WorldWideScience

Sample records for burst monitor detectors

  1. Burst Detector Sensitivity: Past, Present & Future

    OpenAIRE

    Band, David L.

    2006-01-01

    I compare the burst detection sensitivity of CGRO's BATSE, Swift's BAT, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and EXIST as a function of a burst's spectrum and duration. A detector's overall burst sensitivity depends on its energy sensitivity and set of accumulations times Delta t; these two factors shape the detected burst population. For example, relative to BATSE, the BAT's softer energy band decreases the detection rate of short, hard bursts, while the BAT's longer accumulation times increase the...

  2. Earth Occultation Monitoring with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT). Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors for daily monitoring. Light curves, updated daily, are available on our website http://heastro.phys.lsu.edu/gbm. Our software is also capable of performing the Earth occultation monitoring using up to 128 energy bands, or any combination of those bands, using our 128-channel, 4-s CSPEC data. The GBM BGO detectors, sensitive from about 200 keV to 40 keV, can also be used with this technique. In our standard application of the EOT, we use a catalog of sources to drive the measurements. To ensure that our catalog is complete, our team has developed an Earth occultation imaging method. In this talk, I will describe both techniques and the current data products available. I will highlight recent and important results from the GBM EOT, including the current status of our observations of hard X-ray variations in the Crab Nebula.

  3. Validation of the GLAST Burst Monitor Instrument Response Simulation Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises 12 NaI and 2 BGO detectors dispersed about the GLAST spacecraft. The GBM instrument simulation software must generate an accurate response function database for all detectors in their flight configuration to optimize the mission science return. Before science analysis codes use the response database, we must confirm that our simulation codes and models can reproduce laboratory observations. To validate the simulation effort, Monte Carlo results are compared to calibrated laboratory measurements collected with a variety of radiation sources

  4. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Hoover, Andrew S; van der Horst, Alexander J; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, R Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McBreen, Sheila; Paciesas, W S; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wallace, Mark S; Wilson, Robert B; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) will significantly augment the science return from the Fermi Observatory in the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). The primary objective of GBM is to extend the energy range over which bursts are observed downward from the energy range of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi into the hard X-ray range where extensive previous data exist. A secondary objective is to compute burst locations on-board to allow re-orientiong the spacecraft so that the LAT can observe delayed emission from bright bursts. GBM uses an array of twelve sodium iodide scintillators and two bismuth germanate scintillators to detect gamma rays from ~8 keV to ~40 MeV over the full unocculted sky. The on-board trigger threshold is ~0.7 photons/cm2/s (50-300 keV, 1 s peak). GBM generates on-board triggers for ~250 GRBs per year.

  5. Detecting pipe bursts by monitoring water demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Van der Roer, M.; Sperber, V.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm which compares measured and predicted water demands to detect pipe bursts was developed and tested on three data sets of water demand and reported pipe bursts of three years. The algorithm proved to be able to detect bursts where the water loss exceeds 30% of the average water demand in

  6. Reactor Monitoring with Neutrino Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of the use of neutrino detectors to monitor nuclear reactors is currently a very active field of research. While neutrino detectors located close to reactors have been used to provide information about the global performance of the reactors, a general improvement of the technique is needed in order to use it in a practical way to monitor the fissile contents of the fuel of the nuclear reactors or the thermal power delivered. I describe the current status of the Angra Neutrino Project, aimed to building a low-mass neutrino detector to monitor the Angra II reactor of the Brazilian nuclear power plant Almirante Alvaro Ramos in order to explore new approaches to reactor monitoring with neutrino detectors.

  7. The CALET Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM)

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Sakamoto, Takanori; Takahashi, Ichiro; Hara, Takumi; Yamamoto, Tatsuma; Kawakubo, Yuta; Inoue, Ry ota; Terazawa, Shunsuke; Fujioka, Rie; Senuma, Kazumasa; Nakahira, Satoshi; Tomida, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Torii, Shoji; Cherry, Michael L; Ricciarini, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The CALET Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM) is the secondary scientific instrument of the CALET mission on the International Space Station (ISS), which is scheduled for launch by H-IIB/HTV in 2014. The CGBM provides a broadband energy coverage from 7 keV to 20 MeV, and simultaneous observations with the primary instrument Calorimeter (CAL) in the GeV - TeV gamma-ray range and Advanced Star Camera (ASC) in the optical for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and other X-gamma-ray transients. The CGBM consists of two kinds of scintillators: two LaBr$_3$(Ce) (7 keV - 1 MeV) and one BGO (100 keV - 20 MeV) each read by a single photomultiplier. The LaBr$_3$(Ce) crystal, used in space for the first time here for celestial gamma-ray observations, enables GRB observations over a broad energy range from low energy X-ray emissions to gamma rays. The detector performance and structures have been verified using the bread-board model (BBM) via vibration and thermal vacuum tests. The CALET is currently in the development phase of the prot...

  8. Long X-ray burst monitoring with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binary systems. In the frame of the INTEGRAL observational Key Programme over the Galactic Center a good number of the known X-ray bursters are frequently being monitored. An international....... Of special interest are low luminosity bursting sources that exhibit X-ray bursts of very different durations allowing to study the transition from a hydrogen-rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime and from helium burning to carbon burning. I will present results obtained from INTEGRAL archive...

  9. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thermonuclear bursts on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries have been studied for many years and have in a few cases confirmed theoretical models of nuclear ignition and burning mechanisms. The large majority of X-ray bursts last less than 100s. A good number of the...... known X-ray bursters are frequently observed by INTEGRAL, in particular in the frame of the Key Programmes. Taking advantage of the INTEGRAL instrumentation, an international collaboration led by the JEM-X team at the Danish National Space Institute has been monitoring the occurrence of uncommon burst...... events lasting more than a few minutes. Of special interest are exceptional X-ray bursts which duration about a few tens of minutes is intermediate between usual short bursts and hour long superbursts. The processes driving such long bursts are not yet fully understood: depending on the composition of...

  10. The Synergy of Gamma-Ray Burst Detectors in the GLAST Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, David

    2008-01-01

    Simultaneous observations by the large number of gamma-ray burst detectors that will operate in the GLAST era will provide the spectra, lightcurves and locations necessary for studying burst physics and testing the putative relations between intrinsic burst properties. I review the burst detection sensitivities, spectral bands, and localization capabilities of the GLAST (GBM and LAT), Swift (BAT), INTEGRAL (ISGRI), Suzaku (wAM), AGILE (Super-AGILE) and wind (Konus) detectors; the detectors' energy band and the accumulation timescale of their trigger system affect their sensitivity to hard vs. soft and long vs. short bursts. In addition, I estimate the rate of simultaneous burst observations. In particular, coordination of the Swift observing plan consistent with Swift's other science objectives could increase the rate of GLAST bursts with redshifts

  11. Comparison of filters for detecting gravitational wave bursts in interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filters developed in order to detect short bursts of gravitational waves in interferometric detector outputs are compared according to three main points. Conventional receiver operating characteristics (ROC) are first built for all the considered filters and for three typical burst signals. Optimized ROC are shown for a simple pulse signal in order to estimate the best detection efficiency of the filters in the ideal case, while realistic ones obtained with filters working with several 'templates' show how detection efficiencies can be degraded in a practical implementation. Second, estimations of biases and statistical errors on the reconstruction of the time of arrival of pulse-like signals are then given for each filter. Such results are crucial for future coincidence studies between gravitational wave detectors but also with neutrino or optical detectors. As most of the filters require a pre-whitening of the detector noise, the sensitivity to a nonperfect noise whitening procedure is finally analyzed. For this purpose lines of various frequencies and amplitudes are added to a Gaussian white noise and the outputs of the filters are studied in order to monitor the excess of false alarms induced by the lines. The comparison of the performances of the different filters finally show that they are complementary rather than competitive

  12. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.;

    2008-01-01

    exceptional burst events lasting more than ~10 minutes. Half of the dozen so-called intermediate long bursts registered so far have been observed by INTEGRAL. The goal is to derive a comprehensive picture of the relationship between the nuclear ignition processes and the accretion states of the system leading......X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting neutron stars in X-ray binaries. As most of the known X-ray bursters are frequently observed by INTEGRAL, an international collaboration have been taking advantage of its instrumentation to specifically monitor the occurrence of...

  13. Do the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and Swift Burst Alert Telescope see the Same Short Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Eric; Connaughton, Valerie; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Lien, Amy; Briggs, Michael S.; Goldstein, Adam; Pelassa, Veronique; Troja, Eleonora

    2016-02-01

    Compact binary system mergers are expected to generate gravitational radiation detectable by ground-based interferometers. A subset of these, the merger of a neutron star with another neutron star or a black hole, are also the most popular model for the production of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) trigger on short GRBs (SGRBs) at rates that reflect their relative sky exposures, with the BAT detecting 10 per year compared to about 45 for GBM. We examine the SGRB populations detected by Swift BAT and Fermi GBM. We find that the Swift BAT triggers on weaker SGRBs than Fermi GBM, providing they occur close to the center of the BAT field of view, and that the Fermi GBM SGRB detection threshold remains flatter across its field of view. Overall, these effects combine to give the instruments the same average sensitivity, and account for the SGRBs that trigger one instrument but not the other. We do not find any evidence that the BAT and GBM are detecting significantly different populations of SGRBs. Both instruments can detect untriggered SGRBs using ground searches seeded with time and position. The detection of SGRBs below the on-board triggering sensitivities of Swift BAT and Fermi GBM increases the possibility of detecting and localizing the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) events seen by the new generation of GW detectors.

  14. Multi-Index Monitoring and Evaluation on Rock Burst in Yangcheng Mine

    OpenAIRE

    Yunliang Tan; Yanchun Yin; Shitan Gu; Zhiwei Tian

    2015-01-01

    Based on the foreboding information monitoring of the energy released in the developing process of rock burst, prediction system for rock burst can be established. By using microseismic method, electromagnetic radiation method, and drilling bits method, rock burst in Yangcheng Mine was monitored, and a system of multi-index monitoring and evaluation on rock burst was established. Microseismic monitoring and electromagnetic radiation monitoring were early warning method, and drilling bits moni...

  15. Fermi/GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR OBSERVATIONS OF SGR J0501+4516 BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGR J0501+4516, detected with the gamma-ray burst monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during 13 days of the source's activation in 2008 (August 22- September 3). We find that the T90 durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T90 values estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two blackbody functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that Epeak decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of ∼30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10-6 erg cm-2 s-1, increasing steadily afterward. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550-5418 and 1806-20. The isotropic luminosity, Liso, corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4-1.5 x 1040 erg s-1).

  16. THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, NL-1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Beklen, E. [Physics Department, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey); Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 {+-} 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  17. The Fermi-GBM X-Ray Burst Monitor: Thermonuclear Bursts from 4U 0614+09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; van der Horst, A. J.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Chakrabarty, D.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 ± 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  18. Monitoring burst (M-burst) — A novel framework of failure localization in all-optical mesh networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Mohammed L.

    2011-10-10

    Achieving instantaneous and precise failure localization in all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks has been an attractive feature of network fault management systems, and is particularly important when failure-dependent protection is employed. The paper introduces a novel framework of real-time failure localization in all-optical WDM mesh networks, called monitoring-burst (m-burst), which aims to initiate a graceful compromise between consumed monitoring resources and monitoring delay. Different from any previously reported solution, the proposed m-burst framework has a single monitoring node (MN) which launches optical bursts along a set of pre-defined close-loop routes, called monitoring cycles (m-cycles), to probe the links along the m-cycles. Bursts along different m-cycles are kept non-overlapping through any link of the network. By identifying the lost bursts due to single link failure events only, the MN can unambiguously localize the failed link in at least 3-connected networks. We will justify the feasibility and applicability of the proposed m-burst framework in the scenario of interest. To avoid possible collision among optical bursts launched by the MN, we define the problem of collision-free scheduling and formulate it into an integer linear program (ILP) in order to minimize the monitoring delay. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework and the proposed solution.

  19. All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Chaplin, V; Connaughton, V; Camero-Arranz, A; Case, G; Cherry, M; Rodi, J; Finger, M H; Jenke, P; Haynes, R H

    2009-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog enters or exits occultation by the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. In addition, to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels. We will present early results. Regularly updated results can be found on our website http://gammaray.nsstc.nasa.gov/gbm/science/occultation

  20. The Fermi-GBM X-ray burst monitor: thermonuclear bursts from 4U 0614+09

    CERN Document Server

    Linares, M; Jenke, P; van der Horst, A J; Camero-Arranz, A; Kouveliotou, C; Chakrabarty, D; Beklen, E; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Finger, M; Paciesas, W; Preece, R; von Kienlin, A; Wilson-Hodge, C A

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the neutron star interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09, when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12+/-3 d (68% confidence interval) between March 2010 and March 2011, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 d (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations, and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bu...

  1. Silver activated counter detector for measurements of high intensity fast neutron burst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fusion facilities, such as Z pinch, plasma focus or laser driven experiments, fast neutrons are produced in the form of a burst of radiation. For these kinds of sources, moderation of the neutron energy and silver activation is one of the most common techniques for measurement of the neutron yield. In the recent years, the study of this detection system has been revisited in order to improve the calibration methodologies, and to study the effects of moderator geometry for measurements in low intensity burst neutron sources. In this work, the design, construction and characterization of a silver activated neutron counter for measurements in high intensity neutron burst sources are reported. For such sources (Y4π > 109 n/burst), the effects of moderator geometry, as well as, the systematic effects introduced in the measurement by dead time, after irradiation of the detector by a burst of neutrons, are discussed and included in the measurement methodology

  2. Performance of the large-area detectors for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Gamma Ray Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paciesas, W. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Lestrade, J. P.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Wilson, R. B.; Parnell, T. A.; Austin, R. W.; Berry, F. A., Jr.; Horack, J. M.

    1989-01-01

    BATSE, one of four experiments on the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO), is expected to provide the most sensitive observations of gamma-ray bursts yet obtained, as well as to provide long-term monitoring of hard X-ray and low-energy gamma-ray emission from bright pulsating sources, transients, and solar flares. Eight uncollimated modules, positioned at the corners of the spacecraft to provide an unobstructed view of the sky, detect sources by various techniques based on time variability. Use of detectors with anisotropic response allows location of gamma-ray bursts to be determined to an accuracy of about 1 deg using BATSE data alone. The completed BATSE underwent intensive testing and calibration prior to its delivery in October 1988.

  3. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H.-F.; Bhat, P. N.; Burgess, J. M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M. M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  4. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Goldstein, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Meegan, C. A.; Jenke, P.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL (United States); Preece, R. D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Greiner, J.; Yu, H.-F. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Kippen, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States); Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S., E-mail: valerie@nasa.gov [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); and others

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  5. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, V; Goldstein, A; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Gibby, M H; Greiner, J; Gruber, D; Jenke, P; Kippen, R M; Pelassa, V; Xiong, S; Yu, H -F; Bhat, P N; Burgess, J M; Byrne, D; Fitzpatrick, G; Foley, S; Giles, M M; Guiriec, S; van der Horst, A J; von Kienlin, A; McBreen, S; McGlynn, S; Tierney, D; Zhang, B -B

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in July, 2008. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network (IPN), to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1 degree, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.7 degree Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14 degrees. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y-axis better l...

  6. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis

  7. SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during Its Most Prolific Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderHorst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Gorgone, N. M.; Kaneko, Y.; Baring, M. G.; Guiriec, S.; Gogus, E,; Granot, J.; Watts, A. L.; Lin, L.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Chaplin, V. L.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M.; Goldstein, A.; Gruber, D.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2012-01-01

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties.We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J15505418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E(sub peak) and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BBfits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature.We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  8. SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS DETECTED WITH THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR DURING ITS MOST PROLIFIC ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Horst, A. J.; Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gorgone, N. M. [Connecticut College, New London, CT 06320 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Goegues, E.; Lin, L. [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Guiriec, S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, V. L.; Goldstein, A. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, CSPAR, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Granot, J. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Watts, A. L. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissaldi, E.; Gruber, D. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M., E-mail: A.J.VanDerHorst@uva.nl [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

    2012-04-20

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E{sub peak} and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BB fits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high-temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature. We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  9. Neutron monitoring using moderating sphere detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three moderating sphere-detector systems are examined as a neutron area monitoring instruments. The thermal neutron detectors used are the (bare-Cd covered) Li6 (Eu) crystal scintillating detector, the U235-mica track detector and the partially Cd-covered R.M. film. The response of the 12 s sphere-detector systems to Pu-Be neutrons are found to be 0.22 counts/neutrons for the Li6I-system. 8x10-4 tracks per neutron for the track-detector system and 10 mR equivalent γ-ray exposure per 2x10-neutrons per cm- for the Cd-covered R.M. film system

  10. The transient gamma-ray spectrometer: A new high resolution detector for gamma-ray burst spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS) to be flown aboard the WIND spacecraft is primarily designed to perform high resolution spectroscopy of transient gamma-ray events, such as cosmic γ-ray bursts and solar flares, over the energy range 20 keV to 10 MeV with an expected spectroscopic resolution of E/δE = 500. The detector itself consists of a 215 cm3 high purity n-type Ge crystal kept at cryogenic temperatures by a passive radiative cooler. The geometric field of view defined by the cooler is 170 degrees. To avoid continuous triggers caused by soft solar events, a thin Be/Cu sun-shield around the sides of the cooler has been provided. A passive Mo/Pb occulter, which modulates signals from within ±5 degrees of the ecliptic plane at the spacecraft spin frequency, is used to identify and study solar flares, as well as emission from the galactic plane and center. Thus, in addition to transient event measurements, the instrument will allow the search for possible diffuse background lines and monitor the 511 keV positron annihilation radiation from the galactic center. In order to handle the typically large burst count rates which can be in excess of 100 kHz, burst data are stored directly in an on-board 2.75 Mbit burst memory with an absolute timing accuracy of ±1.5 ms after ground processing. This capacity is sufficient to store the entire spectral data set of all but the largest bursts. The experiment is scheduled to be launched on a Delta II launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral in the fall of 1993

  11. Search for gravitational wave bursts by the network of resonant detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The groups operating cryogenic bar detectors of gravitational waves are performing a coordinated search for short signals within the International Gravitational Event Collaboration (IGEC). We review the most relevant aspects of the data analysis, based on a time-coincidence search among triggers from different detectors, and the properties of the data exchanged by each detector under a recently-upgraded agreement. The IGEC is currently analysing the observations from 1997 to 2000, when up to four detectors were operating simultaneously. 10% and 50% of this time period were covered by simultaneous observations, respectively, of at least three or at least two detectors. Typical signal search thresholds were in the range 2-6 10-21/Hz. The coincidences found are within the estimated background, hence improved upper limits on incoming GW (gravitational wave) bursts have been set

  12. FERMI/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor upper limits assuming a magnetar origin for the repeating Fast Radio Burst source, FRB 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, George; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Gogus, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Spitler et al. (2016, 10.1038/nature17168) reported a repeating Fast Radio Burst source, FRB 121102, with a rate of about 3 bursts/hr. We searched the FERMI/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) for possible gamma-ray counterparts for these events.

  13. SGR J1550-5418 bursts detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its most prolific activity

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, A J; Gorgone, N M; Kaneko, Y; Baring, M G; Guiriec, S; Gogus, E; Granot, J; Watts, A L; Lin, L; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Chaplin, V L; Connaughton, V; Finger, M H; Gehrels, N; Gibby, M H; Giles, M M; Goldstein, A; Gruber, D; Harding, A K; Kaper, L; von Kienlin, A; van der Klis, M; McBreen, S; Mcenery, J; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Pe'er, A; Preece, R D; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rau, A; Wachter, S; Wilson-Hodge, C; Woods, P M; Wijers, R A M J

    2012-01-01

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in January 2009, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two black-body functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model we find a mean power-law index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlati...

  14. The Fermi-GBM X-ray burst monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, M.; Fermi GBM X-ray Burst Collaboration

    2010-12-01

    We discuss the first results of the Fermi-GBM all-sky search for X-ray bursts. The very large field of view and X-ray response of the Fermi-GBM make it a unique instrument to study rare, bright and short-lived X-ray bursts. We are performing a systematic search that exploits such capabilities. We present results on long/intermediate type I X-ray bursts, an unusual kind of thermonuclear bursts from accreting neutron stars, and show how Fermi-GBM is giving for the first time robust measurements of their recurrence time.

  15. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor as a Transient Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Fermi GBM Team

    2016-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) performs well as a transient monitor in the 8 keV to 1 MeV range using the publicly available continuous data products. With GBM, we use the Earth occultation technique successfully monitor long-term hard X-ray variations in the Crab Nebula, bright transients such as the black hole binary V404 Cyg, which flared brightly in Jun 2015, and a catalog of 200+ sources. The catalog includes X-ray binaries, active galaxies, and the Sun which we monitor for variations on timescales from days to years, supporting multi wavelength campaigns and triggering other instruments. We monitor the pulse frequency and pulsed flux for 37 accreting pulsars with a high (~50% duty cycle), including Be/X-ray binaries such as V0332+53, which underwent a giant outburst in summer 2015. Through daily searches, we detect X-ray bursts from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries. I will present highlights of these transient monitoring efforts, demonstrating significant science gains using GBM continuous data products.

  16. Nuclear reactors Monitoring using neutrinos detectors1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the feasibility to use antineutrinos detectors for monitoring of nuclear reactors. Using a simple model of fission shower with two components, we illustrate how the numbers of antineutrinos detected at a distance L from the reactor depend on the composition of the nuclear combustible and how it could be used for nuclear safeguards policy.

  17. Use of water-Cherenkov detectors to detect Gamma Ray Bursts at the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) project aims at the detection of high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) using the single particle technique in ground-based water-Cherenkov detectors (WCD). To reach a reasonable sensitivity, high altitude mountain sites have been selected in Mexico (Sierra Negra, 4550 m a.s.l.), Bolivia (Chacaltaya, 5300 m a.s.l.) and Venezuela (Merida, 4765 m a.s.l.). We report on detector calibration and operation at high altitude, search for bursts in 4 months of preliminary data, as well as search for signal at ground level when satellites report a burst

  18. Upper limits from the LIGO and TAMA detectors on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A; Agresti, J; Akutsu, T; Allen, B; Allen, J; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Ando, M; Arai, K; Araya, A; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Asada, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aso, Y; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Dalrymple, J; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; Daw, E; De Bra, D; DeSalvo, R; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujiki, Y; Fujimoto, M K; Fujita, R; Fukushima, M; Futamase, T; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; Goggin, L; Goler, S; González, G; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Günther, M; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hamuro, Y; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Haruyama, T; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Iguchi, H; Iida, Y; Ioka, K; Ishizuka, H; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Kamikubota, N; Kanda, N; Kaneyama, T; Karasawa, Y; Kasahara, K; Kasai, T; Katsavounidis, E; Katsuki, M; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, M; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Kojima, Y; Kokeyama, K; Kondo, K; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozai, Y; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Kudo, H; Kuroda, K; Kuwabara, T; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Luna, M; Lyons, T T; MacInnis, M; Machenschalk, B; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mandic, V; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Matsuda, N; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mikhailov, E; Mio, N; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miura, K; Miyakawa, O; Miyama, S; Miyoki, S; Mizusawa, H; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Moriwaki, S; Mossavi, K; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Musha, M; Myers, E; Myers, J; Müller, G; Nagano, S; Nagayama, Y; Nakagawa, K; Nakamura, T; Nakano, H; Nakao, K; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nishi, Y; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Numata, K; Nutzman, P; O'Reilly, B; Ogawa, Y; Ohashi, M; Ohishi, N; Okutomi, A; Olson, T; Oohara, K; Otsuka, S; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswaran, A J; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rodríguez, A; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Rüdiger, A; Saitô, Y; Sakata, S; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sarin, P; Sasaki, M; Sathyaprakash, B; Sato, K; Sato, N; Sato, S; Sato, Y; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sekido, A; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Seto, N; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shibata, M; Shinkai, H; Shintomi, T; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M

    2005-01-01

    We report on the first joint search for gravitational waves by the TAMA and LIGO collaborations. We looked for millisecond-duration unmodelled gravitational-wave bursts in 473 hr of coincident data collected during early 2003. No candidate signals were found. We set an upper limit of 0.12 events per day on the rate of detectable gravitational-wave bursts, at 90% confidence level. From simulations, we estimate that our detector network was sensitive to bursts with root-sum-square strain amplitude above approximately 1-3x10^{-19} Hz^{-1/2} in the frequency band 700-2000 Hz. We describe the details of this collaborative search, with particular emphasis on its advantages and disadvantages compared to searches by LIGO and TAMA separately using the same data. Benefits include a lower background and longer observation time, at some cost in sensitivity and bandwidth. We also demonstrate techniques for performing coincidence searches with a heterogeneous network of detectors with different noise spectra and orientatio...

  19. Total fluence influence on the detected magnitude of neutron burst using proportional detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of very short neutron bursts, when individual neutrons cannot be counted in the usual manner, is possible with proportional detectors (such as 3He) taking the integration of the total electric charge due to many overlapped interactions, as the measure of the amount of the neutron signal. This method requires a correction related to the total amount of neutrons that interacted with the detector. This correction originates in the well-known build-up of positive electric charge too slow to be dislodged from the detection volume during the neutron burst. This causes self-shielding of the applied electric field with the ensuing reduction of the charge multiplication process in the gas, described in the literature. Short neutron bursts from a plasma focus device and a conventional isotopic neutron source were employed in the experimental phase and the known theory was applied in the analysis, which justifies assigning the observed effects to the space-charge shielding of the externally applied electric field. This work introduces a correction to the neutron yield derived from the registered electric charge, through a model of collected charge reduction as a function of total neutrons measured

  20. Upper limits from the LIGO and TAMA detectors on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the first joint search for gravitational waves by the TAMA and LIGO collaborations. We looked for millisecond-duration unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in 473 hr of coincident data collected during early 2003. No candidate signals were found. We set an upper limit of 0.12 events per day on the rate of detectable gravitational-wave bursts, at 90% confidence level. From software simulations, we estimate that our detector network was sensitive to bursts with root-sum-square strain amplitude above approximately 1-3x10-19 Hz-1/2 in the frequency band 700-2000 Hz. We describe the details of this collaborative search, with particular emphasis on its advantages and disadvantages compared to searches by LIGO and TAMA separately using the same data. Benefits include a lower background and longer observation time, at some cost in sensitivity and bandwidth. We also demonstrate techniques for performing coincidence searches with a heterogeneous network of detectors with different noise spectra and orientations. These techniques include using coordinated software signal injections to estimate the network sensitivity, and tuning the analysis to maximize the sensitivity and the livetime, subject to constraints on the background

  1. Real-Time Supernova Neutrino Burst Monitor at Super-Kamiokande

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.(University of Tokyo, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, Kamioka Observatory, Kamioka, Japan); Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y

    2016-01-01

    We present a real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande (SK). Detecting supernova explosions by neutrinos in real time is crucial for giving a clear picture of the explosion mechanism. Since the neutrinos are expected to come earlier than light, a fast broadcasting of the detection may give astronomers a chance to make electromagnetic radiation observations of the explosions right at the onset. The role of the monitor includes a fast announcement of the neutrino burst dete...

  2. Real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, H.; Tomura, T.; Ueno, K.; Wendell, R. A.; Yokozawa, T.; Irvine, T.; Kajita, T.; Kametani, I.; Kaneyuki, K.; Lee, K. P.; McLachlan, T.; Nishimura, Y.; Richard, E.; Okumura, K.; Labarga, L.; Fernandez, P.; Berkman, S.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tobayama, S.; Gustafson, J.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Goldhaber, M.; Carminati, G.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Weatherly, P.; Renshaw, A.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Takhistov, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Hill, J.; Keig, W. E.; Hong, N.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Akiri, T.; Himmel, A.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Jang, J. S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Bronner, C.; Hirota, S.; Huang, K.; Ieki, K.; Kikawa, T.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takahashi, S.; Tateishi, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Mitsuka, G.; Mijakowski, P.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Wilking, M. J.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Yamaguchi, R.; Yano, T.; Kuno, Y.; Tacik, R.; Kim, S. B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Suda, Y.; Totsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; de Perio, P.; Konaka, A.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Connolly, K.; Wilkes, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande (SK). Detecting supernova explosions by neutrinos in real time is crucial for giving a clear picture of the explosion mechanism. Since the neutrinos are expected to come earlier than light, a fast broadcasting of the detection may give astronomers a chance to make electromagnetic radiation observations of the explosions right at the onset. The role of the monitor includes a fast announcement of the neutrino burst detection to the world and a determination of the supernova direction. We present the online neutrino burst detection system and studies of the direction determination accuracy based on simulations at SK.

  3. Real-Time Supernova Neutrino Burst Monitor at Super-Kamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Hayato, Y; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Tanaka, H; Tomura, T; Ueno, K; Wendell, R A; Yokozawa, T; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kametani, I; Kaneyuki, K; Lee, K P; McLachlan, T; Nishimura, Y; Richard, E; Okumura, K; Labarga, L; Fernandez, P; Berkman, S; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Gustafson, J; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Carminati, G; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Weatherly, P; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Takhistov, V; Ganezer, K S; Hartfiel, B L; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Akiri, T; Himmel, A; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Bronner, C; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Ieki, K; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Murakami, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Takahashi, S; Tateishi, K; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Mijakowski, P; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Yanagisawa, C; Wilking, M J; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Yamaguchi, R; Yano, T; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Suda, Y; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; de Perio, P; Konaka, A; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Connolly, K; Wilkes, R J

    2016-01-01

    We present a real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande (SK). Detecting supernova explosions by neutrinos in real time is crucial for giving a clear picture of the explosion mechanism. Since the neutrinos are expected to come earlier than light, a fast broadcasting of the detection may give astronomers a chance to make electromagnetic radiation observations of the explosions right at the onset. The role of the monitor includes a fast announcement of the neutrino burst detection to the world and a determination of the supernova direction. We present the online neutrino burst detection system and studies of the direction determination accuracy based on simulations at SK.

  4. A Cherenkov Detector for Monitoring ATLAS Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Sbrizzi, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    LUCID (LUminosity Cherenkov Integrating Detector) is the monitor of the luminosity delivered by the LHC accelerator to the ATLAS experiment. The detector is made of two symmetric arms deployed at about 17 m from the ATLAS interaction point. Each arm consists of an aluminum vessel containing 20 tubes, 15 mm diameter and 1500 mm length, and a Cherenkov gaseous radiator (C4F10) at about 1.1 bar absolute. The light generated by charged particles above the Cherenkov threshold is collected by photomultiplier tubes (PMT) directly placed at the tubes end. Thanks to an intrinsically fast response and to its custom readout electronics, LUCID estimates the number of interactions per LHC bunch crossing and provides an interaction trigger to the ATLAS experiment. The relevant details of the detector design and the expexted performance based on Monte Carlo simulations are presented, together with the first results obtained with pp collisions produced by LHC.

  5. Multi-Impairment WDM Optical Performance Monitoring for Burst Switched Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Baker-Meflah, L.; Thomsen, B.C.; Mitchell, J. E.; Bayvel, P.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analytical investigation of a performance monitoring scheme capable of simultaneously monitoring Chromatic Dispersion, Polarization Mode Dispersion and Optical Signal to Noise Ratio at 40 Gbit/s on timescales that are appropriate to optical burst switched networks. This analysis supports previously published experimental results which showed that this technique is scalable to WDM network monitoring.

  6. Anomalies in low-energy Gamma-Ray Burst spectra with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tierney, Dave; Preece, Robert D; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Guiriec, Sylvain; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Burgess, J Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McGlynn, Sinead; Paciesas, William S; Pelassa, Veronique; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A Band function has become the standard spectral function used to describe the prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, deviations from this function have previously been observed in GRBs detected by BATSE and in individual GRBs from the \\textit{Fermi} era. We present a systematic and rigorous search for spectral deviations from a Band function at low energies in a sample of the first two years of high fluence, long bursts detected by the \\textit{Fermi} Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The sample contains 45 bursts with a fluence greater than 2$\\times10^{-5}$ erg / cm$^{2}$ (10 - 1000 keV). An extrapolated fit method is used to search for low-energy spectral anomalies, whereby a Band function is fit above a variable low-energy threshold and then the best fit function is extrapolated to lower energy data. Deviations are quantified by examining residuals derived from the extrapolated function and the data and their significance is determined via comprehensive simulations which account for the ...

  7. Time resolved spectroscopy of SGR J1550–5418 bursts detected with Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550–5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E peak, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ∼ – 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10–5 erg s–1 cm–2. Above this flux value, the E peak–flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ∼1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area–kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R 2∝kT –4, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10–5.5 erg s–1 cm–2). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R max ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R max as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550–5418, B int ≳ 4.5 × 1015 G.

  8. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Baring, M. G.; Granot, J.; Watts, A. L.; Bhat, P. N.; Collazzi, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gorgone, N.; Göğüş, E.; Gruber, D.; Grunblatt, S.; Huppenkothen, D.; Kaneko, Y.; von Kienlin, A.; van der Klis, M.; Lin, L.; Mcenery, J.; van Putten, T.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2014-04-01

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550-5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E peak, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ~ - 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10-5 erg s-1 cm-2. Above this flux value, the E peak-flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ~1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area-kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R 2vpropkT -4, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10-5.5 erg s-1 cm-2). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R max ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R max as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418, B int >~ 4.5 × 1015 G.

  9. MPX Detectors as LHC Luminosity Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2086061; Asbah, Nedaa; Bergmann, Benedikt; Bekhouche, Khaled; Caforio, Davide; Campbell, Michael; Heijne, Erik; Leroy, Claude; Lipniacka, Anna; Nessi, Marzio; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Soueid, Paul; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    A network of 16 Medipix-2 (MPX) silicon pixel devices was installed in the ATLAS detector cavern at CERN. It was designed to measure the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. This study demonstrates that the MPX network can also be used as a self-sufficient luminosity monitoring system. The MPX detectors collect data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, and thus they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors located close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with high precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at sqrt(s) = 8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction rate are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The systematic variations observed in the MPX lum...

  10. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Stifter, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    A new Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) detector system has been installed in the CMS cavern to measure the machine-induced background (MIB) from the LHC. This background originates from interactions of the LHC beam halo with the final set of collimators before the CMS experiment and from beam gas interactions. The BHM detector uses the directional nature of Cherenkov radiation and event timing to select particles coming from the direction of the beam and to suppress those originating from the interaction point. It consists of 40 quartz rods, placed on each side of the CMS detector, coupled to UV sensitive PMTs. For each bunch crossing the PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC and the arrival time of the signal is recorded. The data are processed in real time to yield a precise measurement of per-bunch-crossing background rate. This measurement is made available to CMS and the LHC, to provide real-time feedback on the beam quality and to improve the efficiency of data taking. Here, I present the detector...

  11. Dielectric Track Detector fuel motion monitor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel motion monitor system described is one of the systems being developed for use in the upgraded Sandia ACPR. Like the hodoscope, this system will image fast neutrons from the test fuel element--but there the similarity to the hodoscope ends, because this system will use Dielectric Track Detectors (DTD's) for both neutron detection and recording. Kimfoil is a commercial polycarbonate film that is used as a capacitor dielectric. It is just one example of a Dielectric Track Detector. When a DTD is struck by an energetic and heavy ion, the ion produces damage along its path. If the dielectric is then etched, the damaged track enlarges to form a crater. These craters are then easily visible with an optical microscope. These dielectrics have several properties that make them ideal for use in a reactor environment. First of all, they are completely insensitive to any of the background radiations to which they can be exposed in that environment

  12. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor: Results from the first two years

    OpenAIRE

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Collaboration, for the Fermi GBM

    2011-01-01

    In the first two years since the launch of the Fermi Observatory, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 500 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), of which 18 were confidently detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) above 100 MeV. Besides GRBs, GBM has triggered on other transient sources, such as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs), Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) and solar flares. Here we present the science highlights of the GBM observations.

  13. New detector for neutron beam monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain high precision in neutron cross-section measurements, an essential aspect is the accurate knowledge of the energy distribution of the neutron flux during the measurements. The detector dedicated to this measurement should measure the neutron flux impinging on the sample placed in the beam; therefore it should be placed upstream of the sample position and of the different detectors in the measurement area. As a consequence of that, such a flux detector should ideally have an in-beam mass as small as possible in order to minimize the perturbation on the neutron beam and to minimize the production of background by the device itself. According to these considerations a new neutron detector equipped with a small-mass device based on Micromegas micro-bulk technology has been designed for monitoring the CERN nTOF neutron beam. In order to cover the full range of the neutron energy from thermal to several MeV, two neutron/charged particle converters (235U and 10B) have been used. The 235U(n,f) is suited above a few 100 eV. Below that energy the resonance structure of 235U(n,f) does not allow a precise determination of the neutron flux without taking into account detailed and complicated corrections. To overcome this issue the 10B(n,α) reaction is simultaneously used. After a description of the innovative detector concept, we present the result obtained at the GELINA neutron beam facility of JRC-IRMM Geel, and the preliminary results from the commissioning of the new target of the CERN nTOF facility. (author)

  14. Do the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and Swift Burst Alert Telescope see the Same Short Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, Eric; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Lien, Amy; Briggs, Michael S; Goldstein, Adam; Pelassa, Veronique; Troja, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Compact binary system mergers are expected to generate gravitational radiation detectable by ground-based interferometers. A subset of these, the merger of a neutron star with another neutron star or a black hole, are also the most popular model for the production of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) trigger on short GRBs (SGRBs) at rates that reflect their relative sky exposures, with the BAT detecting 10 per year compared to about 45 for GBM. We examine the SGRB populations detected by Swift BAT and Fermi GBM. We find that the Swift BAT triggers on weaker SGRBs than Fermi GBM, providing they occur close to the center of the BAT field-of-view, and that the Fermi GBM SGRB detection threshold remains flatter across its field-of-view. Overall, these effects combine to give the instruments the same average sensitivity, and account for the SGRBs that trigger one instrument but not the other. We do not find any evidence that the BAT and...

  15. Control and monitoring of the DOe detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DOe experiment at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider is currently studying proton-antiproton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.8 TeV. The data-acquisition system for the experiment was designed with two independent pathways for communication between the front-end computers, which interface with the detector electronics, and the host-level computers, where the event data is logged and where the experiment is monitored and controlled. The event data path employs multiple, high-bandwidth, unidirectional busses while the control path, which uses standard local area network components, handles all control, configuration setting, alarm, and monitoring communications. This paper discusses the software components associated with the control communication path, with emphasis upon the design philosophy, user interface, database, and networking issues. ((orig.))

  16. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A new Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) detector system has been installed in the CMS cavern to measure the machine-induced background (MIB) from the LHC. This background originates from interactions of the LHC beam halo with the final set of collimators before the CMS experiment and from beam gas interactions. The BHM detector uses the directional nature of Cherenkov radiation and event timing to select particles coming from the direction of the beam and to suppress those originating from the interaction point. It consists of 40 quartz rods, placed on each side of the CMS detector, coupled to UV sensitive PMTs. For each bunch crossing the PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC and the arrival time of the signal is recorded. The data are processed in real time to yield a precise measurement of per-bunch-crossing background rate. This measurement is made available to CMS and the LHC, to provide real-time feedback on the beam quality and to improve the efficiency of data taking. In this talk we will describ...

  17. The CMS Beam Halo Monitor Detector System

    CERN Document Server

    Stifter, Kelly Marie

    2015-01-01

    A new Beam Halo Monitor (BHM) detector system has been installed in the CMS cavern to measure the machine-induced background (MIB) from the LHC. This background originates from interactions of the LHC beam halo with the final set of collimators before the CMS experiment and from beam gas interactions. The BHM detector uses the directional nature of Cherenkov radiation and event timing to select particles coming from the direction of the beam and to supress those originating from the interaction point. It consists of 40 quartz rods, placed on each side of the CMS detector, coupled to UV sensitive PMTs. For each bunch crossing the PMT signal is digitized by a charge integrating ASIC and the arrival time of the signal is recorded. The data are processed in real time to yield a precise measurement of per-bunch-crossing background rate. This measurement is made available to CMS and the LHC, to provide real-time feedback on the beam quality and to improve the efficiency of data taking. In this talk we will descri...

  18. Continued Radio Monitoring of the Gamma Ray Burst 991208

    CERN Document Server

    Galama, T J; Sari, R; Berger, E; Taylor, G B; Kulkarni, S R

    2003-01-01

    We present radio observations of the afterglow of the bright gamma-ray burst GRB 991208 at frequencies of 1.4, 4.9 and 8.5 GHz, taken between two weeks and 300 days after the burst. The well-sampled radio light curve at 8.5 GHz shows that the peak flux density peaked about 10 days after the burst and decayed thereafter as a power-law t^-1.07. This decay rate is more shallow than the optical afterglow with t^-2.2, which was measured during the first week. These late-time data are combined with extensive optical, millimeter and centimeter measurements and fitted to the standard relativistic blast wave model. In agreement with previous findings, we find that an isotropic explosion in a constant density or wind-blown medium cannot explain these broadband data without modifying the assumption of a single power-law slope for the electron energy distribution. A jet-like expansion provides a reasonable fit to the data. In this case, the flatter radio light curve compared to the optical may be due to emission from an ...

  19. Methods and results of a search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts using the GEO600, LIGO, and Virgo detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Augustus, H; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castaldi, G; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, J; Hall, E D; Hamilton, W; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Horrom, T; Hoske, D; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, S; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, D Nanda; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Lee, P J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Roux, A Le; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lopez, E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Ma, Y; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Maga\; Magee, R; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N M; Mansell, G; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A H; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Omar, S; Oppermann, P; Oram, R; O'Reilly, B; Ortega, W; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Recchia, S; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Reula, O; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S B; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Salemi, F; Sammut, L; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sankar, S; Sannibale, V; Santiago-Prieto, I; Saracco, E; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Scheuer, J; Schilling, R; Schilman, M; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sidery, T L; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Singh, R; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, R J E; Smith-Lefebvre, N D; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Souradeep, T; Staley, A; Stebbins, J; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Stops, D; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tao, J; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; Tellez, G; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Tshilumba, D; Tuennermann, H; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wolovick, N; Worden, J; Wu, Y; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J; Cain, J; Fotopoulos, N; Gill, C; Jones, G; Patel, P; Rogstad, S; Trias, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz-1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. We introduce the method of a linear search grid to analyse GRB events with large sky localisation uncertainties such as the localisations provided by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Coherent searches for gravitational waves (GWs) can be computationally intensive when the GRB sky position is not well-localised, due to the corrections required for the difference in arrival time between detectors. Using a linear search grid we are able to reduce the computational cost of the analysis by a factor of O(10) for GBM events. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our analysis pipeline can improve upon the sky localisation of GRBs detected by the GBM, if a high-frequency GW signal is observed in coincidence. We use the linear search grid method in a search for GWs associated with 129 GRBs observed...

  20. Time resolved spectroscopy of SGR J1550–5418 bursts detected with Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, G. [Universities Space Research Association, 6767 Old Madison Pike, Suite 450, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); Kouveliotou, C.; Collazzi, A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J.; Watts, A. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Van der Klis, M.; Van Putten, T. [Astronomical Institute " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Raánana 43537 (Israel); Bhat, P. N.; Gorgone, N. [University of Alabama in Huntsville CSPAR, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, N.; Mcenery, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y.; Lin, L. [Sabancı University, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Gruber, D.; Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Grunblatt, S. [University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2500 Campus Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2014-04-10

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550–5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E {sub peak}, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ∼ – 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10{sup –5} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. Above this flux value, the E {sub peak}–flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ∼1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area–kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R {sup 2}∝kT {sup –4}, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10{sup –5.5} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R {sub max} ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R {sub max} as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550–5418, B {sub int} ≳ 4.5 × 10{sup 15} G.

  1. A Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with the Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329 Using the LIGO Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, R; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Díaz, M; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80-2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than 150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational wave signal strength larger than a pre-determined threshold. We report frequency dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around 250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h_RSS = 6E-21 Hz^{-1/2}. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and GRBs...

  2. Digital and Analog Electronics for an autonomous, deep-sea, Gamma Ray Burst Neutrino prototype detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manolopoulos K.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GRBNeT is a Gamma Ray Burst Neutrino Telescope made of autonomously operated arrays of deep-sea light detectors, anchored to the sea-bed without any cabled connection to the shore. This paper presents the digital and analog electronics that we have designed and developed for the GRBNeT prototype. We describe the requirements for these electronics and present their design and functionality. We present low-power analog electronics for the PMTs utilized in the GRBNeT prototype and the FPGA based digital system for data selection and storage. We conclude with preliminary performance measurements of the electronics systems for the GRBNeT prototype.

  3. Praseodymium activation detector for measuring bursts of 14 MeV neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new, accurate, neutron activation detection scheme for measuring pulsed neutrons has been designed and tested. The detection system is sensitive to neutrons with energies above 10 MeV; importantly, it is insensitive to gamma radiation 141Pr, an element that has a single, naturally occurring isotope, a significant n,2n cross-section, and decays by positron emission that result in two coincident 511 keV photons. Neutron fluences are thus inferred by relating measured reaction product decay activity to fluence. Specific sample activity is measured using the sum-peak method to count gamma-ray coincidences from the annihilation of the positron decay products. The system was tested using 14 and 2.45 MeV neutron bursts produced by NSTec Dense Plasma Focus Laboratory fusion sources. Lead, copper, beryllium, and silver activation detectors were compared. The detection method allows measurement of 14 MeV neutron yield with a total error of ∼18%.

  4. Status of radiation detector and neutron monitor technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y K; Ha, J H; Han, S H; Hong, S B; Hwang, I K; Lee, W G; Moon, B S; Park, S H; Song, M H

    2002-01-01

    In this report, we describe the current states of the radiation detection technology, detectors for industrial application, and neutron monitors. We also survey the new technologies being applied to this field. The method to detect radiation is the measurement of the observable secondary effect from the interaction between incident radiation and detector material, such as ionization, excitation, fluorescence, and chemical reaction. The radiation detectors can be categorized into gas detectors, scintillation detectors, and semiconductor detectors according to major effects and main applications. This report contains the current status and operational principles of these detectors. The application fields of radiation detectors are industrial measurement system, in-core neutron monitor, medical radiation diagnostic device, nondestructive inspection device, environmental radiation monitoring, cosmic-ray measurement, security system, fundamental science experiment, and radiation measurement standardization. The st...

  5. Status of radiation detector and neutron monitor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, we describe the current states of the radiation detection technology, detectors for industrial application, and neutron monitors. We also survey the new technologies being applied to this field. The method to detect radiation is the measurement of the observable secondary effect from the interaction between incident radiation and detector material, such as ionization, excitation, fluorescence, and chemical reaction. The radiation detectors can be categorized into gas detectors, scintillation detectors, and semiconductor detectors according to major effects and main applications. This report contains the current status and operational principles of these detectors. The application fields of radiation detectors are industrial measurement system, in-core neutron monitor, medical radiation diagnostic device, nondestructive inspection device, environmental radiation monitoring, cosmic-ray measurement, security system, fundamental science experiment, and radiation measurement standardization. The status of the technology development of these fields are also described

  6. An assessment of burst strength distribution data for monitoring quality of condom stocks in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, M J; Hutchings, J; Lubis, F; Natakusumah, R

    1986-03-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted on condoms to examine the changes that occur over time in indicators of condom burst strength, and to determine the relationship between laboratory-assessed condom burst strength and breakage during use in a developing country setting. Three groups of unaged condoms purchased directly from the manufacturer were used: one group exposed to UV light for 10 hours; one group exposed for five hours; and one group unexposed. A sample of each of these groups was tested according to ISO condom air burst test protocols. The remaining condoms were individually packaged in coded polyethylene bags for shipment to the developing country study site. Also used in the study was a group of condoms that had been aged for over 40 months under field conditions in a tropical climate; a sample from this group was tested by the ISO air burst test protocol and the remainder distributed to the study site. One-hundred-thirty Indonesian urban males participated in the double-blind study. Volunteers were not relying on the condom for contraceptive purposes. Each volunteer was given one individually packaged untreated condom, one condom from each treatment group, and four condoms aged in the field. Study participants were instructed to return all used condoms. Each condom that was returned after use was examined for breakage, and the unbroken condoms were subjected to an air inflation test to determine volume and pressure at burst. A comparison of the air burst volume data for a sample of unused and used condoms from the same treatment group indicates that most of the condoms that broke during use had air burst volumes below 11 liters. Therefore, a significant downward shift in the burst strength distribution as measured in the laboratory is likely to result in an increased breakage rate during use. A Condom Deterioration Index calculated from regular periodic testing of stored condom stocks is a convenient and sensitive means of monitoring trends in the

  7. Detection in coincidence of gravitational wave bursts with a network of interferometric detectors: Geometric acceptance and timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detecting gravitational wave bursts (characterized by short durations and poorly modeled waveforms) requires coincidences between several interferometric detectors in order to reject nonstationary noise events. As the wave amplitude seen in a detector depends on its location with respect to the source direction and as the signal to noise ratio of these bursts is expected to be low, coincidences between antennas may not be very likely. This paper investigates this question from a statistical point of view by using a simple model of a network of detectors; it also estimates the timing precision of a detection in an interferometer, which is an important issue for the reconstruction of the source location based on time delays

  8. The detector response matrices of the burst and transient source experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detector response matrices for the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on board the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) are described, including their creation and operation in data analysis. These response matrices are a detailed abstract representation of the gamma-ray detectors' operating characteristics that are needed for data analysis. They are constructed from an extensive set of calibration data coupled with a complex geometry electromagnetic cascade Monte Carlo simulation code. The calibration tests and simulation algorithm optimization are described. The characteristics of the BATSE detectors in the spacecraft environment are also described. (orig.)

  9. Data Quality Monitoring for the CMS Resistive Plate Chamber Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimmino, A.; CMS Collaboration

    2011-06-01

    Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs), with their excellent time resolution (˜ 2 ns), were chosen as dedicated muon trigger detectors for the CMS experiment. RPCs fulfill the job of muon identification, estimate the momentum and unambiguously assign bunch crossing. The critical tasks of monitoring detector performances, debugging hardware, and certifying recorded data are carried out by the RPC Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) system. We here describe the structure, functionalities, and performances of the DQM applications for the CMS RPC detector.

  10. Meteor Burst Remote Monitoring System Deployment at US DOE Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper details the efforts associated with the design and installation of a Meteor Burst system at the 200-BP-1 Prototype Barrier located at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The existing monitoring data collection and transmission system at the 200-BP-1 location is cellular phone-based. This system required manual data retrieval and was faced with costly upgrades due to ongoing changes in cellular phone technology. The Meteor Burst system on the other hand offers automated transmission of large amounts of monitoring data with minimal infrastructure and easy real-time access to data by facility personnel via user-friendly web pages. Under this project, a meteor burst data collection and transmission system was successfully designed and installed. This system collects and transmits data from 4 water balance monitoring stations and 13 time-domain reflectometry probes located atop the 200-BP-1 Prototype Barrier. The field system employs several data-loggers plus meteor burst components and 900-megahertz radios. In addition to the field design and installation, system programming was performed to successfully interface the components of the field system and to facilitate communication with the Internet server. Lastly, user-friendly web pages were developed to facilitate real-time access to data. (authors)

  11. Monitored Drift Chambers in the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Herten, G

    Monitored Drift Chambers (MDT) are used in the ATLAS Detector to measure the momentum of high energy muons. They consist of drift tubes, which are filled with an Ar-CO2 gas mixture at 3 bar gas pressure. About 1200 drift chambers are required for ATLAS. They are up to 6 m long. Nevertheless the position of every wire needs to be known with a precision of 20 µm within a chamber. In addition, optical alignment sensors are required to measure the relative position of adjacent chambers with a precision of 30µm. This gigantic task seems impossible at first instance. Indeed it took many years of R&D to invent the right tools and methods before the first chamber could be built according to specifications. Today, at the time when 50% of the chambers have been produced, we are confident that the goal for ATLAS can be reached. The mechanical precision of the chambers could be verified with the x-ray tomograph at CERN. This ingenious device, developed for the MDT system, is able to measure the wire position insid...

  12. Observations of a gamma-ray burst and other sources with a large-area, balloon-borne detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. B.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    Observations of a weak cosmic gamma ray burst of integrated intensity 2 x 10 to the -6th erg/sq cm, two solar flare events, and pulsed emission profiles of A0535+26 and NP0532 are reported for several energy intervals in the energy range from 45 to 520 keV. The measurements were made with a NaI(Tl) detector array flown on a balloon to 4 g/sq cm residual atmosphere from Palestine, Texas, on October 6-8, 1980, for 28 hours. The detector is a prototype of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) to be flown on the Gamma-Ray Observatory (GRO).

  13. Praseodymium activation detector for measuring bursts of 14 MeV neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehan, Tim, E-mail: meehanbt@nv.doe.go [National Security Technologies, LLC, P.O. Box 98521, North Las Vegas, NV 89030 (United States); Hagen, E.C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, P.O. Box 98521, North Las Vegas, NV 89030 (United States); Ruiz, C.L.; Cooper, G.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States)

    2010-08-21

    A new, accurate, neutron activation detection scheme for measuring pulsed neutrons has been designed and tested. The detection system is sensitive to neutrons with energies above 10 MeV; importantly, it is insensitive to gamma radiation <10 MeV and to lower-energy (e.g., fission and thermal) neutrons. It is based upon the use of {sup 141}Pr, an element that has a single, naturally occurring isotope, a significant n,2n cross-section, and decays by positron emission that result in two coincident 511 keV photons. Neutron fluences are thus inferred by relating measured reaction product decay activity to fluence. Specific sample activity is measured using the sum-peak method to count gamma-ray coincidences from the annihilation of the positron decay products. The system was tested using 14 and 2.45 MeV neutron bursts produced by NSTec Dense Plasma Focus Laboratory fusion sources. Lead, copper, beryllium, and silver activation detectors were compared. The detection method allows measurement of 14 MeV neutron yield with a total error of {approx}18%.

  14. Indication of radio frequency interference (RFI) sources for solar burst monitoring in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Z. S.; Abidin, Z. Z.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Shariff, N. N. M.

    2012-06-01

    Apart of monitoring the Sun project, the Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) surveying in the region of (1-1200) MHz has been conducted. The main objective of this surveying is to test and qualify the potential of monitoring a continuous radio emission of Solar in Malaysia. This work is also an initiative of International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) project where Malaysia is one of the country that participate a e-Callisto Spectrometer network in order to study the behavior of Solar radio burst in frequency of (45-800) MHz region which will be install in this October. Detail results will indicate the potential of monitoring a solar in Malaysia.

  15. The silicon micro-strip detector plane for the LOFT/wide-field monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldwurm, A.; Ferrando, P.; Götz, D.; Laurent, P.; Lebrun, F.; Limousin, O.; Basa, S.; Bertoli, W.; Delagnes, Eric; Dolgorouky, Y.; Gevin, O.; Gros, A.; Gouiffes, C.; Jeanneau, F.; Lachaud, C.; Llored, M.; Olivetto, C.; Prevot, G.; Renaud, D.; Rodriguez, J.; Rossin, C.; Schanne, S.; Soldi, S.; Varniere, P.

    2012-09-01

    The main objective of the Wide Field Monitor (WFM) on the LOFT mission is to provide unambiguous detection of the high-energy sources in a large field of view, in order to support science operations of the LOFT primary instrument, the LAD. The monitor will also provide by itself a large number of results on the timing and spectral behavior of hundreds of galactic compact objects, Active Galactic Nuclei and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The WFM is based on the coded aperture concept where a position sensitive detector records the shadow of a mask projected by the celestial sources. The proposed WFM detector plane, based on Double Sided micro-Strip Silicon Detectors (DSSD), will allow proper 2-dimensional recording of the projected shadows. Indeed the positioning of the photon interaction in the detector with equivalent fine resolution in both directions insures the best imaging capability compatible with the allocated budgets for this telescope on LOFT. We will describe here the overall configuration of this 2D-WFM and the design and characteristics of the DSSD detector plane including its imaging and spectral performances. We will also present a number of simulated results discussing the advantages that this configuration offers to LOFT. A DSSD-based WFM will in particular reduce significantly the source confusion experienced by the WFM in crowded regions of the sky like the Galactic Center and will in general increase the observatory science capability of the mission.

  16. Development of an advanced antineutrino detector for reactor monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, T., E-mail: classen2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Cabrera-Palmer, B. [Sandia Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Ho, A.; Jonkmans, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Kogler, L.; Reyna, D. [Sandia Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-01-21

    Here we present the development of a compact antineutrino detector for the purpose of nuclear reactor monitoring, improving upon a previously successful design. This paper will describe the design improvements of the detector which increases the antineutrino detection efficiency threefold over the previous effort. There are two main design improvements over previous generations of detectors for nuclear reactor monitoring: dual-ended optical readout and single volume detection mass. The dual-ended optical readout eliminates the need for fiducialization and increases the uniformity of the detector's optical response. The containment of the detection mass in a single active volume provides more target mass per detector footprint, a key design criteria for operating within a nuclear power plant. This technology could allow for real-time monitoring of the evolution of a nuclear reactor core, independent of reactor operator declarations of fuel inventories, and may be of interest to the safeguards community.

  17. Criticality monitoring with digital systems and solid state neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercially available system for criticality monitoring combines the well established technology of digital radiation monitoring with state-of-the art detector systems capable of detecting criticality excursions of varying length and intensity with a high degree of confidence. The field microcomputer servicing the detector clusters contains hardware and software to acquire detector information in both the digital count rate and bit sensing modes supported by the criticality detectors. In both cases special criticality logic in the field microcomputer is used to determine the validity of the criticality event. The solid-state neutron detector consists of a 6LiF wafer coupled to a diffused-junction charged particle detector. Alpha particles resulting from (n,α) interactions within the lithium wafer produce a pulsed signal corresponding to neutron intensity. Special detector circuitry causes the setting of a criticality bit recognizable by the microcomputer should neutron field intensities either exceed a hardware selectable frequency or saturate the detector resulting in a high current condition. These two modes of criticality sensing, in combination with the standard method of comparing an operator selectable alarm setpoint with the detector count rate, results in a criticality system capable of effective operation under the most demanding criticality monitoring conditions

  18. Probing the Nature of Short Swift Bursts via Deep INTEGRAL Monitoring of GRB 050925

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barbier, L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from Swift, XMM-Newton, and deep INTEGRAL monitoring in the region of GRB 050925. This short Swift burst is a candidate for a newly discovered soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) with the following observational burst properties: 1) galactic plane (b=-0.1 deg) localization, 2) 150 msec duration, and 3) a blackbody rather than a simple power-law spectral shape (with a significance level of 97%). We found two possible X-ray counterparts of GRB 050925 by comparing the X-ray images from Swift XRT and XMM-Newton. Both X-ray sources show the transient behavior with a power-law decay index shallower than -1. We found no hard X-ray emission nor any additional burst from the location of GRB 050925 in approximately 5 Ms of INTEGRAL data. We discuss about the three BATSE short bursts which might be associated with GRB 050925, based on their location and the duration. Assuming GRB 050925 is associated with the H(sub II), regions (W 58) at the galactic longitude of 1=70 deg, we also discuss the source frame properties of GRB 050925.

  19. Monitoring, alignment and control of the RICH detectors

    CERN Document Server

    D'Ambrosio, C; Gaspar, C; Laub, M; Lindner, R; Muheim, F; Papanestis, A; Soler, FJP

    2001-01-01

    The physical quantities of the RICH detectors need to be monitored throughout the duration of the experiment to ensure that their performance remains within the design specifications. The present note describes all the physical quantities that need to be monitored and a description of possible devices that could be implemented to achieve the specified level of control. In addition, the angular resolution of the RICH detectors depends on an accurate alignment of the system. Proposals for this alignment procedure are described.

  20. Peaks Over Threshold Method for Structural Health Monitoring Detector Design

    OpenAIRE

    HMAD, Ouadie; MECHBAL, Nazih; REBILLAT, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system offers new approaches to interrogate the integrity of structures. The most critical step of such systems is the damage detection step since it is the first and because performances of the following steps (damage localization, severity estimation…) depend on it. Care has thus to be taken when designing the detector. The objective of this communication is to discuss issues related to the design of a detector for the structural health monitoring of compo...

  1. Coincidence and coherent data analysis methods for gravitational wave bursts in a network of interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Network data analysis methods are the only way to properly separate real gravitational wave (GW) transient events from detector noise. They can be divided into two generic classes: the coincidence method and the coherent analysis. The former uses lists of selected events provided by each interferometer belonging to the network and tries to correlate them in time to identify a physical signal. Instead of this binary treatment of detector outputs (signal present or absent), the latter method involves first the merging of the interferometer data and looks for a common pattern, consistent with an assumed GW waveform and a given source location in the sky. The thresholds are only applied later, to validate or not the hypothesis made. As coherent algorithms use more complete information than coincidence methods, they are expected to provide better detection performances, but at a higher computational cost. An efficient filter must yield a good compromise between a low false alarm rate (hence triggering on data at a manageable rate) and a high detection efficiency. Therefore, the comparison of the two approaches is achieved using so-called receiving operating characteristics (ROC), giving the relationship between the false alarm rate and the detection efficiency for a given method. This paper investigates this question via Monte Carlo simulations, using the network model developed in a previous article. Its main conclusions are the following. First, a three-interferometer network such as Virgo-LIGO is found to be too small to reach good detection efficiencies at low false alarm rates: larger configurations are suitable to reach a confidence level high enough to validate as true GW a detected event. In addition, an efficient network must contain interferometers with comparable sensitivities: studying the three-interferometer LIGO network shows that the 2-km interferometer with half sensitivity leads to a strong reduction of performances as compared to a network of three

  2. The silicon micro-strip detector plane for the LOFT/Wide Field Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Goldwurm, A; Götz, D; Laurent, P; Lebrun, F; Limousin, O; Basa, S; Bertoli, W; Delagnes, E; Dolgorouky, Y; Gevin, O; Gros, A; Gouiffes, C; Jeanneau, F; Lachaud, C; Llored, M; Olivetto, C; Prévôt, G; Renaud, D; Rodriguez, J; Rossin, C; Schanne, S; Soldi, S; Varniere, P

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of the Wide Field Monitor (WFM) on the LOFT mission is to provide unambiguous detection of the high-energy sources in a large field of view, in order to support science operations of the LOFT primary instrument, the LAD. The monitor will also provide by itself a large number of results on the timing and spectral behaviour of hundreds of galactic compact objects, Active Galactic Nuclei and Gamma-Ray Bursts. The WFM is based on the coded aperture concept where a position sensitive detector records the shadow of a mask projected by the celestial sources. The proposed WFM detector plane, based on Double Sided micro-Strip Silicon Detectors (DSSD), will allow proper 2-dimensional recording of the projected shadows. Indeed the positioning of the photon interaction in the detector with equivalent fine resolution in both directions insures the best imaging capability compatible with the allocated budgets for this telescope on LOFT. We will describe here the overall configuration of this 2D-WFM and t...

  3. Radiation detectors as surveillance monitors for IAEA safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation detectors used for personnel dosimetry are examined for use under IAEA Safeguards as monitors to confirm the passage or nonpassage (YES/NO) of plutonium-bearing nuclear material at barrier penetrations declared closed. In this application where backgrounds are ill defined, no advantage is found for a particular detector type because of intrinsic efficiency. Secondary considerations such as complexity, ease of tamper-proofing, and ease of readout are used to recommend specific detector types for routine monitoring and for data-base measurements. Recommendations are made for applications, data acquisition, and instrument development

  4. A Search for gravitational waves associated with the gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S.B.; Anderson, W.G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B.C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; /Potsdam, Max Planck Inst. /Hannover, Max Planck Inst. Grav. /Australian

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80-2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than {approx_equal}150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational wave signal strength larger than a pre-determined threshold. We report frequency dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around {approx_equal}250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h{sub RSS} {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup -21} Hz{sup -1/2}. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and GRBs.

  5. An anisotropic, fast neutron detector for fuel motion monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sensitivity studies show, that 'incore' fuel motion detectors should be sensitive either to epithermal or fast neutrons and that their sensitivity should be anisotropic. A detector has been developed which fulfills these requirements. Elastic neutron scattering with hydrogen is used as a detection reaction. The neutronic behavior of the detector, especially the angular resolution and the signal/noise ratio, has been investigated in thermal and fast neutron fields. With these results the behavior under representative 'incore' conditions has been estimated. It turns out that the detector is suitable as an 'incore' fuel motion monitor and that it is comparable with other proposed concepts. (orig.)

  6. Improved limits on sterile neutrino dark matter using full-sky Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kenny C. Y.; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Gaskins, Jennifer M.; Smith, Miles; Preece, Robert

    2015-08-01

    A sterile neutrino of ˜keV mass is a well-motivated dark matter candidate. Its decay generates an x-ray line that offers a unique target for x-ray telescopes. For the first time, we use the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to search for sterile neutrino decay lines; our analysis covers the energy range 10-25 keV (sterile neutrino mass 20-50 keV), which is inaccessible to x-ray and gamma-ray satellites such as Chandra, Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and INTEGRAL. The extremely wide field of view of the GBM enables a large fraction of the Milky Way dark matter halo to be probed. After implementing careful data cuts, we obtain ˜53 days of full-sky observational data. We observe an excess of photons towards the Galactic center, as expected from astrophysical emission. We search for sterile neutrino decay lines in the energy spectrum, and find no significant signal. From this, we obtain upper limits on the sterile neutrino mixing angle as a function of mass. In the sterile neutrino mass range 25-40 keV, we improve upon previous upper limits by approximately an order of magnitude. Better understanding of detector and astrophysical backgrounds, as well as detector response, will further improve the sensitivity of a search with the GBM.

  7. Methods and Results of a Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the GEO 600, LIGO, and Virgo Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Blackburn, Lindy L.; Camp, Jordan B.; Gehrels, N.; Graff, P. B.; Slutsky, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz-1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. We introduce the method of a linear search grid to analyze GRB events with large sky localization uncertainties such as the localizations provided by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Coherent searches for gravitational waves (GWs) can be computationally intensive when the GRB sky position is not well-localized, due to the corrections required for the difference in arrival time between detectors. Using a linear search grid we are able to reduce the computational cost of the analysis by a factor of O(10) for GBM events. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our analysis pipeline can improve upon the sky localization of GRBs detected by the GBM, if a high-frequency GW signal is observed in coincidence. We use the linear search grid method in a search for GWs associated with 129 GRBs observed satellite-based gamma-ray experiments between 2006 and 2011. The GRBs in our sample had not been previously analyzed for GW counterparts. A fraction of our GRB events are analyzed using data from GEO600 while the detector was using squeezed-light states to improve its sensitivity; this is the first search for GWs using data from a squeezed-light interferometric observatory. We find no evidence for GW signals, either with any individual GRB in this sample or with the population as a whole. For each GRB we place lower bounds on the distance to the progenitor, assuming a fixed GW emission energy of 10(exp -2)Stellar Mass sq c, with a median exclusion distance of 0.8 Mpc for emission at 500 Hz and 0.3 Mpc at 1 kHz. The reduced computational cost associated with a linear search grid will enable rapid searches for GWs associated with Fermi GBM events in the Advanced detector era.

  8. Limits on Neutrino Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the 40 String IceCube Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Geisler, M; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K -H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kelley, J L; Kemming, N; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kuehn, K; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lehmann, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nießen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Prikockis, M; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schoenwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Voigt, B; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, C; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P

    2011-01-01

    IceCube has become the first neutrino telescope with a sensitivity below the TeV neutrino flux predicted from gamma-ray bursts if GRBs are responsible for the observed cosmic-ray flux above $10^{18}$ eV. Two separate analyses using the half-complete IceCube detector, one a dedicated search for neutrinos from $p \\gamma$-interactions in the prompt phase of the GRB fireball, and the other a generic search for any neutrino emission from these sources over a wide range of energies and emission times, produced no evidence for neutrino emission, excluding prevailing models at 90% confidence.

  9. TRTViewer: the ATLAS TRT detector monitoring and diagnostics tool

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, S Yu

    2013-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the LargeHadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It is designed to combine the drift tube tracker with transition radiation detector, providing an important contribution to the charged particles precise momentum measurement and particle (mainly electron) identification. The TRT consists of a barrel section at small pseudo rapidity (eta) and two separate end-cap partitions at large eta. The detector performance and its operational conditions were permanently monitored during all commissioning and data-taking stages using various software tools, one of which -- TRTViewer -- is described in the present paper. The TRTViewer is the dedicated program for monitoring the TRT raw data quality and detector performance at different hardware levels: individual straws, readout chips and electronic boards. The data analysis results can be presented on the event-by-event basis or in the form of color maps representing the ...

  10. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy, trap...

  11. Design and High Precision Monitoring of Detector Structures at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Lackner, Friedrich; Riegler, Werner

    2007-01-01

    Situated on the outskirts of Geneva, CERN is the leading center for particle physics in the world. The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with its 27 km ringshaped accelerator, which is currently under construction and will be operational in 2008, will begin a new era in high energy physics by revealing the basic constituents of the universe. One of the experiments is ALICE (A Large Ion - Colliding - Experiment), a detector consisting of multiple layers of sub detectors around the collision point to detect dierent types and properties of particles created in the collisions. Those particles are identified via their energy, momentum, track and decay products, and it is therefore important to align the various sub detectors very precisely to each other and monitor their position. The monitoring systems have to operate for an extended period of time under extreme conditions (e.g. high radiation) and must not absorb too many of the particles created in the collisions. This dissertation describes monitoring systems develo...

  12. Detector-decoy quantum key distribution without monitoring signal disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hua-Lei; Fu, Yao; Mao, Yingqiu; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2016-02-01

    The round-robin differential phase-shift quantum key distribution protocol provides a secure way to exchange private information without monitoring conventional disturbances and still maintains a high tolerance of noise, making it desirable for practical implementations of quantum key distribution. However, photon number resolving detectors are required to ensure that the detected signals are single photons in the original protocol. Here, we adopt the detector-decoy method and give the bounds to the fraction of detected events from single photons. Utilizing the advantages of the protocol, we provide a practical method of performing the protocol with desirable performances requiring only threshold single-photon detectors.

  13. Rest-frame properties of gamma-ray bursts observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, David

    2012-01-01

    In this talk I present the main spectral and temporal properties of Fermi/GBM gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshift. Key properties of these GRBs in the rest-frame of the progenitor are investigated to better understand the intrinsic nature of these events. The sample comprises 47 GRBs with measured redshift that were observed by GBM until May 2012. 39 sources belong to the long-duration population and 8 events were classified as short bursts. For all of these events we derive, where possible, the intrinsic peak energy in the {\

  14. Rest-frame properties of 32 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, D; von Kienlin, A; Rau, A; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Goldstein, A; van der Horst, A J; Nardini, M; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Burgess, J M; Chaplin, V L; Diehl, R; Fishman, G J; Fitzpatrick, G; Foley, S; Gibby, M H; Giles, M M; Guiriec, S; Kippen, R M; Kouveliotou, C; Lin, L; McBreen, S; Meegan, C A; E., F Olivares; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Tierney, D; Wilson-Hodge, C

    2011-01-01

    Aims: In this paper we study the main spectral and temporal properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by Fermi/GBM. We investigate these key properties of GRBs in the rest-frame of the progenitor and test for possible intra-parameter correlations to better understand the intrinsic nature of these events. Methods: Our sample comprises 32 GRBs with measured redshift that were observed by GBM until August 2010. 28 of them belong to the long-duration population and 4 events were classified as short/hard bursts. For all of these events we derive, where possible, the intrinsic peak energy in the $\

  15. Cerenkov Detectors for Fission Product Monitoring in Reactor Coolant Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expected properties of Cerenkov detectors when used for fission product monitoring in water cooled reactors and test loops are discussed from the point of view of the knowledge of the sensitivity of these detectors to some beta emitting isotopes. The basic theory for calculation of the detector response is presented, taking the optical transmission in the sample container and the properties of the photomultiplier tube into account. Special attention is paid to the energy resolution of this type of Cerenkov detector. For the design of practical detectors the results from several investigations of various window and reflector materials are given, and the selection of photomultiplier tubes is briefly discussed. In the case of optical reflectors and photomultiplier tubes reference is made to two previous reports by the author. The influence of the size and geometry of the sample container on the energy resolution follows from a separate investigation, as well as the relative merits of sample containers with transparent inner walls. Provided that the energy resolution of the Cerenkov detector is sufficiently high, there are several reasons for using this detector type for failed-fuel-element detection. It seems possible to attain the desired energy resolution by careful detector design

  16. Sensitivity of the FERMI Detectors to Gamma-Ray Bursts from Evaporating Primordial Black Holes (PBHs)

    CERN Document Server

    Ukwatta, T N; Parke, W C; Dhuga, K S; Rhodes, S; Eskandarian, A; Gehrels, N; Maximon, L; Morris, D C

    2010-01-01

    Primordial Black Holes (PBHs), which may have been created in the early Universe, are predicted to be detectable by their Hawking radiation. The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope observatory offers increased sensitivity to the gamma-ray bursts produced by PBHs with an initial mass of $\\sim 5\\times 10^{14}$ g expiring today. PBHs are candidate progenitors of unidentified Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) that lack X-ray afterglow. We propose spectral lag, which is the temporal delay between the high and low energy pulses, as an efficient method to identify PBH evaporation events with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT).

  17. Pulse to pulse monitoring of the SLD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SLAC Linear Collider produces bunches of positrons and polarized electrons which collide at 120 hertz inside the SLD detector. A limited amount of information is collected for each pulse in the modules which do real-time data acquisition. Buffers of approximately ten seconds' worth of this monitor data are periodically delivered to a VAX. The generation and uses of the monitor data will be discussed

  18. Development of a modular CdTe detector plane for gamma-ray burst detection below 100 keV

    CERN Document Server

    Ehanno, M; Barret, D; Lacombe, K; Pons, R; Rouaix, G; Gevin, O; Limousin, O; Lugiez, F; Bardoux, A; Penquer, A

    2007-01-01

    We report on the development of an innovative CdTe detector plane (DPIX) optimized for the detection and localization of gamma-ray bursts in the X-ray band (below 100 keV). DPIX is part of an R&D program funded by the French Space Agency (CNES). DPIX builds upon the heritage of the ISGRI instrument, currently operating with great success on the ESA INTEGRAL mission. DPIX is an assembly of 200 elementary modules (XRDPIX) equipped with 32 CdTe Schottky detectors (4x4 mm2, 1 mm thickness) produced by ACRORAD Co. LTD. in Japan. These detectors offer good energy response up to 100 keV. Each XRDPIX is readout by the very low noise front-end electronics chip IDeF-X, currently under development at CEA/DSM/DAPNIA. In this paper, we describe the design of XRDPIX, the main features of the IDeF-X chip, and will present preliminary results of the reading out of one CdTe Schottky detector by the IDeF-X V1.0 chip. A low-energy threshold around 2.7 keV has been measured. This is to be compared with the 12-15 keV threshol...

  19. Design and Fabrication of Detector Module for UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger Telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, A.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, K. -B.;

    2011-01-01

    The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) pathfinder is a space mission devoted to the measurement of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), especially their early light curves which will give crucial information on the progenitor stars and central engines of the GRBs. It consists of two instruments: the UFFO Bu...

  20. Monitoring Radiation Damage in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Schorlemmer, André Lukas; Große-Knetter, Jörn; Rembser, Christoph; Di Girolamo, Beniamino

    2014-11-05

    Radiation hardness is one of the most important features of the ATLAS pixel detector in order to ensure a good performance and a long lifetime. Monitoring of radiation damage is crucial in order to assess and predict the expected performance of the detector. Key values for the assessment of radiation damage in silicon, such as the depletion voltage and depletion depth in the sensors, are measured on a regular basis during operations. This thesis summarises the monitoring program that is conducted in order to assess the impact of radiation damage and compares it to model predictions. In addition, the physics performance of the ATLAS detector highly depends on the amount of disabled modules in the ATLAS pixel detector. A worrying amount of module failures was observed during run I. Thus it was decided to recover repairable modules during the long shutdown (LS1) by extracting the pixel detector. The impact of the module repairs and module failures on the detector performance is analysed in this thesis.

  1. TRTViewer: The ATLAS TRT detector monitoring and diagnosticstool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, S. Yu.; Atlas Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The transition radiation tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS inner detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It is designed to combine the drift tube tracker with the transition radiation detector, providing an important contribution to the charged particles precise momentum measurement and particle (mainly electron) identification. The TRT consists of a barrel section at small pseudorapidity (η) and two separate end-cap partitions at large η. The detector performance and its operational conditions were permanently monitored during all commissioning and data-taking stages using various software tools, one of which - TRTViewer - is described in the present paper. The TRTViewer is the dedicated program for monitoring the TRT raw data quality and detector performance at different hardware levels: individual straws, readout chips and electronic boards. The data analysis results can be presented on the event-by-event basis or in the form of color maps representing the operation parameters (efficiencies, timing, occupancy, etc.) according to the real geometrical position of the detector hardware elements. The paper describes the TRTViewer software package as the event displaying tool, raw data processor and histogram and operation parameters presenter, which works with the different sources of input information: raw data files, online monitoring histograms, offline analysis histograms and TRT DAQ Configuration database. The package proved to be one of the main instruments for the fast and effective TRT diagnostics during debugging and operation periods.

  2. Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) Observed with the Fermi-Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor: The First Hundred TGFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, G J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.

    2010-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi) is now detecting 2.1 TGFs per week. At this rate, nearly a hundred TGFs will have been detected by the time of this Meeting. This rate has increased by a factor of 8 since new flight software was uploaded to the spacecraft in November 2009 in order to increase the sensitivity of GBM to TGFs. The high time resolution (2 microseconds) allows temporal features to be resolved so that some insight may be gained on the origin and transport of the gamma-ray photons through the atmosphere. The absolute time of the TGFs, known to several microseconds, also allows accurate correlations of TGFs with lightning networks and other lightning-related phenomena. The thick bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM system have observed photon energies from TGFs at energies above 40 MeV. New results on the some temporal aspects of TGFs will be presented.

  3. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) Observed with the Fermi-Gamma-ray Burst Monitor: Temporal and Spectral Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, G. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, W.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Bhat, P. N.

    2010-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi) was detecting 2.1 TGFs per week. This rate has increased by a factor of 8 since new flight software was uploaded to the spacecraft in November 2009 in order to increase the sensitivity of GBM to TGFs. Further upgrades to Fermi-GBM to allow observations of weaker TGFs are in progress. The high time resolution (2 s) allows temporal features to be resolved so that some insight may be gained on the origin and transport of the gamma-ray photons through the atmosphere. The absolute time of the TGFs, known to several microseconds, also allows accurate correlations of TGFs with lightning networks and other lightning-related phenomena. The thick bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM system have observed photon energies from TGFs at energies above 40 MeV. New results on the some temporal aspects of TGFs will be presented along with spectral characteristics and properties of several electron-positron TGF events that have been identified.

  4. Pulse properties of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Suzanne; Briggs, Michael S; Connaughton, Valerie; Tierney, David; McBreen, Sheila; Dwyer, Joseph; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Bhat, P Narayana; Byrne, David; Cramer, Eric; Fishman, Gerald J; Xiong, Shaolin; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R Marc; Meegan, Charles A; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D; von Kienlin, Andreas; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has triggered on over 300 terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) since its launch in June 2008. With 14 detectors, GBM collects on average ~100 counts per triggered TGF, enabling unprecedented studies of the time profiles of TGFs. Here we present the first rigorous analysis of the temporal properties of a large sample of TGFs (278), including the distributions of the rise and fall times of the individual pulses and their durations. A variety of time profiles are observed with 19 of TGFs having multiple pulses separated in time and 31 clear cases of partially overlapping pulses. The effect of instrumental dead time and pulse pileup on the temporal properties are also presented. As the observed gamma ray pulse structure is representative of the electron flux at the source, TGF pulse parameters are critical to distinguish between relativistic feedback discharge and lightning leader models. We show that at least 67% of TGFs at satellite ...

  5. Monitoring neutrons from spent reactor fuel by bubble detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, N C; Lakosi, L

    1999-01-01

    In order to eliminate the strong temperature-dependence of bubble detectors used for spent fuel assay, a simple way could be to keep them in the water pond but far from fuel assemblies before exposure for about 20 min, until the detectors warm up. Fast neutrons from fuel assemblies in the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, Hungary, were detected by BD-100R type detectors at 28 deg. C (in winter) and at 35 deg. C in summer). Calibration was performed by a standard sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source in borated water. Burnup monitoring inside fuel assemblies can be provided by smaller diameter detectors prepared from BD-100R type ones.

  6. Monitoring of absolute mirror alignment at COMPASS RICH-1 detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, M. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of East Piemonte, Alessandria (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Birsa, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Chiosso, M. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciliberti, P. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Dalla Torre, S. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Denisov, O. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Duic, V. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Ferrero, A. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Finger, M.; Finger, M. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Gayde, J.Ch. [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland); Giorgi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Maggiora, A. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Martin, A. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Menon, G. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Panzieri, D. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of East Piemonte, Alessandria (Italy); and others

    2014-12-01

    The gaseous COMPASS RICH-1 detector uses two spherical mirror surfaces, segmented into 116 individual mirrors, to focus the Cherenkov photons onto the detector plane. Any mirror misalignment directly affects the detector resolution. The on-line Continuous Line Alignment and Monitoring (CLAM) photogrammetry-based method has been implemented to measure the alignment of individual mirrors which can be characterized by the center of curvature. The mirror wall reflects a regular grid of retroreflective strips placed inside the detector vessel. Then, the position of each mirror is determined from the image of the grid reflection. The images are collected by four cameras. Any small mirror misalignment results in changes of the grid lines’ positions in the image. The accuracy limits of the CLAM method were checked by laser interferometry and are below 0.1 mrad.

  7. The First Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Zhang, Binbin; Bhat, Narayana; Fishman, Gerald; Roberts, Oliver; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Shelia; Grove, Eric; Chekhtman, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We present summary results from the first catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Space Telescope. The catalog reports parameters for over 2700 TGFs. Since the launch of Fermi in 2008 the TGF detection sensitivity of GBM has been improved several times, both in the flight software and in ground analysis. Starting in 2010 July individual photons were downloaded for portions of the orbits, enabling an off-line search that found weaker and shorter TGFs. Since 2012 November 26 this telemetry mode has been extended to continuous coverage. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs).

  8. Prospects of the search for neutrino bursts from Supernovae with Baksan Large Volume Scintillation Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Petkov, V B

    2015-01-01

    Observing a high-statistics neutrino signal from the supernova explosions in the Galaxy is a major goal of low-energy neutrino astronomy. The prospects for detecting all flavors of neutrinos and antineutrinos from the core-collapse supernova (ccSN) in operating and forthcoming large liquid scintillation detectors (LLSD) are widely discussed now. One of proposed LLSD is Baksan Large Volume Scintillation Detector (BLVSD). This detector will be installed at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory (BNO) of the Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, at a depth of 4800 m.w.e. Low-energy neutrino astronomy is one of the main lines of research of the BLVSD.

  9. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of the 3 Brightest and Hardest Short Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with the FGST Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Guiriec, Sylvain; Connaugthon, Valerie; Kara, Erin; Daigne, Frederic; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; van der Horst, Alexander J; Paciesas, William; Meegan, Charles A; Bhat, P N; Foley, Suzanne; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2010-01-01

    From July 2008 to October 2009, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST) has detected 320 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). About 20% of these events are classified as short based on their T90 duration below 2 s. We present here for the first time time-resolved spectroscopy at timescales as short as 2 ms for the three brightest short GRBs observed with GBM. The time-integrated spectra of the events deviate from the Band function, indicating the existence of an additional spectral component, which can be fit by a power-law with index ~-1.5. The time-integrated Epeak values exceed 2 MeV for two of the bursts, and are well above the values observed in the brightest long GRBs. Their Epeak values and their low-energy power-law indices ({\\alpha}) confirm that short GRBs are harder than long ones. We find that short GRBs are very similar to long ones, but with light curves contracted in time and with harder spectra stretched towards higher energies. In our time-resolved spectrosco...

  10. Non-linearity correction of Schottky diode THz detector system using CSR burst from storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We show a practical method to calibrate non-linearity of Schottky diode detector for the short-pulsed THz radiation from the electron storage ring. A frequency distribution of pulse area was measured at three distances of the detector from the radiation source. Non-linearity correction function was obtained by a condition that the three distribution should be the same with non-linearity correction and reduction factor by the distance. (author)

  11. Improved limits on sterile neutrino dark matter using full-sky Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.C.Y. Ng; S. Horiuchi; J.M. Gaskins; M. Smith; R. Preece

    2015-01-01

    A sterile neutrino of similar to keV mass is a well-motivated dark matter candidate. Its decay generates an x-ray line that offers a unique target for x-ray telescopes. For the first time, we use the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to search for sterile neut

  12. The LUCID detector ATLAS luminosity monitor and its electronic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghi, F. Lasagni

    2016-07-01

    In 2015 LHC is starting a new run, at higher center of mass energy (13 TeV) and with 25 ns bunch-spacing. The ATLAS luminosity monitor LUCID has been completely rebuilt, both the detector and the electronics, in order to cope with the new running conditions. The new detector electronics features a new read-out board (LUCROD) for signal acquisition and digitization, PMT-charge integration and single-side luminosity measurements, and a revisited LUMAT board for combination of signals from the two detectors. This note describes the new board design, the firmware and software developments, the implementation of luminosity algorithms, the optical communication between boards and the integration into the ATLAS TDAQ system.

  13. A search for neutrino and gamma ray burst temporal correlations with the IMB detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are associated with a stellar collapse-like phenomenon then it is resonable to expect neutrino production to occur at the source. We have performed a temporal correlation analysis with GRBs using the IMB low-energy neutrino dataset during 809 days of livetime between 1986 and 1990. No correlations were observed placing a 90%. C.L. limit of 0.046 ν interactions per GRB. The dependence of the GRB distances to neutrino yield using volume and shell distribution models is discussed. Lower limits are derived which exclude galactic stellar collapse-like models

  14. Comparison of scintillation and gas filled detectors for contamination monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are now for radioactive contamination monitoring not only instruments with gas filled detectors but also devices with scintillation detectors in use. These detection techniques have significant physical differences and utilize hardware with specific properties. Therefore there are special advantages and drawbacks for the user and the application. A scintillator is usually a rugged component with a relatively low weight and high detection efficiency. The technical problems with scintillators are mainly in effective and uniform light detection. Gas filled detectors have good uniformities in detection efficiencies. Their main disadvantages are the gas supply and thin entrance windows. These foils can easily be damaged resulting in gas leakage. For both types of instruments efficiencies, typical background levels, position dependent responses and minimum detectable activities for a wide range of radionuclides are summarized and discussed. Also other handling features, like for instance weight, temperature ranges and aspects of service and maintenance are discussed. In addition to the presented data characterizing the different types of contamination monitors it is also important to think about service and maintenance. In general gas filled detectors could more easily be destroyed than scintillators. On an average this generates more problems and also higher repair cost. This is certainly one of the reasons that made scintillators in contamination monitoring so popular. Scintillation detection has been proven to be a reliable and competitive technology for contamination monitoring. The efficiencies and detection limits are in general superior to comparable gas filled detectors. This is also true for many nuclear medicine nuclides with photon emitters. Simultaneous and separate measurement of alpha- and beta-gamma radiation can easily be achieved by pulse analysis. The overall weight of a scintillation based instrument can be substantially lower than the weight of

  15. 4H-SiC detectors for ultraviolet light monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzillo, M.; Sciuto, A.; Badalà, P.; Carbone, B.; Russo, A.; Coffa, S.

    2015-02-01

    Silicon Carbide (SiC) provides the unique property of near-perfect visible blindness and very high signal-to-noise ratio due to the high quantum efficiency and low dark current even at high temperature. These features make SiC the best available material for the manufacturing of visible blind semiconductor ultraviolet (UV) light detectors. Thanks to their properties, SiC detectors have been extensively used in fact for flame detection monitoring, UV sterilization and astronomy. Here we report on the electrical and optical performance of patterned thin metal film NiSi/4H-SiC vertical Schottky photodiodes with different semiconductor exposed area suitably designed for UV light monitoring.

  16. Precision of MPX detectors as LHC luminosity monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sopczak, Andre; Ali, Babar; Benes, Petr; Bergmann, Benedikt; Biskup, Bartolomej; Caforio, Davide; Heijne, Erik; Pospisil, Stanislav; Seifert, Frank; Solc, Jaroslav; Suk, Michal; Turecek, Daniel; Vykydal, Zdenek [IEAP CTU in Prague (Czech Republic); Asbah, Nedaa; Leroy, Claude; Soueid, Paul [University of Montreal (Canada); Campbell, Michael; Nessi, Marzio [CERN (Switzerland); Kladiva, Edward [IEP SAS Kosice (Slovakia)

    2015-07-01

    A network consisting of MPX detectors based on Medipix2 silicon pixel devices were originally adapted for measuring the composition and spectral characteristics of the radiation field in the ATLAS experiment and its surroundings. We demonstrate that the MPX network, which consists of 16 MPX detectors, is a self-contained luminosity monitor system. As the MPX detectors are collecting data independently of the ATLAS data-recording chain, they provide independent measurements of the bunch-integrated ATLAS/LHC luminosity. In particular, the MPX detectors close enough to the primary interaction point are used to perform van der Meer calibration scans with good precision. Results from the luminosity monitoring are presented for 2012 data taken at √(s)=8 TeV proton-proton collisions. The characteristics of the LHC luminosity reduction are studied and the effects of beam-beam (burn-off) and beam-gas (single bunch) interactions are evaluated. The variations of the MPX luminosity measurements around the fitted curve lead to a relative uncertainty on the luminosity measurement below 0.3% for one minute time intervals.

  17. Nuclear Reactor Safeguards and Monitoring with Antineutrino Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstein, Adam; Wang, Yifang; Gratta, Giorgio; West, Todd

    2001-01-01

    Cubic-meter-sized antineutrino detectors can be used to non-intrusively, robustly and automatically monitor and safeguard a wide variety of nuclear reactor types, including power reactors, research reactors, and plutonium production reactors. Since the antineutrino spectra and relative yields of fissioning isotopes depend on the isotopic composition of the core, changes in composition can be observed without ever directly accessing the core itself. Information from a modest-sized antineutrino...

  18. The remote monitoring system of BESⅢ detector based on web

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It designed a remote monitoring system of BESⅢ experiment based on web. The software of the system is mainly based on module programming. The Ajax technology and the MVC pattern is used in system framework construction. The function of selecting multiple tables is realized by structural checkbox tree using jstree library. Data chart is plotted by High Charts library. The updating of data curve is realized by the method of calculating the time span between the real data record to measure the http request. The system design can be used by detector monitoring system like BESⅢ. (authors)

  19. GM detector based contamination monitor for screening of TLD badges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At present individual monitoring in India is carried out using the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre made thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) used as chest and wrist badge. The Bhabha Atomic Research Centre TLD badge consisting of CaSO4:Dy Teflon TLD discs (13.3 mm dia x 0.8 mm thickness) mechanically clipped over three symmetrical circular holes each of diameter 12 mm on a nickel plated aluminium plate (52.5 mm x 29.9 mm x 1 mm), a thin paper wrapper (with user information printed on it). To protect the TLD discs from dust, water, oil etc. the card along with its wrapper is sealed in a thin plastic (polythene) pouch which also protects the card from contamination by chemicals or radioactive materials. Normally the collected TLD cards are checked for any radioactive contamination using contamination monitor before the readout. This paper presents a microcontroller based contamination monitor developed using a pair of large area pancake type GM detector for screening of TLD badges prior to their readout in the TLD badge reader. The GM detector pair simultaneously monitors the possible contamination on both sides of the TLD personnel monitoring badge

  20. Geiger Muller (GM) detector as online monitor: an experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring the inadvertent release of radioactivity into otherwise inactive liquid streams is a common requirement in nuclear industry. In addition to conventional off-line sampling and measurement methods, nuclear facilities usually uses online methods to get real-time detection of activity contents in process cooling water lines and steam condensate lines. Due to its simplicity, ruggedness and cost effectiveness, Geiger Muller counter is obviously the first choice for online application. Though GM based monitors for such online application were in industrial use for a long time, practical data on the response of the detector with respect low level activities in the effluents is scarce in literature. This work was carried out to fill this information gap. The data generated in these experiments may be useful in giving a realistic interpretation of the response of the existing monitors and setting up their alarm limits

  1. A passive monitor for radon using electrochemical track etch detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A passive monitor for radon and its decay products based on the electrochemical etching (ECE) of α-particle tracks on Makrofol is described. The monitor has been constructed in such a way that radon and radon daughters attached to aerosols can easily pass through a chamber while dust, heavy particles and water droplets are collected outside. The decay products are accumulated on the bottom of the chamber and a Makrofol detector foil is fixed on the top to register alpha particles. The ECE condition was maintained to detect alpha particles coming mainly from radon daughters trapped on the bottom of the chamber. The response of the monitor was determined at different exposure conditions and compared with those of some active techniques such as working level meters. The merits of this system are low cost, good sensitivity, portability and reliable, unattended operation. (author)

  2. TRTViewer: the ATLAS TRT detector monitoring and diagnostics tool.

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnov, S Yu; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-walled drift tubes (straws), providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 130 um resolution for charged particle tracks. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws, thus enabling the detector to separate electrons from pions over the energy range between 1 and 200 GeV. The TRT performance and its operation conditions have been permanently monitored during all commissioning and data-taking periods using various software tools, one of which - TRTViewer - is described in the present paper. The TRTViewer is the dedicated program for monitoring the TRT raw data quality and detector performance at different hard...

  3. Proton-Electron Discrimination Detector (PEDD) for space weather monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Chad M.; Johnson, Erik B.; Chen, Xiao Jie; Stapels, Christopher; Vogel, Sam; Christian, James

    2015-09-01

    Electronics used for space applications (e.g. communication satellites) are susceptible to space weather, primarily consisting of electrons and protons. As more critical equipment is used in space, a comprehensive monitoring network is needed to mitigate risks associated with radiation damage. Compact detectors suited for this requirement have been too complicated or do not provide sufficient information. As the damage from electrons (e.g. total ionizing dose effects) is significantly different compared to protons (e.g. displacement damage effects), monitors that can provide unique measurements of the dose and/or spectral information for electrons and protons separately are necessary for mission assessment to determine strategies for maintaining function. Previously, we demonstrated that the Proton-Electron Discrimination Detector (PEDD) is space-compatible and can discriminate fast electrons from protons using a diphenylanthrecene (DPA) scintillator coupled to a CMOS silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). The SiPM has a temperature dependence, and a circuit has been developed to provide a stable response as a function of temperature. The PEDD detector is scheduled to participate on the RHEME experiment to be flown on the ISS, scheduled for launch in 2016.

  4. Instruments for calibration and monitoring of the LHCb Muon Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Deplano, C; Lai, A

    2006-01-01

    The subject of this Ph. D. thesis is the study and the development of the instruments needed to monitor and calibrate the Muon Detector of the LHCb (Large Hadron Collider beauty) experiment. LHCb is currently under installation at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and will start to take data during 2007. The experiment will study B mesons decays to achieve a profound understanding of favour physics in the Standard Model framework and to search signs of new physics beyond. Muons can be found in the final states of many B-decays which are sensitive to CP violation. The Muon Detector has the crucial role to identify the muon particles generated by the b-hadron decays through a measurement of their transverse momentum, already at the first trigger level (Level-0). A 95% effciency in events selection is required for the Muon Trigger, which operates at the Level-0. 1380 detectors are used to equip the whole Muon System and the corresponding 122,112 readout channels must be time aligned and monitored with a resol...

  5. Characterization of the Relationship between Intracranial Pressure and Electroencephalographic Monitoring in Burst Suppressed Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Mark; Vespa, Paul; Pouratian, Nader; Gonzalez, Nestor R.; Hu, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize the relationship between ICP and EEG Methods Simultaneous ICP and EEG data were obtained from burst-suppressed patients and segmented by EEG bursts. Segments were categorized as increasing/decreasing and peak/valley to investigate relationship between ICP changes and EEG burst duration. A generalized ICP response was obtained by averaging all segments time-aligned at burst onsets. A vasodilatation index (VDI) was derived from the ICP pulse waveform and calculated on a sliding interval to investigate cerebrovascular changes post-burst. Results Data from two patients contained 309 bursts. 246 ICP segments initially increased, of which 154 peaked. 63 ICP segments decreased, and zero reached a valley. The change in ICP (0.54±0.85mmHg) was significantly correlated with the burst duration (pVDI for increasing segments was significantly elevated (median 0.56, IQR 0.31, p<0.001) and correlated with burst duration (p<0.001). Conclusions Changes in the ICP and pulse-waveform shape after EEG burst suggest that these signals can be related within the context of neurovascular coupling. Significance Existence of a physiological relationship between ICP and EEG may allow the study of neurovascular coupling in acute brain injury patients. PMID:25142827

  6. Use of radiation detectors in remote monitoring for containment and surveillance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupree, S.A.; Ross, M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bonino, A. [Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Lucero, R.; Hasimoto, Yu [PNC Oarai Engineering Center, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Radiation detectors have been included in several remote monitoring field trial systems to date. The present study considers detectors at Embalse, Argentina, and Oarai, Japan. At Embalse four gamma detectors have been operating in the instrumentation tubes of spent fuel storage silos for up to three years. Except for minor fluctuations, three of the detectors have operated normally. One of the detectors appears never to have operated correctly. At Oarai two gamma detectors have been monitoring a spent-fuel transfer hatch for over 18 months. These detectors have operated normally throughout the period, although one shows occasional noise spikes.

  7. Monitoring Nuclear Reactors with Antineutrino Detectors: The ANGRA Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactors are intense source of antineutrinos and the thermal power released in the fission process is directly related to the emitted antineutrino flux. As antineutrinos interact very weekly with matter and escape the reactor containment without any significant change in their number, measuring the antineutrino flux can give quasi real time information on the reactor status (on/off) and thermal power. Furthermore as the amount of fissile elements change during the burn up of the nuclear fuel and each fissile isotope has a characteristic antineutrino energy spectrum, measuring the antineutrino energy spectrum escaping the reactor can give also information on the composition of the nuclear fuel. These unique features make antineutrino detectors good candidates to become in the near future a new safeguards tool for monitoring nuclear reactors through counting rates and spectral antineutrino measurements. We will present the status of the ANGRA Neutrinos project, aimed at developing an antineutrino detector for monitoring nuclear reactor activity. The Angra experiment will be deployed at the Brazilian nuclear power plant Angra II. A water Cherenkov detector of one ton target will be placed in a commercial container just outside the reactor containment, about 30 m of the reactor core. The 4 GW thermal power of the Angra II reactor will provide a few thousand antineutrino inverse beta decay interactions per day. The main challenge of the experiment will be to overcome the very high cosmic ray induced background at sea level, consisting mainly of muons, neutrons, gammas and electrons. We have estimated a muon flux of the order of 350 Hz and a neutron flux of about 4 Hz (left after the polyethylene shielding) in the target region. To overcome the background the detector will consist of three subsystems: 1) a muon veto 99% efficient placed in the outer most detector layer; 2) a neutron shield 30cm thick consisting of polyethylene sheets; 3) a central detector

  8. Quasi -Periodic Pulsations in Solar Flares: new clues from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, D; Bissaldi, E; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Greiner, J; van der Horst, A J; Kanbach, G; Rau, A; Bhat, P N; Diehl, R; von Kienlin, A; Kippen, R M; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Wilson-Hodge, C

    2011-01-01

    In the last four decades it has been observed that solar flares show quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) from the lowest, i.e. radio, to the highest, i.e. gamma-ray, part of the electromagnetic spectrum. To this day, it is still unclear which mechanism creates such QPPs. In this paper, we analyze four bright solar flares which show compelling signatures of quasi-periodic behavior and were observed with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (\\gbm) onboard the Fermi satellite. Because GBM covers over 3 decades in energy (8 keV to 40 MeV) it can be a key instrument to understand the physical processes which drive solar flares. We tested for periodicity in the time series of the solar flares observed by GBM by applying a classical periodogram analysis. However, contrary to previous authors, we did not detrend the raw light curve before creating the power spectral density spectrum (PSD). To assess the significance of the frequencies we made use of a method which is commonly applied for X-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. This...

  9. ALFABURST: A realtime fast radio burst monitor for the Arecibo telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth; MacMahon, David; Armour, Wes; Cobb, Jeff; Lorimer, Duncan; Rajwade, Kaustubh; Siemion, Andrew; Werthimer, Dan; Williams, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) constitute an emerging class of fast radio transient whose origin continues to be a mystery. Realizing the importance of increasing coverage of the search parameter space, we have designed, built, and deployed a realtime monitor for FRBs at the 305-m Arecibo radio telescope. Named 'ALFABURST', it is a commensal instrument that is triggered whenever the 1.4 GHz seven-beam Arecibo $L$-Band Feed Array (ALFA) receiver commences operation. The ongoing commensal survey we are conducting using ALFABURST has an instantaneous field of view of 0.02 sq. deg. within the FWHM of the beams, with the realtime software configurable to use up to 300 MHz of bandwidth. We search for FRBs with dispersion measure up to 2560 cm$^{-3}$ pc and pulse widths ranging from 0.128 ms to 16.384 ms. Commissioning observations performed over the past few months have demonstrated the capability of the instrument in detecting single pulses from known pulsars. In this paper, I describe the instrument and the associated ...

  10. The ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor : Luminosity Detector on the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Schaefer, Douglas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    After the first three years of the LHC running the ATLAS experiment extracted it's pixel detector system to refurbish and re-position the optical readout drivers and install a new barrel layer of pixels. The experiment has also taken advantage of this access to also install a set of beam monitoring telescopes with pixel sensors, four each in the forward and backward regions. These telescopes were assembled based on chemical vapour deposited (CVD) diamond sensors to survive in this high radiation environment without needing extensive cooling. This talk will describe the lessons learned in construction and commissioning of the ATLAS x Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). We will show results from the construction quality assurance tests, commissioning performance, including results from cosmic ray running in early 2015 and also expected first results from LHC run 2 collisions.

  11. The ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor: Luminosity detector at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    After the first three years of the LHC running, the ATLAS experiment extracted its pixel detector system to refurbish and re-position the optical readout drivers and install a new barrel layer of pixels. The experiment has also taken advantage of this access to install a set of beam monitoring telescopes with pixel sensors, four each in the forward and backward regions. These telescopes are based on chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond sensors to survive in this high radiation environment without needing extensive cooling. This paper describes the lessons learned in construction and commissioning of the ATLAS Diamond Beam Monitor (DBM). We show results from the construction quality assurance tests and commissioning performance, including results from cosmic ray running in early 2015.

  12. Silicon detectors for the n-TOF neutron beams monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Cosentino, L; Barbagallo, M; Colonna, N; Damone, L; Pappalardo, A; Piscopo, M; Finocchiaro, P

    2015-01-01

    During 2014 the second experimental area EAR2 was completed at the n-TOF neutron beam facility at CERN. As the neutrons are produced via spallation, by means of a high-intensity 20 GeV pulsed proton beam impinging on a thick target, the resulting neutron beam covers an enormous energy range, from thermal to several GeV. In this paper we describe two beam diagnostic devices, designed and built at INFN-LNS, both exploiting silicon detectors coupled with neutron converter foils containing 6Li. The first one is based on four silicon pads and allows to monitor the neutron beam flux as a function of the neutron energy. The second one, based on position sensitive silicon detectors, is intended for the reconstruction of the beam profile, again as a function of the neutron energy. Several electronic setups have been explored in order to overcome the issues related to the gamma flash, namely a huge pulse present at the start of each neutron bunch which may blind the detectors for some time. The two devices have been ch...

  13. Radiation Tolerance of Cryogenic Beam Loss Monitor Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kurfuerst, C; Bartosik, M; Dehning, B; Eisel, T; Sapinski, M; Eremin, V; Verbitskaya, E; Fabjan, C; Griesmayer, E

    2013-01-01

    At the triplet magnets, close to the interaction regions of the LHC, the current Beam Loss Monitoring system is sensitive to the particle showers resulting from the collision of the two beams. For the future, with beams of higher energy and intensity resulting in higher luminosity, distinguishing between these interaction products and possible quench-provoking beam losses from the primary proton beams will be challenging. Investigations are therefore underway to optimise the system by locating the beam loss detectors as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. This means putting detectors inside the cold mass in superfluid helium at 1.9 K. Previous tests have shown that solid state diamond and silicon detectors as well as liquid helium ionisation chambers are promising candidates. This paper will address the final open question of their radiation resistance for 20 years of nominal LHC operation, by reporting on the results from high irradiation beam tests carried out at CERN in a...

  14. The HUS solar flare and cosmic gamma-ray burst detector aboard the Ulysses spacecraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the instruments and of the scientific objectives of the Ulysses spacecraft is given. The experiment consists of two detectors: Two Si sensors operating in the range 5-20 keV, and two CsI (Tl) scintillators for the range 15-200 keV. The bit rate of the HUS experiment in the Ulysses telemetry is 40 bits/seconds and the time resolution is up to 4 s for the Si sensors and up to 8 ms for the scintillators. The total mass is 2.02 kg. The scientific objectives of the Ulysses mission are investigations on the physics of solar flares, such as their impulsive energy release, the heating and particle acceleration, the storage and the energy transport. The experiment will take place during the next solar maximum of 1991. (orig./HM)

  15. Comparison of filters for gravitational wave burst detection by interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last few years, several filters have been developed for the detection of short gravitational waves. In this presentation we give the main results of a comparison of time domain filters using simulated noise data. This benchmark focused on three points: the filter efficiency versus the false alarm rate for different families of signals, the accuracy of the signal arrival time estimation and the robustness of the filters to a non-perfect whitening procedure of the detector noise. It has been shown that it is mandatory to use a battery of filters because their performance depends on the signal. Concerning the timing accuracy, one can expect a precision much smaller than 1 ms even for low signal-to-noise-ratio signals as long as the waveforms exhibit a well defined peak. Finally, we have determined the requirements on the data whitening procedure which are needed to be able to predict the false alarm rate

  16. Comparison of filters for gravitational wave burst detection by interferometric detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizouard, M.-A.; Arnaud, N.; Barsuglia, M.; Brisson, V.; Cavalier, F.; Davier, M.; Hello, P.; Kreckelbergh, S.; Porter, E. K.; Pradier, T.

    2003-09-01

    During the last few years, several filters have been developed for the detection of short gravitational waves. In this presentation we give the main results of a comparison of time domain filters using simulated noise data. This benchmark focused on three points: the filter efficiency versus the false alarm rate for different families of signals, the accuracy of the signal arrival time estimation and the robustness of the filters to a non-perfect whitening procedure of the detector noise. It has been shown that it is mandatory to use a battery of filters because their performance depends on the signal. Concerning the timing accuracy, one can expect a precision much smaller than 1 ms even for low signal-to-noise-ratio signals as long as the waveforms exhibit a well defined peak. Finally, we have determined the requirements on the data whitening procedure which are needed to be able to predict the false alarm rate.

  17. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy......, trapped particle streams. These background events may simulate the count rate increases characteristic of cosmic gamma bursts. For 12 of the detected events, their true cosmic nature have been confirmed through consistent localizations of the burst sources based on several independent WATCH data sets. The...... derived positions of the bursts are reported. Additionally, most of the events have been confirmed by coincident detections with instruments on other spacecrafts. The features of two of the bursts and the results of searches for related events in the optical are described....

  18. Radioactivity Portal Monitor: An actual application and its unconventional detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Radioactivity Portal Monitor is an instrument designed to be used at traffic check points to detect the presence of ionizing radiation in goods, vehicles, people, in critical places such as those at border road crossing, airports and seaports, the entrance at nuclear facilities etc. and alert the officer to the presence of radioactive and nuclear material. We have developed and built, and is in operation a Radioactivity Portal Monitor for gamma radiation. The detector and the associated electronics does not follow a conventional design concept and is based on a pressurized ionization chamber with a very large sensitive volume (60 liters) and a very large length (2 meters), and a very low level DC electronics (fAmp). The System is simple, and its operational characteristics are excellent. The reference radiation level is the background radiation, which is continuously measured, and compared with the radiation level measured when a subject (vehicle, person, good) goes trough the Monitor. The system automatically takes a decision, and alert the officer with an alarm signal if the detected radiation level is larger than the reference (dynamical) level. We will describe the designed system and some of its characterization results will be shown (author)

  19. Multilayer Scintillation Detector for Nuclear Physics Monitoring of Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batischev, A. G.; Aleksandrin, S. Yu.; Gurov, Yu. B.; Koldashov, S. V.; Lapushkin, S. V.; Mayorov, A. G.

    The physical characteristics of the multilayer scintillation spectrometer (MSS) for identification and energy measurement of cosmic electrons, positrons and nuclei are considered in this paper. This spectrometer is made on the basis of several plastic scintillator plates with various thick viewed by photomultipliers. Two upper layers are strips of orthogonal scintillators. The nuclei energy measurement range is 3 - 100 MeV/nucleon. Spectrometer is planning for space weather monitoring and investigation of solar-magnetospheric and geophysics effects on satellite. MSS time resolution is about 1 microsecond and it can measure the time profiles of fast processes in the Earth's magnetosphere. Spectrometer experimental characteristics were estimated by means of computer simulation. The ionization loss fluctuations, ion charge exchange during pass through detector and, especially, scintillation quenching effect (Bircs effect) were taken into account in calculations.

  20. Nuclear Reactor Monitoring With an Above Ground Antineutrino Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classen, Timothy

    2011-04-01

    Technology to detect νe 's emitted from nuclear reactors has existed for more than 50 years. This technology has been used in a range of experiments probing the neutrino parameter space. A continuing effort has been made at LLNL to test whether this technology may be used for a more practical purpose, the monitoring of nuclear reactors with a focus on safeguarding dangerous nuclear materials. As part of this role a new detector is being developed for deployment above ground at the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station in New Brunswick Canada. The detector will observe a reactor core through a full start-up phase, to determine how well it can measure changes in nuclear fuel composition. This talk will focus on the challenges of the experiment, and how the techniques of fundamental neutrino research may be used to overcome them. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Effect of burst and recombination models for Monte Carlo transport of interacting carriers in a-Se x-ray detectors on Swank noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The authors describe the modification to a previously developed Monte Carlo model of semiconductor direct x-ray detector required for studying the effect of burst and recombination algorithms on detector performance. This work provides insight into the effect of different charge generation models for a-Se detectors on Swank noise and recombination fraction. Methods: The proposed burst and recombination models are implemented in the Monte Carlo simulation package, ARTEMIS, developed byFang et al. [“Spatiotemporal Monte Carlo transport methods in x-ray semiconductor detectors: Application to pulse-height spectroscopy in a-Se,” Med. Phys. 39(1), 308–319 (2012)]. The burst model generates a cloud of electron-hole pairs based on electron velocity, energy deposition, and material parameters distributed within a spherical uniform volume (SUV) or on a spherical surface area (SSA). A simple first-hit (FH) and a more detailed but computationally expensive nearest-neighbor (NN) recombination algorithms are also described and compared. Results: Simulated recombination fractions for a single electron-hole pair show good agreement with Onsager model for a wide range of electric field, thermalization distance, and temperature. The recombination fraction and Swank noise exhibit a dependence on the burst model for generation of many electron-hole pairs from a single x ray. The Swank noise decreased for the SSA compared to the SUV model at 4 V/μm, while the recombination fraction decreased for SSA compared to the SUV model at 30 V/μm. The NN and FH recombination results were comparable. Conclusions: Results obtained with the ARTEMIS Monte Carlo transport model incorporating drift and diffusion are validated with the Onsager model for a single electron-hole pair as a function of electric field, thermalization distance, and temperature. For x-ray interactions, the authors demonstrate that the choice of burst model can affect the simulation results for the generation

  2. New generation detector for monitoring using remote-controlled ground-based and airborne systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new generation detector for monitoring with the use of remote-controlled ground (UAG, robotic rovers) or aircraft (UAV, drones) means was developed and tested within a security project. The main characteristics of the detector and the results of field tests with the detector placed on unmanned aerial means (drones) are described. (orig.)

  3. Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detection of SGR J1550-5418

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Y; Kouveliotou, C; Granot, J; Ramirez-Ruiz, E

    2010-01-01

    SGR J1550-5418 exhibited three active bursting episodes in 2008 October and in 2009 January and March, emitting hundreds of typical Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in soft gamma-rays. The second episode was especially intense, and our untriggered burst search on Fermi/GBM data (8-1000 keV) revealed ~450 bursts emitted over 24 hours during the peak of this activity. Using the GBM data, we identified a ~150-s-long enhanced persistent emission during 2009 January 22 that exhibited intriguing timing and spectral properties: (i) clear pulsations up to ~110 keV at the spin period of the neutron star, (ii) an additional (to a power-law) blackbody component required for the enhanced emission spectra with kT ~ 17 keV, (iii) pulsed fraction that is strongly energy dependent and highest in the 50-74 keV energy band. A total isotropic-equivalent energy emitted during this enhanced emission is estimated to be 2.9 x 10^{40}(D/5 kpc)^2 erg. The estimated area of the blackbody emitting region of ~0.046(D/5 kpc)^2 km^2 is th...

  4. Magnetar Twists: Fermi/Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detection of SGR 1550-5418

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Y; Kouveliotou, C; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Granot, J; van der Horst, A J; Watts, A L; Finger, M H; Gehrels, N; Pe'er, A; van der Klis, M; von Kienlin, A; Wachter, S; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Woods, P M

    2009-01-01

    SGR 1550-5418 (previously known as AXP 1E 1547.0-5408) went into three active bursting episodes in 2008 October and in 2009 January and March, emitting hundreds of typical Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in soft gamma rays. The second episode was especially intense, and our untriggered burst search on Fermi/GBM data (8-1000 keV) revealed ~450 bursts emitted over 24 hours during the peak of this activity. Using the GBM data, we identified a ~150-s-long enhanced persistent emission during 2009 January 22 that exhibited intriguing timing and spectral properties: (i) clear pulsations up to ~110 keV at the spin period of the neutron star (P ~2.07 s, the fastest of all magnetars), (ii) an additional (to a power-law) blackbody component required for the enhanced emission spectra with kT ~17 keV, (iii) pulsed fraction that is strongly energy dependent and highest in the 50-74 keV energy band. A total isotropic-equivalent energy emitted during this enhanced emission is estimated to be 4.3 x 10^{40} ergs. We conclude ...

  5. Target Mass Monitoring and Instrumentation in the Daya Bay Antineutrino Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Band, Henry R; Greenler, Lee S; Heeger, Karsten M; Hinrichs, Paul; Kang, Li; Lewis, Christine; Li, Shanfeng; Lin, Shengxin; McFarlane, Michael C; Wang, Wei; Webber, David M; Wei, Yadong; Wise, Thomas; Xiao, Qiang; Yang, Li; Zhang, Zhijian

    2012-01-01

    The Daya Bay experiment measures sin^2 2{\\theta}_13 using functionally identical antineutrino detectors located at distances of 300 to 2000 meters from the Daya Bay nuclear power complex. Each detector consists of three nested fluid volumes surrounded by photomultiplier tubes. These volumes are coupled to overflow tanks on top of the detector to allow for thermal expansion of the liquid. Antineutrinos are detected through the inverse beta decay reaction on the proton-rich scintillator target. A precise and continuous measurement of the detector's central target mass is achieved by monitoring the the fluid level in the overflow tanks with cameras and ultrasonic and capacitive sensors. In addition, the monitoring system records detector temperature and levelness at multiple positions. This monitoring information allows the precise determination of the detectors' effective number of target protons during data taking. We present the design, calibration, installation and in-situ tests of the Daya Bay real-time ant...

  6. Gamma Radiation Detectors of the TA-55 Waste Line Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers the gamma detectors, measurement instrumentation, and testing results of a system developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This system monitors the process liquid waste streams at the Plutonium Facility (TA-55) for the presence of radioactive contamination. The detectors are at various points on the acid, caustic, and industrial waste lines. Two of the detectors are on the sanitary sewer lines from the facility. A custom interface unit associated with these two detectors furnishes the facility operation center with a notification of the detection of material. All of the detectors furnish measurement information to a central computer system for storage and trending

  7. SEARCHING FOR NEEDLES IN HAYSTACKS-LOOKING FOR GAMMA-RAY BURST γ-RAYS WITH THE FERMI/LAT DETECTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the launch of the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope on 2008 June 11, 55 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been observed at coordinates that fall within 660 of the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) boresight with precise localizations provided by the NASA Swift mission or other satellites. Imposing selection cuts to exclude low Galactic latitudes and high zenith angles reduces the sample size to 41. Using matched filter techniques, the Fermi/LAT photon data for these fields have been examined for evidence of bursts that have so far evaded detection at energies above 100 MeV. Following comparisons with similar random background fields, two events, GRB 080905A and GRB 091208B, stand out as excellent candidates for such an identification. After excluding the six bright bursts previously reported by the LAT team, the remaining 35 events exhibit an excess of LAT 'diffuse' photons with a statistical significance greater than 2σ, independent of the matched filter analysis. After accounting for the total number of photons in the well-localized fields and including estimates of detection efficiency, one concludes that somewhere in the range of 11%-19% of all GRBs within the LAT field of view illuminate the detector with two or more energetic photons. These are the most stringent estimates of the high-energy photon content of GRBs to date. The two new events associated with high-energy photon emission have similar ratios of high- to low-energy fluences as observed previously. This separates them from bursts with similar low-energy fluences by a factor of 10, suggesting a distinct class of events rather than a smooth continuum.

  8. An automatic monitoring system of leak current for testing TGC detectors based on LabVIEW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automatic monitoring system of leak current for testing TGC detectors with high voltage was set up by using the graphic LabVIEW platform and NI 4351 data acquisition card. The leak current was automatically monitored and recorded with this system, the time and the value of the leak current were showed instantly. Good efficiency and precision of monitoring were obtained. (authors)

  9. Gamma-ray detectors for intelligent, hand-held radiation monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small radiation detectors based on HgI2, bismuth germanate (BGO), plastic, or NaI(Tl) detector materials were evaluated for use in small, lighweight radiation monitors. The two denser materials, HgI2 and BGO, had poor resolution at low-energy and thus performed less well than NaI(Tl) in detecting low-energy gamma rays from bare, enriched uranium. The plastic scintillator, a Compton recoil detector, also performed less well at low gamma-ray energy. Two small NaI(Tl) detectors were suitable for detecting bare uranium and sheilded plutonium. One became part of a new lightweight hand-held monitor and the other found uses as a pole-mounted detector for monitoring hard-to-reach locations

  10. Power monitoring in space nuclear reactors using silicon carbide radiation detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddy, Frank H.; Patel, Jagdish U.; Williams, John G.

    2005-01-01

    Space reactor power monitors based on silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor neutron detectors are proposed. Detection of fast leakage neutrons using SiC detectors in ex-core locations could be used to determine reactor power: Neutron fluxes, gamma-ray dose rates and ambient temperatures have been calculated as a function of distance from the reactor core, and the feasibility of power monitoring with SiC detectors has been evaluated at several ex-core locations. Arrays of SiC diodes can be configured to provide the required count rates to monitor reactor power from startup to full power Due to their resistance to temperature and the effects of neutron and gamma-ray exposure, SiC detectors can be expected to provide power monitoring information for the fill mission of a space reactor.

  11. Micrometric Position Monitoring Using Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors in Silicon Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Basile, E; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Caponero, M A; Colonna, D; Falco, F D; Fabbri, F L; Felli, F; Giardoni, M; La Monaca, A; Massa, F; Mensitieri, G; Ortenzi, B; Pallotta, M; Paolozzi, A; Passamonti, L; Pierluigi, D; Pucci, C; Russo, A; Saviano, G

    2005-01-01

    We show R&D results including long term stability, resolution, radiation hardness and characterization of Fiber Grating sensors used to monitor structure deformation, repositioning and surveying of silicon detector in High Energy Physics.

  12. Test Results on the Silicon Pixel Detector for the TTF-FEL Beam Trajectory Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Hillert, S; Müller, U C; Roth, S; Hansen, K; Holl, P; Karstensen, S; Kemmer, J; Klanner, Robert; Lechner, P; Leenen, M; Ng, J S T; Schmüser, P; Strüder, L

    2001-01-01

    Test measurements on the silicon pixel detector for the beam trajectory monitor at the free electron laser of the TESLA test facility are presented. To determine the electronic noise of detector and read-out and to calibrate the signal amplitude of different pixels the 6 keV photons of the manganese K line are used. Two different methods determine the spatial accuracy of the detector: In one setup a laser beam is focused to a straight line and moved across the pixel structure. In the other the detector is scanned using a low-intensity electron beam of an electron microscope. Both methods show that the symmetry axis of the detector defines a straight line within 0.4 microns. The sensitivity of the detector to low energy X-rays is measured using a vacuum ultraviolet beam at the synchrotron light source HASYLAB. Additionally, the electron microscope is used to study the radiation hardness of the detector.

  13. Monitoring detector performance due to ageing process using spectrum analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron flux measurement using JKT03 CX811-CX841 had been done. The diagnosis using statistical and spectrum energy method resumed that signal from JKT03 CX831 deviate from its original significantly. This deviation may indicate that there is some performance degradation on detector JKT03 CX831. After replacing that detector, neuron flux signal showed a normal pattern of spectrum energy as required. From this condition, it can be concluded that spectrum energy can be used to detect the degradation of detector performance

  14. Fabrication and characterization of polycrystalline diamond detectors for fast neutron monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond detectors have been fabricated using commercially available detector grade polycrystalline CVD substrates for fast neutron measurement in the Indian TBM Experiment at the upcoming ITER facility. Subsequent to fabrication, the detectors were characterized for leakage current and for response to alpha particles from 238+239Pu source. The detectors were observed to have low leakage currents at a field of 1 V µm−1. The stability of the alpha response and improvement in the count rate were achieved by β-irradiation using 90Sr β source. The fast neutron response of the detectors was studied using a D–T fast neutron source in India. The detectors showed linear response in the measured neutron flux of 2.86×105–8.76×106 n cm−2 s−1. The neutron response of detectors of 100 µm and 300 µm thicknesses was compared experimentally to study the neutron response dependence on detector thickness. Experimental results show that the detector of 100 µm thickness has better performance compared to the detector of thickness of 300 µm. The results presented in this paper confirm the suitability of commercially available films from Diamond Materials, GmbH, Germany for detector fabrication for fast neutron monitoring. The details of detector fabrication and results of characterization are presented in this paper

  15. Fabrication and characterization of polycrystalline diamond detectors for fast neutron monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Amit; Singh, Arvind; Kumar, Arvind; Topkar, Anita, E-mail: anitatopkar@gmail.com

    2015-06-11

    Diamond detectors have been fabricated using commercially available detector grade polycrystalline CVD substrates for fast neutron measurement in the Indian TBM Experiment at the upcoming ITER facility. Subsequent to fabrication, the detectors were characterized for leakage current and for response to alpha particles from {sup 238+239}Pu source. The detectors were observed to have low leakage currents at a field of 1 V µm{sup −1}. The stability of the alpha response and improvement in the count rate were achieved by β-irradiation using {sup 90}Sr β source. The fast neutron response of the detectors was studied using a D–T fast neutron source in India. The detectors showed linear response in the measured neutron flux of 2.86×10{sup 5}–8.76×10{sup 6} n cm{sup −2} s{sup −1}. The neutron response of detectors of 100 µm and 300 µm thicknesses was compared experimentally to study the neutron response dependence on detector thickness. Experimental results show that the detector of 100 µm thickness has better performance compared to the detector of thickness of 300 µm. The results presented in this paper confirm the suitability of commercially available films from Diamond Materials, GmbH, Germany for detector fabrication for fast neutron monitoring. The details of detector fabrication and results of characterization are presented in this paper.

  16. Compton scattering in terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected with the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Sheila; Briggs, Michael S; Foley, Suzanne; Tierney, David; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Xiong, Shaolin; Dwyer, Joseph; Fishman, Gerald J; Roberts, Oliver J; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are short intense flashes of gamma rays associated with lightning activity in thunderstorms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) process, theoretical predictions for the temporal and spectral evolution of TGFs are compared to observations made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Assuming a single source altitude of 15 km, a comparison of simulations to data is performed for a range of empirically chosen source electron variation time scales. The data exhibit a clear softening with increased source distance, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The simulated spectra follow this trend in the data, but tend to underestimate the observed hardness. Such a discrepancy may imply that the basic RREA model is not sufficient. Alternatively, a TGF beam that is tilted with respect to the zenith could produce an evolution with source distance that is compatible with the da...

  17. Organic liquid scintillation detector shape and volume impact on radiation portal monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paff, Marc G.; Clarke, Shaun D.; Pozzi, Sara A.

    2016-07-01

    We have developed and tested a radiation portal monitor using organic liquid scintillation detectors. In order to optimize our system designs, neutron measurements were carried out with three organic liquid scintillation detectors of different shapes and sizes, along with a 3He radiation portal monitor (RPM) as a reference. The three liquids tested were a 7.62 cm diameter by 7.62 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, a 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector, and a 25 cm by 25 cm by 10 cm "paddle" shaped organic liquid scintillation detector. Background and Cf-252 neutron measurements were recorded to allow for a comparison of neutron intrinsic efficiencies as well as receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves between detectors. The 12.7 cm diameter cylindrical active volume organic liquid scintillation detector exhibited the highest intrinsic neutron efficiency (54%) of all three liquid scintillators. An ROC curve analysis for a heavily moderated Cf-252 measurement showed that using the 12.7 cm diameter by 12.7 cm length cylindrical active volume Eljen EJ309 organic liquid scintillation detector would result in the fewest needed detector units in order to achieve a near 100% positive neutron alarm rate while maintaining a better than 1 in 10,000 false alarm rate on natural neutron background. A small number of organic liquid scintillation detectors could therefore be a valid alternative to 3He in some RPM applications.

  18. Monitoring of D-T accelerator neutron output in a PGNAA system using silicon carbide detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide (SiC) detectors are being employed to monitor the neutron output of the D-T accelerator in a pulsed Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system. Detection of the source neutrons relies on energetic neutron reactions in the detector material. Experimental testing has been performed to confirm that the detector response is caused by fast neutrons from the accelerator source. Modeling calculations have also been carried out to provide additional verification. Use of the SiC detectors in the PGNAA system is expected to assist in evaluating system performance as well as ensuring accurate data interpretation and analysis

  19. Monitoring of D-T accelerator neutron output in a PGNAA system using silicon carbide detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulloo, Abdul R.; Ruddy, Frank H.; Seidel, John G.; Petrović, Bojan

    2001-07-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) detectors are being employed to monitor the neutron output of the D-T accelerator in a pulsed Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) system. Detection of the source neutrons relies on energetic neutron reactions in the detector material. Experimental testing has been performed to confirm that the detector response is caused by fast neutrons from the accelerator source. Modeling calculations have also been carried out to provide additional verification. Use of the SiC detectors in the PGNAA system is expected to assist in evaluating system performance as well as ensuring accurate data interpretation and analysis.

  20. A micro-pattern gaseous detector for beam monitoring in ion-therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakawa, A.; Ishii, K.; Matsuyama, S.; Kikuchi, Y.; Togashi, T.; Arikawa, J.; Yamashita, W.; Takahashi, Y.; Fujishiro, F.; Yamazaki, H.; Sakemi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    A micro-pattern gaseous detector based on gas electron multiplier technology (GEM detector) was developed as a new transmission beam monitor for charged-particle therapy to obtain real-time information about the parameters of a therapeutic beam. Feasibility tests for the GEM detector were performed using an 80-MeV proton beam to evaluate the lateral intensity distributions of a pencil beam and the dose delivered to a target. The beam intensity distributions measured with the GEM detector were in good agreement with those measured with an imaging plate while the charge output from the GEM detector was in proportion to that of a reference dose monitor of an ionization chamber design. These experimental results showed that the GEM detector can be used not only as a beam monitor for the position and two-dimensional intensity distribution but also as a dose monitor. Thus, it is possible to simultaneously measure these beam parameters for beam control in charged-particle therapy using a single GEM-based transmission monitor.

  1. Radiation damage monitoring of the ATLAS pixel detector

    CERN Document Server

    Seidel, Sally; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A measurement has been made of the radiation damage incurred by the ATLAS Pixel Detector barrel silicon modules from the beginning of operations through the end of 2012. This translates to hadronic fluence received over the full period of operation at energies up to and including 8 TeV. The measurement is based on a per-module record of the silicon sensor leakage current. The results are presented as a function of integrated luminosity and compared to predictions by the Hamburg Model. This information can be used to predict limits on the lifetime of the Pixel Detector due to current, for various operating scenarios.

  2. Mining Gamma-Ray Burst Data

    OpenAIRE

    Hakkila, Jon; Roiger, Richard J.; Haglin, David J.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts provide what is probably one of the messiest of all astrophysical data sets. Burst class properties are indistinct, as overlapping characteristics of individual bursts are convolved with effects of instrumental and sampling biases. Despite these complexities, data mining techniques have allowed new insights to be made about gamma-ray burst data. We demonstrate how data mining techniques have simultaneously allowed us to learn about gamma-ray burst detectors and data collectio...

  3. Review of contamination monitoring systems based on large area plastic scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the applicability of wide area plastic scintillation detectors for contamination monitoring in radiation facilities. Plastic scintillation detectors have proved themselves to be more compliant for beta/gamma contamination monitoring. The detector discussed in this paper has an area of ∼ 500 cm2 and is coupled to matching light guide with an embedded 2 pi sensitive photomultiplier tube. Three systems based on these detectors have been developed and evaluated for their performance. These are (i) Ground surface contamination monitor; (ii) Hand and Foot contamination monitor and (iii) Handheld contamination monitor. A brief review of the experience gained in this development work has been described. The contamination monitoring systems developed with the plastic scintillation detectors are very effective for estimation of contamination in all radiation facilities where beta/gamma contamination levels on ground surfaces, hands and feet of radiation workers as well as their clothes and shoes are to be assessed. The systems equipped with a user friendly interface and high degree of personal comfort to the user serve to help check beta/gamma contamination associated radiation risks. The systems provide a visual alarm to flag contamination levels much lower than the limits fixed by the regulatory authorities

  4. Monitoring onboard of ISS with passive detectors - 5 years experience

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ambrožová, Iva; Shurshakov, V. A.; Tolochek, R. V.; Pachnerová Brabcová, Kateřina; Kubančák, Ján; Vlček, Bohumil; Spurný, František

    Moskva: Space Research Institute RAS, 2013, s. 284-292. ISBN 978-5-9903101-2-4. [Space Weather Effects on Humans: In Space and on Earth. Moskva (RU), 04.06.2012-08.06.2012] Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : ISS * dosimetry * plastic nuclear track detectors Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders

  5. RF Power Detector/Monitor Upgrade for the 500MHz Systems at the ALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several systems rely on the accurate and linear detection of 500 MHz signals, (the fundamental frequency of both the Booster Ring and Storage Ring) over a dynamic range in excess of 25dB. Prior to this upgrade, the detector/monitor was diode based and though this type of detector could handle the dynamic range requirement it could not do so in an accurate and linear manner. In order to meet the requirements (dynamic range greater than or equal to 25dB, accurate and linear to +-0.25dB over the range, and additional circuitry to interface to the legacy control system and interlocks), a new RF Power Detector/Monitor has been developed using two AD8361, Analog Devices Tru RMS Detectors and a fuzzy comparator, which extends the overall detector's range to twice that of the AD8361. Further information is available [www.analogedevices.com/]. Details of the design requirements and the detector/monitor's circuit as well as the performance of the detector will be presented

  6. Passive neutron area monitor with pairs of TLDs as neutron detector

    OpenAIRE

    Vega-Carrillo, Héctor René; Guzmán-García, Karen Arlete; Gallego Díaz, Eduardo F.; Lorente Fillol, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    A passive neutron area monitor has been designed using Monte Carlo methods; the monitor is a polyethylene cylinder with pairs of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD600 and TLD700) as thermal neutron detector. The monitor was calibrated with a bare and a thermalzed 241AmBe neutron sources and its performance was evaluated measuring the ambient dose equivalent due to photoneutrons produced by a 15 MV linear accelerator for radiotherapy and the neutrons in the output of a TRIGA Mark III radial bea...

  7. Monitoring of absolute mirror alignment at COMPASS RICH-1 detector

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Dalla Torre, S.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger jr., M.; Gayde, J.Ch.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Panzieri, D.; Pesaro, G.; Polák, Jaroslav; Rocco, E.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Slunečka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, Lukáš; Šulc, Miroslav; Takekawa, S.; Tessarotto, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 766, December (2014), s. 208-211. ISSN 0168-9002. [International Workshop on Ring Imaging Cherenkov Detectors (RICH 2013)/8./. Hayama, Kanagawa, 02.12.2013-06.12.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : RICH * Cherenkov radiation * Mirror alignment * Photogrammetry Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics , Colliders Impact factor: 1.216, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168900214008134#

  8. Online monitor for the alignment of the LHCb detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hallmann, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    During the first long shutdown (LS1) of the Large Hadron Collider, the High Level Trigger (HLT) of the LHCb detector is restructured. The HLT consists of two parts, HLT1 and HLT2. The task of the fast HLT1 is to reduce the rate of triggered events such that the CPU time available in HLT2 is sufficient to trigger on particles formed by combinations of tracks.

  9. Radon monitoring with plastic detectors in earthquake prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1984 a German-Turkish co-operation on earthquake prediction has existed at the North Anatolian fault zone in Turkey. Besides investigations on other parameters, changes in radon concentration are observed. The cellulose nitrate ''Kodak LR115 Type II pelliculable'' from Kodak-Pathe, France, and the 300 μm thick allyl diglycol carbonate CR-39 from Pershore Mouldings, U.K., are used in recording α-particles from radon and its daughter isotopes. The etching behaviour of both detectors has been measured. For LR115 an etchant-creeping effect at the boundary layer between the 13.5 μm CB-detector and the supporting 99.5 μm polyester base was observed. Based on these results, a theoretical calculation of the so-called ''sensitive volumes'' was carried out. The most important result was the calculation of the Rn-sensitivities for both detectors. The calculated LR115/CR-39 sensitivity ratio was found to be equal to the measured track density ratios DCR-39/DLR115 = 2.14±0.81. Moreover, we found that the etching behaviour of LR115 is different from that of ''Kodak CA 80-15''; this was formerly believed to be the same because the same raw cellulose nitrate material was involved in both cases. (author)

  10. Testing and assessment of a large BGO detector for beach monitoring of radioactive particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Beach Monitoring Steering Group (BMSG) was set up by UKAEA to explore whether improved systems for beach monitoring of radioactive particles are available. The BMSG commissioned the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI/NGD), and other companies, to test their most sensitive system. This paper presents the results of trials in a specially created test facility at UKAEA Harwell with a large BGO detector. The detector's size and weight mean that it would be suitable for vehicle deployment but would be too large and heavy to carry in areas that could not be accessed by a vehicle. However, it would be possible to use the same methodology that is described here with a smaller detector capable of being carried in a backpack, albeit with reduced sensitivity for particle detection. The approach that we present is also applicable, with modifications, to the detection of offshore particles using a towed seabed detector

  11. Synchrotron radiation monitoring for LEP2 using the DELPHI-TPC silicon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) of the DELPHI detector suffers contamination due to Synchrotron Radiation (small ionized cloud with slow drift velocity which causes a magnetic field perturbation), specially during the new phase of operation of the LEP. Therefore one needs to monitor this radiation by means of an independent detector. This detector, which has been developed during the last 20 months, uses the silicon technique and allows precise measurements of both the energy and time of flight of the photons, either direct, or back-scattered by the quadrupoles, masks or collimations in front of the TPC. Typical time delay and energy range are of the order of 50 ns and 100 to 400 KeV, respectively. The detector being independent of the DELPHI acquisition system, it allows a good monitoring task that can give some clue on the state of the beams and non-stop trace plot

  12. Diamonds as timing detectors for MIP: The HADES proton-beam monitor and start detectors

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2009-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a recent development of measuring time of flight of minimum-ionizing particles (MIP) with mono-crystalline diamond detectors. The application in the HADES spectrometer as well as test results obtained with proton beams are discussed.

  13. Monitoring the burst-out of Enteromorpha prolifera in the Yellow Sea of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiying; Peng, Hongchun; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Chunlin

    2012-10-01

    In the eve of the Beijing Olympics Games, Qingdao in China, as the host city of OSC of Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, was surrounded by Enteromorpha prolifera, which was followed with interest by whole China and the world. The Enteromorpha often comes from other ocean, monitoring the drifting path of the Enteromorpha will become very important.The Study area is mainly the Yellow Sea. And the data sources are Terra MODIS 1B images from 2000-2010 years. The data preprocessing include BOW-TIE processing, image registration, clip, merge, and masking. And the NDVI was selected as the index of derived Enteromorpha prolifera information, to get the range of Enteromorpha prolifera, and get that of dynamic change with time, and monitor the drifting path of the Enteromorpha.

  14. Coherent sychrotron radiation detector for a non-invasive subpicosecond bunch length monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This CSR detector was developed to monitor nondestructively the length of a subpicosecond bunch with high sensitivity. The monitor uses a state of the art GaAs Schottky whisker diode which is operated at room temperature at a wavelength of a few hundred microns. The detector is capable of detecting radiation power as low as 10 nW, depending on wavelength. This paper describes design specifications, parameter ranges, and monitor features and also reports its performance and comparison between measurement and calculation. The measurement results are cross-compared with an independent bunch length measurement using phase modulation. It was found that the output power varies with bunch length and that detectors at shorter wavelengths are preferred

  15. Spent Nuclear Fuel Cask and Storage Monitoring with 4He Scintillation Fast Neutron Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With this increasing quantity of spent nuclear fuel being stored at nuclear plants across S. Korea, the demand exists for building a long-term disposal facility. However, the Korean government first requires a detailed plan for the monitoring and certification of spent fuel. Several techniques have been developed and applied for the purpose of spent fuel monitoring, including the digital Cerenkov viewing device (DCVD), spent fuel attribute tester (SFAT), and FORK detector. Conventional gamma measurement methods, however, suffer from a lack of nuclear data and interfering background radiation. To date, the primary method of neutron detection for spent fuel monitoring has been through the use of thermal neutron detectors such as 3He and BF3 proportional counters. Unfolding the neutron spectrum becomes extremely complicated. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties, a new fast neutron measurement system is currently being developed at the University of Florida. This system is based on the 4He scintillation detector invented by Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd. These detectors are a relatively new technological development and take advantage of the high 4He cross-section for elastic scattering at fast neutron energies, particularly the resonance around 1 MeV. This novel 4He scintillation neutron detector is characterized by its low electron density, leading to excellent gamma rejection. This detector also has a fast response time on the order of nanoseconds and most importantly, preserves some neutron energy information since no moderator is required. Additionally, these detectors rely on naturally abundant 4He as the fill gas. This study proposes a new technique using the neutron spectroscopy features of 4He scintillation detectors to maintain accountability of spent fuel in storage. This research will support spent fuel safeguards and the detection of fissile material, in order to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. This study conducted a

  16. Spent Nuclear Fuel Cask and Storage Monitoring with {sup 4}He Scintillation Fast Neutron Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hee jun; Kelley, Ryan P; Jordan, Kelly A [Univ. of Florida, Florida (United States); Lee, Wanno [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yong Hyun [Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    With this increasing quantity of spent nuclear fuel being stored at nuclear plants across S. Korea, the demand exists for building a long-term disposal facility. However, the Korean government first requires a detailed plan for the monitoring and certification of spent fuel. Several techniques have been developed and applied for the purpose of spent fuel monitoring, including the digital Cerenkov viewing device (DCVD), spent fuel attribute tester (SFAT), and FORK detector. Conventional gamma measurement methods, however, suffer from a lack of nuclear data and interfering background radiation. To date, the primary method of neutron detection for spent fuel monitoring has been through the use of thermal neutron detectors such as {sup 3}He and BF{sub 3} proportional counters. Unfolding the neutron spectrum becomes extremely complicated. In an attempt to overcome these difficulties, a new fast neutron measurement system is currently being developed at the University of Florida. This system is based on the {sup 4}He scintillation detector invented by Arktis Radiation Detectors Ltd. These detectors are a relatively new technological development and take advantage of the high {sup 4}He cross-section for elastic scattering at fast neutron energies, particularly the resonance around 1 MeV. This novel {sup 4}He scintillation neutron detector is characterized by its low electron density, leading to excellent gamma rejection. This detector also has a fast response time on the order of nanoseconds and most importantly, preserves some neutron energy information since no moderator is required. Additionally, these detectors rely on naturally abundant {sup 4}He as the fill gas. This study proposes a new technique using the neutron spectroscopy features of {sup 4}He scintillation detectors to maintain accountability of spent fuel in storage. This research will support spent fuel safeguards and the detection of fissile material, in order to minimize the risk of nuclear proliferation

  17. Test Results on the Silicon Pixel Detector for the TTF-FEL Beam Trajectory Monitor

    OpenAIRE

    Hillert, S.; Ischebeck, R.; Müller, U. C.; Roth, S.; Hansen, K.; Holl, P.; Karstensen, S.; Kemmer, J.; Klanner, R.; Lechner, P.; Leenen, M; Ng, J. S. T.; Schmüser, P.; Strüder, L.

    2000-01-01

    Test measurements on the silicon pixel detector for the beam trajectory monitor at the free electron laser of the TESLA test facility are presented. To determine the electronic noise of detector and read-out and to calibrate the signal amplitude of different pixels the 6 keV photons of the manganese K line are used. Two different methods determine the spatial accuracy of the detector: In one setup a laser beam is focused to a straight line and moved across the pixel structure. In the other th...

  18. Silicon detectors for the n-TOF neutron beams monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Cosentino, L.; Musumarra, A.; Barbagallo, M.; Colonna, N.; Damone, L.; Pappalardo, A.; Piscopo, M.; Finocchiaro, P.; collaboration, for the n-TOF

    2015-01-01

    During 2014 the second experimental area EAR2 was completed at the n-TOF neutron beam facility at CERN. As the neutrons are produced via spallation, by means of a high-intensity 20 GeV pulsed proton beam impinging on a thick target, the resulting neutron beam covers an enormous energy range, from thermal to several GeV. In this paper we describe two beam diagnostic devices, designed and built at INFN-LNS, both exploiting silicon detectors coupled with neutron converter foils containing 6Li. T...

  19. Tools to Monitor the Quality of the ALICE-TOF Detector Data

    CERN Document Server

    Akindinov, A; Antonioli, P; Arcelli, S; Basile, M; Cara Romeo, G; Cifarelli, L; Cindolo, F; De Caro, A; De Gruttola, D; De Pasquale, S; Fusco Girard, M; Guarnaccia, C; Hatzifotiadou, D; Jung, H T; Jung, W W; Kim, D S; Kim, D W; Kim, H N; Kim, J S; Kiselev, S; Laurenti, G; Lee, K; Lee, S C; Luvisetto, M L; Malkevich, D; Margotti, A; Nania, R; Nedosekin, A; Noferini, F; Pagano, P; Pesci, A; Preghenella, R; Russo, G; Ryabinin, M; Scapparone, E; Scioli, G; Silenzi, A; Sun, Y; Tchoumakov, M; Voloshin, K; Williams, M C S; Zagreev, B; Zampolli, C; Zichichi, A

    2008-01-01

    Since the beginning of commissioning of the ALICE-TOF detector, one of the most crucial aspects has been to check the quality of the data produced. Both during last November tests at the CERN PS and in the cosmic-ray test facility, running since more than one year, the data taking of assembled TOF "modules" has been continuously monitored in order to detect as quickly as possible faulty conditions or bad detector configurations. The tools developed for these purposes, which are currently also used for the commissioning of TOF "supermodules", and the new under-development automatic data quality monitor will ensure the highest possible TOF data quality during its operation.

  20. FERMIGBRST - Fermi GBM Burst Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by a subset of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO) which have been classified as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Note...

  1. Monitor and control systems for the SLD Cherenkov Ring Imaging Detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the stable long-term operation of a Cherenkov Ring Detector at high efficiency, a comprehensive monitor and control system is being developed. This system will continuously monitor and maintain the correct operating temperatures, and will provide an on-line monitor and maintain the correct operating temperatures, and will provide an on-line monitor of the pressures, flows, mixing, and purity of the various fluids. In addition the velocities and trajectories of Cherenkov photoelectrons drifting within the imaging chambers will be measured using a pulsed uv lamp and a fiberoptic light injection system. 9 refs., 6 figs

  2. Improving the gas gain monitoring system in multiwire proportional chambers for MUON detector of LHCb experiment.

    CERN Document Server

    Ruvinskaia, Ekaterina

    2016-01-01

    The gas gain monitoring system in multi-wire proportional chambers for MUON detector of LHCb has been constructed and commissioned. It includes an online- monitoring, tools for analysis the archived data and an alarm system on the quality of the gas mixture. Finally, it will be implemented in the main ECS of LHCb for MUON detector and as a part of safety system of LHCb as a permanent online monitor of the quality of the gas mixture in MWPCs. The main advantage of this setup is a monitoring of Gas Gain (GG) in MWPCs with radioactive sources independently from the presence of beam at LHC. It also provides an option for prompt reaction in case of a problem with the gas.

  3. A liquid-nitrogen monitor for lithium-drifted germanium detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An instrument has been developed that makes use of a load cell to monitor the liquid nitrogen in the Dewar flask of a lithium-drifted germaniun detector. The contents are recorded on a chart recorder, and an alarm is sounded when the previously set content has been reached. A signal switches off the high-voltage power supply 30 minutes after the alarm is triggered. The calibration of the load-cell monitor is described in an appendix

  4. Monitoring and control of the muon detector in the L3 experiment at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the monitoring system of the muon spectrometer of the L3 detector in LEP at CERN is presented. The system is based on a network of VME's using the OS9 operating system. The design guiding lines and the present system configuration are described both from the hardware and the software point of view. In addition, the report contains the description of the monitored parameters showing typical data collected durintg the first months of LEP operation. (Author)

  5. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  6. Development of new system for environmental monitoring based on Al2O3:C detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermoluminescence detectors (TLD) have been widely used for environmental radiation monitoring around nuclear facilities. In this study, a new environmental dosimeter based on Al2O3:C detectors placed in black Perspex holder with appropriate filtrations (0.2 mm Aluminium, 0.2 mm Copper and 0.4 mm Lead) has been proposed. The energy response beneath each filter was determined over a photon energy ranging from 20 keV to 1.3 MeV according to the recommendations of the International Standards Organisation (ISO). An algorithm has been elaborated in order to evaluate the ambient dose equivalent from linear combination of the TL-reading of each detector. The results obtained in terms of energy and angle responses are analysed regarding the environmental monitoring standard performance

  7. Use of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Detectors for an Advanced X-ray Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Remillard, R A; Boughan, E A; Bradt, H V; Morgan, E H; Becker, U J; Nenonen, S; Vilhu, O R

    2000-01-01

    We describe a concept for a NASA SMEX Mission in which Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detectors, developed at CERN, are adapted for use in X-ray astronomy. These detectors can be used to obtain moderately large detector area and two-dimensional photon positions with sub mm accuracy in the range of 1.5 to 15 keV. We describe an application of GEMs with xenon gas, coded mask cameras, and simple circuits for measuring event positions and for anticoincidence rejection of particle events. The cameras are arranged to cover most of the celestial sphere, providing high sensitivity and throughput for a wide variety of cosmic explosions. At longer timescales, persistent X-ray sources would be monitored with unprecedented levels of coverage. The sensitivity to faint X-ray sources on a one-day timescale would be improved by a factor of 6 over the capability of the RXTE All Sky Monitor.

  8. Control and monitoring system for TRT detector in ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Hajduk, Z

    2002-01-01

    In this article we present methods and tools for design and construction of the control and monitoring system for a big particle physics experiment taking as an example one of the ATLAS subdetectors. Several requirements has been enumerated which such a system have to meet both by hardware and software. Harsh environmental conditions, difficult if not impossible access and very long exploitation time create conditions where only application of industrial standards allow for serviceability, possibility of fast and easy upgrades and intuitive running of the system by relatively non-experienced staff. (6 refs).

  9. Sky Coverage and Burst Repetition

    OpenAIRE

    Band, David L.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the repeater content of gamma ray burst samples I develop two models where sources burst at a constant average rate. I find that the sky coverage affects the number of repeaters in a sample predominantly through the detector livetime, and that the number of bursts in the sample is the primary parameter. Thus the repeater content of burst samples should be compared within the context of a repetition model; a direct comparison between two samples is possible only if the samples h...

  10. LRAD, semiconductor, and other radiation detectors applied to environmental monitoring for alpha and beta contamination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The very short range of alpha particles in air (typically 2 to 3 cm) has severely limited the use of traditional alpha monitors for detecting and identifying small amounts of alpha-producing contamination in soil, water, and other materials. Monitors based on the traditional alpha detector technology are often hard pressed to meet continually increasing sensitivity requirements. The long-range alpha detector (LRAD) avoids the distance restriction by detecting the ions produced by the interaction of alpha particles with air, rather than the alpha particles directly. The ions are swept into an ion detector either by a moving air current (generated by a fan) or a weak electric field. The LRAD is limited by the distance the ions can travel in the ∼5-s ion lifetime (1 to 100 m), rather than by the several-centimeter range of the alpha particles. The LRAD can be used to perform sensitive (less than 10 disintegrations per minute per 100 cm2) field scans of large surface areas (ranging from hundreds of square meters of concrete floor to thousands of square meters of soil). Because the 'active' element in a LRAD is a solid-metal ion collection plate, the detector is relatively inexpensive, easy to service, and quite rugged. However, the LRAD cannot supply any spectroscopic information to help identify the contaminant. Semiconductor, ionization chamber, and other types of particle detector can generate clean spectra from small samples of material and can identify trace amounts of surface contamination. Furthermore, these detectors are rugged enough to use routinely in a mobile laboratory for isotope identification of 'hot spots' located by the LRAD system. The combination of the LRAD with either an alpha spectrometer or a mobile laboratory with other particle detectors has applications for field beta-particle monitoring (such as would result from tritium contamination) as well as alpha particle detection. (author)

  11. Test results on the silicon pixel detector for the TTF-FEL beam trajectory monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillert, S.; Ischebeck, R.; Müller, U. C.; Roth, S.; Hansen, K.; Holl, P.; Karstensen, S.; Kemmer, J.; Klanner, R.; Lechner, P.; Leenen, M.; Ng, J. S. T.; Schmüser, P.; Strüder, L.

    2001-02-01

    Test measurements on the silicon pixel detector for the beam trajectory monitor at the free-electron laser of the TESLA test facility are presented. To determine the electronic noise of the detector and the read-out electronics and to calibrate the signal amplitude of different pixels, the 6 keV photons of the manganese K α/K β line are used. Two different methods determine the spatial accuracy of the detector: in one setup a laser beam is focused to a straight line and moves across the pixel structure. In the other, the detector is scanned using a low-intensity electron beam of an electron microscope. Both methods show that the symmetry axis of the detector defines a straight line within 0.4 μm. The sensitivity of the detector to low-energy X-rays is measured using a vacuum ultraviolet beam at the synchrotron light source HASYLAB. Additionally, the electron microscope is used to study the radiation hardness of the detector.

  12. Development of neutron personnel monitoring system based on CR-39 solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Personnel neutron monitoring aims at providing a method to evaluate the magnitude of the detrimental effects on the personnel exposed to neutrons. Neutron monitoring is done for a small though growing number of personnel working with neutrons in a wide range of situations. Over the years, many solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTD) have been tried for neutron personnel monitoring. CR-39 SSNTD is a proton sensitive polymer and offers a lot of promise for neutron personnel monitoring due to its high sensitivity and lower energy threshold for neutron detection. This report presents the mechanism of track formation in this polymer, the development of this neutron personnel monitoring system in our laboratory, its various characteristics and its promise as a routine personnel neutron monitor. (author). 1 tab., 7 figs

  13. Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor measurements of duration distributions of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Norisuke; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Ohno, Masanori; Sugita, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Ryuuji; Nishioka, Yusuke; Hurley, Kevin; Hanabata, Yoshitaka; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Enomoto, Junichi; Fujinuma, Takeshi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Iwakiri, Wataru; Kawano, Takafumi; Kokubun, Motohide; Makishima, Kazuo; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Yujin E.; Nakaya, Souhei; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Sawako; Terada, Yukikatsu; Urata, Yuji; Yabe, Seiya; Yasuda, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    We report on the T90 and T50 duration distributions and their relations with spectral hardness using 1464 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which were observed by the Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) from 2005 August 4 to 2010 December 29. The duration distribution is clearly bimodal in three energy ranges (50-120, 120-250, and 250-550 keV), but is unclear in the 550-5000 keV range, probably because of the limited sample size. The WAM durations decrease with energy according to a power-law index of -0.058(-0.034, +0.033). The hardness-duration relation reveals the presence of short-hard and long-soft GRBs. The short:long event ratio tends to be higher with increasing energy. We compared the WAM distribution with ones measured by eight other GRB instruments. The WAM T90 distribution is very similar to those of INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS and Granat/PHEBUS, and least likely to match the Swift/BAT distribution. The WAM short:long event ratio (0.25:0.75) is much different from Swift/BAT (0.08:0.92), but is almost the same as CGRO/BATSE (0.25:0.75). To explain this difference for BAT, we examined three effects: BAT trigger types, energy dependence of the duration, and detection sensitivity differences between BAT and WAM. As a result, we found that the ratio difference could be explained mainly by energy dependence including soft extended emissions for short GRBs and much better sensitivity for BAT which can detect weak/long GRBs. The reason for the same short:long event ratio for BATSE and WAM was confirmed by calculation using the trigger efficiency curve.

  14. The use of passive detectors to monitor tritium on surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gammage, R.B.; Meyer, K.E.; Brock, J.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Commercially available BeO exoelectron dosemeters and electret ion chambers (EICs) are being adapted and applied to in situ field monitoring of tritium on surfaces. Thin layer BeO on a conductive graphite substrate is of the order of 50 times more sensitive to tritium than the EIC. At the US department of Energy release limit for fixed surface tritium of 5000 dpm per 100 cm{sup 2}, the exposure time for quantification with the exoelectron dosemeter is of the order of one hour. A multipoint Geiger counter was used for reading exoelectron emission. An alternative ceramic BeO dosemeter (Thermalox 995) has low electrical conductivity and will require a different reader to overcome problems of surface charging during exoemission. The electret is very easy to use and read. Its practical use will be for surfaces with relatively high levels of tritium contamination. (author).

  15. Assessment of an Anomaly Detector for Jet Engine Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien Borguet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of module performance analysis is to reliably assess the health of the main components of an aircraft engine. A predictive maintenance strategy can leverage this information to increase operability and safety as well as to reduce costs. Degradation undergone by an engine can be divided into gradual deterioration and accidental events. Kalman filters have proven very efficient at tracking progressive deterioration but are poor performers in the face of abrupt events. Adaptive estimation is considered as an appropriate solution to this deficiency. This paper reports the evaluation of the detection capability of an adaptive diagnosis tool on the basis of simulated scenarios that may be encountered during the operation of a commercial turbofan engine. The diagnosis tool combines a Kalman filter and a secondary system that monitors the residuals. This auxiliary component implements a generalised likelihood ratio test in order to detect abrupt events.

  16. Swift-BAT: The First Year of Gamma-Ray Burst Detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimm, Hans A.

    2006-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift has been detecting gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since Dec. 17,2004 and automated burst alerts have been distributed since Feb. 14,2005. Since commissioning the BAT has triggered on more than 100 GRBs, nearly all of which have been followed up by the narrow-field instruments on Swift through automatic repointing, and by ground and other satellite telescopes after rapid notification. Within seconds of a trigger the BAT produces and relays to the ground a position good to three arc minutes and a four channel light curve. A full ten minutes of event data follows on subsequent ground station passes. The burst archive has allowed us to determine ensemble burst parameters such as fluence, peak flux and duration. An overview of the properties of BAT bursts and BAT'S performance as a burst monitor will be presented in this talk. BAT is a coded aperture imaging system with a wide (approx.2 sr) field of view consisting of a large coded mask located 1 m above a 5200 cm2 array of 32.768 CdZnTe detectors. All electronics and other hardware systems on the BAT have been operating well since commissioning and there is no sign of any degradation on orbit. The flight and ground software have proven similarly robust and allow the real time localization of all bursts and the rapid derivation of burst light curves, spectra and spectral fits on the ground.

  17. Proportional counters as monitoring detectors of BAC chambers at the ZEUS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the investigations presented is the elaboration of the system monitoring working conditions of BAC chambers. The backing calorimeter (BAC) at the ZEUS detector of the HERA accelerator consisting of 5000 proportional chambers of a total volume of 60 m3 is supplied with a gas mixture of Ar+10% CO2 by an open gas system. Flow proportional counters with a 55Fe source are used as gas system monitoring detectors. These counters and sources were designed and made exclusively for that application. The ageing effect of the Ar+CO2 mixture has also been studied. Monitoring measurements of the pulse height distribution enable us to follow the changes of gas pressure and composition in BAC proportional chambers. The results of these measurements will be used for off-line corrections of BAC data. (orig.)

  18. A compendium of results from long-range alpha detector soil surface monitoring: June 1992--May 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soil surface monitors based on long-range alpha detector (LRAD) technology are being used to monitor alpha contamination at various sites in the Department of Energy complex. These monitors, the large soil-surface monitor (LSSM) and the small soil-surface monitor (SSSM), were used to help characterize sites at Fernald, Ohio, and active or inactive firing sites at Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Monitoring results are presented herein in chronological order

  19. A single detector spectrometric portal monitoring concept solving the problems of 'innocent alarms'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to overcome the problems of 'innocent alarms' due to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in vehicle monitoring and to medical isotopes in pedestrian monitoring, a new technology has been developed in the last few years, based on gamma spectrometry. The US Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) has started a new approach to dynamic primary screening of vehicles, namely, advanced spectrometric portals (ASPs) based on multiple NaI scintillation or HPGe detectors. Complex and expensive instruments with up to 14 large volume NaI or HPGe detectors have been built and are presently being tested by DNDO. Up to now, it seems that these ASPs cannot meet the goal of detecting HEU masked by NORM 95% of the time. Even if this could be achieved, the approach is extremely expensive. The proposed new concept is based on a single detector spectrometric portal monitor (SRPM) with one large NaI crystal for dynamic primary screening of pedestrians, luggage, parcels, mail, etc., with immediate identification of innocent alarms. In addition, the SRPM can be used for secondary screening of vehicles in static mode after an alarm is triggered by a conventional plastic scintillator radiation portal monitor. After identification by the SRPM, the radiation source can be quickly localized with a highly sensitive gamma or neutron search detector, faster and easier as compared to a conventional radioisotope identifier device. One SRPM can serve several primary vehicle lanes for secondary inspection. This makes it even more economic. The paper describes test results obtained with a new SRPM, the SPIR IDENT, developed by SynOdys, France. Extensive testing, partly in cooperation with the IAEA, indicates that this instrument can meet the requirements of the IAEA, the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) and the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) for dynamic pedestrian monitoring as well as the IEC and ANSI requirements for static vehicle monitoring in

  20. Enhancements in application for in-vivo monitoring: source, detector and geometry relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In vivo monitors are prepared for the direct assessment of internal contamination of workers and members of public. The type of monitor and the used detection geometry are mostly influenced by the biokinetic of the internal deposited radioactive materials. The objective of the present work is to combine enhanced expertise in in vivo measurement techniques in order to improve the performance of in vivo measurements in combination with anthropomorphic and numerical phantoms and biokinetic modelling for the assessment of internal exposure. To promote the optimization of in vivo monitors this report contains basic information about detector - geometry - shielding correlation's which are influenced by the detection method, the source geometry as well as by the radiation of interest and the background radiation. In direct in-vivo monitoring technique the optimum choice of the detectors to be applied for different monitoring tasks has been investigated in terms of material, size and background in order to improve conditions namely to increase counting efficiency and reduce background. Furthermore, this report is trying to outline some in vivo monitors which are state-of-the-art and, last but not least, developments of most recent techniques such as large surface Germanium as well as Silicon based detection devices. The main selection criteria for optimization of in-vivo counters are: biokinetic and retention of the radioisotopes of interest; whole body and organ size and positions; detector material, size and crystal dimension; preselection methods; measurement (detector-source-size) geometry; shielding technology; calibration. Human body head (skeleton) measurement for low energy radionuclides such as U-238/Th-234, U-235/Th-231, Th-232, Ra-226, Pb-210 and Pu-isotopes for actual and retrospective exposure studies and their calibration with optimal phantoms are presented and discussed. (author)

  1. Characterisation of CVD diamond detectors used for fast neutron flux monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulon, F.; Bergonzo, P.; Amosov, V.N. E-mail: amosov@triniti.ru; Kaschuck, Yu.; Frunze, V.; Tromson, D.; Brambilla, A

    2002-01-01

    Natural diamond detectors (NDD) have been successfully used for fast neutron spectrometry on various fusion installations in plasma diagnostics. These detectors can work at high temperature, are radiation hard and exhibit a high energy resolution. However, the use of NDD is limited by the availability of IIa type diamonds exhibiting high electronic properties. With the recent advance in the growth of high quality chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond at LETI, CVD diamond appears to be a very promising material for plasma diagnostics. We present here for the first time results of the use of CVD diamond detectors for fast neutron flux monitoring on a neutron generator. The characteristics of CVD diamond detectors are compared with that of high quality NDD made by TRINITI. Pulse height spectra have been measured with CVD detectors and NDD under both 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 14.1 MeV neutrons. The quality of CVD diamond enables the recording of structured spectra allowing the distinction between the different neutron reactions on carbon. The efficiency of CVD diamond monitors and their actual limitations are analysed and discussed.

  2. Characterisation of CVD diamond detectors used for fast neutron flux monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural diamond detectors (NDD) have been successfully used for fast neutron spectrometry on various fusion installations in plasma diagnostics. These detectors can work at high temperature, are radiation hard and exhibit a high energy resolution. However, the use of NDD is limited by the availability of IIa type diamonds exhibiting high electronic properties. With the recent advance in the growth of high quality chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond at LETI, CVD diamond appears to be a very promising material for plasma diagnostics. We present here for the first time results of the use of CVD diamond detectors for fast neutron flux monitoring on a neutron generator. The characteristics of CVD diamond detectors are compared with that of high quality NDD made by TRINITI. Pulse height spectra have been measured with CVD detectors and NDD under both 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 14.1 MeV neutrons. The quality of CVD diamond enables the recording of structured spectra allowing the distinction between the different neutron reactions on carbon. The efficiency of CVD diamond monitors and their actual limitations are analysed and discussed

  3. Application of MCP-N (Lif: Mg, Cu, P TL detectors in monitoring environmental radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olko Pavel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermoluminescent MCP-N detectors based on LiF:Mg,Cu,P are by about 2 orders of magnitude more sensitive than TLD-100 detectors based on conventional LiF:Mg,Ti, which makes it possible to use them in short-term monitoring of ionizing radiation in the environment (e. g., over a two-week period, rather than over 3-12 months. We describe the properties of MCP-N detectors and methods of their application in environmental monitoring. The system was tested in short and long-term exposure periods at 100 sites around Krakow region. MCP-N detectors were then applied to measure variation of radiation dose rate at four selected villages in Serbia, where depleted uranium ammunition was deployed in 1999. Together with short-term thermoluminescent dosimetry, in situ measurements using proportional counters were per formed in order to assess the range of variation of natural radiation background in these villages. The mean terrestrial kerma dose rate in these villages was found to vary between 85 and 116 nGyh–1 and the average ambient dose equivalent rate H*(10 determined by thermoluminescent detectors and by proportional counter measurements was 160 nSvh–1. These values of natural radiation back ground dose rates can be applied as reference levels for field measurements around other sites where depleted uranium ammunition was deployed.

  4. Performance evaluation of NaI(Tl) scintillation detector for online monitoring of radioactive effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel reprocessing facilities and reactors have to monitor the presence of activity in various process cooling water streams in order to ensure that no containment failure occurred resulting in mixing of radioactivity into the cooling water. Similarly, in a radiochemical plant using steam for inter-tank transfer or process solution heating, potential exists for radioactivity release into the steam lines, which manifest as contamination in the resultant steam condensates. Nuclear facilities usually use online methods to get real-time detection of activity contents in process cooling water lines and steam condensate lines. In order to avoid flow interruptions and contamination of detectors, the detector is usually kept close to the external surface of the process/sampling line. This experiments were conducted to evaluate the performance of NaI(TI) scintillator detector for online monitoring as an external probe. The results presented here with a single radionuclide and detector configuration is extendable to mixture containing multiple gamma emitters or other detector configuration, by conducting suitable experiments

  5. Fast polycrystalline CdTe detectors for bunch-by-bunch luminosity monitoring in the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Brambilla, A; Jolliot, M; Bravin, E

    2008-01-01

    The luminosity at the four interaction points of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) must be continuously monitored in order to provide an adequate tool for the control and optimisation of beam parameters. Polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) detectors have previously been tested, showing their high potential to fulfil the requirements of luminosity measurement in the severe environment of the LHC interaction regions. Further, the large signal yield and the fast response time should allow bunch-by-bunch measurement of the luminosity at 40 MHz with high accuracy. Four luminosity monitors with two rows of five polycrystalline CdTe detectors each have been fabricated and will be installed at both sides of the low-luminosity interaction points ALICE and LHC-b. A detector housing was specially designed to meet the mechanical constraints in the LHC. A series of elementary CdTe detectors were fabricated and tested, of which 40 were selected for the luminosity monitors. A sensitivity of 104 electrons per minimum ioni...

  6. The Swift Gamna-Ray Burst Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Swift is a NASA Explorer mission that will be launched in late 2004. It is a multiwavelength observatory for transient astronomy. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. The mission will also perform a hard x-ray survey at the 1 milliCrab level and will continuously monitor the sky for transients. A wide-field gamma-ray camera will detect more than a hundred GRBs per year to 3 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 70 sec by an autonomously controlled "swift" spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions will be determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. The instrumentation is a combination of existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (-0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. The ground station in Malindi is contributed by the Italian Space Agency. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift.

  7. Two-photon physics and online beam monitoring using the DELPHI detector at LEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is based on work done during 1989-1993 using the DELPHI detector at LEP, which is summarized in five articles. It consists of three main parts. The first part describes the Very Small Angle Tagger (VSAT), which is a sub-detector of the DELPHI detector at LEP. It consists of four silicon-tungsten electromagnetic calorimeter modules having a silicon strip planes for position determination. The modules are placed adjacent to the beam pipe, at ±7.7 m from the interaction point and after superconducting quadrupole magnets, allowing the detection of electrons in a polar angle range of 4 to 13 mrad. The second part is devoted to two-photon physics at DELPHI, with strong emphasis on a VSAT single-tagged event analysis. Here is shown, for the first time, evidence of hard scattering processes in single-tagged two-photon collisions. A QCD Resolved Photon Contribution (QCD-RPC) model is introduced. Data is then seen to be well described by a full VDM+(QCD-RPC) model. Different parton density functions are compared with data. The third part first describes the system for online monitoring of LEP beam background and luminosity at the DELPHI interaction point. Details are given of contributing sub-detector signals and program structure. Then follows a description of the VSAT online monitoring program (VSAT-MONITOR). A good agreement is found between the VSAT-MONITOR estimates of luminosity and beam spot and those of other detectors. Finally, results are presented of VSAT measurements of a LEP beam separation scan. 75 refs, figs

  8. Studies of a Poenitz-type black neutron detector as a neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A black neutron detector of novel design has been constructed and tested as a neutron flux monitor. The neutron time-of-flight (TOF) technique was used to measure the zero degree neutron spectrum from a subnanosecond pulsed proton beam on a thick metallic lithium target. We describe the detector, discuss the shielding arrangement and electronics, determine the low-energy cut-off. We calculate the efficiency, show spectra and compare measured zero degree differential cross-section of the 7Li(p, n0)7Be reaction with recommended published cross-sections. (orig.)

  9. Purification of liquid xenon and impurity monitoring for a PET detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purification system and the method of impurity monitoring developed for a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner based on liquid xenon position sensitive detectors are described. The present results show that an attenuation length of the scintillation photons in the liquid of the order of 50 cm can be reached by using only commercial purifiers. Although our preliminary measurements show that a strong electron attachment exists in liquid xenon, the electron attenuation length of 2 cm achieved is sufficient for the PET detectors. ((orig.))

  10. Passive neutron area monitor with pairs of TLDs as neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A passive neutron area monitor has been designed using Monte Carlo methods; the monitor is a polyethylene cylinder with pairs of thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD600 and TLD700) as thermal neutron detector. The monitor was calibrated with a bare and a thermalzed 241AmBe neutron sources and its performance was evaluated measuring the ambient dose equivalent due to photoneutrons produced by a 15 MV linear accelerator for radiotherapy and the neutrons in the output of a TRIGA Mark III radial beam port. - Highlights: • A passive neutron area monitor was built and evaluated. • The monitor uses pairs of TLD 600 and TLD700. • It was evaluated in the beam port of a TRIGA Mark III reactor. • The performance was also evaluated in a 15 MV LINAC

  11. Monitoring of garbage with a 5x5NaI (Tl) detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So far in that is carried out the first reload of nuclear fuel in the LVC, the monitoring of garbage has been carried out using monitors trade mark Eberline model RM 14. The procedure consists in manually monitoring each object and to separate of the considered 'clean' garbage the objects considered as contaminated, which register greater or equal counts to 100 cpm. This way to process was adequate under normal operation conditions, but not in the operation rhythm that implies a bigger maintenance since the time required for monitoring from 5 to 10 kg. of garbage is of the order of 0.5 hours and the production rhythm of this it ends up being a lot but high. Due to this necessity it was thought about the problem of looking by a more efficient monitoring method. In this work a method that uses a detector of NaI (Tl) of 5 x 5 inches is discussed. (Author)

  12. The RASNIK Real-Time Relative Alignment Monitor for the CDF Inner Tracking Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Goldstein, D B; Goldstein, David; Saltzberg, David

    2003-01-01

    We describe the design and operation of the RASNIK optical relative alignment system designed for and installed on the CDF inner tracking detectors. The system provides low-cost minute-by-minute alignment monitoring with submicron precision. To reduce ambiguities, we modified the original three-element rasnik design to a two-element one. Since the RASNIKs are located within 10--40 cm of the beamline, the systems were built from low-mass and radiation-hard components and are operated in a mode which reduces damage from radiation. We describe the data-acquisition system, which has been running without interruption since before the CDF detector was rolled into its collision hall in March 2001. We evaluate what has been learned about sources of detector motion from almost two years of RASNIK data and discuss possible improvements to the system.

  13. The RASNIK real-time relative alignment monitor for the CDF inner tracking detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the design and operation of the RASNIK optical relative alignment system designed for and installed on the CDF inner tracking detectors. The system provides low-cost minute-by-minute alignment monitoring with submicron precision. To reduce ambiguities, we modified the original three-element RASNIK design to a two-element one. Since the RASNIKs are located within 10-40 cm of the beam line, the systems were built from low-mass and radiation-hard components and are operated in a mode which reduces damage from radiation. We describe the data-acquisition system, which has been running without interruption since before the CDF detector was rolled into its collision hall in March 2001. We evaluate what has been learned about sources of detector motion from almost 2 years of RASNIK data and discuss possible improvements to the system

  14. AtmoHEAD 2013 workshop / Atmospheric Monitoring for High-Energy Astroparticle Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Bernlöhr, K; Blanch, O; Bourgeat, M; Bruno, P; Buscemi, M; Cassardo, C; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chouza, F; Cilmo, M; Coco, M; Colombi, J; Compin, M; Daniel, M K; Reyes, R De Los; Ebr, J; D'Elia, R; Deil, C; Etchegoyen, A; Doro, M; Ferrarese, S; Fiorini, M; Font, LL; Garrido, D; Gast, H; Gaug, M; Gonzales, F; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Hahn, J; Hrabovsky, M; Kosack, K; Krüger, P; La Rosa, G; Leto, G; Lo, Y T E; López-Oramas, A; Louedec, K; Maccarone, M C; Mandat, D; Marandon, V; Martinetti, E; Martinez, M; de Naurois, M; Neronov, A; Nolan, S J; Otero, L; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Pech, M; Puhlhofer, G; Prouza, M; Quel, E; Raul, D; Ristori, P; Frias, M D Rodriguez; Rivoire, S; Rulten, C B; Schovanek, P; Segreto, A; Sottile, G; Stringhetti, L; Tavernet, J -P; Tonachini, A S; Toscano, S; Travnicek, P; Valore, L; Vasileiadis, G; Vincent, S; Wada, S; Wiencke, L; Will, M

    2014-01-01

    A 3-day international workshop on atmospheric monitoring and calibration for high-energy astroparticle detectors, with a view towards next-generation facilities. The atmosphere is an integral component of many high-energy astroparticle detectors. Imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes and cosmic-ray extensive air shower detectors are the two instruments driving the rapidly evolving fields of very-high- and ultra-high-energy astrophysics. In these instruments, the atmosphere is used as a giant calorimeter where cosmic rays and gamma rays deposit their energy and initiate EASs; it is also the medium through which the resulting Cherenkov light propagates. Uncertainties in real-time atmospheric conditions and in the fixed atmospheric models typically dominate all other systematic errors. With the improved sensitivity of upgraded IACTs such as H.E.S.S.-II and MAGIC-II and future facilities like the Cherenkov Telescope Array (CTA) and JEM-EUSO, statistical uncertainties are expected to be significantly reduced, l...

  15. Advances toward a transportable antineutrino detector system for reactor monitoring and safeguards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyna, D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bernstein, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lund, J.; Kiff, S.; Cabrera-Palmer, B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bowden, N. S.; Dazeley, S.; Keefer, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Nuclear reactors have served as the neutrino source for many fundamental physics experiments. The techniques developed by these experiments make it possible to use these very weakly interacting particles for a practical purpose. The large flux of antineutrinos that leaves a reactor carries information about two quantities of interest for safeguards: the reactor power and fissile inventory. Our SNL/LLNL collaboration has demonstrated that such antineutrino based monitoring is feasible using a relatively small cubic meter scale liquid scintillator detector at tens of meters standoff from a commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). With little or no burden on the plant operator we have been able to remotely and automatically monitor the reactor operational status (on/off), power level, and fuel burnup. The initial detector was deployed in an underground gallery that lies directly under the containment dome of an operating PWR. The gallery is 25 meters from the reactor core center, is rarely accessed by plant personnel, and provides a muon-screening effect of some 20-30 meters of water equivalent earth and concrete overburden. Unfortunately, many reactor facilities do not contain an equivalent underground location. We have therefore attempted to construct a complete detector system which would be capable of operating in an aboveground location and could be transported to a reactor facility with relative ease. A standard 6-meter shipping container was used as our transportable laboratory - containing active and passive shielding components, the antineutrino detector and all electronics, as well as climate control systems. This aboveground system was deployed and tested at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) in southern California in 2010 and early 2011. We will first present an overview of the initial demonstrations of our below ground detector. Then we will describe the aboveground system and the technological developments of the two antineutrino

  16. Computer monitoring and control of the GEO 600 gravitational wave detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, M. M.; Ward, H.; Robertson, D. I.

    2000-10-01

    The GEO 600 gravitational wave detector is at an advanced stage of construction at Ruthe, near Hannover in Northern Germany. Successful long-term stable operation of long-baseline interferometers like GEO 600 will critically depend on continuous monitoring and control of the very large number of interdependent feedback systems involved. We present here a description of the control infrastructure developed for this task for GEO 600. Our solution is based on a combination of purpose-built interfacing hardware, standard local area network-connected personal computers, and control software written using LabVIEW. The software techniques developed allow monitoring of all detector systems and also provide the mechanisms for manual and automated control both locally and from remote internet-connected sites.

  17. The proposed monitoring system for the Fermilab D0 colliding beams detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermilab D0 Detector is a collaborative effort that includes seventeen universities and national laboratories. The monitoring and control system for this detector will be separate from the online detector data system. A distributed, stand-alone, microprocessor-based system is being designed to allow monitoring and control functions to be available to the collaborators at their home institutions during the design, fabrication, and testing phases of the project. Individual stations are VMEbus-based 68000 systems that are networked together during installation using an ARCnet (by Datapoint Corporation) Local Area Network. One station, perhaps a Micro VAX, would have a hard disk to store a backup copy of the distributed database located in non-volatile RAM in the local stations. This station would also serve as a gateway to the online system, so that data from the control system will be available for logging with the detector data. Apple Macintosh personal computers are being developed for use as the local control consoles. Each would be interfaced to ARCnet to provide access to all control system data. Through the use of bit-mapped graphics with multiple windows and pull-down menus, a cost effective, flexible display system can be provided, taking advantage of familiar modern software tools to support the operator interface. (orig.)

  18. Gas-Monitor Detector for Intense and Pulsed VUV/EUV Free-Electron Laser Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokin, A. A.; Bobashev, S. V.; Feldhaus, J.; Gerth, Ch.; Gottwald, A.; Hahn, U.; Kroth, U.; Richter, M.; Shmaenok, L. A.; Steeg, B.; Tiedtke, K.; Treusch, R.

    2004-05-01

    In the framework of current developments of new powerful VUV and EUV radiation sources, like VUV free-electron-lasers or EUV plasma sources for 13-nm lithography, we developed a gas-monitor detector in order to measure the photon flux of highly intense and extremely pulsed VUV and EUV radiation in absolute terms. The device is based on atomic photoionization of a rare gas at low particle density. Therefore, it is free of degradation and almost transparent, which allows the detector to be used as a continuously working beam-intensity monitor. The extended dynamic range of the detector allowed its calibration with relative standard uncertainties of 4% in the Radiometry Laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron-storage ring BESSY II in Berlin using spectrally dispersed synchrotron radiation at low photon intensities and its utilization for absolute photon flux measurements of high power sources. In the present contribution, we describe the design of the detector and its application for the characterization of VUV free-electron-laser radiation at the TESLA test facility in Hamburg. By first pulse resolved measurements, a peak power of more than 100 MW at a wavelength of 87 nm was detected.

  19. Beam test results of a drift velocity monitoring system for silicon drift detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Nouais, D; Bonvicini, V; Cerello, P; Giubellino, P; Hernández-Montoya, R; Kolojvari, A; Mazza, G; Nissinen, J; Rashevsky, A; Rivetti, A; Tosello, F; Vacchi, A

    2002-01-01

    We report results on drift velocity monitoring using MOS charge injectors in silicon drift detectors obtained in beam test conditions. The correction of velocity variations as small as 0.03% caused by temperature variations of the order of 0.04 K allowed to get an average space resolution along all the drift path of 28 mu m. Preliminary result demonstrating the possibility to correct for temperature gradients along the anode axis are also presented.

  20. A cryogenic monitor system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter in the SLD detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, M.J.; Fox, J.D.

    1988-10-01

    This paper describes the monitoring electronics system design for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) portion of the SLD detector. This system measures temperatures and liquid levels inside the LAC cryostat and transfers the results over a fiber-optic serial link to an external monitoring computer. System requirements, unique design constraints, and detailed analog, digital and software designs are presented. Fault tolerance and the requirement for a single design to work in several different operating environments are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  1. A cryogenic monitor system for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter in the SLD detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the monitoring electronics system design for the Liquid Argon Calorimeter (LAC) portion of the SLD detector. This system measures temperatures and liquid levels inside the LAC cryostat and transfers the results over a fiber-optic serial link to an external monitoring computer. System requirements, unique design constraints, and detailed analog, digital and software designs are presented. Fault tolerance and the requirement for a single design to work in several different operating environments are discussed. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  2. Characterisation of CVD diamond detectors used for fast neutron flux monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Foulon, F; Amosov, V N; Kaschuck, Y; Frunze, V; Tromson, D; Brambilla, A

    2002-01-01

    Natural diamond detectors (NDD) have been successfully used for fast neutron spectrometry on various fusion installations in plasma diagnostics. These detectors can work at high temperature, are radiation hard and exhibit a high energy resolution. However, the use of NDD is limited by the availability of IIa type diamonds exhibiting high electronic properties. With the recent advance in the growth of high quality chemically vapour deposited (CVD) diamond at LETI, CVD diamond appears to be a very promising material for plasma diagnostics. We present here for the first time results of the use of CVD diamond detectors for fast neutron flux monitoring on a neutron generator. The characteristics of CVD diamond detectors are compared with that of high quality NDD made by TRINITI. Pulse height spectra have been measured with CVD detectors and NDD under both 5.5 MeV alpha particles and 14.1 MeV neutrons. The quality of CVD diamond enables the recording of structured spectra allowing the distinction between the differ...

  3. Development of a new neutron monitor using a boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rasolonjatovo, A H D; Kim, E; Nakamura, T; Nunomiya, T; Endo, A; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, M

    2002-01-01

    A new type of neutron dose monitor was developed by using a 12.7 cm diameterx12.7 cm long boron-loaded organic liquid scintillation detector BC523A. This detector aims to have a response in the wide energy range of thermal energy to 100 MeV by using the H and C reactions to the fast neutrons of organic liquid and the sup 1 sup 0 B(n, alpha) reaction to thermalized neutrons in the liquid. The response functions of this detector were determined by the Monte Carlo simulation in the energy region from thermal energy to 100 MeV. Using these response functions, the spectrum-weighted dose function, G-function, to get the neutron dose from the light output spectrum of the detector was also determined by the unfolding technique. The calculated G-function was applied to determine the neutron dose in real neutron fields having energies ranging from thermal energy to several tens of MeV, where the light output spectra were measured with the BC523A detector. The thus-obtained ambient doses and effective doses show rather ...

  4. LUCID A Cherenkov Tube Based Detector for Monitoring the ATLAS Experiment Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Sbrizzi, A

    2007-01-01

    The LUCID (LUminosity Cherenkov Integrating Detector) apparatus is composed by two symmetric arms deployed at about 17 m from the ATLAS interaction point. The purpose of this detector, which will be installed in january 2008, is to monitor the luminosity delivered by the LHC machine to the ATLAS experiment. An absolute luminosity calibration is needed and it will be provided by a Roman Pot type detector with the two arms placed at about 240 m from the interaction point. Each arm of the LUCID detector is based on an aluminum vessel containing 20 Cherenkov tubes, 15 mm diameter and 1500 mm length, filled with C4F10 radiator gas at 1.5 bar. The Cherenkov light generated by charged particles above the threshold is collected by photomultiplier tubes (PMT) directly placed at the tubes end. The challenging aspect of this detector is its readout in an environment characterized by the high dose of radiation (about 0.7 Mrad/year at 10^33cm^2 s^-1) it must withstand. In order to fulfill these radiation hardness requirem...

  5. Development of a microcontroller based vehicle monitor using plastic scintillator detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The regular operation of nuclear facilities generates significant amounts of radioactive and non radioactive wastes. Often there is a possibility of these getting mixed up and inadvertently being sent for recycling leading to radioactive contamination in the public domain. It is mandatory that all scrap and garbage generated in and around nuclear facilities are monitored before being sent out for recycling or dumping. This becomes more important particularly during the decommissioning of reactors when optimization of the amount nuclear waste generated is very important. A very effective method for monitoring is by using large volume plastic scintillator detectors. The Vehicle Monitoring System (VMS) that was developed for this purpose uses four plastic scintillator detectors of 0.05 m diameter and 0.5 m length. The system designed and was calibrated to independently measure the radiation field of each detector. The hardware for the system was developed using Philips 80C552 microcontroller based Single Board Computer (SBC). The microcontroller software was developed using Keil environment on a Windows Platform. The counts recorded for 5 seconds are sent to the PC continuously. As a backup the minutely average data is also stored in the SBC RAM and can be transferred to the PC on request. The SBC RAM can store the 18 hours data. A watchdog timer was also incorporated in the SBC software to keep it operational after a system hang up due to any unforeseen electrical disturbances. The scrap containing vehicles or trucks to be monitored have to be stationed on the road alongside the Vehicle Monitor. The radiation field data is sent to a remote PC for analysis and storage. A comparative study was done with a Gamma Tracer with the average of the data from 4 detectors. There was very good correlation between data from the two systems. The Vehicle Monitor has much more stability and sensitivity as compared with Gamma Tracer. Apart from vehicle monitoring, the

  6. The Performance Assessment of the Detector for the Portable Environmental Radiation Distribution Monitoring System with Rapid Nuclide Recognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Uk Jae; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The environment radiation distribution monitoring system measures the radiation using a portable detector and display the overall radiation distribution. Bluetooth and RS-232 communications are used for constructing monitoring system. However RS-232 serial communication is known to be more stable than Bluetooth and also it can use the detector's raw data which will be used for getting the activity of each artificial nuclide. In the present study, the detection and communication performance of the developed detector with RS-232 method is assessed by using standard sources for the real application to the urban or rural environment. Assessment of the detector for the portable environmental radiation distribution monitoring system with rapid nuclide recognition was carried out. It was understood that the raw data of detector could be effectively treated by using RS-232 method and the measurement showed a good agreement with the calculation within the relative error of 0.4 % in maximum.

  7. An infrared motion detector system for lossless real-time monitoring of animal preference tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogány, A; Heszberger, J; Szurovecz, Zita; Vincze, E; Székely, T

    2014-12-01

    Automated behavioural observations are routinely used in many fields of biology, including ethology, behavioural ecology and physiology. When preferences for certain resources are investigated, the focus is often on simple response variables, such as duration and frequency of visits to choice chambers. Here we present an automated motion detector system that use passive infrared sensors to eliminate many drawbacks of currently existing methods. Signals from the sensors are processed by a custom-built interface, and after unnecessary data is filtered by a computer software, the total time and frequency of the subject's visits to each of the choice chambers are calculated. We validate the detector system by monitoring (using the system) and in the same time video recording mating preferences of zebra finches in a four-way choice apparatus. Manual scoring of the video recordings showed very high consistency with data from the detector system both for time and for frequency of visits. Furthermore, the validation revealed that if we used micro-switches or light barriers, the most commonly applied automatic detection techniques, this would have resulted in approximately 22% less information compared to our lossless system. The system provides a low-cost alternative for monitoring animal movements, and we discuss its further applicability. PMID:25475978

  8. A detector based on silica fibers for ion beam monitoring in a wide current range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, M.; Braccini, S.; Carzaniga, T. S.; Ereditato, A.; Nesteruk, K. P.; Scampoli, P.

    2016-03-01

    A detector based on doped silica and optical fibers was developed to monitor the profile of particle accelerator beams of intensity ranging from 1 pA to tens of μA. Scintillation light produced in a fiber moving across the beam is measured, giving information on its position, shape and intensity. The detector was tested with a continuous proton beam at the 18 MeV Bern medical cyclotron used for radioisotope production and multi-disciplinary research. For currents from 1 pA to 20 μA, Ce3+ and Sb3+ doped silica fibers were used as sensors. Read-out systems based on photodiodes, photomultipliers and solid state photomultipliers were employed. Profiles down to the pA range were measured with this method for the first time. For currents ranging from 1 pA to 3 μA, the integral of the profile was found to be linear with respect to the beam current, which can be measured by this detector with an accuracy of ~1%. The profile was determined with a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm. For currents ranging from 5 μA to 20 μA, thermal effects affect light yield and transmission, causing distortions of the profile and limitations in monitoring capabilities. For currents higher than ~1 μA, non-doped optical fibers for both producing and transporting scintillation light were also successfully employed.

  9. Exploring Event and Status Based Phenological Monitoring in Citizen Science Projects: Lessons Learned from Project BudBurst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D.; Henderson, S.; Newman, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Citizen science projects in ecology are in a unique position to address the needs of both the science and education communities. Such projects can provide needed data to further understanding of ecological processes at multiple spatial scales while also increasing public understanding of the importance of the ecological sciences. Balancing the needs of both communities, it is important that citizen science programs also provide different 'entry' points to appeal to diverse segments of society. In the case of NEON's Project BudBurst, a national plant phenology citizen science program, two approaches were developed to address the ongoing challenge to recruitment and retention of participants. Initially, Project BudBurst was designed to be an event-based phenology program. Participants were asked to identify a plant and report on the timing of specific phenoevents throughout the year. This approach requires a certain level of participation, which while yielding useful results, is not going to appeal to the broadest audience possible. To broaden participation, in 2011 and 2012, Project BudBurst added campaigns targeted at engaging individuals in making simple status-based reports of a plant they chose. Three targeted field campaigns were identified to take advantage of times when people notice changes to plants in their environment, using simple status-based protocols: Fall Into Phenology, Cherry Blossom Blitz, and Summer Solstice Snapshot. The interest and participation in these single report phenological status-based campaigns exceeded initial expectations. For example, Fall Into Phenology attracted individuals who otherwise had not considered participating in an ongoing field campaign. In the past, observations of fall phenology events submitted to Project BudBurst had been limited. By providing the opportunity for submitting simple, single reports, the number of both new participants and submitted observations increased significantly.

  10. Gamma-spectrometric module based on HPGe detector for radiation portal monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondratjev Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The appearance of small-sized and powerful enough electric cryocoolers of various types on the market, has opened the perspective of HPGe detectors application, cooled by such coolers, in radiation portal monitors. The first results of a spectrometric module based on HPGe detector with relative efficiency of 45% cooled by a Stirling-cycle cryocooler, are presented. The spectrometer has provided energy resolutions of less than 0.95 keV and 1.95 keV at energies of 122 keV and 1332 keV, respectively. The deterioration of the energy resolution of HPGe detector cooled by electric cryocooler in comparison to the resolution with liquid nitrogen cooling was about 8% at the energy of 1332 keV. With the use of activated filters to suppress pulses produced by the mechanical vibrations, the energy resolution of the spectrometer was 0.8 keV and 1.8 keV, respectively, however, the detector relative efficiency at the energy of 1332 keV has dropped to 39 %.

  11. Radon monitoring using long-range alpha detector-based technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-Range Alpha Detector (LRAD) technology is being studied for monitoring radon gas concentrations. LRAD-based instruments collect and measure the ionization produced in air by alpha decays. These ions can be moved to a collection grid via electrostatic ion-transport design collected approximately 95% of the radon produced ions, while instruments using an airflow transport design collected from 44% to 77% of these ions, depending on detector geometry. The current produced by collecting this ionization is linear with respect to 222Rn concentration over the available test range of 0.07 to 820 pCi/L. In the absence of statistical limitations due to low radon concentrations, the speed of response of LRAD-based instruments is determined by the air exchange rate, and therefore changes in radon concentration can be detected in just a few seconds. Recent tests show that at radon concentrations below 20 pCi/L current pulses produced by individual alpha decays can be counted, thus improving detector sensitivity and stability even further. Because these detectors are simple, rugged, and do not consume much power, they are natural candidates for portable, battery operation

  12. Development of gamma ray monitor using CdZnTe semiconductor detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasolonjatovo, A.H.D.; Shiomi, T.; Nakamura, T. [Tohoku Univ., Department of Quantum Science and Energy Engineering, Sendai, Miyagi (Japan); Nishizawa, H.; Tsudaka, Y.; Fujiwara, H.; Araki, H.; Matsuo, K. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Amagasaki, Hyogo (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    In this study, we aimed to develop a new X-ray and gamma ray monitor using the CdZnTe semiconductor detector, which have high sensitivity at room temperature. The pulse height spectra and the detection efficiencies of 10x10 mm{sup 2} by 2 mm thick CdZnTe detector were measured in the energy range of 10 keV to 1.8 MeV by using monoenergetic X-ray and gamma ray sources. The measured results showed very good agreement with the results calculated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code taking into account the charge collection efficiency in the detector. By using two CZT detectors of 10x10x2 mm{sup 3} and 3x3x2 mm{sup 3} coupled with a filter, the weighted sum of a few energy channels with different cut-off energies was finally found out to realize a flat energy response to equivalent dose (counts per mSv) within {+-}30% or {+-}10% deviation. (author)

  13. Use of active-edge silicon detectors as X-ray beam monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon detectors have been developed which are active to within several microns of the physical edge of the detector. These active-edge devices can be placed near an intense X-ray beam to accurately measure the X-ray beam properties. In addition, they can be fabricated in a variety of geometries that will be useful for monitoring the intensity, profile, and position of synchrotron X-ray beams. One shape is a detector with a through hole surrounded by four active elements. The hole allows the intense X-ray beam to go through the center while the four elements can detect any change in the position or dispersion of the beam. Another shape is a rectangular 5 mm longx0.5 mm wide device with a set of four elements that are 100 μm wide. These devices could be mounted on the upstream side of the jaws of an x-y collimating slit to measure the intensity profile of the beam that each jaw of the slit is stopping. Small detectors could also be mounted in a cylindrical beam stop to give on-line beam intensity measurements. A variety of different geometries were tested at beamline 10.3.1 of the Advanced Light Source using a 12.5 keV X-ray beam. They have wide dynamic range, excellent position sensitivity and low sensitivity to radiation damage

  14. Gamma bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vela satellite series has recently detected gamma bursts in the 0.2-1.5MeV energy range. These bursts last an average of from 0.1 to 10s and have a fine time structure, with pulses lasting less than several tens of milliseconds. With simultaneous observations from different satellites it has been possible to determine the spatial origin of some of the bursts. No correlation, however, has been made with known objects. In spite of the fragmentary character of the information received to date, several theories have already been proposed to account for these phenomena

  15. A nuclear track detector system for personal neutron monitoring around high-energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A personal neutron monitoring system is presented which is based on the charged particle registration in a solid-state nuclear track detector (LR115 cellulose nitrate). In order to cover the wide neutron energy spectrum encountered around high-energy proton accelerators the track detector is used in contact with different radiators (boron, polycarbonate and bismuth). After etching, charged particles, such as alpha particles, create holes in the cellulose nitrate layer which are automatically counted with an image-analysing device (Quantimet). This paper presents the results of a large series of calibration and field tests around the CERN accelerators. It appears that an empirical formula for the neutron dose equivalent can be derived from the readings of the hole density under the boron and polycarbonate radiators that fits the conventional survey dose-equivalent measurements within acceptable limits for a wide variety of neutron spectra. (author)

  16. Monitoring nuclear reactors with anti-neutrino detectors: the ANGRA project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chimenti, Pietro; Leigui, Marcelo Augusto [UFABC - Universidade Federal do ABC. Rua Santa Adelia, 166. Bairro Bangu. Santo Andre - SP (Brazil); Anjos, Joao; Azzi, Gabriel; Rafael, Gama; Ademarlaudo, Barbosa; Lima, Herman; VAZ, Mario; Villar, Arthur [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas - CBPF, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud, 150, Urca, Rio de Janeiro, RJ - 22290-180 (Brazil); Gonzales, Luis Fernando; Bezerra, Thiago; Kemp, Ernesto [Unicamp, State University of Campinas, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , Barao Geraldo - Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Nunokawa, Hiroshi [Department of Physics, Pontifical Catholic University - PUC, Rua Marques de Sao Vicente, 225, 22451-900 Gavea - Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Guedes, Germano; Faria, Paulo Cesar [Universidade Estadual de Feira de Santana - UEFS, Avenida Transnordestina, Novo Horizonte (Brazil); Pepe, Iuri [Universidade Federal da Bahia - UFBA (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    We describe the status of the ANGRA Project, aimed at developing an anti-neutrino detector for monitoring nuclear reactors. Indeed the detection of anti-neutrinos provides a unique handle for non-invasive measurements of the nuclear fuel. This kind of measurements are of deep interest for developing new safeguards tools which may help in nuclear non-proliferation programs. The ANGRA experiment, placed at about 30 m from the core of the 4 GW Brazilian nuclear power reactor ANGRA II, is based on a water Cherenkov detector with about one ton target mass. A few thousand antineutrino interactions per day are expected. The latest results from simulations and the status of the construction are presented. (authors)

  17. Neutron monitors and muon detectors for solar modulation studies: 2. $\\phi$ time series

    CERN Document Server

    Ghelfi, A; Cheminet, A; Derome, L; Hubert, G; Melot, F

    2016-01-01

    The level of solar modulation at different times (related to the solar activity) is a central question of solar and galactic cosmic-ray physics. In the first paper of this series, we have established a correspondence between the uncertainties on ground-based detectors count rates and the parameter $\\phi$ (modulation level in the force-field approximation) reconstructed from these count rates. In this second paper, we detail a procedure to obtain a reference $\\phi$ time series from neutron monitor data. We show that we can have an unbiased and accurate $\\phi$ reconstruction ($\\Delta\\phi/\\phi\\simeq 10\\%$). We also discuss the potential of Bonner spheres spectrometers and muon detectors to provide $\\phi$ time series. Two by-products of this calculation are updated $\\phi$ values for the cosmic-ray database and a web interface to retrieve and plot $\\phi$ from the 50's to today (\\url{http://lpsc.in2p3.fr/crdb}).

  18. PMT Dark Noise Monitoring System for Neutrino Detector Borexino Based on the Devicenet Protocol and WEB-Access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitoring of PMT dark noise in a neutrino detector BOREXINO is a procedure that indicates condition of the detector. Based on CAN industrial network, top level DeviceNet protocol and WEB visualization, the dark noise monitoring system having 256 channels for the internal detector and for the external muon veto was created. The system is composed as a set of controllers, converting the PMT signals to frequency and transmitting them over Can network. The software is the stack of the DeviceNet protocols, providing the data collecting and transporting. Server-side scripts build web pages of user interface and graphical visualization of data

  19. [Sensing characteristics of a real-time monitor using a photoionization detector on organic solvent vapors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hajime; Ishematsu, Sumiyo; Fueta, Yukiko; Hinoue, Mitsuo; Ishidao, Toru

    2012-12-01

    Measurements of organic solvents in the work environment are carried out by either direct sampling using plastic bags/gas chromatography, solid sorbent adsorption using charcoal tubes/gas chromatography, or by a direct reading method using detector tubes. However, these methods cannot always measure the work environment accurately because the concentration of hazardous materials changes from time to time, and from space to space. In this study, the sensor characteristics of a real time monitor using a photoionization detector that can monitor vapor concentration continuously were investigated for 52 organic solvent vapors that are required to be measured in the work environment by the Ordinance of Organic Solvent Poisoning Prevention in Japan. The sensitivity of the monitor was high for the solvents with low ionization potential. However, the sensitivity for the solvents with high ionization potential was low, and the sensor could not detected 7 solvents. Calibration of the sensor using a standard gas was desirable before being used for measurement because the sensitivity of the sensor was variable. PMID:23270260

  20. Study of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TL detectors for individual monitoring for weakly penetrating radiations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P.

    The results are described of a study of three commercially available LiF:Mg,Cu,P TL materials aiming at using this phosphor for individual monitoring for weakly penetrating radiations. Due to the high radiation sensitivity of the material it is suitable for application as thin detectors which are...... presented on a number of important dosimetric characteristics of thin detectors prepared from the material, both commercially available detectors and samples prepared in the laboratory. In particular, annealing requirements, and response characteristics of the detectors to beta and photon radiation were...... necessary for monitoring weakly penetrating radiations. Furthermore, the good energy response characteristics of the material for exposure to photons makes it also attractive for monitoring strongly penetrating radiations. Results are given on glow curve analyses of the LiF:Mg,Cu,P TL phosphor and data are...

  1. Study of LiF:Mg,Cu,P TL detectors for individual monitoring for weakly penetrating radiations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P.

    1993-01-01

    The results are described of a study of three commercially available LiF:Mg,Cu,P TL materials aiming at using this phosphor for individual monitoring for weakly penetrating radiations. Due to the high radiation sensitivity of the material it is suitable for application as thin detectors which are...... necessary for monitoring weakly penetrating radiations. Furthermore, the good energy response characteristics of the material for exposure to photons makes it also attractive for monitoring strongly penetrating radiations. Results are given on glow curve analyses of the LiF:Mg,Cu,P TL phosphor and data are...... presented on a number of important dosimetric characteristics of thin detectors prepared from the material, both commercially available detectors and samples prepared in the laboratory. In particular, annealing requirements, and response characteristics of the detectors to beta and photon radiation were...

  2. Multi-detector environmental radiation monitor with multichannel data communication for Indian Environmental Radiation Monitoring Network (IERMON)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the development and features of a solar powered system for monitoring of environmental radiation for detection of nuclear emergency. In order to extend the range of measurement (50 nGy/hr - 25 Gy/hr) and enhance the reliability of the system, multiple detectors are used with different sensitivities. Also, for redundancy in data communication, different options are provided for communication such as GSM, landline leased or dialup and satellite-based data communication. Similarly options are provided for power supply: mains powered, battery powered or solar powered. The mechanical design of the system is also different from the conventional types. The objective of the new design was to provide a system which is compact, elegant and reliable. The system is adopted by the Indian Environmental Radiation Monitoring Network (IERMON) for deployment across India. The paper gives the detailed specifications, system description with the help of a block diagram. The paper also describes how the system can be easily re-configured for other applications such as in-plant monitoring network with power line carrier data communication. (author)

  3. Spectra of solar proton ground level events using neutron monitor and neutron moderated detector recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoker, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Recordings on relativistic solar flare protons observed at Sanae, Antarctic, show that the percentage increase in counting rates of the neutron moderated detector (4NMD) is larger than the percentage increase in counting rates of the 3NM64 neutron monitor. These relative increases are described by solar proton differential spectra j sub s(P) = AP(beta). The power beta is determined for each event and the hardnesses of the temporal variations of beta, found for the ground level events (GLE) of 7 May, 1978 and 22 November, 1977.

  4. The RASNIK Real-Time Relative Alignment Monitor for the CDF Inner Tracking Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, David; Saltzberg, David

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and operation of the RASNIK optical relative alignment system designed for and installed on the CDF inner tracking detectors. The system provides low-cost minute-by-minute alignment monitoring with submicron precision. To reduce ambiguities, we modified the original three-element rasnik design to a two-element one. Since the RASNIKs are located within 10--40 cm of the beamline, the systems were built from low-mass and radiation-hard components and are operated in a mode...

  5. Gamma-Ray Burst Physics with GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omodei, N.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-10-06

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV, the upper end of which is one of the last poorly observed region of the celestial electromagnetic spectrum. The ancestor of the GLAST/LAT was the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector, which flew onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). The amount of information and the step forward that the high energy astrophysics made thanks to its 9 years of observations are impressive. Nevertheless, EGRET uncovered the tip of the iceberg, raising many questions, and it is in the light of EGRET's results that the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) vastly more capable than instruments own previously, as well as a secondary instrument, the GLAST Bursts Monitor, or GBM, to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) science is one of the most exciting challenges for the GLAST mission, exploring the high energy emission of one of the most intense phenomena in the sky, shading light on various problems: from the acceleration of particles to the emission processes, to more exotic physics like Quantum Gravity effect. In this paper we report the work done so far in the simulation development as well as the study of the LAT sensitivity to GRB.

  6. Silicon detectors for monitoring neutron beams in n-TOF beamlines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, L; Musumarra, A; Barbagallo, M; Colonna, N; Damone, L; Pappalardo, A; Piscopo, M; Finocchiaro, P

    2015-07-01

    During 2014, the second experimental area (EAR2) was completed at the n-TOF neutron beam facility at CERN (n-TOF indicates neutron beam measurements by means of time of flight technique). The neutrons are produced via spallation, by means of a high-intensity 20 GeV pulsed proton beam impinging on a thick target. The resulting neutron beam covers the energy range from thermal to several GeV. In this paper, we describe two beam diagnostic devices, both exploiting silicon detectors coupled with neutron converter foils containing (6)Li. The first one is based on four silicon pads and allows monitoring of the neutron beam flux as a function of the neutron energy. The second one, in beam and based on position sensitive silicon detectors, is intended for the reconstruction of the beam profile, again as a function of the neutron energy. Several electronic setups have been explored in order to overcome the issues related to the gamma flash, namely, a huge pulse present at the start of each neutron bunch which may blind the detectors for some time. The two devices were characterized with radioactive sources and also tested at the n-TOF facility at CERN. The wide energy and intensity range they proved capable of sustaining made them attractive and suitable to be used in both EAR1 and EAR2 n-TOF experimental areas, where they became immediately operational. PMID:26233385

  7. SU-D-213-01: Transparent Photon Detector For The Online Monitoring Of IMRT Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: An innovative Transparent Detector for Radiotherapy (TraDeRa) has been developed. The detector aims at real-time monitoring of modulated beam ahead of the patient during delivery sessions, with a field cover up to 40×40 cm 2. Methods: TraDeRa consists in a pixelated matrix of ionization chambers with a patented electrodes design. An in-house designed specific integrated circuit allows to extract the signal and provides a real-time map of beam intensity and shape, at the linac pulse-scale. The measurements under irradiation are made with a 6 MV clinical X-Ray beam. Dose calculations are performed with the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE, modeling the full accelerator head and the TraDeRa detector. Results: A 2 % attenuation of the beam was measured in the presence of TraDeRa and the PENELOPE dosimetric study showed no significant modification of the photon beam properties. TraDeRa detects error leaf position as small as 1 mm compared to a reference field, for both static and modulated fields. In addition, measurements are accurate over a large dynamic range from low intensity signals, as inter-leaves leaks, to very high intensities as obtained on the medical line of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The detector is fully operational for conventional and high dose rate beams as FFF modes (up to 2400 MU/min). Conclusion: The current version of TraDeRa shows promising results for IMRT quality assurance (QA), allowing pulse-scale monitoring of the beam and high sensitivity for errors detection. The attenuation is small enough not to hinder the irradiation while keeping the beam upstream of the patient under constant control. A final prototype under development will include 1600 independent electrodes, half of them with a high resolution centered on the beam axis. This compact detector provides an independent set of measurements for a better QA. Funding support : This work was supported by the LABEX PRIMES (ANR-11-LABX-0063) of Universite de Lyon, within

  8. In situ radiation test of silicon and diamond detectors operating in superfluid helium and developed for beam loss monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurfürst, C.; Dehning, B.; Sapinski, M.; Bartosik, M. R.; Eisel, T.; Fabjan, C.; Rementeria, C. A.; Griesmayer, E.; Eremin, V.; Verbitskaya, E.; Zabrodskii, A.; Fadeeva, N.; Tuboltsev, Y.; Eremin, I.; Egorov, N.; Härkönen, J.; Luukka, P.; Tuominen, E.

    2015-05-01

    As a result of the foreseen increase in the luminosity of the Large Hadron Collider, the discrimination between the collision products and possible magnet quench-provoking beam losses of the primary proton beams is becoming more critical for safe accelerator operation. We report the results of ongoing research efforts targeting the upgrading of the monitoring system by exploiting Beam Loss Monitor detectors based on semiconductors located as close as possible to the superconducting coils of the triplet magnets. In practice, this means that the detectors will have to be immersed in superfluid helium inside the cold mass and operate at 1.9 K. Additionally, the monitoring system is expected to survive 20 years of LHC operation, resulting in an estimated radiation fluence of 1×1016 proton/cm2, which corresponds to a dose of about 2 MGy. In this study, we monitored the signal degradation during the in situ irradiation when silicon and single-crystal diamond detectors were situated in the liquid/superfluid helium and the dependences of the collected charge on fluence and bias voltage were obtained. It is shown that diamond and silicon detectors can operate at 1.9 K after 1×1016 p/cm2 irradiation required for application as BLMs, while the rate of the signal degradation was larger in silicon detectors than in the diamond ones. For Si detectors this rate was controlled mainly by the operational mode, being larger at forward bias voltage.

  9. Development of an area monitor for neutrons using solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An area monitor for neutrons composed of the solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) Makrofol DE, together with a (n,α) converter, in the center of a 25 cm diameter polyethylene sphere, is developed. The optimal electrochemical etching conditions for the detection of thermal neutrons by the Makrofol DE using the BN converter are studied, leading to the choice of 55 min, at 300 C, under a 44,2 kV.cm-1 electric field with oscillation frequency of 2,0 khz. The response of this system to thermal neutrons, in the optimal conditions, is of 2,76(10)x 10-3 tr/n. Changing from the BN converter to a 2,73(3)g compressed boric acid tablet this value lowers to 3,88(17)x 10-4 tr/n. The performance of the whole monitor in the detection of fast neutrons is examined using the BN converter and neutrons from a 241 Am Be source, with a response of 4,4(2)x 103 tr.mSv-1.cm-2 and operational limits between 7(3)μSv and 5,6(2)mSv. The result of the monitoring of the control room of the IPEN Cyclotron accelerator are also presented as a final test for the viability of the practical use of the monitor. (author). 34 refs, 15 figs, 6 tabs, 1 app

  10. SROSS C-2 Detections of Gamma Ray Bursts and the SGR 1627-41

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Sinha; P. Sreekumar; K. Kasturirangan

    2002-03-01

    The GRB monitor (GRBM) on board the Indian SROSS C-2 satellite has detected 53 classical gamma ray bursts since its launch in May, 1994 till its re-entry in July, 2001. For a subset of 26 events, locations were obtained from simultaneous observations by other gamma-ray detectors in space. The sky distribution of these 26 SROSS C-2 bursts is consistent with isotropy. The distribution of event durations shows evidence for bimodality. There is an evidence for a moderate hardness ratio-intensity (HIC) correlation in the data. The SROSS C-2 GRBM has also detected three episodes of emission from the SGR 1627-41.

  11. SWIFT and BATSE bursts' classification

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, I; Balazs, L G; Tusnady, G; Veres, P

    2009-01-01

    Two classes of gamma-ray bursts were identified in the BATSE catalogs characterized by their durations. There were also some indications for the existence of a third type of gamma-ray bursts. Swift satellite detectors have different spectral sensitivity than pre-Swift ones for GRBs. Therefore in this paper we analyze the bursts' duration distribution and also the duration-hardness bivariate distribution, published in The First BAT Catalog. Similarly to the BATSE data, to explain the BAT GRBs' duration distribution three components are needed. Although, the relative frequencies of the groups are different than they were in the BATSE GRB sample, the difference in the instrument spectral sensitivities can explain this bias in a natural way. This means theoretical models may have to explain three different type of gamma-ray bursts.

  12. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal experiment control and monitor software maintenance manual, version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    The Experiment Control and Monitor (EC&M) software was developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenter's terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various investigations by government agencies, universities, and industry. The EC&M software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitoring (C&PM) software system of the HBR-LET. The EC&M software allows users to initialize, control, and monitor the instrumentation within the HBR-LET using a predefined sequence of commands. Besides instrument control, the C&PM software system is also responsible for computer communication between the HBR-LET and the ACTS NASA Ground Station and for uplink power control of the HBR-LET to demonstrate power augmentation during rain fade events. The EC&M Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 (NASA-CR-189160) outlines the commands required to install and operate the EC&M software. Input and output file descriptions, operator commands, and error recovery procedures are discussed in the document. The EC&M Software Maintenance Manual, Version 1.0 (NASA-CR-189161) is a programmer's guide that describes current implementation of the EC&M software from a technical perspective. An overview of the EC&M software, computer algorithms, format representation, and computer hardware configuration are included in the manual.

  13. Advanced communications technology satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal experiment control and monitor software user's guide, version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    The Experiment Control and Monitor (EC&M) software was developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenter's terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various investigations by government agencies, universities, and industry. The EC&M software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitoring (C&PM) software system of the HBR-LET. The EC&M software allows users to initialize, control, and monitor the instrumentation within the HBR-LET using a predefined sequence of commands. Besides instrument control, the C&PM software system is also responsible for computer communication between the HBR-LET and the ACTS NASA Ground Station and for uplink power control of the HBR-LET to demonstrate power augmentation during rain fade events. The EC&M Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 (NASA-CR-189160) outlines the commands required to install and operate the EC&M software. Input and output file descriptions, operator commands, and error recovery procedures are discussed in the document.

  14. Post-Launch Analysis of Swift's Gamma-Ray Burst Detection Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Band, David L.

    2006-01-01

    The dependence of Swift's detection sensitivity on a burst's temporal and spectral properties shapes the detected burst population. Using simplified models of the detector hardware and the burst trigger system I find that Swift is more sensitive to long, soft bursts than CGRO's BATSE, a reference detector because of the large burst database it accumulated. Thus Swift has increased sensitivity in the parameter space region into which time dilation and spectral redshifting shift high redshift b...

  15. Gravitational-wave bursts with memory and experimental prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors show that for any kind of detector the best way to search for a ''bursts with memory'' (BWM) gravitation wave is to integrate up the signal for an integration time tau-circumflex approx.= 1/fsub(opt), where fsub(opt) is the frequency at which the detector has optimal amplitude sensitivity to ordinary bursts (bursts with memory). In such a search the sensitivity to BWM with duration Δt < or approx. 1/fsub(opt) is independent of the burst duration Δt and is approximately equal to the sensitivity to ordinary bursts one cycle long with frequency fsub(opt). (author)

  16. Phase II: Field Detector Development For Undeclared/Declared Nuclear Testing For Treaty Verfiation Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kriz, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Hunter, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Riley, T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-02

    Radioactive xenon isotopes are a critical part of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) for the detection or confirmation of nuclear weapons tests as well as on-site treaty verification monitoring. On-site monitoring is not currently conducted because there are no commercially available small/robust field detector devices to measure the radioactive xenon isotopes. Xenon is an ideal signature to detect clandestine nuclear events since they are difficult to contain and can diffuse and migrate through soils due to their inert nature. There are four key radioxenon isotopes used in monitoring: 135Xe (9 hour half-life), 133mXe (2 day half-life), 133Xe (5 day half-life) and 131mXe (12 day half-life) that decay through beta emission and gamma emission. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a leader in the field of gas collections and has developed highly selective molecular sieves that allow for the collection of xenon gas directly from air. Phase I assessed the development of a small, robust beta-gamma coincidence counting system, that combines collection and in situ detection methodologies. Phase II of the project began development of the custom electronics enabling 2D beta-gamma coincidence analysis in a field portable system. This will be a significant advancement for field detection/quantification of short-lived xenon isotopes that would not survive transport time for laboratory analysis.

  17. Thin silicon strip detectors for beam monitoring in Micro-beam Radiation Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Povoli, Marco; Bravin, Alberto; Cornelius, Iwan; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Fournier, Pauline; Hansen, Thor-Erik; Kok, Angela; Lerch, Michael; Monakhov, Edouard; Morse, John; Petasecca, Marco; Requardt, Herwig; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Röhrich, Dieter; Sandaker, Heidi; Salomé, Murielle; Stugu, Bjarne

    2015-01-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is an emerging cancer treatment that is currently being developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. This technique uses a highly collimated and fractionated X-ray beam array with extremely high dose rate and very small divergence, to benefit from the dose-volume effect, thus sparing healthy tissue. In case of any beam anomalies and system malfunctions, special safety measures must be installed, such as an emergency safety shutter that requires continuous monitoring of the beam intensity profile. Within the 3DMiMic project, a novel silicon strip detector that can tackle the special features of MRT, such as the extremely high spatial resolution and dose rate, has been developed to be part of the safety shutter system. The first prototypes have been successfully fabricated, and experiments aimed to demonstrate their suitability for this unique application have been performed. Design, fabrication and the experimental results as well as any...

  18. Up-down and in-out asymmetries monitoring based on broadband radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding the origin of asymmetries, being in plasma flows reaching the divertor region being in plasma emissivity from the confined volume, is a question of great interest in magnetic confined plasmas research. In the TJ-II stellarator, a set of bolometer systems distributed around the vacuum chamber has been installed to monitor the up-down and in-out radiation asymmetries that are observed in transitions to different confinement regimes. Although plasma emissivity is a complex magnitude, the comparison of signals from twin detectors placed at selected positions, may serve to distinguish among the different causes of asymmetry. This is a non-perturbing method that is especially appropriate when plasma wall clearance is small. (Author)

  19. An improved electrostatic integrating radon monitor with the CR-39 as alpha-particle detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, based on the electrostatic integrating radon monitor (EIRM) developed by Iida et al., a new type of EIRM with the allyl glycol carbonate (CR-39) as alpha-particle detector was developed for outdoor radon measurements. Besides using the CR-39 to replace the cellulose nitrate film as alpha-particle detector, the electrode and the setting place of the CR-39 were also optimally designed based on the simulation results of the electric field and the detection efficiency. The calibration factor of the new EIRM was estimated to be 0.136±0.002 tracks cm-2 (Bq m-3 h)-1, with the lower detection limit of 0.6 Bq m-3 for a 2-month exposure. Furthermore, both the battery and the dry agent were also replaced to protect the environment. The results of intercomparison and field experiments showed that the performances of the new EIRM were much better than the original one. It suggests that the new type of ERIM is more suitable for large-scale and long-term outdoor radon surveys. (authors)

  20. Research for the life-extension of the wide-range monitoring neutron detectors of HTTR (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Wide-Range Monitoring neutron detectors (WRM detectors) of HTTR are used under the high temperature environment of 450degC in normal operation and 550degC in the accidents. When the WRM detectors are used under the high temperature environment for a long time, characteristics of the neutron detector might be degraded, because of the decrease of the nitrogen concentration in the ionization gas caused by adsorption of nitrogen into the electrode material. Consequently, the nitrogen gas adsorption test was carried out to clarify the quantity of absorbed nitrogen gas in electrode material under the high temperature environment. Then, the performance evaluation test of the prototype detector was carried out, and it was confirmed that degradation of the prototype detector characteristics, caused by adsorption of nitrogen into the electrode material, didn't occur under the high temperature environment. As a result of this research, it was confirmed that the WRM detectors of HTTR are usable for 5 years under the high temperature environment of 450degC in normal operation. This report describes the results of consideration about the life-extension of WRM detectors of HTTR. (author)

  1. A First Targeted Search for Gravitational-Wave Bursts from Core-Collapse Supernovae in Data of First-Generation Laser Interferometer Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; ADAMS, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with a set of two core-collapse supernovae observed between 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO 600 gravitational-wave observatory. The targeted core-collapse supernovae were selected on the basis of (1) proximity (within approximately 15 Mpc), (2) tightness of observational constraints on the time of cor...

  2. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  3. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels;

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  4. Follow the BAT: Monitoring Swift BAT FoV for Prompt Optical Emission from Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ukwatta, T N; Dhuga, K S; Gehrels, N

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of implementing a system called 'Follow the BAT' that will coordinate ground-based robotic optical and near infrared (NIR) telescopes to monitor the Swift BAT field-of-view (FoV). The system will optimize the monitoring locations in the BAT FoV based on individual robotic telescopes' location, FoV, sensitivity and local weather conditions. The aim is to perform coordinated BAT FoV monitoring by professional as well as amateur astronomers around the world. The scientific goal of the proposed system is to facilitate detection of prompt optical and NIR emission from GRBs, especially from short duration GRBs. We have performed a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the feasibility of the project.

  5. Development of three methods for control rod position monitoring based on fixed in-core neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Three methods are utilized separately to unfold the control rod position from the fixed in-core neutron detector measurements. • Fixed in-core neutron detector measurements are simulated by neutronics code SMART. • Numerical results show that all these methods can unfold the control rod position accurately. • Two correction strategies are proposed to correct the simulated fixed in-core detector signals. - Abstract: Nuclear reactor core power distribution on-line monitoring system is very important in core surveillance, and this system should have the ability to indicate some abnormal conditions, such as the unacceptable control rod misalignment. In this study, the methodologies of radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), group method of data handling (GMDH) and Levenberg–Marquardt (LM) algorithm are utilized separately to unfold the control rod position from the fixed in-core neutron detector measurements. For using these methods, a large number of in-core detector signals corresponding to various known rod positions are needed. These data can be generated by an advanced core calculation code. In this study, the neutronics code SMART was used. The simulation results show that all these methods can unfold the control rod position accurately, and the performance comparison shows that the regularized RBFNN performs best. Two correction strategies are proposed to correct the simulated fixed in-core detector signals and improve the rod position monitoring accuracy when there are mismatches between actual physical factors and modeled physical factors

  6. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Ye [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Tang, Xiao-Bin, E-mail: tangxiaobin@nuaa.edu.cn [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Chen, Da [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Equipment Materials Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2015-10-11

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr{sub 3} detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R{sup 2}=0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. - Highlights: • An airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was developed to measure radionuclide after a nuclear accident. • A spectrum correction algorithm was proposed to obtain precise information on the detected radioactivity within a small area. • The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. • The corresponding spectrum correction coefficients increase first and then stay constant.

  7. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr3 detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R2=0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. - Highlights: • An airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was developed to measure radionuclide after a nuclear accident. • A spectrum correction algorithm was proposed to obtain precise information on the detected radioactivity within a small area. • The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible. • The corresponding spectrum correction coefficients increase first and then stay constant

  8. A detector for monitoring the onset of cavitation during therapy-level measurements of ultrasonic power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodnett, M.; Zeqiri, B.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation occurring in the water path between a transducer and the target of a radiation force balance can provide a significant source of error during measurements of ultrasonic power. These problems can be particularly acute at physiotherapy levels (>1 W), and low frequencies (leq 1 MHz). The cavitating bubbles can absorb and scatter incident ultrasound, leading to an underestimate in the measured power. For these reasons, International Specification standards demand the use of degassed water. This imposes requirements that may actually be difficult to meet, for example, in the case of hospitals. Also, initially degassed water will rapidly re-gas, increasing the likelihood of cavitation occurring. For these reasons, NPL has developed a device that monitors acoustic emissions generated by bubble activity, for detecting the onset of cavitation during power measurements. A commercially available needle hydrophone is used to detect these emissions. The acoustic signals are then monitored using a Cavitation Detector (CD) unit, comprising an analogue electrical filter that may be tuned to detect frequency components generated by cavitating bubbles, and which provides an indication of when the measured level exceeds a pre-defined threshold. This paper describes studies to establish a suitable detection scheme, the principles of operation of the CD unit, and the performance tests carried out with a range of propagation media.

  9. A detector for monitoring the onset of cavitation during therapy-level measurements of ultrasonic power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodnett, M; Zeqiri, B [National Physical Laboratory, Queens Road, Teddington, Middlesex, TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic cavitation occurring in the water path between a transducer and the target of a radiation force balance can provide a significant source of error during measurements of ultrasonic power. These problems can be particularly acute at physiotherapy levels (>1 W), and low frequencies ({<=} 1 MHz). The cavitating bubbles can absorb and scatter incident ultrasound, leading to an underestimate in the measured power. For these reasons, International Specification standards demand the use of degassed water. This imposes requirements that may actually be difficult to meet, for example, in the case of hospitals. Also, initially degassed water will rapidly re-gas, increasing the likelihood of cavitation occurring. For these reasons, NPL has developed a device that monitors acoustic emissions generated by bubble activity, for detecting the onset of cavitation during power measurements. A commercially available needle hydrophone is used to detect these emissions. The acoustic signals are then monitored using a Cavitation Detector (CD) unit, comprising an analogue electrical filter that may be tuned to detect frequency components generated by cavitating bubbles, and which provides an indication of when the measured level exceeds a pre-defined threshold. This paper describes studies to establish a suitable detection scheme, the principles of operation of the CD unit, and the performance tests carried out with a range of propagation media.

  10. A novel straightness measurement system applied to the position monitoring of large Particle Physics Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Goudard, R; Ribeiro, R; Klumb, F

    1999-01-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid experiment, CMS, is one of the two general purpose experiments foreseen to operate at the Large Hadron Collider, LHC, at CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. The experiment aims to study very high energy collisions of proton beams. Investigation of the most fundamental properties of matter, in particular the study of the nature of the electroweak symmetry breaking and the origin of mass, is the experiment scope. The central Tracking System, a six meter long cylinder with 2.4 m diameter, will play a major role in all physics searches of the CMS experiment. Its performance depends upon the intrinsic detector performance, on the stability of the supporting structure and on the overall survey, alignment and position monitoring system. The proposed position monitoring system is based on a novel lens-less laser straightness measurement method able to detect deviations from a nominal position of all structural elements of the Central Tracking system. It is based on the recipr...

  11. Implementation of gamma-ray spectrometry in two real-time water monitors using NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the implementation of gamma-ray spectrometry in two real-time water monitors using 2 in.×2 in. NaI(Tl) scintillation detectors is described. These monitors collect the water from the river through a pump and it is analyzed in a vessel, which is shielded with Pb. The full calibration of the monitors was performed experimentally, except for the efficiency curve, which was set using validated Monte Carlo simulations with the EGS5 code system. After the calibration, the monitors permitted the identification and quantification of the involved isotopes in a possible radioactive increment and made it possible to discard possible leaks in the nuclear plants. As an example, a radiological increment during rain is used to show the advantages of gamma-ray spectrometry. To study the capabilities of the monitor, the minimum detectable activity concentrations for 131I, 137Cs and 40K are presented for different integration times. - Highlights: • Gamma-ray spectrometry with NaI(Tl) detectors was implemented in two water monitors. • The monitors were calibrated using experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations. • The efficiency calculations and MDAC values are given. • Advantages of using gamma-ray spectrometry are discussed. • The monitors permit the identification and quantification of isotopes in water

  12. Online monitoring of the Osiris reactor with the Nucifer neutrino detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boireau, G.; Bouvet, L.; Collin, A. P.; Coulloux, G.; Cribier, M.; Deschamp, H.; Durand, V.; Fechner, M.; Fischer, V.; Gaffiot, J.; Gérard Castaing, N.; Granelli, R.; Kato, Y.; Lasserre, T.; Latron, L.; Legou, P.; Letourneau, A.; Lhuillier, D.; Mention, G.; Mueller, Th. A.; Nghiem, T.-A.; Pedrol, N.; Pelzer, J.; Pequignot, M.; Piret, Y.; Prono, G.; Scola, L.; Starzinski, P.; Vivier, M.; Dumonteil, E.; Mancusi, D.; Varignon, C.; Buck, C.; Lindner, M.; Bazoma, J.; Bouvier, S.; Bui, V. M.; Communeau, V.; Cucoanes, A.; Fallot, M.; Gautier, M.; Giot, L.; Guilloux, G.; Lenoir, M.; Martino, J.; Mercier, G.; Milleto, T.; Peuvrel, N.; Porta, A.; Le Quéré, N.; Renard, C.; Rigalleau, L. M.; Roy, D.; Vilajosana, T.; Yermia, F.; Nucifer Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    Originally designed as a new nuclear reactor monitoring device, the Nucifer detector has successfully detected its first neutrinos. We provide the second-shortest baseline measurement of the reactor neutrino flux. The detection of electron antineutrinos emitted in the decay chains of the fission products, combined with reactor core simulations, provides a new tool to assess both the thermal power and the fissile content of the whole nuclear core and could be used by the International Agency for Atomic Energy to enhance the safeguards of civil nuclear reactors. Deployed at only 7.2 m away from the compact Osiris research reactor core (70 MW) operating at the Saclay research center of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, the experiment also exhibits a well-suited configuration to search for a new short baseline oscillation. We report the first results of the Nucifer experiment, describing the performances of the ˜0.85 m3 detector remotely operating at a shallow depth equivalent to ˜12 m of water and under intense background radiation conditions. Based on 145 (106) days of data with the reactor on (off), leading to the detection of an estimated 40760 ν¯ e , the mean number of detected antineutrinos is 281 ±7 (stat )±18 (syst )ν¯ e/day , in agreement with the prediction of 277 ±23 ν¯ e/day . Because of the large background, no conclusive results on the existence of light sterile neutrinos could be derived, however. As a first societal application we quantify how antineutrinos could be used for the Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement.

  13. First Very Low Frequency detection of short repeated bursts from magnetar SGR J1550-5418

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Y T; Bertoni, F C P; Fagundes, P R; Chau, J; Schuch, N J; Hayakawa, M; Hobara, Y; Terasawa, T; Takahashi, T

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first detection of ionospheric disturbances caused by short repeated gamma-ray bursts from the magnetar SGR J1550-5418. Very low frequency (VLF) radio wave data obtained in South America clearly show sudden amplitude and phase changes at the corresponding times of eight SGR bursts. Maximum amplitude and phase changes of the VLF signals appear to be correlated with the gamma-ray fluence. On the other hand, VLF recovery timescales do not show any significant correlation with the fluence, possibly suggesting that the bursts' spectra are not similar to each other. In summary, the Earth's ionosphere can be used as a very large gamma-ray detector and the VLF observations provide us with a new method to monitor high energy astrophysical phenomena without interruption such as Earth Occultation.

  14. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ye; Tang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2015-10-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr3 detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R2=0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible.

  15. Use of corona discharge in gas discharge detectors for monitoring of measurement equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The circuits of designs with gas discharge detectors of ionizing radiation and a method for checking their serviceability without using radioactive sources by measuring corona discharge parameters in the detectors are described. The method is suitable for any gas discharge detectors, it requires small (0.1 sec) time for testing the equipment and provides necessary accuracy and validity of measurements

  16. Portable Heart Rate Detector Based on Photoplethysmography with Android Programmable Devices for Ubiquitous Health Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Kin Lao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a miniature portable heart rate detector system is implemented by modern hardware ICs and simple sensor circuit with software executable on both PC and Android platform. The biosignal is first extracted via photoplethysmography (PPG principle into electric signal. Then a microprocessor is used to covert biosignal from analog to digital format, suitably for feeding into an RF module (nRF24L01 for RF transmission. On the receiver end, the computer and/or smart phone can analyze the data using a robust algorithm that can detect peaks of the PPG waveform, hence to calculating the heart rate. Some application software running on Windows and Android phone have been developed to display heart rate information and time domain waveform to users for health care monitoring. In the future, pure Bluetooth technology will be used for wireless personal communications instead of RF modules. At the same time, the data can be sent to computer console using existing available networks (3G, 4G, WiFi, etc. for health database logging purpose.

  17. Front-end Design and Characterization for the ν-Angra Nuclear Reactor Monitoring Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornelas, T. I.; Araújo, F. T. H.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Costa, J. A.; Nóbrega, R. A.

    2016-07-01

    The Neutrinos Angra (ν-Angra) Experiment aims to construct an antineutrinos detection device capable of monitoring the Angra dos Reis nuclear reactor activity. Nuclear reactors are intense sources of antineutrinos, and the thermal power released in the fission process is directly related to the flow rate of these particles. The antineutrinos energy spectrum also provides valuable information on the nuclear source isotopic composition. The proposed detector will be equipped with photomultipliers tubes (PMT) which will be readout by a custom Amplifier-Shaper-Discriminator circuit designed to condition its output signals to the acquisition modules to be digitized and processed by an FPGA. The readout circuit should be sensitive to single photoelectron signals, process fast signals, with a full-width-half-amplitude of about 5 ns, have a narrow enough output pulse width to detect both particles coming out from the inverse beta decay (bar nue+p → n + e+), and its output amplitude should be linear to the number of photoelectrons generated inside the PMT, used for energy estimation. In this work, some of the main PMT characteristics are measured and a new readout circuit is proposed, described and characterized.

  18. Thin silicon strip detectors for beam monitoring in Micro-beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is an emerging cancer treatment that is currently being developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. This technique uses a highly collimated and fractionated X-ray beam array with extremely high dose rate and very small divergence, to benefit from the dose-volume effect, thus sparing healthy tissue. In case of any beam anomalies and system malfunctions, special safety measures must be installed, such as an emergency safety shutter that requires continuous monitoring of the beam intensity profile. Within the 3DMiMic project, a novel silicon strip detector that can tackle the special features of MRT, such as the extremely high spatial resolution and dose rate, has been developed to be part of the safety shutter system. The first prototypes have been successfully fabricated, and experiments aimed to demonstrate their suitability for this unique application have been performed. Design, fabrication and the experimental results as well as any identified inadequacies for future optimisation are reported and discussed in this paper

  19. Micro-strip Metal Foil Detectors for the Beam Profile Monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Pugatch, V M; Fedorovitch, O A; Mikhailenko, A V; Prystupa, S V; Pylypchenko, Y

    2005-01-01

    The Micro-strip Metal Foil Detectors (MMFD) designed and used for the Beam Profile Monitoring (BPM) are discussed. Fast particles hitting a metal strip initiate Secondary Electron Emission (SEE) which occurs at 10 - 50 nm surface layers of a strip. The SEE yield is measured by a sensitive Charge Integrator with built-in current-to-frequency converter (1 Hz per 1 fA). The MMFD (deposited onto the 20 μm thick Si-wafer) with 32 Al strips (10 μm wide, 32 μm pitch) has been used for the BPM of the 32 MeV alpha-particle beam at the MPIfK (Heidelberg) Tandem generator for Single-Event-Upset studies of the BEETLE micro-chip. Similar MMFD (0.5 μm thick Ni-strips) with totally removed Si-wafer (by plasma-chemistry, at the working area of 8 x 10 mm2) has been applied for the on-line X-ray BPM at the HASYLAB (DESY). The number of photons (11.3 GeV, mean X-ray energy 18 keV) producing out of a strip a single SEE was evaluated as (1.5 ±0.5)* 104. MMFD has demonstrated stable...

  20. Thin silicon strip detectors for beam monitoring in Micro-beam Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povoli, M.; Alagoz, E.; Bravin, A.; Cornelius, I.; Bräuer-Krisch, E.; Fournier, P.; Hansen, T. E.; Kok, A.; Lerch, M.; Monakhov, E.; Morse, J.; Petasecca, M.; Requardt, H.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Röhrich, D.; Sandaker, H.; Salomé, M.; Stugu, B.

    2015-11-01

    Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) is an emerging cancer treatment that is currently being developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. This technique uses a highly collimated and fractionated X-ray beam array with extremely high dose rate and very small divergence, to benefit from the dose-volume effect, thus sparing healthy tissue. In case of any beam anomalies and system malfunctions, special safety measures must be installed, such as an emergency safety shutter that requires continuous monitoring of the beam intensity profile. Within the 3DMiMic project, a novel silicon strip detector that can tackle the special features of MRT, such as the extremely high spatial resolution and dose rate, has been developed to be part of the safety shutter system. The first prototypes have been successfully fabricated, and experiments aimed to demonstrate their suitability for this unique application have been performed. Design, fabrication and the experimental results as well as any identified inadequacies for future optimisation are reported and discussed in this paper.

  1. A First Targeted Search for Gravitational-Wave Bursts from Core-Collapse Supernovae in Data of First-Generation Laser Interferometer Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calder'on; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavagli`a, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corpuz, A; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Del'eglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; D'iaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Girolamo, T; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J -D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; Gonz'alez, G; Castro, J M Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Grado, A; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J -M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jim'enez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; K, Haris; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamaretsos, I; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; K'ef'elian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Kr'olak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; L"uck, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; na-Sandoval, F Maga; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; M'arka, S; M'arka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, K N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Pereira, R; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; P"urrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosi'nska, D; Rowan, S; R"udiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Santamaria, L; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O E S; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Sch"onbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepa'nczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; T'apai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; T"oyr"a, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifir`o, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vas'uth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicer'e, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; zny, A Zadro; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J

    2016-01-01

    We present results from a search for gravitational-wave bursts coincident with a set of two core-collapse supernovae observed between 2007 and 2011. We employ data from the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), the Virgo gravitational-wave observatory, and the GEO 600 gravitational-wave observatory. The targeted core-collapse supernovae were selected on the basis of (1) proximity (within approximately 15 Mpc), (2) tightness of observational constraints on the time of core collapse that defines the gravitational-wave search window, and (3) coincident operation of at least two interferometers at the time of core collapse. We find no plausible gravitational-wave candidates. We present the probability of detecting signals from both astrophysically well-motivated and more speculative gravitational-wave emission mechanisms as a function of distance from Earth, and discuss the implications for the detection of gravitational waves from core-collapse supernovae by the upgraded Advanced LIGO and V...

  2. Design and characterization of the beam monitor detectors of the Italian National Center of Oncological Hadron-therapy (CNAO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new hadron-therapy facility implementing an active beam scanning technique has been developed at the Italian National Center of Oncological Hadron-therapy (CNAO). This paper presents the design and the characterization of the beam monitor detectors developed for the on-line monitoring and control of the dose delivered during a treatment at CNAO. The detectors are based on five parallel-plate transmission ionization chambers with either a single large electrode or electrodes segmented in 128 strips (strip chambers) and 32×32 pixels (pixel chamber). The detectors are arranged in two independent boxes with an active area larger than 200×200 mm2 and a total water equivalent thickness along the beam path of about 0.9 mm. A custom front-end chip with 64 channels converts the integrated ionization channels without dead-time. The detectors were tested at the clinical proton beam facility of the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI) which implements a spot scanning technique, each spot being characterized by a predefined number of protons delivered with a pencil beam in a specified point of the irradiation field. The short-term instability was measured by delivering several identical spots in a time interval of few tenths of seconds and is found to be lower than 0.3%. The non-uniformity, measured by delivering sequences of spots in different points of the detector surface, results to be lower than 1% in the single electrode chambers and lower than 1.5% in the strip and pixel chambers, reducing to less than 0.5% and 1% in the restricted 100×100 mm2 central area of the detector.

  3. Development of the ZnS(Ag)/BC-408 phoswich detector for monitoring radioactive contamination inside pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small radiation detection system is necessary for the direct characterization of alpha/beta-ray contamination inside pipes generated during the decommission of a nuclear facility. In this work, the new type phoswich detector consisting of the ZnS(Ag) and plastic scintillator for α/β simultaneous counting was designed as part of a development of a equipment capable of monitoring radiological contamination inside pipes. The optimum counting conditions in dimensions of scintillator and a detection system were experimentally confirmed and a performance of alpha/beta-ray discrimination was evaluated. As a result, optimum conditions of a detector suitable for monitoring radiological contamination inside pipes and a feasibility of application to pipe-inside were confirmed

  4. Development of hybrid gas detectors for monitoring neutrons induced from the large intensity proton linear Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, G. S.; Lee, G. S.; Ahn, S. H. [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-05-15

    Design of a hybrid gaseous detector for slow neutrons. Construction of the hybrid gaseous detector and tests with a {sup 52}Cf isotope and the MC-50 cyclotron. Designs, constructions, and tests for hybrid scintillators using various neutron sensitive materials (2{sup nd} year). Application to development of detectors for high energy physics (2{sup nd} year). Practical R and Ds for applications to medical and industrial purposes (3{sup rd} year)

  5. Properties of PACE-I HgCdTe Detectors in Space - the NICMOS Warm-up Monitoring Program

    OpenAIRE

    Boeker, T.

    2000-01-01

    We summarize the results of a monitoring program which was executed following the cryogen exhaustion of the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS) onboard the Hubble Space Telescope. During the subsequent warm-up, detector parameters such as detective quantum efficiency, dark current, bias offsets, and saturation levels have been measured over the temperature range 62K to about 100K. The measurements provide a unique database of the characteristics of PACE-I HgCdTe detect...

  6. Indigenous pedestrian portal monitor radiation detector design for safeguard applications in Brazilian fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazilian Navy Fuel Cycle facilities manipulate radioactive materials safeguarded by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC). Non-proliferation measures are needed to avoid any risks that could jeopardize the credibility of security practices at these facilities. Efforts to nationalize equipment used worldwide in safeguard and security applications, a radiation pedestrian portal monitor detector (RPPMD), contribute to the development of new applied research and respond to current concerns regarding adequate storage of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). In this work, preliminary studies were performed based on our indigenous design to estimate initial geometries, materials and performance of our initial design according to criteria suggested by ANSI N42.38-2006 standard. Numerical simulations were conducted using GEANT4 code, an open source Monte Carlo toolkit simulation package, to track particle interactions in matter. The RPPMD was initially modeled with PVT-based plastic scintillators with density of 1.032 g/cm3. Project constraints limit acquisition costs, detection volume, dimensions and maintenance costs. In PVT-based plastic scintillators, due to its low averaged atomic number, density and poor energy resolution, probabilities of having well defined full energy peaks are negligible, so spectroscopic information needed to identify radioisotopes is severely limited. Thus, the design considers all available information, limited spectroscopy in addition to pulse counting information. The activity of the nuclear material to be safeguarded is significantly lower than the activity of suggested test sources used in ANSI N42.38-2006 standard (1000 γ/s with energy of 1001 keV and 20 000 γ/s with energy of 186 keV, for a commercial UO2 PWR fuel pellet disregarding self-absorption). Thus, in order to correctly statistically model this problem, it was necessary to consider

  7. Monitoring implementation of the RP-10 reactor by N-16 using an NaI detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements with an NaI detector are carried out in order to: first, to locate the detector optimal position to measure the activity of N16; and second, to determine the energy and time spectrum for the activity observed. This will allow calibration of the march chamber 4 according to the activities of N16

  8. Design of a novel Cherenkov detectors system for machine induced background monitoring in the CMS cavern

    CERN Document Server

    Orfanelli, Styliani; Giunta, Marina; Stickland, David P; Ambrose, Mitchell J; Rusack, Roger; Finkel, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    A novel detector system has been designed for an efficient online measurement of the machineinduced background in the CMS experimental cavern. The suppression of the CMS cavern background originating from pp collision products and the 25 ns bunch spacing have set the requirements for the detector design. Each detector unit will be a radiation hard, cylindrical Cherenkov radiator optically coupled to an ultra-fast UV-sensitive photomultiplier tube, providing a prompt, directionally sensitive measurement. Simulation and test beam measurements have shown the achievability of the goals that have driven the baseline design. The system will consist of 20 azimuthally distributed detectors per end, installed at a radius of r ~ 180 cm and a distance 20.6 m away from the CMS interaction region. The detector units will enable a measurement of the transverse distribution of the bunchby- bunch machine induced background flux. This will provide important feedback from the CMS on the beam conditions during the LHC machine s...

  9. Sensitivity of a low energy Ge detector system for in vivo monitoring in the framework of ICRP 78 applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In in vivo detection of internal contamination by actinides the minimum detectable activities (MDAs) correspond to significant doses, so the sensitivity of the detection system is the key to establishing adequate individual monitoring programmes for internal exposures of these radionuclides. The whole body counting (WBC) faculty at CIEMAT uses a low-energy Ge detector system with different available counting geometries to estimate the retention of actinides in the lungs and evaluate 125I in thyroid and 241Am in bone (skull and knee). A study of the factors and uncertainties involved in estimations of MDA is presented for lung and thyroid monitoring. The dependence of detection limits on counting efficiency in the measurement of low-energy emitters in lungs has been carefully studied, carrying out a comparison among different biometric equations obtained by ultrasound techniques for estimations of chest wall thickness. Dosimetric implications of the estimated MDS's are taken into account in the framework of ICRP-78 application and considering Spanish regulations. The main interest in lung measurements is for the assessment of occupational exposures. This work confirms the low-energy Ge detector system as an adequate in vivo technique for the routine monitoring of internal exposure to most insoluble uranium compounds (detection of 3% enriched uranium in lungs), and also to be useful in special monitoring programmes or in case of incidents when the detection of 241Am is required. (author)

  10. Avalanche photodiodes as large dynamic range detectors for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigated silicon-based avalanche photodiodes (APDs) as X-ray detectors in terms of their linearity, maximum counting rates, and dynamic range with 8.4 keV synchrotron radiation. Measurements resulted in counting rates that extend from the APD's noise level of 10-2 Hz to saturation counting rates in excess of 108 Hz. In addition, by monitoring the APD's noise level and photon counting efficiency between synchrotron bursts, we demonstrate nine orders of magnitude dynamic range. ((orig.))

  11. Development of hybrid gas detectors for monitoring neutrons induced from the Large Intensity Proton Linear Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the research is developments of new hybrid-neutron detectors to measure neutron fluxes where proton accelerators are operated for the purpose of neutron therapy or various industrial applications. The framework of the R and D based upon GEANT simulations was developed for 10B and Gd2O3 hybrid scintillation detectors. The simulation results were applied to design the detector structures and to determine the proper test method where neutron sources were used. The detector response functions for the 10B and Gd2O3 hybrid scintillators were measured by proper calibrations by using neutrons emitted from a 0.5 Ci 252Cf isotope. Furthermore, the detector characteristics were obtained by the comparisons of the neutron signals with those of the gamma-rays emitted from the 137Cs and 60Co sources. We have performed a feasibility study for the future applications of the 10B and Gd2O3 hybrid scintillators to medical imaging of the thermal neutron fields for neutron-beam therapies. A radiation hardness tested for the Resistive Plate Chamber of the CMS/LHC experiment was performed by using the fast neutrons produced by the M50 proton cyclotron in KIRAMS and a 10 mm thick beryllium target. Four tests with cosmic muons have been carried out before and after the neutron irradiation to investigate the effects on the characteristics of the detectors. No significant degradation of the detector characteristics due to the effect, equivalent to 45 Gy, has been observed

  12. On technology of electromagnetic radiation monitoring and treatment on rock burst in island working face%孤岛工作面冲击地压电磁辐射监测与治理技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈杨

    2014-01-01

    Taking the 1304 island working face in Yangcheng Mine as the example,based on the principle of electromagnetic radiation predicting rock burst and combining with support pres-sure distribution law in island working face,the paper analyzes the electromagnetic radiation mo-nitoring method and layout of measuring points.By using a variety of monitoring and treatment means centered on the electromagnetic radiation monitoring technology,a new technical method of monitoring and controlling for rock burst in island working face is established,including elec-tromagnetic radiation warning,rock burst hazard identification by drilling cuttings method,un-loading pressure by deep-hole blasting in coal and electromagnetic radiation testing the stress re-lease effect,which has obtained good effectiveness.%以阳城煤矿1304孤岛工作面为例,基于电磁辐射预测冲击地压原理,结合孤岛工作面支承压力分布规律,分析了电磁辐射监测方法及测点布置方式,通过采用以电磁辐射监测技术为核心的多种监测与治理手段,建立了电磁辐射预警→钻屑法危险识别→煤体深孔爆破卸压→电磁辐射卸压效果检验的孤岛工作面冲击地压危险监测与治理技术,并取得了良好的效果。

  13. Up-down and in-out asymmetries monitoring based on broadband radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertical (up-down) and in-out asymmetries in the particle and heat divertor flow distributions, or in plasma emissivity from the confined volume, are recognized as universal phenomena, but each type of magnetic confinement device presents its own particular balance between different sources of asymmetries. The direction of the toroidal magnetic field, the nature, intensity and toroidal position of the heating source, the convection-like losses of fast ions and electrons have been found to modify significantly the flux asymmetries. The search for physical mechanisms responsible for the asymmetry and possible methods of asymmetry correction has become an imperative goal of divertor research for large stellarator type devices and next generation devices. In the TJ-II stellarator, changes in wall recycling due to changes in the ECRH driven convective flux of trapped particles were detected by means of toroidal asymmetries in radiation near the plasma periphery. In this high-ripple low-shear stellarator, changes in the transport of ripple-trapped particles before they reach the limiter or the divertor region can also induce asymmetries in some bulk plasma parameters, such as global radiation. Although the spatial distribution as well as the degree of asymmetry would depend on birth position, the production rate and energy spectrum of the trapped particle populations and total radiation depends on electron density and temperature as well as on plasma composition, the systematic study of the asymmetry in signals from twin detectors located at selected toroidal and poloidal positions can serve to assess the relative importance of the different drift mechanisms. This is a non- perturbing method that is especially appropriate when the shape of the vacuum chamber does not allow for installing probes around the complete poloidal section at any toroidal position, as is the case of TJ-II. Recently, a set of bolometer systems distributed has been installed about the vacuum

  14. HgI2 detectors for Pu contamination monitoring and radiological protection measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HgI2 detectors developed from solution-grown crystals show good-detection properties (resolution, efficiency, stability) for X-rays and low-energy gamma rays (EL. Two examples of devices based on these HgI2 detectors are shown: (1) A compact probe for Pu detection in wounds which gives also information on the depth of the contamination, and (2) an array of 16x1 cm2 HgI2 detectors for Pu contamination of soil or wet surfaces where alpha detection is not valid. A tentative use of HgI2 detectors as compact ionization chambers working in the current mode is also described. (orig.)

  15. Research on self-powered detectors for gamma-ray monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-powered neutron detectors are used extensively in power reactors both for flux mapping and for power control and over-power protection, because of their small size, ruggedness and simplicity. But they have a few disadvantages such as high burn-up rate and background signal produced by the gamma-rays from the reactor itself. In order to overcome these disadvantages and to achieve a better understanding of gamma-ray effects of self-powered detectors, a new type of self-powered detectors was designed and fabricated by the author, and experiments have been carried out in the 10kCi sup(60)Co gamma irradiation facility in Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute. The configuration of the new type detectors is not of coaxial type but of paralled plate in order to obtain directional effects of gamma-ray incidence. Detector materials and dimensions are so chosen that the output current signal is large enough to be detected using some commercial measuring divice even at low dose rate and the contribution of the lead cable to the totel signal is negligibly small. The results are 1) sensitivity is depended primarily on the materials of the insulator, 2) output signal has a good linearity to gamma dose rate, 3) response of detectors is prompt, but not perfect, 4) critical thickness for satusation of the output current is thinner than the range of photoelectron in the materials. (Author) πT

  16. Characterisation and monitoring of the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) in fractured gneisses of the Roselend underground laboratory: permeability measurements, transport property changes and related radon bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, Jérôme; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe; Richon, Patrick; Pontreau, Sébastien; Guillon, Sophie; Pili, Eric

    2010-05-01

    pressure measurements between an obturated borehole and the tunnel is conducted to monitor the possible modifications of the transport properties of the EDZ due to hydraulical and/or mechanical sollicitations of the nearby Roselend reservoir lake. As radon level is controlled by emanation and transport path through the medium. The observed bursts of radon should be due to changes of the radon transport properties (Trique et al. 1999) of the EDZ. A correlation between the differential pressure variations and radon bursts is clearly observed. Radon bursts seem to be related to overpressure events that take place in the instrumented borehole. Which external sollicitations, hydraulical or mechanical, or both, induce such a behaviour? References Bossart, P., Meier, P. M., Moeri, A., Trick, T., and J.-C. Mayor (2002). Geological and hydraulic characterisation of the excavation disturbed zone in the Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Engineering Geology, 66, 19-38. Dezayes, C., and T. Villemin (2002). Etat de la fracturation dans la galerie CEA de Roselend et analyse de la déformation cassante dans le massif du Méraillet, technical report, Lab. de Geodyn. de Chaisnes Alp., Univ. de Savoie, Savoie, France. Jakubick, A. T., and T. Franz (1993). Vacuum testing of the permeability of the excavation damaged zone, Rock Mech. Rock Engng., 26(2), 165-182. Patriarche, D., Pili, E., Adler, P. M., and J.-F. Thovert (2007). Stereological analysis of fractures in the Roselend tunnel and permeability determination, Water Resour. Res., 43, W09421. Richon, P., Perrier, F., Sabroux, J.-C., Trique, M., Ferry, C., Voisin, V., and E. Pili (2004). Spatial and time variations of radon-222 concentration in the atmosphere of a dead-end horizontal tunnel, J. Environ. Radioact., 78, 179-198. Richon, P., Perrier, F., Pili, E., and J.-C. Sabroux (2009). Detectability and significance of the 12hr barometric tide in radon-222 signal, dripwater flow rate, air temperature and carbon dioxide

  17. New Results on the Spectral Evolution of Magnetar Bright Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, George A.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A.; GBM Magnetar Team

    2013-04-01

    Magnetars are isolated neutron stars characterized by long spin periods (2-12 s) and large spin down rates, implying a very strong magnetic field, B>10E14 G. Magnetars exhibit short bursts of hard X-/soft gamma-rays with luminosities ranging from 10E37 to 10E41 erg/s. The magnetar SGR J1550-5418 entered an extremely active bursting episode, starting on 2008 October 03 until 2009 April 17, during which Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) observed several hundred bursts from this source. Such wealth of bursts resulted in the largest catalog of detailed temporal and spectral results for SGR J1550-5418. Here, we discuss new results from time-resolved spectral analysis of the brightest bursts from this source. Our analysis, together with the comparison of our results with other magnetar bursts, enabled us to put strong constraints on the theories underlying the magnetar bursts emission mechanism.

  18. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazzi, A. C.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Younes, G. A.; Kaneko, Y.; Göğüş, E.; Lin, L.; Granot, J.; Finger, M. H.; Chaplin, V. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Watts, A. L.; von Kienlin, A.; Baring, M. G.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Gibby, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.; van der Klis, M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2015-05-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550-5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  19. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Collazzi, A C; van der Horst, A J; Younes, G A; Kaneko, Y; Gogus, E; Lin, L; Granot, J; Finger, M H; Chaplin, V L; Huppenkothen, D; Watts, A L; von Kienlin, A; Baring, M G; Gruber, D; Bhat, P N; Gibby, M H; Gehrels, N; McEnery, J; van der Klis, M; Wijers, R A M J

    2015-01-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, giving the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from July 2008 to June 2013. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550-5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  20. Burst investigation on zircaloy-4 claddings in inert environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Burst investigations on zircaloy-4 cladding in argon environment. • Clad wall displacement measurement. • Effect of internal overpressure and heating rate on burst parameters. • Semi-empirical correlation for burst stress has been proposed. - Abstract: An extensive burst investigation has been carried out on the zircaloy-4 claddings in an inert environment to simulate clad burst during a postulated loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) conditions. The parameters varied during the burst experiments were heating rate and internal overpressure. The temperature, internal overpressure and ballooning data were monitored online and recorded during the heating process of burst specimen. In addition, post-experiment measurements were also conducted on the burst specimen to determine various burst parameters–burst strains and burst stress. A semi-empirical correlation was developed to predict the burst stress for a given burst temperature. A reasonable agreement between the predicted and experimental data has been observed. The proposed correlation was also compared with available established correlation for steam environment

  1. Development of environmental radiation monitoring system NaI (Tl) scintillation detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurement of environmental dose rate and the discrimination of radiation source can be achieved by the NaI(Tl) detector and circuits. The dose conversion factor evaluating the exposure rate of gamma radiation is obtained from the NaI(Tl) response function. The response function is simulated by Monte Carlo method and experimentally corrected for realistic energy resolution. For a 3 x 3 inch cylindrical NaI(Tl) scintillation detector, the dose conversion factor was electronically recorded to the memory of the developed dose conversion unit (DCU). When the limit signals is emitted to a microprocessor-controlled single channel analyzer (SCA) as memorized, the number equivalent to total and specific energy level dose is counted. This process was confirmed by the standard dose measurement detector for several dose rates. The result is so good at environmental radiation dose level (<1%). The deviation in high dose rate is smaller than that of basic multi-channel analyzer (MCA) dose calculation. The 3 x 3 inch detector shows more sensitivity than the 2 x 2 inch one and the angular sensitivity of this detector is maximum at 45deg - 90deg and minimum at 135deg - 180deg. (author)

  2. Observations on the Stanford 4800 kg gravity wave detector with a cosmic ray monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gravitational radiation was first predicted in 1916 by A. Einstein as a consequence of the theory of general relativity. The resonant acoustic detector, invented in 1960 by J. Weber, promises the best change at present of direct observation of gravitational radiation. The group at Stanford University has constructed a 4800 kg cryogenic detector, which is the most sensitive detector successfully operated to date. In this dissertation, data are presented from the 1985 run of 36.8 days aggregate collection time. Over the full bandwidth of approximately 13 Hz, the optimum detector noise temperature was found to be 8 mK when the system was operated at 4.3 K. An actual filter was implemented over a 5 Hz bandwidth which yielded the filtered noise temperature of 15 mK. Filtering over the entire bandwidth and operation of a dilution refrigerator at 1 K should lower the noise temperature to below 3 mK. In the second half of this dissertation, the effect of cosmic rays on a gravity wave bar detector is considered. A one-dimensional thermoacoustic model is used to predict the size of the signal. Measurable effects are restricted to rarer events which may easily be vetoed as gravity wave candidates

  3. Relativistic effects in gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to recent models of the sources of gamma-ray bursts the extremely energetic emission is caused by shells expanding with ultrarelativistic velocity. With the recent identification of optical sources at the positions of some gamma-ray bursts these ''fireball'' models have acquired an actuality that invites to use them as a motivating application when teaching special relativity. We demonstrate several relativistic effects associated with these models which are very pronounced due to the great velocity of the shell. For example a burst lasting for a month in the rest frame of an element of the shell lasts for a few seconds only, in the rest frame of our detector. It is shown how the observed properties of a burst are modified by aberration and the Doppler effect. The apparent luminosity as a function of time is calculated. Modifications due to the motion of the star away from the observer are calculated. (Author)

  4. Performance of the Gas Gain Monitoring system of the CMS RPC muon detector and effective working point fine tuning

    CERN Document Server

    Colafranceschi, S; Bianco, S; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Russo, A; Saviano, G; Vendittozzi, C; Abbrescia, M; Aleksandrov, A; Berzano, U; Calabria, C; Carrillo, C; Colaleo, A; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Kang, M; Lee, K S; Loddo, F; Park, S K; Pugliese, G; Maggi, M; Shin, S; Rodozov, M; Shopova, M; Sultanov, G; Verwillingen, P

    2012-01-01

    The Gas Gain Monitoring (GGM) system of the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) muon detector in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment provides fast and accurate determination of the stability in the working point conditions due to gas mixture changes in the closed loop recirculation system. In 2011 the GGM began to operate using a feedback algorithm to control the applied voltage, in order to keep the GGM response insensitive to environmental temperature and atmospheric pressure variations. Recent results are presented on the feedback method used and on alternative algorithms.

  5. Possible use of CdTe detectors in kVp monitoring of diagnostic x-ray tubes

    OpenAIRE

    Krmar, M.; Bucalović, N.; Baucal, M.; Jovančević, N.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that kVp of diagnostic X-ray devices (or maximal energy of x-ray photon spectra) should be monitored routinely; however a standardized noninvasive technique has yet to be developed and proposed. It is well known that the integral number of Compton scattered photons and the intensities of fluorescent x-ray lines registered after irradiation of some material by an x-ray beam are a function of the maximal beam energy. CdTe detectors have sufficient energy resolution to dist...

  6. Gadolinium-doped water cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma-ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazeley, Steven A; Svoboda, Robert C; Bernstein, Adam; Bowden, Nathaniel

    2013-02-12

    A water Cerenkov-based neutron and high energy gamma ray detector and radiation portal monitoring system using water doped with a Gadolinium (Gd)-based compound as the Cerenkov radiator. An optically opaque enclosure is provided surrounding a detection chamber filled with the Cerenkov radiator, and photomultipliers are optically connected to the detect Cerenkov radiation generated by the Cerenkov radiator from incident high energy gamma rays or gamma rays induced by neutron capture on the Gd of incident neutrons from a fission source. The PMT signals are then used to determine time correlations indicative of neutron multiplicity events characteristic of a fission source.

  7. Performance of the Gas Gain Monitoring system of the CMS RPC muon detector and effective working point fine tuning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gas Gain Monitoring (GGM) system of the Resistive Plate Chamber (RPC) muon detector in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment provides fast and accurate determination of the stability in the working point conditions due to gas mixture changes in the closed loop recirculation system. In 2011 the GGM began to operate using a feedback algorithm to control the applied voltage, in order to keep the GGM response insensitive to environmental temperature and atmospheric pressure variations. Recent results are presented on the feedback method used and on alternative algorithms. (technical report)

  8. Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH‐EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    The WATCH wide field x‐ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence of...

  9. High-energy emission from bright gamma-ray bursts using Fermi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the scientific objectives of one of the present NASA missions, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST), is the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fermi's payload comprises two science instruments, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). GBM was designed to detect and localize bursts for the Fermi mission. By means of an array of 12 NaI(Tl) (8 keV to 1 MeV) and two BGO (0.2 to 40 MeV) scintillation detectors, GBM extends the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the LAT instrument into the traditional range of current GRB databases. The physical detector response of the GBM instrument to GRBs has been determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground individual detector calibration measurements. The GBM detectors have been calibrated from 10 keV to 17.5 MeV using various gamma sources, and the detector response has been derived by simulations over the entire energy range (8 keV to 40 MeV) using GEANT. The GBM instrument has been operating successfully in orbit since June 11, 2008. The total trigger count from the time GBM triggering was enabled in July 2008 through December 2009 is 655, and about 380 of these triggers were classified as GRBs. Moreover, GBM detected several bursts in common with the LAT. These amazing detections mainly fulfill the primary science goal of GBM, which is the joint analysis of spectra and time histories of GRBs observed by both Fermi instruments. For every trigger, GBM provides near-real time on-board burst locations to permit repointing of the spacecraft and to obtain LAT observations of delayed emission from bursts. GBM and LAT refined locations are rapidly disseminated to the scientific community, often permitting extensive multiwavelength follow-up observations by NASA's Swift mission or other space- based observatories, and by numerous ground-based telescopes, thus allowing redshift determinations. Calculations of LAT upper limits are mainly based

  10. High-energy emission from bright gamma-ray bursts using Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta

    2010-05-25

    Among the scientific objectives of one of the present NASA missions, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST), is the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fermi's payload comprises two science instruments, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). GBM was designed to detect and localize bursts for the Fermi mission. By means of an array of 12 NaI(Tl) (8 keV to 1 MeV) and two BGO (0.2 to 40 MeV) scintillation detectors, GBM extends the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the LAT instrument into the traditional range of current GRB databases. The physical detector response of the GBM instrument to GRBs has been determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground individual detector calibration measurements. The GBM detectors have been calibrated from 10 keV to 17.5 MeV using various gamma sources, and the detector response has been derived by simulations over the entire energy range (8 keV to 40 MeV) using GEANT. The GBM instrument has been operating successfully in orbit since June 11, 2008. The total trigger count from the time GBM triggering was enabled in July 2008 through December 2009 is 655, and about 380 of these triggers were classified as GRBs. Moreover, GBM detected several bursts in common with the LAT. These amazing detections mainly fulfill the primary science goal of GBM, which is the joint analysis of spectra and time histories of GRBs observed by both Fermi instruments. For every trigger, GBM provides near-real time on-board burst locations to permit repointing of the spacecraft and to obtain LAT observations of delayed emission from bursts. GBM and LAT refined locations are rapidly disseminated to the scientific community, often permitting extensive multiwavelength follow-up observations by NASA's Swift mission or other space- based observatories, and by numerous ground-based telescopes, thus allowing redshift determinations. Calculations of LAT upper limits are

  11. MeV ion beams generated by intense pulsed laser monitored by Silicon Carbide detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Calcagno, L.; Musumeci, P.; Cutroneo, M.; Torrisi, L.; La Via, F.; Ullschmied, Jiří

    Bristol : IOP Publishing, 2014, Č. 012009. ISSN 1742-6588. [Plasma Physics by Laser and Applications 2013 Conference (PPLA2013). Lecce (IT), 02.10.2013-04.10.2013] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 284464 - LASERLAB-EUROPE Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : MeV ions * plasma * SiC detector * PALS Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  12. Computed neutron response of spherical moderator-detector systems for radiation protection monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutrons of energies below 500 keV are important from the point of view of radiation protection of personnel working around reactors. However, as no neutron sources are available at lower energies, no measured values of neutron energy response are available between thermal and 0.5 MeV (but for Sb-Be source at 24 keV). The response functions in this range are, therefore, arrived at theoretically. After giving a comprehensive review of the work done in the field of response of moderated neutron detectors, a Monte Carlo method developed for this purpose is described and used to calculate energy response functions of the two spherical moderator-detector systems, namely, one using a central BF3 counter and the other using 6LiI(Eu) scintillator of 0.490 dia crystal. The polythene sphere diameter ranged from 2'' to 12''. The results obtained follow the trend predicted by other calculations and experiments, but are a definite improvement over them, because the most recent data on cross sections and angular distribution are used and the opacity of the detector i.e. the presence and size of the detector within the moderator is taken into account in the present calculations. The reasons for the discrepancies in the present results and those obtained earlier by other methods are discussed. The response of the Leake counter arrived at by the present method agrees very well with experimental calibration. (M.G.B.)

  13. A spectroscopy-based detector to monitor tomato growth condition in greenhouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ce; Li, Minzan; Cui, Di

    2008-12-01

    A spectroscopy-based detector is developed to measure the nitrogen and chlorophyll content of tomato leaves and then to predict the growth condition of tomato plants in greenhouse. The detector uses two wavebands, 527 nm and 762 nm, since it is proved that these wavebands are sensitive to nitrogen and chlorophyll content in plant leaves by previous field test. The detector contains: A Y-type optic fiber, two silicon photocells, a signal processing unit, and a MCU. Light reflection from tomato leaves is transmitted by the Y-type optic fiber to the surface of the silicon photo cells, which transfer optical signal into electrical signal. Then the analog signal is amplified to conform to the TTL level signal standard and finally converted to digital signal by MAX186. After that, the MCU carries on a series of actions, including data calculating, displaying and storage. Using the measured data, the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is calculated to estimate the nitrogen and chlorophyll content in plant leaves. The result is directly displayed on an LCD screen. Users have an option in saving data, either into a USB-memory stick or into a database over the PC serial port. The detector is portable, inexpensive, and convenient, which make it meet farmers' need in China. The performance test shows that the growth model works very well, and the device has high accuracy in predicting the growth condition of tomato plants in greenhouse.

  14. Development of a monitor system for gas based detectors and measurement of electron attachment in the chamber gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of an international collaboration a new electron-positron linear accelerator (ILC) with a c. m. energy up to 500 GeV is planned. For the International Large Detector Concept (ILD) a time projection chamber (TPC) shall perform precise measurements of the particle tracks. In order to fulfil the high requirements on the resolution, a microstructure gas-amplification system is used for read-out. For research and development of the detector principle for the application at the ILC at DESY a large TPC prototype is developed. For the operation of the detector it is necessary to monitor its state and especially that of the measurement gas. For this purpose in the framework of this thesis a slow control system is built, which shall make possible for the different collaboration partners to operate the prototype and to integrate the slow control data into their measurement. For this with an object-oriented control system a graphic user interface was created, which makes an overview over the applied measurement devices and a driving allows. Furthermore the influence of impurities of the gas mixture by oxygen was studied. For this with a small TPC prototype measurements of the electron attachment coefficient at different oxygen concentrations were performed with a magnetic flux density of 4 T. From the amplitude of the measurement signal a rate for the electron attachment could be determined. The values obtained for this agree sufficiently in comparison with literature values

  15. Long-term source monitoring with BATSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, R. B.; Harmon, B. A.; Finger, M. H.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    The uncollimated Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) large area detectors (LADs) are well suited to nearly continuous monitoring of the stronger hard x-ray sources, and time series analysis for pulsars. An overview of the analysis techniques presently being applied to the data are discussed, including representative observations of the Crab Nebula, Crab pulsar, and summaries of the sources detected to data. Results of a search for variability in the Crab Pulsar pulse profile are presented.

  16. Testing and assessment of large BGO detector for beach monitoring of radioactive particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E.R.; Rigollet, C.; Maleka, P.P.; Jones, D.G.

    2007-01-01

    The Beach Monitoring Steering Group (BMSG) was set up by UKAEA to explore whether improved systems for beach monitoring of radioactive particles are available. The BMSG commissioned the British Geological Survey (BGS) and the Nuclear Geophysics Division of the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI/N

  17. Application of sensitive and supersensitive radon detectors for radon flux density and radon concentration in environmental monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a review of principles and operational parameters of the latest instrumental development in sensitive and high sensitive radon detectors at Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). The focus is on advances in measurement technology of radon concentration in air and radon flux density. Two areas in which ANSTO is actively involved are discussed. The first area concerns radon in air monitoring at Cape Grim Baseline Air Pollution Station. Results recorded at the Station with a supersensitive radon detector characterised by lower limit of detection down to few mBq m-3 with time resolution better than 90 minutes are presented to illustrate importance of the technique in global monitoring of airborne pollution. The second area concerns estimates of radon and thoron fluxes from large geographical areas. This is illustrated by results obtained during an Australia-wide survey of radon fluxes and from thoron flux measurements around the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. The radon flux estimates from Australia come from a coarse net of spot measurements combined with data from aerial gamma surveys. It is argued that as radon global flux and air concentration estimates improve, the data will provide progressively more stringent tests of global air transport models. (author)

  18. Hadron-therapy beam monitoring: Towards a new generation of ultra-thin p-type silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadron-therapy has gained increasing interest for cancer treatment especially within the last decade. System commissioning and quality assurance procedures impose to monitor the particle beam using 2D dose measurements. Nowadays, several monitoring systems exist for hadron-therapy but all show a relatively high influence on the beam properties: indeed, most devices consist of several layers of materials that degrade the beam through scattering and energy losses. For precise treatment purposes, ultra-thin silicon strip detectors are investigated in order to reduce this beam scattering. We assess the beam size increase provoked by the Multiple Coulomb Scattering when passing through Si, to derive a target thickness. Monte-Carlo based simulations show a characteristic scattering opening angle lower than 1 mrad for thicknesses below 20 μm. We then evaluated the fabrication process feasibility. We successfully thinned down silicon wafers to thicknesses lower than 10 μm over areas of several cm2. Strip detectors are presently being processed and they will tentatively be thinned down to 20 μm. Moreover, two-dimensional TCAD simulations were carried out to investigate the beam detector performances on p-type Si substrates. Additionally, thick and thin substrates have been compared thanks to electrical simulations. Reducing the pitch between the strips increases breakdown voltage, whereas leakage current is quite insensitive to strips geometrical configuration. The samples are to be characterized as soon as possible in one of the IBA hadron-therapy facilities. For hadron-therapy, this would represent a considerable step forward in terms of treatment precision. (authors)

  19. The γ-Ray Bursts Polarization Detector Design Based on Multi-Channel Application-Specific Integrated Circuits%基于多通道专用集成电路的γ暴偏振探测仪设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴军营; 张永杰; 卢云鹏; 江晓山; 吴泊冰; 孔敏南

    2014-01-01

    设计了基于VA32-TA32芯片的γ暴偏振探测仪,用于探测γ暴的偏振度。设计中,采用多通道专用集成电路采集γ射线与多个塑料闪烁体棒发生康普顿散射的散射光子和电子信号,从采集的位置而得到入射γ暴射线的偏振度。该采集方法可大大降低传统电子学探测系统的功耗和复杂程度,从而为γ暴偏振探测仪的航天应用提供技术支撑。该探测仪的线性动态范围为66.9 dB,最大输入电荷量20 pC,串扰不大于0.1%,基线不大于±10 mV。%This article designs γ-ray bursts polarization detector to detect the γ-ray polarization based the VA32-TA32 chips.To achieve this purpose, it uses the multi-channel application-specific integrated cir-cuits to collect the scattering photon and electron signals when the Compton scattering happen between the in-comingγ-ray photons and the multiple plastic scintillator bars, so the incoming γ-rays polarization degree could be deduced from the positions of scattering photons and electrons.This method could reduce the power dissipation and complexity level largely comparing to the custom electronics detection system,so as to offer tech-nical support for space application.This detector's input linear dynamic range is 66.9 dB, the largest input quantity of electric charge is 20 pC, the crosstalk is less than 0 .1%, and the baselines are less than ±10 mV.

  20. Understanding the Long-Term Spectral Variability of Cygnus X-1 with Burst and Transient Source Experiment and All-Sky Monitor Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Poutanen, Juri; Paciesas, William S.; Wen, Lin-Qing

    2002-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of all observations of Cyg X-1 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE; 20-300 keV) and by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer all-sky monitor (ASM; 1.5-12 keV) until 2002 June, including approximately 1200 days of simultaneous data. We find a number of correlations between fluxes and hardnesses in different energy bands. In the hard (low) spectral state, there is a negative correlation between the ASM 1.5-12 keV flux and the hardness at any energy. In the soft (high) spectral state, the ASM flux is positively correlated with the ASM hardness but uncorrelated with the BATSE hardness. In both spectral states, the BATSE hardness correlates with the flux above 100 keV, while it shows no correlation with the 20-100 keV flux. At the same time, there is clear correlation between the BATSE fluxes below and above 100 keV. In the hard state, most of the variability can be explained by softening the overall spectrum with a pivot at approximately 50 keV. There is also another, independent variability pattern of lower amplitude where the spectral shape does not change when the luminosity changes. In the soft state, the variability is mostly caused by a variable hard (Comptonized) spectral component of a constant shape superposed on a constant soft blackbody component. These variability patterns are in agreement with the dependencies of the rms variability on the photon energy in the two states. We also study in detail recent soft states from late 2000 until 2002. The last of them has lasted thus far for more than 200 days. Their spectra are generally harder in the 1.5-5 keV band and similar or softer in the 3-12 keV band than the spectra of the 1996 soft state, whereas the rms variability is stronger in all the ASM bands. On the other hand, the 1994 soft state transition observed by BATSE appears very similar to the 1996 one. We interpret the variability patterns in terms of theoretical Comptonization

  1. Design and Performance of a Lead Fluoride Detector as a Luminosity Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Benito, Roberto Pérez; O'Connor, Colton; Capozza, Luigi; Diefenbach, Jürgen; Gläser, Boris; Ma, Yue; Maas, Frank; Piñeiro, David Rodríguez

    2016-01-01

    Precise luminosity measurements for the OLYMPUS two-photon exchange experiment at DESY were performed by counting scattering events with alternating beams of electrons and positrons incident on atomic electrons in a gaseous hydrogen target. Final products of M{\\o}ller, Bhabha, and pair annihilation interactions were observed using a pair of lead fluoride Cherenkov calorimeters with custom housings and electronics, adapted from a system used by the A4 parity violation experiment at MAMI. This paper describes the design, calibration, and operation of these detectors. An explanation of the Monte Carlo methods used to simulate the physical processes involved both at the scattering vertices and in the detector apparatus is also included.

  2. How Long does a Burst Burst?

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Murase, Kohta; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (~ hours) in gamma-rays than typical long GRBs (~ minutes), and recently it was proposed that these "ultra-long GRBs" may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g. blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations have suggested that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with XRT observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to check whether ultra-long GRBs are special. We define burst duration t_{burst} based on both gamma-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using gamma-ray observations only. We show that the distribution of t_{burst} peaks at ~ 320s for the entire sample, with 17.6% GRBs having t_{burst} > 10^3 s and 5.4% GRBs having t_{burst} > 10^4 s. The distribution shows a tail at the long t_{burst} end. The existence of a separate population is not ruled ou...

  3. Neutron monitors and muon detectors for solar modulation studies: 2. $\\phi$ time series

    OpenAIRE

    Ghelfi, A.; Maurin, D.; Cheminet, A.; Derome, L.; G. Hubert; Melot, F.

    2016-01-01

    The level of solar modulation at different times (related to the solar activity) is a central question of solar and galactic cosmic-ray physics. In the first paper of this series, we have established a correspondence between the uncertainties on ground-based detectors count rates and the parameter $\\phi$ (modulation level in the force-field approximation) reconstructed from these count rates. In this second paper, we detail a procedure to obtain a reference $\\phi$ time series from neutron mon...

  4. Experimental and Monte Carlo simulation studies of open cylindrical radon monitoring device using CR-39 detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are several methods of measuring radon concentrations but nuclear track detector cylindrical dosimeters are widely employed. In this investigation, the consequence of effective volumes of the dosimeters on the registration of alpha tracks in a CR-39 detector was studied. In a series of experiments an optimum radius for a CR-39-based open cylindrical radon dosimeter was found to be about 3 cm. Monte Carlo simulation techniques hav been employed to verify the experimental results. In this context, a computer code Monte Carlo simulation dosimetry (MOCSID) was developed. Monte Carlo simulation experiments gave the optimum radius of the dosimeters as 3.0 cm. The experimental results are in good agreement with those obtained by Monte Carlo design calculations. In addition to this, plate-out effects of radon progeny were also studied. It was observed that the contribution of radon progeny (218Po and 214Po) plated-out on the wall of the dosimeters increases with an increase of dosimeter radii and then decrease to 0 at a radius of about 3 cm if a point detector has been installed at the center of the dosimeter base. In the code MOCSID different types of random number generators were employed. The results of this research are very useful for designing an optimum size of radon dosimeters

  5. A J2EE based server for muon spectrometer alignment monitoring in the ATLAS detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the software chain for the Atlas muon optical alignment system, dedicated to the measurement of geometry corrections for the Muon Spectrometer chambers positions. The corrections are then used inside the reconstruction software. We detail in particular the architecture of the monitoring application, deployed in a J2EE server, and the monitoring tools that have been developed for the daily follow up. The system has been in production during the whole Run 1 period (2010-2013).

  6. Performance of a 4H-SiC Schottky diode as a compact sized detector for neutron pulse form measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    4H-silicon carbide (4H-SiC) detectors are desirable for neutron pulse form measurement for their compact size, excellent radiation resistance and hydrogen free composition. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of a 4H-SiC detector to measure the pulse form of a neutron burst. A 4H-SiC detector is fabricated and tested in the pulsed neutron field of the Chinese Fast Burst Reactor II (CFBR II). Important parameters such as the breeding period and the FWHM of the neutron pulse are derived from the experimental result of the 4H-SiC detector. These parameters agree well with those from a plastic scintillator detector. The divergences are only 0.5%, demonstrating that the 4H-SiC detector can yield a high fidelity time profile of the CFBR II pulse. The difference in peak centroid of alpha spectra is negligible for the 4H-SiC detector even after 18 reactor pulses (a neutron fluence of 8.41×1012 cm−2), confirming the excellent radiation hardness of the 4H-SiC detector in pulsed neutron field. This study therefore indicates that 4H-SiC detectors can be usable as a compact sized detector to measure neutron pulses. - Highlight: • A 4H-SiC detector has been developed as a monitor for reactor neutron pulses for the first time. • The 4H-SiC detector can yield a high fidelity time profile of the Chinese Fast Burst Reactor II (CFBR II) pulse. • The difference in peak centroid of alpha spectra is negligible for the 4H-SiC detector even after 18 reactor pulses (8.41×1012 n/cm2)

  7. Development and characterization of two-component albedo based neutron individual monitoring system using thermoluminescent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A TLD-albedo based two-component neutron individual monitoring system was developed and characterized in this work. The monitor consists of a black plastic holder, an incident neutron boron loaded shield, a moderator polyethylene body (to increase its response), two pairs of TLD-600 and TLD-700 (one pair to each component) and an adjustable belt. This monitoring system was calibrated in thermal neutron fields and in 70 keV, 144 keV, 565 keV, 1.2 MeV and 5 MeV monoenergetic neutron fields. In addition, it was calibrated in 252Cf(D2O), 252Cf, 241Am-B, 241Am-Be and 238Pu-Be source fields. For the latter, the lower detection levels are, respectively, 0.009 mSv, 0.06 mSv, 0.12 mSv, 0.09 mSv and 0.08 mSv. The participation in an international intercomparison sponsored by IAEA with simulated workplace fields validated the system. The monitoring system was successfully characterized in the ISO 21909 standard and in an IRD - the Brazilian Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry - technical regulation draft. Nowadays, the neutron individual system is in use by IRD for whole body individual monitoring of five institutions, which comprehend several activities. (author)

  8. A Monte Carlo Study Of Different Detector Geometries For Hawc

    CERN Document Server

    Gebauer, I

    2005-01-01

    Compared to other parts of astronomy the study of the universe at energies above 100GeV is a relatively new field. Pointed instruments presently achieve the highest sensitivities. They have detected gamma-rays from at least 10 sources, but they are only able to monitor a relatively small fraction of the sky. The detection of exciting phenomena such as Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) requires a highly sensitive detector capable of continuously monitoring the entire overhead sky. Such an instrument could make an unbiased study of the entire field of view. With sufficient sensitivity it could detect short transients (∼ 15 minutes) and study the time structure of Active galactic nuclei (AGN) flares at energies unattainable to space-based instruments. This thesis describes the design and performance of the next generation water Cherenkov detector HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov). Focussing on the performance in background-rejection and sensitivity to point sources, two possible detector geometries, different i...

  9. Applications Geiger-Muller detectors monitor the level of radioactivity in the human body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear technology is the technology high risk, because of an application and implementation have to support by human skill. The support facility has to complete and up to date, or modern. It means if the accident occurs in mistake have to do or delayed something, they can solved that problem. So the probability the risk of accident can be minimized. The specific problem is in the implementation nuclear technology on the human safety which is works in the radiation field or in the environment where they are working. The pointer that the problems have to design the tools monitor to monitoring the value radiation maximum was allowed. The tools monitor design is giving the information signal, if the radiation level maximum have over limit. Whereas the high and low level radiation can be just depend on the needed. (author)

  10. Bursting Smoke as an Infrared Countermeasure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amarjit Singh

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the experimental setup for the evaluation of bursting smoke for anti-infrared role using SR-5000 spectroradiometer and a source of IR radiation (8-13 micrometer using cadmium-mercury-telluride (CMI detector cooled by liquid nitrogen. The particle size and shape of the powders used in the bursting smokes were determined microscopically using Carl Zeiss Jena Neophot- 21. Highest attenuation of 97 -lOO percent was produced for about 12 s using a mixture of bronze flakes and chaff, and for about 8 s using a mixture of bronze copper lined flakes, bronze flakes and chaff.

  11. A Hydrogen detectors Wireless network for monitoring the gas ambient in a laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system to monitor the hydrogen contents in the atmosphere present in the various sections of a crystal growth laboratory has been built. When hydrogen is used in the processes carried out in a laboratory it is important to monitor its content because the oxygen-hydrogen mixture is highly flammable and/or explosive. The system emits a warning when the Hydrogen concentration increases and if the concentration rises above 1% in vol. it shuts down automatically any process that is using hydrogen. The design and performance of the system is reported here

  12. Online Monitoring of the Osiris Reactor with the Nucifer Neutrino Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Boireau, G; Collin, A P; Coulloux, G; Cribier, M; Deschamp, H; Durand, V; Fechner, M; Fischer, V; Gaffiot, J; Castaing, N Gerard; Granelli, R; Kato, Y; Lasserre, T; Latron, L; Legou, P; Letourneau, A; Lhuillier, D; Mention, G; Mueller, T; Nghiem, T-A; Pedrol, N; Pelzer, J; Pequignot, M; Piret, Y; Prono, G; Scola, L; Starzinski, P; Vivier, M; Dumonteil, E; Varignon, C; Buck, C; Lindner, M; Bazoma, J; Bouvier, S; Bui, V M; Communeau, V; Cucoanes, A; Fallot, M; Gautier, M; Giot, L; Guilloux, G; Lenoir, M; Martino, J; Mercier, G; Milleto, T; Peuvrel, N; Porta, A; Quere, N Le; Renard, C; Rigalleau, L M; Roy, D; Vilajosana, T; Yermia, F

    2015-01-01

    The detection of electron antineutrinos emitted in the decay chains of the fission products in nuclear reactors, combined with reactor core simulations, provides an efficient tool to assess both the thermal power and the fissile content of the whole nuclear core. This new information could be used by the International Agency for Atomic Energy (IAEA) to enhance the Safeguards of civil nuclear reactors. We report the first results of the Nucifer experiment demonstrating the concept of "neutrinometry" at the pre-industrialized stage. A novel detector has been designed to meet requirements discussed with the IAEA for the last ten years as well as international nuclear safety standards. Nucifer has been deployed at only 7.2m away from the Osiris research reactor core (70 MW) operating at the Saclay research center of the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). We describe the performances of the 1 m3 detector remotely operating at a shallow depth equivalent to 12m of water and under intense...

  13. An intelligent gradient detector with minimization of visual landmarks distortion for monitoring of passenger flows

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbenko, A.; Popov, V.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we study the problem of monitoring of passenger flows. We consider an intelligent gradient algorithm to solve the problem. We use a method of minimization of visual landmarks distortion to improve the quality of recognition. © 2013 Anna Gorbenko and Vladimir Popov.

  14. Variable filtered photographic film as a radiation detector for environmental radiation monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Zafri Azran Abdul; Junet, Laila Kalidah; Hazali, Norazlanshah; Abdullah, Abdul Adam; Hanafiah, Megat Ahmad Kamal Megat

    2013-05-01

    Environmental radiation is an ionising radiation that present in the natural environment which mostly originates from cosmic rays and radionuclide agents in the environment. This may lead the population to be exposed to the radiation. Therefore, the environmental radiation needs to be observed cautiously to minimize the impact of radiation. However, there is no specific or proper monitoring device that provides an outdoor environmental radiation monitoring. Hence, a new outdoor environmental radiation monitoring device was developed. A photographic film has been chosen as a dosimeter. The purpose of this study was to prove the covered photographic film attached with variable filter can be used to develop environmental radiation monitoring device to detect the ionising radiation. The filter used was variable thickness of plastic, aluminium (Al) and lead (Pb). The result from the study showed that the mean optical density (OD) values for medium speed film are in the range 0.41 to 0.73, and for fast speed film the OD values are in the range 0.51 to 1.35. The OD values decreased when the filter was attached. This has proven that the photographic film can be used to detect radiation and fast speed film was more sensitive compared to medium speed film.

  15. Phase-reference monitoring in coherent-state discrimination assisted by a photon-number resolving detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bina, Matteo; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria; Olivares, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Phase estimation represents a crucial challenge in many fields of Physics, ranging from Quantum Metrology to Quantum Information Processing. This task is usually pursued by means of interferometric schemes, in which the choice of the input states and of the detection apparatus is aimed at minimizing the uncertainty in the estimation of the relative phase between the inputs. State discrimination protocols in communication channels with coherent states also require the monitoring of the optical phase. Therefore, the problem of phase estimation is relevant to face the issue of coherent states discrimination. Here we consider a quasi-optimal Kennedy-like receiver, based on the interference of two coherent signals, to be discriminated, with a reference local oscillator. By means of the Bayesian processing of a small amount of data drawn from the outputs of the shot-by-shot discrimination protocol, we demonstrate the achievement of the minimum uncertainty in phase estimation, also in the presence of uniform phase noise. Moreover, we show that the use of photon-number resolving detectors in the receiver improves the phase-estimation strategy, especially with respect to the usually employed on/off detectors. From the experimental point of view, this comparison is realized by employing hybrid photodetectors.

  16. Phase-reference monitoring in coherent-state discrimination assisted by a photon-number resolving detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bina, Matteo; Allevi, Alessia; Bondani, Maria; Olivares, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Phase estimation represents a crucial challenge in many fields of Physics, ranging from Quantum Metrology to Quantum Information Processing. This task is usually pursued by means of interferometric schemes, in which the choice of the input states and of the detection apparatus is aimed at minimizing the uncertainty in the estimation of the relative phase between the inputs. State discrimination protocols in communication channels with coherent states also require the monitoring of the optical phase. Therefore, the problem of phase estimation is relevant to face the issue of coherent states discrimination. Here we consider a quasi-optimal Kennedy-like receiver, based on the interference of two coherent signals, to be discriminated, with a reference local oscillator. By means of the Bayesian processing of a small amount of data drawn from the outputs of the shot-by-shot discrimination protocol, we demonstrate the achievement of the minimum uncertainty in phase estimation, also in the presence of uniform phase noise. Moreover, we show that the use of photon-number resolving detectors in the receiver improves the phase-estimation strategy, especially with respect to the usually employed on/off detectors. From the experimental point of view, this comparison is realized by employing hybrid photodetectors. PMID:27189140

  17. How long does a burst burst?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (∼hours) in γ-rays than typical long GRBs (∼minutes), and it has recently been proposed that these 'ultra-long GRBs' may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g., blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations suggest that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with X-Ray Telescope observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to determine whether ultra-long GRBs are unusual events. We define burst duration t burst based on both γ-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using γ-ray observations alone. We find that t burst can be reliably measured in 343 GRBs. Within this 'good' sample, 21.9% GRBs have t burst ≳ 103 s and 11.5% GRBs have t burst ≳ 104 s. There is an apparent bimodal distribution of t burst in this sample. However, when we consider an 'undetermined' sample (304 GRBs) with t burst possibly falling in the gap between GRB duration T 90 and the first X-ray observational time, as well as a selection effect against t burst falling into the first Swift orbital 'dead zone' due to observation constraints, the intrinsic underlying t burst distribution is consistent with being a single component distribution. We found that the existing evidence for a separate ultra-long GRB population is inconclusive, and further multi-wavelength observations are needed to draw a firmer conclusion. We also discuss the theoretical implications of our results. In particular, the central engine activity duration of GRBs is generally much longer than the γ-ray T 90 duration and it does not even correlate with T 90. It would be premature to make a direct connection between T 90 and the size of the progenitor star.

  18. Determination of the Optimum Counting Condition of a ZnS(Ag) Scintillation Detector for Contamination Monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wastes generated during decommissioning must be surveyed for clearance. There are so many types of decommissioning wastes, such as, pipes, vessels, concretes, etc. Especially, it is very difficult to monitor the contamination of a pipe because of small diameter. In the previous study we estimated a basic concept for the detector system for monitoring the in-pipe contamination consisted with a silver-activated zinc sulfide (ZnS(Ag)) scintillator and photomultiplier tube(PMT). In setting up a counting system, it is often desirable to establish an operating point which will provide maximum stability over long periods of time. It is recommended not to use too high voltage in a PMT, because the lifetime of the phototube may be a little longer at the lower voltage. At the same time, the operating voltage should be taken above the threshold voltage of the plateau. With a suitable choice of bias it is possible to obtain a satisfactorily long plateau and to determine the true alpha counting rate to within a few percent. The operating voltage is one of the criteria to select the optimum counting conditions in a ZnS(Ag) scintillation detector. The operating voltage should be selected in a region referred to as the plateau in which minimum sensitivity to drifts in the supply voltage and/or in discrimination level are achieved. This criterion involves the selection of the operating voltage at one third of the plateau length or 75 V above the low voltage end of the plateau, which ever is less. Therefore, we suggest the optimum voltage and low level discrimination (LLD)

  19. Development and calibration of a real-time airborne radioactivity monitor using direct gamma-ray spectrometry with two scintillation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The implementation of in-situ gamma-ray spectrometry in an automatic real-time environmental radiation surveillance network can help to identify and characterize abnormal radioactivity increases quickly. For this reason, a Real-time Airborne Radioactivity Monitor using direct gamma-ray spectrometry with two scintillation detectors (RARM-D2) was developed. The two scintillation detectors in the RARM-D2 are strategically shielded with Pb to permit the separate measurement of the airborne isotopes with respect to the deposited isotopes.In this paper, we describe the main aspects of the development and calibration of the RARM-D2 when using NaI(Tl) or LaBr3(Ce) detectors. The calibration of the monitor was performed experimentally with the exception of the efficiency curve, which was set using Monte Carlo (MC) simulations with the EGS5 code system. Prior to setting the efficiency curve, the effect of the radioactive source term size on the efficiency calculations was studied for the gamma-rays from 137Cs. Finally, to study the measurement capabilities of the RARM-D2, the minimum detectable activity concentrations for 131I and 137Cs were calculated for typical spectra at different integration times. - Highlights: • A real-time airborne radioactivity monitor was developed. • The monitor is formed using two scintillation detectors for gamma-ray spectrometry. • The detectors are shielded with Pb. One detector is pointing up and the other down. • The monitors were calibrated using experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations. • The efficiency calculations and MDAC values are given

  20. SDSS Pre-Burst Observations of Recent Gamma-Ray Burst Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Cool, R J; Brinkmann, J; Eisenstein, D J; Hogg, D W; Schlegel, D J; Schneider, D P; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hogg, David W.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry and spectroscopy in the fields of 24 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by Swift, including bursts localized by Swift, HETE-2, and INTEGRAL, after December 2004. After this bulk release, we plan to provide individual releases of similar data shortly after the localization of future bursts falling in the SDSS survey area. These data provide a solid basis for the astrometric and photometric calibration of follow-up afterglow searches and monitoring. Furthermore, the images provided with this release will allow observers to find transient objects up to a magnitude fainter than possible with Digitized Sky Survey image comparisons.

  1. Diamond pixel detector for beam profile monitoring in COMET experiment at J-PARC

    CERN Document Server

    Cerv, M; Pernegger, H; Vageesvaran, P; Griesmayer, E

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and initial prototype results of a pixellized proton beam profile monitor for the COMET experiment at J-PARC. The goal of COMET is to look for charged lepton flavor violation by direct muon to electron conversion at a sensitivity of $0^{-19}$. An 8 GeV proton beam pulsed at 100 ns with $10^{10}$ protons/s will be used to create muons through pion production and decay. In the final experiment, the proton flux will be raised to $10^{14}$ protons/sec to increase the sensitivity. These requirements of harsh radiation tolerance and fast readout make diamond a good choice for constructing a beam profile monitor in COMET. We present first results of the characterization of single crystal diamond (scCVD) sourced from a new company, 2a systems Singapore. Our measurements indicate excellent charge collection efficiency and high carrier mobility down to cryogenic temperatures.

  2. ACONTINUOUS RADON MONITORING SYSTEM BASED ON A SOLID-STATE SILICON DETECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Peña-Eguiluz

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design of a programmable stay-alone continuous radon monitoring system able to detect, count and store the amount of alpha particles with an energy of 5.49 MeV produced by the radioactive decay of environmental radon-222. It is included the electronic circuit design, the software development as well as the user interface and the hardware ensemble of all the system components.

  3. Development of a detector position monitoring system with a laser and Fresnel zone plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently the experimental equipment using accelerators for elementary particles and atomic nuclei has become large because of the use of high energy beam and the incorporation of various measuring instruments. The performance of the instrument recording particle flight tracks has been improved, and the position resolution is several tens to 200 μm. The problem is how can the original position resolution of individual instruments be utilized in large experimental equipment. The position of measuring instrument changes during experiment due to thermal expansion, magnetic field, the vibration of machines and so on. The position monitor reported in this paper has been developed for the large elementary particle experiment equipment HERMES. Laser Fresnel zone plate and CCD camera are used. The position resolution is 50 μm. In order to elucidate the riddle of spin, the international joint research HERMES was started in 1995 by 10 countries in DESY, Germany. The structure and the principle of measurement of the position monitor are explained. As to the two-stage software processing of image data, the on-line monitor and data analysis are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Treatment of the X and γ rays lung monitoring spectra obtained by using HP-Ge detectors in case of exposures to uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A lung monitoring counting spectrum can be described as a random phenomenon. Channel-by-channel Poisson-type modelling was verified for cases of pure background. When carrying out spectral analysis for qualitative research, one must work with the sum of the detectors. The quantification must be calculated detector by detector. Statistical tests make it possible to certify that one or several peaks are really present in the organism. The calculations are currently made with automatic spectral analysis, peak search, specific area, statistics and probability of the real presence of analytic photo peak taking into account the morphological parameters of the worker. The results are analysed detector by detector, with and without the background of the room. Detection limits obtained in Pierrelatte in monitoring measurement conditions were assessed for variable tissues covering the range of subjects to be examined. For each subject, the calculations are made taking into account the equivalent tissue thicknesses derived from individual morphological parameters. This method makes it possible to quantify lung activities with a detection limit of 3.9 Bq (235U; thirty minutes counting time; reference man parameters) and to monitor exposure to the different compounds of uranium. (author)

  5. High sensitivity neutron bursts detecting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technique and instrumentation to detect multiplicity of fast neutrons, emitted in sharp bursts, has been developed. A bank of 16 BF3 detectors, in an appropriate thermalising assembly, efficiency ∼ 16%, is used to detect neutron bursts. The output from this setup, through appropriate electronics, is divided into two paths. The first is directly connected to a computer controlled scalar. The second is connected to another similar scalar through a delay time unit (DTU). The DTU design is such that once it is triggered by a count pulse than it does not allow any counts to be recorded for a fixed dead time set at ∼ 100 μs. The difference in counts recorded directly and through DTU gives the total number of neutrons produced in bursts. This setup is being used to study lattice cracking, anomalous effects in solid deuterium systems and various reactor physics experiments. (author). 3 refs., 1 fig

  6. Gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma-ray burst polarimeter (GAP: GAmma-ray burst Polarimeter), which had been almost handcrafted by scientists, has succeeded in working normally in interplanetary space, and in detecting the polarization of the gamma-ray from a mysterious astronomical object 'gamma-ray burst'. It is the first result of the detectors in the world exclusively aiming at detecting gamma-ray polarization. We mainly describe the hardware of our GAP equipment and show the method of preparing equipment to work in the cosmic space with a tight budget. The mechanical structure, the electronic circuits, the software on the equipment, the data analysis on the earth, and the scientific results gained by the observation just over one year, are presented after explaining the principle of gamma-ray polarization detection. Our design to protect equipment against mechanical shock and cosmic radiation may provide useful information for future preparation of compact satellite. (J.P.N.)

  7. The role of ultrasonic bat detectors in improving inventory and monitoring surveys in Vietnamese karst bat assemblages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Neil M. FUREY; Iain J. MACKIE; Paul A. RACEY

    2009-01-01

    Bats account for 30% of mammal diversity in SE Asia and are potential bioindieators of wider biodiversity impacts resulting from habitat loss and climate change. As existing sampling techniques in the region typically fall to record bats that habitually fly in open areas and at higher altitudes, current inventory efforts are less than comprehensive. Acoustic sampling with bat detectors may help to overcome these limitations for insectivorous bats, but has yet to be tested in mainland SE Asia. To do so, we sampled bats while simultaneously recording the echolocation calls of insectivorous species commuting and foraging in a variety of karst habitats in north Vietnam. Monitoring of cave-dwelling bats was also undertaken. Discriminant function analysis of 367 echolocation calls produced by 30 insectivorous species showed that acoustic identification was feasible by correctly classifying 89. 1% of caLls. In all habitats, acoustic sampling and capture methods recorded significantly more species each night than capture methods alone. Capture methods consequently failed to record 29% (ten spp. of aerial insectivores) of the bat fauna in commuting and foraging habitats and 11% ( two spp. ) of that in our cave sample. Only four of these species were subsequently captured following significantly greater sampling effort. This strongly suggests that acoustic methods axe indispensable for maximizing bat inventory completeness in SE Asia. As accurate inventories and monitoring are essential for effective species conservation, we recommend the inclusion of acoustic sampling in future studies of bat assemblages across the region [Current Zoology 55 (5) : 327 - 341, 2009].

  8. The role of ultrasonic bat detectors in improving inventory and monitoring surveys in Vietnamese karst bat assemblages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil M. FUREY

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Bats account for 30 % of mammal diversity in SE Asia and are potential bioindicators of wider biodiversity impacts resulting from habitat loss and climate change. As existing sampling techniques in the region typically fail to record bats that habitually fly in open areas and at higher altitudes, current inventory efforts are less than comprehensive. Acoustic sampling with bat detectors may help to overcome these limitations for insectivorous bats, but has yet to be tested in mainland SE Asia. To do so, we sampled bats while simultaneously recording the echolocation calls of insectivorous species commuting and foraging in a variety of karst habitats in north Vietnam. Monitoring of cave-dwelling bats was also undertaken. Discriminant function analysis of 367 echolocation calls produced by 30 insectivorous species showed that acoustic identification was feasible by correctly classifying 89.1 % of calls. In all habitats, acoustic sampling and capture methods recorded significantly more species each night than capture methods alone. Capture methods consequently failed to record 29 % (ten spp. of aerial insectivores of the bat fauna in commuting and foraging habitats and 11 % (two spp. of that in our cave sample. Only four of these species were subsequently captured following significantly greater sampling effort. This strongly suggests that acoustic methods are indispensable for maximizing bat inventory completeness in SE Asia. As accurate inventories and monitoring are essential for effective species conservation, we recommend the inclusion of acoustic sampling in future studies of bat assemblages across the region [Current Zoology 55(5:–2009].

  9. TRTViewer: Monitoring and Diagnostic Tool for the TRT Detector of the ATLAS Experiment at LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, S. Yu.; Tikhomirov, V. O.

    TRTViewer is the dedicated software tool for monitoring of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) performance at dif- ferent electronics levels: individual channels, readout chips or electronic boards. It can use several sources of input information - from direct DAQ stream or raw data files to ROOT files with processed analysis histograms. Using TRTViewer one can quickly estimate the TRT operational parameters - occupancy, efficiency, timing, reveal problematic regions with noisy, dead or inefficient channels, check calibration uniformity, etc. This tool is widely used by shifters in ATLAS Control Room and also by TRT experts during electronics installation, tuning, operation control and express-offline data analysis.

  10. Neutron flux monitoring system of the French GEN-IV SFR: Assessment of diverse solutions for in-vessel detector installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The expression of need of the ASTRID neutron monitoring system is presented. • Performance criteria of neutron detector are proposed. • Neutronics computational models are described in details. • Study of diverse solutions for in-vessel neutron detector installation is carried out. • The location behind the lateral shielding with neutron guide and that at the lower part of the above-core structure are preferred. - Abstract: The neutron flux monitoring (NFM) system of any reactor must, in any situation, permit both reactivity control and power level monitoring. It also has to monitor the change in neutron flux distribution within the core region in order to prevent any local melting accident. This paper presents the recent output of the design of the NFM system of the French Generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). The expression of need of such a system is first specified. Its main functions and important requirements for safety and detection are defined. Diverse solutions for detector installation into the reactor vessel and the performance criteria for their assessment are proposed. This work relies mostly on simulation results obtained with the use of various computational models that are described. The detailed study and the selection of detector locations are carried out. It is shown that two locations have passed a majority of those criteria: the outer part of the lateral neutron shield and the lower part of the above-core structure

  11. Unattended mode monitoring of passive neutron coincidence detector systems using a commercial data logger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercial Data Logger for unattended passive neutron coincidence data acquisition is described. This consists of an inexpensive commercial Data Logging equipment attached to a neutron coincidence electronics and a software package for data review. The Data Logger permits both the flexible configuration of a passive neutron coincidence measurement system for unattended mode monitoring and the storage of the measured Totals and Reals count rates. An additional feature of the Data Logger is a custom software package providing for the complete analysis of the stored data and yielding an assay of each item passing through the measurement cavity. The analysis includes an input for different isotopic compositions, the calculation of the multiplication corrected Reals rates, the inclusion of a calibration functions, and the determination of240Pu masses. The software package for data review displays the Totals and Reals count rates logged by the Data Logger as a function of time. In addition the custom software provides input files to the data review package to display the multiplication corrected Reals count rates and the measured 240Pu masses as a function of time. Information on the Data Logger is presented along with the monitoring mode specifications. The analysis functions implemented are described as is the data review software. Results are presented for a specific application

  12. Feasibility study of the water Cherenkov detector as a D-T fusion power monitor in the system using neutron activation of flowing water. First experimental phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technique of monitoring D-T neutrons using water flow is based on the reaction of the 16O(n, p)16N. In order to significantly improve the D-T neutron monitoring system in the ITER reactor in comparison with the system that uses a γ-ray scintillation detector, a new approach was proposed. The basic idea of this approach is to utilize the Cherenkov light, produced by energetic β-particles from 16N in water near the first wall of the fusion reactor, and then deliver the light by the optical fiber to the remote light detector. The proof of the principle experiment is divided into two phases. The main idea of the first experimental phase is to examine Cherenkov light measurements using a remotely located water and light detector. During the second phase the water radiator will be placed next to the neutron source, then the Cherenkov light will be transferred by an optical fiber to the remotely located light detector. For the purpose of the first experimental phase, a water Cherenkov detector was installed in the shielded measurement room. A closed water loop, with circulating water, was used to transport 16N from the D-T source to the Cherenkov detector. The experiment was carried out at FNS/JAERI, with the accelerator set to a direct current mode, the source neutron yield around 2 x 1011 n/s, and the water flowage approximately 2 m/s. The registered Cherenkov signal was identified as the light produced by β-particles from 16N using the time decay and the energy spectra data. According to the present study, the water Cherenkov detector is very effective for measurements of the 16N activity, due to high counting efficiency, absence of the scintillation detector and simplicity of the method. (author)

  13. Thermonuclear burst oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Watts, Anna L

    2012-01-01

    Burst oscillations, a phenomenon observed in a significant fraction of Type I (thermonuclear) X-ray bursts, involve the development of highly asymmetric brightness patches in the burning surface layers of accreting neutron stars. Intrinsically interesting as nuclear phenomena, they are also important as probes of dense matter physics and the strong gravity, high magnetic field environment of the neutron star surface. Burst oscillation frequency is also used to measure stellar spin, and doubles the sample of rapidly rotating (above 10 Hz) accreting neutron stars with known spins. Although the mechanism remains mysterious, burst oscillation models must take into account thermonuclear flame spread, nuclear processes, rapid rotation, and the dynamical role of the magnetic field. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the observational properties of burst oscillations, an assessment of the status of the theoretical models that are being developed to explain them, and an overview of how they can be used to...

  14. Characterisation of SiC photo-detectors for solar UV radiation monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borchi, E.; Macii, R. [Fondazione Osservatorio Ximeniano, Via Borgo San Lorenzo, 26-50123 Firenze (Italy); Bruzzi, M. [INFN Firenze and Dipartimento di Energetica, Via S. Marta 3-50139 Firenze (Italy); Scaringella, M., E-mail: Scaringella@fi.infn.it [INFN Firenze and Dipartimento di Energetica, Via S. Marta 3-50139 Firenze (Italy)

    2011-12-01

    Silicon carbide has a potential for solar UV radiation monitoring: extremely resistant to UV radiation damage, nearly-blind to visible and infrared radiation and less sensitive to temperature variations than standard radiometric systems. A radiometer composed by three SiC photodiodes has been designed, manufactured and tested under solar radiation. Two photodiodes are equipped with filters in the UVB (280-315 nm) and UVA (315-400 nm) ranges while a third is filtered to match the erythemal action spectrum. UVA, UVB components of the solar radiation as well as UV index (UVI) at the earth's surface have been determined in two site positions in Tuscany, Italy. Data as a function of day-light allowed us to evaluate total optical thickness for UVA and UVB: {tau}{sub UVA}=0.46 and {tau}{sub UVB}=1.8. UVI values measured during the year well compares with computed ones used for weather forecast procedures.

  15. Swift: A Gamma Ray Bursts Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2003-01-01

    Swift is a NASA gamma-ray burst MIDEX mission that is in development for launch in December 2003. It is a multiwavelength transient observatory for GRB astronomy. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of GRBs and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. It will also.perform a survey of the hard X-ray sky to a sensitivity level of -1 mCrab. A wide-field camera will detect more than a hundred GRBs per year to 5 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 70 sec by an autonomously controlled 'swift' spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions will be determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Measurements of redshift will be made for many of the bursts. The instrumentation is a combination of superb existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (approximately 0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. The hardware is currently in final stages of fabrication and initial stages of integration and test. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift.

  16. Study On Burst Location Technology under Steady-state in Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianpin; Li, Shuping; Wang, Shaowei; He, Fang; He, Zhixun; Cao, Guodong

    2010-11-01

    According to the characteristics of hydraulic information under the state of burst in water distribution system, to get the correlation of monitoring values and burst location and locate the position of burst on time by mathematical fitting. This method can effectively make use of the information of SCADA in water distribution system to active locating burst position. A new idea of burst location in water distribution systems to shorten the burst time, reduce the impact on urban water supply, economic losses and waste of water resources.

  17. Linking burst-only X-ray binary sources to faint X-ray transients

    OpenAIRE

    Campana, S.

    2009-01-01

    Burst-only sources are X-ray sources showing up only during short bursts but with no persistent emission (at least with the monitoring instrument which led to their discovery). These bursts have spectral characteristics consistent with thermonuclear (type I) burst from the neutron star surface, linking burst-only sources to neutron star X-ray binary transients. We have carried out a series of snapshot observations of the entire sample of burst-only sources with the Swift satellite. We found a...

  18. Phase Detector For Rectangular Waveforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dischert, Robert A.; Walter, James M.

    1993-01-01

    Phase detector for use with phase-locked-loops, servocontrol, and other electronic circuits designed to avoid disadvantages of other phase detectors. Used with both intermittent and continuous input signals. Circuit offers several advantages; reference signals continuous, burst of few pulses, or single pulse. Circuit "coasts" in absence of reference signal. Generates no steady-state output waveform at lock which makes filtering easier.

  19. First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Allen, B.; R. Amin; Anderson, S; Anderson, W.; Araya, M; Armandula, H.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at a 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveform...

  20. Long-term environment monitoring based on MTS-N (LiF:Mg, Ti) and MCP-N (LiF:Mg, Cu, P) thermoluminescent detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An environmental radiation monitoring system using standard MTS-N (LiF:Mg, Ti) and high-sensitive thermoluminescent LiF:Mg,Cu,P (MCP-N) detectors was applied to control the radiation exposure over the area of the Institute of Nuclear Physics (INP) in Krakow. First environmental measurements using MTS-N detectors began in 1970 at five locations and were continued during the Chernobyl accident at six sites. In March 1987 high-sensitive MCP-N detectors read out in a manual TL reader were first introduced into service at the INP. Since 1992 about 60 locations over an area of the INP were selected for quarterly dose rate measurements, using an automatic TLD system based on MTS-N detectors placed in cards. In 2002 MTS-N detectors were replaced by high-sensitive MCP-N pellets. The dose rate in long-term measurements changed over the last 30 years. The average gamma dose rate over the area of INP in the years 1975-1978 was 63 nGy-1. After the Chernobyl accident the gamma dose rate increased to 880 nGyh-1. In December 1986 the dose rate at the location place decreased to 103 nGyh-1. At present, the average dose rate has returned to the pre-Chernobyl level of about 68 nGyh-1. Construction and beam tests of a new isochronous cyclotron at the INP resulted in highly enhanced environmental dose rates at several monitored INP sites. In this work results of almost 11 years of environmental indoor and outdoor measurements with thermoluminescent detectors are summarised

  1. Rapid Centroids and the Refined Position Accuracy of the Swift Gamma-ray Burst Catalogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Swift X-ray Telescope autonomously refines the Burst Alert Telescope positions (∼1-4' uncertainty) to better than 5 arcsec, within 5 seconds of target acquisition by the observatory for typical bursts. The results of the rapid positioning capability of the XRT are presented here for both known sources and newly discovered GRBs, demonstrating the ability to automatically utilise one of two integration times according to the burst brightness, and to correct the position for alignment offsets caused by the fast pointing performance and variable thermal environment of the satellite as measured by the Telescope Alignment Monitor. We present an evaluation of the position accuracy for both the onboard centroiding software and the ground software for the calibration targets and show that a significant improvement in position accuracy is obtained if the boresight detector position is optimised relative to the spacecraft pointing. Finally, we present an updated catalogue of Swift GRB X-ray positions obtained in Photon Counting Mode using the improved, calibrated boresight

  2. The influence of liquid crystal display monitors on observer performance for the detection of interstitial lung markings on both storage phosphor and flat-panel-detector chest radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To compare observer performance with a flat-panel liquid crystal display (LCD) monitor and with a high-resolution gray-scale cathode ray tube (CRT) monitor in the detection of interstitial lung markings using a silicon flat-panel-detector direct radiography (DR) and storage phosphor computed radiography (CR) in a clinical setting. Materials and methods: We displayed 39 sets of posteroanterior chest radiographs from the patients who were suspected of interstitial lung disease. Each sets consisted of DR, CR and thin-section CT as the reference standard. Image identities were masked, randomly sorted, and displayed on both five mega pixel (2048 x 2560 x 8 bits) LCD and CRT monitors. Ten radiologists independently rated their confidence in detection for the presence of linear opacities in the four fields of the lungs; right upper, left upper, right lower, and left lower quadrant. Performance of a total 6240 (39 sets x 2 detector systems x 2 monitor system x 4 fields x 10 observers) observations was analyzed by multi-reader multi-case receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Differences between monitor systems in combinations of detector systems were compared using ANOVA and paired-samples t-test. Results: Area under curves (AUC) for the presence of linear opacities measured by ROC analysis was higher on the LCDs than CRTs without statistical significance (p = 0.082). AUC was significantly higher on the DR systems than CR systems (p = 0.006). AUC was significantly higher on the LCDs than CRTs for DR systems (p = 0.039) but not different for CR systems (p = 0.301). Conclusion: In clinical conditions, performance of the LCD monitor appears to be better for detecting interstitial lung markings when interfaced with DR systems.

  3. On indoor radon contamination monitoring with plastic nuclear track detectors: the influence of plate-out effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of alpha activity from radon-222 and its daughters inside a glass receptacle were carried out using solid state nuclear track detectors. The results of these measurements indicate a considerable plate-out of radon daughters on the surfaces both of materials surrounding the detectors and of the detectors themselves. In this work some aspects of the influence of the plate-out effect (in the absence of ventilation) were studied. (author)

  4. High-contrast X-ray radiography using hybrid semiconductor pixel detectors with 1 mm thick Si sensor as a tool for monitoring liquids in natural building stones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the preservation of buildings and other cultural heritage, the application of various conservation products such as consolidants or water repellents is often used. X-ray radiography utilizing semiconductor particle-counting detectors stands out as a promising tool in research of consolidants inside natural building stones. However, a clear visualization of consolidation products is often accomplished by doping with a contrast agent, which presents a limitation. This approach causes a higher attenuation for X-rays, but also alters the penetration ability of the original consolidation product. In this contribution, we focus on the application of Medipix type detectors newly equipped with a 1 mm thick Si sensor. This thicker sensor has enhanced detection efficiency leading to extraordinary sensitivity for monitoring consolidants and liquids in natural building stones even without any contrast agent. Consequently, methods for the direct monitoring of organosilicon consolidants and dynamic visualization of the water uptake in the Opuka stone using high-contrast X-ray radiography are demonstrated. The presented work demonstrates a significant improvement in the monitoring sensitivity of X-ray radiography in stone consolidation studies and also shows advantages of this detector configuration for X-ray radiography in general

  5. Radon monitoring in groundwater samples from some areas of northern Rajasthan, India, using a RAD7 detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Asha; Mehra, Rohit; Duggal, Vikas

    2013-01-01

    Radon monitoring has been increasingly conducted worldwide because of the hazardous effects of radon on the health of human beings. In the present research, groundwater samples were taken from hand pumps at different areas of the districts of SriGanganagar, Hanumangarh, Sikar and Churu in northern Rajasthan. RAD7, an electronic radon detector (Durridge co., USA), was used to estimate the radon concentration in groundwater used for drinking. Radon concentration in the groundwater ranged from 0.5 ± 0.3 Bq l(-1) (Chimanpura) to 85.7±4.9 Bq l(-1)(Khandela) with an average value of 9.03±1.03 Bq l(-1). In 89 % of the samples, radon concentration is well below the allowed maximum contamination level (MCL) of radon concentration in water of 11 Bq l(-1), proposed by US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA). Only in 11 % of the samples, the recorded values were found to be higher than MCL proposed by USEPA and only in 5 % of the samples, the recorded values were found to be higher than the values between 4 and 40 Bq l(-1) suggested for radon concentration in water for human consumption by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the effect of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). The annual effective dose in stomach and lungs per person was also evaluated in this research. The estimated total annual effective dose of adults ranged from 1.34 to 229.68 µSv y(-1). The total annual effective dose from three locations of the studied area was found to be greater than the safe limit (0.1 mSv y(-1)) recommended by World Health Organization and EU Council. PMID:22826356

  6. The Possible Impact of GRB Detector Thresholds on Cosmological Standard Candles

    OpenAIRE

    Shahmoradi, A.; Nemiroff, R. J.

    2009-01-01

    GRB satellites are relatively inefficient detectors of dim hard bursts because they trigger on photon counts, which are number-biased against hard photons. Therefore, for example, given two bursts of identical peak luminosity near the detection threshold, a dim soft burst will be preferentially detected over a dim hard burst. This detector bias can create or skew an apparent correlation where increasingly hard GRBs appear increasingly bright. Although such correlations may be obfuscated by a ...

  7. The Swift Gamma Ray Burst Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2004-01-01

    Swift is an international mission managed by NASA as part of its MIDEX program. It is a multiwavelength transient observatory for GRB astronomy that will launch in 2004. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of GRBs and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. A wide field gamma-ray camera will detect more than a hundred GRBs per year to 2-5 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray, and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 75 sec by an autonomously controlled 'swift' spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions will be determined and optical/UV/x-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. Measurements of redshift will be made for many of the bursts. The instrumentation is a combination of superb existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (approx. 0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. The instruments have now completed their fabrication phase and are integrated on the observatory for final testing. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift. The talk will describe the mission and its status and give a summary of our plans for GRB operations.

  8. Observation of the huge neutron bursts in Tien-Shan neutron super monitor in the cores of extensive air showers with energy above 3 PeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Investigations being carried out at the NM64 type neutron supermonitor [1] based on the shower installation of the Tien-Shan mountain station of the Lebedev Physical Institute, have led to the discovery of an anomalous delay of the neutron signals in EAS cores [2]. The essence of this phenomenon consists of the following. The NM64 monitor (just as all other types of neutron monitors) registers the evaporation neutrons from nuclear fission produced by high energy hadrons (with energies above 100 MeV) within the lead monitor's generator. Before detection, these evaporation neutrons, created with energies of a few MeV, are thermalized to the energies about 10-2 eV) diffusing inside the monitor. The diffusion process results in an exponential time distribution of the neutron signals with a characteristic relaxation time of about 360-400 μs. Such a picture is reproduced with high accuracy when EAS with an energy below 3 PeV passes through the monitor. However, at energies above 3 PeV a small part of the showers (of about 2-3% of the whole) has a prolonged shape of the intensity of neutron signals. The fraction of such anomalous showers rapidly increases with increasing energy, and reaches about 20-30% at an EAS energy of about 10 PeV. An attempt to explain this effect as a result of neutron signal losses in registration channels [3] leads to a contradiction with the existing models of EAS development in the atmosphere, because the hadron multiplicities, necessary for an explanation of the experimental time distribution of the intensity of neutron signals, prove to be two to three orders of magnitude higher than the values predicted by the models. It should be noted that the observed effect has a threshold character: it starts to become apparent in the energy region above 3 PeV, where a characteristic knee in primary cosmic ray spectrum, of still unknown nature, is present. In the same energy region, a wide range of unexplained phenomena are also observed in

  9. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  10. Development of sodium leak detectors for PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Sodium leak detection system developed for PFBR using diverse principle. ► Miniature, remotely locatable diverse leak detector developed for Main Vessel. ► Mutual inductance type leak detectors designed and adapted for different locations. ► Sodium Ionisation detectors used for area monitoring. ► Crosswire type leak detector designed, developed and tested. - Abstract: The 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is under advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam near Chennai in India. The wide and high operating temperature, highly chemically active nature of sodium and its reaction with air make the sodium instrumentation complex over the conventional instrumentation. Over the years, traditional instruments such as wire type leak detectors, spark plug type leak detectors were developed and used in different sodium systems. The redundant and diverse leak detection method calls for development of special instrumentation for sodium systems which include sodium ionization (leak) detector for detecting minute sodium leak in addition to those systems based on mutual inductance principle. For detection of sodium leak from reactor Main Vessel (MV), diverse methods are used such as miniature, remotely locatable, Mutual Inductance type Leak Detector(MILD) and specially modified spark plug type leak detector. The design of MILD is suitably modified for detecting leak in double wall pipes and Diverse Safety Rod drive Mechanism (DSRDM). Steam/water leak in steam generator produces hydrogen and leads to high pressure and temperature in the system. Rupture disc is used as a safety device which punctures itself due to sudden pressure rise. To detect the discharge of sodium and its reaction products at the downstream of the rupture disc due to bursting of the rupture disc, cross wire type leak detector has been designed, developed and tested. The selection of the leak detection system depends on the location where leak has to be detected. This paper

  11. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  12. First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Abbott et al.

    2004-03-09

    We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h{sub rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h{sub rss} {approx} 10{sup -19} - 10{sup -17} strain/{radical}Hz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

  13. First upper limits from LIGO on gravitational wave bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B; Adhikari, R; Ageev, A N; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S V; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barker-Patton, C; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff,S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Bland-Weaver, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R G; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Brozek, S; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Colacino, C N; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Davies, R; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Ebeling, C; Edlund, J; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Flanagan, E; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ingley, R; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Kloevekorn, P; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Lück, H B; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K O; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNamara, P; Mendell, G; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Naundorf, H; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Papa, M A; Parameswariah, C; Parameshwaraiah, V; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Pratt, M; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schofield, R; Schrempel, M; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P S; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Skeldon, K D; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traeger, S; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Vallisneri, M; Van, M; Putten; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2004-01-01

    We report on a search for gravitational wave bursts using data from the first science run of the LIGO detectors. Our search focuses on bursts with durations ranging from 4 ms to 100 ms, and with significant power in the LIGO sensitivity band of 150 to 3000 Hz. We bound the rate for such detected bursts at less than 1.6 events per day at 90% confidence level. This result is interpreted in terms of the detection efficiency for ad hoc waveforms (Gaussians and sine-Gaussians) as a function of their root-sum-square strain h_{rss}; typical sensitivities lie in the range h_{rss} ~ 10^{-19} - 10^{-17} strain/rtHz, depending on waveform. We discuss improvements in the search method that will be applied to future science data from LIGO and other gravitational wave detectors.

  14. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  15. Technical Note: Nanometric organic photovoltaic thin film detectors for dose monitoring in diagnostic x-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elshahat, Bassem [Medical Physics Program, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 and Department of Medical Imaging, Royal Jubilee Hospital, Vancouver Island Health Authority, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 1J8 (Canada); Gill, Hardeep Singh; Kumar, Jayant [Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States); Filipyev, Ilya; Zygmanski, Piotr [Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Shrestha, Suman; Karellas, Andrew [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Hesser, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Mannheim, Heidelberg University, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, Mannheim 68167 (Germany); Sajo, Erno [Medical Physics Program, Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, Massachusetts 01854 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To fabricate organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells with nanometric active layers sensitive to ionizing radiation and measure their dosimetric characteristics in clinical x-ray beams in the diagnostic tube potential range of 60–150 kVp. Methods: Experiments were designed to optimize the detector’s x-ray response and find the best parameter combination by changing the active layer thickness and the area of the electrode. The OPV cell consisted of poly (3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl): [6,6]-phenyl C{sub 61} butyric acid methyl ester photoactive donor and acceptor semiconducting organic materials sandwiched between an aluminum electrode as an anode and an indium tin oxide electrode as a cathode. The authors measured the radiation-induced electric current at zero bias voltage in all fabricated OPV cells. Results: The net OPV current as a function of beam potential (kVp) was proportional to kVp{sup −0.5} when normalized to x-ray tube output, which varies with kVp. Of the tested configurations, the best combination of parameters was 270 nm active layer thicknesses with 0.7 cm{sup 2} electrode area, which provided the highest signal per electrode area. For this cell, the measured current ranged from approximately 0.7 to 2.4 nA/cm{sup 2} for 60–150 kVp, corresponding to about 0.09 nA–0.06 nA/mGy air kerma, respectively. When compared to commercial amorphous silicon thin film photovoltaic cells irradiated under the same conditions, this represents 2.5 times greater sensitivity. An additional 40% signal enhancement was observed when a 1 mm layer of plastic scintillator was attached to the cells’ beam-facing side. Conclusions: Since both OPVs can be produced as flexible devices and they do not require external bias voltage, they open the possibility for use as thin film in vivo detectors for dose monitoring in diagnostic x-ray imaging.

  16. The Etiology and Outcome Analysis of Neonatal Burst Suppression EEG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lian; ZHOU Yanxia; XU Sanqing

    2007-01-01

    The neonatal burst suppression is a severe EEG pattern and always demonstrates serious damage of nerve system. But the outcome of these patients depends on the different etiology. A total of 256 cases of video EEG recordings were analyzed in order to summarize the etiology and outcome of burst suppression. The results showed that some patients in all 17 cases of burst suppression showed EEG improvement. The etiology was the dominant factor in long term outcome. It was sug-gested that effective video EEG monitoring is helpful for etiologic study and prognosis evaluation.

  17. Mixed Burst Error Correcting Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Sethi, Amita

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we construct codes which are an improvement on the previously known block wise burst error correcting codes in terms of their error correcting capabilities. Along with different bursts in different sub-blocks, the given codes also correct overlapping bursts of a given length in two consecutive sub-blocks of a code word. Such codes are called mixed burst correcting (mbc) codes.

  18. Development of a criticality monitoring and alarm system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we are presenting the development of a Criticality Monitor and Alarm System (SIMAC). It monitors the burst of radiation produced during such an accident and triggers an alarm for evacuation in case the radiation exceeds a pre-established threshold. It consists of two subsystems, one for gamma rays and the other for neutrons. Each subsystem has three independent detectors modules. Each module is composed of an ion chamber plus its associated electronics, feeding a logic module that in turn would trigger the evacuation alarm. An additional feature is a PC interface for data acquisition. The radiation detectors are ion chambers working in current mode. The electronics associated to each detector can manage a wide signal range using a logarithmic converter. (author)

  19. Estimation of time history of I-131 concentration in air using NaI(Tl) detector pulse height distribution at monitoring post in Fukushima prefecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time histories of the I-131 concentration in air at monitoring posts in Fukushima prefecture in March 2011 were estimated using the pulse height distribution of a NaI(Tl) detector, which was opened to the public. Several corrections to the pulse height distribution were necessary owing to high count rates. The contribution to the count rates from I-131 accumulated around the monitoring post was estimated on the basis of the time history of the peak count rate by the method proposed by the authors. The concentrations of I-131 in air were converted from the peak count rates using the calculated response of the NaI(Tl) detector with egs5 for a model of a plume containing I-131 uniformly. The obtained time histories of the I-131 concentration in air at a fixed point in March 2011 were the first ones for Fukushima prefecture. The results at 3 monitoring posts, Naraha Town Shoukan, Hirono Town Futatsunuma and Fukushima City Momijiyama, which can be analyzed during almost all of March, show that a plume including I-131 arrived after March 15. The results at other monitoring posts near Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station are used to characterize plume diffusion at the early period of the accident before March 15. The I-131 time-integrated concentrations in air at several monitoring posts were compared with those given in UNSCEAR 2013 ANNEX A, which were obtained using estimated time-dependent rates of release to the atmosphere. The agreement between the two results varies depending on the places compared, owing to the large uncertainties in the estimated release rate used in UNSCEAR. The results obtained in this study can be used to increase the accuracy of the time-dependent release rate estimation. (author)

  20. Organic liquid scintillation detectors for on-the-fly neutron/gamma alarming and radionuclide identification in a pedestrian radiation portal monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paff, Marc Gerrit; Ruch, Marc L; Poitrasson-Riviere, Alexis; Sagadevan, Athena; Clarke, Shaun D; Pozzi, Sara

    2015-07-21

    We present new experimental results from a radiation portal monitor based on the use of organic liquid scintillators. The system was tested as part of a {sup 3}He-free radiation portal monitor testing campaign at the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre in Ispra, Italy, in February 2014. The radiation portal monitor was subjected to a wide range of test conditions described in ANSI N42.35, including a variety of gamma-ray sources and a 20,000 n/s {sup 252}Cf source. A false alarm test tested whether radiation portal monitors ever alarmed in the presence of only natural background. The University of Michigan Detection for Nuclear Nonproliferation Group’s system triggered zero false alarms in 2739 trials. It consistently alarmed on a variety of gamma-ray sources travelling at 1.2 m/s at a 70 cm source to detector distance. The neutron source was detected at speeds up to 3 m/s and in configurations with up to 8 cm of high density polyethylene shielding. The success of on-the-fly radionuclide identification varied with the gamma-ray source measured as well as with which of two radionuclide identification methods was used. Both methods used a least squares comparison between the measured pulse height distributions to library spectra to pick the best match. The methods varied in how the pulse height distributions were modified prior to the least squares comparison. Correct identification rates were as high as 100% for highly enriched uranium, but as low as 50% for {sup 241}Am. Both radionuclide identification algorithms produced mixed results, but the concept of using liquid scintillation detectors for gamma-ray and neutron alarming in radiation portal monitor was validated.

  1. Technical Basis for the Use of Alarming Personal Criticality Detectors to Augment Permanent Nuclear Incident Monitor (NIM) Systems in Areas Not Normally Occupied

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, K R

    2003-01-01

    The technical basis for the use of alarming personal criticality detectors (APCDs) to augment permanent Nuclear Incident Monitor (NIM) Systems in areas not normally occupied is evaluated. All applicable DOE O 420.1A and ANSI/ANS-8.3-1997 criticality alarm system requirements and recommendations are evaluated for applicability to APCDs. Based on this evaluation, design criteria and administrative requirements are presented for APCDs. Siemens EPD/Mk-2 and EPD-N devices are shown to meet the design criteria. A definition of not normally occupied is also presented.

  2. A repeating fast radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  3. A repeating fast radio burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  4. A new method based on noise counting to monitor the frontend electronics of the LHCb muon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Anderlini, L; Bonivento, W; Gruber, L; Kashchuk, A; Levitskaya, O; Maev, O; Martellotti, G; Penso, G; Pinci, D; Sarti, A; Schmidt, B

    2013-01-01

    A new method has been developed to check the correct behaviour of the frontend electronics of the LHCb muon detector. This method is based on the measurement of the electronic noise rate at different thresholds of the frontend discriminator. The method was used to choose the optimal discriminator thresholds. A procedure based on this method was implemented in the detector control system and allowed the detection of a small percentage of frontend channels which had deteriorated. A Monte Carlo simulation has been performed to check the validity of the method.

  5. Development of high sensitivity spectrometric alpha emitter detector for use in monitoring of environment and radio protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the project was to design and construct a prototype of a reliable high sensitivity alpha particle detector which will complement solid state track detectors in applications which require superior energy resolution and in which the need for etching is inappropriate. A multiwire proportional chamber of alpha particles was developed that is adaptable for samples deposited onto carriers or introduced in a gaseous form. The final report covers in fact the whole duration of the project with a particular attention to the work done during the last year. (R.P.) 7 refs., 8 figs

  6. Observation of solar radio bursts using swept-frequency radiospectrograph in 20 - 40 MHz band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new station for the observation of solar decametric radio bursts has been developed at Miyagi Vocational Training College in Tsukidate, Miyagi, Japan. Using the swept frequency radiospectrograph covering a frequency range from 20 MHz to 40 MHz within 200 msec, with bandwidth of 30 kHz, the radio outbursts from the sun have been currently monitored with colored dynamic spectrum display. After July 1982, successful observations provide the data which include all types of solar radio bursts such as type I, II, III, IV and V in the decametric wavelength range. In addition to these typical radio bursts, rising tone bursts with fast drift rate followed by strong type III bursts and a series of bursts repeating rising and falling tone bursts with slow drift rate have been observed. (author)

  7. The Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, N; Burrows, D N; Chincarini, G L; Cominsky, L R; Giommi, P; Hurley, K C; Marshall, F E; Mason, K O; Mészáros, P; Nousek, J A; Roming, P W A; Wells, A A; White, N E; Team, Swift Science

    2004-01-01

    The Swift mission, scheduled for launch in early 2004, is a multiwavelength observatory for gamma-ray burst (GRB) astronomy. It is the first-of-its-kind autonomous rapid-slewing satellite for transient astronomy and pioneers the way for future rapid-reaction and multiwavelength missions. It will be far more powerful than any previous GRB mission, observing more than 100 bursts per year and performing detailed X-ray and UV/optical afterglow observations spanning timescales from 1 minute to several days after the burst. The objectives are to determine the origin of GRBs; classify GRBs and search for new types; study the interaction of the ultra-relativistic outflows of GRBs with their surrounding medium; and use GRBs to study the early universe out to z>10. The mission is being developed by a NASA-led international collaboration. It will carry three instruments: a new-generation wide-field gamma-ray (15-150 keV) detector; a narrow-field X-ray telescope; and a narrow-field UV/optical telescope. Redshift determin...

  8. Recreating the top quark: Commissioning and monitoring of the ATLAS Inner Detector and search for New Physics with heavy particles

    CERN Document Server

    Tonoyan, Arshak

    The ATLAS (A Toroidal Lhc ApparatuS) experiment is one of the two general purpose experiments at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. The LHC is a proton-proton and ion-ion collider built in a 27 km long circular tunnel 100 meter below the surface of the Earth. The maximum energy at which LHC is capable to collide protons is 14 TeV in the center of mass frame, but currently it is being operated at half of its maximum energy, i.e. at 7 TeV. The first collisions at the LHC took place in November 2009. Before that the LHC detectors, including ATLAS (which was already built and installed in 2007) were commissioned using muons produced from the interaction of cosmic rays with the Earth atmosphere. The Inner Detector is one of components of ATLAS detector, which is responsible for tracking of charged particles. It consists of three independent but complementary sub-detectors, which are built using different types of charged particle detecting concepts. This thesis...

  9. Development of skin surface radiation detector system to monitor radioactivity in arterial blood with positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a unique method to determine quantitatively and localize precisely human physiological functions. The measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) is one of the most commonly used clinical PET studies. Two conventional methods are commonly used to measure the time course of activity concentration (TCC) in arterial blood. A new type detector system for measuring the TCC in the arterial blood of a subject in PET study without taking the arterial blood have been developed. The system measures the radioactivity in arterial blood through the skin of a subject. A detector is placed on the skin over a wrist. The block diagram of the detector system is shown. It was tried to measure 15O activity (half life: 122s). The nuclei emit the positrons of maximum energy 1.73 MeV, which has about 9 mm range in tissues, and can penetrate through a skin from an artery. The phantom experiment to examine the performance of the detector system and the clinical PET study and their results are reported. (K.I.)

  10. SU-E-T-249: Neutron Model Upgrade for Radiotherapy Patients Monitoring Using a New Online Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irazola, L; Sanchez Doblado, F. [Departamento de Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica, Universidad de Sevilla (Spain); Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Lorenzoli, M; Pola, A. [Politecnico di Milano, Departimento di Ingegneria Nuclear, Milano (Italy); Terron, J.A. [Servicio de Radiofisica, Hospital Universitario Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain); Bedogni, R. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) (Italy); Sanchez Nieto, B. [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Romero-Exposito, M. [Departamento de Fisica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to improve the existing methodology to estimate neutron equivalent dose in organs during radiotherapy treatments, based on a Static Random Access Memory neutron detector (SRAMnd) [1]. This is possible thanks to the introduction of a new digital detector with improved characteristics, which is able to measure online the neutron fluence rate in the presence of an intense photon background [2]. Its reduced size, allows the direct estimation of doses in specific points inside an anthropomorphic phantom (NORMA) without using passive detectors as TLD or CR-39. This versatility will allow not only to improve the existing models (generic abdomen and H and N [1]) but to generate more specific ones for any technique. Methods: The new Thermal Neutron Rate Detector (TNRD), based on a diode device sensitized to thermal neutrons, have been inserted in 16 points of the phantom. These points are distributed to infer doses to specific organs. Simultaneous measurements of these devices and a reference one, located in front of the gantry, have been performed for the mentioned generic treatments, in order to improve the existing model. Results: These new devices have shown more precise since they agree better with Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison of the thermal neutron fluence, measured with TNRD, and the existing models, converted from events to fluence, shows an average improvement of (3.90±3.37) % for H and N and (12.61±9.43) % for abdomen, normalized to the maximum value. Conclusion: This work indicates the potential of these new devices for more precise neutron equivalent dose estimation in organs, as a consequence of radiotherapy treatments. The simplicity of the process makes possible to establish more specific models that will provide a better dose estimation. References[1] Phys Med Biol 2012; 57:6167–6191.[2] A new active thermal neutron detector. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. (in press)

  11. Optical telescope BIRT in ORIGIN for gamma ray burst observing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Content, Robert; Sharples, Ray; Page, Mathew J.; Cole, Richard; Walton, David M.; Winter, Berend; Pedersen, Kristian; Hjorth, Jens; Andersen, Michael; Hornstrup, Allan; Den Herder, Jan-Willem A.; Piro, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The ORIGIN concept is a space mission with a gamma ray, an X-ray and an optical telescope to observe the gamma ray bursts at large Z to determine the composition and density of the intergalactic matter in the line of sight. It was an answer to the ESA M3 call for proposal. The optical telescope is...... path length. All 3 instruments use the same 2k x 2k detector simultaneously so that telescope pointing and tip-tilt control of a fold mirror permit to place the gamma ray burst on the desired instrument without any other mechanism. © 2012 SPIE....

  12. Design of monitoring circuit of PMT HV power supply control system of LASCAR scintillator array detector at RIBLL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is described that the monitoring circuit of PMT HV power supply control system of LASCAR in this paper, which is based on CC123 HV power supply module supplied by Beijing HAMAMATSU Phonetics Co.. The detailed design of this monitoring circuit, which has combined MCU and Personal Computer, is presented. (authors)

  13. Development of a silicon detector monitor for the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting upgrade of the REX-ISOLDE heavy-ion linac

    CERN Document Server

    Zocca, F; Bravin, E; Pasini, M; Voulot, D; Wenander, F

    2012-01-01

    A silicon detector monitor has been developed and tested in the framework of the beam diagnostics development program for the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting upgrade of the REX-ISOLDE heavy-ion linac at CERN. The monitor is intended for beam energy and timing measurements aimed at the phase tuning of the superconducting cavities. Tests were performed with a stable ion beam, composed of carbon, oxygen and neon ions accelerated to energies from 300keV/u to 2.82MeV/u. The energy measurements performed allowed for beam spectroscopy and ion identification with a resolution of 1.4%-0.5% rms in the measured energy range. The achieved resolution is suited for a fast phase tuning of the cavities, which was demonstrated with the third REX 7-gap resonator. The time structure of the beam, characterised by a bunch period of 9.87ns, was measured with a resolution better than 200ps rms. This paper describes the results from all these tests and provides details of the detector set-up.

  14. Doping the 1 kton Large Volume Detector with Gd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Large Volume Detector (LVD) in the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy, is a ν observatory which has been monitoring the Galaxy since June 1992 to study neutrinos from core collapse supernovae. The experiment in the present configuration is made by 840 scintillator detectors, for a total active mass of 1000 tons. The detector sensitivity to neutrino bursts due to a core collapse supernova has been already discussed in term of maximum detectable distance. In this paper we evaluate the improvements that LVD could obtain if all its active scintillator mass was doped with a small amount (0.14% in weight) of Gadolinium. We simulated neutron captures following ν-bar e inverse beta decay reactions in one LVD counter (1.2 ton) with Gd doped liquid scintillator obtaining an efficiency for the detection of this process of ηn|Gd = 80% and a mean capture time τ = 25μs, in good agreement with the results obtained by the measures. This implies a gain of a factor ∼ 20 in the signal to noise ratio for neutron capture detection with respect to the undoped liquid scintillator. We discuss how the captures of neutrons from rock radioactivity on Gd modify the background conditions of the detector and we calculate the curves expressing the sensitivity to a ν-bar e burst from core collapse supernovae depending on the distance of the collapsing star. It results that doping the 1 kton Large Volume Detector with Gd would assure a 90% detection efficiency at the distance of the Large Magellanic Cloud (50 kpc), an achievement which is equivalent to that obtained by doubling the number of counters in LVD

  15. Doping the 1 kton Large Volume Detector with Gd

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, Gianmarco [University of L' Aquila, Via Vetoio snc, 67100 Coppito (AQ) Italy (Italy); Fulgione, Walter; Porta, Amanda [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF, Corso Fiume 4, Torino (Italy); Machado, Ana Amelia Bergamini [Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, INFN, s.s. 17bis Km 18-10, Assergi (AQ) (Italy); Mal' gin, Alexei [Institute for Nuclear Research, Russian Academy of Sciences, pr. Shestidesyatiletiya Oktyabrya 7a, Moscow, 117312 (Russian Federation); Molinario, Andrea; Vigorito, Carlo, E-mail: bruno@to.infn.it, E-mail: fulgione@to.infn.it, E-mail: ana.machado@lngs.infn.it, E-mail: malgin@lngs.infn.it, E-mail: amolinar@to.infn.it, E-mail: Amanda.Porta@subatech.in2p3.fr, E-mail: vigorito@to.infn.it [INFN, Via Pietro Giuria 1, Torino (Italy)

    2011-06-01

    The Large Volume Detector (LVD) in the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS), Italy, is a ν observatory which has been monitoring the Galaxy since June 1992 to study neutrinos from core collapse supernovae. The experiment in the present configuration is made by 840 scintillator detectors, for a total active mass of 1000 tons. The detector sensitivity to neutrino bursts due to a core collapse supernova has been already discussed in term of maximum detectable distance. In this paper we evaluate the improvements that LVD could obtain if all its active scintillator mass was doped with a small amount (0.14% in weight) of Gadolinium. We simulated neutron captures following ν-bar {sub e} inverse beta decay reactions in one LVD counter (1.2 ton) with Gd doped liquid scintillator obtaining an efficiency for the detection of this process of η{sub n}|{sub Gd} = 80% and a mean capture time τ = 25μs, in good agreement with the results obtained by the measures. This implies a gain of a factor ∼ 20 in the signal to noise ratio for neutron capture detection with respect to the undoped liquid scintillator. We discuss how the captures of neutrons from rock radioactivity on Gd modify the background conditions of the detector and we calculate the curves expressing the sensitivity to a ν-bar {sub e} burst from core collapse supernovae depending on the distance of the collapsing star. It results that doping the 1 kton Large Volume Detector with Gd would assure a 90% detection efficiency at the distance of the Large Magellanic Cloud (50 kpc), an achievement which is equivalent to that obtained by doubling the number of counters in LVD.

  16. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE BeppoSAX GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1996 July and 2002 April, one or more spacecraft of the interplanetary network detected 786 cosmic gamma-ray bursts that were also detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and/or Wide-Field X-Ray Camera experiments aboard the BeppoSAX spacecraft. During this period, the network consisted of up to six spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 475 bursts were obtained. We present the localization data for these events.

  17. The Fermi–GBM Three-year X-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, P. A.; Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Beklen, E.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M. H.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all-sky gamma-ray monitor well known in the gamma-ray burst (GRB) community. Although GBM excels in detecting the hard, bright extragalactic GRBs, its sensitivity above 8 keV and its all-sky view make it an excellent instrument for the detection of rare, short-lived Galactic transients. In 2010 March, we initiated a systematic search for transients using GBM data. We conclude this phase of the search by presenting a three-year catalog of 1084 X-ray bursts. Using spectral analysis, location, and spatial distributions we classified the 1084 events into 752 thermonuclear X-ray bursts, 267 transient events from accretion flares and X-ray pulses, and 65 untriggered gamma-ray bursts. All thermonuclear bursts have peak blackbody temperatures broadly consistent with photospheric radius expansion (PRE) bursts. We find an average rate of 1.4 PRE bursts per day, integrated over all Galactic bursters within about 10 kpc. These include 33 and 10 bursts from the ultra-compact X-ray binaries 4U 0614+09 and 2S 0918-549, respectively. We discuss these recurrence times and estimate the total mass ejected by PRE bursts in our Galaxy.

  18. Risk evaluation of rock burst through theory of static and dynamic stresses superposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振雷; 蔡武; 窦林名; 何江; 王桂峰; 丁言露

    2015-01-01

    Rock burst is one of the most catastrophic dynamic hazards in coal mining. A static and dynamic stresses superposition-based (SDSS-based) risk evaluation method of rock burst was proposed to pre-evaluate rock burst risk. Theoretical basis of this method is the stress criterion incurring rock burst and rock burst risk is evaluated according to the closeness degree of the total stress (due to the superposition of static stress in the coal and dynamic stress induced by tremors) with the critical stress. In addition, risk evaluation criterion of rock burst was established by defining the “Satisfaction Degree” of static stress. Furthermore, the method was used to pre-evaluate rock burst risk degree and prejudge endangered area of an insular longwall face in Nanshan Coal Mine in China. Results show that rock burst risk is moderate at advance extent of 97 m, strong at advance extent of 97−131 m, and extremely strong (i.e. inevitable to occur) when advance extent exceeds 131 m (mining is prohibited in this case). The section of two gateways whose floor abuts 15−3 coal seam is a susceptible area prone to rock burst. Evaluation results were further compared with rock bursts and tremors detected by microseismic monitoring. Comparison results indicate that evaluation results are consistent with microseismic monitoring, which proves the method’s feasibility.

  19. BROADBAND SPECTRAL INVESTIGATIONS OF SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander; Watts, Anna L. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gruber, David; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Younes, George [USRA, National Space Science and Technology Center, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, Neil, E-mail: linlin@sabanciuniv.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  20. Broadband Spectral Investigations of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Baring, Matthew G.; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Younes, George; Watts, Anna L.; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  1. Status of GRB Observations with the Suzaku Wideband All-sky Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, M S; Urata, Y; Onda, K; Kodaka, N; Endo, A; Suzuki, M; Morigami, K; Yamaoka, K; Nakagawa, Y E; Sugita, S; Fukazawa, Y; Ohno, M; Takahashi, T; Kira, C; Uehara, T; Tamagawa, T; Enoto, T; Miyawaki, R; Nakazawa, K; Makishima, K; Sonoda, E; Yamauchi, M; Maeno, S; Tanaka, H; Hara, R; Suzuki, M; Kokubun, M; Takahashi, T; Hong, S J; Murakami, T; Tajima, H

    2008-01-01

    The Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) is a function of the large lateral BGO shield of the Hard X-ray Detector (HXD) onboard Suzaku. Its large geometrical area of 800 cm^2 per side, the large stopping power for the hard X-rays and the wide-field of view make the WAM an ideal detector for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observations in the energy range of 50-5000 keV. In fact, the WAM has observed 288 GRBs confirmed by other satellites, till the end of May 2007.

  2. Introduction to Optical Burst Switching

    OpenAIRE

    KERNÁCS János; SZILÁGYI Szabolcs

    2010-01-01

    Optical Burst Switching (OBS) isconsidered a popular switching paradigm for therealization of all-optical networks due to the balance itoffers between the coarse-grained Optical CircuitSwitching (OSC) and fine-grained Optical PacketSwitching (OPS). Given that the data are switched allopticallyat the burst level, Optical Burst Switchingcombines the transparency of Optical CircuitSwitching with the benefits of statistical multiplexingin Optical Packet Switching.

  3. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Zumstein, James M.; Vigars, Mark L.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  4. NEW BURST ASSEMBLY AND SCHEDULING TECHNIQUE FOR OPTICAL BURST SWITCHING NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    V.KAVITHA; Palanisamy, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Optical Burst Switching is a new switching technology that efficiently utilizes the bandwidth in the optical layer. The key areas to be concentrated in Optical Burst Switching (OBS) networks are the burst assembly and burst scheduling i.e., assignment of wavelengths to the incoming bursts. This study presents a New Burst Assembly and Scheduling (NBAS) technique in a simultaneous multipath transmission for burst loss recovery in OBS networks. A Redundant Burst Segmentation (RBS) is used fo...

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The five year Fermi/GBM magnetar burst catalog (Collazzi+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazzi, A. C.; Kouveliotou, C.; van den Horst, A. J.; Younes, G. A.; Kaneko, Y.; Gogus, E.; Lin, L.; Granot, J.; Finger, M. H.; Chaplin, V. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Watts, A. L.; Kienlin, A. V.; Baring, M. G.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Gibby, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.; van der Klis, M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2015-07-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550-5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7. (3 data files).

  6. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  7. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  8. Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, Neil; 10.1126/science.1216793

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, last typically 10s of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  9. Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stell...

  10. Design support of the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, E. A., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Engineering design specifications and development of the large area detector and photomultiplier tube assemblies for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission are examined.

  11. The 3rd Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Six Years

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, P Narayana; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S; Briggs, Michael S; Burgess, J Michael; Burns, Eric; Chaplin, Vandiver; Cleveland, William H; Collazzi, Andrew C; Connaughto, Valerie; Diekmann, Anne M; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Gibby, Melissa H; Giles, Misty M; Goldstein, Adam M; Greiner, Jochen; Jenke, Peter A; Kippen, R Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Mailyan, Bagrat; McBreen, Sheila; Pelassa, Veronique; Preece, Robert D; Roberts, Oliver J; Sparke, Linda S; Stanbro, Matthew; Veres, Peter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Xiong, Shaolin; Younes, George; Yu, Hoi-Fung; Zhang, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Since its launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has triggered and located on average approximately two gamma-ray bursts (GRB) every three days. Here we present the third of a series of catalogs of GRBs detected by GBM, extending the second catalog by two more years, through the middle of July 2014. The resulting list includes 1405 triggers identified as GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected GRBs. For each GRB the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux and fluence are derived. The latter two quantities are calculated for the 50-300~keV energy band, where the maximum energy release of GRBs in the instrument reference system is observed, and also for a broader energy band from 10-1000 keV, exploiting the full energy range of GBM's low-energy NaI(Tl) detectors. Using statistical methods to assess clustering, we find that the hardness and duration of GRB...

  12. The Second Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Four Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael; Byrne, David; Chaplin, Vandiver; Cleveland, William; Connaughton, Valerie; Collazzi, Andrew C.; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Layden, Emily; McBreen, Sheila; McGlynn, Sinéad; Pelassa, Veronique; Preece, Robert D.; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Xiong, Shaolin; Younes, George; Yu, Hoi-Fung

    2014-03-01

    This is the second of a series of catalogs of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). It extends the first two-year catalog by two more years, resulting in an overall list of 953 GBM triggered GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected GRBs. For each GRB the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux and fluence are derived. The latter two quantities are calculated for the 50-300 keV energy band, where the maximum energy release of GRBs in the instrument reference system is observed and also for a broader energy band from 10-1000 keV, exploiting the full energy range of GBMs low-energy detectors. Furthermore, information is given on the settings and modifications of the triggering criteria and exceptional operational conditions during years three and four in the mission. This second catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  13. THE SECOND FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG: THE FIRST FOUR YEARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Kienlin, Andreas; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Meegan, Charles A.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Paciesas, William S.; Cleveland, William [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Byrne, David; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Collazzi, Andrew C. [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); Guiriec, Sylvain [NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); and others

    2014-03-01

    This is the second of a series of catalogs of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). It extends the first two-year catalog by two more years, resulting in an overall list of 953 GBM triggered GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected GRBs. For each GRB the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux and fluence are derived. The latter two quantities are calculated for the 50-300 keV energy band, where the maximum energy release of GRBs in the instrument reference system is observed and also for a broader energy band from 10-1000 keV, exploiting the full energy range of GBMs low-energy detectors. Furthermore, information is given on the settings and modifications of the triggering criteria and exceptional operational conditions during years three and four in the mission. This second catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  14. The 2nd Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Four Years

    CERN Document Server

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Burgess, J Michael; Byrne, David; Chaplin, Vandiver; Cleveland, William; Connaughton, Valerie; Collazzi, Andrew C; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Layden, Emily; McBreen, Sheila; McGlynn, Sinead; Pelassa, Veronique; Preece, Robert D; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Xiong, Shaolin; Younes, George; Yu, Hoi-Fung

    2014-01-01

    This is the second of a series of catalogs of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). It extends the first two-year catalog by two more years, resulting in an overall list of 953 GBM triggered GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected GRBs. For each GRB the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux and fluence are derived. The latter two quantities are calculated for the 50 - 300 keV energy band, where the maximum energy release of GRBs in the instrument reference system is observed and also for a broader energy band from 10 - 1000 keV, exploiting the full energy range of GBMs low-energy detectors. Furthermore, information is given on the settings and modifications of the triggering criteria and exceptional operational conditions during years three and four in the mission. This second catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM sci...

  15. A Blind Search for Bursts of Very High Enery Gamma Rays with Milagro

    CERN Document Server

    Vasileiou, Vlasios

    2008-01-01

    Milagro is a water-Cherenkov detector that observes the extended air showers produced by cosmic gamma rays of energies E>100GeV. The effective area of Milagro peaks at energies E~10TeV, however it is still large even down to a few hundred GeV (~10m^2 at 100GeV). The wide field of view (~2sr) and high duty cycle (>90%) of Milagro make it ideal for continuously monitoring the overhead sky for transient Very High Energy (VHE) emissions. This study searched the Milagro data for such emissions. Even though the search was optimized primarily for detecting the emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), it was still sensitive to the emission from the last stages of the evaporation of Primordial Black Holes or to any other kind of phenomena that produce bursts of VHE gamma rays. Measurements of the GRB spectra by satellites up to few tens of GeV showed no signs of a cutoff. Even though multiple instruments sensitive to $GeV/TeV$ gamma rays have performed observations of GRBs, there has not yet been a definitive detection ...

  16. Algorithm for in-pile field monitoring using conditional dividing of detectors into training and control ones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuristic solution of the problem of reliability parameter evaluation of two information sources-physical calculation and measurements - in reactor control systems is suggested. The approach described presupposes that the existing control systems of power release fields in reactors located at regular intervals over the core. It is suggested that the detectors should be subdivided into the training (by which correction with different values of reliability parameters is made) and control onesd (those, by which appropriate values of parameters are compared and selected). The algorithm considered is realized at the BIlibin heat and power generating nuclear plant and is succesfully used. 7 refs.; 5 refs.; 1 tab

  17. Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Brdar, Vedran; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a p-wave process than for s-wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to Standard Model particles later, the annihilation bu...

  18. The Third Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Six Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayana Bhat, P.; Meegan, Charles A.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael; Burns, Eric; Chaplin, Vandiver; Cleveland, William H.; Collazzi, Andrew C.; Connaughton, Valerie; Diekmann, Anne M.; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Gibby, Melissa H.; Giles, Misty M.; Goldstein, Adam M.; Greiner, Jochen; Jenke, Peter A.; Kippen, R. Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Mailyan, Bagrat; McBreen, Sheila; Pelassa, Veronique; Preece, Robert D.; Roberts, Oliver J.; Sparke, Linda S.; Stanbro, Matthew; Veres, Péter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Xiong, Shaolin; Younes, George; Yu, Hoi-Fung; Zhang, Binbin

    2016-04-01

    Since its launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has triggered and located on average approximately two γ-ray bursts (GRBs) every three days. Here, we present the third of a series of catalogs of GRBs detected by GBM, extending the second catalog by two more years through the middle of 2014 July. The resulting list includes 1405 triggers identified as GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM-detected GRBs. For each GRB, the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux, and fluence are derived. The latter two quantities are calculated for the 50–300 keV energy band where the maximum energy release of GRBs in the instrument reference system is observed, and also for a broader energy band from 10 to 1000 keV, exploiting the full energy range of GBM's low-energy [Nai[Tl)] detectors. Using statistical methods to assess clustering, we find that the hardness and duration of GRBs are better fit by a two-component model with short-hard and long-soft bursts than by a model with three components. Furthermore, information is provided on the settings and modifications of the triggering criteria and exceptional operational conditions during years five and six in the mission. This third catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  19. Monitor

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — A custom-built, dual-language (English and Spanish) system (http://www.monitor.net.co/) developed by DevTech that debuted in January 2011. It features a central PMP...

  20. Fermi/GBM and BATSE Gamma-Ray Bursts: comparison of the spectral properties

    OpenAIRE

    Nava, Lara; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Celotti, Annalisa

    2010-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board Fermi allows to study the spectra of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) over an unprecedented wide energy range (8 keV - 35 MeV). We compare the spectral properties of short and long GRBs detected by the GBM (up to March 2010) with those of GRBs detected by the BATSE instrument on board the CGRO. GBM and BATSE long bursts have similar distributions of fluence (F), Epeak and peak flux (P) but GBM bursts have a slightly harder low-energy spectral index \\alpha wit...

  1. Comparison of WATCH and IPN Locations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, K.; Lund, Niels; Brandt, Søren; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Sommer, M.; Lapshov, I.; Laros, J.; Klebesadel, R.; Fishman, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.

    The WATCH all sky monitors aboard the Granat and EURECA spacecraft have the capability of independently localizing gamma‐ray bursts to error circles whose 3 sigma radii are 1 degree or less. These are the most accurate single‐experiment localizations currently achievable. In those cases where both...... WATCH and one or more experiments from the IPN detect a burst, the localizations may be refined considerably. We have identified approximately 35 bursts between 1991 and 1993 in this category. Some were detected by WATCH, Ulysses, PVO, and BATSE, and so on. We present and compare the locations of some...... of these bursts....

  2. Burst propagation in Texas Helimak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, F. A. C.; Toufen, D. L.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We present investigations of extreme events (bursts) propagating in the Texas Helimak, a toroidal plasma device in which the radial electric field can be changed by application of bias. In the experiments analyzed, a large grid of Langmuir probes measuring ion saturation current fluctuations is used to study the burst propagation and its dependence on the applied bias voltage. We confirm previous results reported on the turbulence intermittency in the Texas Helimak, extending them to a larger radial interval with a density ranging from a uniform decay to an almost uniform value. For our analysis, we introduce an improved procedure, based on a multiprobe bidimensional conditional averaging method, to assure precise determination of burst statistical properties and their spatial profiles. We verify that intermittent bursts have properties that vary in the radial direction. The number of bursts depends on the radial position and on the applied bias voltage. On the other hand, the burst characteristic time and size do not depend on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage modifies the vertical and radial burst velocity profiles differently. The burst velocity is smaller than the turbulence phase velocity in almost all the analyzed region.

  3. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  4. Burst Mode Transmission in GPON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Liang-chuan; ZHANG Yan-gan; LI Ling; XU Da-xiong

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a newly approved standard G.984 for Gigabit-capable Passive Optical Networks (GPON) is introduced. Technical challenges about high-speed burst-mode data transmission in GPON are discussed and key issues such as Forward Error Correction (FEC), timing to uplink performance of burst mode are high-lighted.

  5. Scheduling start time in CDMA burst admission

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuge, L; Li, VOK

    2002-01-01

    Burst transmission protocols have been proposed in the next generation CDMA cellular systems to support short-time high-speed data communications. The existing burst admission algorithm considers only the current interference condition in the system. The burst transmission request will be rejected if the interference in the system will exceed the acceptable level with the burst admitted. In this paper we propose a new burst admission algorithm where a currently-unacceptable burst request can ...

  6. Thermonuclear bursts from slowly and rapidly accreting neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Manuel

    2012-07-01

    Models of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars predict different ignition regimes, depending mainly on the mass accretion rate per unit area. For more than three decades, testing these regimes observationally has met with only partial success. I will present recent results from the Fermi-GBM all-sky X-ray burst monitor, which is yielding robust measurements of recurrence time of rare and highly energetic thermonuclear bursts at the lowest mass accretion rates. I will also present RXTE observations of thermonuclear bursts at high mass accretion rates, including the discovery of millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations and several bursting regimes in a neutron star transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar. This unusual neutron star, with higher magnetic field and slower rotation than any other known burster, showed copious bursting activity when the mass accretion rate varied between 10% and 50% of the Eddington rate. I will discuss the role of fuel composition and neutron star spin in setting the burst properties of this system, and the possible implications for the rest of thermonuclear bursters.

  7. How gravitational-wave observations can shape the gamma-ray burst paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By reaching through shrouding blastwaves, efficiently discovering off-axis events and probing the central engine at work, gravitational wave (GW) observations will soon revolutionize the study of gamma-ray bursts. Already, analyses of GW data targeting gamma-ray bursts have helped constrain the central engines of selected events. Advanced GW detectors with significantly improved sensitivities are under construction. After outlining the GW emission mechanisms from gamma-ray burst progenitors (binary coalescences, stellar core collapses, magnetars and others) that may be detectable with advanced detectors, we review how GWs will improve our understanding of gamma-ray burst central engines, their astrophysical formation channels and the prospects and methods for different search strategies. We place special emphasis on multimessenger searches. To achieve the most scientific benefit, GW, electromagnetic and neutrino observations should be combined to provide greater discriminating power and science reach. (topical review)

  8. MD456: Monitoring of abort gap population with diamond particle detectors at the BGI in IP 4

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    In this MD, diamond based particle detectors (dBLM) were used for measuring showers of the beam interactions with the in the BGI induced neon gas. This setup was proposed in a feasibility study for using dBLMs at the BGI to measure the abort gap population by detecting the beam gas interactions. During the MD neon gas was induced in the BGI vacuum chamber to increase the interaction rate. Two nominal bunches were injected and accelerated up to 6.5 TeV. The measurements lasted for 140 minutes. The bunches could be clearly identified. But the resulting count rate of the beam gas interactions was a factor 70 lower than predicted by the feasibility study. In addition, a problem with the timing information lead to a widening of the histogram peaks.

  9. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  10. In-Situ monitoring of radioactivity using NaI probe detector and chemical analysis along sebou river

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Radionuclides released into the aquatic environment are usually accompagned by gamma-emitters. Therefore, a gamma-monitoring system would provide an excellent solution for the monitoring of radionuclides in the aquatic environment. Gamma-ray spectrometers operating underwater can be effectively used for short term as well as long term monitoring of radioactivity. The can, in specific cases, replace sporadic sampling campaigns and laborious analytical measurements in the laboratory. Stationary monitoring systems have several advantages when compared to traditional sampling systems e.g (a) real-time reporting of data, (b) investigation of temporal changes, (c) development of time series. On the other hand, one monitor can cover large surfaces which require large-scale sampling and analysis of many samples in the laboratory. The tidal estuary of Kenitra (some 30 Km north Rabat) has been selected for a training period with a gamma -monitoring system placed in a secure environment. The estuary of Kenitra is of major environmental relevance for several reasons : the important population living in the surroundings, the harbour and the wildlife reservoirs for migratory birds. Upstream several industries release their wastes, enhancing the concentrations of heavy metals in the water and the particulate matter. The entrance of the estuary is protected by a defence dock to prevent the intrusion of sand in the harbour, a serious problem in most of the atlantic port from Morocco. The low activity liquid wastes from the nuclear reactor operated by the CNESTEN will be released in this estuary in the near future. Thus, there is a nice opportunity to combine the objectives of testing and initial training with the improvement of our scientific knowledge of this estuarine system, in order to achieve a better protection of the environment and to assist the decision-making activities. 40K is a naturally occuring gamma emitter that can be found in salt water at relatively

  11. The Fermi GBM gamma-ray burst time-resolved spectral catalog: brightest bursts in the first four years

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Greiner, Jochen; Bhat, P Narayana; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Cleveland, William H; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Mailyan, Bagrat; Meegan, Charles A; Paciesas, William S; Rau, Arne; Roberts, Oliver J; Veres, Péter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Zhang, Bin-Bin; van Eerten, Hendrik J

    2016-01-01

    We aim to obtain high-quality time-resolved spectral fits of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We perform time-resolved spectral analysis with high temporal and spectral resolution of the brightest bursts observed by Fermi GBM in its first 4 years of mission. We present the complete catalog containing 1,491 spectra from 81 bursts with high spectral and temporal resolution. Distributions of parameters, statistics of the parameter populations, parameter-parameter and parameter-uncertainty correlations, and their exact values are obtained and presented as main results in this catalog. We report a criterion that is robust enough to automatically distinguish between different spectral evolutionary trends between bursts. We also search for plausible blackbody emission components and find that only 3 bursts (36 spectra in total) show evidence of a pure Planck function. It is observed that the averaged time-resolved low-energy power-law...

  12. The Fermi GBM gamma-ray burst time-resolved spectral catalog: brightest bursts in the first four years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Preece, Robert D.; Greiner, Jochen; Narayana Bhat, P.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S.; Cleveland, William H.; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Mailyan, Bagrat; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Rau, Arne; Roberts, Oliver J.; Veres, Péter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Zhang, Bin-Bin; van Eerten, Hendrik J.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We aim to obtain high-quality time-resolved spectral fits of gamma-ray bursts observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Methods: We performed time-resolved spectral analysis with high temporal and spectral resolution of the brightest bursts observed by Fermi GBM in its first four years of mission. Results: We present the complete catalog containing 1491 spectra from 81 bursts with high spectral and temporal resolution. Distributions of parameters, statistics of the parameter populations, parameter-parameter and parameter-uncertainty correlations, and their exact values are obtained and presented as main results in this catalog. We report a criterion that is robust enough to automatically distinguish between different spectral evolutionary trends between bursts. We also search for plausible blackbody emission components and find that only three bursts (36 spectra in total) show evidence of a pure Planck function. It is observed that peak energy and the averaged, time-resolved power-law index at low energy are slightly harder than the time-integrated values. Time-resolved spectroscopic results should be used instead of time-integrated results when interpreting physics from the observed spectra. Tables A.1 and B.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A135

  13. Search for gravitational-wave bursts in LIGO's third science run

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Allen, B.; R. Amin; Anderson, S; Anderson, W.; Araya, M; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Ajith, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R.

    2006-01-01

    We report on a search for gravitational-wave bursts in data from the three LIGO interferometric detectors during their third science run. The search targets subsecond bursts in the frequency range 100-1100 Hz for which no waveform model is assumed and has a sensitivity in terms of the root-sum-square (rss) strain amplitude of h(rss) ~10^(-20) Hz^(-1/2). No gravitational-wave signals were detected in the eight days of analysed data.

  14. Gamma-Ray Burst Follow-up Observations with STACEE During 2003-2007

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, A; Carson, J E; Covault, C E; Driscoll, D D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Mukherjee, R; Müller, C; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope (ACT) that uses a large mirror array to achieve a relatively low energy threshold. For sources with Crab-like spectra, at high elevations, the detector response peaks near 100 GeV. Gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations have been a high priority for the STACEE collaboration since the inception of the experiment. We present the results of 20 GRB follow-up observations at times ranging from 3 minutes to 15 hours after the burst triggers. Where redshift measurements are available, we place constraints on the intrinsic high-energy spectra of the bursts.

  15. First search for neutrinos in correlation with gamma-ray bursts with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Albert, A; André, M; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Jesus, A C Assis; Astraatmadja, T; Aubert, J-J; Baret, B; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bigongiari, C; Bogazzi, C; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouhou, B; Bouwhuis, M; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Carloganu, C; Carr, J; Cecchini, S; Charif, Z; Charvis, Ph; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Core, L; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; Curtil, C; De Bonis, G; Decowski, M P; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti, Q; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; Emanuele, U; Enzenhöfer, A; Ernenwein, J-P; Escoffier, S; Fehn, K; Fermani, P; Ferri, M; Ferry, S; Flaminio, V; Folger, F; Fritsch, U; Fuda, J-L; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geyer, K; Giacomelli, G; Giordano, V; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; Hallewell, G; Hamal, M; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hößl, J; Hsu, C C; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Kooijman, P; Kopper, C; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lambard, G; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Lefèvre, D; Lim, G; Presti, D Lo; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Louis, F; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Montaruli, T; Morganti, M; Moscoso, L; Motz, H; Neff, M; Nezri, E; Palioselitis, D; Pavalas, G E; Payet, K; Petrovic, J; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Presani, E; Racca, C; Reed, C; Riccobene, G; Richardt, C; Richter, R; Rivière, C; Robert, A; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Ruiz-Rivas, J; Rujoiu, M; Russo, G V; Salesa, F; Samtleben, D F E; Sánchez-Losa, A; Sapienza, P; Schnabel, J; Schöck, F; Schuller, J-P; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Shanidze, R; Simeone, F; Spies, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Trovato, A; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Vecchi, M; Vernin, P; Visser, E; Wagner, S; Wijnker, G; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; Yepes, H; Zaborov, D; Zornoza, J D; Zúniga, J

    2013-01-01

    A search for neutrino-induced muons in correlation with a selection of 40 gamma-ray bursts that occurred in 2007 has been performed with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. During that period, the detector consisted of 5 detection lines. The ANTARES neutrino telescope is sensitive to TeV--PeV neutrinos that are predicted from gamma-ray bursts. No events were found in correlation with the prompt photon emission of the gamma-ray bursts and upper limits have been placed on the flux and fluence of neutrinos for different models.

  16. First search for neutrinos in correlation with gamma-ray bursts with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A search for neutrino-induced muons in correlation with a selection of 40 gamma-ray bursts that occurred in 2007 has been performed with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. During that period, the detector consisted of 5 detection lines. The ANTARES neutrino telescope is sensitive to TeV–PeV neutrinos that are predicted from gamma-ray bursts. No events were found in correlation with the prompt photon emission of the gamma-ray bursts and upper limits have been placed on the flux and fluence of neutrinos for different models

  17. Monitoring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ložek, Vojen; Němec, J.

    Praha : Consult, 2003 - (Němec, J.), s. 111-115 ISBN 80-902132-4-3 Grant ostatní: Magistrát hlavního města Prahy(CZ) DAG/67/04/000176/2001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : monitoring * environmental quality * Prague Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  18. Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its main source of fuel. To keep your blood sugar level on target and avoid problems with your eyes, kidneys, heart and feet, you should eat right ... better. And monitoring doesn’t stop at measuring blood sugar levels. Because ... blood testing) Eye health (eye exams) Foot health (foot exams and ...

  19. Portal, freight and vehicle monitor performance using scintillating glass fiber detectors for the detection of plutonium in the Illicit Trafficking Radiation Assessment Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron-sensitive scintillating glass fiber sensors provide several advantages over neutron-sensitive gas-tuber for plutonium detection and surveillance. Large area detectors and higher effective neutron capture density provide significant improvements in sensitivity versus cost. The glass sensors offer a wide dynamic counting range, fast response time, no transport hazard, greater operator safety and lower micro-phonic susceptibility relative to conventional 3He and 10BF3 sensors. Testing methods used in Illicit Trafficking Radiation Assessment Program and experience in evaluating the performance of the portal, freight and vehicle monitors for customs applications employing these new sensors is reported. Results of false and real alarm tests and distribution tests are presented and compared to previous Monte Carlo and first principle calculations. These earlier calculations determined the detection limits for neutron glass panels used for continuous monitoring of special nuclear materials. Assumptions used in the model assumed a nominal background count rate for neutrons of 0.010 n x cm-2 x s-1, an intrinsic neutron efficiency of 20% and an alarm set point of 5.2 sigma representing one false alarm per month. Measured neutron data taken with 252Cf and several gamma ray sources confirm the calculated data. Calculations assume an unshielded source and are conservative because they do not include environmental improvements in neutron economy. The results demonstrate that these systems are capable of reliably detecting special nuclear materials (SNM) and other radionuclides within a few seconds. (author)

  20. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC Apparatus). The ALFA system is composed by four stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronics for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  1. ALFA Detector Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Oleiro Seabra, Luis Filipe; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    ALFA (Absolute Luminosity For ATLAS) is one of the sub-detectors of ATLAS/LHC. The ALFA system is composed by two stations installed in the LHC tunnel 240 m away from each side of the ATLAS interaction point. Each station has a vacuum and ventilation system, movement control and all the required electronic for signal processing. The Detector Control System (DCS) provides control and monitoring of several components and ensures the safe operation of the detector contributing to good Data Quality. This paper describes the ALFA DCS system including a detector overview, operation aspects and hardware control through a SCADA system, WinCC OA.

  2. Graphene-Based FET Detector for E. coli K12 Real-Time Monitoring and Its Theoretical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieyi Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical analysis for a graphene-based FET real-time detector of the target bacteria E. coli K12. The motivation for this study is to design a sensor device for detection of bacteria in food and water in order to guarantee food safety. Graphene is chosen as our material for sensor design, which has outstanding electrical, physical, and optical performance. In our sensor structure, graphene-based solution gate field effect transistor (FET is the device model; fabrication and functionalization protocol are presented together in this paper. What is more, a real-time signal display system is the accompanied equipment for our designed biosensor device. In this system, the sensor bias current signal Ids would change obviously when the target bacteria are attached to the sensor surface. And the bias current Ids increases when the E. coli concentration increases. In the latter part, a theoretical interpretation of the sensor signal is to explain the bias current Ids increasing after the E. coli K12 attachment.

  3. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  4. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  5. $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts and Related Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Piran, T

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have puzzled astronomers since their accidental discovery in the sixties. The BATSE detector on the COMPTON-GRO satellite has been detecting one burst per day for the last six years. Its findings have revolutionized our ideas about the nature of these objects. They have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances. This idea was accepted with difficulties at first. However, the recent discovery of an x-ray afterglow by the Italian/Dutch satellite BeppoSAX led to a detection of high red-shift absorption lines in the optical afterglow of GRB970508 and to a confirmation of its cosmological origin. The simplest and practically inevitable interpretation of these observations is that GRBs result from the conversion of the kinetic energy of ultra-relativistic particles flux to radiation in an optically thin region. The "inner engine" that accelerates the particles or generates the Poynting flux is hidden from direct observations. Recent studies suggest the ``internal-external'' model: intern...

  6. Interference Resilience of Burst-by-burst Adaptive Modems

    OpenAIRE

    Torrance, J.M.; Hanzo, L.; Keller, T

    1997-01-01

    Adaptive modulation can achieve channel capacity gains by adapting t h e number of bits per transmission symbol on a burst-by-burst basis, in harmony with channel quality fluctuations. In this treatise their interference resilience is quantified and the modem mode switching levels are determined under interfered conditions. The associated performance curves are portrayed in Figures 6, 7 and 8 for target bit error rates of 1 and 0.01 %, respectively. The corresponding modem mode switching leve...

  7. Analysis of Burst Assembly Modeling for Optical Burst Switched Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhumika Patel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have study the current state of the technology, the Optical burst Switched (OBS network is the most practical in all-optical architecture. Here we define how Burst Assembly will carried out and also here in the network architecture each node is consist of Core router and Edge router. Moreover we define challenges faced at practical implementation of OBS and proposed its unique solution at the node as Delay model.

  8. Search for Gamma Ray Bursts at Chacaltaya

    CERN Document Server

    Vernetto, S

    2001-01-01

    A search for Gamma Ray Bursts in the GeV-TeV energy range has been performed by INCA, an air shower array working at 5200 m of altitude at the Chacaltaya Laboratory (Bolivia). The altitude of the detector and the use of the "single particle technique" allows to lower the energy threshold up to few GeVs. No significant signals are observed during the occurrence of 125 GRBs detected by BATSE, and the obtained upper limits on the energy fluence in the interval 1-1000(100) GeV range from 3.2(8.6) 10^-5 to 2.6(7.0) 10^-2 erg/cm^2 depending on the zenith angle of the events. These limits, thanks to the extreme altitude of INCA, are the lowest ever obtained in the sub-TeV energy region by a ground based esperiment.

  9. Observation of gamma ray bursts at ground level under the thunderclouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Y.; Oguri, S.; Kato, Y.; Nakata, R.; Inoue, Y.; Ito, C.; Minowa, M.

    2016-07-01

    We observed three γ-ray bursts related to thunderclouds in winter using the prototype of anti-neutrino detector PANDA made of 360-kg plastic scintillator deployed at Ohi Power Station at the coastal area of the Japan Sea. The maximum rate of the events which deposited the energy higher than 3 MeV was (5.5 ± 0.1) ×102 /s. Monte Carlo simulation showed that electrons with approximately monochromatic energy falling downwards from altitudes of order 100 m roughly produced the observed total energy spectra of the bursts. It is supposed that secondary cosmic-ray electrons, which act as seed, were accelerated in electric field of thunderclouds and multiplied by relativistic runaway electron avalanche. We actually found that the γ-rays of the bursts entered into the detector from the direction close to the zenith. The direction stayed constant during the burst within the detector resolution. In addition, taking advantage of the delayed coincidence detection of the detector, we found neutron events in one of the bursts at the maximum rate of ∼ 14 ± 5 /s.

  10. BurstCube: A Gamma-ray Burst Detecting Swarm of CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Jeremy S; Racusin, Judith L.; Krizmanic, John F; McEnery, Julie E.

    2014-08-01

    The study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has seen major advances in the past decade based on the results of several highly successful missions like Swift and Fermi. These prolific GRB detectors have enabled multi-wavelength follow-up of hundreds of GRBs and have allowed us to answer some of the outstanding questions in this field as well as prompted research in many new directions. It is critical to continue GRB detection, especially with gravitational wave detectors coming online in the next few years, e.g. advanced LIGO/Virgo, and the continued operation of multi-messenger observatories such as IceCube. Without the detection and study of counterparts to these future non-photon detections, the full characterization of a GRB would be difficult. The current GRB detection technology is at a mature level such that small, inexpensive detectors on CubeSats could perform as well or better than the current generation of GRB scintillator detectors. This paper will detail the design parameters and performance of small, GRB detecting CubeSats operating in a swarm that can detect, localize, and characterize GRBs via the high energy photon signatures.

  11. Disinhibition Bursting of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin J Lobb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc dopaminergic neurons receive strong tonic inputs from GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr and globus pallidus (GP, and glutamatergic neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. The presence of these tonic inputs raises the possibility that phasic disinhibition may trigger phasic bursts in dopaminergic neurons. We first applied constant NMDA and GABAA conductances onto a two-compartment single cell model of the dopaminergic neuron (Kuznetsov et al., 2006. The model exhibited disinhibition bursting upon stepwise removal of inhibition. A further bifurcation analysis suggests that disinhibition may be more robust than excitation alone in that for most levels of NMDA conductance, the cell remains capable of bursting even after a complete removal of inhibition, whereas too much excitatory input will drive the cell into depolarization block. To investigate the network dynamics of disinhibition, we used a modified version of an integrate-and-fire based model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al., 2006. Synaptic activity generated in the network was delivered to the two-compartment single cell dopaminergic neuron. Phasic activation of the D1-expressing medium spiny neurons in the striatum (D1STR produced disinhibition bursts in dopaminergic neurons through the direct pathway (D1STR to SNpr to SNpc. Anatomical studies have shown that D1STR neurons have collaterals that terminate in GP. Adding these collaterals to the model, we found that striatal activation increased the intra-burst firing frequency of the disinhibition burst as the weight of this connection was increased. Our studies suggest that striatal activation is a robust means by which disinhibition bursts can be generated by SNpc dopaminergic neurons, and that recruitment of the indirect pathway via collaterals may enhance disinhibition bursting.

  12. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2015-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of stability function in the incoherent (i.e. disorder), coherent, chimera and multi-chimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multi-chimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is i...

  13. Gamma-ray burst detection with the AGILE mini-calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Marisaldi, M; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Argan, A; Barbiellini, G; Basset, M; Boffelli, F; Bulgarelli, A; Caraveo, P; Cattaneo, P W; Chen, A; Cocco, V; Costa, E; D'Ammando, F; Del Monte, E; De Paris, G; Di Cocco, G; Di Persio, G; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Feroci, M; Ferrari, A; Fiorini, M; Foggetta, L; Froysland, T; Frutti, M; Gianotti, F; Giuliani, A; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Liello, F; Lipari, P; Longo, F; Mastropietro, M; Mattaini, E; Mauri, A; Mauri, F; Mereghetti, S; Morelli, E; Morselli, A; Pacciani, L; Pellizzoni, A; Perotti, F; Picozza, P; Pontoni, C; Porrovecchio, G; Prest, M; Pucella, G; Rapisarda, M; Rappoldi, A; Rossi, E; Rubini, A; Soffitta, P; Tavani, M; Traci, A; Trifoglio, M; Trois, A; Vallazza, E; Vercellone, S; Vittorini, V; Zambra, A; Zanello, D; Pittori, C; Verrecchia, F; Cutini, S; Gasparrini, D; Preger, B; Santolamazza, P; Giommi, P; Antonelli, L A; Colafrancesco, S; Salotti, L

    2008-01-01

    The Mini-Calorimeter (MCAL) instrument on-board the AGILE satellite is a non-imaging gamma-ray scintillation detector sensitive in the 300keV-100MeV energy range with a total on-axis geometrical area of 1400cm^2. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are one of the main scientific targets of the AGILE mission and the MCAL design as an independent self-triggering detector makes it a valuable all-sky monitor for GRBs. Furthermore MCAL is one of the very few operative instruments with microsecond timing capabilities in the MeV range. In this paper the results of GRB detections with MCAL after one year of operation in space are presented and discussed. A flexible trigger logic implemented in the AGILE payload data-handling unit allows the on-board detection of GRBs. For triggered events, energy and timing information are sent to telemetry on a photon-by-photon basis, so that energy and time binning are limited by counting statistics only. When the trigger logic is not active, GRBs can be detected offline in ratemeter data, alt...

  14. Burst Suppression: A Review and New Insights

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Dillon Kenny; M. Brandon Westover; ShiNung Ching; Brown, Emery N.; Ken Solt

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is a pattern of brain electrical activity characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude bursts and electrical silence. Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the...

  15. Activity from Magnetar Candidate 4U 0142+61: Bursts and Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Gavriil, Fotis P; Kaspi, Victoria M

    2007-01-01

    After 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months. During the active phase, several bursts were detected, and many aspects of the X-ray emission changed. We report on the discovery of six X-ray bursts, the first ever seen from this AXP in ~10 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) monitoring. All the bursts occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The bursts had the canonical fast rise slow decay profiles characteristic of SGR/AXP bursts. The burst durations ranged from 8-3x10^3 s as characterized by T90,these are very long durations even when compared to the broad T90 distributions of other bursts from SGRs and AXPs. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by simple blackbodies, with temperature kT ~2-6 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum consisting of at least three emission lines with possible additional emission and absorption lines. The most significant feature was...

  16. Creep Burst Testing of a Woven Inflatable Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, Molly M.; Valle, Gerard D.; James, George H.; Oliveras, Ovidio M.; Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.

    2015-01-01

    A woven Vectran inflatable module 88 inches in diameter and 10 feet long was tested at the NASA Johnson Space Center until failure from creep. The module was pressurized pneumatically to an internal pressure of 145 psig, and was held at pressure until burst. The external environment remained at standard atmospheric temperature and pressure. The module burst occurred after 49 minutes at the target pressure. The test article pressure and temperature were monitored, and video footage of the burst was captured at 60 FPS. Photogrammetry was used to obtain strain measurements of some of the webbing. Accelerometers on the test article measured the dynamic response. This paper discusses the test article, test setup, predictions, observations, photogrammetry technique and strain results, structural dynamics methods and quick-look results, and a comparison of the module level creep behavior to the strap level creep behavior.

  17. Fermi/GBM Observations of SGRJ0501 + 4516 Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Baring, Matthew G.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Woods, Peter M.; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Scargle, Jeffrey; Granot, Jonathan; Preece, Robert; von Kienlin, Andreas; Chaplin, Vandiver; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Zhang, Shuang Nan; Bhat, Narayan; Finger, Mark H.; Gehrels. Neil; Harding, Alice; Kaper, Lex; Kaspi, Victoria; Mcenery, Julie; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGRJ0501+4516, detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during the 13 days of the source activation in 2008 (August 22 to September 3). We find that the T(sub 90) durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of approx. 123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T(sub 90)s estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of approx. 124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two black body functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that E(sub peak) decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of approx. 30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10(exp -6)erg/sq cm/s, increasing steadily afterwards. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550 - 5418 and 1806 - 20. The isotropic luminosity, L(sub iso), corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4 - l.5 x 10(exp 40) erg/s.

  18. A Novel Experimental Technique to Simulate Pillar Burst in Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, M. C.; Zhao, F.; Cai, M.; Du, S.

    2015-09-01

    Pillar burst is one type of rockburst that occurs in underground mines. Simulating the stress change and obtaining insight into the pillar burst phenomenon under laboratory conditions are essential for studying the rock behavior during pillar burst in situ. To study the failure mechanism, a novel experimental technique was proposed and a series of tests were conducted on some granite specimens using a true-triaxial strainburst test system. Acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used to monitor the rock fracturing process. The damage evolution process was investigated using techniques such as macro and micro fracture characteristics observation, AE energy evolution, and b value analysis and fractal dimension analysis of cracks on fragments. The obtained results indicate that stepped loading and unloading simulated the pillar burst phenomenon well. Four deformation stages are divided as initial stress state, unloading step I, unloading step II, and final burst. It is observed that AE energy has a sharp increase at the initial stress state, accumulates slowly at unloading steps I and II, and increases dramatically at peak stress. Meanwhile, the mean b values fluctuate around 3.50 for the first three deformation stages and then decrease to 2.86 at the final stage, indicating the generation of a large amount of macro fractures. Before the test, the fractal dimension values are discrete and mainly vary between 1.10 and 1.25, whereas after failure the values concentrate around 1.25-1.35.

  19. Broadband Spectral Investigations of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lin; Baring, Matthew G; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Younes, George; Watts, Anna L; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT Windowed Timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5 - 200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT/GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbo...

  20. Robust Gravitational Wave Burst Detection and Source Localization in a Network of Interferometers Using Cross Wigner Spectra

    OpenAIRE

    Croce, Rocco P.; Pierro, Vincenzo; Postiglione, Fabio; Principe, Maria; Pinto, Innocenzo M.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss a fast cross-Wigner transform based technique for detecting gravitational wave bursts, and estimating the direction of arrival, using a network of (three) non co-located interferometric detectors. The performances of the detector as a function of signal strength and source location, and the accuracy of the direction of arrival estimation are investigated by numerical simulations.

  1. Silicon detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status and recent progress of silicon detectors for high energy physics is reviewed. Emphasis is put on detectors with high spatial resolution and the use of silicon detectors in calorimeters. (orig.)

  2. Light Dawns on Dark Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    [1] Gamma-ray bursts lasting longer than two seconds are referred to as long bursts and those with a shorter duration are known as short bursts. Long bursts, which were observed in this study, are associated with the supernova explosions of massive young stars in star-forming galaxies. Short bursts are not well understood, but are thought to originate from the merger of two compact objects such as neutron stars. [2] The Gamma-Ray burst Optical and Near-infrared Detector (GROND) was designed and built at the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in collaboration with the Tautenburg Observatory, and has been fully operational since August 2007. [3] Other studies relating to dark gamma-ray bursts have been released. Early this year, astronomers used the Subaru Telescope to observe a single gamma-ray burst, from which they hypothesised that dark gamma-ray bursts may indeed be a separate sub-class that form through a different mechanism, such as the merger of binary stars. In another study published last year using the Keck Telescope, astronomers studied the host galaxies of 14 dark GRBs, and based on the derived low redshifts they infer dust as the likely mechanism to create the dark bursts. In the new work reported here, 39 GRBs were studied, including nearly 20 dark bursts, and it is the only study in which no prior assumptions have been made and the amount of dust has been directly measured. [4] Because the afterglow light of very distant bursts is redshifted due to the expansion of the Universe, the light that left the object was originally bluer than the light we detect when it gets to Earth. Since the reduction of light intensity by dust is greater for blue and ultraviolet light than for red, this means that the overall dimming effect of dust is greater for the more distant gamma-ray bursts. This is why GROND's ability to observe near-infrared radiation makes such a difference. More information This research is presented in a paper to appear in the

  3. Evaluation of Burst Loss Rate of an Optical Burst Switching (OBS) Network with Wavelength Conversion Capability

    OpenAIRE

    Reza, Md. Shamim; Hossain, Md. Maruf; Majumder, Satya Prasad

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new analytical model for calculating burst loss rate (BLR) in a slotted optical burst switched network. The analytical result leads to a framework which provides guidelines for optical burst switched networks. Wavelength converter is used for burst contention resolution. The effect of several design parameters such as burst arrival probability, wavelength conversion capability, number of slots per burst and number of wavelengths is incorporated on the above performance m...

  4. Soil gas radon–thoron monitoring in Dharamsala area of north-west Himalayas, India using solid state nuclear track detectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gulshan Kumar; Arvind Kumar; Vivek Walia; Jitender Kumar; Vikash Gupta; Tsanyao Frank Yang; Surinder Singh; Bikramjit Singh Bajwa

    2013-10-01

    The study described here is based on the measurements of soil gas radon–thoron concentrations performed at Dharamsala region of north-west (NW) Himalayas, India. The study area is tectonically and environmentally significant and shows the features of ductile shear zone due to the presence of distinct thrust planes. Solid state nuclear track detectors (LR-115 films) have been used for the soil gas radon–thoron monitoring. Twenty five radon–thoron discriminators with LR-115 films were installed in the borehole of about 50 cm in the study areas. The recorded radon concentration varies from 1593 to 13570 Bq/m3 with an average value of 5292 Bq/m3. The recorded thoron concentration varies from 223 to 2920 Bq/m3 with an average value of 901 Bq/m3. The anomalous value of radon–thoron has been observed near to the faults like main boundary thrust (MBT and MBT2) as well as neotectonic lineaments in the region.

  5. Search for gravitational-wave bursts from soft gamma repeaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B; Abbott, R; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arain, M A; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Armor, P; Aso, Y; Aston, S; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Ballmer, S; Bantilan, H; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bastarrika, M; Bayer, K; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bodiya, T P; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brinkmann, M; Brooks, A; Brown, D A; Brunet, G; Bullington, A; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cao, J; Cardenas, L; Casebolt, T; Castaldi, G; Cepeda, C; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Christensen, N; Clark, D; Clark, J; Cokelaer, T; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cutler, R M; Dalrymple, J; Danzmann, K; Davies, G; Debra, D; Degallaix, J; Degree, M; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; Desalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Drever, R W P; Duke, I; Dumas, J-C; Dupuis, R J; Dwyer, J G; Echols, C; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Finn, L S; Flasch, K; Fotopoulos, N; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Garofoli, J; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L; González, G; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Grimaldi, F; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guenther, M; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G; Harstad, E; Hayama, K; Hayler, T; Heefner, J; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Heptonstall, A; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hosken, D; Hough, J; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D; Ito, M; Ivanov, A; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kamat, S; Kanner, J; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalili, F Ya; Khan, R; Khazanov, E; Kim, C; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R K; Kozak, D; Kozhevatov, I; Krishnan, B; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lang, M M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leindecker, N; Leonhardt, V; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Lin, H; Lindquist, P; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lormand, M; Lu, P; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Lück, H; Machenschalk, B; Macinnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Mandic, V; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Martin, I; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McIntyre, G; McIvor, G; McKechan, D; McKenzie, K; Meier, T; Melissinos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C J; Meyers, D; Miller, J; Minelli, J; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mowlowry, C; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mukhopadhyay, H; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nelson, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Numata, K; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Petrie, T; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Postiglione, F; Principe, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Ramsunder, M; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rodriguez, A; Rogan, A M; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Route, R; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruet, L; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Samidi, M; de la Jordana, L Sancho; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Schediwy, S W; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Stein, L C; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strom, D M; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K-X; Sung, M; Sutton, P J; Takahashi, H; Tanner, D B; Taylor, R; Taylor, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D; Ulmen, J; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Van Den Broeck, C; van der Sluys, M; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Villar, A; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, H; Ward, R; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, H R; Williams, L; Willke, B; Wilmut, I; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yan, Z; Yoshida, S; Zanolin, M; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J; Barthelmy, S; Gehrels, N; Hurley, K C; Palmer, D

    2008-11-21

    We present a LIGO search for short-duration gravitational waves (GWs) associated with soft gamma ray repeater (SGR) bursts. This is the first search sensitive to neutron star f modes, usually considered the most efficient GW emitting modes. We find no evidence of GWs associated with any SGR burst in a sample consisting of the 27 Dec. 2004 giant flare from SGR 1806-20 and 190 lesser events from SGR 1806-20 and SGR 1900+14. The unprecedented sensitivity of the detectors allows us to set the most stringent limits on transient GW amplitudes published to date. We find upper limit estimates on the model-dependent isotropic GW emission energies (at a nominal distance of 10 kpc) between 3x10;{45} and 9x10;{52} erg depending on waveform type, detector antenna factors and noise characteristics at the time of the burst. These upper limits are within the theoretically predicted range of some SGR models. PMID:19113401

  6. Signal processing of macro pulse monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam current signal processing system for long burst beam is now under development at JAERI FEL superconducting linac. The system utilizes core current monitors already installed and enables simultaneous monitoring of the long burst beam current along the linac. (author)

  7. All-Sky Search for Gravitational-Wave Bursts in the First Joint LIGO-GEO-Virgo Run

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, J. B.; Camizzo, J.

    2012-01-01

    We present results from an aU-sky search for unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO, GEO 600 and Virgo detectors between November 2006 and October 2007. The search is performed. by three different analysis algorithms over the frequency band 50 - 6000 Hz. Data are analyzed for times with at least two of the four LIGO-Virgo detectors in coincident operation, with a total live time of 266 days, No events produced by the search algorithms survive the selection cuts. We set a frequentist upper limit on the rate of gravitational-wave bursts impinging on our network of detectors. When combined with the previous LIGO search of the data collected between November 2005 and November 2006, the upper limit on the rate of detectable gra.vitational. wave bursts in the 64-2048 Hz band is 2,0 events per year at 90% confidence. We also present event rate versus strength exclusion plots for several types of plausible burst waveforms. The sensitivity of the combined search is expressed in terms of the root-sum-squared strain amplitude for a variety of simulated waveforms and lies in the range 6 X 10(exp -22) Hz(exp - 1/2) to 2 X 10(exp -20) Hz(exp -l/2). This is the first untriggered burst search to use data from the LIGO and Virgo detectors together, and the most sensitive untriggered burst search performed so far.

  8. Slit burst test of tubes for evaluation of J-R curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work evaluates the J-R curves obtained from the slit burst tests and small compact tension specimens from medium carbon steel (A106 Gr C) seamless tubes. The slit burst tests were carried out using a custom-built test setup with unloading compliance as the crack growth monitoring method. The results from these two types of tests and the relation between them is used to examine the issue of transferability of specimen J-R curve to the burst test conditions in the tubes. The J-R curves obtained from small specimen and burst tests of tubes agree with each other over a very small crack growth region (Δa ∼ 0.7 mm). The internal pressure predicted by the J initiation value obtained from the curved compact tension specimens agree well with the burst data. The fracture morphology and nature of crack growth front is different for these two cases. (author)

  9. Results of the IGEC-2 search for gravitational wave bursts during 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Astone, P; Baggio, L; Bassan, M; Bignotto, M; Bonaldi, M; Camarda, M; Carelli, P; Cavallari, G; Cerdonio, M; Chincarini, A; Coccia, Eugenio; Conti, L; D'Antonio, S; de Rossa, M; di Paolo Emilio, M; Drago, M; Dubath, F; Fafone, V; Falferi, P; Foffa, S; Fortini, P; Frasca, S; Gemme, G; Giordano, G; Giusfredi, G; Hamilton, W O; Hanson, J; Inguscio, M; Johnson, W W; Liguori, N; Longo, S; Maggiore, M; Marin, F; Mairni, A; McHuge, H P; Mezzena, R; Miller, P; Minenkov, Y; Mion, A; Modestino, G; Moleti, A; Nettles, D; Ortolan, A; Pallottino, G V; Parodi, R; Piano Mortari, G; Poggi, S; Prodi, G A; Quintieri, L; Re, V; Rocchi, A; Ronga, F; Salemi, F; Soranzo, G; Sturani, R; Tafferello, L; Terenzi, R; Torrioli, G; Vaccaronne, R; Vandoni, G; Vedovato, G; Vinante, A; Visco, M; Vitale, S; Weaver, J; Zendri, J P; Zhang, P

    2007-01-01

    The network of resonant bar detectors of gravitational waves resumed coordinated observations within the International Gravitational Event Collaboration (IGEC-2). Four detectors are taking part in this collaboration: ALLEGRO, AURIGA, EXPLORER and NAUTILUS. We present here the results of the search for gravitational wave bursts over 6 months during 2005, when IGEC-2 was the only gravitational wave observatory in operation. The network data analysis implemented is based on a time coincidence search among AURIGA, EXPLORER and NAUTILUS, keeping the data from ALLEGRO for follow-up studies. With respect to the previous IGEC 1997-2000 observations, the amplitude sensitivity of the detectors to bursts improved by a factor about 3 and the sensitivity bandwidths are wider, so that the data analysis was tuned considering a larger class of detectable waveforms. Thanks to the higher duty cycles of the single detectors, we decided to focus the analysis on three-fold observation, so to ensure the identification of any singl...

  10. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  11. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  12. Ionization detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel ionization detector for use in X-ray tomography is described in detail. To achieve the ultimate resolution, the use of small detectors is necessary and, for ionization detectors, this implies using xenon gas at high pressure. Conventional small detectors can suffer from ''bowing'' but the present design overcomes their problems. (U.K.)

  13. Detectability of gravitational wave bursts from a class of neutron star starquake GRB models

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, J E

    1995-01-01

    A large class of gamma-ray burst (GRB) models (overwhelming until recently) involve the release of energy in a neutron star quake. Even though the extreme isotropy of the GRB sky established by the BATSE experiment has now shifted the interest to cosmological models, the former starquake scenarios are still attractive and may naturally produce a gravitational wave burst that carries most of the released energy. We discuss the prospects for detection of these high-frequency bursts by the forthcoming interferometers and spheroidal antennas, emphasizing the most recent results on the distribution and nature of GRB sources. We find that, even if the overall picture is correct, the positive detection of GRB-associated gravitational wave bursts is unlikely and therefore these events will not be a prime target for the detectors.

  14. Improvements of the sensitivity of burst cartridge detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I - Special tests for improving the sensitivity of burst cartridge detection equipment in power reactors II - Scintillator purge-flow tests using aged gas in the B.C.D. /E.D.F. 2 Summary. - The first part of this report describes the tests carried out on fission product detectors by a process in which gas is continuously injected in front of the scintillator. Using this system, the background is reduced and perturbations caused by pneumatic switches on the prospecting circuits are eliminated. The quality of the signals thus obtained permits better processing of the data and thus leads to a possible improvement in the sensitivity of burst cartridge detection. The second part gives results of tests carried out with both fresh and aged gases, the economic advantage of the latter being that it permits recycling through the reactor. Reduction of the background is less pronounced but the advantage of the stable signals is conserved. (author)

  15. Gamma Ray Bursts and Their Links With Supernovae and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, Peter; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, whose origin and mechanism is the focus of intense interest. They appear connected to supernova remnants from massive stars or the merger of their remnants, and their brightness makes them temporarily detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. After pioneering breakthroughs from space and ground experiments, their study is entering a new phase with observations from the recently launched Fermi satellite, as well as the prospect of detections or limits from large neutrino and gravitational wave detectors. The interplay between such observations and theoretical models of gamma-ray bursts is reviewed, as well as their connections to supernovae and cosmology.

  16. Neural Network Aided Glitch-Burst Discrimination and Glitch Classification

    CERN Document Server

    Rampone, Salvatore; Troiano, Luigi; Pinto, Innocenzo M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the potential of neural-network based classifiers for discriminating gravitational wave bursts (GWBs) of a given canonical family (e.g. core-collapse supernova waveforms) from typical transient instrumental artifacts (glitches), in the data of a single detector. The further classification of glitches into typical sets is explored.In order to provide a proof of concept,we use the core-collapse supernova waveform catalog produced by H. Dimmelmeier and co-Workers, and the data base of glitches observed in laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) data maintained by P. Saulson and co-Workers to construct datasets of (windowed) transient waveforms (glitches and bursts) in additive (Gaussian and compound-Gaussian) noise with different signal-tonoise ratios (SNR). Principal component analysis (PCA) is next implemented for reducing data dimensionality, yielding results consistent with, and extending those in the literature. Then, a multilayer perceptron is trained by a backpropagation ...

  17. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxham, Amanda

    central engine activity and compare the model results with the observational data. We show that the observed X-ray flare phenomenology can be explained within the internal shock model. The number, width and occurring time of flares are then used to diagnose the central engine activity, putting constraints on the energy, ejection time, width and number of ejected shells. We find that the observed X-ray flare time history generally reflects the time history of the central engine, which reactivates multiple times after the prompt emission phase with progressively reduced energy. This shell model code can be used to constrain broadband observations of GRB 090926A, which showed two flares in both the Swift UVOT and XRT bands. Using the prompt emission fluence to constrain the total energy contained in the blastwave, the internal shock model requires that Lorentz factors of the shells causing flares must be less than the Lorentz factor of the blastwave when the shells are ejected. Recent observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) revealed a power law decay feature of the high energy emission (above 100 MeV), which led to the suggestion that it originates from an external shock. We analyze four GRBs (080916C, 090510, 090902B and 090926A) jointly detected by Fermi LAT and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), which have high quality lightcurves in both instrument energy bands. Using the MeV prompt emission (GBM) data, we can record the energy output from the central engine as a function of time. Assuming a constant radiative efficiency, we are able to track energy accumulation in the external shock using our internal/external shell model code and show that the late time lightcurves fit well within the external shock model, but the early time lightcurves are dominated by the internal shock component which has a shallow decay phase due to the initial pile-up of shells onto the blast wave.

  18. Microfluidic Scintillation Detectors

    CERN Multimedia

    Microfluidic scintillation detectors are devices of recent introduction for the detection of high energy particles, developed within the EP-DT group at CERN. Most of the interest for such technology comes from the use of liquid scintillators, which entails the possibility of changing the active material in the detector, leading to an increased radiation resistance. This feature, together with the high spatial resolution and low thickness deriving from the microfabrication techniques used to manufacture such devices, is desirable not only in instrumentation for high energy physics experiments but also in medical detectors such as beam monitors for hadron therapy.

  19. A Bayesian coincidence test for noise rejection in a gravitational-wave burst search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, Kipp C [LIGO Laboratory 18-34, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)], E-mail: kcannon@ligo.caltech.edu

    2008-05-21

    In searches for gravitational-wave bursts, a standard technique used to reject noise is to discard burst event candidates that are not seen in coincidence in multiple detectors. A coincidence test in which Bayesian inference is used to measure how noise-like a tuple of events appears is presented here. This technique is shown to yield higher detection efficiencies for a given false alarm rate than do techniques based on per-parameter thresholds when applied to a toy model covering a broad class of event candidate populations. Also presented is the real-world example of a use of the technique for noise rejection in a time-frequency burst search conducted on simulated gravitational-wave detector data. Besides achieving a higher detection efficiency, the technique is significantly less challenging to implement well than is a per-parameter threshold method.

  20. The LOFT Burst Alert System and its Burst On-board Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, S; Provost, H Le; Château, F; Bozzo, E; Brandt, S

    2014-01-01

    The ESA M3 candidate mission LOFT (Large Observatory For x-ray Timing) has been designed to study strong gravitational fields by observing compact objects, such as black-hole binaries or neutron-star systems and supermassive black-holes, based on the temporal analysis of photons collected by the primary instrument LAD (Large Area Detector), sensitive to X-rays from 2 to 50 keV, offering a very large effective area (>10 m 2 ), but a small field of view ({\\o}{\\pi} sr), the WFM actually detects all types of transient sources, including Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), which are of primary interest for a world-wide observers community. However, observing the quickly decaying GRB afterglows with ground-based telescopes needs the rapid knowledge of their precise localization. The task of the Loft Burst Alert System (LBAS) is therefore to detect in near- real-time GRBs (about 120 detections expected per year) and other transient sources, and to deliver their localization in less than 30 seconds to the observers, via a VHF a...

  1. US Army Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS) was developed to meet the Army requirements of an unattended, automatic nuclear burst reporting system. It provides pertinent data for battlefield commanders on a timely basis with high reliability

  2. Preemption window for burst differentiation in OBS

    OpenAIRE

    Klinkowski, Miroslaw; Careglio, Davide; Morató, Daniel; Solé Pareta, Josep

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel control architecture for optical burst switching networks to efficiently apply burst preemption without the resources overbooking, which is specific to conventional OBS. Simulation results prove the effectiveness of this proposal.

  3. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts in the IceCube and ARA Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guetta Dafne

    2016-01-01

    I discuss the constraints on the hadronic component of GRBs derived from the search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino fux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs and more in general I present the results of the search for high-energy neutrinos interacting within the IceCube detector between 2010 and 2013.

  4. The Fermi-GBM 3-year X-ray Burst Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Jenke, P A; Connaughton, V; Beklen, E; Camero-Arranz, A; Finger, M H; Wilson-Hodge, C A

    2016-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all sky gamma-ray monitor well known in the gamma-ray burst community. Although GBM excels in detecting the hard, bright extragalactic GRBs, its sensitivity above 8 keV and all-sky view make it an excellent instrument for the detection of rare, short-lived Galactic transients. In March 2010, we initiated a systematic search for transients using GBM data. We conclude this phase of the search by presenting a 3 year catalog of 1084 non-solar events. Using spectral analysis, location and spatial distributions we subdivided the 1084 events into 752 thermonuclear X-ray bursts, 267 transient events from accretion flares and X-ray pulses, and 65 untriggered gamma-ray bursts.

  5. Do cosmic rays perturb the operation of a large resonant spherical detector of gravitational waves?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of resonant gravitational wave detectors is reviewed. The effect of cosmic rays on a large spherical detector is considered. It is shown that the sensibility to short bursts, to monochromatic and to stochastic GW is not significantly degraded by cosmic rays. For a two-detector experiment, only one detector needs to be installed in an underground laboratory. This supports the idea to install a resonant detector at sea-level near a GW interferometer

  6. Long Type I X-ray Bursts and Neutron Star Interior Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Cumming, Andrew; Macbeth, Jared; Zand, J. J. M. in't; Page, Dany

    2005-01-01

    Superbursts are very energetic Type I X-ray bursts discovered in recent years by long term monitoring of X-ray bursters, believed to be due to unstable ignition of carbon in the deep ocean of the neutron star. A number of "intermediate duration" bursts have also been observed, probably associated with ignition of a thick helium layer. We investigate the sensitivity of these long X-ray bursts to the thermal profile of the neutron star crust and core. We first compare cooling models of superbur...

  7. Testing and Performance of UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Ripa, J; Lee, J; Park, I H; Kim, J E; Lim, H; Jeong, S; Castro-Tirado, A J; Connell, P H; Eyles, C; Reglero, V; Rodrigo, J M; Bogomolov, V; Panasyuk, M I; Petrov, V; Svertilov, S; Yashin, I; Brandt, S; Budtz-Jorgensen, C; Chang, Y -Y; Chen, P; Huang, M A; Liu, T -C; Nam, J W; Wang, M -Z; Chen, C R; Choi, H S; Kim, S -W; Min, K W

    2015-01-01

    The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory pathfinder (UFFO-p) is a new space mission dedicated to detect Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and rapidly follow their afterglows in order to provide early optical/ultraviolet measurements. A GRB location is determined in a few seconds by the UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger telescope (UBAT) employing the coded mask imaging technique and the detector combination of Yttrium Oxyorthosilicate (YSO) scintillating crystals and multi-anode photomultiplier tubes. The results of the laboratory tests of UBAT's functionality and performance are described in this article. The detector setting, the pixel-to-pixel response to X-rays of different energies, the imaging capability for <50 keV X-rays, the localization accuracy measurements, and the combined test with the Block for X-ray and Gamma-Radiation Detection (BDRG) scintillator detector to check the efficiency of UBAT are all described. The UBAT instrument has been assembled and integrated with other equipment on UFFO-p and should be launche...

  8. Accessing the population of high redshift Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Mereghetti, S; Tagliaferri, G; Campana, S; Osborne, J P; O'Brien, P; Tanvir, N; Willingale, R; Amati, L; Basa, S; Bernardini, M G; Burlon, D; Covino, S; D'Avanzo, P; Frontera, F; Gotz, D; Melandri, A; Nava, L; Piro, L; Vergani, S D

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are a powerful probe of the high redshift Universe. We present a tool to estimate the detection rate of high-z GRBs by a generic detector with defined energy band and sensitivity. We base this on a population model that reproduces the observed properties of GRBs detected by Swift, Fermi and CGRO in the hard X-ray and gamma-ray bands. We provide the expected cumulative distributions of the flux and fluence of simulated GRBs in different energy bands. We show that scintillator detectors, operating at relatively high energies (e.g. tens of keV to the MeV), can detect only the most luminous GRBs at high redshifts due to the link between the peak spectral energy and the luminosity (Ep-Liso) of GRBs. We show that the best strategy for catching the largest number of high-z bursts is to go softer (e.g. in the soft X-ray band) but with a very high sensitivity. For instance, an imaging soft X-ray detector operating in the 0.2-5 keV energy band reaching a sensitivity, corresponding to a fluence o...

  9. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG: THE FIRST TWO YEARS

    OpenAIRE

    Paciesas, W. S.; Meegan, C. A.; Kienlin, von, A.; Bhat, P.N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M S; Burgess, M; Chaplin, V.; Connaughton, V.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G. J.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Gibby, H., M.; Giles, M

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to enhance the scientific return from Fermi in studying gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In its first two years of operation GBM triggered on 491 GRBs. We summarize the criteria used for triggering and quantify the general characteristics of the triggered GRBs, including their locations, durations, peak flux, and fluence. This catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are availab...

  10. Periodicities in gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma ray burst models based on magnetic neutron stars face a problem of account for the scarcity of observed periods. Both this scarcity and the typical period found when any is detected are explained if the neutron stars are accreting in binary systems

  11. Performance of photomultiplier tubes and sodium iodide scintillation detector systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    The performance of photomultiplier tubes (PMT's) and scintillation detector systems incorporating 50.8 by 1.27 cm NaI (T l) crystals was investigated to determine the characteristics of the photomultiplier tubes and optimize the detector geometry for the Burst and Transient Source Experiment on the Gamma Ray Observatory. Background information on performance characteristics of PMT's and NaI (T l) detectors is provided, procedures for measurement of relevant parameters are specified, and results of these measurements are presented.

  12. Fuzzy-Based Adaptive Hybrid Burst Assembly Technique for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakar Muhammad Umaru; Muhammad Shafie Abd Latiff; Yahaya Coulibaly

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) paradigm is perceived as an intermediate switching technology for future all-optical networks. Burst assembly that is the first process in OBS is the focus of this paper. In this paper, an intelligent hybrid burst assembly algorithm that is based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The new algorithm is evaluated against the traditional hybrid burst assembly algorithm and the fuzzy adaptive threshold (FAT) burst assembly algorithm via simulation. Simulation results sh...

  13. Two-dimensional burst identification codes and their use in burst correction

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    A new class of codes, called burst identification codes, is defined and studied. These codes can be used to determine the patterns of burst errors. Two-dimensional burst correcting codes can be easily constructed from burst identification codes. The resulting class of codes is simple to implement and has lower redundancy than other comparable codes. The results are pertinent to the study of radiation effects on VLSI RAM chips, which can cause two-dimensional bursts of errors.

  14. Closest Gamma Ray Burst Providing Scientists With Crucial Test for Burst Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    -ray observations, visible light from GRB 030329 was observed by 65 telescopes around the world. At its brightest, the visible light from this burst was detectable with moderate-sized amateur telescopes. Gamma Ray Bursts were first detected in 1967 by a satellite monitoring compliance with the 1963 atmospheric nuclear test-ban treaty. For three decades thereafter, astronomers were unable to determine their distances from Earth, and thus were unable to begin understanding the physics underlying the explosions. In 1997, the first distance measurements were made to GRBs, and the NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) detected the first radio emission from a GRB afterglow. Once scientists determined that GRBs originate in distant galaxies and that they probably occur in regions of those galaxies where stars are actively forming, some 200 proposed models for what causes GRBs were reduced to a handful of viable models. Most scientists now believe that GRBs arise from a violent explosion that ends the life of a star much more massive than the Sun. Whereas such an explosion as a typical supernova leaves a dense neutron star, a GRB explosion leaves a black hole, a concentration of mass with gravitational pull so strong that not even light can escape it. The VLBA is a continent-wide system of ten radio- telescope antennas, ranging from Hawaii in the west to the U.S. Virgin Islands in the east, providing the greatest resolving power, or ability to see fine detail, in astronomy. Dedicated in 1993, the VLBA is operated from the NRAO's Array Operations Center in Socorro, New Mexico. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  15. Duration distributions for gamma-ray bursts registered in various experiments since VENERA11/KONUS up to Fermi/GBM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkhangelskaja, I. V.

    2016-02-01

    Gamma-ray bursts duration distributions properties for events registered by experiments CGRO/BATSE, VENERA11/KONUS, VENERA12/KONUS, Swift/BAT, GRANAT/PHEBUS, Suzaku/WAM, RHESSI and Fermi/GBM are considered. GRBs observed since 1967 and now several thousands of events were listed in more than 30 catalogues. Gamma-ray bursts duration distribution was the first analysed using data of BATSE instrument onboard the CGRO. The GRBs duration distribution analysis had shown the existence of two bursts classes: long and short separated by t90 = 2 s. But results of similar distributions for bursts observed by other detectors have shown shifting of boundary between short and long events from value of 2 s. For example, Swift/BAT GRBs subset analysis gives the value of ∼1 s for this separator point. Moreover, t90 has dependence from instrument registered this burst - it is function of detector sensitivity threshold and operation energy band. For instance, the duration of GRB060418 burst t90 is ∼52 s according to Swift/BAT data and only 36 s according to RHESSI data. Therefore, the type of GGB (whether it short or long) should be defined only taking into account distinctive features of instrument detected this event. Also attributes of third intermediate GRBs subgroup appearance in events subsets for various detectors are discussed. Firstly this subgroup was found some years ago in BATSE GRB duration and duration-hardness distributions.

  16. Maxi observations of long X-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Serino, Motoko; Tamagawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Takanori; Nakahira, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Negoro, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We report nine long X-ray bursts from neutron stars, detected with Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). Some of these bursts lasted for hours, and hence are qualified as superbursts, which are prolonged thermonuclear flashes on neutron stars and are relatively rare events. MAXI observes roughly 85% of the whole sky every 92 minutes in the 2-20 keV energy band, and has detected nine bursts with a long e-folding decay time, ranging from 0.27 to 5.2 hours, since its launch in 2009 August until 2015 August. The majority of the nine events were found to originate from transient X-ray sources. The persistent luminosities of the sources, when these prolonged bursts were observed, were lower than 1% of the Eddington luminosity for five of them and lower than 20% for the rest. This trend is contrastive to the 18 superbursts observed before MAXI, all but two of which originated from bright persistent sources. The distribution of the total emitted energy, i.e., the product of e-folding time and luminosity, of these bu...

  17. Alkali metal ionization detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauerle, James E.; Reed, William H.; Berkey, Edgar

    1978-01-01

    Variations in the conventional filament and collector electrodes of an alkali metal ionization detector, including the substitution of helical electrode configurations for either the conventional wire filament or flat plate collector; or, the substitution of a plurality of discrete filament electrodes providing an in situ capability for transferring from an operationally defective filament electrode to a previously unused filament electrode without removing the alkali metal ionization detector from the monitored environment. In particular, the helical collector arrangement which is coaxially disposed about the filament electrode, i.e. the thermal ionizer, provides an improved collection of positive ions developed by the filament electrode. The helical filament design, on the other hand, provides the advantage of an increased surface area for ionization of alkali metal-bearing species in a monitored gas environment as well as providing a relatively strong electric field for collecting the ions at the collector electrode about which the helical filament electrode is coaxially positioned. Alternatively, both the filament and collector electrodes can be helical. Furthermore, the operation of the conventional alkali metal ionization detector as a leak detector can be simplified as to cost and complexity, by operating the detector at a reduced collector potential while maintaining the sensitivity of the alkali metal ionization detector adequate for the relatively low concentration of alkali vapor and aerosol typically encountered in leak detection applications.

  18. Gamma-Ray Bursts: The End Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Don

    1997-11-01

    The nature of gamma-ray bursts has been one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in astrophysics for more than a quarter century. A major reason for this is that no definite counterparts to the bursts could be found at other wavelengths, despite intense efforts spanning more than two decades. Consequently, the study of gamma-ray bursts has been isolated from the rest of astronomy. Scientists studying them have had only the laws of physics and the bursts themselves to guide them in attempting to solve the burst mystery. All of this changed dramatically with the discovery earlier this year of fading X-ray and optical sources in the arcminute-sized positional error boxes of several gamma-ray bursts. For the first time, temporal, as well as spatial, coincidence could be used to associate these X-ray and optical sources with the gamma-ray bursts. As a result, the odds are great that the fading X-ray and optical sources are counterparts of the bursts, and that the study of gamma-ray bursts has finally been connected with the rest of astronomy. In this talk, we describe the dramatic new information about the nature of gamma-ray bursts that the X-ray, optical, and radio observations of the fading sources have provided, and emphasize the implications that this information has for the distance scale to the bursts.

  19. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Balamurugan, A. M.; A. Sivasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The...

  20. Bubbles and Monetary Policy: To Burst or not to Burst?

    OpenAIRE

    König, Philipp; POTHIER, David

    2015-01-01

    The question of whether monetary policy should target asset prices remains a contentious issue. Prior to the 2007/08 financial crisis, central banks opted for a wait-and-see approach, remaining passive during the build-up of asset price bubbles but actively seeking to stabilize prices and output after they burst. The macroeconomic and financial turbulence that followed the subprime housing bubble has led to a renewed debate concerning monetary policy’s role in maintaining financial stability....