic and social benefits.

  16. A Type II Radio Burst without a Coronal Mass Ejection

    CERN Document Server

    Su, W; Ding, M D; Chen, P F; Sun, J Q

    2015-01-01

    Type II radio bursts are thought to be a signature of coronal shocks. In this paper, we analyze a short-lived type II burst that started at 07:40 UT on 2011 February 28. By carefully checking white-light images, we find that the type II radio burst is not accompanied by a coronal mass ejection, only with a C2.4 class flare and narrow jet. However, in the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) images provided by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO), we find a wave-like structure that propagated at a speed of $\\sim$ 600 km s$^{-1}$ during the burst. The relationship between the type II radio burst and the wave-like structure is in particular explored. For this purpose, we first derive the density distribution under the wave by the differential emission measure (DEM) method, which is used to restrict the empirical density model. We then use the restricted density model to invert the speed of the shock that produces the observed frequency drift rate in the dynamic spectrum. The ...

  17. An internally consistent gamma ray burst time history phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A phenomenology for gamma ray burst time histories is outlined. Order of their generally chaotic appearance is attempted, based on the speculation that any one burst event can be represented above 150 keV as a superposition of similarly shaped increases of varying intensity. The increases can generally overlap, however, confusing the picture, but a given event must at least exhibit its own limiting characteristic rise and decay times if the measurements are made with instruments having adequate temporal resolution. Most catalogued observations may be of doubtful or marginal utility to test this hypothesis, but some time histories from Helios-2, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and other instruments having one-to several-millisecond capabilities appear to provide consistency. Also, recent studies of temporally resolved Solar Maximum Mission burst energy spectra are entirely compatible with this picture. The phenomenology suggested here, if correct, may assist as an analytic tool for modelling of burst processes and possibly in the definition of burst source populations.

  18. Solar cosmic ray bursts and solar neutrino fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilevakaya, G. A.; Nikolsky, S. I.; Stozhkov, Y. I.; Charakhchyan, T. N.

    1985-01-01

    The neutrino flux detected in the C1-Ar experiment seems to respond to the powerful solar cosmic ray bursts. The ground-based detectors, the balloons and the satellites detect about 50% of the bursts of soalr cosmic ray generated on the Sun's visible side. As a rule, such bursts originate from the Western side of the visible solar disk. Since the solar cosmic ray bursts are in opposite phase withthe 11-year galactic cosmic ray cycle which also seems to be reflected by neutrino experiment. The neutrino generation in the bursts will flatten the possible 11-year behavior of the AR-37 production rate, Q, in the Cl-Ar experiment. The detection of solar-flare-generated gamma-quanta with energies above tens of Mev is indicative of the generation of high-energy particles which in turn may produce neutrinos. Thus, the increased Q during the runs, when the flare-generated high energy gamma-quanta have been registered, may be regarded as additional evidence for neutrino geneation in the solar flare processes.

  19. Importance of greenstick lamina fractures in low lumbar burst fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersozlu, S.; Aydinli, U.

    2006-01-01

    Lumbar burst fractures (L3–L5) represent a small percentage of all spinal fractures. The treatment of fractures involving the lumbar spine has been controversial. Lamina fractures may be complete or of the greenstick type. Dural tears and nerve root entrapment may accompany these lamina fractures. The aim of this retrospective study was to determine the incidence of dural tear in patients who had lumbar burst fractures with greenstick lamina fractures and the importance of these lamina fractures when choosing the optimum treatment. Twenty-six patients with 28 lumbar burst fractures were treated from 1995 through 2002. The average follow-up was 60 months (range 32–110 months). The male to female ratio was 21:5 and the mean age was 37 years (17–64). Dural tear was detected in seven (25%) out of 28 burst fractures. The functional outcome of the entire study group was assessed using the Smiley-Webster Scale. Good to excellent results were obtained in 24 (92%) of 26 patients. Lumbar burst fractures with greenstick lamina fractures occur mostly in the L2–L4 area. In the surgical treatment, any reduction manoeuvre will close the fracture and crush the entrapped neural elements. Therefore, it may be better to explore the greenstick lamina fracture whether there is any neural entrapment or not, before any reduction manoeuvre is attempted. PMID:16501977

  20. The "Musical Emotional Bursts": a validated set of musical affect bursts to investigate auditory affective processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Sébastien; Peretz, Isabelle; Belin, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    The Musical Emotional Bursts (MEB) consist of 80 brief musical executions expressing basic emotional states (happiness, sadness and fear) and neutrality. These musical bursts were designed to be the musical analog of the Montreal Affective Voices (MAV)-a set of brief non-verbal affective vocalizations portraying different basic emotions. The MEB consist of short (mean duration: 1.6 s) improvisations on a given emotion or of imitations of a given MAV stimulus, played on a violin (10 stimuli × 4 [3 emotions + neutral]), or a clarinet (10 stimuli × 4 [3 emotions + neutral]). The MEB arguably represent a primitive form of music emotional expression, just like the MAV represent a primitive form of vocal, non-linguistic emotional expression. To create the MEB, stimuli were recorded from 10 violinists and 10 clarinetists, and then evaluated by 60 participants. Participants evaluated 240 stimuli [30 stimuli × 4 (3 emotions + neutral) × 2 instruments] by performing either a forced-choice emotion categorization task, a valence rating task or an arousal rating task (20 subjects per task); 40 MAVs were also used in the same session with similar task instructions. Recognition accuracy of emotional categories expressed by the MEB (n:80) was lower than for the MAVs but still very high with an average percent correct recognition score of 80.4%. Highest recognition accuracies were obtained for happy clarinet (92.0%) and fearful or sad violin (88.0% each) MEB stimuli. The MEB can be used to compare the cerebral processing of emotional expressions in music and vocal communication, or used for testing affective perception in patients with communication problems.