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Sample records for burst grb 000301c

  1. The afterglow of the short/intermediate-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 000301C: A jet at z=2.04

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B.L.; Fynbo, J.U.; Gorosabel, J.

    2001-01-01

    We present Ulysses and NEAR data from the detection of the short or intermediate duration (2 s) gamma-ray burst GRB 000301C (2000 March 1.41 UT). The gamma-ray burst (GRB) was localised by the Inter Planetary Network (IPN) and RXTE to an area of similar to 50 arcmin(2). A fading optical counterpart...... the burst. The optical light curve is consistent with bring achromatic from 2 to 11 days after the burst and exhibits a break. A broken power-law fit yields a shallow pre-break decay power-law slope of alpha (1) = -0.72 +/- 0.06, a break time of t(break) = 4.39 +/- 0.26 days after the burst, and a post......-break slope of alpha (2) = -2.29 +/- 0.17. These properties of the light curve are best explained by a sideways expanding jet in an ambient medium of constant mean density. In the optical spectrum we find absorption features that are consistent with Fe II, C IV, C II, Si II and Ly alpha at a redshift of 2...

  2. Hubble Space Telescope STIS observations of GRB 000301C: CCD imaging and near-ultraviolet MAMA spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smette, A.; Fruchter, A.S.; Gull, T.R.

    2001-01-01

    We present Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph observations of the optical transient (OT) counterpart of the c-ray burster GRB 000301C obtained 5 days after the burst, on 2000 March 6. CCD clear-aperture imaging reveals a R similar or equal to 21.50 +/- 0.15 source with no apparent host galaxy. ...

  3. Deep Ly alpha imaging of two z=2.04 GRB host galaxy fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, J.P.U.; Møller, Per; Thomsen, Bente

    2002-01-01

    We report on the results of deep narrow-band Lyalpha and broad-band U and I imaging of the fields of two Gamma-Ray bursts at redshift z = 2.04 (GRB 000301C and GRB 000926). We find that the host galaxy of GRB 000926 is an extended (more than 2 arcsec), strong Lyalpha emitter with a rest-frame equ......We report on the results of deep narrow-band Lyalpha and broad-band U and I imaging of the fields of two Gamma-Ray bursts at redshift z = 2.04 (GRB 000301C and GRB 000926). We find that the host galaxy of GRB 000926 is an extended (more than 2 arcsec), strong Lyalpha emitter with a rest...

  4. Unusually rapid variability of the GRB000301C optical afterglow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masetti, N.; Bartolini, C.; Bernabei, S.;

    2000-01-01

    with BVI data has revealed complex behavior, with a long term flux decrease and various short time scale features superimposed. These features are uncommon among other observed afterglows. and might trace either intrinsic variability within the relativistic shock (re-acceleration and re...

  5. GRB Catalog: Bursts from Vela to Swift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, L.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma ray burst (GRB) astronomy started when the first event was recorded on July 2, 1967 by Vela 4a and 4b. Since then many missions have flown experiments capable of detecting GRBs. The events collected by these older experiments are mostly available in paper copy, each containing a few ten to a few hundred bursts. No systematic effort in cataloging of these bursts has been available. In some cases the information is unpublished and in others difficult to retrieve. The first major GRB catalog was obtained by GRO with the BATSE experiment. It contains more than 2000 bursts and includes homogeneous information for each of the bursts. With the launch of Swift, the first Gamma-ray/X-ray mission dedicated to the study of GRBs and their afterglows, a wealth of information is collected by the Swift instrument as well as from ground-based telescopes. This talk will describe the efforts to create a comprehensive GRBCAT and its current status and future prospective.

  6. GRB 050505: A high redshift burst discovered by Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Hurkett, C P; Page, K L; Rol, E; Goad, M R; O'Brien, P T; Beardmore, A; Godet, O; Burrows, D N; Tanvir, N R; Levan, A; Zhang, B; Malesani, D; Hill, J E; Kennea, J A; Chapman, R; La Parola, V; Perri, M; Romano, P; Gehrels, R S N

    2006-01-01

    We report the discovery and subsequent multi-wavelength afterglow behaviour of the high redshift (z = 4.27) Gamma Ray Burst GRB 050505. This burst is the third most distant burst, measured by spectroscopic redshift, discovered after GRB 000131 (z = 4.50) and GRB 050904 (z = 6.29). GRB 050505 is a long GRB with a multipeaked gamma-ray light curve, with a duration of T_90 = 63+/-2 s and an inferred isotropic release in gamma-rays of ~4.44 x 10^53 ergs in the 1-10^4 keV rest frame energy range. The Swift X-Ray Telescope followed the afterglow for 14 days, detecting two breaks in the light curve at 7.4(+/-1.5) ks and 58.0 (+9.9/-15.4) ks after the burst trigger. The power law decay slopes before, between and after these breaks were 0.25 (+0.16/-0.17), 1.17 (+0.08/-0.09) and 1.97 (+0.27/-0.28) respectively. The light curve can also be fit with a `smoothly broken' power law model with a break observed at ~ T+18.5 ks, with decay slopes of ~0.4 and ~1.8 before and after the break respectively. The X-ray afterglow sho...

  7. The weak INTEGRAL bursts GRB040223 and GRB040624: an emerging population of dark afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Filliatre, P; D'Avanzo, P; De Luca, A; Gotz, D; McGlynn, S; McBreen, S; Fugazza, D; Antonelli, A; Campana, S; Chincarini, G; Cucchiara, A; Valle, M D; Foley, S; Goldoni, P; Hanlon, L; Israel, G; McBreen, B; Mereghetti, S; Stella, L; Tagliaferri, G

    2005-01-01

    We report here gamma-ray, X-ray and near-infrared observations of GRB040223 along with gamma-ray and optical observations of GRB040624. GRB040223 was detected by INTEGRAL close to the Galactic plane and GRB040624 at high Galactic latitude. Analyses of the prompt emission detected by the IBIS instrument on INTEGRAL are presented for both bursts. The two GRBs have long durations, slow pulses and are weak. The gamma-ray spectra of both bursts are best fit with steep power-laws, implying they are X-ray rich. GRB040223 is among the weakest and longest of INTEGRAL GRBs. The X-ray afterglow of this burst was detected 10 hours after the prompt event by XMM-Newton. The measured spectral properties are consistent with a column density much higher than that expected from the Galaxy, indicating strong intrinsic absorption. We carried out near-infrared observations 17 hours after the burst with the NTT of ESO, which yielded upper limits. Given the intrinsic absorption, we find that these limits are compatible with a simpl...

  8. "Anomalous" Optical GRB Afterglows are Common: Two z~4 Bursts, GRB 060206 and 060210

    CERN Document Server

    Stanek, K Z; Calkins, M L; Dai, X; Dobrzycki, A; Garnavich, P M; Hao, H; Howk, C; Matheson, T; Prieto, J L; Serven, J; Worthey, G

    2006-01-01

    We report on two recent z~4 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), GRB 060206 and GRB 060210, for which we have obtained well-sampled optical light curves. Our data, combined with early optical data reported in the literature, shows unusual behavior for both afterglows. In R-band GRB 060206 (z=4.045) experienced a slow early decay, followed by a rapid increase in brightness by factor ~2.5 about 1 hour after the burst. Its afterglow then faded in a broken power-law fashion, with a smooth break at t_b=0.6 days, but with additional, less dramatic (~10%) ``bumps and wiggles'', well detected in the densely sampled light curve. The R-band afterglow of GRB 060210 (z=3.91) is also unusual: the light curves was more or less flat between 60 and 300 sec after the burst, followed by ~70% increase at ~600 sec after the burst, after which the light curve declined as a \\~t^{-1.3} power-law. The early X-ray light curve of GRB 060210 exhibited two sharp flares, but later X-ray emission fades in the same fashion as the optical light curve. ...

  9. Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows with Energy Injection: Homogeneous VersusWind External Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 戴子高

    2001-01-01

    Assuming an adiabatic evolution of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) fireball interacting with an external medium,we calculate the hydrodynamics of the fireball with an energy injection from a strongly magnetic millisecond pulsar through magnetic dipole radiation, and obtain the light curve of the optical afterglow from the fireball by synchrotron radiation. The results are given both for an homogeneous external medium and for a wind ejected by GRB progenitor. Our calculations are also available in both ultra-relativistic and non-relativistic phases.Furthermore, the observed R-band light curve of GRB000301C can be well fitted in our model, which might provide a probe of the properties of GRB progenitors.

  10. GRB090426: the farthest short gamma-ray burst?

    CERN Document Server

    Antonelli, L A; Perna, R; Amati, L; Covino, S; Cutini, S; Elia, V D; Gallozzi, S; Grazian, A; Palazzi, E; Piranomonte, S; Rossi, A; Spiro, S; Stella, L; Testa, V; Chincarini, G; Di Paola, A; Fiore, F; Fugazza, D; Giallongo, E; Maiorano, E; Masetti, N; Pedichini, F; Salvaterra, R; Tagliaferri, G; Vergani, S

    2009-01-01

    Aims. With an observed and rest-frame duration of < 2s and < 0.5s, respectively, GRB090426 could be classified as a short GRB. The prompt detection, both from space and ground-based telescopes, of a bright optical counterpart to this GRB offered a unique opportunity to complete a detailed study. Methods. Based on an extensive ground-based observational campaign, we obtained the spectrum of the optical afterglow of GRB090426, measuring its redshift and obtaining information about the medium in which the event took place. We completed follow-up observation of the afterglow optical light curve down to the brightness level of the host galaxy that we firmly identified and studied. We also retrieved and analyzed all the available high-energy data of this event, and compared the results with our findings in the optical. This represents one of the most detailed studies of a short-duration event presented so far. Results. The time properties qualify GRB090426 as a short burst. In this case, its redshift of z = 2...

  11. Light speed variation from gamma ray burst GRB 160509A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haowei; Ma, Bo-Qiang

    2016-09-01

    It is postulated in Einstein's relativity that the speed of light in vacuum is a constant for all observers. However, the effect of quantum gravity could bring an energy dependence of light speed. Even a tiny speed variation, when amplified by the cosmological distance, may be revealed by the observed time lags between photons with different energies from astrophysical sources. From the newly detected long gamma ray burst GRB 160509A, we find evidence to support the prediction for a linear form modification of light speed in cosmological space.

  12. Light speed variation from gamma ray burst GRB 160509A

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Haowei

    2016-01-01

    It is postulated in Einstein's relativity that the speed of light in vacuum is a constant for all observers. However, the effect of quantum gravity could bring an energy dependence of light speed. Even a tiny speed variation, when amplified by the cosmological distance, may be revealed by the observed time lags between photons with different energies from astrophysical sources. From the newly detected long gamma ray burst GRB~160509A, we find evidence to support the prediction for a linear form modification of light speed in cosmological space.

  13. Fermi-LAT Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 130427A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Ajello, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Gehrels, Cornelis

    2013-01-01

    The observations of the exceptionally bright gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A by the Large Area Telescope aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope provide constraints on the nature of these unique astrophysical sources. GRB 130427A had the largest fluence, highest-energy photon (95 GeV), longest gamma-ray duration (20 hours), and one of the largest isotropic energy releases ever observed from a GRB. Temporal and spectral analyses of GRB 130427A challenge the widely accepted model that the nonthermal high-energy emission in the afterglow phase of GRBs is synchrotron emission radiated by electrons accelerated at an external shock.

  14. Constraints on an Optical Afterglow and on Supernova Light Following the Short Burst GRB 050813

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrero, P.; Sanchez, S. F.; Kann, D. A.; Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Hartmann, D. H.; Henden, A. A.; Moller, P.; Palazzi, E.; Rau, A.; Stecklum, B.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Fynbok J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Masetti, N.; Pian, E.; Tanvir, N. R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2006-01-01

    We report early follow-up observations of the error box of the short burst 050813 using the telescopes at Calar Alto and at Observatorio Sierra Nevada (OSN), followed by deep VLT/FORS2 I-band observations obtained under very good seeing conditions 5.7 and 11.7 days after the event. No evidence for a GRB afterglow was found in our Calar Alto and OSN data, no rising supernova component was detected in our FORS2 images. A potential host galaxy can be identified in our FORS2 images, even though we cannot state with certainty its association with GRB 050813. IN any case, the optical afterglow of GRB 050813 was very faint, well in agreement with what is known so far about the optical properties of afterglows of short bursts. We conclude that all optical data are not in conflict with the interpretation that GRB 050813 was a short burst.

  15. Gamma-Ray Burst at the extreme: "the naked-eye burst" GRB 080319B

    CERN Document Server

    Wozniak, P R; Panaitescu, A D; Wren, J A; Davis, H R; White, R R

    2008-01-01

    On 19 March 2008, the northern sky was the stage of a spectacular optical transient that for a few seconds remained visible to the naked eye. The transient was associated with GRB 080319B, a gamma-ray burst at a luminosity distance of about 6 Gpc (standard cosmology), making it the most luminous optical object ever recorded by human kind. We present comprehensive sky monitoring and multi-color optical follow-up observations of GRB 080319B collected by the RAPTOR telescope network covering the development of the explosion and the afterglow before, during, and after the burst. The extremely bright prompt optical emission revealed features that are normally not detectable. The optical and gamma-ray variability during the explosion are correlated, but the optical flux is much greater than can be reconciled with single emission mechanism and a flat gamma-ray spectrum. This extreme optical behavior is best understood as synchrotron self-Compton model (SSC). After a gradual onset of the gamma-ray emission, there is ...

  16. INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations of the weak gamma-ray burst GRB 030227

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mereghetti, S.; Gotz, D.; Tiengo, A.

    2003-01-01

    We present International Gamma-Ray Astrophysical Laboratory ( INTEGRAL) and XMM-Newton observations of the prompt gamma-ray emission and the X-ray afterglow of GRB 030227, the first gamma-ray burst for which the quick localization obtained with the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System has led to the disco...

  17. Probing the Nature of Short Swift Bursts via Deep INTEGRAL Monitoring of GRB 050925

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barbier, L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from Swift, XMM-Newton, and deep INTEGRAL monitoring in the region of GRB 050925. This short Swift burst is a candidate for a newly discovered soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) with the following observational burst properties: 1) galactic plane (b=-0.1 deg) localization, 2) 150 msec duration, and 3) a blackbody rather than a simple power-law spectral shape (with a significance level of 97%). We found two possible X-ray counterparts of GRB 050925 by comparing the X-ray images from Swift XRT and XMM-Newton. Both X-ray sources show the transient behavior with a power-law decay index shallower than -1. We found no hard X-ray emission nor any additional burst from the location of GRB 050925 in approximately 5 Ms of INTEGRAL data. We discuss about the three BATSE short bursts which might be associated with GRB 050925, based on their location and the duration. Assuming GRB 050925 is associated with the H(sub II), regions (W 58) at the galactic longitude of 1=70 deg, we also discuss the source frame properties of GRB 050925.

  18. The gamma-ray burst GRB060614 requires a novel explosive process

    CERN Document Server

    Gal-Yam, A; Price, P; Davis, M; Leonard, D; Soderberg, A M; Nakar, E; Ofek, E; Schmidt, B; Lewis, K; Peterson, B; Kulkarni, S; Berger, E; Cenko, B; Sari, R; Sharon, K; Frail, D A; Gehrels, N; Nousek, J; Burrows, D; Mangano, V; Holland, S; Brown, P; Moon, D S; Harrison, F; Piran, T; McCarthy, P; Penprase, B; Chevalier, R

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade our physical understanding of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has progressed rapidly thanks to the discovery and observation of their long-lived afterglow emission. Long-duration (T 2 s) GRBs arise from a different origin, which has been argued to be the merger of two compact objects, either neutron stars or black holes. Here we present observations of GRB060614, a 100-s long burst discovered by the Swift satellite, which require the invocation of a new explosive process: either a massive ``collapsar'' that powers a GRB without any associated supernova, or a new type of engine, as long-lived as the collapsar but without any such massive stellar host. We also discuss the properties of this burst's redshift z=0.125 host galaxy, which distinguish it from other long-duration GRBs and suggest that an entirely new type of GRB progenitor may be required.

  19. The Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope Gamma-Ray Burst Alert System, and Observations of GRB 020813

    CERN Document Server

    Li, W; Chornock, R; Jha, S; Li, Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Chornock, Ryan; Jha, Saurabh

    2003-01-01

    We present the technical details of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) alert system of the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) at Lick Observatory, and the successful observations of the GRB 020813 optical afterglow with this system. KAIT responds to GRB alerts robotically, interrupts its pre-arranged program, and takes a sequence of images for each GRB alert. A grid-imaging procedure is used to increase the efficiency of the early-time observations. Different sequences of images have been developed for different types of GRB alerts. With relatively fast telescope slew and CCD readout speed, KAIT can typically complete the first observation within 60 s after receiving a GRB alert, reaching a limiting magnitude of $\\sim 19$. Our reduction of the GRB 020813 data taken with KAIT shows that unfiltered magnitudes can be reliably transformed to a standard passband with a precision of $\\sim$5%, given that the color of the object is known. The GRB 020813 optical afterglow has an exceptionally slow early-time power-law ...

  20. Constraints on Short Gamma-Ray Burst Models with Optical Limits of GRB 050509b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjorth, Jens; Sollerman, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Granot, J.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Melinder, J.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Starling, R.; Thomsen, B.; Andersen, M.I.; Fynbo,; Jensen, B.L.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Castro-Ceron, J.M.; Jakobsson, P.; Levan, A.; Pedersen, K.; Rhoads, J.E.; Tanvir, N.R.; Watson, D.; /Bohr Inst. /Stockholm U. /IAA, Granada

    2005-06-15

    We have obtained deep optical images with the Very Large Telescope at ESO of the first well-localized short-duration gamma-ray burst, GRB 050509b. We observed in the V and R bands at epochs starting at {approx}2 days after the GRB trigger and lasting up to three weeks. We detect no variable objects inside the small Swift/XRT X-ray error circle down to 5{sigma} limiting magnitudes of V = 26.5 and R = 25.2. The X-ray error circle includes a giant elliptical galaxy at z = 0.225, which has been proposed as the likely host of this GRB. Our limits indicate that if the GRB originated at z = 0.225, any supernova-like event accompanying the GRB would have to be over 100 times fainter than normal Type Ia SNe or Type Ic hypernovae, 5 times fainter than the faintest known Ia or Ic SNe, and fainter than the faintest known Type II SNe. Moreover, we use the optical limits to constrain the energetics of the GRB outflow, and conclude that there was very little radioactive material produced during the GRB explosion. These limits strongly constrain progenitor models for this short GRB.

  1. GRB 070714B - Discovery of the Highest Spectroscopically Confirmed Short Burst Redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, J F; Levan, A J; Nysewander, M; Tanvir, N R; Dahlen, T; Bersier, D; Peér, A

    2008-01-01

    Gemini Nod & Shuffle spectroscopy on the host of the short GRB 070714B shows a single emission line at 7167 angstroms which, based on a grizJHK photometric redshift, we conclude is the 3727 angstrom [O II] line. This places the host at a redshift of z=.923 exceeding the previous record for the highest spectroscopically confirmed short burst redshift of z=.546 held by GRB 051221. This dramatically moves back the time at which we know short bursts were being formed, and suggests that the present evidence for an old progenitor population may be observationally biased.

  2. GRB 080407: An Ultra-long Burst Discovered by the IPN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, J; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H.; Palmer, D.; Palshin, V.; Hurley, K.; Goldsten, J.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Boynton, W.; vonKienlln, A.; Feroci, M.; Aptekar, R.; Frederiks, D.; Golenetskli, S.; Mazets, E.; Svinkin, D.; Golovin, D.; Litvak, M. L.; Sanin, A. B.; Fellows, C.; Harshman, K.; Starr, R.; Rau, A.; Zhang, X.

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of the extremely long GRB 080704 obtained with the instruments of the Interplanetary Network (IPN). The observations reveal two distinct emission episodes, separated by a approx.1500 s long period of quiescence. The total burst duration is about 2100 s. We compare the temporal and spectral characteristics of this burst with those obtained for other ultra-long GRBs and discuss these characteristics in the context of different models.

  3. GRB 080407: an ultra-long burst discovered by the IPN

    CERN Document Server

    Pal'shin, V; Goldsten, J; Mitrofanov, I G; Boynton, W; von Kienlin, A; Cummings, J; Feroci, M; Aptekar, R; Frederiks, D; Golenetskii, S; Mazets, E; Svinkin, D; Golovin, D; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Starr, R; Rau, A; Savchenko, V; Zhang, X; Barthelmy, S; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Palmer, D; Del Monte, E; Marisaldi, M

    2013-01-01

    We present observations of the extremely long GRB 080704 obtained with the instruments of the Interplanetary Network (IPN). The observations reveal two distinct emission episodes, separated by a ~1500 s long period of quiescence. The total burst duration is about 2100 s. We compare the temporal and spectral characteristics of this burst with those obtained for other ultra-long GRBs and discuss these characteristics in the context of different models.

  4. The afterglow and complex environment of the optically dim burst GRB 980613

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, J.; Thomsen, Bente; Nielsen, S.R.;

    2002-01-01

    of the optical afterglow was mainly due to the fairly at spectral shape rather than internal reddening in the host galaxy. We also present late-time Hubble Space Telescope/Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph images of the field in which GRB 980613 occurred, obtained 799 days after the burst. These images show...

  5. Constraints on an Optical Afterglow and on Supernova Light Following the Short Burst GRB 050813

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrero, P.; Sanchez, S.F.; Kann, D.A.; Klose, S.; Greiner, J.; Gorosabel, J.; Hartmann, D.H.; Henden, A.A.; Møller, P.; Palazzi, E.; Rau, A.; Stecklum, B.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Masetti, N.; Pian, E.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    We report early follow-up observations of the error box of the short burst GRB 050813 using the telescopes at Calar Alto and Observatorio Sierra Nevada, followed by deep VLT FORS2 I-band observations obtained under very good seeing conditions 5.7 and 11.7 days after the event. Neither a fading after

  6. HETE-2 Localization and Observations of the Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 020813

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, R

    2005-01-01

    A bright, long gamma-ray burst (GRB) was detected and localized by the instruments on board the High Energy Transient Explorer 2 satellite (HETE-2) at 02:44:19.17 UTC (9859.17 s UT) on 2002 August 13. The location was reported to the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) about 4 min after the burst. In the prompt emission, the burst had a duration of approximately 125 s, and more than four peaks. We analyzed the time-resolved 2-400 keV energy spectra of the prompt emission of GRB 020813 using the Wide Field X-Ray Monitor (WXM) and the French Gamma Telescope (FREGATE) in detail. We found that the early part of the burst (17-52 s after the burst trigger) shows a depletion of low-energy photons below about 50 keV. It is difficult to explain the depletion with by either synchrotron self-absorption or Comptonization. One possibility is that the low-energy depletion may be understood as a mixture of ``jitter'' radiation the usual synchrotron radiation component.

  7. Rapid optical variability of the gamma-ray burst grb 080319b and its central engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Bondar, S.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Greco, D.; Piccioni, A.

    2010-07-01

    The results of observations of the optical emission that accompanied the gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B are reported. Observations were made using the TORTORA fast wide-field camera mounted on the REM robotic telescope in Chile. The behavior of the light curve before, during, and after the gamma-ray burst is described. The light curve consists of four, possibly periodic, 5-7 s long peaks 8-9 s apart. The behavior of the burst in the gamma and optical energy ranges are compared and the results of the theoretical interpretation of this comparison are reported.

  8. GRB 090426: Discovery of a jet break in a short burst afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Rossi, A; Kann, D A; Krühler, T; Greiner, J; Rau, A; E., F Olivares; Afonso, P M J; Filgas, R; Yoldaş, A Küpcü; McBreen, S; Nardini, M; Schady, P; Schmidl, S; Updike, A C; Yoldaş, A

    2011-01-01

    Context: The link between the duration of GRBs and the nature of their progenitors remains disputed. Short bursts (with durations of less than ~2 s) are less frequently observed, technically more difficult to localize, and exhibit significantly fainter afterglows. Aims: It is of critical importance to establish whether the burst duration can reliably distinguish the different GRB population models of collapsars and compact stellar mergers. The Swift GRB 090426 provides an unique opportunity to address this question. Its duration (T_90=1.28 s) places GRB 090426 firmly in the short burst population, while the high redshift (z=2.609), host galaxy properties, and prompt emission spectral characteristics are more similar to those of long-duration GRBs. Methods: On the basis of data obtained with the Tautenburg 2m telescope (Germany) and the 7-channel imager GROND (La Silla, Chile), we compiled the most finely sampled light curve available for a short burst optical/NIR afterglow. The light curve was then analysed i...

  9. The unusual afterglow of GRB 980326 evidence for the $\\gamma$-ray burst/supernova connection

    CERN Document Server

    Bloom, J S; Djorgovski, S G; Eichelberger, A C; Côté, P; Blakeslee, J P; Odewahn, S C; Harrison, F A; Frail, D A; Filippenko, A V; Leonard, D C; Riess, A G; Spinrad, H; Stern, D; Bunker, A J; Dey, A; Stanford, S A; Grossan, B; Perlmutter, S; Knop, R A; Hook, I M; Feroci, M

    1999-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been firmly established as one of the most powerful phenomena in the Universe, releasing electromagnetic energy approaching the rest-mass energy of a neutron star in a few seconds. The two currently popular models for GRB progenitors are the coalescence of two compact objects (such as neutron stars or black holes) or collapse of a massive star. An unavoidable consequence of the latter model is that a bright supernovae should accompany the GRB. The emission from this supernova competes with the much brighter afterglow produced by the relativistic shock that gives rise to the GRB itself. Here we present evidence for an unusual light curve for GRB 980326 based on new optical observations. The transient brightened ~3 weeks after the burst to a flux sixty times larger than that extrapolated from the rapid decay seen at early time. Furthermore, the spectrum changed dramatically and became extremely red. We argue that the new source is the underlying supernova. If our hypothesis i...

  10. GRB 140206A: the most distant polarized Gamma-Ray Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Gotz, D; Antier, S; Covino, S; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; Melandri, A

    2014-01-01

    The nature of the prompt gamma-ray emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) is still far from being completely elucidated. The measure of linear polarization is a powerful tool that can be used to put further constraints on the content and magnetization of the GRB relativistic outflows, as well as on the radiation processes at work. To date only a handful of polarization measurements are available for the prompt emission of GRBs. Here we present the analysis of the prompt emission of GRB 140206A, obtained with INTEGRAL/IBIS, Swift/BAT, and Fermi/GBM. Using INTEGRAL/IBIS as a Compton polarimeter we were able to constrain the linear polarization level of the second peak of this GRB as being larger than 28% at 90% c.l. We also present the GRB afterglow optical spectroscopy obtained at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG), which allowed us the measure the distance of this GRB, z=2.739. This distance value together with the polarization measure obtained with IBIS, allowed us to derive the deepest and most reliable li...

  11. Beam On Target (BOT) Produces Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) Fireballs and Afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greyber, H. D.

    1997-12-01

    Unlike the myriads of ad hoc models that have been offered to explain GRB, the BOT process is simply the very common process used worldwide in accelerator laboratories to produce gamma rays. The Strong Magnetic Field (SMF) model postulates an extremely intense, highly relativistic current ring formed during the original gravitational collapse of a distant galaxy when the plasma cloud was permeated by a primordial magnetic field. GRB occur when solid matter (asteroid, white dwarf, neutron star, planet) falls rapidly through the Storage Ring beam producing a very strongly collimated electromagnetic shower, and a huge amount of matter from the target, in the form of a giant, hot, expanding plasma cloud, or ``Fireball,'' is blown off. BOT satisfies all the ``severe constraints imposed on the source of this burst --'' concluded by the CGRO team (Sommer et al, Astrophys. J. 422 L63 (1994)) for the huge intense burst GRB930131, whereas neutron star merger models are ``difficult to reconcile.'' BOT expects the lowest energy gamma photons to arrive very slightly later than higher energy photons due to the time for the shower to penetrate the target. The millisecond spikes in bursts are due to the slender filaments of current that make up the Storage Ring beam. Delayed photons can be explained by a broken target ``rock.'' See H. Greyber in the book ``Compton Gamma Ray Observatory,'' AIP Conf. Proc. 280, 569 (1993).

  12. GRB 091024A and the nature of ultra-long gamma-ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgili, F. J.; Mundell, C. G.; Harrison, R.; Kobayashi, S.; Steele, I. A.; Mottram, C. J.; Clay, N. R. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Pal' shin, V. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Guidorzi, C. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Margutti, R.; Chornock, R. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Melandri, A. [INAF/Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Henden, A. [AAVSO, 49 Bay State Road, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Updike, A. C. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States); Cenko, S. B. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Cucchiara, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Levan, A. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Cano, Z., E-mail: F.J.Virgili@ljmu.ac.uk [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); and others

    2013-11-20

    We present a broadband study of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 091024A within the context of other ultra-long-duration GRBs. An unusually long burst detected by Konus-Wind (KW), Swift, and Fermi, GRB 091024A has prompt emission episodes covering ∼1300 s, accompanied by bright and highly structured optical emission captured by various rapid-response facilities, including the 2 m autonomous robotic Faulkes North and Liverpool Telescopes, KAIT, S-LOTIS, and the Sonoita Research Observatory. We also observed the burst with 8 and 10 m class telescopes and determine the redshift to be z = 1.0924 ± 0.0004. We find no correlation between the optical and γ-ray peaks and interpret the optical light curve as being of external origin, caused by the reverse and forward shock of a highly magnetized jet (R{sub B} ≈ 100-200). Low-level emission is detected throughout the near-background quiescent period between the first two emission episodes of the KW data, suggesting continued central-engine activity; we discuss the implications of this ongoing emission and its impact on the afterglow evolution and predictions. We summarize the varied sample of historical GRBs with exceptionally long durations in gamma-rays (≳1000 s) and discuss the likelihood of these events being from a separate population; we suggest ultra-long GRBs represent the tail of the duration distribution of the long GRB population.

  13. The host galaxy and optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst GRB 980703

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, S.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Hjorth, J.

    2001-01-01

    We present deep HST/STIS and ground-based photometry of the host galaxy of the gamma-ray burst GRB 980703 taken 17, 551, 710, and 716 days after the burst. We find that the host is a blue, slightly over-luminous galaxy with V-gal = 23.00 +/-0.10, (V - R)(gal) = 0.43 +/-0.13, and a centre that is ......We present deep HST/STIS and ground-based photometry of the host galaxy of the gamma-ray burst GRB 980703 taken 17, 551, 710, and 716 days after the burst. We find that the host is a blue, slightly over-luminous galaxy with V-gal = 23.00 +/-0.10, (V - R)(gal) = 0.43 +/-0.13, and a centre...... 980703 with any special features in the host. The host galaxy appears to be a typical example of a compact star forming galaxy similar to those found in the Hubble Deep Field North. The R-band light curve of the optical afterglow associated with this gamma-ray burst is consistent with a single power......-law decay having a slope of alpha = 1.37 +/-0.14. Due to the bright underlying host galaxy the late time properties of the light-curve are very poorly constrained. The decay of the optical light curve is consistent with a contribution from an underlying type Ic supernova like SN1998bw, or a dust echo...

  14. The supercritical pile gamma-ray burst model: The GRB afterglow steep decline and plateau phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sultana, J. [Mathematics Department, Faculty of Science, University of Malta, Msida MSD2080 (Malta); Kazanas, D. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Mastichiadis, A., E-mail: joseph.sultana@um.edu.mt [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, GR 15783 Zografos (Greece)

    2013-12-10

    We present a process that accounts for the steep decline and plateau phase of the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curves, vexing features of gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenology. This process is an integral part of the 'supercritical pile' GRB model, proposed a few years ago to account for the conversion of the GRB kinetic energy into radiation with a spectral peak at E {sub pk} ∼ m{sub e}c {sup 2}. We compute the evolution of the relativistic blast wave (RBW) Lorentz factor Γ to show that the radiation-reaction force due to the GRB emission can produce an abrupt, small (∼25%) decrease in Γ at a radius that is smaller (depending on conditions) than the deceleration radius R{sub D} . Because of this reduction, the kinematic criticality criterion of the 'supercritical pile' is no longer fulfilled. Transfer of the proton energy into electrons ceases and the GRB enters abruptly the afterglow phase at a luminosity smaller by ∼m{sub p} /m{sub e} than that of the prompt emission. If the radius at which this slow-down occurs is significantly smaller than R{sub D} , the RBW internal energy continues to drive the RBW expansion at a constant (new) Γ and its X-ray luminosity remains constant until R{sub D} is reached, at which point it resumes its more conventional decay, thereby completing the 'unexpected' XRT light curve phase. If this transition occurs at R ≅ R{sub D} , the steep decline is followed by a flux decrease instead of a 'plateau,' consistent with the conventional afterglow declines. Besides providing an account of these peculiarities, the model suggests that the afterglow phase may in fact begin before the RBW reaches R ≅ R{sub D} , thus providing novel insights into GRB phenomenology.

  15. The Supercritical Pile Gamma-Ray Burst Model: The GRB Afterglow Steep Decline and Plateau Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultana, Joseph; Kazanas, D.; Mastichiadis, A.

    2013-01-01

    We present a process that accounts for the steep decline and plateau phase of the Swift X-Ray Telescope (XRT) light curves, vexing features of gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomenology. This process is an integral part of the "supercritical pile" GRB model, proposed a few years ago to account for the conversion of the GRB kinetic energy into radiation with a spectral peak at E(sub pk) is approx. m(sub e)C(exp 2). We compute the evolution of the relativistic blast wave (RBW) Lorentz factor Gamma to show that the radiation-reaction force due to the GRB emission can produce an abrupt, small (approx. 25%) decrease in Gamma at a radius that is smaller (depending on conditions) than the deceleration radius R(sub D). Because of this reduction, the kinematic criticality criterion of the "supercritical pile" is no longer fulfilled. Transfer of the proton energy into electrons ceases and the GRB enters abruptly the afterglow phase at a luminosity smaller by approx. m(sub p)/m(sub e) than that of the prompt emission. If the radius at which this slow-down occurs is significantly smaller than R(sub D), the RBW internal energy continues to drive the RBW expansion at a constant (new) Gamma and its X-ray luminosity remains constant until R(sub D) is reached, at which point it resumes its more conventional decay, thereby completing the "unexpected" XRT light curve phase. If this transition occurs at R is approx. equal to R(sub D), the steep decline is followed by a flux decrease instead of a "plateau," consistent with the conventional afterglow declines. Besides providing an account of these peculiarities, the model suggests that the afterglow phase may in fact begin before the RBW reaches R is approx. equal to R(sub D), thus providing novel insights into GRB phenomenology.

  16. Use of water-Cherenkov detectors to detect Gamma Ray Bursts at the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allard, D. [APC, CNRS et Universite Paris 7 (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina); Alvarez, C. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Asorey, H. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina); Barros, H. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Bertou, X. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina)], E-mail: bertou@cab.cnea.gov.ar; Burgoa, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Gomez Berisso, M. [Centro Atomico Bariloche, Instituto Balseiro (Argentina); Martinez, O. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Miranda Loza, P. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Murrieta, T.; Perez, G. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Rivera, H. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Rovero, A. [Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio (Argentina); Saavedra, O. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale and INFN, Torino (Italy); Salazar, H. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Tello, J.C. [Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear, Universidad Simon Bolivar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Ticona Peralda, R.; Velarde, A. [Instituto de Investigaciones Fisicas, UMSA (Bolivia); Villasenor, L. [Facultad de Ciencias Fisico-Matematicas de la BUAP (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad de Michoacan (Mexico)

    2008-09-21

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) project aims at the detection of high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) using the single particle technique in ground-based water-Cherenkov detectors (WCD). To reach a reasonable sensitivity, high altitude mountain sites have been selected in Mexico (Sierra Negra, 4550 m a.s.l.), Bolivia (Chacaltaya, 5300 m a.s.l.) and Venezuela (Merida, 4765 m a.s.l.). We report on detector calibration and operation at high altitude, search for bursts in 4 months of preliminary data, as well as search for signal at ground level when satellites report a burst.

  17. GRB 090727 and gamma-ray bursts with early time optical emission

    CERN Document Server

    Kopac, D; Gomboc, A; Japelj, J; Mundell, C G; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Bersier, D; Cano, Z; Smith, R J; Steele, I A; Virgili, F J

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of gamma-ray burst GRB 090727, for which optical emission was detected during the prompt gamma-ray emission by the 2-m autonomous robotic Liverpool Telescope and subsequently monitored for a further two days with the Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes. Within the context of the standard fireball model, we rule out a reverse shock origin for the early time optical emission in GRB 090727 and instead conclude that the early time optical flash likely corresponds to emission from an internal dissipation processes. Putting GRB 090727 into a broader observational and theoretical context, we build a sample of 36 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with contemporaneous early time optical and gamma-ray detections. From these GRBs, we extract a sub-sample of 18 GRBs, which show optical peaks during prompt gamma-ray emission, and perform detailed temporal and spectral analysis in gamma-ray, X-ray, and optical bands. We find that in most cases early time optical emission shows sharp and steep beha...

  18. GRB 091024A and the nature of ultra-long gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Virgili, F J; Pal'shin, V; Guidorzi, C; Margutti, R; Melandri, A; Harrison, R; Kobayashi, S; Chornock, R; Henden, A; Updike, A C; Cenko, S B; Tanvir, N R; Steele, I A; Cucchiara, A; Gomboc, A; Levan, A; Cano, Z; Mottram, C J; Clay, N R; Bersier, D; Kopac, D; Japelj, J; Filippenko, A V; Li, W; Svinkin, D; Golenetskii, S; Hartmann, D H; Milne, P A; Williams, G; O'Brien, P T; Fox, D B; Berger, E

    2013-01-01

    We present a broadband study of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 091024A within the context of other ultra-long-duration GRBs. An unusually long burst detected by Konus-Wind, Swift, and Fermi, GRB 091024A has prompt emission episodes covering ~1300 s, accompanied by bright and highly structured optical emission captured by various rapid-response facilities, including the 2-m autonomous robotic Faulkes North and Liverpool Telescopes, KAIT, S-LOTIS, and SRO. We also observed the burst with 8- and 10-m class telescopes and determine the redshift to be z = 1.0924 \\pm 0.0004. We find no correlation between the optical and gamma-ray peaks and interpret the optical light curve as being of external origin, caused by the reverse and forward shock of a highly magnetized jet (R_B ~ 100-200). Low-level emission is detected throughout the near-background quiescent period between the first two emission episodes of the Konus-Wind data, suggesting continued central-engine activity; we discuss the implications of this ongoing emission a...

  19. Constraint on the counter-jet emission in gamma-ray burst afterglows from GRB 980703

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We present a numerical investigation of emission from the receding jet of gamma-ray bursts.It is found that the peak time of the receding jet emission is significantly affected by synchrotron self-absorption in radio wavelengths.However,the receding jet component is generally very weak.It is observable mainly for those nearby events in a dense environment.Although GRB 980703 has been observed in radio wavelengths for more than 1000 days,we argue that the receding jet emission still has not been detected for this event.Actually,it is completely submerged by the host galaxy.

  20. GRB 080503: Implications of a Naked Short Gamma-Ray Burst Dominated by Extended Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Perley, D A; Granot, J; Butler, N R; Sakamoto, T; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Levan, A J; Bloom, J S; Miller, A A; Bunker, A; Chen, H -W; Filippenko, A V; Gehrels, N; Glazebrook, K; Hall, P; Hurley, K C; Kocevski, D; Li, W; López, S; Norris, J; Piro, A L; Poznanski, D; Prochaska, J X; Quataert, E; Tanvir, N

    2008-01-01

    We report on observations of GRB 080503, a short gamma-ray burst with very bright extended emission (about 30 times the gamma-ray fluence of the initial spike) in conjunction with a thorough comparison to other short Swift events. In spite of the prompt-emission brightness, however, the optical counterpart is extraordinarily faint, never exceeding 25 mag in deep observations starting at ~1 hr after the BAT trigger. The optical brightness peaks at ~1 day and then falls sharply in a manner similar to the predictions of Li & Paczynski (1998) for supernova-like emission following compact-binary mergers. However, a shallow spectral index and similar evolution in X-rays inferred from Chandra observations are more consistent with an afterglow interpretation. The extreme faintness of this probable afterglow relative to the bright gamma-ray emission argues for a very low-density medium surrounding the burst (a "naked" GRB), consistent with the lack of a coincident host galaxy down to 28.5 mag in deep HST imaging. ...

  1. Detection of the optical afterglow of GRB 000630: Implications for dark bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, J.U.; Jensen, B.L.; Gorosabel, J.

    2001-01-01

    We present the discovery of the optical transient of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 000630. The optical transient was detected with the Nordic Optical Telescope 21.1 hours after the burst. At the time of discovery the magnitude of the transient was R = 23.04 +/- 0.08. The transient displayed...... a power-law decline characterized by a decay slope of alpha = -1.035 +/- 0.097. A deep image obtained 25 days after the burst shows no indication of a contribution from a supernova or a host galaxy at the position of the transient. The closest detected galaxy is a R = 324.68 +/- 0.15 galaxy 2.0 arcsec...... that i) based on the gamma-ray: properties of the current sample we cannot conclude that GRBs with no detected OTs belong to another class of GRBs than GRBs with detected OTs and ii) the majority (greater than or similar to 75%) of GRBs for which searches for optical afterglow have been unsuccessful...

  2. A Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with the Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329 Using the LIGO Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, R; Ageev, A; Allen, B; Amin, R; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Ashley, M; Asiri, F; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Balasubramanian, R; Ballmer, S; Barish, B C; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barnes, M; Barr, B; Barton, M A; Bayer, K; Beausoleil, R; Belczynski, K; Bennett, R; Berukoff, S J; Betzwieser, J; Bhawal, B; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Black, E; Blackburn, K; Blackburn, L; Bland, B; Bochner, B; Bogue, L; Bork, R; Bose, S; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Brown, D A; Bullington, A; Bunkowski, A; Buonanno, A; Burgess, R; Busby, D; Butler, W E; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Camp, J B; Cantley, C A; Cardenas, L; Carter, K; Casey, M M; Castiglione, J; Chandler, A; Chapsky, J; Charlton, P; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chickarmane, V; Chin, D; Christensen, N; Churches, D; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C; Coldwell, R; Coles, M; Cook, D; Corbitt, T; Coyne, D; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Crooks, D R M; Csatorday, P; Cusack, B J; Cutler, C; D'Ambrosio, E; Danzmann, K; Daw, E; De Bra, D; Delker, T; Dergachev, V; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S V; Di Credico, A; Díaz, M; Ding, H; Drever, R W P; Dupuis, R J; Edlund, J A; Ehrens, P; Elliffe, E J; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fairhurst, S; Fallnich, C; Farnham, D; Fejer, M M; Findley, T; Fine, M; Finn, L S; Franzen, K Y; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Ganezer, K S; Garofoli, J; Giaime, J A; Gillespie, A; Goda, K; González, G; Goler, S; Grandclément, P; Grant, A; Gray, C; Gretarsson, A M; Grimmett, D; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Gustafson, E; Gustafson, R; Hamilton, W O; Hammond, M; Hanson, J; Hardham, C; Harms, J; Harry, G; Hartunian, A; Heefner, J; Hefetz, Y; Heinzel, G; Heng, I S; Hennessy, M; Hepler, N; Heptonstall, A; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hindman, N; Hoang, P; Hough, J; Hrynevych, M; Hua, W; Ito, M; Itoh, Y; Ivanov, A; Jennrich, O; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Johnston, W R; Jones, D I; Jones, L; Jungwirth, D; Kalogera, V; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kells, W; Kern, J; Khan, A; Killbourn, S; Killow, C J; Kim, C; King, C; King, P; Klimenko, S; Koranda, S; Kotter, K; Kovalik, Yu; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Landry, M; Langdale, J; Lantz, B; Lawrence, R; Lazzarini, A; Lei, M; Leonor, I; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lindquist, P; Liu, S; Logan, J; Lormand, M; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lyons, T T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majid, W; Malec, M; Mann, F; Marin, A; Marka, S; Maros, E; Mason, J; Mason, K; Matherny, O; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McHugh, M; McNabb, J W C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messaritaki, E; Messenger, C; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Miyoki, S; Mohanty, S; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Müller, G; Mukherjee, S; Murray, P; Myers, J; Nagano, S; Nash, T; Nayak, R; Newton, G; Nocera, F; Noel, J S; Nutzman, P; Olson, T; O'Reilly, B; Ottaway, D J; Ottewill, A; Ouimette, D A; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pan, Y; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Parameswariah, C; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Pitkin, M; Plissi, M; Prix, R; Quetschke, V; Raab, F; Radkins, H; Rahkola, R; Rakhmanov, M; Rao, S R; Rawlins, K; Ray-Majumder, S; Re, V; Redding, D; Regehr, M W; Regimbau, T; Reid, S; Reilly, K T; Reithmaier, K; Reitze, D H; Richman, S; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Rizzi, A; Robertson, D I; Robertson, N A; Robison, L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J; Rong, H; Rose, D; Rotthoff, E; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Salzman, I; Sandberg, V; Sanders, G H; Sannibale, V; Sathyaprakash, B; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Sazonov, A; Schilling, R; Schlaufman, K; Schmidt, V; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, S M; Seader, S E; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seel, S; Seifert, F; Sengupta, A S; Shapiro, C A; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Shu, Q Z; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sievers, L; Sigg, D; Sintes, A M; Smith, J R; Smith, M; Smith, M R; Sneddon, P H; Spero, R; Stapfer, G; Steussy, D; Strain, K A; Strom, D; Stuver, A; Summerscales, T; Sumner, M C; Sutton, P J; Sylvestre, J; Takamori, A; Tanner, D B; Tariq, H; Taylor, I; Taylor, R; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Tibbits, M; Tilav, S; Tinto, M; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Traylor, G; Tyler, W; Ugolini, D W; Ungarelli, C; Vallisneri, M; Van Putten, M H P M; Vass, S; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Wallace, L; Walther, H; Ward, H; Ware, B; Watts, K; Webber, D; Weidner, A; Weiland, U; Weinstein, A; Weiss, R; Welling, H; Wen, L; Wen, S; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wiley, S; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, P R; Williams, R; Willke, B; Wilson, A; Winjum, B J; Winkler, W; Wise, S; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yoshida, S; Zaleski, K D; Zanolin, M; Zawischa, I; Zhang, L; Zhu, R; Zotov, N P; Zucker, M; Zweizig, J

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80-2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than 150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational wave signal strength larger than a pre-determined threshold. We report frequency dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around 250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h_RSS = 6E-21 Hz^{-1/2}. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and GRBs...

  3. VLT identification of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB000131 at z=4.50

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.I.; Hjorth, J.; Jesen, B.L.

    2000-01-01

    Angstrom. This places GRB 000131 at a redshift of 4.500 +/- 0.015. The inferred isotropic energy release in gamma rays alone was similar to 10(54) erg (depending on the assumed cosmology). The rapid power-law decay of the afterglow (index alpha = 2.25, similar to bursts with a prior break in the lightcurve......We report the discovery of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 and its optical afterglow. The optical identification was made with the VLT 84 hours after the burst following a BATSE detection and an Inter Planetary Network localization. GRB 000131 was a bright, long-duration GRB, with an apparent...... precursor signal 62 s prior to trigger. The afterglow was detected in ESO VLT, NTT, and DK1.54m follow-up observations. Broad-band and spectroscopic observations of the spectral energy distribution reveals a sharp break at optical wavelengths which is interpreted as a Ly alpha absorption edge at 6700...

  4. VLT identification of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 at z=4.50

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M.I.; Hjorth, J.; Pedersen, H.

    2000-01-01

    Angstrom. This places GRB 000131 at a redshift of 4.500 +/- 0.015. The inferred isotropic energy release in gamma rays alone was similar to 10(54) erg (depending on the assumed cosmology). The rapid power-law decay of the afterglow (index alpha = 2.25, similar to bursts with a prior break in the lightcurve......We report the discovery of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 and its optical afterglow. The optical identification was made with the VLT 84 hours after the burst following a BATSE detection and an Inter Planetary Network localization. GRB 000131 was a bright, long-duration GRB, with an apparent...... precursor signal 62 s prior to trigger. The afterglow was detected in ESO VLT, NTT, and DK1.54m follow-up observations. Broad-band and spectroscopic observations of the spectral energy distribution reveals a sharp break at optical wavelengths which is interpreted as a Ly alpha absorption edge at 6700...

  5. VLT identification of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 at z=4.50

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, M. I.; Hjorth, J.; Pedersen, H.

    2000-01-01

    . This places GRB 000131 at a redshift of 4.500 +/- 0.015. The inferred isotropic energy release in gamma rays alone was approximately 10^54 erg (depending on the assumed cosmology). The rapid power-law decay of the afterglow (index alpha=2.25, similar to bursts with a prior break in the lightcurve), however......We report the discovery of the gamma-ray burst GRB 000131 and its optical afterglow. The optical identification was made with the VLT 84 hours after the burst following a BATSE detection and an Inter Planetary Network localization. GRB 000131 was a bright, long-duration GRB, with an apparent...... precursor signal 62 s prior to trigger. The afterglow was detected in ESO VLT, NTT, and DK1.54m follow-up observations. Broad-band and spectroscopic observations of the spectral energy distribution reveals a sharp break at optical wavelengths which is interpreted as a Ly-alpha absorption edge at 6700 A...

  6. Constraints on the optical precursor to the naked-eye burst GRB080319B from Pi of the Sky observations

    CERN Document Server

    Piotrowski, Lech Wiktor

    2012-01-01

    I present the results of the search for an optical precursor to the naked-eye burst - GRB080319B, which reached 5.87m optical peak luminosity in the "Pi of the Sky" data. A burst of such a high brightness could have been preceded by an optical precursor luminous enough to be in detection range of our experiment. The "Pi of the Sky" cameras observed the coordinates of the GRB for about 20 minutes prior to the explosion, thus provided crucial data for the precursor search. No signal within 3 sigma limit was found. A limit of 12m (V-band equivalent) was set based on the data combined from two cameras, the most robust limit to my knowledge for this precursor.

  7. The unusual optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 021004 Color changes and short-time-scale variability

    CERN Document Server

    Bersier, D F; Winn, J N; Grav, T; Holman, M J; Matheson, T; Mochejska, B; Steeghs, D; Walker, A R; Garnavich, P M; Quinn, J; Jha, S; Calitz, H; Meintjes, P

    2003-01-01

    We report UBVRI observations of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 021004. We observed significant (10-20%) deviations from a power law decay on several time scales, ranging from a few hours down to 20-30 minutes. We also observed a significant color change starting ~1.5 days after the burst, confirming the spectroscopic results already reported by Matheson et al. (2002). We discuss these results in the context of several models that have recently been proposed to account for the anomalous photometric behavior of this event.

  8. GRB 090426: The Environment of a Rest-Frame 0.35-second Gamma-Ray Burst at Redshift z=2.609

    CERN Document Server

    Levesque, Emily M; Butler, Nathaniel R; Perley, Daniel A; Cenko, S Bradley; Prochaska, J Xavier; Kewley, Lisa J; Bunker, Andrew; Chen, Hsiao-Wen; Chornock, Ryan; Filippenko, Alexei V; Glazebrook, Karl; Lopez, Sebastian; Masiero, Joseph; Modjaz, Maryam; Morgan, Adam N; Poznanski, Dovi

    2009-01-01

    We present the discovery of an absorption-line redshift of z = 2.609 for GRB 090426, establishing the first firm lower limit to a redshift for a gamma-ray burst with an observed duration of 90% confidence) a member of the short/hard phenomenological class of GRBs. From analysis of the optical-afterglow spectrum we find that the burst originated along a very low HI column density sightline, with N_HI < 3.2 x 10^19 cm^-2. Our GRB 090426 afterglow spectrum also appears to have weaker low-ionisation absorption (Si II, C II) than ~95% of previous afterglow spectra. Finally, we also report the discovery of a blue, very luminous, star-forming putative host galaxy (~2 L*) at a small angular offset from the location of the optical afterglow. We consider the implications of this unique GRB in the context of burst duration classification and our understanding of GRB progenitor scenarios.

  9. GRB 120521C at z ∼ 6 and the properties of high-redshift γ-ray bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskar, Tanmoy; Berger, Edo; Zauderer, B. Ashley; Margutti, Raffaella; Fong, Wen-fai [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Tanvir, Nial; Wiersema, Klaas [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Levan, Andrew [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Perley, Daniel [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Menten, Karl [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Hrudkova, Marie [Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes, Apartado de Correos 321, E-387 00 Santa Cruz de la Palma, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2014-01-20

    We present optical, near-infrared, and radio observations of the afterglow of GRB 120521C. By modeling the multi-wavelength data set, we derive a photometric redshift of z ≈ 6.0, which we confirm with a low signal-to-noise ratio spectrum of the afterglow. We find that a model with a constant-density environment provides a good fit to the afterglow data, with an inferred density of n ≲ 0.05 cm{sup –3}. The radio observations reveal the presence of a jet break at t {sub jet} ≈ 7 d, corresponding to a jet opening angle of θ{sub jet} ≈ 3°. The beaming-corrected γ-ray and kinetic energies are E {sub γ} ≈ E{sub K} ≈ 3 × 10{sup 50} erg. We quantify the uncertainties in our results using a detailed Markov Chain Monte Carlo analysis, which allows us to uncover degeneracies between the physical parameters of the explosion. To compare GRB 120521C to other high-redshift bursts in a uniform manner we re-fit all available afterglow data for the two other bursts at z ≳ 6 with radio detections (GRBs 050904 and 090423). We find a jet break at t {sub jet} ≈ 15 d for GRB 090423, in contrast to previous work. Based on these three events, we find that γ-ray bursts (GRBs) at z ≳ 6 appear to explode in constant-density environments, and exhibit a wide range of energies and densities that span the range inferred for lower redshift bursts. On the other hand, we find a hint for narrower jets in the z ≳ 6 bursts, potentially indicating a larger true event rate at these redshifts. Overall, our results indicate that long GRBs share a common progenitor population at least to z ∼ 8.

  10. Gamma--Ray Bursts associated with Supernovae: A systematic analysis of BATSE GRB candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Bosnjak, Z; Ghirlanda, G; Valle, M D; Pian, E

    2005-01-01

    We examined the properties of a sample of BATSE Gamma--Ray Bursts (GRBs) comprising events which have indications of association with a supernova (SN), some on the basis of indications of re--brightening in the optical afterglow light curve, but in most cases based only on the `loose' temporal and directional coincidence inferred from the cross correlation of catalogs. Despite of the large uncertainties in the latter selection method, the temporal and spectral analysis reveal three interesting statistical results when the sample is compared with that of all the BATSE GRBs: the GRBs tentatively associated with SNe are found to predominantly (in $\\sim$ 80% of the cases) have single-peaked light curves, a softer spectrum (i.e. low energy power law index $\\alpha \\sim$ --1.5) and tend not to follow the Lag-Luminosity and Isotropic Energy--Peak Energy correlations. These three independent statistical properties point toward the existence of a significant number of under-luminous,GRB 980425-like events constituting ...

  11. CONSTRAINTS ON THE EMISSION MODEL OF THE 'NAKED-EYE BURST' GRB 080319B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdo, A. A.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Linnemann, J. T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 3245 BioMedical Physical Sciences Building, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Allen, B. T.; Chen, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Aune, T. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Berley, D.; Goodman, J. A. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Christopher, G. E.; Kolterman, B. E.; Mincer, A. I. [Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); DeYoung, T. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Dingus, B. L.; Hoffman, C. M. [Group P-23, Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ellsworth, R. W. [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Gonzalez, M. M. [Instituto de Astronomia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, D.F., Mexico 04510 (Mexico); Granot, J. [Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, POB 808, Ra' anana 43537 (Israel); Hays, E.; McEnery, J. E. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Huentemeyer, P. H. [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931 (United States); and others

    2012-07-10

    On 2008 March 19, one of the brightest gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever recorded was detected by several ground- and space-based instruments spanning the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to gamma rays. With a peak visual magnitude of 5.3, GRB 080319B was dubbed the 'naked-eye' GRB, as an observer under dark skies could have seen the burst without the aid of an instrument. Presented here are results from observations of the prompt phase of GRB 080319B taken with the Milagro TeV observatory. The burst was observed at an elevation angle of 47 Degree-Sign . Analysis of the data is performed using both the standard air shower method and the scaler or single-particle technique, which results in a sensitive energy range that extends from {approx}5 GeV to >20 TeV. These observations provide the only direct constraints on the properties of the high-energy gamma-ray emission from GRB 080319B at these energies. No evidence for emission is found in the Milagro data, and upper limits on the gamma-ray flux above 10 GeV are derived. The limits on emission between {approx}25 and 200 GeV are incompatible with the synchrotron self-Compton model of gamma-ray production and disfavor a corresponding range (2 eV-16 eV) of assumed synchrotron peak energies. This indicates that the optical photons and soft ({approx}650 keV) gamma rays may not be produced by the same electron population.

  12. RAPTOR observations of delayed explosive activity in the high-redshift gamma-ray burst GRB 060206

    CERN Document Server

    Wozniak, P R; Evans, S M; Vestrand, W T; White, R R; Wren, J A

    2006-01-01

    The RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response (RAPTOR) system at Los Alamos National Laboratory observed GRB 060206 starting 48.1 minutes after gamma-ray emission triggered the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on-board the Swift satellite. The afterglow light curve measured by RAPTOR shows a spectacular re-brightening by ~1 mag about 1 h after the trigger and peaks at R ~ 16.4 mag. Shortly after the onset of the explosive re-brightening the OT doubled its flux on a time-scale of about 4 minutes. The total R-band fluence received from GRB 060206 during this episode is 2.3e-9 erg/cm2. In the rest frame of the burst (z = 4.045) this yields an isotropic equivalent energy release of ~0.7e50 erg in just a narrow UV band 130 +/- 22 nm. We discuss the implications of RAPTOR observations for untriggered searches for fast optical transients and studies of GRB environments at high redshift.

  13. A black hole preying on the star for a gamma-ray burst of GRB080503:Evidence for the second event in this new class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper,we critically assess GRB080503,a short gamma-ray burst with very bright extended emission(about 30 times the gamma-ray fluence of the initial spike).The light curve of the prompt γ-ray emission of GRB080503 resembles that of GRB 060614 which has been suggested to be due to an event from an intermediate mass black hole(IMBH) preying on a star.We therefore propose that GRB080503 is also due to a similar event;the mass of the IMBH is estimated to be about 4.6×104 solar masses,and the engulfed star had about the same mass and size as the Sun.We also estimate that the total burst energy is about 7.67× 1050 ergs.

  14. Limits on the Transient Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Flux from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) Derived from RICE Data

    CERN Document Server

    Hussain, S; al, et

    2006-01-01

    We present limits on ultra-high energy (UHE; E(nu)>1 PeV) neutrino fluxes from gamma-ray bursts (GRB), based on recently presented data, limits, and simulations from the RICE experiment. We use data from five recorded transients with sufficient photon spectral shape and redshift information to derive an expected neutrino flux, assuming that the observed photons are linked to neutrino production through pion decay via the well-known 'Waxman-Bahcall' prescription. Knowing the declination of the observed burst, as well as the RICE sensitivity as a function of polar angle and the previously published non-observation of any neutrino events allows an estimate of the sensitivity to a given neutrino flux. Although several orders of magnitude weaker than the expected fluxes, our GRB neutrino flux limits are nevertheless the first in the PeV--EeV energy regime. For completeness, we also provide a listing of other bursts, recorded at times when the RICE experiment was active, but requiring some assumptions regarding lum...

  15. A Search for gravitational waves associated with the gamma ray burst GRB030329 using the LIGO detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ageev, A.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S.B.; Anderson, W.G.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Asiri, F.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Balasubramanian, R.; Ballmer, S.; Barish, B.C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barnes, M.; /Potsdam, Max Planck Inst. /Hannover, Max Planck Inst. Grav. /Australian

    2005-01-01

    We have performed a search for bursts of gravitational waves associated with the very bright Gamma Ray Burst GRB030329, using the two detectors at the LIGO Hanford Observatory. Our search covered the most sensitive frequency range of the LIGO detectors (approximately 80-2048 Hz), and we specifically targeted signals shorter than {approx_equal}150 ms. Our search algorithm looks for excess correlated power between the two interferometers and thus makes minimal assumptions about the gravitational waveform. We observed no candidates with gravitational wave signal strength larger than a pre-determined threshold. We report frequency dependent upper limits on the strength of the gravitational waves associated with GRB030329. Near the most sensitive frequency region, around {approx_equal}250 Hz, our root-sum-square (RSS) gravitational wave strain sensitivity for optimally polarized bursts was better than h{sub RSS} {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup -21} Hz{sup -1/2}. Our result is comparable to the best published results searching for association between gravitational waves and GRBs.

  16. The second closest gamma-ray burst: sub-luminous GRB 111005A with no supernova in a super-solar metallicity environment

    CERN Document Server

    Michałowski, Michał J; Stevens, Jamie; Levan, Andrew; Yang, Jun; Paragi, Zsolt; Kamble, Atish; Dannerbauer, Helmut; van der Horst, Alexander J; Shao, Lang; Crosby, David; Gentile, Gianfranco; Stanway, Elizabeth; Wiersema, Klaas; Fynbo, Johan P U; Tanvir, Nial R; Kamphuis, Peter; Garrett, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We report the detection of the radio afterglow of a long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 111005A at 5-345 GHz, including the very long baseline interferometry observations with the positional error of 0.2 mas. The afterglow position is coincident with the disk of a galaxy ESO 580-49 at z= 0.01326 (~1" from its center), which makes GRB 111005A the second closest GRB known to date, after GRB 980425. The radio afterglow of GRB 111005A was an order of magnitude less luminous than those of local low-luminosity GRBs, and obviously than those of cosmological GRBs. The radio flux was approximately constant and then experienced an unusually rapid decay a month after the GRB explosion. Similarly to only two other GRBs, we did not find the associated supernovae (SN), despite deep near- and mid-infrared observations 1-9 days after the GRB explosion, reaching ~20 times fainter than other SNe associated with GRBs. Moreover, we measured twice solar metallicity for the GRB location. The low gamma-ray and radio luminosities, rapid deca...

  17. Selection effects in Gamma Ray Bursts correlations: consequences on the ratio between GRB and star formation rates

    CERN Document Server

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Shigehiro, Nagataki; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) visible up to very high redshift have become attractive targets as potential new distance indicators. It is still not clear whether the relations proposed so far originate from an unknown GRB physics or result from selection effects. We investigate this issue in the case of the $L_X-T^*_a$ correlation (hereafter LT) between the X-ray luminosity $L_X (T_a)$ at the end of the plateau phase, $T_a$, and the rest frame time $T^{*}_a$. We devise a general method to build mock data sets starting from a GRB world model and taking into account selection effects on both time and luminosity. This method shows how not knowing the efficiency function could influence the evaluation of the intrinsic slope of any correlation and the GRB density rate. We investigate biases (small offsets in slope or normalization) that would occur in the LT relation as a result of truncations, possibly present in the intrinsic distributions of $L_X$ and $T^*_a$. We compare these results with the ones in Dainotti et al....

  18. A possible FRB/GRB connection: towards a multi-wavelength campaign to unveil the nature of Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Bing

    2013-01-01

    The physical nature of Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs), a new type of cosmological transients discovered recently, is not known. It has been suggested that FRBs can be produced when a spinning supra-massive neutron star loses centrifugal support and collapses to a black hole. Here we suggest that such implosions can happen in supra-massive neutron stars shortly (hundreds to thousands of seconds) after their births, and an observational signature of such implosions may have been observed in the X-ray afterglows of some long and short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Within this picture, a small fraction of FRBs would be physically connected to GRBs. We discuss possible multi-wavelength electromagnetic signals and gravitational wave signals that might be associated with FRBs, and propose an observational campaign to unveil the physical nature of FRBs. In particular, we strongly encourage a rapid radio follow-up observation of GRBs starting from 100 s after GRB triggers.

  19. The very red afterglow of GRB 000418: Further evidence for dust extinction in a gamma-ray burst host galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, S.; Stecklum, B.; Masetti, N.;

    2000-01-01

    We report near-infrared and optical follow-up observations of the afterglow of the GRB 000418 starting 2.5 days after the occurrence of the burst and extending over nearly 7 weeks. GRB 000418 represents the second case for which the afterglow was initially identified by observations in the near-i......) bursts are associated with events in star-forming regions.......-infrared. During the first 10 days its R-band afterglow was well characterized by a single power-law decay with a slope of 0.86. However, at later times the temporal evolution of the afterglow flattens with respect to a simple power-law decay. Attributing this to an underlying host galaxy, we find its magnitude...... to be R = 23.9 and an intrinsic afterglow decay slope of 1.22. The afterglow was very red with R-K approximate to 4 mag. The observations can be explained by an adiabatic, spherical fireball solution and a heavy reddening due to dust extinction in the host galaxy. This supports the picture that (long...

  20. Long and short GRB

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    1995-01-01

    We report evidence from the 3B Catalogue that short (T_90 10 s) GRB represent different populations and processes: Their spectral behavior is qualitatively different, with short bursts harder in the BATSE range, but chiefly long bursts detected at higher photon energies; \\langle V/V_max \\rangle = 0.385 \\pm 0.019 for short GRB but \\langle V/V_max \\rangle = 0.282 \\pm 0.014 for long GRB, differing by 0.103 \\pm 0.024. Long GRB may be the consequence of accretion-induced collapse, but this mechanism fails for short GRB, for which we suggest colliding neutron stars.

  1. GEMINI SPECTROSCOPY OF THE SHORT-HARD GAMMA-RAY BURST GRB 130603B AFTERGLOW AND HOST GALAXY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucchiara, A.; Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Perley, D.; Cao, Y. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cenko, S. B. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Cardwell, A.; Turner, J. [Gemini South Observatory, AURA, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Bloom, J. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Cobb, B. E., E-mail: acucchia@ucolick.org [The George Washington University, Washington, DC (United States)

    2013-11-10

    We present early optical photometry and spectroscopy of the afterglow and host galaxy of the bright short-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 130603B discovered by the Swift satellite. Using our Target of Opportunity program on the Gemini South telescope, our prompt optical spectra reveal a strong trace from the afterglow superimposed on continuum and emission lines from the z = 0.3568 ± 0.0005 host galaxy. The combination of a relatively bright optical afterglow (r' = 21.52 at Δt = 8.4 hr), together with an observed offset of 0.''9 from the host nucleus (4.8 kpc projected distance at z = 0.3568), allow us to extract a relatively clean spectrum dominated by afterglow light. Furthermore, the spatially resolved spectrum allows us to constrain the properties of the explosion site directly, and compare these with the host galaxy nucleus, as well as other short-duration GRB host galaxies. We find that while the host is a relatively luminous (L∼0.8 L{sup *}{sub B}), star-forming (SFR = 1.84 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1}) galaxy with almost solar metallicity, the spectrum of the afterglow exhibits weak Ca II absorption features but negligible emission features. The explosion site therefore lacks evidence of recent star formation, consistent with the relatively long delay time distribution expected in a compact binary merger scenario. The star formation rate (SFR; both in an absolute sense and normalized to the luminosity) and metallicity of the host are both consistent with the known sample of short-duration GRB hosts and with recent results which suggest GRB 130603B emission to be the product of the decay of radioactive species produced during the merging process of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary ({sup k}ilonova{sup )}. Ultimately, the discovery of more events similar to GRB 130603B and their rapid follow-up from 8 m class telescopes will open new opportunities for our understanding of the final stages of compact-objects binary systems and provide crucial

  2. The Lag-Luminosity Relation in the GRB Source-Frame: An Investigation with Swift BAT Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ukwatta, T N; Stamatikos, M; Dermer, C D; Sakamoto, T; Sonbas, E; Parke, W C; Maximon, L C; Linnemann, J T; Bhat, P N; Eskandarian, A; Gehrels, N; Abeysekara, U; Tollefson, K; Norris, J P

    2011-01-01

    Spectral lag, which is defined as the difference in time of arrival of high and low energy photons, is a common feature in Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). Previous investigations have shown a correlation between this lag and the isotropic peak luminosity for long duration bursts. However, most of the previous investigations used lags extracted in the observer-frame only. In this work (based on a sample of 43 Swift long GRBs with known redshifts), we present an analysis of the lag-luminosity relation in the GRB source-frame. Our analysis indicates a higher degree of correlation -0.82 +/- 0.05 (chance probability of ~ 5.5 x 10^-5) between the spectral lag and the isotropic peak luminosity, Liso, with a best-fit power-law index of -1.2 +/- 0.2, such that Liso proportional to lag^-1.2. In addition, there is an anti-correlation between the source-frame spectral lag and the source-frame peak energy of the burst spectrum, E_pk(1+z).

  3. A Merger Origin for Short Gamma-Ray Bursts Inferred from the Afterglow and Host Galaxy of GRB 050724

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, E; Cenko, S B; Gal-Yam, A; Soderberg, A M; Kasliwal, M; Leonard, D C; Cameron, P B; Frail, D A; Kulkarni, S R; Murphy, D C; Krzeminski, W; Piran, T; Lee, B L; Roth, K C; Moon, D S; Fox, D B; Harrison, F A; Persson, S E; Schmidt, B P; Penprase, B E; Rich, J; Peterson, B A; Cowie, L L

    2005-01-01

    Despite a rich phenomenology, gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are divided into two classes based on their duration and spectral hardness -- the long-soft and the short-hard bursts. The discovery of afterglow emission from long GRBs was a watershed event, pinpointing their origin to star forming galaxies, and hence the death of massive stars, and indicating an energy release of about 10^51 erg. While theoretical arguments suggest that short GRBs are produced in the merger of compact object binaries (neutron stars or black holes), the progenitors, energetics, and environments of these events remain elusive despite recent localizations. Here we report the discovery of radio, optical, and infrared afterglow emission from the short-hard GRB 050724, which unambiguously associate it with an elliptical galaxy at a redshift, z=0.257. We show that the energy release is 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than that of long GRBs, and that the burst ejecta may be collimated in jets. More importantly, the nature of the host galaxy for...

  4. Single star progenitors of long gamma-ray bursts I: Model grids and redshift dependent GRB rate

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, S C; Norman, C

    2006-01-01

    We present grids of massive star evolution models at four different metallicities (Z=0.004, 0.002, 0.001, 0.00001). The effects of rotation on the stellar structure and the transport of angular momentum and chemical elements through the Spruit-Tayler dynamo and rotationally induced instabilities are considered. After discussing uncertainties involved with the adopted physics, we elaborate the final fate of massive stars as a function of initial mass and spin rate, at each considered metallicity. In particular, we investigate for which initial conditions long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are expected to be produced in the frame of the collapsar model. Then, using an empirical spin distribution of young massive metal-poor stars and a specified metallicity-dependent history of star-formation, we compute the expected GRB rate as function of metallicity and redshift based on our stellar evolution models. The GRB production in our models is limited to metallicities of Z \\lsim 0.004, with the consequence that about 50 % ...

  5. The unusual gamma-ray burst GRB 101225A explained as a minor body falling onto a neutron star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, S; Lodato, G; D'Avanzo, P; Panagia, N; Rossi, E M; Della Valle, M; Tagliaferri, G; Antonelli, L A; Covino, S; Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Melandri, A; Pian, E; Salvaterra, R; Cusumano, G; D'Elia, V; Fugazza, D; Palazzi, E; Sbarufatti, B; Vergani, S D

    2011-11-30

    The tidal disruption of a solar-mass star around a supermassive black hole has been extensively studied analytically and numerically. In these events, the star develops into an elongated banana-shaped structure. After completing an eccentric orbit, the bound debris falls into the black hole, forming an accretion disk and emitting radiation. The same process may occur on planetary scales if a minor body passes too close to its star. In the Solar System, comets fall directly into our Sun or onto planets. If the star is a compact object, the minor body can become tidally disrupted. Indeed, one of the first mechanisms invoked to produce strong gamma-ray emission involved accretion of comets onto neutron stars in our Galaxy. Here we report that the peculiarities of the 'Christmas' gamma-ray burst (GRB 101225A) can be explained by a tidal disruption event of a minor body around an isolated Galactic neutron star. This would indicate either that minor bodies can be captured by compact stellar remnants more frequently than occurs in the Solar System or that minor-body formation is relatively easy around millisecond radio pulsars. A peculiar supernova associated with a gamma-ray burst provides an alternative explanation.

  6. GRB 090313

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Ugarte Postigo...[}, A.; Goldoni, P.; Thöne, Christina;

    2010-01-01

    % illuminated Moon was just 30 degrees away from the field. In spite of the adverse conditions, we obtained a spectrum that, for the first time in GRB research, simultaneously covers the range from 5700 to 23¿000 Å. Results. The spectrum shows multiple absorption features at a redshift of 3.3736, which we......Context. X-shooter is the first second-generation instrument to become operative at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT). It is a broad-band medium-resolution spectrograph designed with gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectroscopy as one of its main science drivers. Aims. During the first...

  7. GRB 050408: An Atypical Gamma-Ray Burst as a Probe of an Atypical Galactic Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, R J; Bailyn, C; Blake, C H; Bloom, J S; Chen, H W; Cobb, B; Falco, E E; Green, P J; Kowalski, M P; Li, W; Perley, D A; Perlmutter, S; Pooley, D; Prochaska, J X; Roth, K; Volk, K

    2005-01-01

    The bright GRB 050408 was localized by HETE-II near local midnight, enabling an impressive ground-based followup effort as well as space-based followup from Swift. The Swift data from the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and our own optical photometry and spectrum of the afterglow provide the cornerstone for our analysis. Under the traditional assumption that the visible waveband was above the peak synchrotron frequency and below the cooling frequency, the optical photometry from 0.03 to 5.03 days show an afterglow decay corresponding to an electron energy index of p_lc = 2.05 +/- 0.04, without a jet break as suggested by others. A break is seen in the X-ray data at early times (at ~12600 sec after the GRB). The spectral slope of the optical spectrum is consistent with p_lc assuming a host-galaxy extinction of A_V = 1.18 mag. The optical-NIR broadband spectrum is also consistent with p = 2.05, but prefers A_V = 0.57 mag. The X-ray afterglow shows a break at 1.26 x 10^4 sec, which may be the result of a refreshed shock. ...

  8. High energy emission of GRB 130821A: Constraining the density profile of the circum-burst medium as well as the initial Lorentz factor of the outflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Bei; He, Hao-Ning; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming [Key laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-01

    GRB 130821A was detected by Fermi-GBM/LAT, Konus-WIND, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, RHESSI and Mars Odyssey-HEND. Although the data of GRB 130821A are very limited, we show in this work that the high energy γ-ray emission (i.e., above 100 MeV) alone imposes tight constraint on the density profile of the circum-burst medium as well as the initial Lorentz factor of the outflow. The temporal behavior of the high energy γ-ray emission is consistent with the forward shock synchrotron radiation model, and the circum-burst medium likely has a constant-density profile. The Lorentz factor is about a few hundred, similar to other bright GRBs.

  9. GRB hosts through cosmic time. VLT/X-Shooter emission-line spectroscopy of 96 γ-ray-burst-selected galaxies at 0.1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Krühler; D. Malesani; J.P.U. Fynbo; O.E. Hartoog; J. Hjorth; P. Jakobsson; D.A. Perley; A.. Rossi; P. Schady; S. Schulze; N.R. Tanvir; S.D. Vergani; K. Wiersema; P.M.J. Afonso; J. Bolmer; Z. Cano; S. Covino; V. D’Elia; A. de Ugarte Postigo; R. Filgas; M. Friis; J.F. Graham; J. Greiner; P. Goldoni; A. Gomboc; F. Hammer; J. Japelj; D.A. Kann; L. Kaper; S. Klose; A.J. Levan; G. Leloudas; B. Milvang-Jensen; A. Nicuesa Guelbenzu; E. Palazzi; E. Pian; S. Piranomonte; R. Sánchez-Ramírez; S. Savaglio; J. Selsing; G. Tagliaferri; P.M. Vreeswijk; D.J. Watson; D. Xu

    2015-01-01

    We present data and initial results from VLT/X-Shooter emission-line spectroscopy of 96 galaxies selected by long γ-ray bursts (GRBs) at 0.1 GRB host spectra available to date. Most of our GRBs were detected by Swift and 76% are at 0.5

  10. GeV emission from short Gamma-Ray Bursts: the case of GRB 081024B

    CERN Document Server

    Corsi, Alessandra; Piro, Luigi

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the origin of the high energy tail detected by Fermi/LAT in the short GRB 081024B through synchrotron and self-Compton emission in either the internal or external shock models. In the internal shock scenario, we explore the possibility of generating the high energy photons directly through synchrotron process, or through inverse Compton emission in which target photons are synchrotron photons produced in internal shocks taking place either in the short prompt phase, or in a lately emitted shell (delayed internal shocks). In the external shock scenario, we consider the possibility of the high energy tail being the extension of the afterglow synchrotron emission, or alternatively the inverse Compton component associated to the afterglow synchrotron photons. For the internal shock scenario we conclude that, given the constraints set by the observations on the prompt emission spectrum, only an inverse Compton component from delayed internal shocks can accommodate the presence of a high energy tail ...

  11. An optical study of the GRB 970111 field beginning 19 hours after the gamma-ray burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Wolf, Christian

    1998-01-01

    We present the results of the monitoring of the GRB 970111 field that started 19 hours after the event. This observation represents the fastest ground-based follow-up performed for GRB 970111 in all wavelengths. As soon as the detection of the possible GRB 970111 X-ray afterglow was reported...... by Feroci et al. (1998) we reanalyzed the optical data collected for the GRB 970111 field. Although we detect small magnitude variability in some objects, no convincing optical counterpart is found inside the WFC error box. Any change in brightness 19 hours after the GRB is less than 0.2 mag for objects...... multicolour photometry for objects in the GRB 970111 error box. The colour-colour diagrams do not show any object with unusual colours. We applied a photometric classification method to the objects inside the GRB error box, that can distinguish stars from galaxies and estimate redshifts. We were able...

  12. Closing in on a Short-Hard Burst Progenitor: Constraints From Early-Time Optical Imaging and Spectroscopy of a Possible Host Galaxy of GRB 050509b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloom, Joshua S.; Prochaska, J.X.; Pooley, D.; Blake, C.W.; Foley, R.J.; Jha, S.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Granot, J.; Filippenko, A.V.; Sigurdsson, S.; Barth, A.J.; Chen,; Cooper, M.C.; Falco, E.E.; Gal, R.R.; Gerke, B.F.; Gladders, M.D.; Greene, J.E.; Hennanwi, J.; Ho, L.C.; Hurley, K.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /Lick Observ.

    2005-06-07

    The localization of the short-duration, hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst GRB050509b by the Swift satellite was a watershed event. Never before had a member of this mysterious subclass of classic GRBs been rapidly and precisely positioned in a sky accessible to the bevy of ground-based follow-up facilities. Thanks to the nearly immediate relay of the GRB position by Swift, we began imaging the GRB field 8 minutes after the burst and have continued during the 8 days since. Though the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT) discovered an X-ray afterglow of GRB050509b, the first ever of a short-hard burst, thus far no convincing optical/infrared candidate afterglow or supernova has been found for the object. We present a re-analysis of the XRT afterglow and find an absolute position of R.A. = 12h36m13.59s, Decl. = +28{sup o}59'04.9'' (J2000), with a 1{sigma} uncertainty of 3.68'' in R.A., 3.52'' in Decl.; this is about 4'' to the west of the XRT position reported previously. Close to this position is a bright elliptical galaxy with redshift z = 0.2248 {+-} 0.0002, about 1' from the center of a rich cluster of galaxies. This cluster has detectable diffuse emission, with a temperature of kT = 5.25{sub -1.68}{sup +3.36} keV. We also find several ({approx}11) much fainter galaxies consistent with the XRT position from deep Keck imaging and have obtained Gemini spectra of several of these sources. Nevertheless we argue, based on positional coincidences, that the GRB and the bright elliptical are likely to be physically related. We thus have discovered reasonable evidence that at least some short-duration, hard-spectra GRBs are at cosmological distances. We also explore the connection of the properties of the burst and the afterglow, finding that GRB050509b was underluminous in both of these relative to long-duration GRBs. However, we also demonstrate that the ratio of the blast-wave energy to the {gamma}-ray energy is consistent with that

  13. The 999th Swift gamma-ray burst: Some like it thermal. A multiwavelength study of GRB 151027A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nappo, F.; Pescalli, A.; Oganesyan, G.; Ghirlanda, G.; Giroletti, M.; Melandri, A.; Campana, S.; Ghisellini, G.; Salafia, O. S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Bernardini, M. G.; Covino, S.; Carretti, E.; Celotti, A.; D'Elia, V.; Nava, L.; Palazzi, E.; Poppi, S.; Prandoni, I.; Righini, S.; Rossi, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Testa, V.; Venturi, T.; Vergani, S. D.

    2017-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of GRB 151027A. This is the 999th gamma-ray burst detected by the Swift satellite and it has a densely sampled emission in the X-ray and optical band and has been observed and detected in the radio up to 140 days after the prompt. The multiwavelength light curve from 500 s to 140 days can be modelled through a standard forward shock afterglow, but it requires an additional emission component to reproduce the early X-ray and optical emission. We present optical observations performed with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) and the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) 19.6, 33.9, and 92.3 days after the trigger which show a bump with respect to a standard afterglow flux decay and are interpreted as possibly due to the underlying supernova and host galaxy (at a level of 0.4 μJy in the optical R band, RAB 25). Radio observations, performed with the Sardinia Radio Telescope (SRT) and Medicina in single-dish mode and with the European Very Long Baseline Interferometer (VLBI) Network and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), between day 4 and 140 suggest that the burst exploded in an environment characterized by a density profile scaling with the distance from the source (wind profile). A remarkable feature of the prompt emission is the presence of a bright flare 100 s after the trigger, lasting 70 s in the soft X-ray band, which was simultaneously detected from the optical band up to the MeV energy range. By combining Swift-BAT/XRT and Fermi-GBM data, the broadband (0.3-1000 keV) time resolved spectral analysis of the flare reveals the coexistence of a non-thermal (power law) and thermal blackbody components. The blackbody component contributes up to 35% of the luminosity in the 0.3-1000 keV band. The γ-ray emission observed in Swift-BAT and Fermi-GBM anticipates and lasts less than the soft X-ray emission as observed by Swift-XRT, arguing against a Comptonization origin. The blackbody component could either be produced by an outflow

  14. Scenario Machine: Fast Radio Bursts, Short GRB, Dark Energy and LIGO silence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruzhinskaya, Maria; Lipunov, Vladimir

    We discuss the recently reported discovery of fast radio bursts (FRBs) in the frame- work of the neutron star-neutron star (NS+NS) or neutron star-black hole (NS+BH) binary merger model. We concentrate on what we consider to be an issue of greatest im- portance: what is the NS merger rate given that the FRB rate (1/1000 yr (-1) per galaxy) is inconsistent with gamma-ray burst rate as discussed by Thornton and should be significantly higher. We show that there is no discrepancy between NS merger rate and observed FRB rates in the framework of the Scenario Machine population syn- thesis - for a kick velocity of 100-150 km s (-1) an average NS merger rate is 1/500- 1/2000 yr (-1) per galaxy up to z = 0.5-1. Based on the Scenario Machine NS merger rate estimates, we discuss the lack of positive detections on the ground-based interferom- eters, considering the LIGO (Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory).

  15. Afterglows from precursors in Gamma Ray Bursts. Application to the optical afterglow of GRB 091024

    CERN Document Server

    Nappo, F; Ghirlanda, G; Melandri, A; Nava, L; Burlon, D

    2014-01-01

    About 15% of Gamma Ray Bursts have precursors, i.e. emission episodes preceding the main event, whose spectral and temporal properties are similar to the main emission. We propose that precursors have their own fireball, producing afterglow emission due to the dissipation of the kinetic energy via external shock. In the time lapse between the precursor and the main event, we assume that the central engine is not completely turned off, but it continues to eject relativistic material at a smaller rate, whose emission is below the background level. The precursor fireball generates a first afterglow by the interaction with the external circumburst medium. Matter injected by the central engine during the "quasi-quiescent" phase replenishes the external medium with material in relativistic motion. The fireball corresponding to the main prompt emission episode crashes with this moving material, producing a second afterglow, and finally catches up and merges with the first precursor fireball. We apply this new model ...

  16. GRB as luminosity indicator

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Rupal

    2014-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are found at much higher redshifts (z>6) than Supernova Ia (z~1), and hence, they can be used to probe very primitive universe. However, radiation mechanism of GRB remains a puzzle, unlike Supernova Ia. Through comprehensive description, both empirical and physical, we shall discuss the most likely way to use the constituent pulses of a GRB to find the radiation mechanism as well as using the pulses as luminosity indicators.

  17. Is GRB 100418A a Cosmic Twin of GRB 060614?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lan-Wei Jia; Hou-Jun Lü; Shu-Jin Hou; En-Wei Liang

    2011-03-01

    GRB 100418A is a long burst at = 0.624 without detection of associated supernova (SN).We present a detailed analysis on this event and discuss possible origins of its multi-wavelength emission. The temporal features of this event is similar to GRB 060614, a well-known nearby long GRB without SN association (possibly a Type I GRB), indicating that the two events may be cosmic twins. However, both the circumburst medium density and the GRB classification based on the gamma-ray energy and spectrum suggest that GRB 100418A would be a Type II GRB. These results make a great puzzle on the progenitors of this kind of events, if they belong to the same population.

  18. GRB 091208B: FIRST DETECTION OF THE OPTICAL POLARIZATION IN EARLY FORWARD SHOCK EMISSION OF A GAMMA-RAY BURST AFTERGLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, T.; Chiyonobu, S.; Fukazawa, Y.; Ikejiri, Y.; Itoh, R.; Komatsu, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Nagae, O.; Sakimoto, K.; Sasada, M.; Tanaka, H.; Yamanaka, M. [Department of Physical Science, Hiroshima University, Kagamiyama 1-3-1, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Toma, K. [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka 560-0043 (Japan); Kawabata, K. S.; Mizuno, T.; Ohsugi, T.; Uemura, M. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Inoue, T.; Yamashita, T. [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Fuchinobe, Chuou-ku, Sagamihara 252-5258 (Japan); Nakaya, H., E-mail: uehara@hep01.hepl.hiroshima-u.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); and others

    2012-06-10

    We report that the optical polarization in the afterglow of GRB 091208B is measured at t = 149-706 s after the burst trigger, and the polarization degree is P = 10.4( {+-} 2.5%. The optical light curve at this time shows a power-law decay with index -0.75 {+-} 0.02, which is interpreted as the forward shock synchrotron emission, and thus this is the first detection of the early-time optical polarization in the forward shock (rather than that in the reverse shock reported by Steele et al.). This detection disfavors the afterglow model in which the magnetic fields in the emission region are random on the plasma skin depth scales, such as those amplified by the plasma instabilities, e.g., Weibel instability. We suggest that the fields are amplified by the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, which would be tested by future observations of the temporal changes of the polarization degrees and angles for other bursts.

  19. Can the bump in the composite spectrum of GRB 910503 be an emission line feature of gamma-ray bursts?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ping Qin; Fu-Wen Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Appearing in the composite spectral data of BATSE, EGRET and COMPTEL for GRB 910503, there is a bump at around 1600keV. We perform a statistical analysis on the spectral data, trying to find out if the bump could be accounted for by a blue-shifted and significantly broadened rest frame line due to the Doppler effect of an expanding fireball surface. We made an F-test and adopted previously proposed criteria. The study reveals that the criteria are well satisfied and the feature can be interpreted as the blue shifted 6.4 keV line. From the fit with this line taken into account, we find the Lorentz factor of this source to be Γ = 116+9-9 (at the 68% confident level,△X2 = 1) and the rest frame spectral peak energy to be EO,p= 2.96+0.24-0.18 keV. Although the existence of the emission line feature requires other independent tests to confirm, the analysis suggests that it is feasible to detect emission line features in the high energy range of GRB spectra when taking into account the Doppler effect of fireball expansion.

  20. Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: A Short Hard Gamma-Ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-Law Component from 10 keV to GeV Energies

    CERN Document Server

    LAT, The Fermi

    2010-01-01

    We present detailed observations of the bright short-hard gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi observatory. GRB 090510 is the first burst detected by the LAT that shows strong evidence for a deviation from a Band spectral fitting function during the prompt emission phase. The time-integrated spectrum is fit by the sum of a Band function with $\\Epeak = 3.9\\pm 0.3$\\,MeV, which is the highest yet measured, and a hard power-law component with photon index $-1.62\\pm 0.03$ that dominates the emission below $\\approx$\\,20\\,keV and above $\\approx$\\,100\\,MeV. The onset of the high-energy spectral component appears to be delayed by $\\sim$\\,0.1\\,s with respect to the onset of a component well fit with a single Band function. A faint GBM pulse and a LAT photon are detected 0.5\\,s before the main pulse. During the prompt phase, the LAT detected a photon with energy $30.5^{+5.8}_{-2.6}$ GeV, the highest ever measured from a short GRB. Observ...

  1. GRB 120422A/SN 2012bz: Bridging the gap between low- and high-luminosity gamma-ray bursts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schulze, S.; et al., [Unknown; Ellerbroek, L.E.; Kaper, L.; Hartoog, O.E.

    2014-01-01

    Context. At low redshift, a handful of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been discovered with luminosities that are substantially lower (Liso ≲ 1048.5 erg s-1) than the average of more distant ones (Liso ≳ 1049.5 erg s-1). It has been suggested that the properties of several low-luminosity (low-L) GRBs a

  2. A minor body falling onto a neutron star as an explanation for the unusual gamma-ray burst GRB 101225A

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, S; D'Avanzo, P; Panagia, N; Rossi, E M; Della Valle, M; Tagliaferri, G; Antonelli, L A; Covino, S; Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Melandri, A; Pian, E; Salvaterra, R; Cusumano, G; D'Elia, V; Fugazza, D; Palazzi, E; Sbarufatti, B; Vergani, S D

    2011-01-01

    The tidal disruption of a solar mass star around a supermassive black hole has been extensively studied analytically and numerically. In these events the star develops into an elongated banana-shaped structure. After completing an eccentric orbit, the bound debris fall onto the black hole, forming an accretion disk and emitting radiation. The same process may occur on planetary scales, if a minor body orbits too close to its star. In the Solar System, comets fall directly onto our Sun or onto planets. If the star is a compact object, the minor body can become tidally disrupted. Indeed, one of the first mechanisms invoked to produce strong gamma-ray emission involved accretion of comets onto neutron stars in our Galaxy. Here we report that the peculiarities of the `Christmas' gamma-ray burst (GRB 101225A) can be explained by a tidal disruption event of a minor body around a Galactic isolated neutron star. This result would indicate either that minor bodies can be captured by compact stellar remnants more frequ...

  3. The Spectral SN-GRB Connection: Systematic Spectral Comparisons between Type Ic Supernovae, broad-lined Type Ic Supernovae with and without Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Modjaz, Maryam; Bianco, Federica B; Graur, Or

    2015-01-01

    We present the first systematic investigation of spectral properties of 17 Type Ic Supernovae (SNe Ic), 10 broad-lined SNe Ic (SNe Ic-bl) without observed Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) and 10 SNe Ic-bl with GRBs (SN-GRBs) as a function of time in order to probe their explosion conditions and progenitors. We analyze a total of 396 spectra, which were drawn from published spectra of individual SNe as well as from the densely time-sampled spectra data of Modjaz et al. (2014). In order to quantify the diversity of the SN spectra as a function of SN subtype, we construct average spectra of SNe Ic, SNe Ic-bl without GRBs and SNe Ic-bl with GRBs, along with standard deviation and maximum deviation contours. We find that SN~1994I is not a typical SN Ic, in contrast to common belief, while the spectra of SN 1998bw/GRB 980425 are representative of mean spectra of SNe Ic-bl. We measure the ejecta absorption and width velocities (as traced by FeII 5169) and find that SNe Ic-bl with GRBs, on average, have quantifiably higher ab...

  4. Fermi Observations of GRB 090510: A Short-Hard Gamma-ray Burst with an Additional, Hard Power-law Component from 10 keV TO GeV Energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, M.; Asano, K.; Atwood, W. B.; Axelsson, M.; Baldini, L.; Ballet, J.; Barbiellini, G.; Baring, M. G.; Bastieri, D.; Bechtol, K.; Bellazzini, R.; Berenji, B.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Blandford, R. D.; Bloom, E. D.; Bonamente, E.; Borgland, A. W.; Bouvier, A.; Bregeon, J.; Brez, A.; Briggs, M. S.; Brigida, M.; Bruel, P.; Buson, S.; Caliandro, G. A.; Cameron, R. A.; Caraveo, P. A.; Carrigan, S.; Casandjian, J. M.; Cecchi, C.; Çelik, Ö.; Charles, E.; Chiang, J.; Ciprini, S.; Claus, R.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Connaughton, V.; Conrad, J.; Dermer, C. D.; de Palma, F.; Dingus, B. L.; Silva, E. do Couto e.; Drell, P. S.; Dubois, R.; Dumora, D.; Farnier, C.; Favuzzi, C.; Fegan, S. J.; Finke, J.; Focke, W. B.; Frailis, M.; Fukazawa, Y.; Fusco, P.; Gargano, F.; Gasparrini, D.; Gehrels, N.; Germani, S.; Giglietto, N.; Giordano, F.; Glanzman, T.; Godfrey, G.; Granot, J.; Grenier, I. A.; Grondin, M.-H.; Grove, J. E.; Guiriec, S.; Hadasch, D.; Harding, A. K.; Hays, E.; Horan, D.; Hughes, R. E.; Jóhannesson, G.; Johnson, W. N.; Kamae, T.; Katagiri, H.; Kataoka, J.; Kawai, N.; Kippen, R. M.; Knödlseder, J.; Kocevski, D.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kuss, M.; Lande, J.; Latronico, L.; Lemoine-Goumard, M.; Llena Garde, M.; Longo, F.; Loparco, F.; Lott, B.; Lovellette, M. N.; Lubrano, P.; Makeev, A.; Mazziotta, M. N.; McEnery, J. E.; McGlynn, S.; Meegan, C.; Mészáros, P.; Michelson, P. F.; Mitthumsiri, W.; Mizuno, T.; Moiseev, A. A.; Monte, C.; Monzani, M. E.; Moretti, E.; Morselli, A.; Moskalenko, I. V.; Murgia, S.; Nakajima, H.; Nakamori, T.; Nolan, P. L.; Norris, J. P.; Nuss, E.; Ohno, M.; Ohsugi, T.; Omodei, N.; Orlando, E.; Ormes, J. F.; Ozaki, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Paneque, D.; Panetta, J. H.; Parent, D.; Pelassa, V.; Pepe, M.; Pesce-Rollins, M.; Piron, F.; Preece, R.; Rainò, S.; Rando, R.; Razzano, M.; Razzaque, S.; Reimer, A.; Ritz, S.; Rodriguez, A. Y.; Roth, M.; Ryde, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sander, A.; Scargle, J. D.; Schalk, T. L.; Sgrò, C.; Siskind, E. J.; Smith, P. D.; Spandre, G.; Spinelli, P.; Stamatikos, M.; Stecker, F. W.; Strickman, M. S.; Suson, D. J.; Tajima, H.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, T.; Tanaka, T.; Thayer, J. B.; Thayer, J. G.; Thompson, D. J.; Tibaldo, L.; Toma, K.; Torres, D. F.; Tosti, G.; Tramacere, A.; Uchiyama, Y.; Uehara, T.; Usher, T. L.; van der Horst, A. J.; Vasileiou, V.; Vilchez, N.; Vitale, V.; von Kienlin, A.; Waite, A. P.; Wang, P.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Winer, B. L.; Wu, X. F.; Yamazaki, R.; Yang, Z.; Ylinen, T.; Ziegler, M.

    2010-06-01

    We present detailed observations of the bright short-hard gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi observatory. GRB 090510 is the first burst detected by the LAT that shows strong evidence for a deviation from a Band spectral fitting function during the prompt emission phase. The time-integrated spectrum is fit by the sum of a Band function with E peak = 3.9 ± 0.3 MeV, which is the highest yet measured, and a hard power-law component with photon index -1.62 ± 0.03 that dominates the emission below ≈20 keV and above ≈100 MeV. The onset of the high-energy spectral component appears to be delayed by ~0.1 s with respect to the onset of a component well fit with a single Band function. A faint GBM pulse and a LAT photon are detected 0.5 s before the main pulse. During the prompt phase, the LAT detected a photon with energy 30.5+5.8 -2.6 GeV, the highest ever measured from a short GRB. Observation of this photon sets a minimum bulk outflow Lorentz factor, Γgsim 1200, using simple γγ opacity arguments for this GRB at redshift z = 0.903 and a variability timescale on the order of tens of ms for the ≈100 keV-few MeV flux. Stricter high confidence estimates imply Γ >~ 1000 and still require that the outflows powering short GRBs are at least as highly relativistic as those of long-duration GRBs. Implications of the temporal behavior and power-law shape of the additional component on synchrotron/synchrotron self-Compton, external-shock synchrotron, and hadronic models are considered.

  5. The Strongly Polarized Afterglow of GRB 020405

    CERN Document Server

    Bersier, D F; Garnavich, P M; Holman, M J; Grav, T; Quinn, J; Kaluzny, J; Challis, P M; Bower, R G; Wilman, D J; Heyl, J S; Holland, S T; Hradecky, V; Jha, S; Stanek, K Z

    2003-01-01

    We report polarization measurements and photometry for the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 020405. We measured a highly significant 9.9% polarization (in V band) 1.3 days after the burst and argue that it is intrinsic to the GRB. The light curve decay is well fitted by a $t^{-1.72}$ power-law; we do not see any evidence for a break between 1.24 and 4.3 days after the burst. We discuss these measurements in the light of several models of GRB afterglows.

  6. Study of WATCH GRB error boxes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Lund, Niels;

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the first WATCH GRB Catalogue ofγ-ray Bursts in order to find correlations between WATCH GRB error boxes and a great variety of celestial objects present in 33 different catalogues. No particular class of objects has been found to be significantly correlated with the WATCH GRBs....

  7. The supernova associated with GRB 020405

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, S; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon; Rujula, Alvaro De

    2002-01-01

    We used the very simple and successful Cannonball (CB) model of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows (AGs) to analyze the observations of the mildly extinct optical AG of the relatively nearby GRB 020405, first made with ground-based telescopes, and with the HST at later times. We show that GRB 020405 was associated with a 1998bw-like supernova (SN) at the GRB's redshift which appeared dimmer and red relative to SN1998bw because of extinction in the host and our Galaxy. The case for the SN/GRB association --advocated in the CB model-- is becoming indubitable.

  8. GRB Simulations in GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omodei, Nicola; /INFN, Pisa; Battelino, Milan; /Stockholm Observ.; Komin, Nukri; /Montpellier U.; Longo, Francesco; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; McEnery, Julie; /NASA, Goddard; Ryde, Felix; /Denver U.

    2007-10-22

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST), scheduled to be launched in fall of 2007, is the next generation satellite for high-energy gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT) is a pair conversion telescope built with a high precision silicon tracker, a segmented CsI electromagnetic calorimeter and a plastic anticoincidence shield. The LAT will survey the sky in the energy range between 20 MeV to more than 300 GeV, shedding light on many issues left open by its highly successful predecessor EGRET. LAT will observe Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB) in an energy range never explored before; to tie these frontier observations to the better-known properties at lower energies, a second instrument, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will provide important spectra and timing in the 10 keV to 30 MeV range. We briefly present the instruments onboard the GLAST satellite, their synergy in the GRB observations and the work done so far by the collaboration in simulation, analysis, and GRB sensitivity estimation.

  9. A Trio of GRB-SNe: GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez and GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Z; Pozanenko, A; Butler, N; Thone, C C; Guidorzi, C; Kruhler, T; Gorosabel, J; Jakobsson, P; Leloudas, G; Malesani, D; Hjorth, J; Melandri, A; Mundell, C; Wiersema, K; D'Avanzo, P; Schulze, S; Gomboc, A; Johansson, A; Zheng, W; Kann, D A; Knust, F; Varela, K; Akerlof, C W; Bloom, J; Burkhonov, O; Cooke, E; de Diego, J A; Dhungana, G; Farina, C; Ferrante, F V; Flewelling, H A; Fox, O D; Fynbo, J; Gehrels, N; Georgiev, L; Gonzalez, J J; Greiner, J; Guver, T; Hartoog, O; Hatch, N; Jelinek, M; Kehoe, R; Klose, S; Klunko, E; Kopac, D; Kutyrev, A; Krugl, Y; Lee, W H; Levan, A; Linkov, V; Matkin, A; Minikulov, N; Molotov, I; Prochaska, J Xavier; Richer, M G; Roman-Zuniga, C G; Rumyantsev, V; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Steele, I; Tanvir, N R; Volnova, A; Watson, A M; Xu, D; Yuan, F

    2014-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry for three gamma-ray burst supernovae (GRB-SNe): GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez and GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu. In the case of GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez, we also present optical spectroscopy at t-t0=16.1 d, which covers rest-frame 3000-6250 Angstroms. Based on Fe II (5169) and Si (II) (6355), our spectrum indicates an unusually low expansion velocity of 4000-6350 km/s, the lowest ever measured for a GRB-SN. Additionally, we determined the brightness and shape of each accompanying SN relative to a template supernova (SN 1998bw), which were used to estimate the amount of nickel produced via nucleosynthesis during each explosion. We find that our derived nickel masses are typical of other GRB-SNe, and greater than those of SNe Ibc that are not associated with GRBs. For GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu, we use our well-sampled R-band light curve (LC) to estimate the amount of ejecta mass and the kinetic energy of the SN, finding that these too are similar to other GRB-...

  10. Magnetic energy injection in GRB 080913

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    GRB 080913,with a spectroscopically determined redshift of z=6.7,was the record holder for being the most remote stellar object before the discovery of the recent gamma-ray burst GRB 090423,whose redshift is about 8.2.The gradually accumulated high redshift GRB sample has shed light on the origin and physical properties of GRBs during the cosmic re-ionization epoch.Here,we present a detailed numerical fit to the multi-wavelength data of the optical afterglow of GRB 080913 and then constrain its circumburst environment and the other model parameters.We conclude that the late optical/X-ray plateau at about one day since the burst is due to the Poynting-flux dominated injection from the central engine which is very likely a massive spinning black hole with super strong magnetic fields.

  11. GRB 130427A: a Nearby Ordinary Monster

    CERN Document Server

    Maselli, A; Nava, L; Mundell, C G; Kawai, N; Campana, S; Covino, S; Cummings, J R; Cusumano, G; Evans, P A; Ghirlanda, G; Ghisellini, G; Guidorzi, C; Kobayashi, S; Kuin, P; La Parola, V; Mangano, V; Oates, S; Sakamoto, T; Serino, M; Virgili, F; Zhang, B -B; Barthelmy, S; Beardmore, A; Bernardini, M G; Bersier, D; Burrows, D; Calderone, G; Capalbi, M; Chiang, J; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; De Pasquale, M; Fugazza, D; Gehrels, N; Gomboc, A; Harrison, R; Hanayama, H; Japelj, J; Kennea, J; Kopac, D; Kouveliotou, C; Kuroda, D; Levan, A; Malesani, D; Marshall, F; Nousek, J; O'Brien, P; Osborne, J P; Pagani, C; Page, K L; Page, M; Perri, M; Pritchard, T; Romano, P; Saito, Y; Sbarufatti, B; Salvaterra, R; Steele, I; Tanvir, N; Vianello, G; Weigand, B; Wiersema, K; Yatsu, Y; Yoshii, T; Tagliaferri, G

    2014-01-01

    Long-duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are an extremely rare outcome of the collapse of massive stars, and are typically found in the distant Universe. Because of its intrinsic luminosity ($L\\sim 3 \\times 10^{53}$ erg s$^{-1}$) and its relative proximity ($z=0.34$), GRB 130427A was a unique event that reached the highest fluence observed in the gamma-ray band. Here we present a comprehensive multiwavelength view of GRB 130427A with Swift, the 2-m Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes and by other ground-based facilities, highlighting the evolution of the burst emission from the prompt to the afterglow phase. The properties of GRB 130427A are similar to those of the most luminous, high-redshift GRBs, suggesting that a common central engine is responsible for producing GRBs in both the contemporary and the early Universe and over the full range of GRB isotropic energies.

  12. Highly Luminous Supernovae associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts I.: GRB 111209A/SN 2011kl in the Context of Stripped-Envelope and Superluminous Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kann, D A; E., F Olivares; Klose, S; Rossi, A; Perley, D A; Krühler, T; Greiner, J; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Elliott, J; Knust, F; Filgas, R; Pian, E; Mazzali, P; Fynbo, J P U; Leloudas, G; Afonso, P M J; Delvaux, C; Graham, J F; Rau, A; Schmidl, S; Schulze, S; Tanga, M; Updike, A C; Varela, K

    2016-01-01

    We address the question whether GRB 111209A was a special event beyond its extreme duration alone, and whether it is a classical GRB or another kind of high-energy transient. Furthermore, we place SN 2011kl into the context of large samples of SNe, addressing in more detail the question of whether it could be radioactively powered. We present afterglow photometry obtained in seven bands with the GROND imager as well as in further seven bands with the UVOT telescope on-board \\emph{Swift}. The light curve is analysed by multi-band modelling and joint fitting with power-laws and broken power-laws. We model SN 2011kl using SN 1998bw as a template and derive a bolometric light curve including near-infrared data. We compare the optical afterglow and the properties of SN 2011kl to large ensembles we have analysed in earlier works, additional GRB-SNe analysed here, as well as literature results on stripped-envelope and superluminous supernovae. We find a strong, chromatic rebrightening event at $\\approx0.8$ days afte...

  13. GRB 140606B / iPTF14bfu: Detection of shock-breakout emission from a cosmological gamma-ray burst?

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Z; Perley, D; Kruhler, T; Margutti, R; Friis, M; Malesani, D; Jakobsson, P; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Hjorth, J; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Schulze, S; Tanvir, N R; Thone, C C; Xu, D

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared photometry of GRB 140606B ($z=0.384$), and optical photometry and spectroscopy of its associated supernova (SN). The bolometric properties of the SN are: a nickel mass of M$_{\\rm Ni}$=0.4$\\pm$0.2 M$_{\\odot}$, an ejecta mass of M$_{\\rm ej}$=5$\\pm$2 M$_{\\odot}$, and a kinetic energy of E$_{\\rm K}$=2$\\pm1\\times10^{52}$ erg. The uncertain value of M$_{\\rm Ni}$ is primarily due to the poorly constrained rest-frame extinction ($E(B-V)_{\\rm rest}$=0.16$\\pm$0.14 mag). The photospheric velocity of the SN near maximum light is $v_{\\rm ph}\\approx$20,000 km/s. The photospheric velocity and bolometric properties are fully consistent with the statistical averages determined for other GRB-SNe. However, in terms of its $\\gamma$-ray emission, GRB 140606B is an outlier of the Amati relation, and occupies the same region as low-luminosity ($ll$) and short GRBs. The $\\gamma$-ray emission in $ll$GRBs is thought to arise, at least in some events, from a shock-breakout (SBO), rather than from a ...

  14. GRB 080913 at redshift 6.7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greiner, J.; Krühler, T.; Fynbo, J. P. U.

    2009-01-01

    We report on the detection by Swift of GRB 080913, and subsequent optical/near-infrared follow-up observations by GROND, which led to the discovery of its optical/NIR afterglow and the recognition of its high-z nature via the detection of a spectral break between the i' and z' bands. Spectroscopy...... obtained at the ESO-VLT revealed a continuum extending down to ¿ = 9400 Å, and zero flux for 7500 Åz = 6.695± 0.025 (95.5% confidence level), making GRB 080913 the highest-redshift gamma-ray burst (GRB) to date, and more distant than...

  15. Advances on GRB as cosmological tools

    CERN Document Server

    Ghirlanda, G

    2009-01-01

    Several interesting correlations among Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) prompt and afterglow properties have been found in the recent years. Some of these correlations have been proposed also to standardize GRB energetics to use them as standard candles in constraining the expansion history of the universe up to z>6. However, given the still unexplained nature of most of these correlations, only the less scattered correlations can be used for constraining the cosmological parameters. The updated E_peak-E_gamma correlation is presented. Caveats of alternative methods of standardizing GRB energetics are discussed.

  16. The Redshift of GRB 970508

    CERN Document Server

    Reichart, D E

    1997-01-01

    GRB 970508 is the second gamma-ray burst (GRB) for which an optical afterglow has been detected. It is the first GRB for which a distance scale has been determined: absorption and emission features in spectra of the optical afterglow place GRB 970508 at a redshift of z >= 0.835 (Metzger et al. 1997a, 1997b). The lack of a Lyman-alpha forest in these spectra further constrains this redshift to be less than approximately 2.3. I show that the spectrum of the optical afterglow of GRB 970508, once corrected for Galactic absorption, is inconsistent with the relativistic blast-wave model unless a second, redshifted source of extinction is introduced. This second source of extinction may be the yet unobserved host galaxy. I determine its redshift to be z = 1.09^{+0.14}_{-0.41}, which is consistent with the observed redshift of z = 0.835. Redshifts greater than z = 1.40 are ruled out at the 3 sigma confidence level.

  17. Calibration and Simulation of the GRB trigger detector of the Ultra Fast Flash Observatory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, M.-H.A.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2013-01-01

    The UFFO (Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory) is a GRB detector on board the Lomonosov satellite, to be launched in 2013. The GRB trigger is provided by an X-ray detector, called UBAT (UFFO Burst Alarm & Trigger Telescope), which detects X-rays from the GRB and then triggers to determine the direction ...

  18. A trio of gamma-ray burst supernovae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cano, Z.; Ugarte Postigo, Antonio de; Pozanenko, A.

    2014-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared (NIR) photometry for three gamma-ray burst supernovae (GRB-SNe): GRB 120729A, GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez and GRB 130831A / SN 2013fu. In the case of GRB 130215A / SN 2013ez, we also present optical spectroscopy at t-t0=16.1 d, which covers rest-frame 3000-6250 An...

  19. Hyper-accreting black hole as GRB central engine. I: Baryon loading in GRB jets

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Wei-Hua; Liang, En-Wei

    2012-01-01

    A hyper-accreting stellar-mass black hole has been long speculated as the best candidate of central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent rich observations of GRBs by space missions such as Swift and Fermi pose new constraints on GRB central engine models. In this paper, we study the baryon loading processes of a GRB jet launched from a black hole central engine. We consider a relativistic jet powered by $\

  20. GRB Prompt Optical Observations by Master and Lomonosov

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbovskoy, Evgeny

    We present the results of the prompt, early and afterglow optical observations of five γ-ray bursts (GRBs): GRB 100901A, GRB 100902A, GRB 100905A, GRB 100906A and GRB 101020A. These observations were made with the Mobile Astronomical System of TElescope-Robots in Russia (MASTER-II Net), the 1.5-m telescope of the Sierra Nevada Observatory and the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope. For two sources, GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A, we detected optical counterparts and obtained light curves starting before the cessation of γ-ray emission, at 113 and 48 s after the trigger, respectively. Observations of GRB 100906A were conducted in two polarizing filters. Observations of the other three bursts gave the upper limits on the optical flux; their properties are briefly discussed. A more detailed analysis of GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A, supplemented by Swift data, provides the following results and indicates different origins for the prompt optical radiation in the two bursts. The light-curve patterns and spectral distributions suggest that there is a common production site for the prompt optical and high-energy emission in GRB 100901A. The results of the spectral fits for GRB 100901A in the range from optical to X-ray favour power-law energy distributions and a consistent value of the optical extinction in the host galaxy. GRB 100906A produced a smoothly peaking optical light curve, suggesting that the prompt optical radiation in this GRB originated in a front shock. This is supported by a spectral analysis. We have found that the Amati and Ghirlanda relations are satisfied for GRB 100906A. We obtain an upper limit on the value of the optical extinction on the host of GRB 100906A. Also we consider prompt observation of dark gamma ray bursts for which on very widefield cameras MASTER-VWF and MASTER-II telescopes upper limits were received. We represent SHOCK experiment onboard the spacecraft Lomonosov.

  1. Gamma-Ray Burst Early Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B

    2005-01-01

    The successful launch and operation of NASA's Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Explorer open a new era for the multi-wavelength study of the very early afterglow phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). GRB early afterglow information is essential to explore the unknown physical composition of GRB jets, the link between the prompt gamma-ray emission and the afterglow emission, the GRB central engine activity, as well as the immediate GRB environment. Here I review some of the recent theoretical efforts to address these problems and describe how the latest Swift data give answers to these outstanding questions.

  2. Prompt GRB optical follow-up experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H-S; Williams, G; Ables, E; Band, D; Barthelmy, S; Bionta, R; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Hartmann, D; Hurley, K; Kippen, M; Nemiroff, R; Pereira, W; Porrata, R

    2000-11-13

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are brief, randomly located, releases of gamma-ray energy from unknown celestial sources that occur almost daily. The study of GRBs has undergone a revolution in the past three years due to an international effort of follow-up observations of coordinates provided by Beppo/SAX and IPN GRB. These follow-up observations have shown that GRBs are at cosmological distances and interact with surrounding material as described by the fireball model. However, prompt optical counterparts have only been seen in one case and are therefore very rare or much dimmer than the sensitivity of the current instruments. Unlike later time afterglows, prompt optical measurements would provide information on the GRB progenitor. LOTIS is the very first automated and dedicated telescope system that actively utilizes the GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) and it attempts to measure simultaneous optical light curve associated with GRBs. After 3 years of running, LOTIS has responded to 75 GRB triggers. The lack of any optical signal in any of the LOTIS images places numerical limits on the surrounding matter density, and other physical parameters in the environment of the GRB progenitor. This paper presents LOTIS results and describes other prompt GRB follow-up experiments including the Super-LOTIS at Kitt Peak in Arizona.

  3. Early emission of rising optical afterglows: The case of GRB 060904B and GRB 070420

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, A; Stratta, G; Galli, A; Corsi, A; Preger, B; Cutini, S; Pelangeon, A; Atteia, J L; Boër, M; Piro, L

    2008-01-01

    We present the time-resolved optical emission of gamma-ray bursts GRB 060904B and GRB 070420 during their prompt and early afterglow phases. We used time resolved photometry from optical data taken by the TAROT telescope and time resolved spectroscopy at high energies from the Swift spacecraft instrument. The optical emissions of both GRBs are found to increase from the end of the prompt phase, passing to a maximum of brightness at t_{peak}=9.2 min and 3.3 min for GRB 060904B and GRB 070420 respectively and then decrease. GRB 060904B presents a large optical plateau and a very large X-ray flare. We argue that the very large X-flare occurring near t_{peak} is produced by an extended internal engine activity and is only a coincidence with the optical emission. GRB 070420 observations would support this idea because there was no X-flare during the optical peak. The nature of the optical plateau of GRB 060904B is less clear and might be related to the late energy injection.

  4. The ultraluminous GRB 110918A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederiks, D. D.; Svinkin, D. S.; Pal' shin, V. D.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Mazets, E. P.; Oleynik, Ph. P.; Tsvetkova, A. E.; Ulanov, M. V.; Kokomov, A. A. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Hurley, K. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); Mangano, V.; Burrows, D. N.; Sbarufatti, B.; Siegel, M. H. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, College Park, PA 16801 (United States); Oates, S. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Cline, T. L.; Krimm, H. A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pagani, C. [University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Mitrofanov, I. G., E-mail: fred@mail.ioffe.ru [Space Research Institute, Profsoyuznaya 84/32, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); and others

    2013-12-20

    GRB 110918A is the brightest long gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Konus-WIND during its almost 19 yr of continuous observations and the most luminous GRB ever observed since the beginning of the cosmological era in 1997. We report on the final Interplanetary Network localization of this event and its detailed multiwavelength study with a number of space-based instruments. The prompt emission is characterized by a typical duration, a moderate peak energy of the time-integrated spectrum, and strong hard-to-soft evolution. The high observed energy fluence yields, at z = 0.984, a huge isotropic-equivalent energy release E {sub iso} = (2.1 ± 0.1) × 10{sup 54} erg. The record-breaking energy flux observed at the peak of the short, bright, hard initial pulse results in an unprecedented isotropic-equivalent luminosity L {sub iso} = (4.7 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 54} erg s{sup –1}. A tail of the soft γ-ray emission was detected with temporal and spectral behavior typical of that predicted by the synchrotron forward-shock model. The Swift/X-Ray Telescope and the Swift/Ultraviolet Optical Telescope observed the bright afterglow from 1.2 to 48 days after the burst and revealed no evidence of a jet break. The post-break scenario for the afterglow is preferred from our analysis, with a hard underlying electron spectrum and interstellar-medium-like circumburst environment implied. We conclude that, among the multiple reasons investigated, the tight collimation of the jet must have been a key ingredient to produce this unusually bright burst. The inferred jet opening angle of 1.°7-3.°4 results in reasonable values of the collimation-corrected radiated energy and the peak luminosity, which, however, are still at the top of their distributions for such tightly collimated events. We estimate a detection horizon for a similar ultraluminous GRB of z ∼ 7.5 for Konus-WIND and z ∼ 12 for the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope, which stresses the importance of GRBs as probes of the early

  5. Circular polarization in the optical afterglow of GRB 121024A

    CERN Document Server

    Wiersema, K; Toma, K; van der Horst, A J; Varela, K; Min, M; Greiner, J; Starling, R L C; Tanvir, N R; Wijers, R A M J; Campana, S; Curran, P A; Fan, Y; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Gomboc, A; Gotz, D; Hjorth, J; Jin, Z P; Kobayashi, S; Kouveliotou, C; Mundell, C; O'Brien, P T; Pian, E; Rowlinson, A; Russell, D M; Salvaterra, R; Alighieri, S di Serego; Tagliaferri, G; Vergani, S D; Elliott, J; Farina, C; Hartoog, O E; Karjalainen, R; Klose, S; Knust, F; Levan, A J; Schady, P; Sudilovski, V; Willingale, R

    2014-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are most probably powered by collimated relativistic outflows (jets) from accreting black holes at cosmological distances. Bright afterglows are produced when the outflow collides with the ambient medium. Afterglow polarization directly probes the magnetic properties of the jet, when measured minutes after the burst, and the geometric properties of the jet and the ambient medium when measured hours to days after the burst. High values of optical polarization detected minutes after burst in GRB 120308A indicate the presence of large-scale ordered magnetic fields originating from the central engine (the power source of the GRB). Theoretical models predict low degrees of linear polarization and negligable circular polarization at late times, when the energy in the original ejecta is quickly transferred to the ambient medium and propagates farther into the medium as a blastwave. Here we report the detection of circularly polarized optical light in the afterglow of GRB 121024A, measured 0.1...

  6. Search for Gravitational Waves Associated with Gamma-Ray Bursts During the First Advanced LIGO Observing Run and Implications for the Origin of GRB 150906B

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Ananyeva, A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Appert, S; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Avila-Alvarez, A; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Beer, C; Bejger, M; Belahcene, I; Belgin, M; Bell, A S; Berger, B K; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Billman, C R; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blackman, J; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bohe, A; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Broida, J E; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Brunett, S; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cabero, M; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Bustillo, J Calder'on; Callister, T A; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Canepa, M; Cannon, K C; Cao, H; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Diaz, J Casanueva; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavagli`a, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Baiardi, L Cerboni; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Cheeseboro, B D; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, H -P; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Chmiel, T; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, A J K; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Cocchieri, C; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conti, L; Cooper, S J; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Covas, P B; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cullen, T J; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Canton, T Dal; D'alya, G; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dasgupta, A; Costa, C F Da Silva; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Davis, D; Daw, E J; Day, B; Day, R; De, S; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Del'eglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Devenson, J; Devine, R C; Dhurandhar, S; D'iaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Girolamo, T; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Doctor, Z; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Dorrington, I; Douglas, R; 'Alvarez, M Dovale; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Eisenstein, R A; Essick, R C; Etienne, Z; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Fauchon-Jones, E J; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Galiana, A Fern'andez; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fong, H; Forsyth, S S; Fournier, J -D; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fries, E M; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H; Gadre, B U; Gaebel, S M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gaur, G; Gayathri, V; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghonge, S; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; Gonz'alez, G; Castro, J M Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Grado, A; Graef, C; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Henry, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J -M; Isi, M; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jim'enez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Junker, J; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Karvinen, K S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; K'ef'elian, F; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, Chunglee; Kim, J C; Kim, Whansun; Kim, W; Kim, Y -M; Kimbrell, S J; King, E J; King, P J; Kirchhoff, R; Kissel, J S; Klein, B; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koch, P; Koehlenbeck, S M; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kr"amer, C; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Kr'olak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lang, R N; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lanza, R K; Lartaux-Vollard, A; Lasky, P D; Laxen, M; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lehmann, J; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Liu, J; Lockerbie, N A; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lovelace, G; L"uck, H; Lundgren, A P; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; Macfoy, S; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magana-Sandoval, F; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; M'arka, S; M'arka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martynov, D V; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Mastrogiovanni, S; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGrath, C; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McRae, T; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E L; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Metzdorff, R; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, A L; Miller, A; Miller, B B; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Muniz, E A M; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Napier, K; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nelemans, G; Nelson, T J N; Neri, M; Nery, M; Neunzert, A; Newport, J M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Noack, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pace, A E; Page, J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perez, C J; Perreca, A; Perri, L M; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O J; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poe, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Pratt, J W W; Predoi, V; Prestegard, T; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L G; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; P"urrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Qiu, S; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajan, C; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Rhoades, E; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Rizzo, M; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosi'nska, D; Rowan, S; R"udiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Sakellariadou, M; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sampson, L M; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Scheuer, J; Schmidt, E; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Sch"onbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Schwalbe, S G; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Setyawati, Y; Shaddock, D A; Shaffer, T J; Shahriar, M S; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sieniawska, M; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, B; Smith, J R; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Spencer, A P; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stevenson, S P; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strigin, S E; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sunil, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepa'nczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; T'apai, M; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thrane, E; Tippens, T; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Toland, K; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Tornasi, Z; Torrie, C I; T"oyr"a, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifir`o, D; Trinastic, J; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Tso, R; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Varma, V; Vass, S; Vas'uth, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Venugopalan, G; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Vicer'e, A; Viets, A D; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D V; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Watchi, J; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wessels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whiting, B F; Whittle, C; Williams, D; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Woehler, J; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, D S; Wu, G; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, Hang; Yu, Haocun; Yvert, M; zny, A Zadro; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zevin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, T; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, S J; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J; Aptekar, R L; Frederiks, D D; Golenetskii, S V; Golovin, D V; Hurley, K; Litvak, M L; Mitrofanov, I G; Rau, A; Sanin, A B; Svinkin, D S; von Kienlin, A; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of the search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected during the first observing run of the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), which took place between September 12, 2015 and January 19, 2016. We perform a modeled search for coalescences of either two neutron stars (NSs) or an NS and a stellar-mass black hole (BH), and a search for unmodeled GW transients using minimal assumptions about the signal morphology. We search for GW signals associated with the 41 GRBs for which LIGO data are available with sufficient duration. We find no evidence of a GW signal for any of them. For all GRBs, we place lower bounds on the distance to the source using the optimistic assumption that GWs with an energy of $10^{-2}M_\\odot c^2$ were emitted at a given frequency, and find a median 90% confidence limit of 71Mpc at 150Hz. For the subset of 19 short-hard GRBs, we place lower bounds on distance with a median 90% confidence limit of 9...

  7. Challenging GRB models through the broadband dataset of GRB060908

    CERN Document Server

    Covino, S; Conciatore, M L; D'Elia, V; Palazzi, E; Thöne, C C; Vergani, S D; Wiersema, K; Brusasca, M; Cucchiara, A; Cobb, B E; Fernandez-Soto, A; Kann, D A; Malesani, D; Tanvir, N R; Antonelli, L A; Bremer, M; Castro-Tirado, A J; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Molinari, E; Nicastro, L; Stefanon, M; Testa, V; Tosti, G; Vitali, F; Amati, L; Chapman, R; Conconi, P; Cutispoto, G; Fynbo, J P U; Goldoni, P; Henriksen, C; Horne, K D; Malaspina, G; Meurs, E J A; Pian, E; Stella, L; Tagliaferri, G; Ward, P; Zerbi, F M

    2010-01-01

    Context: Multiwavelength observations of gamma-ray burst prompt and afterglow emission are a key tool to disentangle the various possible emission processes and scenarios proposed to interpret the complex gamma-ray burst phenomenology. Aims: We collected a large dataset on GRB060908 in order to carry out a comprehensive analysis of the prompt emission as well as the early and late afterglow. Methods: Data from Swift-BAT, -XRT and -UVOT together with data from a number of different ground-based optical/NIR and millimeter telescopes allowed us to follow the afterglow evolution from about a minute from the high-energy event down to the host galaxy limit. We discuss the physical parameters required to model these emissions. Results: The prompt emission of GRB060908 was characterized by two main periods of activity, spaced by a few seconds of low intensity, with a tight correlation between activity and spectral hardness. Observations of the afterglow began less than one minute after the high-energy event, when it ...

  8. Confronting GRB prompt emission with a model for subphotospheric dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlgren, Björn; Nymark, Tanja; Ryde, Felix; Pe'er, Asaf

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still an unsolved problem and several different mechanisms have been suggested. Here we fit Fermi GRB data with a photospheric emission model which includes dissipation of the jet kinetic energy below the photosphere. The resulting spectra are dominated by Comptonization and contain no significant contribution from synchrotron radiation. In order to fit to the data we span a physically motivated part of the model's parameter space and create DREAM ($\\textit{Dissipation with Radiative Emission as A table Model}$), a table model for ${\\scriptsize XSPEC}$. We show that this model can describe different kinds of GRB spectra, including GRB 090618, representing a typical Band function spectrum, and GRB 100724B, illustrating a double peaked spectrum, previously fitted with a Band+blackbody model, suggesting they originate from a similar scenario. We suggest that the main difference between these two types of bursts is the optical depth at the dissipatio...

  9. A New GRB follow-up Software at TUG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dindar, M.; Parmaksizoglu, M.; Helhel, S.; Esenoglu, H.; Kirbiyik, H.

    2016-12-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) optical photometric follow-up system at TUBITAK (Scientic and Technological Research Council of Turkey) National Observatory (TUG) has been planned. It uses the 0.6 m Telescope (T60) and can automatically respond to GRB Coordinates Network (GCN) alerts. The telescopes slew relatively fast, being able to point to a new target field within 30 s upon a request. Whenever available, the 1 m T100 and 2.5 m RTT150 telescopes will be used in the future. As an example in 2015, the GRB software system (will be server side) at T60-telescope responded to GRB alert and started the observation as early as 129 s after the GRB trigger autonomously.

  10. GRB optical and IR rapid follow-up with the 2 m Liverpool Robotic Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Gomboc, A; Carter, D; Mundell, C G; Newsam, A M; Smith, R J; Steele, I A

    2003-01-01

    The Liverpool Telescope, owned and operated by Liverpool John Moores University and situated at Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, is the first 2-m, fully instrumented robotic telescope. We plan to use the LT in conjunction with Gamma Ray Observatories (HETE-2, INTEGRAL, Swift) to study GRB physics. A special over-ride mode will enable observations commencing less than a minute after the GRB alert, including optical and near infrared imaging and spectroscopy. These observations, together with systematic monitoring of the burst through the afterglow, will help to unravel the nature of prompt optical flashes, short bursts, optically dark bursts, redshift distribution, GRB - supernova connection and other questions related to the GRB phenomenon. In particular, the combination of aperture, instrumentation and rapid automated response makes the Liverpool Telescope excellently suited to the investigation of optically dark bursts and currently optically unstudied short bursts.

  11. Gamma-ray bursts at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M.J. Wijers

    1999-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are much brighter than supernovae, and could therefore possibly probe the Universe to high redshift. The presently established GRB redshifts range from 0.83 to 5, and quite possibly even beyond that. Since most proposed mechanisms for GRB link them closely to deaths of massive stars

  12. GRB as a counterpart for Gravitational Wave detection in LCGT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Nobuyuki

    2010-10-01

    Short Gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitors are considered as merger of compact star binaries which consist of neutron stars or blackholes. These compact star binaries will radiate a strong gravitational wave in their coalescence, and gravitational wave detectors aim to detect them. We studied the chance probability of coincidence between GRB and GW detection in LCGT detector. Due to omni-directional acceptance of GW detectors, about 75% of GRB events which closer than cosmological redshift z<0.1 are expected to confirm by GW detection.

  13. A multi band study of the optically dark GRB 051028

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Yuji; Kuo, Ping-Hung; Ip, Wing-Huen; Qiu, Yulei; Masuno, Keisuke; Tashiro, Makoto; Abe, Keichi; Onda, Kaori; Kodaka, Natsuki; Kuwahara, Makoto; Tamagawa, Toru; Usui, Fumihiko; Ioka, Kunihito; Lee, Yi-Hsi; Wei, Jianyan; Deng, Jinsong; Zheng, Weikang; Makishima, Kazuo

    2007-01-01

    Observations were made of the optical afterglow of GRB 051028 with the Lulin observatory's 1.0 m telescope and the WIDGET robotic telescope system. R band photometric data points were obtained on 2005 October 28 (UT), or 0.095-0.180 days after the burst. There is a possible plateau in the optical light curve around 0.1 days after the burst; the light curve resembles optically bright afterglows (e.g. GRB 041006, GRB 050319, GRB060605) in shape of the light curve but not in brightness. The brightness of the GRB 051028 afterglow is 3 magnitudes fainter than that of one of the dark events, GRB 020124. Optically dark GRBs have been attributed to dust extinction within the host galaxy or high redshift. However, the spectrum analysis of the X-rays implies that there is no significant absorption by the host galaxy. Furthermore, according to the model theoretical calculation of the Ly$\\alpha$ absorption to find the limit of GRB 051028's redshift, the expected $R$ band absorption is not high enough to explain the darkn...

  14. The Optical Afterglow of GRB 011211

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, S T; Gladders, M D; Barrientos, L F; Berlind, P; Bersier, D F; Garnavich, P M; Jha, S; Stanek, K Z; Holland, Stephen T.; Gladders, Michael D.; Bersier, David; Garnavich, Peter M.; Jha, Saurabh

    2002-01-01

    We present early-time optical photometry and spectroscopy of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 011211. The spectrum contains several narrow metal lines which are consistent with the burst occurring at a redshift of 2.140 +/- 0.001. The optical afterglow decays as a power law with a slope of 0.83 +/- 0.04 for approximately the first two days after the burst at which time there is evidence for a break. The slope after the break is greater than approximately 1.4. There is evidence for rapid variations in the R-band light approximately 0.5 days after the burst, which suggests that there are density fluctuations near the GRB on spatial scales of approximately 30 to 200 AU. The magnitude of the break in the light curve, and the observed fluence, suggest that the burst expanded into an ambient medium that is homogeneous on large scales with a local particle density between approximately 0.1 and 10 per cubic cm. The total energy in the burst was 1.6-2.4 x 10^50 erg, consistent with the ``standard'' val...

  15. A multi-colour study of the dark GRB 000210 host galaxy and its environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorosabel, J.; Christensen, Lise; Hjorth, J.;

    2003-01-01

    We present UBVRIZJsHKs broad band photometry of the host galaxy of the dark gamma-ray burst (GRB) of February 10, 2000. These observations represent the most exhaustive photometry given to date of any GRB host galaxy. A grid of spectral templates have been fitted to the Spectral Energy Distributi...

  16. Multiwavelength analysis of the intriguing GRB 061126: The reverse shock scenario and magnetization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomboc, A.; Kobayashi, S.; Guidorzi, C.; Melandri, A.; Mangano, V.; Sbarufatti, B.; Mundell, C.G.; Schady, P.; Smith, R.J.; Updike, A.C.; Kann, D.A.; Misra, K.; Rol, E.; Pozanenko, A.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Anupama, G.C.; Bersier, D.; Bode, M.F.; Carter, D.; Curran, P.; Fruchter, A.; Graham, J.; Hartmann, D.H.; Ibrahimov, M.; Levan, A.; Monfardini, A.; Mottram, C.J.; O'Brien, P.T.; Prema, P.; Sahu, D.K.; Steele, I.A.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wiersema, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present a detailed study of the prompt and afterglow emission from Swift GRB 061126 using BAT, XRT, UVOT data and multicolor optical imaging from 10 ground-based telescopes. GRB 061126 was a long burst (T90 = 191 s) with four overlapping peaks in its γ-ray light curve. The X-ray afterglow, observ

  17. The Early Optical Brightening in the GRB 071010B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J H; Schwamb, M E; Huang, K Y; Wen, C Y; Zhang, Z W; Wang, S Y; Chen, W P; Bianco, F B; Dave, R; Lehner, M J; Marshall, S L; Porrata, R; Alcock, C; Byun, Y I; Cook, K H; King, S K; Lee, T; Urata, Y

    2008-04-08

    We report the detection of early (60-230 s) optical emission of the gamma-ray burst afterglow of GRB071010B. No significant correlation with the prompt {gamma}-ray emission was found. Our high time-resolution data combining with other measurements within 2 days after the burst indicate that GRB071010B is composed of a weak early brightening ({alpha} {approx} 0.6), probably caused by the peak frequency passing through the optical wavelengths, followed by a decay ({alpha} {approx} -0.51), attributed to continuous energy injection by patchy jets.

  18. Testing GRB models with the strange afterglow of GRB 090102

    CERN Document Server

    Gendre, B; Palazzi, E; Kruhler, T; Covino, S; Afonso, P; Antonelli, L A; Atteia, J L; D'Avanzo, P; Boër, M; Greiner, J; Klose, S

    2009-01-01

    We present the observations of the afterglow of gamma-ray burst GRB 090102. We use optical data taken by the TAROT, REM, GROND, Palomar and NOT telescopes, and X-ray data taken by the XRT instrument on board the Swift spacecraft. This event features an unusual light curve. In X-rays, it presents a very monotonic decrease with no hint of temporal break from 0.005 to 6 days after the burst. In optical, the light curve presents a flattening after 1 ks. Before this break, the optical light curve is steeper than the X-ray one. In optical, no further break is observed up to 10 days after the burst. We tried to explain these observations in light of the standard fireball model, but we failed to do so. We then investigated several other models, like the cannonball model. We find that the explanation of the broad band data by any model requires a strong fine tuning when taking into account both optical and X-ray bands.

  19. Extremely long hard bursts observed by Konus-Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Pal'shin, V; Frederiks, D; Golenetskii, S; Il'Inskii, V; Mazets, E; Yamaoka, K; Ohno, M; Hurley, K; Sakamoto, T; Oleynik, P; Ulanov, M; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Shinohara, C; Starr, R; 10.1063/1.2943422

    2013-01-01

    We report the observations of the prompt emission of the extremely long hard burst, GRB 060814B, discovered by Konus-Wind and localized by the IPN. The observations reveal a smooth, hard, ~40-min long pulse followed by weaker emission seen several hours after the burst onset. We also present the Konus-Wind data on similar burst, GRB 971208, localized by BATSE/IPN. And finally we discuss the different possible origins of these unusual events.

  20. Multi-wavelength afterglow observations of the high redshift GRB 050730

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    GRB 050730 is a long duration high-redshift burst (z=3.967) discovered by Swift. The afterglow shows variability and is well monitored over a wide wavelength range. We present comprehensive temporal and spectral analysis of the afterglow of GRB 050730 including observations from the millimeter to X-rays. We use multi-wavelength afterglow data to understand the temporal and spectral decay properties with superimposed variability of this high redshift burst. Five telescopes were used to study t...

  1. Probing the bright radio flare and afterglow of GRB 130427A with the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anderson, G.E.; van der Horst, A.J.; Staley, T.D.; Fender, R.P.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Scaife, A.M.M.; Rumsey, C.; Titterington, D.J.; Rowlinson, A.; Saunders, R.D.E.

    2014-01-01

    We present one of the best sampled early-time light curves of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) at radio wavelengths. Using the Arcminute Mircrokelvin Imager (AMI), we observed GRB 130427A at the central frequency of 15.7 GHz between 0.36 and 59.32 d post-burst. These results yield one of the earliest radio d

  2. Implications for the Origin of GRB 070201 from LIGO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Agresti, J.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Amin, R.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arain, M.; Araya, M.; Armandula, H.; Ashley, M.; Aston, S.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Ballmer, S.; Bantilan, H.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barton, M. A.; Bayer, K.; Betzwieser, J.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bhawal, B.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bogue, L.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A.; Brown, D. A.; Bullington, A.; Bunkowski, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burmeister, O.; Busby, D.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cantley, C. A.; Cao, J.; Cardenas, L.; Castaldi, G.; Cepeda, C.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chatterji, S.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Chiadini, F.; Christensen, N.; Clark, J.; Cochrane, P.; Cokelaer, T.; Coldwell, R.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T.; Coyne, D.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Croce, R. P.; Crooks, D. R. M.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Dalrymple, J.; D'Ambrosio, E.; Danzmann, K.; Davies, G.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Degree, M.; Demma, T.; Dergachev, V.; Desai, S.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M.; Dickson, J.; Di Credico, A.; Diederichs, G.; Dietz, A.; Doomes, E. E.; Drever, R. W. P.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dupuis, R. J.; Dwyer, J. G.; Ehrens, P.; Espinoza, E.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Fazi, D.; Fejer, M. M.; Finn, L. S.; Fiumara, V.; Fotopoulos, N.; Franzen, A.; Franzen, K. Y.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fyffe, M.; Galdi, V.; Garofoli, J.; Gholami, I.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Goda, K.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gossler, S.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Gray, M.; Greenhalgh, J.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guenther, M.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hammer, D.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G.; Harstad, E.; Hayler, T.; Heefner, J.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hirose, E.; Hoak, D.; Hosken, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D.; Innerhofer, E.; Ito, M.; Itoh, Y.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kasprzyk, D.; Katsavounidis, E.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalili, F. Ya.; Kim, C.; King, P.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Kozak, D.; Krishnan, B.; Kwee, P.; Lam, P. K.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lazzarini, A.; Lei, M.; Leiner, J.; Leonhardt, V.; Leonor, I.; Libbrecht, K.; Lindquist, P.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Longo, M.; Lormand, M.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Malec, M.; Mandic, V.; Marano, S.; Márka, S.; Markowitz, J.; Maros, E.; Martin, I.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matone, L.; Matta, V.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McHugh, M.; McKenzie, K.; McWilliams, S.; Meier, T.; Melissinos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C. J.; Meyers, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Mohanty, S.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; MowLowry, C.; Moylan, A.; Mudge, D.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murray, P.; Myers, E.; Myers, J.; Nash, T.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Numata, K.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pan, Y.; Papa, M. A.; Parameshwaraiah, V.; Patel, P.; Pedraza, M.; Penn, S.; Pierro, V.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Pletsch, H.; Plissi, M. V.; Postiglione, F.; Prix, R.; Quetschke, V.; Raab, F.; Rabeling, D.; Radkins, H.; Rahkola, R.; Rainer, N.; Rakhmanov, M.; Ramsunder, M.; Ray-Majumder, S.; Re, V.; Rehbein, H.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Ribichini, L.; Riesen, R.; Riles, K.; Rivera, B.; Robertson, N. A.; Robinson, C.; Robinson, E. L.; Roddy, S.; Rodriguez, A.; Rogan, A. M.; Rollins, J.; Romano, J. D.; Romie, J.; Route, R.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruet, L.; Russell, P.; Ryan, K.; Sakata, S.; Samidi, M.; Sancho de la Jordana, L.; Sandberg, V.; Sannibale, V.; Saraf, S.; Sarin, P.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Sato, S.; Saulson, P. R.; Savage, R.; Savov, P.; Schediwy, S.; Schilling, R.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R.; Schutz, B. F.; Schwinberg, P.; Scott, S. M.; Searle, A. C.; Sears, B.; Seifert, F.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Shawhan, P.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Sibley, A.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Sinha, S.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Slutsky, J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, M. R.; Somiya, K.; Strain, K. A.; Strom, D. M.; Stuver, A.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, K.-X.; Sung, M.; Sutton, P. J.; Takahashi, H.

    2008-07-01

    We analyzed the available LIGO data coincident with GRB 070201, a short-duration, hard-spectrum γ-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral arms of the Andromeda galaxy (M31). Possible progenitors of such short, hard GRBs include mergers of neutron stars or a neutron star and a black hole, or soft γ-ray repeater (SGR) flares. These events can be accompanied by gravitational-wave emission. No plausible gravitational-wave candidates were found within a 180 s long window around the time of GRB 070201. This result implies that a compact binary progenitor of GRB 070201, with masses in the range 1 M⊙ 99% confidence. If the GRB 070201 progenitor was not in M31, then we can exclude a binary neutron star merger progenitor with distance D < 3.5 Mpc, assuming random inclination, at 90% confidence. The result also implies that an unmodeled gravitational-wave burst from GRB 070201 most probably emitted less than 4.4 × 10-4 M⊙c2 (7.9 × 1050 ergs) in any 100 ms long period within the signal region if the source was in M31 and radiated isotropically at the same frequency as LIGO's peak sensitivity (f ≈ 150 Hz). This upper limit does not exclude current models of SGRs at the M31 distance.

  3. GRB 030227: The first multiwavelength afterglow of an INTEGRAL GRB

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Gorosabel, J.; Guziy, S.

    2003-01-01

    We present multiwavelength observations of a gamma-ray burst detected by INTEGRAL (GRB 030227) between 5.3 hours and similar to1.7 days after the event. Here we report the discovery of a dim optical afterglow (OA) that would not have been detected by many previous searches due to its faintess (R...... similar to 23). This OA was seen to decline following a power law decay with index alpha(R) = - 0.95 +/- 0.16. The spectral index beta(opt/NIR) yielded - 1.25 +/- 0.14. These values may be explained by a relativistic expansion of a fireball ( with p = 2.0) in the cooling regime. We also find evidence...... for inverse Compton scattering in X-rays....

  4. Evidence of polarisation in the prompt gamma-ray emission from GRB 930131 and GRB 960924

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, D R; Bird, A J; Clark, D J; Dean, A J; McConnell, M L; Moran, L; Shaw, S E; Sguera, V

    2005-01-01

    The true nature of the progenitor to GRBs remains elusive; one characteristic that would constrain our understanding of the GRB mechanism considerably is gamma-ray polarimetry measurements of the initial burst flux. We present a method that interprets the prompt GRB flux as it Compton scatters off the Earth's atmosphere, based on detailed modelling of both the Earth's atmosphere and the orbiting detectors. The BATSE mission aboard the \\textit{CGRO} monitored the whole sky in the 20 keV - 1 MeV energy band continuously from April 1991 until June 2000. We present the BATSE Albedo Polarimetry System (BAPS), and show that GRB 930131 and GRB 960924 provide evidence of polarisation in their prompt flux that is consistent with degrees of polarisation of $\\Pi>35$% and $\\Pi>50$% respectively. While the evidence of polarisation is strong, the method is unable to strongly constrain the degree of polarisation beyond a systematics based estimation. Hence the implications on GRB theory are unclear, and further measurements...

  5. RAPTOR observations of the early optical afterglow from GRB 050319

    CERN Document Server

    Wozniak, P R; Wren, J A; White, R R; Evans, S M; Casperson, D

    2005-01-01

    The RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response (RAPTOR) system at Los Alamos National Laboratory observed GRB 050319 starting 25.4 seconds after gamma-ray emission triggered the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on-board the Swift satellite. Our well sampled light curve of the early optical afterglow is composed of 32 points (derived from 70 exposures) that measure the flux decay during the first hour after the GRB. The GRB 050319 light curve measured by RAPTOR can be described as a relatively gradual flux decline (power-law index alpha = -0.37) with a transition, at about 400 s after the GRB, to a faster flux decay (alpha = -0.91). The addition of other available measurements to the RAPTOR light curve suggests that another emission component emerged after 10^4 s. We hypothesize that the early afterglow emission is powered by extended energy injection or delayed reverse shock emission followed by the emergence of forward shock emission.

  6. XMM-Newton and Swift observations prove GRB 090709A to be a distant, standard, long GRB

    CERN Document Server

    De Luca, A; Israel, G L; Götz, D; Novara, F; Tiengo, A; Mereghetti, S

    2009-01-01

    GRB 090709A is a long gamma-ray burst (GRB) discovered by Swift, featuring a bright X-ray afterglow as well as a faint infrared transient with very red and peculiar colors. The burst attracted a large interest because of a possible quasi-periodicity at P=8.1 s in the prompt emission, suggesting that it could have a different origin with respect to standard, long GRBs. In order to understand the nature of this burst, we obtained a target of opportunity observation with XMM-Newton. X-ray spectroscopy, based on XMM-Newton and Swift data, allowed us to model the significant excess in photoelectric absorption with respect to the Galactic value as due to a large column density (about 6.5E+22 cm^-2) in the GRB host, located at z=4.2. Such a picture is also consistent with the infrared transient's properties. Re-analysis of the prompt emission, based on INTEGRAL and on Swift data, excludes any significant modulation at P=8.1 s. Thus, we conclude that GRB 090709A is a distant, standard, long GRB.

  7. GRB070610 : A Curious Galactic Transient

    CERN Document Server

    Kasliwal, M M; Kulkarni, S R; Cameron, P B; Nakar, E; Ofek, E O; Rau, A; Soderberg, A M; Campana, S; Bloom, J S; Perley, D A; Pollack, L; Barthelmy, S; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H A; Markwardt, C B; Sato, G; Chandra, P; Frail, D; Fox, D B; Price, P; Berger, E; Grebenev, S A; Krivonos, R A; Sunyaev, R A

    2007-01-01

    GRB070610 is a typical high-energy event with a duration of 5s. Yet within the burst localization we detect a highly unusual X-ray and optical transient, Swift J195509.6+261406. We see high amplitude X-ray and optical variability on very short time scales even at late times. Using near-infrared imaging assisted by a laser guide star and adaptive optics, we have identified a quiescent counterpart to Swift J195509.6+261406. Our spectroscopic observations show that the spectral type of the counterpart is likely a K dwarf/sub-giant. It is possible that GRB070610 and Swift J195509.6+261406 are unrelated sources. However, the absence of a typical X-ray afterglow from GRB070610 in conjunction with the spatial and temporal coincidence of GRB070610 and Swift J195509.6+261406 motivate us to suggest that the sources are related. The closest analog to Swift J195509.6+261406 is V4641 Sgr, an unusual black hole binary. We suggest that Swift J195509.6+261406 along with V4641 Sgr define a sub-class of stellar black holes -- ...

  8. Swift and optical observations of GRB 050401

    CERN Document Server

    De Pasquale, M; Barthelmy, S D; Boyd, P; Burrows, D N; Fink, R; Geherls, N; Kobayashi, S; Mason, K O; McNought, R; Nousek, J A; Page, K L; Palmer, D M; Peterson, B A; Price, P A; Rich, J; Roming, P; Rosen, S R; Sakamoto, T; Schimdt, B P; Tüller, J; Wells, A A; Zane, S; Zhang, B; Ziaeepour, H; Pasquale, Massimiliano De; Beardmore, Andy P.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of the analysis of gamma-ray and X-ray data of GRB 050401 taken with the Swift satellite, together with a series of ground-based follow-up observations. The Swift X-ray light curve shows a clear break at about 4900 seconds after the GRB. The decay indices before and after the break are consistent with a scenario of continuous injection of radiation from the 'central engine' of the GRB to the fireball. Alternatively, this behaviour could result if ejecta are released with a range of Lorentz factors with the slower shells catching up the faster at the afterglow shock position. The two scenarios are observationally indistinguishable. The GRB 050401 afterglow is quite bright in the X-ray band but weak in the optical, with an optical to X-ray flux ratio similar to those of 'dark bursts'. We detect a significant amount of absorption in the X-ray spectrum, with N_H = (1.7 +/- 0.2) x 10^22 cm^-2 at a redshift of z=2.9, which is typical of a dense circumbust medium. Such high column density impl...

  9. An HST study of three very faint GRB host galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaunsen, A.O.; Andersen, M.I.; Hjorth, J.;

    2003-01-01

    . (2002). We obtain a revised and much higher probability that the galaxies identified as hosts indeed are related to the GRBs (P(n(chance))=0.69, following Bloom et al. 2002), thereby strengthening the conclusion that GRBs are preferentially located in star-forming regions in their hosts. Apart from......As part of the HST/STIS GRB host survey program we present the detection of three faint gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies based on an accurate localisation using ground-based data of the optical afterglows (OAs). A common property of these three hosts is their extreme faintness. The location...... at which GRBs occur with respect to their host galaxies and surrounding environments are robust indicators of the nature of GRB progenitors. The bursts studied here are among the four most extreme outliers, in terms of relative distance from the host center, in the recent comprehensive study of Bloom et al...

  10. The 1.4 GHZ light curve of GRB 970508

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, TJ; Wijers, RAMJ; Groot, PJ; Strom, RG; De Bruyn, AG; Kouveliotou, C; Robinson, CR; van Paradus, J

    1998-01-01

    We report on Westerbork 1.4 GHz radio observations of the radio counterpart to gamma-ray burst GRB 970508, between 0.80 and 138 days after this event. The 1.4 GHz light curve shows a transition from optically thick to thin emission between 39 and 54 days after the event. We derive the slope p of the

  11. An External Shock Origin of GRB $\\textit{141028A}$

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, J Michael; Ryde, Felix; Omodei, Nicola; Pe'er, Asaf; Racusin, J L; Cucchiara, A

    2015-01-01

    The prompt emission of the long, smooth, and single-pulsed gamma-ray burst, GRB $\\textit{141028A}$, is analyzed under the guise of an external shock model. First, we fit the $\\gamma$-ray spectrum with a two-component photon model, namely synchrotron+blackbody, and then fit the recovered evolution of the synchrotron $\

  12. Shocked by GRB 970228: the afterglow of a cosmological fireball

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Rees, M.J.; Meszaros, P.

    1997-01-01

    The location accuracy of the BeppoSAX Wide Field Cameras and acute ground-based follow-up have led to the detection of a decaying afterglow in X-rays and optical light following the classical gamma-ray burst GRB 970228. The afterglow in X-rays and optical light fades as a power law at all wavelength

  13. Physics of the GRB 030328 afterglow and its environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maiorano, E.; Masetti, N.; Palazzi, E.; Savaglio, S.; Rol, E.; Vreeswijk, P.M.; Pian, E.; Price, P.A.; Peterson, B.A.; Jelínek, M.; Amati, L.; Andersen, M.I.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Castro Cerón, J.M.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Frontera, F.; Fruchter, A.S.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Gorosabel, J.; Henden, A.A.; Hjorth, J.; Jensen, B.L.; Klose, S.; Kouveliotou, C.; Masi, G.; Møller, P.; Nicastro, L.; Ofek, E.O.; Pandey, S.B.; Rhoads, J.E.; Tanvir, N.R.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; van den Heuvel, E.P.J.

    2006-01-01

    Aims.To investigate the physical nature of the afterglow emission. We report on the photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric observations of the optical afterglow of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 030328 detected by HETE-2. Methods.Photometric, spectroscopic and polarimetric monitoring of the optical afte

  14. Spectroscopy of the short-hard GRB 130603B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postigo, A. de Ugarte; Thoene, C. C.; Rowlinson, A.;

    2014-01-01

    Short duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are thought to be related to the violent merger of compact objects, such as neutron stars or black holes, which makes them promising sources of gravitational waves. The detection of a 'kilonova'-like signature associated to the Swift-detected GRB 130603B has...

  15. GRB 060218 and the binaries as progenitors of GRB-SN systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; Guida, Roberto; Ruffini, Remo

    2007-01-01

    (shortened) We study the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 060218: a particularly close source at z=0.033 with an extremely long duration, namely T_{90} ~ 2000 s, related to SN 2006aj. [...] I present the fitting time consuming procedure. In order to show its sensitivity I also present two examples of fits with the same value of B and different value of E_{e^\\pm}^{tot}. We fit the X- and \\gamma-ray observations by Swift of GRB 060218 in the 0.1-150 keV energy band during the entire time of observations from 0 all the way to 10^6 s within a unified theoretical model. The free parameters of our theory are only three, namely the total energy E_{e\\pm}^{tot} of the e^\\pm plasma, its baryon loading B \\equiv M_Bc^2/E_{e\\pm}^{tot}, as well as the CircumBurst Medium (CBM) distribution. We justify the extremely long duration of this GRB by a total energy E_{e\\pm}^{tot} = 2.32\\times 10^{50} erg, a very high value of the baryon loading B=1.0\\times 10^{-2} and the effective CircumBurst Medium (CBM) density which shows a radial depend...

  16. The HAWC GRB Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennarz, D.; Taboada, I.

    2016-10-01

    HAWC is a very-high-energy gamma-ray extensive air shower detector located in central Mexico at an altitude of 4,100 m above sea level. This contribution summarises recent results of the HAWC GRB programme.

  17. The Glast Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meegan, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) will include a secondary instrument to augment the observatory's capabilities for GRB studies. The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBK is a collaboration between Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Huntsville, Alabama, and the Max Plank Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics. The purpose of the GBM is to extend energy coverage below the main instrument's lower limit of about 20 MeV, and to provide an on-board burst trigger and approximate location. The instrument consists of twelve NaI detectors and two BGO detectors. This combination provides energy coverage from a few keV up to about 30 MeV.

  18. On the constraining observations of the dark GRB 001109 and the properties of a z=0.398 radio selected starburst galaxy contained in its error box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceron, J.M.C.; Gorosabel, J.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.;

    2004-01-01

    We present optical and NIR (near infrared) follow up observations of the GRB 001109 from 1 to 300 days after the burst. No transient emission was found at these wavelengths within this GRB's (Gamma Ray Burst) 50" radius BeppoSAX error box. Strong limits (3sigma) are set with: Rgreater than...... or similar to21, 10.2 h after the GRB; Igreater than or similar to23, 11.4 h after the GRB; Hgreater than or similar to20.7, 9.9 h after the GRB; and K(S)greater than or similar to20, 9.6 h after the GRB. We discuss whether the radio source found in the GRB's error box (Taylor et al. 2000) might be related...

  19. GRB 131014A: a Laboratory to Study the Thermal-Like and Non-Thermal Emissions in Gamma-Ray Bursts, and the new L$_\\mathrm{i}^\\mathrm{nTh}$-E$_\\mathrm{peak,i}^\\mathrm{nTh,rest}$ relation

    CERN Document Server

    Guiriec, S; Piran, T; Daigne, F; Kouveliotou, C; Racusin, J; Gehrels, N; McEnery, J

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has been accumulated on the existence of a thermal-like component during the prompt phase of GRBs. This component, often associated with the GRB jet's photosphere, is usually subdominant compared to a much stronger non-thermal one. The prompt emission of Fermi GRB 131014A provides a unique opportunity to study this thermal-like component. Indeed, the thermal emission in GRB 131014A is much more intense than in other GRBs and a pure thermal episode is observed during the initial 0.16 s. The thermal-like component cools monotonically during the first second while the non-thermal emission kicks off. The intensity of the non-thermal component progressively increases until being energetically dominant at late time. This is a perfect scenario to disentangle the thermal component from the non-thermal one. A low-energy spectral index of +0.6 better fit the thermal component than the typical index value +1 corresponding to a pure Planck function. The non-thermal component is adequately fitted with a Band func...

  20. The red optical afterglow of GRB 030725

    CERN Document Server

    Pugliese, G; Gorosabel, J; Jensen, B L; Fynbo, J P U; Hjorth, J; Jorgensen, S F; Monard, B; Vinter, C

    2005-01-01

    We present a photometric study of the optical counterpart of the long-duration Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 030725, which triggered the HETE FREGATE and WXM instruments on July 25th, 2003, and lasted more than 160s. An optical counterpart was identified at the Bronberg Observatory in South Africa about 7 hours after the burst occurred. The optical afterglow (OA) was observed between 4 and 15 days after the burst with the 1.54m Danish telescope at La Silla in the V, Rc, and Ic bands. We fit a broken power law to the data and determine a break time in the light curve between 16 hours and 4.7 days after the first detection of the burst. The decay slope is alpha1 = -0.59 +0.59/-0.44 before and alpha2 = -1.43 +/- 0.06 after the break. A bump may be present in the light curve, only significant at the 2-sigma level, 13.9 days after the main burst. The spectral slope of the OA, measured 12 days after the burst, is -2.9 +/- 0.6 , i.e. it falls in the extreme red end of the distribution of previous OA spectral slopes. Observa...

  1. Correlated optical and gamma emissions from GRB 081126

    CERN Document Server

    Klotz, Alain; Atteia, J L; Boër, Michel; Coward, David M; Imerito, Alan C

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of time-resolved optical emissions observed from the gamma-ray burst GRB 081126 during the prompt phase. The analysis employed time-resolved photometry using optical data obtained by the TAROT telescope, using BAT data from the Swift spacecraft, and time-resolved spectroscopy at high energies from the GBM instrument onboard the Fermi spacecraft. The optical emission of GRB 081126 is found to be compatible with the second gamma emission pulse shifted by a positive time lag of 8.4 $\\pm$ 3.9 s. This is the first well-resolved observation of a time lag between optical and gamma emissions during a gamma-ray burst. Our observations could potentially provide new constraints on the fireball model for gamma-ray burst early emissions. Furthermore, observations of time lags between optical and gamma ray photons provides an exciting opportunity to constrain quantum gravity theories.

  2. Fireball and cannonball models of gamma ray bursts confront observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dar, Arnon

    2005-01-01

    The two leading contenders for the theory of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows, the Fireball and Cannonball models, are compared and their predictions are confronted, within space limitations, with key GRB observations, including recent observations with SWIFT

  3. Constraints on Very High Energy Emission from GRB 130427A

    CERN Document Server

    Aliu, E; Barnacka, A; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Berger, K; Biteau, J; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cardenzana, J V; Cerruti, M; Chen, X; Ciupik, L; Connaughton, V; Cui, W; Dickinson, H J; Eisch, J D; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Federici, S; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Fleischhack, H; Fortin, P; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gillanders, G H; Griffin, S; Griffiths, S T; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Håkansson, N; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Johnson, C A; Kaaret, P; Kar, P; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Meagher, K; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nieto, D; de Bhróithe, A O'Faoláin; Ong, R A; Otte, A N; Park, N; Pohl, M; Popkow, A; Prokoph, H; Pueschel, E; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Rajotte, J; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Richards, G T; Roache, E; Sembroski, G H; Shahinyan, K; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Tucci, J V; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Wakely, S P; Weiner, O M; Weinstein, A; Welsing, R; Wilhelm, A; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B; McEnery, J E; Perkins, J S; Veres, P; Zhu, S

    2014-01-01

    Prompt emission from the very fluent and nearby (z=0.34) gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A was detected by several orbiting telescopes and by ground-based, wide-field-of-view optical transient monitors. Apart from the intensity and proximity of this GRB, it is exceptional due to the extremely long-lived high-energy (100 MeV to 100 GeV) gamma-ray emission, which was detected by the Large Area Telescope on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope for ~70 ks after the initial burst. The persistent, hard-spectrum, high-energy emission suggests that the highest-energy gamma rays may have been produced via synchrotron self-Compton processes though there is also evidence that the high-energy emission may instead be an extension of the synchrotron spectrum. VERITAS, a ground-based imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescope array, began follow-up observations of GRB 130427A ~71 ks (~20 hr) after the onset of the burst. The GRB was not detected with VERITAS; however, the high elevation of the observations, coupled with the low redsh...

  4. Template Reproduction of GRB Pulse Light Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkila, Jon E.; Preece, R. D.; Loredo, T. J.; Wolpert, R. L.; Broadbent, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    A study of well-isolated pulses in gamma ray burst light curves indicates that simple models having smooth and monotonic pulse rises and decays are inadequate. Departures from the Norris et al. (2005) pulse shape are in the form of a wave-like pre-peak residual that is mirrored and stretched following the peak. Pulse shape departures are present in GRB pulses of all durations, but placement of the departures relative to pulse peaks correlates with asymmetry. This establishes an additional link between temporal structure and spectral evolution, as pulse asymmetry is related to initial hardness while pulse duration indicates the rate of hard-to-soft pulse evolution.

  5. The Structure and Dynamics of GRB Jets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-10-25

    There are several lines of evidence which suggest that the relativistic outflows in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are collimated into narrow jets. The jet structure has important implications for the true energy release and the event rate of GRBs, and can constrain the mechanism responsible for the acceleration and collimation of the jet. Nevertheless, the jet structure and its dynamics as it sweeps up the external medium and decelerates, are not well understood. In this review I discuss our current understanding of GRB jets, stressing their structure and dynamics.

  6. Time-resolved GRB spectra in the complex radiation of synchrotron and Compton processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y. G.; Hu, S. M.; Chen, X.; Li, K.; Guo, D. F.; Li, Y. T.; Li, H. Z.; Zhao, Y. Y.; Lin, H. N.; Chang, Z.

    2016-03-01

    Under the steady-state condition, the spectrum of electrons is investigated by solving the continuity equation under the complex radiation of both the synchrotron and Compton processes. The resulted gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectrum is a broken power law in both the fast and slow cooling phases. On the basis of this electron spectrum, the spectral indices of the Band function in four different phases are presented. In the complex radiation frame, the detail investigation on physical parameters reveals that three models can answer the α ˜ -1 problem, which are the synchrotron plus synchrotron self-Compton in the internal and the external shock models, and the synchrotron plus the external Compton processes in the external shock model. A possible marginal to fast cooling phase transition in GRB 080916C is discussed. The time-resolved spectra in different main pulses of GRB 100724B, GRB 100826A and GRB 130606B are investigated. We found that the flux is proportional to the peak energy in almost all main pulses. A significant (5σ) correlation for Fp ˜ Ep is evident the first main pulse of GRB 100826A, and three marginally significant (3σ) correlations Fp ˜ Ep are found in main pulses of GRB 100826A and GRB 130606B. The correlation between spectral index and Ep at 3 ˜ 4σ level are observed in the first main pulse of GRB 100826A. Such correlations are possible explained in the complex radiation scenario.

  7. Constraining GRB progenitors environment with Swift XRT

    CERN Document Server

    Saez, Dounia

    2015-01-01

    The characteristics of the Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) environment may reflect the differences in GRB progenitors: long GRBs are expected to be found in high-density star-forming regions of the GRB host galaxies, while short ones may be associated with an older stellar population that may have had the time to travel far from stellar forming regions in potentially lower density regions. The latter is related to the hypothesis that short GRBs are associated to the merging of compact objects (BH-NS or NS-NS). We used the Swift XRT GRB afterglow archive to compare the intrinsic neutral hydrogen column density values for long and short GRBs within the redshift range 0.1- 1.3, performing a coherent analysis, and excluding from our analysis observations with poor statistics, which reduced our sample to 15 short GRBs. While short GRBs effectively show a median absorption value smaller than long ones the result is not statistically significant. In order to increase our sample we added short GRBs without redshift measure, ...

  8. The pulse luminosity function of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral-Rogers, A.; Willingale, R.; O'Brien, P. T.

    2017-01-01

    The complete Swift Burst Alert Telescope and X-Ray Telescope light curves of 118 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshifts were fitted using the physical model of GRB pulses by Willingale et al. to produce a total of 607 pulses. We compute the pulse luminosity function utilizing three GRB formation rate models: a progenitor that traces the cosmic star formation rate density (CSFRD) with either a single population of GRBs, coupled to various evolutionary parameters, or a bimodal population of high- and low-luminosity GRBs; and a direct fit to the GRB formation rate excluding any a priori assumptions. We find that a single population of GRB pulses with an evolving luminosity function is preferred over all other univariate evolving GRB models, or bimodal luminosity functions in reproducing the observed GRB pulse L-z distribution and that the magnitude of the evolution in brightness is consistent with studies that utilize only the brightest GRB pulses. We determine that the appearance of a GRB formation rate density evolution component is an artefact of poor parametrization of the CSFRD at high redshifts rather than indicating evolution in the formation rate of early epoch GRBs. We conclude that the single brightest region of a GRB light curve holds no special property; by incorporating pulse data from the totality of GRB emission we boost the GRB population statistics by a factor of 5, rule out some models utilized to explain deficiencies in GRB formation rate modelling, and constrain more tightly some of the observed parameters of GRB behaviour.

  9. The spatially resolved host of GRB 060505 and implications for the nature of the progenitor

    CERN Document Server

    Thoene, Christina C

    2007-01-01

    We present a study of the host galaxy of the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) of May 5 2006 (GRB 060505). The host is spatially resolved in both imaging data and in a long slit spectrum including the GRB site. We find the galaxy to be a Sbc spiral, which is unusual for a long GRB host galaxy. The site of the GRB is considerably different from the rest of the galaxy with intense star formation, low metallicity and a young age. This suggest a massive stellar progenitor rather than a merger of compact objects which has been suggested based on the the relatively short duration of T_90=4s for the prompt emission.

  10. Spectroscopic Discovery of the Supernova Associated with GRB 030329

    CERN Document Server

    Stanek, K Z; Garnavich, P M; Martini, P; Caldwell, P B N; Challis, P M; Brown, W; Schild, R; Krisciunas, K; Calkins, M L; Lee, J C; Hathi, N; Jansen, R; Windhorst, R A; Echevarria, L; Eisenstein, D J; Pindor, B; Olszewski, E W; Harding, P; Bersier, D F

    2003-01-01

    We present early observations of the afterglow of the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 030329 and the spectroscopic discovery of its associated supernova. We obtained spectra of the afterglow of GRB 030329 each night from March 30.12 (0.6 days after the burst) to April 8.13 (UT) (9.6 days after the burst). The spectra cover a wavelength range of 350 nm to 850 nm. The early spectra consist of a power-law continuum (F_{nu} ~ nu^{-0.9}) with narrow emission lines originating from HII regions in the host galaxy, indicating a low redshift of z=0.1687. However, our spectra taken after 2003 Apr. 5 show broad peaks in flux characteristic of a supernova. Correcting for the afterglow emission, we find the spectrum of the supernova is remarkably similar to the type Ic `hypernova' SN 1998bw. While the presence of supernovae have been inferred from the light curves and colors of GRB afterglows in the past, this is the first direct, spectral confirmation that a subset of classical gamma-ray bursts originate from supernovae.

  11. Discovery of Early Optical Emission from GRB 021211

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, D W; Soderberg, A M; Berger, E; Kulkarni, S R; Sari, R; Frail, D A; Harrison, F A; Yost, S A; Matthews, K; Peterson, B A; Tanaka, I; Christiansen, J; Moriarty-Schieven, G H

    2003-01-01

    We report our discovery and early time optical, near-infrared, and radio wavelength follow-up observations of the afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 021211. Our optical observations, beginning 21 min after the burst trigger, demonstrate that the early afterglow of this burst is roughly three magnitudes fainter than the afterglow of GRB 990123 at similar epochs, and fainter than almost all known afterglows at an epoch of 1d after the GRB. Our near-infrared and optical observations indicate that this is not due to extinction. Combining our observations with data reported by other groups, we identify the signature of a reverse shock. This reverse shock is not detected to a 3-sigma limit of 110 uJy in an 8.46-GHz VLA observation at t=0.10d, implying either that the Lorentz factor of the burst gamma ~ 1 week, we find that the late-time radio flux is suppressed by a factor of two relative to the >~ 80 uJy peak flux at optical wavelengths. This suppression is not likely to be due to synchrotron self-absorption or ...

  12. GRB Cosmology and Self-organized Criticality in GRBs

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which have isotropic energy up to $10^{54}$ erg, would be the ideal tool to study the properties of early universe: including dark energy, star formation rate, and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. We will briefly review the progress on the field of GRB cosmology. Meanwhile, X-ray flares, which may have important clues to the central engine, are common phenomena in the GRB afterglows. We present statistical results of X-ray flares, i.e., energy, duration time and waiting time distributions, and compare the results with solar flares. The similarity between the two kinds of flares are found, which may indicates that the physical mechanism of GRB X-ray flares is magnetic reconnection.

  13. High Precision Analyses of Lyman alpha Damping Wing of Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Reionization Era: On the Controversial Results from GRB 130606A at z = 5.91

    CERN Document Server

    Totani, Tomonori; Hattori, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    The unprecedentedly bright afterglow of GRB 130606A at z = 5.91 gave us a unique opportunity to probe the reionization era by high precision analyses of the redward damping wing of Lyman alpha absorption, but the reported constraints on the neutral hydrogen fraction (f_{HI}) in intergalactic medium (IGM) derived from spectra taken by different telescopes are in contradiction. Here we examine the origin of this discrepancy by analyzing the spectrum taken by VLT with our own analysis code previously used to fit the Subaru spectrum. Though the VLT team reported no evidence for IGM HI using the VLT spectrum, we confirmed our previous result of 3-4 sigma preference for non-zero IGM HI (f_{HI} ~ 0.06, when IGM HI extends to the GRB redshift). The fit residuals of the VLT spectrum by the model without IGM HI show the same systematic trend as the Subaru spectrum. We consider that the likely origin of the discrepancy between the two teams is the difference of the wavelength ranges adopted in the fittings; our waveleng...

  14. The optical afterglow and host galaxy of GRB 000926

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fynbo, J.U.; Gorosabel, J.; Dall, T.H.;

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we illustrate with the case of GRB 000926 how Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) can be used as cosmological lighthouses to identify and study star forming galaxies at high redshifts. The optical afterglow of the burst was located with optical imaging at the Nordic Optical Telescope 20.7 hours...... after the burst. Rapid follow-up spectroscopy allowed the determination of the redshift of the burst and a measurement of the host galaxy HI-column density in front of the burst. With late-time narrow band Lyalpha as well as broad band imaging, we have studied the emission from the host galaxy and found...... that it is a strong Lyalpha emitter in a state of active star formation....

  15. The GRB afterglow onset observed by REM: fireball Lorentz factor and afterglow fluence

    CERN Document Server

    Malesani, Daniele; Vergani, Susanna; Covino, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    We report observations of the early light curves of GRB 060418 and GRB 060607A, carried out with the pink robotic telescope REM. A clear peak is detected for both events, which is interpreted as the onset of the afterglow, that is the time at which the fireball starts decelerating. This detection allows to directly measure the initial fireball Lorentz factor, which was found to be Gamma_0 ~ 400 for both events, fully confirming the ultrarelativistic nature of gamma-ray burst fireballs. Sampling the light curve before the peak also allows to compute the bolometric fluence of the afterglow, which is 16% of the prompt one in the case of GRB 060418.

  16. The host of the SN-less GRB 060505 in high resolution

    CERN Document Server

    Thöne, C C; Prochaska, J X; Bloom, J S; Gorosabel, J; Fynbo, J P U; Jakobsson, P; Fruchter, A S

    2014-01-01

    The spiral host galaxy of GRB 060505 at z=0.089 was the site of a puzzling long duration burst without an accompanying supernova. Studies of the burst environment by Th\\"one et al. (2008) suggested that this GRB came from the collapse of a massive star and that the GRB site was a region with properties different from the rest of the galaxy. We reobserved the galaxy in high spatial resolution using the VIMOS integral-field unit (IFU) at the VLT with a spaxel size of 0.67 arcsec. Furthermore, we use long slit high resolution data from HIRES/Keck at two different slit positions covering the GRB site, the center of the galaxy and an HII region next to the GRB region. We compare the properties of different HII regions in the galaxy with the GRB site and study the global and local kinematic properties of this galaxy. The resolved data show that the GRB site has the lowest metallicity in the galaxy with around 1/3 Z_solar, but its specific SFR (SSFR) of 7.4 M_solar/yr/L/L* and age (determined by the Halpha EW) are s...

  17. The Redshift of the Optical Transient Associated with GRB 010222

    CERN Document Server

    Jha, S; Garnavich, P M; Calkins, M L; Kilgard, R E; Matheson, T; McDowell, J C; Roll, J B; Stanek, K Z; Jha, Saurabh; Pahre, Michael A.; Garnavich, Peter M.; Calkins, Michael L.; Kilgard, Roy E.; Matheson, Thomas; Dowell, Jonathan C. Mc; Roll, John B.; Stanek, Krzysztof Z.

    2001-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) 010222 is the brightest GRB detected to date by the BeppoSAX satellite. Prompt identification of the associated optical transient (OT) allowed for spectroscopy with the Tillinghast 1.5m telescope at F. L. Whipple Observatory while the source was still relatively bright (R ~ 18.6 mag), within five hours of the burst. The OT shows a blue continuum with many superimposed absorption features corresponding to metal lines at z = 1.477, 1.157, and possibly also at 0.928. The redshift of GRB 010222 is therefore unambiguously placed at z >= 1.477. The high number of Mg II absorbers and especially the large equivalent widths of the Mg II, Mg I, and Fe II absorption lines in the z = 1.477 system further argue either for a very small impact parameter or that the z = 1.477 system is the GRB host galaxy itself. The spectral index of the OT is relatively steep, beta = 0.89 +/- 0.03, and this cannot be caused by dust with a standard Galactic extinction law in the z = 1.477 absorption system. This sp...

  18. WIDGET: System Performance and GRB Prompt Optical Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Yuji; Tamagawa, Toru; Usui, Fumihiko; Kuwahara, Makoto; Lin, Hungmiao; Kageyama, Shoichi; Iwakiri, Wataru; Sugasahara, Takako; Takahara, Kazuki; Kodaka, Natsuki; Abe, Keiichi; Masuno, Keisuke; Onda, Kaori

    2010-01-01

    The WIDeField telescope for Gamma-ray burst Early Timing (WIDGET) is used for a fully automated, ultra-wide-field survey aimed at detecting the prompt optical emission associated with Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). WIDGET surveys the HETE-2 and Swift/BAT pointing directions covering a total field of view of 62 degree x 62 degree every 10 secounds using an unfiltered system. This monitoring survey allows exploration of the optical emission before the gamma-ray trigger. The unfiltered magnitude is well converted to the SDSS r' system at a 0.1 mag level. Since 2004, WIDGET has made a total of ten simultaneous and one pre-trigger GRB observations. The efficiency of synchronized observation with HETE-2 is four times better than that of Swift. There has been no bright optical emission similar to that from GRB 080319B. The statistical analysis implies that GRB080319B is a rare event. This paper summarizes the design and operation of the WIDGET system and the simultaneous GRB observations obtained with this instrument.

  19. LOTIS Upper Limits and the Prompt OT from GRB 990123

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G G; Hartmann, D H; Park, H S; Porrata, R A; Ables, E; Bionta, R; Band, D L; Barthelmy, S D; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Ferguson, D H; Fishman, G; Kippen, R M; Kouveliotou, C; Hurley, K; Nemiroff, R; Sasseen, T

    2000-08-10

    GRB 990123 established the existence of prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The Livermore Optical Transient Imaging System (LOTIS) has been conducting a fully automated search for this kind of simultaneous low energy emission from GRBs since October 1996. Although LOTIS has obtained simultaneous, or near simultaneous, coverage of the error boxes obtained with BATSE, IPN, XTE, and BeppoSAX for several GRBs, image analysis resulted in only upper limits. The unique gamma-ray properties of GRB 990123, such as very large fluence (top 0.4%) and hard spectrum, complicate comparisons with more typical bursts. We scale and compare gamma-ray properties, and in some cases afterglow properties, from the best LOTIS events to those of GRB 990123 in an attempt to determine whether the prompt optical emission of this event is representative of all GRBs. Furthermore, using LOTIS upper limits in conjunction with the relativistic blast wave model, we weakly constrain the GRB and afterglow parameters such as density of the circumburster medium and bulk Lorentz factor of the ejecta.

  20. Radio rebrightening of the GRB afterglow by the accompanying supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Duran, Rodolfo Barniol

    2015-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet powers the afterglow emission by shocking the surrounding medium, and radio afterglow can now be routinely observed to almost a year after the explosion. Long-duration GRBs are accompanied by supernovae (SNe) that typically contain much more energy than the GRB jet. Here we consider the fact that the SN blast wave will also produce its own afterglow, which will peak at much later time (since it is non-relativistic), when the SN blast wave transitions from a coasting phase to a decelerating Sedov-Taylor phase. We predict that this component will peak generally a few tens of years after the explosion and it will outshine the GRB powered afterglow well-before its peak emission. In the case of GRB 030329, where the external density is constrained by the $\\sim 10$-year coverage of the radio GRB afterglow, the radio emission is predicted to start rising over the next decade and to continue to increase for the following decades up to a level of $\\sim 0.5$ mJy. Detection of the SN-powere...

  1. The Diversity and Versatility of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskar, Tanmoy

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, thus providing a unique laboratory for the study of extreme astrophysical processes. In parallel, their large luminosity makes GRBs a premier probe of the early Universe. My thesis has explored and exploited both aspects of GRB science by addressing the following fundamental open questions: 1) what is the nature of the GRB ejecta?, 2) how does the GRB progenitor population evolve with redshift, and 3) how can GRBs be used to probe the high-redshift Universe? To answer these questions, I present the first multi-wavelength detection and modeling of a GRB reverse shock, a comprehensive analysis of the plateau phase of GRB light curves, studies of the evolution of the progenitor population to redshifts, z~9, and demonstrate the use of GRBs as probes of galaxy formation and evolution through the first galaxy mass-metallicity relation at z~3-5. I find support for baryonic ejecta in GRB 130427A, evidence that GRB jets contain a large amount of energy in slow-moving ejecta, and proof that the GRB progenitor population does not evolve to the highest redshifts at which it has yet been observed. Building on the decade of observations by the Swift GRB mission, future observations and modeling of GRBs and their host galaxies will provide clues to these and other open questions in GRB science, allowing for the first statistical studies of their progenitors and host environments to the epoch of reionization and beyond.

  2. High-precision analyses of Lyα damping wing of gamma-ray bursts in the reionization era: On the controversial results from GRB 130606A at z = 5.91

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totani, Tomonori; Aoki, Kentaro; Hattori, Takashi; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    The unprecedentedly bright afterglow of Swift GRB 130606A at z = 5.91 gave us a unique opportunity to probe the reionization era through high-precision analyses of the redward damping wing of Lyα absorption, but the reported constraints on the neutral hydrogen fraction (f_{H I}) in intergalactic medium (IGM) derived from spectra taken by different telescopes are in contradiction to each other. Here we examine the origin of this discrepancy by analyzing the spectrum taken by the Very Large Telescope (VLT) with our own analysis code previously used to fit the Subaru spectrum. Though the VLT team reported no evidence for IGM H I using the VLT spectrum, we confirm our previous result of preferring non-zero IGM H I (the best fit f_{H I} ˜ 0.06, when IGM H I extends to the GRB redshift). The fit residuals of the VLT spectrum using the model without IGM H I show the same systematic trend as the Subaru spectrum. We consider that the likely origin of the discrepancy between the two teams is the difference of the wavelength ranges adopted in the fittings; our wavelength range is wider than that of the VLT team, and also we avoided the shortest wavelength range of deep Lyα absorption (λobs < 8426 Å), because this region is dominated by H I in the host galaxy and the systematic uncertainty about host H I velocity distribution is large. We also study the sensitivity of these results to the adopted Lyα cross-section formulae, ranging from the classical Lorentzian function to the most recent one taking into account fully quantum mechanical scattering. It is found that the preference for non-zero IGM H I is robust against the choice of the cross-section formulae, but it is quantitatively not negligible and hence one should be careful in future analyses.

  3. Time resolved spectroscopy of GRB 030501 using INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beckmann, V.; Borkowski, J.; Courvoisier, T.J.L.;

    2003-01-01

    The gamma-ray instruments on-board INTEGRAL offer an unique opportunity to perform time resolved analysis on GRBs. The imager IBIS allows accurate positioning of GRBs and broad band spectral analysis, while SPI provides high resolution spectroscopy. GRB 030501 was discovered by the INTEGRAL Burst...... Alert System in the ISGRI field of view. Although the burst was fairly weak (fluence F20-200 keV similar or equal to 3.5x10(-6) erg cm(-2)) it was possible to perform time resolved spectroscopy with a resolution of a few seconds. The GRB shows a spectrum in the 20-400 keV range which is consistent...

  4. The Enigma of the Strong MgII Absorbers along the GRB Sightlines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, Antonino; Charlton, J.; Jones, T.; Fox, D. B.; Narayan, A.; Narayan, A.

    2009-01-01

    The startling result of Prochter & Prochaska (2006) that the incidence of strong MgII absorbers (equivalent width EW(2796Å) > 1 Å) along gamma-ray burst (GRB) sightlines is four times larger (dN/dzGR=0.90) than for quasar sightlines (dN/dzQSO=0.24) has yet to be understood. In particular, explanations relating to dust bias in quasar samples, partial covering of quasars, and lensing amplification of the GRB beam all fail to satisfy basic observational constraints. We are currently engaged in an effort to explore this mystery using archival VLT/UVES (R=45,000) quasar and afterglow spectra. Identifying strong MgII absorbers in a uniform and statistically complete manner, we have compiled a sample of 28 absorbers toward 81 quasars and 9 absorbers toward 6 GRB afterglows. We explore the kinematics of the absorbers, the abundances of other metal species, and the strength of dust depletion in the GRB and QSO samples. We fail to identify any respects in which 75% of the GRB line-of-sight absorbers can be distinguished from the other members of the GRB and QSO absorber populations. We consider whether this finding rules out the possibility of an intrinsic high-velocity (v 0.2 c) GRB or GRB host-related origin for the excess absorbers, and conclude that it does not.

  5. Spectroscopic Observations of the Bright Afterglow of GRB021004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Fiona

    2001-09-01

    One of the holy grails of gamma-ray burst research is to detect X-ray line signatures from an afterglow with high statistical significance. Of all possible observations, this perhaps offers the best chance of constraining the GRB mechanism and environment, and could provide the "smoking gun" signature connecting GRBs to massive stellar deaths. In order to accomplish this, we know long observations within one day of the event are necessary.

  6. GRB060602B = Swift J1749.4−2807: an unusual transiently accreting neutron-star X-ray binary

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, R.; Rol, E.; Cackett, E.; Starling, R.L.C.; Remillard, R.A.

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and X-ray telescope (XRT) data of GRB060602B, which is most likely an accreting neutron star in a binary system and not a gamma-ray burst. Our analysis shows that the BAT burst spectrum is consistent with a thermonuclear flash (type I X

  7. H.E.S.S. Observations of the Prompt and Afterglow Phases of GRB 060602B

    CERN Document Server

    Aharonian, F; Barresde Almeida, U; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Behera, B; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bernlöhr, K; Boisson, C; Borrel, V; Braun, I; Brion, E; Brucker, J; Buhler, R; Bulik, T; Büsching, I; Boutelier, T; Carrigan, S; Chadwick, P M; Chaves, R; Chounet, L M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Cornils, R; Costamante, L; Dalton, M; Degrange, B; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Atai, A; Domainko, W; O'Connor-Drury, L; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Egberts, K; Emmanoulopoulos, D; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Feinstein, F; Fiasson, A; Förster, A; Fontaine, G; Fussling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Goret, P; Hadjichristidis, C; Hauser, D; Hauser, M; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; De Jager, O C; Jung, I; Katarzy, K; Kendziorra, E; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Kh, B; Keogh, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Lamanna, G; Latham, I J; Lenain, J P; Lohse, T; Martin, J M; Martineau-Huynh, O; Marcowith, A; Masterson, C; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; De Naurois, Mathieu; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J P; De Ona Wilhelmi, E; Orford, K J; Osborne, J L; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P O; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, Andreas G; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Renaud, M; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Ruppel, J; Sahakian, V V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Sch, F M; Schroder, R; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sol, H; Spangler, D; Stawarz, L; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Superina, G; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J P; Terrier, R; Van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Vialle, J P; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A

    2008-01-01

    We report on the first completely simultaneous observation of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) using an array of Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes which is sensitive to photons in the very-high-energy (VHE) gamma-ray range (>~100 GeV). On 2006 June 2, the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) registered an unusually soft gamma-ray burst (GRB 060602B). The burst position was under observation using the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) at the time the burst occurred. Data were taken before, during, and after the burst. A total of 5 hours of observations were obtained during the night of 2006 June 2-3, and 5 additional hours were obtained over the next 3 nights. No VHE gamma-ray signal was found during the period covered by the H.E.S.S. observations. The 99% confidence level flux upper limit (>1 TeV) for the prompt phase (9s) of GRB 060602B is 2.9x10^-9 erg cm^-2 s^-1. Due to the very soft BAT spectrum of the burst compared to other Swift GRBs and its proximity to the Galactic center, the burst is likely ass...

  8. Time resolved spectroscopy of GRB030501 using INTEGRAL

    CERN Document Server

    Beckmann, V; Courvoisier, Thierry J L; Goetz, D; Hudec, R; Hroch, F; Lund, N; Mereghetti, S; Shaw, S E; Wigger, C

    2003-01-01

    The Gamma-ray instruments on-board INTEGRAL offer an unique opportunity to perform time resolved analysis on GRBs. The imager IBIS allows accurate positiioning of GRBs and broad band spectral analysis, while SPI provides high resolution spectroscopy. GRB 030501 was discovered by the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System in the ISGRI field of view. Although the burst was fairly weak (fluence F = 3.5 * 10^-6 erg cm^-2 in the 20-200 keV energy band) it was possible to perform time resolved spectroscopy with a resolution of a few seconds. The GRB shows a spectrum in the 20 - 400 keV range which is consistent with a spectral photon index of -1.7. No emission line or spectral break was detectable in the spectrum. Although the flux seems to be correlated with the hardness of the GRB spectrum, there is no clear soft to hard evolution seen over the duration of the burst. The INTEGRAL data have been compared with results from the Ulysses and RHESSI experiments.

  9. Extinction and Absorption of the Afterglow of GRB980329

    CERN Document Server

    Reichart, D E; Metzger, M R; Quashnock, J M; Cole, D M; Castander, F J; Cooray, A R; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Reichart, Daniel E.; Lamb, Donald Q.; Metzger, Mark R.; Quashnock, Jean M.; Cole, David M.; Castander, Francisco J.; Cooray, Asantha R.; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden

    1998-01-01

    We report R-, J- and K-band observations of the GRB980329 field made on April 1 with the APO 3.5-m telescope, and J- and K-band observations made between April 6 - 8 with the Keck-I 10-m telescope. We show that these data and other reported measurements are consistent with a power-law fading of the optical/NIR source that is coincident with the variable radio source VLA J0702+3850. This establishes this source as the afterglow of GRB980329. We construct a model of the observed optical/NIR and X-ray spectrum of burst afterglows that takes into account the extinction of optical/NIR light and the absorption of soft X rays by dust and gas along the line-of-sight to the burst and in any host galaxy. For GRB980329, we find a rest-frame V-band absorption magnitude of A_V(1+z) = 3.00 +/- 0.25 mag, assuming a power law for the intrinsic spectrum, and that the observed spectrum of the burst afterglow is fully consistent with extinction of the intrinsic spectrum in the optical/NIR. This value of A_V is too large to be c...

  10. Two classes of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    1995-01-01

    Data from the 3B Catalogue suggest that short and long GRB are the results of different classes of events, rather than different parameter values within a single class: Short bursts have harder spectra in the BATSE bands, but chiefly long bursts are detected at photon energies over 1 MeV, implying that their hard photons are radiated by a process not found in short bursts. The values of \\langle V/V_{max} \\rangle for short and long bursts differ by 4.3 \\sigma, implying different spatial distributions. Only the soft gamma-ray radiation mechanisms are the same in both classes.

  11. GRB 110721A: PHOTOSPHERE 'DEATH LINE' AND THE PHYSICAL ORIGIN OF THE GRB BAND FUNCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Bing; Lu Ruijing; Liang Enwei [Department of Physics and GXU-NAOC Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Wu Xuefeng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2012-10-20

    The prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) usually have a dominant component that is well described by a phenomenological Band function. The physical origin of this spectral component is debated. Although the traditional interpretation is synchrotron radiation of non-thermal electrons accelerated in internal shocks or magnetic dissipation regions, the growing trend within the community is to interpret this component as modified thermal emission from a dissipative photosphere of a GRB fireball. We analyze the time-dependent spectrum of GRB 110721A detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope, and pay special attention to the rapid evolution of the peak energy E{sub p} . We define a 'death line' of thermally dominated dissipative photospheric emission in the E{sub p} -L plane, and show that E{sub p} of GRB 110721A at the earliest epoch has a very high E{sub p} {approx} 15 MeV that is beyond the 'death line'. Together with the finding that an additional 'shoulder' component exists in this burst that is consistent with a photospheric origin, we suggest that at least for some bursts, the Band component is not from a dissipative photosphere, but must invoke a non-thermal origin (e.g., synchrotron or inverse Compton) in the optically thin region of a GRB outflow. We also suggest that the rapid hard-to-soft spectral evolution is consistent with the quick discharge of magnetic energy in a magnetically dominated outflow in the optically thin region.

  12. The pulse luminosity function of Swift gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Amaral-Rogers, A; O'Brien, P T

    2016-01-01

    The complete Swift Burst Alert Telescope and X-Ray Telescope light curves of 118 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshifts were fitted using the physical model of GRB pulses by Willingale et al. to produce a total of 607 pulses. We compute the pulse luminosity function utilizing three GRB formation rate models: a progenitor that traces the cosmic star formation rate density (CSFRD) with either a single population of GRBs, coupled to various evolutionary parameters, or a bimodal population of high- and low-luminosity GRBs, and a direct fit to the GRB formation rate excluding any a priori assumptions. We find that a single population of GRB pulses with an evolving luminosity function is preferred over all other univariate evolving GRB models, or bimodal luminosity functions in reproducing the observed GRB pulse L-z distribution and that the magnitude of the evolution in brightness is consistent with studies that utilize only the brightest GRB pulses. We determine that the appearance of a GRB formation rate d...

  13. A Burst to See

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    On 19 March, Nature was particularly generous and provided astronomers with the wealth of four gamma-ray bursts on the same day. But that was not all: one of them is the most luminous object ever observed in the Universe. Despite being located in a distant galaxy, billions of light years away, it was so bright that it could have been seen, for a brief while, with the unaided eye. ESO PR Photo 08a/08 ESO PR Photo 08a/08 The REM Telescope and TORTORA Camera Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. It is now widely accepted that the majority of the gamma-ray bursts signal the explosion of very massive, highly evolved stars that collapse into black holes. Gamma-ray bursts, which are invisible to our eyes, are discovered by telescopes in space. After releasing their intense burst of high-energy radiation, they become detectable for a short while in the optical and in the near-infrared. This 'afterglow' fades very rapidly, making detailed analysis possible for only a few hours after the gamma-ray detection. This analysis is important in particular in order to determine the GRB's distance and, hence, intrinsic brightness. The gamma-ray burst GRB 080319B was detected by the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift satellite. "It was so bright that it almost blinded the Swift instruments for a while," says Guido Chincarini, Italian principal investigator of the mission. A bright optical counterpart was soon identified in the Boötes Constellation (the "Bear Driver" or "Herdsman"). A host of ground-based telescopes reacted promptly to study this new object in the sky. In particular, the optical emission was detected by a few wide-field cameras on telescopes that constantly monitor a large fraction of the sky, including the TORTORA camera in symbiosis with the 0.6-m REM telescope located at La Silla

  14. Evidence for TeV Emission from GRB 970417a

    CERN Document Server

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, C; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2000-01-01

    Milagrito, a detector sensitive to very high energy gamma rays, monitored the northern sky from February 1997 through May 1998. With a large field of view and a high duty cycle, this instrument was well suited to perform a search for TeV gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We report on a search made for TeV counterparts to GRBs observed by BATSE. BATSE detected 54 GRBs within the field of view of Milagrito during this period. An excess of events coincident in time and space with one of these bursts, GRB 970417a, was observed by Milagrito. The excess has a chance probability of $2.8 \\times 10^{-5}$ of being a fluctuation of the background. The probability for observing an excess at least this large from any of the 54 bursts is $1.5 \\times 10^{-3}$. No significant correlations were detected from the other bursts.

  15. The optical identifcation of events with poorly defined locations: The case of the Fermi GBM GRB140801A

    CERN Document Server

    Lipunov, V M; Pruzhinskaya, M V; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Pelassa, V; Tsvetkova, A E; Sokolov, I V; Kann, D A; Xu, Dong; Gorbovskoy, E S; Krushinski, V V; Kornilov, V G; Balanutsa, P V; Boronina, S V; Budnev, N M; Cano, Z; Castro-Tirado, A J; Chazov, V V; Connaughton, V; Delvaux, C; Frederiks, D D; Fynbo, J F U; Gabovich, A V; Goldstein, A; Greiner, J; Gress, O A; Ivanov, K I; Jakobsson, P; Klose, S; Knust, F; Komarova, V N; Konstantinov, E; Krylov, A V; Kuvshinov, D A; Kuznetsov, A S; Lipunova, G V; Moskvitin, A S; Pal'shin, V D; Pandey, S B; Poleshchuk, V A; Schmidl, S; Sergienko, Yu P; Sinyakov, E V; Schulze, S; Sokolov, V V; Sokolova, T N; Sparre, M; Thone, C C; Tlatov, A G; Tyurina, N V; Ulanov, M V; Yazev, S A; Yurkov, V V

    2015-01-01

    We report the early discovery of the optical afterglow of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 140801A in the 137 deg$^2$ 3-$\\sigma$ error-box of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). MASTER is the only observatory that automatically react to all Fermi alerts. GRB 140801A is one of the few GRBs whose optical counterpart was discovered solely from its GBM localization. The optical afterglow of GRB 140801A was found by MASTER Global Robotic Net 53 sec after receiving the alert, making it the fastest optical detection of a GRB from a GBM error-box. Spectroscopy obtained with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias and the 6-m BTA of SAO RAS reveals a redshift of $z=1.32$. We performed optical and near-infrared photometry of GRB 140801A using different telescopes with apertures ranging from 0.4-m to 10.4-m. GRB 140801A is a typical burst in many ways. The rest-frame bolometric isotropic energy release and peak energy of the burst is $E_\\mathrm{iso} = 5.54_{-0.24}^{+0.26} \\times 10^{52}$ erg and $E_\\mathrm{p, rest}\\simeq280$ keV,...

  16. Is there a 1998bw-like supernova in the afterglow of gamma ray burst 010921?

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, S; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon; Rujula, Alvaro De

    2002-01-01

    We use the very simple and successful Cannonball Model (CB) of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows (AGs) to analyze the observations of the strongly extinct optical AG of GRB 010921 with ground-based telescopes at early times, and with the HST at later time. We show that GRB 010921 was indeed associated with a 1998bw-like supernova at the GRB's redshift.

  17. Velocity variation of internal shock waves in gamma ray bursts: Observational properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU; Mei; CHEN; Li; QU; Jinlu; Poon; Helen; WU; Bobing; SONG; Liming

    2006-01-01

    The work uses the data in the TTS mode of BATSE to analyze the time lags and pulse widths of GRB960113 and GRB960722 in high as well as low energy bands. The results show that their time lags increase monotonously. This phenomenon can reasonably be interpreted with the model of internal shock waves of γ-ray bursts (GRB). Perhaps we obtain the direct observational evidence for the fireball model of GRBs for the first time.

  18. The flux-E_p relation within GRB060218 in comparison with typical GRB pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The prompt gamma-ray/X-ray emission of gamma-ray burst(GRB) 060218 was simultaneously observed by the Burst Alert Telescope(BAT) and X-ray Telescope(XRT) onboard Swift.Its peak energy of the joint νfν spectrum(Ep) clearly evolves with time from tens of keV to-1 keV,crossing both the BAT and XRT bands.The best fit yields log Ep=(4.61± 0.23)+(-1.29±0.08) log t,with a correlation coefficient of 0.98 and a chance probability of p<10-4.We derive its bolometric flux(F)in the 0.01-10 4 keV band,and find that its F-Ep relation,with a power-law index of 0.37,is much shallower than that observed in typical GRB pulses.Discussion of this shallowness is presented.

  19. GRB 141221A: gone is the wind

    CERN Document Server

    Bardho, O; Rossi, A; Amati, L; Haislip, J; Klotz, A; Palazzi, E; Reichart, D; Trotter, A S; Boer, M

    2016-01-01

    GRB 141221A was observed from infrared to soft gamma-ray bands. Here, we investigate its properties, in light of the standard model. We find that the optical light curve of the afterglow of this burst presents an unusual steep/quick rise. The broad band spectral energy distribution taken near the maximum of the optical emission presents either a thermal component or a spectral break. In the former case, the properties of the afterglow are then very unusual, but could explain the lack of apparent jet breaks in the Swift light curves. In the latter case, the afterglow properties of this burst are more usual, and we can see in the light curves the passing through of the injection and cooling frequencies within the optical bands, not masked by a reverse shock. This model also excludes the presence of a stellar wind, challenging either the stellar progenitor properties, or the very stellar nature of the progenitor itself. In all cases, this burst may be a part of a Rosetta stone that could help to explain some of ...

  20. A Fe K Line in GRB 970508

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protassov, R.; van Dyk, D.; Connors, A.; Kashyap, V.; Siemiginowska, A.

    2000-12-01

    We examine the x-ray spectrum of the afterglow of GRB 970508, analyzed for Fe line emission by Piro et al (1999, ApJL, 514, L73). This is a difficult and extremely important measurement: the detection of x-ray afterglows from γ -ray bursts is at best a tricky business, relying on near-real satellite time response to unpredictable events; and a great deal of luck in catching a burst bright enough for a useful spectral analysis. Detecting a clear atomic (or cyclotron) line in the generally smooth and featureless afterglow (or burst) emission not only gives one of the few very specific keys to the physics local to the emission region, but also provides clues or confirmation of its distance (via redshift). Unfortunately, neither the likelihood ratio test or the related F-statistic commonly used to detect spectral lines adhere to their nominal Chi square and F-distributions. Thus we begin by calibrating the F-statistic used in Piro et al (1999, ApJL, 514, L73) via a simulation study. The simulation study relies on a completely specified source model, i.e. we do Monte Carlo simulations with all model parameters fixed (so--called ``parametric bootstrapping''). Second, we employ the method of posterior predictive p-values to calibrate a LRT statistic while accounting for the uncertainty in the parameters of the source model. Our analysis reveals evidence for the Fe K line.

  1. HAPPY BIRTHDAY SWIFT: ULTRA-LONG GRB 141121A AND ITS BROADBAND AFTERGLOW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cucchiara, A. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Veres, P. [The George Washington University, Department of Physics, 725 21st, NW Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Corsi, A. [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Box 41051, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Cenko, S. B.; Marshall, F. E.; Kutyrev, A. S. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, MC 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Perley, D. A.; Horesh, A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lien, A. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (CRESST) and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pagani, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Toy, V. L.; Capone, J. I. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Frail, D. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory P.O. Box 0. Socorro, NM (United States); Modjaz, M. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Butler, N. R.; Littlejohns, O. M. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, AZ 85287 (United States); Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Richer, M. G. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-264, 04510 México, D. F., México (Mexico); Klein, C. R., E-mail: antonino.cucchiara@nasa.gov [Astronomy Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-7450 (United States); and others

    2015-10-20

    We present our extensive observational campaign on the Swift-discovered GRB 141121A, almost 10 years after its launch. Our observations cover radio through X-rays and extend for more than 30 days after discovery. The prompt phase of GRB 141121A lasted 1410 s and, at the derived redshift of z = 1.469, the isotropic energy is E{sub γ,iso} = 8.0 × 10{sup 52} erg. Due to the long prompt duration, GRB 141121A falls into the recently discovered class of ultra-long GRBs (UL-GRBs). Peculiar features of this burst are (1) a flat early-time optical light curve and (2) a radio-to-X-ray rebrightening around three days after the burst. The latter is followed by a steep optical-to-X-ray decay and a much shallower radio fading. We analyze GRB 141121A in the context of the standard forward–reverse shock (FS, RS) scenario and we disentangle the FS and RS contributions. Finally, we comment on the puzzling early-time (t ≲ 3 days) behavior of GRB 141121A, and suggest that its interpretation may require a two-component jet model. Overall, our analysis confirms that the class of UL-GRBs represents our best opportunity to firmly establish the prominent emission mechanisms in action during powerful gamma-ray burst explosions, and future missions (like SVOM, XTiDE, or ISS-Lobster) will provide many more of such objects.

  2. An Exact Solution of the Gamma Ray Burst Arrival Time Analysis Problem

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Sinha

    2002-03-01

    An analytical solution of the GRB arrival time analysis is presented. The errors in the position of the GRB resulting from timing and position errors of different satellites are calculated. A simple method of cross-correlating gamma ray burst time-histories is discussed.

  3. Afterglow from GRB 070610/Swift J195509.6+261406:An explanation using the fireball model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    GRB 070610,which is also named Swift J195509.6+261406,is a peculiar Galactic transient with significant variability on short timescales in both X-ray and optical light curves.One possible explanation is that GRB 070610/Swift J195509.6 + 261406 is a soft gamma-ray repeater(SGR) in our Galaxy.Here,we use the fireball model,which is usually recognized as the standard model of gamma-ray burst(GRB) afterglows,and the energy injection hypothesis to interpret the X-ray and optical afterglow light curves of GRB 070610/Swift J195509.6 + 261406.It is found that the model is generally consistent with observations.

  4. A Missing-Link in the Supernova-GRB Connection: The Case of SN 2012ap

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Chomiuk, Laura; Kamble, Atish; Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak; Hurley, Kevin; Margutti, Raffaella; Milisavljevic, Dan; Bietenholz, Michael; Brunthaler, Andreas; Pignata, Giuliano; Pian, Elena; Mazzali, Paolo; Fransson, Claes; Bartel, Norbert; Hamuy, Mario; Levesque, Emily; MacFadyen, Andrew; Dittmann, Jason; Krauss, Miriam; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Yamaoka, K; Takahashi, T; Ohno, M; Fukazawa, Y; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Goldsten, J; Barthelmy, S; Gehrels, N; Cummings, J; Krimm, H; Palmer, D; Golenetskii, S; Aptekar, R; Frederiks, D; Svinkin, D; Cline, T; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Enos, H; von Kienlin, A; Rau, A; Zhang, X; Savchenko, V

    2014-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are characterized by ultra-relativistic outflows, while supernovae are generally characterized by non-relativistic ejecta. GRB afterglows decelerate rapidly usually within days, because their low-mass ejecta rapidly sweep up a comparatively larger mass of circumstellar material. However supernovae, with heavy ejecta, can be in nearly free expansion for centuries. Supernovae were thought to have non-relativistic outflows except for few relativistic ones accompanied by GRBs. This clear division was blurred by SN 2009bb, the first supernova with a relativistic outflow without an observed GRB. Yet the ejecta from SN 2009bb was baryon loaded, and in nearly-free expansion for a year, unlike GRBs. We report the first supernova discovered without a GRB, but with rapidly decelerating mildly relativistic ejecta, SN 2012ap. This shows that central engines in type Ic supernovae, even without an observed GRB, can produce both relativistic and rapidly decelerating outflows like GRBs.

  5. High Energy Polarimetry of Prompt GRB Emission

    CERN Document Server

    McConnell, Mark L

    2016-01-01

    Evidence of polarized $\\gamma$-ray emission ($>$ 50 keV) from Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) has been accumulated in recent years. Measurements have been reported with levels in the range of 30-80\\%, typically with limited statistical significance. No clear picture has yet emerged with regards to the polarization properties of GRBs. Taken at face value, the data suggest that most GRBs have a relatively large level of polarization (typically, $> 50\\%$), which may suggest synchrotron emission associated with an ordered magnetic field structure within the GRB jet. But these results are far from conclusive. Here, we review the observations that have been made, concentrating especially on the instrumental issues and the lessons that might be learned from these data.

  6. Correlating prompt GRB photons with neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Taboada, Ignacio

    2007-01-01

    It is standard in theoretical neutrino astrophysics to use a broken power law approximation, based on the Band function, to describe the average photon flux of the prompt emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts. We will show that this approximation overestimates the contribution of high energy gamma-rays (and underestimates low energy gamma-rays). As a consequence models that rely on this approximation overestimate neutrino event rate by a factor of approx 2 depending on Earth's column density in the direction of the GRB. Furthermore the characteristic energy of neutrinos that trigger a km^3 detector is typically 10^{16} eV, higher than previously predicted. We also provide a new broken power law approximation to the Band function and show that it properly represents the photon spectra.

  7. GRB Observational Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Bing; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-01-01

    We summarize basic observational properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), including prompt emission properties, afterglow properties, and classification schemes. We also briefly comment on the current physical understanding of these properties.

  8. The future Gamma-Ray Burst Mission SVOM

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, S; Wei, J; Zhang, S -N; Basa, S; Atteia, J -L; Barret, D; Claret, A; Cordier, B; Daigne, F; Godet, O; Götz, D; Mandrou, P

    2010-01-01

    We present the Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor (SVOM), a future satellite mission for Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) studies, developed in cooperation between the Chinese National Space Agency (CNSA), the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS), the French Space Agency (CNES) and French research institutes. The scientific objectives of the SVOM GRB studies cover their classification (GRB diversity and unity of the model), their physics (particle acceleration and radiation mechanisms), their progenitors, cosmological studies (host galaxies, star formation history, re-ionization, cosmological parameters), and fundamental physics (origin of cosmic rays, Lorentz invariance, gravitational wave sources). From 2015 on, SVOM will provide fast and accurate localizations of all known types of GRB, and determine the temporal and spectral properties of the GRB emission, thanks to a set of four onboard instruments. The trigger system of the coded-mask telescope ECLAIRs onboard SVOM images the sky in the 4-120 ...

  9. Implications For The Origin Of GRB 051103 From LIGO Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Abadie, J; Abbott, T D; Abbott, R; Abernathy, M; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G S; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballmer, S; Barker, D; Barnum, S; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Bauchrowitz, J; Behnke, B; Bell, A S; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Bose, S; Boyle, M; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Bridges, D O; Brinkmann, M; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummitt, A; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Burmeister, O; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Cao, J; Capano, C; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cepeda, C; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Chung, C T Y; Clara, F; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R C; Cornish, N; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coward, D M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Culter, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; Danzmann, K; Das, K; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Dayanga, T; DeBra, D; Degallaix, J; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Palma, I; Diaz, M; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Dorsher, S; Douglas, E S D; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Finn, L S; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Fotopoulos, N; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Garcia, J; Garofoli, J A; Gholami, I; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Gill, C; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Graef, C; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guido, C; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J B; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Kelner, M; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, N; Kim, H; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kozak, D; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Leong, J; Leonor, I; Li, J; Lindquist, P E; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Lormand, M; Lu, P; Luan, J; Lubinski, M; Luck, H; Lundgren, A P; Macdonald, E; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Marandi, A; Marka, S; Marka, Z; Maros, E; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McKechan, D J A; Meadors, G; Mehmet, M; Meier, T; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Miao, H; Miller, J; Mino, Y; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Moesta, P; Mohanty, S D; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Mossavi, K; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Muller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Nash, T; Nawrodt, R; Nelson, J; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Nolting, D; Nuttall, L; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G H; Oldenburg, R G; Osthelder, C; Ott, C D; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Page, A; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Papa, M A; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Pekowsky, L; Penn, S; Peralta, C; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pickenpack, M; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Podkaminer, J; Pold, J; Postiglione, F; Predoi, V; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Quetschke, V; Raab, F J; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C R; Rankins, B; Mohapatra, S R P; Raymond, V; Redwine, K; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Roberts, P; Robertson, N A; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Roddy, S; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romie, J H; Rover, C; Rowan, S; Rudiger, A; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Sakosky, M; Salemi, F; Salit, M; Sammut, L; de la Jordana, L Sancho; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; SantamarÌa, L; Santiago-Prieto, I; Santostasi, G; Saraf, S; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Schilling, R; Schlamminger, S; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sergeev, A; Shaddock, D A; Shaltev, M; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Weerathunga, T Shihan; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Singer, A; Singer, L; Sintes, A M; Skelton, G; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Smith, R; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Soto, J; Speirits, F C; Stein, A J; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steplewski, S; Stefszky, M; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A S; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sung, M; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Szokoly, G P; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, J R; Taylor, R; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Thuring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Torres, C; Torrie, C I; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Tseng, K; Ugolini, D; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vaishnav, B; Vallisneri, M; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Sluys, M V; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Veltkamp, C; Villar, A E; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Wanner, A; Ward, R L; Wei, P; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wen, S; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; White, D; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, H R; Williams, L; Willke, B; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, K; Yamamoto, H; Yang, H; Yeaton-Massey, D; Yoshida, S; Yu, P; Zanolin, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, Z; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J; Bizouard, M A; Dietz, A; Guidi, G M; Was, M

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6 Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at the distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed gamma-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30 deg we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with > 99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81 our findings support the the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it the most distant extr...

  10. The distribution of equivalent widths in long GRB afterglow spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Postigo, A de Ugarte; Thoene, C C; Christensen, L; Gorosabel, J; Milvang-Jensen, B; Schulze, S; Jakobsson, P; Wiersema, K; Sanchez-Ramirez, R; Leloudas, G; Zafar, T; Malesani, D; Hjorth, J

    2012-01-01

    The extreme brightness of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows and their simple spectral shape make them ideal beacons to study the interstellar medium of their host galaxies through absorption line spectroscopy. Using 69 low-resolution GRB afterglow spectra, we conduct a study of the rest-frame equivalent width (EW) distribution of features with an average rest-frame EW larger than 0.5 A. To compare an individual GRB with the sample, we develop EW diagrams as a graphical tool, and we give a catalogue with diagrams for the 69 spectra. We introduce a line strength parameter (LSP) that allows us to quantify the strength of the absorption features as compared to the sample by a single number. Using the distributions of EWs of single-species features, we derive the distribution of column densities by a curve of growth (CoG) fit. We find correlations between the LSP and the extinction of the GRB, the UV brightness of the host galaxies and the neutral hydrogen column density. However, we see no significant evolution of...

  11. IMPLICATIONS FOR THE ORIGIN OF GRB 051103 FROM LIGO OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Adhikari, R.; Ajith, P.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C. [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Abbott, T. D. [California State University Fullerton, Fullerton, CA 92831 (United States); Abernathy, M. [University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Adams, C. [LIGO-Livingston Observatory, Livingston, LA 70754 (United States); Affeldt, C.; Allen, B. [Albert-Einstein-Institut, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); Allen, G. S. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ceron, E. Amador; Anderson, W. G. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Amariutei, D.; Arain, M. A. [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Amin, R. S. [Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Aston, S. M. [University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Collaboration: LIGO Collaboration; and others

    2012-08-10

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6 Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at a distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed {gamma}-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30 Degree-Sign , we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with >99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81, then our findings support the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it one of the most distant extragalactic magnetars observed to date.

  12. Implications for the Origin of GRB 051103 from LIGO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abadie, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, T. D.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M.; Adams, C.; Adhikari, R.; Affeldt, C.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allen, G. S.; Amador Ceron, E.; Amariutei, D.; Amin, R. S.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Arain, M. A.; Araya, M. C.; Aston, S. M.; Atkinson, D.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P.; Ballmer, S.; Barker, D.; Barnum, S.; Barr, B.; Barriga, P.; Barsotti, L.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Bastarrika, M.; Bauchrowitz, J.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Belopolski, I.; Benacquista, M.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Beveridge, N.; Beyersdorf, P. T.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biswas, R.; Black, E.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, D.; Bland, B.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bogan, C.; Bondarescu, R.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, S.; Boyle, M.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Breyer, J.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brummitt, A.; Buonanno, A.; Burguet-Castell, J.; Burmeister, O.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Camp, J. B.; Campsie, P.; Cannizzo, J.; Cannon, K.; Cao, J.; Capano, C.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chalkley, E.; Charlton, P.; Chelkowski, S.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, N.; Chua, S. S. Y.; Chung, S.; Chung, C. T. Y.; Clara, F.; Clark, D.; Clark, J.; Clayton, J. H.; Conte, R.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R. C.; Cornish, N.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M.; Coward, D. M.; Coyne, D. C.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cruise, A. M.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Culter, R. M.; Dahl, K.; Danilishin, S. L.; Dannenberg, R.; Danzmann, K.; Das, K.; Daudert, B.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G.; Daw, E. J.; Dayanga, T.; DeBra, D.; Degallaix, J.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Di Palma, I.; Díaz, M.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Dorsher, S.; Douglas, E. S. D.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Dumas, J.-C.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edgar, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Ehrens, P.; Engel, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, Y.; Farr, B. F.; Fazi, D.; Fehrmann, H.; Feldbaum, D.; Finn, L. S.; Flanigan, M.; Foley, S.; Forsi, E.; Fotopoulos, N.; Frede, M.; Frei, M.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Friedrich, D.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Garcia, J.; Garofoli, J. A.; Gholami, I.; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giampanis, S.; Giardina, K. D.; Gill, C.; Goetz, E.; Goggin, L. M.; González, G.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Goßler, S.; Graef, C.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grosso, R.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C.; Gupta, R.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hage, B.; Hallam, J. M.; Hammer, D.; Hammond, G.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hanson, J.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Harstad, E. D.; Hartman, M. T.; Haughian, K.; Hayama, K.; Heefner, J.; Hendry, M. A.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Herrera, V.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Holt, K.; Hong, T.; Hooper, S.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Howell, E. J.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isogai, T.; Ivanov, A.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Kalmus, P.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kawabe, K.; Kawamura, S.; Kawazoe, F.; Kells, W.; Kelner, M.; Keppel, D. G.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, N.; Kim, H.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kopparapu, R.; Koranda, S.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D.; Kringel, V.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Krishnan, B.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, R.; Kwee, P.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Lastzka, N.; Lazzarini, A.; Leaci, P.; Leong, J.; Leonor, I.; Li, J.; Lindquist, P. E.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lodhia, D.; Lormand, M.; Lu, P.; Luan, J.; Lubinski, M.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Macdonald, E.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Mageswaran, M.; Mailand, K.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Marandi, A.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Maros, E.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Matzner, R. A.; Mavalvala, N.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McKechan, D. J. A.; Meadors, G.; Mehmet, M.; Meier, T.; Melatos, A.; Melissinos, A. C.; Mendell, G.; Mercer, R. A.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Meyer, M. S.; Miao, H.; Miller, J.; Mino, Y.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Miyakawa, O.; Moe, B.; Moesta, P.; Mohanty, S. D.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Mossavi, K.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, G.; Mukherjee, S.; Mullavey, A.; Müller-Ebhardt, H.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D.; Murray, P. G.; Nash, T.; Nawrodt, R.; Nelson, J.; Newton, G.; Nishizawa, A.; Nolting, D.; Nuttall, L.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.

    2012-08-01

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst (GRB) whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6 Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at a distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed γ-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30°, we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with >99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81, then our findings support the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it one of the most distant extragalactic magnetars observed to date.

  13. The interplanetary gamma ray burst network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T.

    The Interplanetary Gamma-Ray Burst Network (IPN) is providing gamma-ray burst (GRB) alerts and localizations at the maximum rate anticipated before the launch of the Swift mission. The arc-minute source precision of the IPN is again permitting searches for GRB afterglows in the radio and optical regimes with delays of only hours up to 2 days. The successful addition of the Mars Odyssey mission has compensated for the loss of the asteroid mission NEAR, to reconstitute a fully long- baseline interplanetary network, with Ulysses at > 5 AU and Konus-Wind and HETE-2 near the Earth. In addition to making unassisted GRB localizations that enable a renewed supply of counterpart observations, the Mars/Ulysses/Wind IPN is confirming and reinforcing GRB source localizations with HETE-2. It has also confirmed and reinforced localizations with the BeppoSAX mission before the BeppoSAX termination in May and has detected and localized both SGRs and an unusual hard x-ray transient that is neither an SGR nor a GRB. This IPN is expected to operate until at least 2004.

  14. GRB 090510: a genuine short-GRB from a binary neutron star coalescing into a Kerr-Newman black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Enderli, M; Muccino, M; Aimuratov, Y; Bianco, C L; Cherubini, C; Kovacevic, M; Moradi, R; Penacchioni, A V; Pisani, G B; Rueda, J A; Wang, Y

    2016-01-01

    In a new classification of merging binary neutron stars (NSs) we separate short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in two sub-classes. The ones with $E_{\\rm iso}\\lesssim10^{52}$ erg coalesce to form a massive NS and are indicated as short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs). The hardest, with $E_{\\rm iso}\\gtrsim10^{52}$ erg, coalesce to form a black hole (BH) and are indicated as genuine short-GRBs (S-GRBs). Within the fireshell model, S-GRBs exhibit three different components: the P-GRB emission, observed at the transparency of a self-accelerating baryon-$e^+e^-$ plasma; the prompt emission, originating from the interaction of the accelerated baryons with the circumburst medium; the high-energy (GeV) emission, observed after the P-GRB and indicating the formation of a BH. GRB 090510 gives the first evidence for the formation of a Kerr-Newman BH. Its P-GRB spectrum can be fitted by a convolution of thermal spectra whose origin can be traced back to an axially symmetric dyadotorus. A large value of the angular momentum of the new...

  15. An Artificial Intelligence Classification Tool and Its Application to Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Giblin, Timothy; Paciesas, William S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Mallozzi, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    Despite being the most energetic phenomenon in the known universe, the astrophysics of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has still proven difficult to understand. It has only been within the past five years that the GRB distance scale has been firmly established, on the basis of a few dozen bursts with x-ray, optical, and radio afterglows. The afterglows indicate source redshifts of z=1 to z=5, total energy outputs of roughly 10(exp 52) ergs, and energy confined to the far x-ray to near gamma-ray regime of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multi-wavelength afterglow observations have thus far provided more insight on the nature of the GRB mechanism than the GRB observations; far more papers have been written about the few observed gamma-ray burst afterglows in the past few years than about the thousands of detected gamma-ray bursts. One reason the GRB central engine is still so poorly understood is that GRBs have complex, overlapping characteristics that do not appear to be produced by one homogeneous process. At least two subclasses have been found on the basis of duration, spectral hardness, and fluence (time integrated flux); Class 1 bursts are softer, longer, and brighter than Class 2 bursts (with two second durations indicating a rough division). A third GRB subclass, overlapping the other two, has been identified using statistical clustering techniques; Class 3 bursts are intermediate between Class 1 and Class 2 bursts in brightness and duration, but are softer than Class 1 bursts. We are developing a tool to aid scientists in the study of GRB properties. In the process of developing this tool, we are building a large gamma-ray burst classification database. We are also scientifically analyzing some GRB data as we develop the tool. Tool development thus proceeds in tandem with the dataset for which it is being designed. The tool invokes a modified KDD (Knowledge Discovery in Databases) process, which is described as follows.

  16. The Double Firing Burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Astronomers from around the world combined data from ground- and space-based telescopes to paint a detailed portrait of the brightest explosion ever seen. The observations reveal that the jets of the gamma-ray burst called GRB 080319B were aimed almost directly at the Earth. Uncovering the disc ESO PR Photo 28/08 A Gamma-Ray Burst with Two Jets Read more on this illuminating blast in the additional story. GRB 080319B was so intense that, despite happening halfway across the Universe, it could have been seen briefly with the unaided eye (ESO 08/08). In a paper to appear in the 11 September issue of Nature, Judith Racusin of Penn State University, Pennsylvania (USA), and a team of 92 co-authors report observations across the electromagnetic spectrum that began 30 minutes before the explosion and followed it for months afterwards. "We conclude that the burst's extraordinary brightness arose from a jet that shot material almost directly towards Earth at almost the speed of light - the difference is only 1 part in 20 000," says Guido Chincarini, a member of the team. Gamma-ray bursts are the Universe's most luminous explosions. Most occur when massive stars run out of fuel. As a star collapses, it creates a black hole or neutron star that, through processes not fully understood, drives powerful gas jets outward. As the jets shoot into space, they strike gas previously shed by the star and heat it, thereby generating bright afterglows. The team believes the jet directed toward Earth contained an ultra-fast component just 0.4 degrees across (this is slightly smaller than the apparent size of the Full Moon). This jet is contained within another slightly less energetic jet about 20 times wider. The broad component is more typical of other bursts. "Perhaps every gamma-ray burst has a narrow jet, but astronomers miss it most of the time," says team member Stefano Covino. "We happened to view this monster down the barrel of the very narrow and energetic jet, and the chance for

  17. Multiwavelength observations of the energetic GRB 080810: detailed mapping of the broad-band spectral evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Page, K.L.; Willingale, R.; Bissaldi, E.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Holland, S.T.; McBreen, S.; O'Brien, P.T.; Osborne, J.P.; Prochaska, J.X.; Rol, E.; Rykoff, E.S.; Starling, R.L.C.; Tanvir, N.R.; van der Horst, A.J.; Wiersema, K.; Zhang, B.; Aceituno, F.J.; Akerlof, C.; Beardmore, A.P.; Briggs, M.S.; Burrows, D.N.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Connaughton, V.; Evans, P.A.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Gehrels, N.; Guidorzi, C.; Howard, A.W.; Kennea, J.A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pagani, C.; Preece, R.; Perley, D.; Steele, I.A.; Yuan, F.

    2009-01-01

    GRB 080810 was one of the first bursts to trigger both Swift and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It was subsequently monitored over the X-ray and UV/optical bands by Swift, in the optical by Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) and a host of other telescopes, and was detected in

  18. The rapidly flaring afterglow of the very bright and energetic GRB 070125

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Updike, A.C.; Haislip, J.B.; Nysewander, M.C.; Fruchter, A.S.; Kann, D.A.; Klose, S.; Milne, P.A.; Williams, G.G.; Zheng, W.; Hergenrother, C.W.; Prochaska, J.X.; Halpern, J.P.; Mirabal, N.; Thorstensen, J.R.; van der Horst, A.J.; Starling, R.L.C.; Racusin, J.L.; Burrows, D.N.; Kuin, N.P.M.; Roming, P.W.A.; Bellm, E.; Hurley, K.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A.V.; Blake, C.; Starr, D.; Falco, E.E.; Brown, W.R.; Dai, X.; Deng, J.; Xin, L.; Qiu, Y.; Wei, J.; Urata, Y.; Nanni, D.; Maiorano, E.; Palazzi, E.; Greco, G.; Bartolini, C.; Guarnieri, A.; Piccioni, A.; Pizzichini, G.; Terra, F.; Misra, K.; Bhatt, B.C.; Anupama, G.C.; Fan, X.; Jiang, L.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Reichart, D.E.; Eid, H.A.; Bryngelson, G.; Puls, J.; Goldthwaite, R.C.; Hartmann, D.H.

    2008-01-01

    We report on multiwavelength observations, ranging from X-ray to radio wave bands, of the IPN-localized gamma-ray burst GRB 070125. Spectroscopic observations reveal the presence of absorption lines due to O I, Si II, and C IV, implying a likely redshift of z = 1.547. The well-sampled light curves,

  19. VLT/X-shooter spectroscopy of the GRB 120327A afterglow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Elia, V.; Fynbo, Johan Peter Uldall; Goldoni, P.;

    2014-01-01

    We present a study of the environment of the Swift long gamma-ray burst GRB 120327A at z ~2.8 through optical spectroscopy of its afterglow. We analyzed medium-resolution, multi-epoch spectroscopic observations (~7000 - 12000, corresponding to ~ 15 - 23 km/s, S/N = 15- 30 and wavelength range 3000...

  20. The origin of the early-time optical emission of Swift GRB 080310

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Littlejohns, O.M.; Willingale, R.; O'Brien, P.T.; Beardmore, A.P.; Covino, S.; Perley, D.A.; Tanvir, N.R.; Rol, E.; Yuan, F.; Akerlof, C.; D'Avanzo, P.; Bersier, D.F.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Christian, P.; Cobb, B.E.; Evans, P.A.; Filippenko, A.V.; Flewelling, H.; Fugazza, D.; Hoversten, E.A.; Kamble, A.P.; Kobayashi, S.; Li, W.; Morgan, A.N.; Mundell, C.G.; Page, K.; Palazzi, E.; Quimby, R.M.; Schulze, S.; Steele, I.A.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.

    2012-01-01

    We present broad-band multiwavelength observations of GRB 080310 at redshift z= 2.43. This burst was bright and long-lived, and unusual in having extensive optical and near-infrared (IR) follow-up during the prompt phase. Using these data we attempt to simultaneously model the gamma-ray, X-ray, opti

  1. Hyperaccreting Black Hole as Gamma-Ray Burst Central Engine. I. Baryon Loading in Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing; Liang, En-Wei

    2013-03-01

    A hyperaccreting stellar-mass black hole has been long speculated as the best candidate for the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent rich observations of GRBs by space missions such as Swift and Fermi pose new constraints on GRB central engine models. In this paper, we study the baryon-loading processes of a GRB jet launched from a black hole central engine. We consider a relativistic jet powered by \

  2. The Angular Size and Proper Motion of the Afterglow of GRB 030329

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, G B; Berger, E; Kulkarni, S R

    2004-01-01

    The bright, nearby (z=0.1685) gamma-ray burst of 29 March 2003 has presented us with the first opportunity to directly image the expansion of a GRB. This burst reached flux density levels at centimeter wavelengths more than 50 times brighter than any previously studied event. Here we present the results of a VLBI campaign using the VLBA, VLA, Green Bank, Effelsberg, Arecibo, and Westerbork telescopes that resolves the radio afterglow of GRB 030329 and constrains its rate of expansion. The size of the afterglow is found to be \\~0.07 mas (0.2 pc) 25 days after the burst, and 0.17 mas (0.5 pc) 83 days after the burst, indicating an average velocity of 3-5 c. This expansion is consistent with expectations of the standard fireball model. We measure the projected proper motion of GRB 030329 in the sky to <0.3 mas in the 80 days following the burst. In observations taken 52 days after the burst we detect an additional compact component at a distance from the main component of 0.28 +/- 0.05 mas (0.80 pc). The pres...

  3. EVIDENCE FOR A PHOTOSPHERIC COMPONENT IN THE PROMPT EMISSION OF THE SHORT GRB 120323A AND ITS EFFECTS ON THE GRB HARDNESS-LUMINOSITY RELATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guiriec, S.; McEnery, J.; Gehrels, N. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Daigne, F.; Hascoeet, R.; Mochkovitch, R. [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris UMR 7095 Universite Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 06 (France); CNRS 98 bis bd Arago, F-75014 Paris (France); Vianello, G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ryde, F. [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kouveliotou, C. [Office of Science and Technology, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Xiong, S.; Bhat, P. N.; Burgess, J. M. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Foley, S.; McGlynn, S. [UCD School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Gruber, D., E-mail: sylvain.guiriec@nasa.gov [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-06-10

    The short GRB 120323A had the highest flux ever detected with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Here we study its remarkable spectral properties and their evolution using two spectral models: (1) a single emission component scenario, where the spectrum is modeled by the empirical Band function (a broken power law), and (2) a two-component scenario, where thermal (a Planck-like function) emission is observed simultaneously with a non-thermal component (a Band function). We find that the latter model fits the integrated burst spectrum significantly better than the former, and that their respective spectral parameters are dramatically different: when fit with a Band function only, the E{sub peak} of the event is unusually soft for a short gamma-ray burst (GRB; 70 keV compared to an average of 300 keV), while adding a thermal component leads to more typical short GRB values (E{sub peak} {approx} 300 keV). Our time-resolved spectral analysis produces similar results. We argue here that the two-component model is the preferred interpretation for GRB 120323A based on (1) the values and evolution of the Band function parameters of the two component scenario, which are more typical for a short GRB, and (2) the appearance in the data of a significant hardness-intensity correlation, commonly found in GRBs, when we employee two-component model fits; the correlation is non-existent in the Band-only fits. GRB 110721A, a long burst with an intense photospheric emission, exhibits the exact same behavior. We conclude that GRB 120323A has a strong photospheric emission contribution, observed for the first time in a short GRB. Magnetic dissipation models are difficult to reconcile with these results, which instead favor photospheric thermal emission and fast cooling synchrotron radiation from internal shocks. Finally, we derive a possibly universal hardness-luminosity relation in the source frame using a larger set of GRBs (L{sub i}{sup Band

  4. Is there a 1998bw-like supernova in the afterglow of gamma ray burst 011121?

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, S; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon; Rujula, Alvaro De

    2002-01-01

    We use the very simple and successful Cannonball Model (CB) of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and their afterglows (AGs) to analyze the observations of the strongly extinct optical AG of the relatively nearby GRB 011121, which were made with ground-based telescopes at early times, and with the HST at later time. We show that GRB 011121 was indeed associated with a 1998bw-like supernova at the GRB's redshift, as we had specifically predicted for this GRB before the supernova could be observed.

  5. Gamma-Ray Bursts Subset and Supernova Remnants Low Radio-Frequency Turnover

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang

    2000-01-01

    Durations of gamma-ray bursts (GRB's) are featured by >2s subset and <2s one, with initial corresponding energy ratio being 20:1. It is found that supernova remants(SNR 's) turnover frequencies peak at 100 and 500 MHz. After assuming that GRB's originate from hypernova and making an analysis on the evolution of GRB's, we find that the initial energy of two GRB subsets leads to a different radio-frequency turnover of their remnant spectra, which accords positively with the turnover-frequency ratio of SNR's.

  6. On GRB Physics Revealed by FERMI/LAT

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Zhuo

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the implications of Fermi/LAT observations on several aspects of gamma-ray burst (GRB) physics, including the radiation process, the emission sites, the bulk Lorentz factor, and the pre-shock magnetic field: (1) MeV-range emission favors synchrotron process but the highest energy (>10GeV) emission may not be synchrotron origin, more likely inverse Compton origin; (2) GRB should have multi-zone emission region, with MeV emission produced at smaller radii while optical and >100MeV emission at larger radii; (3) the bulk Lorentz factor can be a few 100's, much lower than 10^3, in multi-zone model; (4) the upstream magnetic field of afterglow shock is strongly amplified to be at least in mG scale.

  7. Spectral Lag Evolution among -Ray Burst Pulses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lan-Wei Jia; Yun-Feng Liang; En-Wei Liang

    2014-09-01

    We analyse the spectral lag evolution of -ray burst (GRB) pulses with observations by CGRO/BATSE. No universal spectral lag evolution feature and pulse luminosity-lag relation within a GRB is observed.Our results suggest that the spectral lag would be due to radiation physics and dynamics of a given emission episode, possibly due to the longer lasting emission in a lower energy band, and the spectral lag may not be an intrinsic parameter to discriminate the long and short GRBs.

  8. A SUPRAMASSIVE MAGNETAR CENTRAL ENGINE FOR GRB 130603B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming [Key Laboratory of dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Science, Nanjing 210008 (China); Yu, Yun-Wei [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China); Xu, Dong [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Wu, Xue-Feng [Chinese Center for Antarctic Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2013-12-20

    We show that the peculiar early optical emission and, in particular, the X-ray afterglow emission of the short-duration burst GRB 130603B can be explained by continuous energy injection into the blastwave from a supramassive magnetar central engine. The observed energetics and temporal/spectral properties of the late infrared bump (i.e., the {sup k}ilonova{sup )} are also found to be consistent with emission from the ejecta launched during a neutron star (NS)-NS merger and powered by a magnetar central engine. The isotropic-equivalent kinetic energies of both the gamma-ray burst (GRB) blastwave and the kilonova are approximately E{sub k} ∼ 10{sup 51} erg, consistent with being powered by a near-isotropic magnetar wind. However, this relatively small value requires that most of the initial rotational energy of the magnetar (∼a few × 10{sup 52} erg) is carried away by gravitational wave radiation. Our results suggest that (1) the progenitor of GRB 130603B was a NS-NS binary system, the merger product of which would have been a supramassive NS that lasted for about ∼1000 s; (2) the equation of state of the nuclear matter should be stiff enough to allow the survival of a long-lived supramassive NS; thus this suggested that the detection of the bright electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave triggers without short GRB associations is promising in the upcoming Advanced LIGO/VIRGO era.

  9. A Reverse Shock in GRB 160509A

    CERN Document Server

    Laskar, Tanmoy; Berger, Edo; Fong, Wen-fai; Margutti, Raffaella; Shivvers, Isaac; Williams, Peter K G; Kopac, Drejc; Kobayashi, Shiho; Mundell, Carole; Gomboc, Andreja; Zheng, WeiKang; Menten, Karl M; Graham, Melissa L; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2016-01-01

    We present the second multi-frequency radio detection of a reverse shock in a $\\gamma$-ray burst. By combining our extensive radio observations of the Fermi-LAT GRB 160509A at $z = 1.17$ up to $20$ days after the burst with Swift X-ray observations and ground-based optical and near-infrared data, we show that the afterglow emission comprises distinct reverse shock and forward shock contributions: the reverse shock emission dominates in the radio band at $\\lesssim10~$days, while the forward shock emission dominates in the X-ray, optical, and near-infrared bands. Through multi-wavelength modeling, we determine a circumburst density of $n_0\\approx10^{-3}~$cm$^{-3}$, supporting our previous suggestion that a low-density circumburst environment is conducive to the production of long-lasting reverse shock radiation in the radio band. We infer the presence of a large excess X-ray absorption column, $N_{\\rm H} \\approx 1.5\\times10^{22}~$cm$^{-2}$, and a high rest-frame optical extinction, $A_{\\rm V}\\approx3.4~$mag. We...

  10. A Reverse Shock in GRB 130427A

    CERN Document Server

    Laskar, T; Zauderer, B A; Margutti, R; Soderberg, A M; Chakraborti, S; Lunnan, R; Chornock, R; Chandra, P; Ray, A

    2013-01-01

    We present extensive radio and millimeter observations of the unusually bright GRB 130427A at z=0.340, spanning 0.67 to 12 days after the burst. Taken in conjunction with detailed multi-band UV, optical, NIR, and X-ray observations we find that the broad-band afterglow emission is composed of distinct reverse shock and forward shock contributions. The reverse shock emission dominates in the radio/millimeter and at 0.1 days in the UV/optical/NIR. We further find that the optical and X-ray data require a Wind circumburst environment, pointing to a massive star progenitor. Using the combined forward and reverse shock emission we find that the parameters of the burst are an isotropic kinetic energy of E_Kiso~2e53 erg, a mass loss rate of Mdot~3e-8 Msun/yr (for a wind velocity of 1,000 km/s), and a Lorentz factor at the deceleration time of Gamma(200s)~130. Due to the low density and large isotropic energy, the absence of a jet break to ~15 days places only a weak constraint on the opening angle of theta_j>2.5 deg...

  11. Happy Birthday Swift: Ultra-long GRB141121A and its broad-band Afterglow

    CERN Document Server

    Cucchiara, A; Corsi, A; Cenko, S B; Perley, D A; Marshall, A Lien F E; Pagani, C; Toy, V L; Capone, J I; Frail, D A; Horesh, A; Modjaz, M; Butler, N R; Littlejohns, O M; Watson, A M; Kutyrev, A S; Lee, W H; Richer, M G; Klein, C R; Fox, O D; Prochaska, J X; Bloom, J S; Troja, E; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; de Diego, J A; Georgiev, L; Gonzalez, J; Roman-Zuniga, C G; Gehrels, N; Moseley, H

    2015-01-01

    We present our extensive observational campaign on the Swift-discovered GRB141121A, al- most ten years after its launch. Our observations covers radio through X-rays, and extends for more than 30 days after discovery. The prompt phase of GRB 141121A lasted 1410 s and, at the derived redshift of z = 1.469, the isotropic energy is E{\\gamma},iso = 8.0x10^52 erg. Due to the long prompt duration, GRB141121A falls into the recently discovered class of UL-GRBs. Peculiar features of this burst are a flat early-time optical light curve and a radio-to-X-ray rebrightening around 3 days after the burst. The latter is followed by a steep optical-to-X-ray decay and a much shallower radio fading. We analyze GRB 141121A in the context of the standard forward-reverse shock (FS,RS) scenario and we disentangle the FS and RS contributions. Finally, we comment on the puzzling early-time (t ~3 d) behavior of GRB 141121A, and suggest that its interpretation may require a two-component jet model. Overall, our analysis confirms that ...

  12. Late time observations of GRB080319B: jet break, host galaxy and accompanying supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Tanvir, Nial R; Levan, Andrew; Fruchter, Andrew; Granot, Jonathan; Svensson, Karl M; O'Brien, Paul T; Wiersema, Klaas; Starling, Rhaana L C; Jakobsson, Pall; Fynbo, Johan; Hjorth, Jens; Curran, Peter; van der Horst, Alexander J; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Racusin, Judith L; Burrows, David N; Genet, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The Swift-discovered GRB080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked eye brightness, reaching a peak magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z=0.937. We present our late time optical and X-ray observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at ~10^6 s post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E_{jet} \\gsim 10^{52.5} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova, similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) = 27.2, rest-frame M_B = -17.3). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low metallicity environment.

  13. X-ray Spectroscopy of Bursts from SGR 1806-20 with RXTE

    CERN Document Server

    Strohmayer, T E; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Ibrahim, Alaa

    1998-01-01

    We report on new RXTE X-ray spectral analysis of bursts from SGR 1806-20, the most prolific SGR source known. Previous studies of bursts from this source revealed a remarkable lack of spectral variability both in single bursts as well as from burst to burst. We present here some of the first evidence for significant spectral evolution within SGR bursts. We find that optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB) spectra including photoelectric absorption provide the best fits to most bursts, however, other models (power law, Band GRB) can also produce statistically acceptable fits. We confirm the existence of a rolloff in the photon number spectrum below 5 keV.

  14. Did a gamma-ray burst initiate the late Ordovician mass extinction?

    CERN Document Server

    Melott, A; Laird, C M; Martin, L; Medvedev, M; Thomas, B; Cannizzo, J K; Gehrels, N; Jackman, C H

    2003-01-01

    At least five times in the history of life, the Earth experienced mass extinctions that eliminated a large percentage of the biota. Many possible causes have been documented, and gamma-ray bursts (GRB) may also have contributed. GRB produce a flux of radiation detectable across the observable Universe. A GRB within our own galaxy could do considerable damage to the Earth's biosphere. Rate estimates suggest that a number of such GRB may lie within the fossil record. The late Ordovician mass extinction shows a water-depth dependent extinction pattern that is a natural result of the attenuation of the strong ultraviolet radiation expected to result from a nearby GRB. In addition, a GRB would trigger global cooling which is associated with this mass extinction.

  15. A MISSING-LINK IN THE SUPERNOVA–GRB CONNECTION: THE CASE OF SN 2012ap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Soderberg, Alicia; Kamble, Atish; Margutti, Raffaella; Milisavljevic, Dan; Dittmann, Jason [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chomiuk, Laura [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, 1 Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Hurley, Kevin [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bietenholz, Michael [Department of Physics and Astronomy, York University, 4700 Keele St., M3J 1P3 Ontario (Canada); Brunthaler, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Pignata, Giuliano [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Pian, Elena [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza Dei Cavalieri 7—I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Mazzali, Paolo [Liverpool John Moores University, IC2, 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Fransson, Claes [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Bartel, Norbert [Hartebeesthoek Radio Astronomy Observatory, PO Box 443, Krugersdrop, 1740 (South Africa); Hamuy, Mario [Departamento de Astronoma, Universidad de Chile (Chile); Levesque, Emily [University of Colorado, C327A, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); MacFadyen, Andrew, E-mail: schakraborti@fas.harvard.edu [New York University, 4 Washington Place, New York, NY 10003 (United States); and others

    2015-06-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are characterized by ultra-relativistic outflows, while supernovae are generally characterized by non-relativistic ejecta. GRB afterglows decelerate rapidly, usually within days, because their low-mass ejecta rapidly sweep up a comparatively larger mass of circumstellar material. However, supernovae with heavy ejecta can be in nearly free expansion for centuries. Supernovae were thought to have non-relativistic outflows except for a few relativistic ones accompanied by GRBs. This clear division was blurred by SN 2009bb, the first supernova with a relativistic outflow without an observed GRB. However, the ejecta from SN 2009bb was baryon loaded and in nearly free expansion for a year, unlike GRBs. We report the first supernova discovered without a GRB but with rapidly decelerating mildly relativistic ejecta, SN 2012ap. We discovered a bright and rapidly evolving radio counterpart driven by the circumstellar interaction of the relativistic ejecta. However, we did not find any coincident GRB with an isotropic fluence of more than one-sixth of the fluence from GRB 980425. This shows for the first time that central engines in SNe Ic, even without an observed GRB, can produce both relativistic and rapidly decelerating outflows like GRBs.

  16. The Third Swift Burst Alert Telescope Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Lien, Amy; Barthelmy, Scott D; Baumgartner, Wayne H; Cannizzo, John K; Chen, Kevin; Collins, Nicholas R; Cummings, Jay R; Gehrels, Neil; Krimm, Hans A; Markwardt, Craig B; Palmer, David M; Stamatikos, Michael; Troja, Eleonora; Ukwatta, T N

    2016-01-01

    To date, the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) onboard Swift has detected ~ 1000 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), of which ~ 360 GRBs have redshift measurements, ranging from z = 0.03 to z = 9.38. We present the analyses of the BAT-detected GRBs for the past ~ 11 years up through GRB151027B. We report summaries of both the temporal and spectral analyses of the GRB characteristics using event data (i.e., data for each photon within approximately 250 s before and 950 s after the BAT trigger time), and discuss the instrumental sensitivity and selection effects of GRB detections. We also explore the GRB properties with redshift when possible. The result summaries and data products are available at http://swift.gsfc.nasa.gov/results/batgrbcat/index.html. In addition, we perform searches for GRB emissions before or after the event data using the BAT survey data. We estimate the false detection rate to be only one false detection in this sample. There are 15 ultra-long GRBs (~ 2% of the BAT GRBs) in this search with confirmed emi...

  17. Discovery of a Transient Absorption Edge in the X-ray Spectrum of GRB 990705

    CERN Document Server

    Amati, L; Vietri, M; in 't Zand, J J M; Soffitta, P; Costa, E; Del Sordo, S; Pian, E; Piro, L; Antonelli, L A; Dal Fiume, D; Feroci, M; Gandolfi, G; Guidorzi, C; Heise, J; Kuulkers, E; Masetti, N; Montanari, E; Nicastro, L; Orlandini, M; Palazzi, E

    2000-01-01

    We report the discovery of a transient equivalent hydrogen column density with an absorption edge at ~3.8 kiloelectron volts in the spectrum of the prompt x-ray emission of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 990705. This feature can be satisfactorily modeled with a photoelectric absorption by a medium located at a redshift of ~0.86 and with an iron abundance of ~75 times the solar one. The transient behavior is attributed to the strong ionization produced in the circumburst medium by the GRB photons. The high iron abundance points to the existence of a burst environment enriched by a supernova along the line of sight. The supernova explosion is estimated to have occurred about 10 years before the burst. Our results agree with models in which GRBs originate from the collapse of very massive stars and are preceded by a supernova event

  18. Fermi Observations of high-energy gamma-ray emissions from GRB 080916C

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Arimoto, M; Asano, K; Atwood, W B; Axelsson, M; Baldini, L; Ballet, J; Band, D L; Barbiellini, Guido; Baring, Matthew G; Bastieri, Denis; Battelino, M; Baughman, B M; Bechtol, K; Bellardi, F; Bellazzini, R; Berenji, B; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Blandford, R D; Bloom, Elliott D; Bogaert, G; Bogart, J R; Bonamente, E; Bonnell, J; Borgland, A W; Bouvier, A; Bregeon, J; Brez, A; Briggs, M S; Brigida, M; Bruel, P; Burnett, Thompson H; Burrows, David N; Busetto, Giovanni; Caliandro, G A; Cameron, R A; Caraveo, P A; Casandjian, J M; Ceccanti, M; Cecchi, C; Celotti, Annalisa; Charles, E; Chekhtman, A; Cheung, C.C.Teddy; Chiang, J; Ciprini, S; Claus, R; Cohen-Tanugi, Johann; Cominsky, Lynn R; Connaughton, V; Conrad, J; Costamante, L; Cutini, S; DeKlotz, M; Dermer, C D; De Angelis, Alessandro; de Palma, F; Digel, S W; Dingus, B L; do Couto e Silva, Eduardo; Drell, P S; Dubois, R; Dumora, D; Edmonds, Y; Evans, P A; Fabiani, D; Farnier, C; Favuzzi, C; Finke, Justin D; Fishman, G; Focke, W B; Frailis, M; Fukazawa, Y; Funk, S; Fusco, P; Gargano, F; Gasparrini, D; Gehrels, N; Germani, S; Giebels, B; Giglietto, N; Giommi, P; Giordano, F; Glanzman, Thomas Lynn; Godfrey, Gary L; Goldstein, A; Granot, J; Greiner, J; Grenier, I A; Grondin, M H; Grove, J.Eric; Guillemot, L; Guiriec, S; Haller, G; Hanabata, Y; Harding, Alice K; Hayashida, M; Hays, Elizabeth A; Hernando Morata, J A; Hoover, A; Hughes, R E; Johannesson, G; Johnson, A S; Johnson, R P; Johnson, T J; Johnson, W N; Kamae, Tsuneyoshi; Katagiri, H; Kataoka, J; Kavelaars, A; Kawai, N; Kelly, H; Kennea, J; Kerr, M; Kippen, R M; Knodlseder, J; Kocevski, D; Kocian, M L; Komin, N; Kouveliotou, C; Kuehn, Frederick Gabriel Ivar; Kuss, Michael; Lande, J; Landriu, D; Larsson, S; Latronico, L; Lavalley, C; Lee, B; Lee, S H; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lichti, G G; Longo, F; Loparco, F; Lott, B; Lovellette, M N; Lubrano, Pasquale; Madejski, G M; Makeev, A; Marangelli, B; Mazziotta, M N; McBreen, Sheila; McEnery, J E; McGlynn, S; Meegan, C; Miszaros, P; Meurer, C; Michelson, P F; Minuti, M; Mirizzi, N; Mitthumsiri, W; Mizuno, T; Moiseev, A A; Monte, C; Monzani, M E; Moretti, E; Morselli, A; Moskalenko, Igor Vladimirovich; Murgia, Simona; Nakamori, T; Nelson, D; Nolan, P L; Norris, J P; Nuss, E; Ohno, M; Ohsugi, Takashi; Okumura, Akira; Omodei, N; Orlando, E; Ormes, J F; Ozaki, M; Paciesas, W S; Paneque, D; Panetta, J H; Parent, D; Pelassa, V; Pepe, M; Perri, M; Pesce-Rollins, M; Petrosian, Vahe; Pinchera, M; Piron, F; Porter, Troy A; Preece, R; Rainr, S; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rando, R; Rapposelli, E; Razzano, M; Razzaque, Soebur; Rea, N; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Reposeur, Thierry; Reyes, Luis C; Ritz, S; Rochester, L S; Rodriguez, A Y; Roth, M; Ryde, F; Sadrozinski, H F W; Sanchez, D; Sander, A; Parkinson, P.M.Saz; Scargle, J D; Schalk, T L; Segal, K N; Sgro, C; Shimokawabe, T; Siskind, E J; Smith, D A; Smith, P D; Spandre, G; Spinelli, P; Stamatikos, M; Starck, Jean-Luc; Stecker, Floyd William; Steinle, H; Stephens, T E; Strickman, M S; Suson, Daniel J; Tagliaferri, G.; Tajima, Hiroyasu; Takahashi, H; Takahashi, T; Tanaka, T; Tenze, A; Thayer, J B; Thayer, J G; Thompson, D J; Tibaldo, L; Torres, Diego F; Tosti, G; Tramacere, A; Turri, M; Tuvi, S; Usher, T L; van der Horst, A J; Vigiani, L; Vilchez, N; Vitale, V; von Kienlin, A; Waite, A P; Williams, D A; Wilson-Hodge, C; Winer, B L; Wood, K S; Wu, X F; Yamazaki, R; Ylinen, T; Ziegler, M

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are highly energetic explosions signaling the death of massive stars in distant galaxies. The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor and Large Area Telescope onboard the Fermi Observatory together record GRBs over a broad energy range spanning about 7 decades of gammaray energy. In September 2008, Fermi observed the exceptionally luminous GRB 080916C, with the largest apparent energy release yet measured. The high-energy gamma rays are observed to start later and persist longer than the lower energy photons. A simple spectral form fits the entire GRB spectrum, providing strong constraints on emission models. The known distance of the burst enables placing lower limits on the bulk Lorentz factor of the outflow and on the quantum gravity mass.

  19. Modeling the Early Afterglow in the Short and Hard GRB 090510

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraija, N.; Lee, W. H.; Veres, P.; Barniol Duran, R.

    2016-11-01

    The bright, short, and hard GRB 090510 was detected by all instruments aboard the Fermi and Swift satellites. The multiwavelength observations of this burst presented similar features to the Fermi-LAT-detected gamma-ray bursts. In the framework of the external shock model of early afterglow, a leptonic scenario that evolves in a homogeneous medium is proposed to revisit GRB 090510 and explain the multiwavelength light curve observations presented in this burst. These observations are consistent with the evolution of a jet before and after the jet break. The long-lasting LAT, X-ray, and optical fluxes are explained in the synchrotron emission from the adiabatic forward shock. Synchrotron self-Compton emission from the reverse shock is consistent with the bright LAT peak provided that the progenitor environment is entrained with strong magnetic fields. It could provide compelling evidence of magnetic field amplification in the neutron star merger.

  20. Modeling the early afterglow in the short and hard GRB 090510

    CERN Document Server

    Fraija, Nissim; Veres, Peter; Duran, Rodolfo Barniol

    2016-01-01

    The bright, short and hard GRB 090510 was detected by all instruments aboard Fermi and Swift satellites. The multiwavelength observations of this burst presented similar features with the Fermi-LAT-detected gamma-ray bursts. In the framework of the external shock model of early afterglow, a leptonic scenario that evolves in a homogeneous medium is proposed to revisit GRB 090510 and explain the multiwavelength light curve observations presented in this burst. These observations are consistent with the evolution of a jet before and after the jet break. The long-lasting LAT, X-ray and optical fluxes are explained in the synchrotron emission from the adiabatic forward shock. Synchrotron self-Compton emission from the reverse shock is consistent with the bright LAT peak provided that progenitor environment is entrained with strong magnetic fields. It could provide compelling evidence of magnetic field amplification in the neutron star merger.

  1. Evidence for jet launching close to the black hole in GRB 101219B - a Fermi GRB dominated by thermal emission

    CERN Document Server

    Larsson, J; Burgess, J M

    2015-01-01

    We present observations by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) of the nearby (z=0.55) GRB 101219B. This burst is a long GRB, with an associated supernova and with a blackbody component detected in the early afterglow observed by the Swift X-ray Telescope (XRT). Here we show that the prompt gamma-ray emission has a blackbody spectrum, making this the second such burst observed by Fermi GBM. The properties of the blackbody, together with the redshift and our estimate of the radiative efficiency, makes it possible to calculate the absolute values of the properties of the outflow. We obtain an initial Lorentz factor Gamma=138\\pm 8, a photospheric radius r_phot=4.4\\pm 1.9 \\times 10^{11} cm and a launch radius r_0=2.7\\pm 1.6 \\times 10^{7} cm. The latter value is close to the event horizon for a stellar-mass black hole and suggests that the jet has a relatively unobstructed path through the star. There is no smooth connection between the blackbody components seen by GBM and XRT, ruling ...

  2. Black Holes, Supernovae and Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, Remo

    2013-01-01

    We review recent progress in our understanding of the nature of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) and in particular, of the relationship between short GRBs and long GRBs. The first example of a short GRB is described. The coincidental occurrence of a GRB with a supernova (SN) is explained within the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm, following the sequence: 1) an initial binary system consists of a compact carbon-oxygen (CO) core star and a neutron star (NS); 2) the CO core explodes as a SN, and part of the SN ejecta accretes onto the NS which reaches its critical mass and collapses to a black hole (BH) giving rise to a GRB; 3) a new NS is generated by the SN as a remnant. The observational consequences of this scenario are outlined.

  3. Critical Test Of Gamma Ray Burst Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Long and precise follow-up measurements of the X-ray afterglow (AG) of very intense gamma ray bursts (GRBs) provide a critical test of GRB afterglow theories. Here we show that the power-law decline with time of X-ray AG of GRB 130427A, the longest measured X-ray AG of an intense GRB with the Swift, Chandra and XMM Newton satellites, and of all other well measured late-time X-ray afterglow of intense GRBs, is that predicted by the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs from their measured spectral index, while it disagrees with that predicted by the widely accepted fireball (FB) models of GRBs.

  4. The LAGO Collaboration: Searching for high energy GRB emissions in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, H.; Lago Collaboration

    2012-02-01

    During more than a decade Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB a cosmological phenomena of tremendous power) have been extensively studied in the keV - MeV energy range. However, the higher energy emission still remains a mystery. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (L.A.G.O.) is an international collaboration started in 2005 aiming at a better understanding of the GRB by studying their emission at high energies (> 1 GeV), where the fluxes are low and measurements by satellites are difficult. This is done using the Single Particle Technique, by means of ground-based Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) at sites of high altitude. At those altitudes it is possible to detect air showers produced by high energy photons from the GRB, i. e. a higher rate of events on a short time scale, of the order of the second. The Pierre Auger Observatory could detect such GRB given its large number of detectors, but at 1400 m.a.s.l. the expected signal is quite small. At higher altitudes, similar performance is expected with only a very small number of WCD. As of 2011, high altitude WCD are in operation at Sierra Negra (Mexico, 4650 m.a.s.l.), Chacaltaya (Bolivia, 5200 m.a.s.l.), Maracapomacocha (Peru, 4200 m.a.s.l.), and new WCDs are being installed in Venezuela (Pico Espejo, 4750 m.a.s.l.), Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia and Guatemala. Most of the new WCDs will not be at high enough altitude to detect GRB, never the less it will allow obtaining valuable measurements of secondaries at ground level, which are relevant for solar physics. The LAGO sensitivity to GRB is determined from simulations (under a sudden increase of 1 GeV - 1 TeV photons from a GRB) of the gamma initiated particle shower in the atmosphere and the WCD response to secondaries. We report on WDC calibration and operation at high altitude, GRB detectability, background rates, search for bursts in several months of preliminary data, as well as search for signals at ground level when satellite burst is reported, all these show the

  5. Puzzled by GRB 060218

    CERN Document Server

    Ghisellini, G; Tavecchio, F

    2006-01-01

    We study the optical-UV/X-ray spectral energy distribution of GRB 060218 during the prompt phase and during what seems to be the afterglow phase. The results are puzzling, since if the opt-UV and the X-ray emission belong to a single black body, then its luminosity is too large, and it cannot be interpreted as the signature of the supernova shock breakout. Problems are also encountered in associating the expected supernova shock breakout emission with either the opt-UV or the X-ray emission. In the former case we derive too small ejecta velocities; in the latter case, on the contrary, the required velocity is too large. We then present what we think is the most conservative alternative explanation, namely a synchrotron spectrum, self-absorbed in the opt-UV and extending up to the X-ray band, where we observe the emission of the most energetic electrons, which are responsible for the exponential roll-over of the spectrum. The fit to the data is quite satisfactory, and can explain the entire spectrum except the...

  6. A Characteristic Wind Signature in Prompt GRB Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Kobayashi, S; Zhang, B; Kobayashi, Shiho; Meszaros, Peter; Zhang, Bing

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the self-absorption effects in the prompt emission from the reverse shock in GRB afterglows that occur in the wind environment of a massive stellar progenitor. We point out that the higher self-absorption frequency in a wind environment implies a hump in the reverse shock emission spectrum and a more complex optical/IR light curve behavior than previously thought. We discuss a possible new diagnostic to test for the presence of a wind environment, and to provide constraints on the progenitor wind mass loss and the burst parameters.

  7. Preliminary Results on VLT K-band Imaging Observations of GRB Host Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E. Le Floc’h; I. F. Mirabel; P.-A. Duc

    2002-03-01

    We have obtained -band imaging observations of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) host galaxies with the near-infrared spectro-imager ISAAC installed on the Very Large Telescope at Paranal (Chile). The derived magnitudes, combined with other photometric data taken from the literature, are used to investigate the – colors of GRB hosts. We do not find any extremely reddened starbursts in our sample, despite the capability of GRBs to trace star formation even in dusty regions. The observed – colors are on the contrary typical of irregular and spiral blue galaxies at high redshift.

  8. Gamma-ray burst models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Andrew

    2007-05-15

    I consider various possibilities for making gamma-ray bursts, particularly from close binaries. In addition to the much-studied neutron star+neutron star and black hole+neutron star cases usually considered good candidates for short-duration bursts, there are also other possibilities. In particular, neutron star+massive white dwarf has several desirable features. These systems are likely to produce long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), in some cases definitely without an accompanying supernova, as observed recently. This class of burst would have a strong correlation with star formation and occur close to the host galaxy. However, rare members of the class need not be near star-forming regions and could have any type of host galaxy. Thus, a long-duration burst far from any star-forming region would also be a signature of this class. Estimates based on the existence of a known progenitor suggest that this type of GRB may be quite common, in agreement with the fact that the absence of a supernova can only be established in nearby bursts.

  9. A nearby GRB host prototype for z~7 Lyman-break galaxies: Spitzer-IRS and X-shooter spectroscopy of the host galaxy of GRB031203

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, D; Christensen, L; O'Halloran, B; Michałowski, M; Hjorth, J; Malesani, D; Fynbo, J P U; Gordon, K D; Cerón, J M Castro

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies have been studied extensively in optical photometry and spectroscopy. Here we present the first mid-infrared spectrum of a GRB host, HG031203. It is one of the nearest GRB hosts at z=0.1055, allowing both low and high-resolution spectroscopy with Spitzer-IRS. Medium resolution UV-to-K-band spectroscopy with the X-shooter spectrograph on the VLT is also presented, along with Spitzer IRAC and MIPS photometry, as well as radio and sub-mm observations. These data allow us to construct a UV-to-radio spectral energy distribution with almost complete spectroscopic coverage from 0.3-35 micron of a GRB host galaxy for the first time, potentially valuable as a template for future model comparisons. The IRS spectra show strong, high-ionisation fine structure line emission indicative of a hard radiation field in the galaxy, suggestive of strong ongoing star-formation and a very young stellar population. The selection of HG031203 via the presence of a GRB suggests that it might be a use...

  10. Detection of the ultra-high z short GRB 080913 and its implications on progenitors and energy extraction mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Pérez-Ramírez, D; Gorosabel, J; Aloy, M A; Guerrero, M A; Osborne, J P; Page, K L; Warwick, R S; Horváth, I; Veres, P; Jelinek, M; Kubánek, P; Guziy, S; Bremer, M; Winters, J M; Castro-Tirado, A J

    2008-01-01

    Aims: We present multiwavelength observations of the most distant gamma-ray burst detected so far GRB 080913 and study whether it can be considered a short-duration GRB and the implications for the progenitor nature and energy extraction mechanisms. Methods: Multiwavelength (X-ray/nIR/millimetre) observations were made between 20.7 hours and ~16.8 days after the event. Results: Whereas a very faint afterglow was seen at the 3.5m CAHA telescope in the nIR, the X-ray afterglow was clearly detected in our XMM-Newton observations. An upper limit is reported in the mm range. At typical redshifts of other bursts, GRB 080913 would be found in the locus of short-duration GRBs on a hardness-duration diagram, thus strengthening its membership of this class. We also report that GRB 080913 shows lower isotropic luminosities than GRB 060121, another likely member of the short-duration class of GRB at z~4.6. Regarding the nature of the progenitor, we find that a NS+BH is slightly preferred over a double NS merger, with the...

  11. The extremely red host galaxy of GRB 080207

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Leslie; Rossi, Andrea; Savaglio, Sandra; Cresci, Giovanni; Klose, Sylvio; Michalowski, Michal; Pian, Elena

    2011-01-01

    We present optical, near-infrared, and Spitzer IRAC and MIPS observations of the host galaxy of the dark gamma-ray burst GRB 080207. The host is faint, with extremely red optical-infrared colors ($R-K\\,=\\,6.3$, 24\\micron/$R-$band flux $\\sim1000$) making it an extremely red object (ERO) and a dust-obscured galaxy (DOG). The spectral energy distribution (SED) shows the clear signature of the 1.6 micron photometric "bump", typical of evolved stellar populations. We use this bump to establish the photometric redshift $z_{\\rm phot}$ as 2.2$^{+0.2}_{-0.3}$, using a vast library of SED templates, including M 82. The star-formation rate (SFR) inferred from the SED fitting is $\\sim$119\\msun\\,yr$^{-1}$, the stellar mass $3\\times10^{11}$\\,\\msun, and \\av\\ extinction from 1-2\\,mag. The ERO and DOG nature of the host galaxy of the dark GRB 080207 may be emblematic of a distinct class of dark GRB hosts, with high SFRs, evolved and metal-rich stellar populations, and significant dust extinction within the host galaxy.

  12. The 050709 macronova and the GRB/macronova connection

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Zhi-Ping; Li, Xiang; Tanaka, Masaomi; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Covino, Stefano; Wei, Da-Ming; Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    We reanalyzed the publicly-available optical/near-infrared afterglow observations of GRB 050709, the first short GRB from which an optical afterglow was detected. The $I$-band/F814W-band light curve is significantly shallower than the $R$-band light curve. This additional low-luminosity soft component can be a signature of a Li-Paczy\\'{n}ski macronova (also known as kilonova) arising from $\\sim 0.05~M_\\odot$ r-process material launched by a compact binary merger. As macronovae are relatively weak and soft they can be identified only within the afterglows of relatively nearby ($z<0.4$) bursts that have sufficient near-infrared/optical data. There are five such events: GRBs 050709, 060505, 060614, 061201 and 130603B. However, the redshift of 061201 is unclear and there is doubt concerning the origin of GRB 060505. Remarkably, evidence for a macronova signature is found in the afterglow of each one of the remaining three events. This demonstrates that macronovae are ubiquitous. The significant mass ejection s...

  13. The Interpretation and Implication of the Afterglow of GRB 060218

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Y; Xu, D; Fan, Yizhong; Piran, Tsvi; Xu, Dong

    2006-01-01

    The nearby GRB 060216/SN 2006aj was an extremely long, weak and very soft GRB. While it was peculiar in many aspects its late ($>10^4$ sec) X-ray afterglow showed a canonical power law decay. Assuming that this component arises due to a relativistic blast wave decelerated by a circumburst matter we infer that the blast wave's kinetic energy was rather high, $5 \\times 10^{50}$ erg, close to what is seen in other GRBs. The lack of a "jet break" implies that the outflow was wide $\\theta_j \\sim 1$. The rather weak early optical emission rules out a dense circumburst wind profile. It also constrains the initial Lorentz factor to be significantly lower than usual, $\\Gamma_{\\rm ini}\\sim 15$. The observed afterglow suggests that the medium surrounding a massive star progenitor (up to distances of $\\sim 10^{17}-10^{18}$ cm) is not the expected dense stellar wind (a similar result was seen in many other bursts and in particular in GRB 030329). This implies that the progenitor's wind was weak during the last 100-1000 ye...

  14. Implications for the Origin of GRB 051103 from LIGO Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizouard, M. A.; Dietz, A.; Guidi, G. M.; Was, M.; Camp, J. B.; Cannizzo, J.; Stroeer, A. S.; Blackburn, L.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a LIGO search for gravitational waves (GWs) associated with GRB 051103, a short-duration hard-spectrum gamma-ray burst whose electromagnetically determined sky position is coincident with the spiral galaxy M81, which is 3.6Mpc from Earth. Possible progenitors for short-hard GRBs include compact object mergers and soft gamma repeater (SGR) giant flares. A merger progenitor would produce a characteristic GW signal that should be detectable at the distance of M81, while GW emission from an SGR is not expected to be detectable at that distance. We found no evidence of a GW signal associated with GRB 051103. Assuming weakly beamed gamma-ray emission with a jet semi-angle of 30. we exclude a binary neutron star merger in M81 as the progenitor with a confidence of 98%. Neutron star-black hole mergers are excluded with > 99% confidence. If the event occurred in M81 our findings support the hypothesis that GRB 051103 was due to an SGR giant flare, making it the most distant extragalactic magnetar observed to date.

  15. Pulse-wise GRB correlation: implication as a cosmological tool

    CERN Document Server

    Basak, Rupal

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are cosmological explosions which carry valuable information from the distant past of the expanding universe. One of the greatest discoveries in modern cosmology is the finding of the accelerated expansion of the universe using Type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) as standard candles. However, due to the interstellar extinction SN Ia can be seen only up to a redshift $z\\sim 1.5$. GRBs are considered as the potential alternative to push this limit to as high as $z\\sim 10$, a redshift regime corresponding to an epoch when the universe just started to form the first structures. There exist several correlations between the energy and an observable of a GRB which can be used to derive luminosity distance. In recent works, we have studied spectral evolution within the individual pulses and obtained such correlations within the pulses. Here we summarize our results of the pulse-wise GRB correlation study. It is worth mentioning that all GRB correlations are still empirical, and we cannot use them in co...

  16. The H.E.S.S. II GRB Program

    CERN Document Server

    Parsons, R D; Füssling, M; Hoischen, C; Holler, M; Mitchell, A M W; Pühlhofer, G; Rowell, G; Wagner, S; Bissaldi, E; O'Brien, P; Tam, P H T

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are some of the most energetic and exotic events in the Universe, however their behaviour at the highest energies (>10 GeV) is largely unknown. Although the Fermi-LAT space telescope has detected several GRBs in this energy range, it is limited by the relatively small collection area of the instrument. The H.E.S.S. experiment has now entered its second phase by adding a fifth telescope of 600 m$^{2}$ mirror area to the centre of the array. This new telescope increases the energy range of the array, allowing it to probe the sub-100 GeV range while maintaining the large collection area of ground based gamma-ray observatories, essential to probing short-term variability at these energies. We will present a description of the GRB observation scheme used by the H.E.S.S. experiment, summarising the behaviour and performance of the rapid GRB repointing system, the conditions under which potential GRB repointings are made and the data analysis scheme used for these observations.

  17. A compact binary merger model for GRB 050509b

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, W H; Granot, J; Lee, William H.; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan

    2005-01-01

    The first X-ray afterglow for a short (30 ms), hard gamma-ray burst was detected by Swift on 9 May 2005 (GRB 050509b). No optical or radio counterpart was identified in follow--up observations. The tentative association of the GRB with a nearby giant elliptical galaxy at redshift z=0.2248 would imply the progenitor had traveled several tens of kpc from its point of origin, in agreement with expectations linking these events to the final merger of compact binaries driven by gravitational wave emission. We model the dynamical merger of such a system and the time--dependent evolution of the accretion tori thus created. The resulting energetics, variability, and expected durations are consistent with GRB 050509b originating from the tidal disruption of a neutron star by a stellar mass black hole, or of the merger of two neutron stars followed by prompt gravitational collapse of the massive remnant. We discuss how the available gamma-ray and X-ray data provides a probe for the nature of the relativistic ejecta and...

  18. GRB060602B = Swift J1749.4-2807: an unusual transiently accreting neutron-star X-ray binary

    OpenAIRE

    Wijnands, R.; Rol, E.; Cackett, E.; Starling, R. L. C.; Remillard, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Swift BAT and XRT data of GRB060602B, which is most likely an accreting neutron star in a binary system and not a gamma-ray burst. Our analysis shows that the BAT burst spectrum is consistent with a thermonuclear flash (type-I X-ray burst) from the surface of an accreting neutron star in a binary system. The X-ray binary nature is further confirmed by the report of a detection of a faint point source at the position of the XRT counterpart of the burst in archival...

  19. The long and the short of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    1995-01-01

    We report evidence from the 3B Catalogue that long (T_{90} > 10 s) and short (T_{90} 1 MeV. This implies different spatial origin and physical processes for long and short bursts. Long bursts may be explained by accretion-induced collapse. Short bursts require another mechanism, for which we suggest neutron star collisions. These are capable of producing neutrino bursts as short as a few ms, consistent with the shortest observed time scales in GRB. We briefly investigate the parameters of clusters in which neutron star collisons may occur, and discuss the nuclear evolution of expelled and accelerated matter.

  20. A Unified Model for GRB Prompt Emission from Optical to Gamma-Rays; a New Type of Standard Candle

    CERN Document Server

    Guiriec, S; Hartmann, D H; Granot, J; Asano, K; Meszaros, P; Gill, R; Gehrels, N; McEnery, J

    2016-01-01

    The origin of prompt emission from gamma ray bursts remains to be an open question. Correlated prompt optical and gamma-ray emission observed in a handful of GRBs strongly suggests a common emission region, but failure to adequately fit the broadband GRB spectrum prompted the hypothesis of different emission mechanisms for the low- and high-energy radiations. We demonstrate that our multi-component model for GRB gamma-ray prompt emission provides an excellent fit to GRB 110205A from optical to gamma-ray energies. Our results show that the optical and highest gamma-ray emissions have the same spatial and spectral origin, which is different from the bulk of the X- and softest gamma-ray radiation. Finally, our accurate redshift estimate for GRB 110205A demonstrates promise for using GRBs as cosmological standard candles.

  1. IDENTIFYING THE LOCATION IN THE HOST GALAXY OF THE SHORT GRB 111117A WITH THE CHANDRA SUBARCSECOND POSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, T.; Troja, E. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (CRESST), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Aoki, K. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Guiriec, S.; Barthelmy, S. D. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Im, M.; Jeon, Y. [Center for the Exploration of the Origin of the Universe (CEOU), Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Leloudas, G.; Malesani, D.; De Ugarte Postigo, A.; Andersen, M. I. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Melandri, A.; D' Avanzo, P. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Urata, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Chung-Li 32054, Taiwan (China); Xu, D. [Department of Particle Physics and Astronomy, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Gorosabel, J.; Sanchez-Ramirez, R. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Bai, J. [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan Province, 650011 (China); Briggs, M. S. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Foley, S. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); and others

    2013-03-20

    We present our successful Chandra program designed to identify, with subarcsecond accuracy, the X-ray afterglow of the short GRB 111117A, which was discovered by Swift and Fermi. Thanks to our rapid target of opportunity request, Chandra clearly detected the X-ray afterglow, though no optical afterglow was found in deep optical observations. The host galaxy was clearly detected in the optical and near-infrared band, with the best photometric redshift of z=1.31{sub -0.23}{sup +0.46} (90% confidence), making it one of the highest known short gamma-ray burst (GRB) redshifts. Furthermore, we see an offset of 1.0 {+-} 0.2 arcsec, which corresponds to 8.4 {+-} 1.7 kpc, between the host and the afterglow position. We discuss the importance of using Chandra for obtaining subarcsecond X-ray localizations of short GRB afterglows to study GRB environments.

  2. Gamma Ray Bursts in the Era of Rapid Followup

    CERN Document Server

    Mundell, C G; Steele, I A

    2010-01-01

    We present a status report on the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) in the era of rapid follow-up using the world's largest robotic optical telescopes - the 2-m Liverpool and Faulkes telescopes. Within the context of key unsolved issues in GRB physics, we describe (1) our innovative software that allows real-time automatic analysis and interpretation of GRB light curves, (2) the novel instrumentation that allows unique types of observations (in particular, early time polarisation measurements) and (3) the key science questions and discoveries to which robotic observations are ideally suited, concluding with a summary of current understanding of GRB physics provided by combining rapid optical observations with simultaneous observations at other wavelengths.

  3. GRB 140619B: a short GRB from a binary neutron stars merger leading to the black hole formation

    CERN Document Server

    Muccino, M; Kovacevic, M; Izzo, L; Oliveira, F G; Rueda, J A; Bianco, C L; Enderli, M; Penacchioni, A V; Pisani, G B; Wang, Y; Zaninoni, E

    2014-01-01

    Following the recent identification of the prototypical short GRB 090227B originating from a binary neutron star (NS) merger and forming a black hole (BH), we present here a new example of such sources, GRB 140619B. The time-resolved spectral analysis of the early ~0.2s of the Fermi-GBM data, allows for the identification of the characteristic features of the e^+e^- plasma at transparency (P-GRB): i.e., a thermal spectrum with an observed temperature kT=(324+/-33)keV which represents ~40% of the total source fluence. The subsequent emission, with no thermal spectrum, is identified with the prompt emission. We consequently deduce a theoretical redshift of z=2.67+/-0.37, a total burst energy E+/-=(6.03+/-0.79)x10^{52}erg, a baryon load B=(5.52+/-0.73)x10^{-5}, and a Lorentz factor at transparency Gamma=(1.08+/-0.08)x10^4. From the simulation of the prompt emission we determine the average density of the circumburst medium (CBM), n_CBM=(4.7+/-1.2)x10^{-5}cm^{-3}, typical of the galactic halo environment. These l...

  4. WATCH observations of gamma ray bursts during 1990–1992

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castro-Tirado, A.; Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels;

    1994-01-01

    The first WATCH/GRANAT Gamma‐Ray Burst Catalogue comprises 70 events which have been detected by WATCH during the period December 1989–September 1992. 32 GRBs could be localized within a 3σ error radii of 1°. We have found a weak (2.2σ) clustering of these 32 bursts towards the Galactic Center....... However we conclude that there is no strong evidence of concentration of the bursts towards the Galactic Center or Plane. Around ∼10% of the 70 bursts showed x‐ray precursor or/and X‐ray tail. We discuss the possibility that two events, GRB 900126 and GRB 920311, would have been produced by the same...

  5. Spectroscopic Discovery of the Supernova 2003dh Associated with GRB 030329

    CERN Document Server

    Stanek, K Z; Garnavich, P M; Martini, P; Berlind, P; Caldwell, N; Challis, P M; Brown, W; Schild, R; Krisciunas, K; Calkins, M L; Lee, J C; Hathi, N; Jansen, R; Windhorst, R A; Echevarria, L; Eisenstein, D J; Pindor, B; Olszewski, E W; Harding, P; Holland, S T; Bersier, D F

    2003-01-01

    We present early observations of the afterglow of the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 030329 and the spectroscopic discovery of its associated supernova 2003dh. We obtained spectra of the afterglow of GRB 030329 each night from March 30.12 (0.6 days after the burst) to April 8.13 (UT) (9.6 days after the burst). The spectra cover a wavelength range of 350 nm to 850 nm. The early spectra consist of a power-law continuum (F_{nu} ~ nu^{-0.9}) with narrow emission lines originating from HII regions in the host galaxy, indicating a low redshift of z=0.1687. However, our spectra taken after 2003 Apr. 5 show broad peaks in flux characteristic of a supernova. Correcting for the afterglow emission, we find the spectrum of the supernova is remarkably similar to the type Ic `hypernova' SN 1998bw. While the presence of supernovae have been inferred from the light curves and colors of GRB afterglows in the past, this is the first direct, spectroscopic confirmation that a subset of classical gamma-ray bursts originate from supernova...

  6. The local energy production rates of GRB photons and of UHECRs

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, Eli

    2010-01-01

    In a recent analysis it was found that the local (z=0) rate at which gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) produce energy in 1 MeV photons, Q_GRB(z=0), is 300 times lower than the local energy production rate in ultra-high energy cosmic-rays. This may appear to be in contradiction with earlier results, according to which Q_GRB(z=0) is similar to the local energy production rate in >10^{19} eV cosmic-rays, Q_{10EeV}(z=0). This short (1 page) note identifies the origin of the apparent discrepancy and shows that Q_GRB(z=0) Q_{10EeV}(z=0) holds.

  7. Physical conditions and element abundances in SN and GRB host galaxies at different redshifts

    CERN Document Server

    Contini, M

    2016-01-01

    We compare the physical parameters and the relative abundances calculated throughout supernova (SN) and gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies by the detailed modelling of the spectra. The results show that : 1) shock velocities are lower in long period GRB (LGRB) than in SN host galaxies. 2) O/H relative abundance in SN hosts are scattered within a range 8.0 10^5 K. Ts in LGRB hosts are 3-8 10^4 K. 4) Ha increases with the ionization parameter U. We suggest that SN-host symbiosis is stronger in terms of host galaxy activity than GRB-host in the range of energies related to the near UV - optical - near IR spectra.

  8. Late Time Observations of the Afterglow and Environment of GRB 030329

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, G B; Pihlström, Y M; Ghosh, T; Salter, C

    2004-01-01

    We present Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations 217 days after the gamma-ray burst of 2003 March 29. These observations provide further measurements of the size and position of GRB 030329 that are used to constrain the expansion rate and proper motion of this nearby GRB. The expansion rate appears to be slowing down with time, favoring expansion into a constant density interstellar medium, rather than a circumstellar wind with an r^-2 density profile. We also present late time Arecibo observations of the redshifted HI and OH absorption spectra towards GRB 030329. No absorption (or emission) is seen allowing us to place limits on the atomic neutral hydrogen of N_H < 8.5 x 10^20 cm^-2, and molecular hydrogen of N_H_2 < 1.4 x 10^22 cm^-2. Finally, we present VLA limits on the radio polarization from the afterglow of <2% at late times.

  9. A new model of the central engine of GRB and the cosmic jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiziev, P.; Staicova, D.

    Despite the volume of already existing observational data, current models still cannot explain completely the excessive energy output and the time variability of gamma-ray bursts(GRB). One of the reasons for this is the lack of a good model of the central engine of GRB. A major problem in the proposed models with a black hole (BH) in the center is that they don't explain the observed evidences of late time activity of the central engine. In this paper we are starting the search for a possible model of that central engine as a rotating compact body of still unknown nature. The formation of jets in the new model lies entirely on the fundamental Teukolsky Master Equation. We demonstrate that this general model can describe the formation of collimated GRB-jets of various forms. Some preliminary results are presented.

  10. The nature of GRB-selected submillimeter galaxies: hot and young

    CERN Document Server

    Michałowski, M J; Cerón, J M Castro; Watson, D

    2007-01-01

    We present detailed fits of the spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of four submillimeter (submm) galaxies selected by the presence of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) event (GRBs 980703, 000210, 000418 and 010222). These faint ~3 mJy submm emitters at redshift ~1 are characterized by an unusual combination of long- and short-wavelength properties, namely enhanced submm and/or radio emission combined with optical faintness and blue colors. We exclude an active galactic nucleus as the source of long-wavelength emission. From the SED fits we conclude that the four galaxies are young (ages 45 K) indicate that GRB host galaxies are hotter, younger, and less massive counterparts to submm-selected galaxies detected so far. Future facilities like Herschel, JCMT/SCUBA-2 and ALMA will test this hypothesis enabling measurement of dust temperatures of fainter GRB-selected galaxies.

  11. Simulations of GRB detections with the ECLAIRs telescope onboard the future SVOM mission

    CERN Document Server

    Antier, S; Cordier, B; Gros, A; Götz, D; Lachaud, C

    2015-01-01

    The soft gamma-ray telescope ECLAIRs with its Scientific Trigger Unit is in charge of detecting Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) on-board the future SVOM satellite. Using the "scientific software model" (SSM), we study the efficiency of both implemented trigger algorithms, the Count-Rate Trigger for time-scales below 20s and the Image Trigger for larger ones. The SMM provides a simulation of ECLAIRs with photon projection through the coded-mask onto the detection plane. We developed an input GRB database for the SSM based on GRBs light curves detected by the Fermi GBM instrument. We extrapolated the GRB spectra into the ECLAIRs band (4-120 keV) and projected them onto the detection plane, superimposed with cosmic extragalactic background photons (CXB). Several simulations were performed by varying the GRB properties (fluxes and positions in the field of view). We present first results of this study in this paper.

  12. Evidence of Bulk Acceleration of the GRB X-Ray Flare Emission Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing

    2016-06-01

    Applying our recently developed generalized version of the high-latitude emission theory to the observations of X-ray flares in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), here we present clear observational evidence that the X-ray flare emission region is undergoing rapid bulk acceleration as the photons are emitted. We show that both the observed X-ray flare light curves and the photon index evolution curves can be simultaneously reproduced within a simple physical model invoking synchrotron radiation in an accelerating emission region far from the GRB central engine. Such an acceleration process demands an additional energy dissipation source other than kinetic energy, which points toward a significant Poynting flux in the emission region of X-ray flares. As the X-ray flares are believed to share a similar physical mechanism as the GRB prompt emission, our finding here hints that the GRB prompt emission jets may also carry a significant Poynting flux in their emitting region.

  13. When Do Internal Shocks End and External Shocks Begin? Early-Time Broadband Modelling of GRB 051111

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, N R; Perley, D; Huang, K Y; Urata, Y; Prochaska, J X; Bloom, J S; Filippenko, A V; Foley, R J; Kocevski, D; Chen, H W; Qiu, Y; Kuo, P H; Huang, F Y; Ip, W H; Tamagawa, T; Onda, K; Tashiro, M; Makishima, K; Nishihara, S; Sarugaku, Y

    2006-01-01

    Even with the renaissance in gamma-ray burst (GRB) research fostered by the Swift satellite, few bursts have both contemporaneous observations at long wavelengths and exquisite observations at later times across the electromagnetic spectrum. We present here contemporaneous imaging with the KAIT robotic optical telescope, dense optical sampling with Lulin, and supplemented with infrared data from PAIRITEL and radio to gamma-ray data from the literature. For the first time, we can test the constancy of microphysical parameters in the internal-external shock paradigm and carefully trace the flow of energy from the GRB to the surrounding medium. KAIT data taken 10^21 cm^-2), indicate a low dust-to-metals ratio and a possible over-abundance of the light metals. An apparent small ratio of total to selective extinction (R_V~ 2) and time constancy of both optical and X-ray spectra argue against dust destruction by the GRB itself.

  14. Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouveliotou, Chryssa

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) was launched in June 2008. During the last five years the instrument has observed several hundreds of bursts from 8 confirmed magnetars and 19 events from unconfirmed sources. I will discuss the results of the GBM magnetar burst catalog, expand on the different properties of their diverse source population, and compare these results with the bursting activity of past sources. I will then conclude with thoughts of how these properties fit the magnetar theoretical models.

  15. Gamma-Ray Burst Follow-up Observations with STACEE During 2003-2007

    CERN Document Server

    Jarvis, A; Carson, J E; Covault, C E; Driscoll, D D; Fortin, P; Gingrich, D M; Hanna, D S; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Mukherjee, R; Müller, C; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J

    2007-01-01

    The Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) is an atmospheric Cherenkov telescope (ACT) that uses a large mirror array to achieve a relatively low energy threshold. For sources with Crab-like spectra, at high elevations, the detector response peaks near 100 GeV. Gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations have been a high priority for the STACEE collaboration since the inception of the experiment. We present the results of 20 GRB follow-up observations at times ranging from 3 minutes to 15 hours after the burst triggers. Where redshift measurements are available, we place constraints on the intrinsic high-energy spectra of the bursts.

  16. Swift and Fermi observations of the early afterglow of the short Gamma-Ray Burst 090510

    CERN Document Server

    De Pasquale, M; Kuin, N P M; Page, M J; Curran, P A; Zane, S; Oates, S R; Holland, S T; Breeveld, A A; Hoversten, E A; Chincarini, G; Grupe, D

    2009-01-01

    We present the observations of GRB090510 performed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope and the Swift observatory. This is a bright, short burst that shows an extended emission detected in the GeV range. Furthermore, its optical emission initially rises, a feature so far observed only in long bursts, while the X-ray flux shows an initial shallow decrease, followed by a steeper decay. This exceptional behavior enables us to investigate the physical properties of the GRB outflow, poorly known in short bursts. We discuss internal shock and external shock models for the broadband energy emission of this object.

  17. GRB 090510: A Genuine Short GRB from a Binary Neutron Star Coalescing into a Kerr-Newman Black Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruffini, R.; Muccino, M.; Aimuratov, Y.; Bianco, C. L.; Cherubini, C.; Enderli, M.; Kovacevic, M.; Moradi, R.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Pisani, G. B.; Rueda, J. A.; Wang, Y.

    2016-11-01

    In a new classification of merging binary neutron stars (NSs) we separate short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) into two subclasses. The ones with {E}{iso}≲ {10}52 erg coalesce to form a massive NS and are indicated as short gamma-ray flashes (S-GRFs). The hardest, with {E}{iso}≳ {10}52 erg, coalesce to form a black hole (BH) and are indicated as genuine short GRBs (S-GRBs). Within the fireshell model, S-GRBs exhibit three different components: the proper GRB (P-GRB) emission, observed at the transparency of a self-accelerating baryon-{e}+{e}- plasma; the prompt emission, originating from the interaction of the accelerated baryons with the circumburst medium; and the high-energy (GeV) emission, observed after the P-GRB and indicating the formation of a BH. GRB 090510 gives the first evidence for the formation of a Kerr BH or, possibly, a Kerr-Newman BH. Its P-GRB spectrum can be fitted by a convolution of thermal spectra whose origin can be traced back to an axially symmetric dyadotorus. A large value of the angular momentum of the newborn BH is consistent with the large energetics of this S-GRB, which reach in the 1-10,000 keV range {E}{iso}=(3.95+/- 0.21)× {10}52 erg and in the 0.1-100 GeV range {E}{LAT}=(5.78+/- 0.60)× {10}52 erg, the most energetic GeV emission ever observed in S-GRBs. The theoretical redshift {z}{th}=0.75+/- 0.17 that we derive from the fireshell theory is consistent with the spectroscopic measurement z=0.903+/- 0.003, showing the self-consistency of the theoretical approach. All S-GRBs exhibit GeV emission, when inside the Fermi-LAT field of view, unlike S-GRFs, which never evidence it. The GeV emission appears to be the discriminant for the formation of a BH in GRBs, confirmed by their observed overall energetics.

  18. The host of GRB 060206: kinematics of a distant galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Thoene, Christina C; Ledoux, Cedric; Starling, Rhaana L C; Fynbo, Johan P U; Curran, Peter A; Gorosabel, Javier; van der Horst, Alexander J; Kewley, Lisa J; Levan, Andrew J; LLorente, Alvaro; Rol, Evert; Tanvir, Nial R; Postigo, Antonio de Ugarte; Vreeswijk, Paul M; Wijers, Ralph A M J

    2007-01-01

    Context. The spectra of afterglows can provide us with detailed information on the line-of-sight towards high redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). This allows us to use GRB afterglows as sensitive probes of interstellar matter in their host galaxies, and the circumstellar material around the progenitor star. Aims. In this paper we present early WHT/ISIS optical spectroscopy of the afterglow of the gamma-ray burst GRB 060206 at z = 4.048, detecting a range of metal absorption lines and their fine-structure transitions. Additional information is provided by properties derived from the afterglow lightcurve and from deep imaging of the host galaxy. Methods. The resolution and wavelength range of the spectra and the bright afterglow facilitate a detailed study of the circumburst and host galaxy environment through fitting of the absorption line systems. Their column densities allow us to derive properties for the different detected velocity components. We also use the deep imaging to detect the host galaxy and probe ...

  19. The Integral Burst Alert System (IBAS)

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, S; Borkowski, J J; Walter, R; Pedersen, H

    2003-01-01

    We describe the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS): the automatic software for the rapid distribution of the coordinates of the Gamma-Ray Bursts detected by INTEGRAL. IBAS is implemented as a ground based system, working on the near-real time telemetry stream. During the first six months of operations, six GRB have been detected in the field of view of the INTEGRAL instruments and localized by IBAS. Positions with an accuracy of a few arcminutes are currently distributed by IBAS to the community for follow-up observations within a few tens of seconds of the event.

  20. A Burst Chasing X-ray Polarimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Joanne

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the rationale, design, and importance of an X-Ray Polarimeter. There is a brief discussion of Gamma Ray Bursts, followed by a review of the theories of Gamma-Ray Bursts Polarization. This leads to the question of "How do we measure the polarization?" and a discussion of the GRB x-ray emission, the photoelectric effect and photoelectric polarimetry. The requirements for the work, can only be approached using a gas detector. This leads to a discussion of a Micropattern Gas Polarimeter, and the Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) X-ray Polarimeter.

  1. Rossi Prize Lecture: Gamma Ray Bursts: Origins and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meszaros, P.

    2000-12-01

    Some of the major stepping stones towards uncovering the mystery of gamma ray bursts will be discussed. This is an unfinished process, new observations being expected in the near future. I will review the current observational status, and discuss the present theoretical understanding of GRB, as well as the possible impact of future missions and experiments.

  2. Prompt Optical Emission from Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kehoe, R; Balsano, R; Barthelmy, S D; Bloch, J; Butterworth, P S; Casperson, D E; Cline, T; Fletcher, S; Frontera, F; Gisler, G; Heise, J; Hills, J; Hurley, K; Lee, B; Marshall, S; McKay, T; Pawl, A; Piro, L; Priedhorsky, B; Szymanski, J J; Wren, J; Kehoe, Robert; Akerlof, Carl; Balsano, Richard; Barthelmy, Scott; Bloch, Jeff; Butterworth, Paul; Casperson, Don; Cline, Tom; Fletcher, Sandra; Frontera, Fillippo; Gisler, Galen; Heise, John; Hills, Jack; Hurley, Kevin; Lee, Brian; Marshall, Stuart; Kay, Tim Mc; Pawl, Andrew; Piro, Luigi; Priedhorsky, Bill; Szymanski, John; Wren, Jim

    2001-01-01

    The Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) seeks to measure contemporaneous and early afterglow optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The ROTSE-I telescope array has been fully automated and responding to burst alerts from the GRB Coordinates Network since March 1998, taking prompt optical data for 30 bursts in its first year. We will briefly review observations of GRB990123 which revealed the first detection of an optical burst occurring during the gamma-ray emission, reaching 9th magnitude at its peak. In addition, we present here preliminary optical results for seven other gamma-ray bursts. No other optical counterparts were seen in this analysis, and the best limiting sensitivities are m(V) > 13.0 at 14.7 seconds after the gamma-ray rise, and m(V) > 16.4 at 62 minutes. These are the most stringent limits obtained for GRB optical counterpart brightness in the first hour after the burst. This analysis suggests that there is not a strong correlation between optical flux and gamma-ray em...

  3. HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION OF GRB 130427A: EVIDENCE FOR INVERSE COMPTON RADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Zhang, Fu-Wen; He, Hao-Ning; Zhou, Bei; Yang, Rui-Zhi; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wei, Da-Ming [Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Tam, P. H. T. [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liang, Yun-Feng, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn [Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Guangxi 530004 (China)

    2013-10-20

    A nearby superluminous burst GRB 130427A was simultaneously detected by six γ-ray space telescopes (Swift, the Fermi GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM)/Large Area Telescope, Konus-Wind, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, AGILE, and RHESSI) and by three RAPTOR full-sky persistent monitors. The isotropic γ-ray energy release is ∼10{sup 54} erg, rendering it the most powerful explosion among gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a redshift z ≤ 0.5. The emission above 100 MeV lasted about one day, and four photons are at energies greater than 40 GeV. We show that the count rate of 100 MeV-100 GeV emission may be mainly accounted for by the forward shock synchrotron radiation and the inverse Compton radiation likely dominates at GeV-TeV energies. In particular, an inverse Compton radiation origin is favored for the ∼(95.3, 47.3, 41.4, 38.5, 32) GeV photons arriving at t ∼ (243, 256.3, 610.6, 3409.8, 34366.2) s after the trigger of Fermi-GBM. Interestingly, the external inverse Compton scattering of the prompt emission (the second episode, i.e., t ∼ 120-260 s) by the forward-shock-accelerated electrons is expected to produce a few γ-rays at energies above 10 GeV, while five were detected in the same time interval. A possible unified model for the prompt soft γ-ray, optical, and GeV emission of GRB 130427A, GRB 080319B, and GRB 090902B is outlined. Implications of the null detection of >1 TeV neutrinos from GRB 130427A by IceCube are discussed.

  4. Slope evolution of GRB correlations and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Piedipalumbo, Ester; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Gamma -ray bursts (GRBs) observed up to redshifts $z>9.4$ can be used as possible probes to test cosmological models. Here we show how changes of the slope of the {\\it luminosity $L^*_X$ -break time $T^*_a$} correlation in GRB afterglows, hereafter the LT correlation, affect the determination of the cosmological parameters. With a simulated data set of 101 GRBs with a central value of the correlation slope that differs on the intrinsic one by a $5\\sigma$ factor, we find an overstimated value of the matter density parameter, $\\Omega_M$, compared to the value obtained with SNe Ia, while the Hubble constant, $H_0$, best fit value is still compatible in 1$\\sigma$ compared to other probes. We show that this compatibility of $H_0$ is due to the large intrinsic scatter associated with the simulated sample. Instead, if we consider a subsample of high luminous GRBs ($HighL$), we find that both the evaluation of $H_0$ and $\\Omega_M$ are not more compatible in 1$\\sigma$ and $\\Omega_M$ is underestimated by the $13\\%$. Ho...

  5. CONSTRAINING THE GRB-MAGNETAR MODEL BY MEANS OF THE GALACTIC PULSAR POPULATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rea, N. [Anton Pannekoek Institute for Astronomy, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gullón, M.; Pons, J. A.; Miralles, J. A. [Departament de Fisica Aplicada, Universitat d’Alacant, Ap. Correus 99, E-03080 Alacant (Spain); Perna, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (United States); Dainotti, M. G. [Physics Department, Stanford University, Via Pueblo Mall 382, Stanford, CA (United States); Torres, D. F. [Instituto de Ciencias de l’Espacio (ICE, CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Carrer Can Magrans s/n, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-11-10

    A large fraction of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) displays an X-ray plateau phase within <10{sup 5} s from the prompt emission, proposed to be powered by the spin-down energy of a rapidly spinning newly born magnetar. In this work we use the properties of the Galactic neutron star population to constrain the GRB-magnetar scenario. We re-analyze the X-ray plateaus of all Swift GRBs with known redshift, between 2005 January and 2014 August. From the derived initial magnetic field distribution for the possible magnetars left behind by the GRBs, we study the evolution and properties of a simulated GRB-magnetar population using numerical simulations of magnetic field evolution, coupled with Monte Carlo simulations of Pulsar Population Synthesis in our Galaxy. We find that if the GRB X-ray plateaus are powered by the rotational energy of a newly formed magnetar, the current observational properties of the Galactic magnetar population are not compatible with being formed within the GRB scenario (regardless of the GRB type or rate at z = 0). Direct consequences would be that we should allow the existence of magnetars and “super-magnetars” having different progenitors, and that Type Ib/c SNe related to Long GRBs form systematically neutron stars with higher initial magnetic fields. We put an upper limit of ≤16 “super-magnetars” formed by a GRB in our Galaxy in the past Myr (at 99% c.l.). This limit is somewhat smaller than what is roughly expected from Long GRB rates, although the very large uncertainties do not allow us to draw strong conclusion in this respect.

  6. GRB 090423:Marking the death of a massive star at z=8.2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    GRB 090423 is the new high-z record holder of Gamma-ray bursts(GRBs) with z-8.2.We present a detailed analysis of both the spectral and temporal features of GRB 090423 observed with Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM.We find that the T90 observed with BAT in the 15-150 keV band is 13.2 s,corresponding to-1.4 s at z=8.2.It once again gives rise to the issue of whether the progenitors of high-z GRBs are massive stars or mergers since the discovery of GRB 080913 at z=6.7.In comparison with the T90 distribution in the burst frame of the current redshift-known GRB sample,we find that it is marginally grouped into the long group(Type II GRBs).The spectrum observed with both BAT and GBM is well fitted by a power-law with exponential cutoff,which yields an Ep=(50.4±7.0) keV.The event satisfies the Amati-relation well for Type II GRBs within their 3σ uncertainty range.Our results indicate that this event would be produced by the death of a massive star.Based on the Amati-relation,we derive its distance modulus,which follows the Hubble diagram of the concordance cosmology model at a redshift of-8.2.

  7. Machine Learning Model of the Swift/BAT Trigger Algorithm for Long GRB Population Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Graff, Philip B; Baker, John G; Sakamoto, Takanori

    2015-01-01

    To draw inferences about gamma-ray burst (GRB) source populations based on Swift observations, it is essential to understand the detection efficiency of the Swift burst alert telescope (BAT). This study considers the problem of modeling the Swift/BAT triggering algorithm for long GRBs, a computationally expensive procedure, and models it using machine learning algorithms. A large sample of simulated GRBs from Lien 2014 is used to train various models: random forests, boosted decision trees (with AdaBoost), support vector machines, and artificial neural networks. The best models have accuracies of $\\gtrsim97\\%$ ($\\lesssim 3\\%$ error), which is a significant improvement on a cut in GRB flux which has an accuracy of $89.6\\%$ ($10.4\\%$ error). These models are then used to measure the detection efficiency of Swift as a function of redshift $z$, which is used to perform Bayesian parameter estimation on the GRB rate distribution. We find a local GRB rate density of $n_0 \\sim 0.48^{+0.41}_{-0.23} \\ {\\rm Gpc}^{-3} {\\...

  8. GRB 090423: Marking the Death of a Massive Star at z=8.2

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lin; Nan, Zhang Shuang

    2009-01-01

    GRB 090423 is the new high-z record holder of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with z~ 8.2. We present a detailed analysis of both the spectral and temporal features of GRB 090423 observed with Swift/BAT and Fermi/GBM. We find that the T90 observed with BAT in the 15-150 keV band is 13.2 s, corresponding to ~ 1.4 s at z=8.2. It once again gives rise to an issue whether the progenitors of high-z GRBs are massive stars or mergers since the discovery of GRB 080913 at z=6.7. In comparison with T90 distribution in the burst frame of current redshift-known GRB sample, we find that it is marginally grouped into the long group (Type II GRBs). The spectrum observed with both BAT and GBM is well fitted by a power-law with exponential cutoff, which yields an Ep=50.4+/-7.0 keV. The event well satisfies the Amati-relation for the Type II GRBs within their 3 siggma uncertainty range. Our results indicate that this event would be produced by the death of a massive star. Based on the Amati-relation, we derive its distance modulus, wh...

  9. GRB afterglows: Dust extinction properties from the low to high redshift universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Tayyaba

    2016-11-01

    Long-duration Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are excellent probes to study dust extinction due to their occurrence in star-forming regions and having simple synchrotron emission spectra. Inclusion of spectroscopic data to the GRB X-ray to the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) could better define the continuum and confirm extinction feature. A preliminary SED analysis of GRB afterglows targeted with the VLT/X-Shooter spectrograph finds that all the 60% of extinguished bursts fit-well with featureless extinction curves. The longer wavelength coverage from ultraviolet to the near-infrared of X-Shooter helps to derive individual extinction curves and determine the total-to-selective extinction, RV precisely, suggesting extinction curves steeper (with a mean of RV = 2.66 ± 0.10) than the Small Magellanic Cloud. Moreover, addition of more data to the study of dust-to-metals ratios in GRB afterglows, quasar absorbers, and multiply lensed galaxies still shows the dust-to-metals ratios close to the Galactic value (with a mean value of log - 21.2cm-2mag-1), hinting short time delay between metals and dust formation. Such studies demonstrate the strength of using GRB afterglows to study dust origin and its properties the from low to high redshift Universe.

  10. Rapid, Machine-Learned Resource Allocation: Application to High-redshift GRB Follow-up

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, Adam N; Richards, Joseph W; Broderick, Tamara; Butler, Nathaniel R; Bloom, Joshua S

    2011-01-01

    As the number of observed Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) continues to grow, follow-up resources need to be used more efficiently in order to maximize science output from limited telescope time. As such, it is becoming increasingly important to rapidly identify bursts of interest as soon as possible after the event, before the afterglows fade beyond detectability. Studying the most distant (highest redshift) events, for instance, remains a primary goal for many in the field. Here we present our Random forest Automated Triage Estimator for GRB redshifts (RATE GRB-z) for rapid identification of high-redshift candidates using early-time metrics from the three telescopes onboard Swift. While the basic RATE methodology is generalizable to a number of resource allocation problems, here we demonstrate its utility for telescope-constrained follow-up efforts with the primary goal to identify and study high-z GRBs. For each new GRB, RATE GRB-z provides a recommendation - based on the available telescope time - of whether the e...

  11. Measuring the pulse of GRB 090618: A Simultaneous Spectral and Timing Analysis of the Prompt Emission

    CERN Document Server

    RupalBasak,

    2011-01-01

    We develop a new method for simultaneous timing and spectral studies of Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) prompt emission and apply it to make a pulse-wise description of the prompt emission of GRB 090618, the brightest GRB detected in the Fermi era. We exploit the large area (and sensitivity) of Swift/BAT and the wide band width of Fermi/GBM to derive the parameters for a complete spectral and timing description of the individual pulses of this GRB, based on the various empirical relations suggested in the literature. We demonstrate that this empirical model correctly describes the other observed properties of the burst like the variation of the lag with energy and the pulse width with energy. The measurements also show an indication of an increase in pulse width as a function of energy at low energies for some of the pulses, which is naturally explained as an off-shoot of some particular combination of the model parameters. We argue that these model parameters, particularly the peak energy at the beginning of the pulse...

  12. GRB 130606A within a sub-DLA at redshift 5.91

    CERN Document Server

    Castro-Tirado, A J; Ellison, S L; Jelínek, M; Martín-Carrillo, A; Bromm, V; Gorosabel, J; Bremer, M; Winters, J M; Hanlon, L; Meegan, S; Topinka, M; Pandey, S B; Guziy, S; Jeong, S; Sonbas, E; Pozanenko, A S; Cunniffe, R; Fernández-Muñoz, R; Ferrero, P; Gehrels, N; Hudec, R; Kubánek, P; Lara-Gil, O; Muñoz-Martínez, V F; Pérez-Ramírez, D; Štrobl, J; Álvarez-Iglesias, C; Inasaridze, R; Rumyantsev, V; Volnova, A; Hellmich, S; Mottola, S; Cerón, J M Castro; Cepa, J; Göğüş, E; Güver, T; Taş, Ö Önal; Park, I H; Sabau-Graziati, L; Tejero, A

    2013-01-01

    Events such as GRB130606A at z=5.91, offer an exciting new window into pre-galactic metal enrichment in these very high redshift host galaxies. We study the environment and host galaxy of GRB 130606A, a high-z event, in the context of a high redshift population of GRBs. We have obtained multiwavelength observations from radio to gamma-ray, concentrating particularly on the X-ray evolution as well as the optical photometric and spectroscopic data analysis. With an initial Lorentz bulk factor in the range \\Gamma_0 ~ 65-220, the X-ray afterglow evolution can be explained by a time-dependent photoionization of the local circumburst medium, within a compact and dense environment. The host galaxy is a sub-DLA (log N (HI) = 19.85+/-0.15), with a metallicity content in the range from ~1/7 to ~1/60 of solar. Highly ionized species (N V and Si IV) are also detected. This is the second highest redshift burst with a measured GRB-DLA metallicity and only the third GRB absorber with sub-DLA HI column density. GRB ' lightho...

  13. HST Data Suggest Proper Motion for the Optical Counterpart of GRB 970228

    CERN Document Server

    Caraveo, P A; Tavani, M; Bignami, Giovanni Fabrizio

    1997-01-01

    After a quarter of a century of gamma-ray burst (GRB) astronomy, the Italian-Dutch satellite BeppoSAX on Feb 28th, 1997 detected a soft X-ray afterglow from GRB 970228 and positioned it accurately. This made possible the successful detection of an optical transient. Two public Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images of the GRB/optical transient region were taken on March 26th and April 7th, 1997. They are analyzed here, with the purpose of understanding the nature of GRB 970228. We find that the position of the faint point-like object V ~ 26 seen at the transient location changed by 0.40 +/-0.10 pixels in 12 days, corresponding to a proper motion of ~ 550 mas/year. By comparison, four adjacent sources in the same field do not show any significant displacement, with astrometric residuals close to zero and average absolute displacements less than 0.09 pixels. If confirmed, this result would strongly support the galactic nature of GRB 970228.

  14. GRB 070125 and the environments of spectral-line poor afterglow absorbers

    CERN Document Server

    De Cia, A; Wiersema, K; van der Horst, A J; Vreeswijk, P M; Björnsson, G; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Jakobsson, P; Levan, A J; Rol, E; Schulze, S; Tanvir, N R

    2011-01-01

    GRB 070125 is among the most energetic bursts detected and the most extensively observed so far. Nevertheless, unresolved issues are still open in the literature on the physics of the afterglow and on the GRB environment. In particular, GRB 070125 was claimed to have exploded in a galactic halo environment, based on the uniqueness of the optical spectrum and the non-detection of an underlying host galaxy. In this work we collect all publicly available data and address these issues by modelling the NIR-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution (SED) and studying the high signal-to-noise VLT/FORS afterglow spectrum in comparison with a larger sample of GRB absorbers. The SED reveals a synchrotron cooling break in the UV, low equivalent hydrogen column density and little reddening caused by a LMC- or SMC-type extinction curve. From the weak MgII absorption at z=1.5477 in the spectrum, we derived logN(MgII)=12.96+0.13-0.18 and upper limits on the ionic column density of several metals. These suggest that the GRB abso...

  15. The ECLAIRs GRB-trigger telescope on-board the future mission SVOM

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, Stéphane; Atteia, Jean-Luc; Godet, Olivier; Lachaud, Cyril; Mercier, Karine

    2015-01-01

    The Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Objects Monitor (SVOM) is an approved satellite mission for Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) studies, developed in cooperation between the Chinese National Space Agency (CNSA), the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), the French Space Agency (CNES) and French laboratories. SVOM entered Phase B in 2014 and is scheduled for launch in 2021. SVOM will provide fast and accurate GRB localizations, and determine the temporal and spectral properties of the GRB emission, thanks to a set of 4 on-board instruments. The trigger system of the coded-mask telescope ECLAIRs images the sky in the 4-120 keV energy range, in order to detect and localize GRBs in its 2 sr-wide field of view. The low-energy threshold of ECLAIRs is well suited for the detection of highly redshifted GRB. The high-energy coverage is extended up to 5 MeV thanks to the non-imaging gamma-ray spectrometer GRM. GRB alerts are sent in real-time to the ground observers community, and a spacecraft slew is performed in orde...

  16. Constraining the GRB-magnetar model by means of the Galactic pulsar population

    CERN Document Server

    Rea, Nanda; Pons, Jose' A; Perna, Rosalba; Dainotti, Maria G; Miralles, Juan A; Torres, Diego F

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) displays an X-ray plateau phase within <10^{5} s from the prompt emission, proposed to be powered by the spin-down energy of a rapidly spinning newly born magnetar. In this work we use the properties of the Galactic neutron star population to constrain the GRB-magnetar scenario. We re-analyze the X-ray plateaus of all Swift GRBs with known redshift, between January 2005 and August 2014. From the derived initial magnetic field distribution for the possible magnetars left behind by the GRBs, we study the evolution and properties of a simulated GRB-magnetar population using numerical simulations of magnetic field evolution, coupled with Monte Carlo simulations of Pulsar Population Synthesis in our Galaxy. We find that if the GRB X-ray plateaus are powered by the rotational energy of a newly formed magnetar, the current observational properties of the Galactic magnetar population are not compatible with being formed within the GRB scenario (regardless of the GRB type...

  17. GRB 110715A: the peculiar multiwavelength evolution of the first afterglow detected by ALMA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Hancock, P. J.; Jóhannesson, G.; Murphy, Tara; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Gorosabel, J.; Kann, D. A.; Krühler, T.; Oates, S. R.; Japelj, J.; Thöne, C. C.; Lundgren, A.; Perley, D. A.; Malesani, D.; de Gregorio Monsalvo, I.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; D'Elia, V.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Garcia-Appadoo, D.; Goldoni, P.; Greiner, J.; Hu, Y.-D.; Jelínek, M.; Jeong, S.; Kamble, A.; Klose, S.; Kuin, N. P. M.; Llorente, A.; Martín, S.; Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.; Rossi, A.; Schady, P.; Sparre, M.; Sudilovsky, V.; Tello, J. C.; Updike, A.; Wiersema, K.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2017-02-01

    We present the extensive follow-up campaign on the afterglow of GRB 110715A at 17 different wavelengths, from X-ray to radio bands, starting 81 s after the burst and extending up to 74 d later. We performed for the first time a GRB afterglow observation with the ALMA observatory. We find that the afterglow of GRB 110715A is very bright at optical and radio wavelengths. We use the optical and near-infrared spectroscopy to provide further information about the progenitor's environment and its host galaxy. The spectrum shows weak absorption features at a redshift z = 0.8225, which reveal a host-galaxy environment with low ionization, column density, and dynamical activity. Late deep imaging shows a very faint galaxy, consistent with the spectroscopic results. The broad-band afterglow emission is modelled with synchrotron radiation using a numerical algorithm and we determine the best-fitting parameters using Bayesian inference in order to constrain the physical parameters of the jet and the medium in which the relativistic shock propagates. We fitted our data with a variety of models, including different density profiles and energy injections. Although the general behaviour can be roughly described by these models, none of them are able to fully explain all data points simultaneously. GRB 110715A shows the complexity of reproducing extensive multiwavelength broad-band afterglow observations, and the need of good sampling in wavelength and time and more complex models to accurately constrain the physics of GRB afterglows.

  18. AstroSat CZT Imager observations of GRB 151006A: timing, spectroscopy, and polarisation study

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Iyyani, S; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A P K; Malkar, J P; Paul, D; Bhalerao, V B; Bhattacharya, D; Dewangan, G C; Pawar, Pramod; Vibhute, A M; Chattopadhyay, T; Mithun, N P S; Vadawale, S V; Vagshette, N; Basak, R; Pradeep, P; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S; Vinod, P; Navalgund, K H; Pandiyan, R; Sarma, K S; Seetha, S; Subbarao, K

    2016-01-01

    AstroSat is a multi-wavelength satellite launched on 2015 September 28. The CZT Imager of AstroSat on its very first day of operation detected a long duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) namely GRB 151006A. Using the off-axis imaging and spectral response of the instrument, we demonstrate that CZT Imager can localise this GRB correct to about a few degrees and it can provide, in conjunction with Swift, spectral parameters similar to that obtained from Fermi/GBM. Hence CZT Imager would be a useful addition to the currently operating GRB instruments (Swift and Fermi). Specifically, we argue that the CZT Imager will be most useful for the short hard GRBs by providing localisation for those detected by Fermi and spectral information for those detected only by Swift. We also provide preliminary results on a new exciting capability of this instrument: CZT Imager is able to identify Compton scattered events thereby providing polarisation information for bright GRBs. GRB 151006A, in spite of being relatively faint, shows h...

  19. "Dark" GRB 080325 In A Dusty Massive Galaxy At z \\sim 2

    CERN Document Server

    Hashimoto, T; Aoki, K; Tanaka, I; Yabe, K; Kawai, N; Aoki, W; Furusawa, H; Hattori, T; Iye, M; Kawabata, K S; Kobayashi, N; Komiyama, Y; Kosugi, G; Minowa, Y; Mizumoto, Y; Niino, Y; Nomoto, K; Noumaru, J; Ogasawara, R; Pyo, T -S; Sakamoto, T; Sekiguchi, K; Shirasaki, Y; Suzuki, M; Tajitsu, A; Takata, T; Tamagawa, T; Terada, H; Totani, T; Watanabe, J; Yamada, T; Yoshida, A

    2010-01-01

    We present optical and near infrared observations of GRB 080325 putatively classified as a "Dark GRB". Near-infrared observations with Subaru/MOIRCS provided a clear detection of afterglow in Ks band, although no optical counterpart was reported. The flux ratio of rest-wavelength optical to X-ray bands of the afterglow indicates that the dust extinction along the line of sight to the afterglow is Av = 2.5 - 10 mag. This large extinction is probably the major reason for optical faintness of GRB 080325. The J - Ks color of the host galaxy, (J - Ks = 1.3 in AB magnitude), is significantly redder than those for typical GRB hosts previously identified. In addition to J and Ks bands, optical images in B, Rc, i', and z' bands with Subaru/Suprime-Cam were obtained at about one year after the burst, and a photometric redshift of the host is estimated to be z_{photo} = 1.9. The host luminosity is comparable to L^{*} at z \\sim 2 in contrast to the sub-L^{*} property of typical GRB hosts at lower redshifts. The best-fit ...

  20. Investigation of Primordial Black Hole Bursts using Interplanetary Network Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ukwatta, T N; MacGibbon, J H; Svinkin, D S; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Pal'shin, V D; Goldsten, J; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Rau, A; Kienlin, A; Zhang, X; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Meegan, C; Yamaoka, K; Fukazawa, Y; Ohno, M; Ohmori, N; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Feroci, M; Frontera, F; Guidorzi, C; Barthelmy, S; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Cummings, J; Krimm, H A; Smith, D M; McTiernan, J

    2015-01-01

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating Primordial Black Holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the minimum distance to gamma-ray bursts using detections from widely separated spacecraft. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 10^13-10^18 cm (7-10^5 AU) range, consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate for the first time lower limits ...

  1. Concluding Remarks: The Current Status and Future Prospects for GRB Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2009-01-01

    We are in a remarkable period of discovery in GRB astronomy. The current satellites including Swift, Fermi. AGILE and INTEGRAL are detecting and observing bursts of all varieties. Increasing capabilities for follow-up observations on the ground and in space are leading to rapid and deep coverage across the electromagnetic spectrum, The future will see continued operation of the current experiments and with future missions like SVOM plus possible rni_Ssions like JANUS and EXIST. An exciting expansion of capabilities is occurring in areas of gravitational waves and neutrinos that could open new windows on the GRB phenomenon. Increased IR capabilities on the ground and with missions like JWST will enable further exploration of high redshift bursts. The future is bright.

  2. The afterglow and the host galaxy of GRB 011211

    CERN Document Server

    Jakobsson, P; Fynbo, J P U; Gorosabel, J; Pedersen, K; Burud, I; Levan, A J; Kouveliotou, C; Tanvir, N R; Fruchter, A S; Rhoads, J; Grav, T; Hansen, M W; Michelsen, R; Andersen, M I; Jensen, B L; Pedersen, H; Thomsen, B; Weidinger, M; Bhargavi, S G; Cowsik, R; Pandey, S B

    2003-01-01

    We present optical, near-infrared, and X-ray observations of the optical afterglow (OA) of the X-ray rich, long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 011211. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) data obtained 14, 26, 32, and 59 days after the burst, show the host galaxy to have a morphology that is fairly typical of blue galaxies at high redshift. We measure its magnitude to be R = 24.95 +/- 0.11. We detect a break in the OA R-band light curve which is naturally accounted for by a collimated outflow geometry. By fitting a broken power-law to the data we find a best fit with a break 1.56 +/- 0.02 days after the burst, a pre-break slope of alpha_1 = -0.95 +/- 0.02, and a post-break slope of alpha_2 = -2.11 +/- 0.07. The UV-optical spectral energy distribution (SED) around 14 hours after the burst is best fit with a power-law with index beta = -0.56 +/- 0.19 reddened by an SMC-like extinction law with a modest A_V = 0.08 +/- 0.08 mag. By comparison, from the XMM-Newton X-ray data at around the same time, we find a decay index of...

  3. The Gamma-Ray Burst ToolSHED is Open for Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblin, Timothy W.; Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.

    2004-09-01

    The GRB ToolSHED, a Gamma-Ray Burst SHell for Expeditions in Data-Mining, is now online and available via a web browser to all in the scientific community. The ToolSHED is an online web utility that contains pre-processed burst attributes of the BATSE catalog and a suite of induction-based machine learning and statistical tools for classification and cluster analysis. Users create their own login account and study burst properties within user-defined multi-dimensional parameter spaces. Although new GRB attributes are periodically added to the database for user selection, the ToolSHED has a feature that allows users to upload their own burst attributes (e.g. spectral parameters, etc.) so that additional parameter spaces can be explored. A data visualization feature using GNUplot and web-based IDL has also been implemented to provide interactive plotting of user-selected session output. In an era in which GRB observations and attributes are becoming increasingly more complex, a utility such as the GRB ToolSHED may play an important role in deciphering GRB classes and understanding intrinsic burst properties.

  4. Hubble space telescope observations of the afterglow, supernova, and host galaxy associated with the extremely bright GRB 130427A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Tanvir, N. R.; Wiersema, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Fruchter, A. S.; Hounsell, R. A.; Graham, J. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Hjorth, J.; Fynbo, J. P. U. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Pian, E. [INAF, Trieste Astronomical Observatory, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34143 Trieste (Italy); Mazzali, P. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, IC2 Liverpool Science Park 146 Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Cano, Z. [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 5, 107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Cenko, S. B. [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Science and Technology Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Pe' er, A. [Department of Physics, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Misra, K., E-mail: a.j.levan@warwick.ac.uk [Aryabhatta Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Manora Peak, Nainital-263 002 (India)

    2014-09-10

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst (GRB), GRB 130427A. At z = 0.34, this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova (SN) and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E {sub iso} > 10{sup 54} erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated SN. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability, and invariant point-spread function of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host, and SN contributions to the observed light ∼17 rest-frame days after the burst, utilizing a host subtraction spectrum obtained one year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys grism observations show that the associated SN, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, v {sub ph} ∼ 15, 000 km s{sup –1}). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (v {sub ph} ∼ 30, 000 km s{sup –1}), but this SN is significantly fainter and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated ∼4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}), possibly interacting disk galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size, and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it, are also strikingly similar to those of GRB 980425/SN 1998bw. The similarity of the SNe and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests that broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  5. Clustering of galaxies around gamma-ray burst sight-lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sudilovsky, V.; Greiner, J.; Rau, A.

    2013-01-01

    -lines, as strong MgII tends to trace these sources. In this work, we test this expectation by calculating the two point angular correlation function of galaxies within 120'' (~470 h Kpc470h71-1Kpc at z ~ 0.4) of GRB afterglows. We compare the gamma-ray burst optical and near-infrared detector (GROND) GRB afterglow......There is evidence of an overdensity of strong intervening MgII absorption line systems distributed along the lines of sight toward gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows relative to quasar sight-lines. If this excess is real, one should also expect an overdensity of field galaxies around GRB sight...

  6. MIRAX sensitivity for Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacahui, J. R.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Braga, J.; Castro, M. A.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present the detection capability of the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de RAios-X) experiment for Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). MIRAX is an X-ray astronomy mission designed to perform a wide band hard X-ray (10-200 keV) survey of the sky, especially in the Galactic plane. With a total detection area of 169 cm2, large field of view (FoV, 20 ° × 20 °), angular resolution of 1°45‧ and good spectral and time resolution (∼8% at 60 keV, 10 μs), MIRAX will be optimized for the detection and study of transient sources, such as accreting neutron stars (NS), black holes (BH), Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), and both short and long GRBs. This is especially important because MIRAX is expected to operate in an epoch when probably no other hard X-ray wide-field imager will be active. We have performed detailed simulations of MIRAX GRB observations using the GEANT4 package, including the background spectrum and images of GRB sources in order to provide accurate predictions of the sensitivity for the expected GRB rate to be observed. MIRAX will be capable of detecting ∼44 GRBs per year up to redshifts of ∼4.5. The MIRAX mission will be able to contribute significantly to GRB science by detecting a large number of GRBs per year with wide band spectral response. The observations will contribute mainly to the part of GRB spectra where a thermal emission is predicted by the Fireball model. We also discuss the possibility of detecting GRB afterglows in the X-ray band with MIRAX.

  7. Very High Energy Observations of Gamma-Ray Burst Locations with the Whipple Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Horan, D; Badran, H M; Blaylock, G; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Byrum, K L; Celik, O; Chow, Y C K; Cogan, P; Cui, W; Daniel, M K; Perez, I de la Calle; Dowdall, C; Falcone, A D; Fegan, D J; Fegan, S J; Finley, J P; Fortin, P; Fortson, L F; Gillanders, G H; Grube, J; Gutíerrez, K J; Hall, J; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, S B; Humensky, T B; Kenny, G E; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D B; Kildea, J; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Le Bohec, S; Maier, G; Moriarty, P; Nagai, T; Ong, R A; Perkins, J S; Petry, D; Quinn, J; Quinn, M; Ragan, K; Reynolds, P T; Rose, H J; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Steele, D; Swordy, S P; Toner, J A; Valcarcel, L; Vasilev, V V; Wagner, R G; Wakely, S P; Weekes, T C; White, R J; Williams, D A; 10.1086/509567

    2008-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations at very high energies (VHE, E > 100 GeV) can impose tight constraints on some GRB emission models. Many GRB afterglow models predict a VHE component similar to that seen in blazars and plerions, in which the GRB spectral energy distribution has a double-peaked shape extending into the VHE regime. VHE emission coincident with delayed X-ray flare emission has also been predicted. GRB follow-up observations have had high priority in the observing program at the Whipple 10m Gamma-ray Telescope and GRBs will continue to be high priority targets as the next generation observatory, VERITAS, comes on-line. Upper limits on the VHE emission, at late times (>~4 hours), from seven GRBs observed with the Whipple Telescope are reported here.

  8. Hyperluminal Signatures in the Afterglows of Gamma-Ray Bursts 980425 and 030329

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, A

    2016-01-01

    The late-time high-resolution X-ray and radio observations of GRB980425/SN1998bw, the closest known gamma ray burst (GRB) associated with a supernova (SN) explosion, may have actually resolved the hyperluminal source that produced the GRB and its afterglow. Its hyperluminal speed ~350c is consistent with that expected in the cannonball (CB) model of GRBs. The observed superluminal expansion of the late-time radio image of GRB030329/SN2003dh, the GRB with the brightest and longest followed up radio afterglow to date, is also consistent with that expected in the CB model of GRBs and extrapolates to an apparent early-time hyperluminal expansion.

  9. Analysis of the Prompt Optical Emission of the Naked-Eye GRB 080319B

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, C; Guarnieri, A; Piccioni, A; Beskin, G; Bondar, S; Karpov, S; Molinari, E

    2009-01-01

    We present the observed/intrinsic optical parameters and the variability analysis of the Naked-Eye Burst, GRB 080319B, observed by the TORTORA wide-field optical monitoring system. The event is extreme not only in observed properties but also intrinsically: it is the most luminous event ever recorded at optical wavelengths. The temporal properties suggest short-lived periodic activities of the internal engine. This is the fastest optically variable source detected at cosmological distances.

  10. Important Property of GRB Pulse: Power-Law Indices of Time Properties on Energy

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zhao-Yang Peng

    2014-09-01

    The dependence of pulse temporal properties (pulse width, pulse rise width and pulse decay width) on energy is power-law function. Some correlated relationships between the power-law indices of the pulse time properties on energy and the spectral lags, relative spectral lags, spectral parameters of band function, and photon flux using a well-separated long-duration -ray burst (GRB) pulse sample is demonstrated here. We argue that the curvature effect can explain the correlated properties.

  11. The Ultra-long GRB 111209A. II. Prompt to Afterglow and Afterglow Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratta, G.; Gendre, B.; Atteia, J. L.; Boër, M.; Coward, D. M.; De Pasquale, M.; Howell, E.; Klotz, A.; Oates, S.; Piro, L.

    2013-12-01

    The "ultra-long" gamma-ray burst GRB 111209A at redshift z = 0.677 is the longest GRB ever observed thus far, with a rest frame prompt emission duration of ~4 hr. In order to explain the burst exceptional longevity, a low-metallicity blue supergiant progenitor was invoked. In this article we further constrain the phenomenology and progenitor properties of this peculiar GRB by performing a multiband temporal and spectral analysis of both the prompt and the afterglow emission. We use proprietary and publicly available data from Swift, Konus WIND, XMM-Newton, and TAROT, as well as from other ground-based optical and radio telescopes. We find some peculiar properties that are possibly connected to the exceptional nature of this burst, namely: (1) an unprecedented large optical delay of 410 ± 50 s between the peak time in gamma-rays and the peak time in the optical of a marked multiwavelength flare; (2) multiwavelength prompt emission spectral modeling requires a certain amount of dust in the circumburst environment. The dust produces a rest frame visual extinction of AV = 0.3-1.5 mag, and may undergo destruction at late times; and (3) we detect the presence of a hard spectral extra power-law component at the end of the X-ray steep steep decay phase and before the start of the X-ray afterglow, which has never been revealed thus far in past GRBs. The optical afterglow shows more usual properties; it has a flux power-law decay with an index of 1.6 ± 0.1 and a late rebrightening feature observed at ~1.1 the day after the first Burst Alert Telescope trigger. We discuss our findings in the context of several possible interpretations that have been given thus far of the complex multiband GRB phenomenology and propose a binary channel formation for the blue supergiant progenitor.

  12. The ultra-long GRB 111209A. II. Prompt to afterglow and afterglow properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratta, G. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (OAR/INAF), via Frascati 33, I-00040 Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Gendre, B.; Boër, M. [ARTEMIS, UMR 7250 (CNRS/OCA/UNS), boulevard de l' Observatoire, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex (France); Atteia, J. L. [Université de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Coward, D. M.; Howell, E. [School of Physics, University of Western Australia (UWA), Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL), University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Klotz, A. [IRAP, 14, avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400 Toulouse (France); Piro, L. [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali di Roma (IAPS/INAF), via fosso del cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2013-12-10

    The 'ultra-long' gamma-ray burst GRB 111209A at redshift z = 0.677 is the longest GRB ever observed thus far, with a rest frame prompt emission duration of ∼4 hr. In order to explain the burst exceptional longevity, a low-metallicity blue supergiant progenitor was invoked. In this article we further constrain the phenomenology and progenitor properties of this peculiar GRB by performing a multiband temporal and spectral analysis of both the prompt and the afterglow emission. We use proprietary and publicly available data from Swift, Konus WIND, XMM-Newton, and TAROT, as well as from other ground-based optical and radio telescopes. We find some peculiar properties that are possibly connected to the exceptional nature of this burst, namely: (1) an unprecedented large optical delay of 410 ± 50 s between the peak time in gamma-rays and the peak time in the optical of a marked multiwavelength flare; (2) multiwavelength prompt emission spectral modeling requires a certain amount of dust in the circumburst environment. The dust produces a rest frame visual extinction of A{sub V} = 0.3-1.5 mag, and may undergo destruction at late times; and (3) we detect the presence of a hard spectral extra power-law component at the end of the X-ray steep steep decay phase and before the start of the X-ray afterglow, which has never been revealed thus far in past GRBs. The optical afterglow shows more usual properties; it has a flux power-law decay with an index of 1.6 ± 0.1 and a late rebrightening feature observed at ∼1.1 the day after the first Burst Alert Telescope trigger. We discuss our findings in the context of several possible interpretations that have been given thus far of the complex multiband GRB phenomenology and propose a binary channel formation for the blue supergiant progenitor.

  13. Hydrodynamic Evolution of GRB Afterglow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a relativistic fireball which decelerates as it sweeps up ambient matter. Not only the radiative and adiabatic cases, but also the realistic intermediate cases are calculated. We perform numerical calcula-tion for various ambient media and sizes of beaming expansion, and find that the deceleration radius R0 may play an important role for the hydrodynamic evolution of GRB afterglow.

  14. The ultraluminous GRB 110918A

    CERN Document Server

    Frederiks, D D; Svinkin, D S; Pal'shin, V D; Mangano, V; Oates, S; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Mazets, E P; Oleynik, Ph P; Tsvetkova, A E; Ulanov, M V; Kokomov, A V; Cline, T L; Burrows, D N; Krimm, H A; Pagani, C; Sbarufatti, B; Siegel, M H; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Enos, H; Starr, R; von Kienlin, A; Rau, A; Zhang, X; Goldstein, J

    2013-01-01

    GRB 110918A is the brightest long GRB detected by Konus-WIND during its 19 years of continuous observations and the most luminous GRB ever observed since the beginning of the cosmological era in 1997. We report on the final IPN localization of this event and its detailed multiwavelength study with a number of space-based instruments. The prompt emission is characterized by a typical duration, a moderare $E_{peak}$ of the time-integrated spectrum, and strong hard-to-soft evolution. The high observed energy fluence yields, at z=0.984, a huge isotropic-equivalent energy release $E_{iso}=(2.1\\pm0.1)\\times10^{54}$ erg. The record-breaking energy flux observed at the peak of the short, bright, hard initial pulse results in an unprecedented isotropic-equivalent luminosity $L_{iso}=(4.7\\pm0.2)\\times10^{54}$erg s$^{-1}$. A tail of the soft gamma-ray emission was detected with temporal and spectral behavior typical of that predicted by the synchrotron forward-shock model. Swift/XRT and Swift/UVOT observed the bright af...

  15. Evidence for a Photospheric Component in the Prompt Emission of the Short GRB120323A and its Effects on the GRB Hardness-Luminosity Relation

    CERN Document Server

    Guiriec, S; Hascoët, R; Vianello, G; Mochkovitch, R; Ryde, F; Kouveliotou, C; Xiong, S; Bhat, P N; Foley, S; Grüber, D; Burgess, J M; McGlynn, S; McEnery, J; Gehrels, N

    2012-01-01

    The short GRB 120323A had the highest flux ever detected with the Fermi/GBM. Here we study its remarkable spectral properties and their evolution using two spectral models: (i) a single emission component scenario, where the spectrum is modeled by the empirical Band function, and (ii) a two component scenario, where thermal (Planck-like) emission is observed simultaneously with a non-thermal component (a Band function). We find that the latter model fits the integrated burst spectrum significantly better than the former, and that their respective spectral parameters are dramatically different: when fit with a Band function only, the Epeak of the event is unusually soft for a short GRB, while adding a thermal component leads to more typical short GRB values. Our time-resolved spectral analysis produces similar results. We argue here that the two-component model is the preferred interpretation for GRB 120323A, based on: (i) the values and evolution of the Band function parameters of the two component scenario, ...

  16. GRB 051008: A long, spectrally-hard dust-obscured GRB in a Lyman-Break Galaxy at z ~ 2.8

    CERN Document Server

    Volnova, A A; Gorosabel, J; Perley, D A; Frederiks, D D; Kann, D A; Rumyantsev, V V; Biryukov, V V; Burkhonov, O; Castro-Tirado, A J; Ferrero, P; Golenetskii, S V; Klose, S; Loznikov, V M; Minaev, P Yu; Stecklum, B; Svinkin, D S; Tsvetkova, A E; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Ulanov, M V

    2014-01-01

    We present observations of the dark Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 051008 provided by Swift/BAT, Swift/XRT, Konus-WIND, INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS in the high-energy domain and the Shajn, Swift/UVOT, Tautenburg, NOT, Gemini and Keck I telescopes in the optical and near-infrared bands. The burst was detected only in gamma- and X-rays and neither a prompt optical nor a radio afterglow were detected down to deep limits. We identified the host galaxy of the burst, which is a typical Lyman-break Galaxy (LBG) with R-magnitude of 24.06 +/- 0.10. A redshift of the galaxy of z = 2.77 (-0.20,+0.15) is measured photometrically due to the presence of a clear, strong Lyman-break feature. The host galaxy is a small starburst galaxy with moderate intrinsic extinction (A_V = 0.3 mag) and has a SFR of ~ 60 M_Sun / yr typical for LBGs. It is one of the few cases where a GRB host has been found to be a classical Lyman-break galaxy. Using the redshift we estimate the isotropic-equivalent radiated energy of the burst to be E_iso = (1.15 +/- 0.20) x 1...

  17. Gamma-Ray Burst Dust Echoes Revisited: Expectations at Early Times

    CERN Document Server

    Moran, J A; Moran, Jane A.; Reichart, Daniel E.

    2004-01-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) dust echoes were first proposed as an alternative explanation for the supernova-like (SN-like) components to the afterglows of GRB 980326 and GRB 970228. However, the spectroscopic identification of Type Ic SN 2003dh associated with GRB 030329, as well as the identification of SN-like components to the afterglows of other GRBs, appears to have confirmed the GRB/SN paradigm. However, the likely progenitors of Type Ic SNe are Wolf-Rayet WC stars, and late-type WC stars have been observed to be surrounded by dust, at a distance of 10^14 -- 10^15 cm from the star. Consequently, we revisit the possibility of GRB dust echoes, not on a timescale of weeks after the burst but on a timescale of minutes to hours. We find that if the optical flash is sufficiently bright and the jet sufficiently wide, GRB afterglows may be accompanied by chromatic variations on this timescale. From these signatures, such model parameters as the inner radius of the dust distribution, the initial opening angle of the j...

  18. Spectral components in the bright, long GRB 061007: properties of the photosphere and the nature of the outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Larsson, J; Lundman, C; McGlynn, S; Larsson, S; Yamaoka, M Ohno K

    2011-01-01

    We present a time-resolved spectral analysis of the bright, long GRB 061007 (z=1.261) using Swift BAT and Suzaku WAM data. We find that the prompt emission of GRB 061007 can be equally well explained by a photospheric component together with a power law as by a Band function, and we explore the implications of the former model. The photospheric component, which we model with a multicolour blackbody, dominates the emission and has a very stable shape throughout the burst. This component provides a natural explanation for the hardness-intensity correlation seen within the burst and also allows us to estimate the bulk Lorentz factor and the radius of the photosphere. The power-law component dominates the fit at high energies and has a nearly constant slope of -1.5. We discuss the possibility that this component is of the same origin as the high-energy power laws recently observed in some Fermi LAT bursts.

  19. Discovery of the Low-Redshift Afterglow of GRB 011121 and Its Progenitor Supernova 2001ke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnavich, P. M.; Stanek, K. Z.; Wyrzykowski, L.; Infante, L.; Bendek, E.; Holland, S. T.; Bersier, D.; Jha, S.; Matheson, T.; Kirshner, R. P.; Phillips, M. M.; Krisciunas, K.; Carlberg, R.

    2002-05-01

    We identify and present the first optical observations of the afterglow of the Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) 011121. Images were obtained with the OGLE 1.3m telescope in BVRI passbands, starting 10.3;hours after the burst. The temporal analysis of our data indicates a steep decay, independent of wavelength with Fν t{-1.72+/- 0.05}. There is no evidence for a break in the light curve earlier than 2.5 days after the burst. The spectral energy distribution determined from the early broad-band photometry is a power-law with Fν ν {-0.46+/- 0.10} after correcting for a large Galactic extinction. Spectra, obtained with the Magellan 6.5m Baade telescope, reveal narrow emission lines from the host galaxy and these provide a redshift of z=0.36, which is the lowest measured redshift for an optical afterglow. We also present late R and J-band observations of the afterglow ~ 14;days after the burst. The late-time photometry shows a large deviation from the initial decline and our data combined with Hubble Space Telescope photometry provide strong evidence for a supernova peaking less than 10 rest-frame days after the GRB. This is the best evidence to date that classical, long gamma-ray bursts are generated by core-collapse supernovae. This work is partially supported by NASA LTSA grant NAG5-9364.

  20. Prompt Optical Observations of $\\gamma$-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Akerlof, Carl W; Barthelmy, S D; Bloch, J; Butterworth, P S; Casperson, D E; Cline, T; Fletcher, S; Frontera, F; Gisler, G; Heise, J; Hills, J; Hurley, K; Kehoe, R; Lee, B; Marshall, S; McKay, T; Pawl, A; Piro, L; Szymanski, J J; Wren, J; Akerlof, Carl; Balsano, Richard; Barthelmy, Scott; Bloch, Jeff; Butterworth, Paul; Casperson, Don; Cline, Tom; Fletcher, Sandra; Frontera, Fillippo; Gisler, Galen; Heise, John; Hills, Jack; Hurley, Kevin; Kehoe, Robert; Lee, Brian; Marshall, Stuart; Kay, Tim Mc; Pawl, Andrew; Piro, Luigi; Szymanski, John; Wren, Jim

    2000-01-01

    The Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) seeks to measure simultaneous and early afterglow optical emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A search for optical counterparts to six GRBs with localization errors of 1 square degree or better produced no detections. The earliest limiting sensitivity is m(ROTSE) > 13.1 at 10.85 seconds (5 second exposure) after the gamma-ray rise, and the best limit is m(ROTSE) > 16.0 at 62 minutes (897 second exposure). These are the most stringent limits obtained for GRB optical counterpart brightness in the first hour after the burst. Consideration of the gamma-ray fluence and peak flux for these bursts and for GRB990123 indicates that there is not a strong positive correlation between optical flux and gamma-ray emission.

  1. Observations of the Prompt Gamma-Ray Emission of GRB 070125

    CERN Document Server

    Bellm, Eric C; Pal'shin, Valentin; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Bandstra, Mark E; Boggs, Steven E; Hong, Soojing; Kodaka, Natsuki; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Mitrofanov, I G; Nakagawa, Yujin E; Ohno, Masanori; Onda, Kaori; Sanin, A B; Sugita, Satoshi; Tashiro, Makoto; Tretyakov, V I; Urata, Yuji; Wigger, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    The long, bright gamma-ray burst GRB 070125 was localized by the Interplanetary Network. We present light curves of the prompt gamma-ray emission as observed by Konus-WIND, RHESSI, Suzaku-WAM, and Swift-BAT. We detail the results of joint spectral fits with Konus and RHESSI data. The burst shows moderate hard-to-soft evolution in its multi-peaked emission over a period of about one minute. The total burst fluence as observed by Konus is $1.75 \\times 10^{-4}$ erg/cm$^2$ (20 keV-10 MeV). Using the spectroscopic redshift z = 1.547, we find that the burst is consistent with the Amati $E_{peak,i}-E_{iso}$ and the Ghirlanda $E_{peak,i}-E_\\gamma$ correlations.

  2. Search for gamma-rays from the unusually bright GRB 130427A with the HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; BenZvi, S Y; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-García, R; Malone, K; Marinelli, A; Marinelli, S S; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T O; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Ponce, E; Pretz, J; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Sandoval, A; Schneider, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H; Álvarez, J D

    2014-01-01

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift $z\\lesssim0.5$, featuring the highest energy photon so far detected from a GRB and the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory is a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. It features two data acquisition (DAQ) systems - one designed to readout full air-shower events (main DAQ) and the other one counting the signals in each photomultiplier tube (scaler DAQ). The burst occurred at a zenith angle of $57^\\circ$, when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector and collecting data with the scaler DAQ only. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, 8 different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC de...

  3. Dust-to-metal ratios in Damped Lyman-alpha absorbers: Fresh clues to the origins of dust and optical extinction towards gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    De Cia, A; Savaglio, S; Schady, P; Vreeswijk, P M

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by the anomalous dust-to-metal ratios (DTM) derived in the literature for gamma-ray burst (GRB) damped Ly-alpha absorbers (DLAs), we measure these ratios using the dust-depletion pattern observed in UV/optical afterglow spectra, associated with the interstellar medium (ISM) at the GRB host-galaxy redshifts. Our sample consists of 20 GRB absorbers and a comparison sample of 72 QSO-DLAs, overall at redshift 1.2 14.7, above which several QSO-DLAs reveal H2, making GRB-DLAs promising candidates for molecular research.

  4. Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Since the successful launch of NASA's dedicated gamma-ray burst (GRB) mission,Swift, the study of cosmological GRBs has entered a new era. Here I review the rapid observational and theoretical progress in this dynamical research field during the first two-year of the Swift mission, focusing on how observational breakthroughs have revolutionized our understanding of the physical origins of GRBs. Besides summarizing how Swift helps to solve some pre-Swift mysteries, I also list some outstanding problems raised by the Swift observations. An outlook of GRB science in the future, especially in the GLAST era, is briefly discussed.

  5. Gamma Ray Bursts in the Swift-Fermi Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Razzaque, Soebur

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are among the most violent occurrences in the universe. They are powerful explosions, visible to high redshift, and thought to be the signature of black hole birth. They are highly luminous events and provide excellent probes of the distant universe. GRB research has greatly advanced over the past 10 years with the results from Swift, Fermi and an active follow-up community. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  6. Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, B

    2007-01-01

    Since the successful launch of NASA's dedicated gamma-ray burst (GRB) mission, Swift, the study of cosmological GRBs has entered a new era. Here I review the rapid observational and theoretical progress in this dynamical research field during the first two-year of the Swift mission, focusing on how observational breakthroughs have revolutionized our understanding of the physical origins of GRBs. Besides summarizing how Swift helps to solve some pre-Swift mysteries, I also list some outstanding problems raised by the Swift observations. An outlook of GRB science in the future, especially in the GLAST era, is briefly discussed.

  7. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Dark Energy - Dark Matter interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Barreiro, T; Torres, P

    2010-01-01

    In this work Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) data is used to place constraints on a putative coupling between dark energy and dark matter. Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) constraints from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) first-year results, the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) shift parameter from WMAP seven year results and the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) peak from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are also discussed. The prospects for the field are assessed, as more GRB events become available.

  8. Integrating the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor into the 3rd Interplanetary Network

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, K; Connaughton, V; Meegan, C; Cline, T; Mitrofanov, I; Golovin, D; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Starr, R; Golenetskii, S; Aptekar, R; Mazets, E; Pal'shin, V; Frederiks, D; Smith, D M; Wigger, C; Rau, A; von Kienlin, A; Yamaoka, K; Ohno, M; Fukazawa, Y; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Barthelmy, S; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Goldsten, J; Del Monte, E; Feroci, M; Marisaldi, M

    2009-01-01

    We are integrating the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) into the Interplanetary Network (IPN) of Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) detectors. With the GBM, the IPN will comprise 9 experiments. This will 1) assist the Fermi team in understanding and reducing their systematic localization uncertainties, 2) reduce the sizes of the GBM and Large Area Telescope (LAT) error circles by 1 to 4 orders of magnitude, 3) facilitate the identification of GRB sources with objects found by ground- and space-based observatories at other wavelengths, from the radio to very high energy gamma-rays, 4) reduce the uncertainties in associating some LAT detections of high energy photons with GBM bursts, and 5) facilitate searches for non-electromagnetic GRB counterparts, particularly neutrinos and gravitational radiation. We present examples and demonstrate the synergy between Fermi and the IPN. This is a Fermi Cycle 2 Guest Investigator project.

  9. Unveiling the Secrets of Metallicity and Massive Star Formation Using DLAs Along Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, A.; Fumagalli, M.; Rafelski, M.; Kocevski, D.; Prochaska, J. X.; Cooke, R. J.; Becker, G. D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the largest, publicly available, sample of Damped Lyman-alpha systems (DLAs) along Swift discovered Gamma-ray Bursts (GRB) line of sights in order to investigate the environmental properties of long GRB hosts in the z = 1.8 - 6 redshift range. Compared with the most recent quasar DLAs sample (QSO-DLA), our analysis shows that GRB-DLAs probe a more metal enriched environment at z approximately greater than 3, up to [X/H] approximately -0.5. In the z = 2 - 3 redshift range, despite the large number of lower limits, there are hints that the two populations may be more similar (only at 90% significance level) than at higher redshifts. Also, at high-z, the GRB-DLA average metallicity seems to decline at a shallower rate than the QSO-DLAs: GRB-DLA hosts may be polluted with metals at least as far as approximately 2 kpc from the GRB explosion site, probably due to previous star-formation episodes and/or supernovae explosions. This shallow metallicity trend, extended now up to z approximately 5, confirms previous results that GRB hosts are star-forming and have, on average, higher metallicity than the general QSO-DLA population. Finally, our host metallicity measurements are broadly consistent with the predictions derived from the hypothesis of two channels of GRB progenitors, one of which is mildly affected by a metallicity bias, although more data are needed to constrain the models at z approximately greater than 4.

  10. A search for \\textit{Fermi} bursts associated to supernovae and their frequency of occurrence

    CERN Document Server

    Kovacevic, M; Wang, Y; Muccino, M; Della Valle, M; Amati, L; Barbarino, C; Enderli, M; Pisani, G B; Li, L

    2014-01-01

    Context: Observations suggest that the major fraction of long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are connected with broad-lines supernovae Ib/c, (SNe-Ibc). The presence of GRB-SNe is revealed by rebrightenings emerging from the optical GRB afterglow $10$--$15$ days, in the rest-frame of the source, after the prompt GRB emission. Aims: \\textit{Fermi}-GBM has a field of view (FoV) which is about 6.5 times larger than the FoV of \\textit{Swift}, therefore we expect that a number of GRB-SN connections have been missed due to lack of optical and X-ray instruments on board of \\textit{Fermi}, which are essential to reveal SNe associated with GRBs. This fact has motivated our search in the \\textit{Fermi} catalogue for possible GRB-SN events. Methods: The search for possible GRB-SN associations follows two requirements: (1) SN should fall inside the \\textit{Fermi}-GBM error box of the considered long GRB, and (2) this GRB should occur within $20$ days before the SN event. Results: We have found $5$ cases, within $z<0....

  11. GRB 080503 LATE AFTERGLOW RE-BRIGHTENING: SIGNATURE OF A MAGNETAR-POWERED MERGER-NOVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, He; Ding, Xuan; Wu, Xue-Feng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Dai, Zi-Gao [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 2100093 (China); Zhang, Bing, E-mail: hug18@psu.edu, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States)

    2015-07-10

    GRB 080503 is a short gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by Swift and has been classified as a GRB originating from a compact star merger. The soft extended emission and the simultaneous late re-brightening in both the X-ray and optical afterglow light curves raise interesting questions regarding its physical origin. We show that the broadband data of GRB 080503 can be well explained within the framework of the double neutron star merger model, provided that the merger remnant is a rapidly rotating massive neutron star with an extremely high magnetic field (i.e., a millisecond magnetar). We show that the late optical re-brightening is consistent with the emission from a magnetar-powered “merger-nova.” This adds one more case to the growing sample of merger-novae associated with short GRBs. The soft extended emission and the late X-ray excess emission are well connected through a magnetar dipole spin-down luminosity evolution function, suggesting that direct magnetic dissipation is the mechanism to produce these X-rays. The X-ray emission initially leaks from a hole in the merger ejecta pierced by the short GRB jet. The hole subsequently closes after the magnetar spins down and the magnetic pressure drops below ram pressure. The X-ray photons are then trapped behind the merger-nova ejecta until the ejecta becomes optically thin at a later time. This explains the essentially simultaneous re-brightening in both the optical and X-ray light curves. Within this model, future gravitational-wave sources could be associated with a bright X-ray counterpart along with the merger-nova, even if the short GRB jet beams away from Earth.

  12. A Large Catalog of Homogeneous Ultra-Violet/Optical GRB Afterglows: Temporal and Spectral Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roming, Peter W. A.; Koch, T. Scott; Oates, Samantha R.; Porterfield, Blair L.; Bayless, Amanda J.; Breeveld, Alice A.; Gronwall, Caryl; Kuin, N. P. M.; Page, Mat J.; de Pasquale, Massimiliano; Siegel, Michael H.; Swenson, Craig A.; Tobler, Jennifer M.

    2017-02-01

    We present the second Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT) gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow catalog, greatly expanding on the first Swift UVOT GRB afterglow catalog. The second catalog is constructed from a database containing over 120,000 independent UVOT observations of 538 GRBs first detected by Swift, the High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE2), the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), the Interplanetary Network (IPN), Fermi, and Astro-rivelatore Gamma a Immagini Leggero (AGILE). The catalog covers GRBs discovered from 2005 January 17 to 2010 December 25. Using photometric information in three UV bands, three optical bands, and a “white” or open filter, the data are optimally coadded to maximize the number of detections and normalized to one band to provide a detailed light curve. The catalog provides positional, temporal, and photometric information for each burst, as well as Swift Burst Alert Telescope and X-ray Telescope (XRT) GRB parameters. Temporal slopes are provided for each UVOT filter. The temporal slope per filter of almost half the GRBs are fit with a single power law, but one to three breaks are required in the remaining bursts. Morphological comparisons with the X-ray reveal that ∼ 75 % of the UVOT light curves are similar to one of the four morphologies identified by Evans et al. (2009). The remaining ∼ 25 % have a newly identified morphology. For many bursts, redshift- and extinction-corrected UV/optical spectral slopes are also provided at 2 × 103, 2 × 104, and 2 × 105 s.

  13. A Survey for NV Absorption at z~z_GRB in GRB Afterglow Spectra: Clues to Gas Near the Progenitor Star

    CERN Document Server

    Prochaska, Jason X; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Chen, Hsiao-Wen

    2008-01-01

    We survey NV absorption in the afterglow spectra of long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the intent to study highly ionized gas in the galaxies hosting these events. We identify a high incidence (6/7) of spectra exhibiting NV gas with z~z_GRB and the majority show large column densities NV > 10^14 cm^-2. With one exception, the observed line-profiles are kinematically `cold', i.e. they are narrow and have small velocity offset (Dv 10^3 cm^-3) environments, typical of molecular clouds. The observations, therefore, primarily constrain the physical conditions -- metallicity, density, velocity fields -- of the gas within the (former) molecular cloud region surrounding the GRB.

  14. Closest Gamma Ray Burst Providing Scientists With Crucial Test for Burst Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    The closest Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) yet known is providing astronomers with a rare opportunity to gain information vital to understanding these powerful cosmic explosions. Extremely precise radio-telescope observations already have ruled out one proposed mechanism for the bursts. "This is the closest and brightest GRB we've ever seen, and we can use it to decipher the physics of how these bursts work," said Greg Taylor of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM. Taylor worked with Dale Frail, also of the NRAO, along with Prof. Shri Kulkarni and graduate student Edo Berger of Caltech in studying a GRB detected on March 29, 2003. The scientists presented their findings to the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Nashville, TN. VLBA image of GRB 030329 VLBA IMAGE of GRB 030329 CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on Image for Larger Version) Taylor and Frail used the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) and other radio telescopes to study the burst, known as GRB 030329. In a series of observations from April 1 to May 19, they determined the size of the expanding "fireball" from the burst and measured its position in the sky with great precision. At a distance of about 2.6 billion light-years, GRB 030329 is hardly next door. However, compared to other GRBs at typical distances of 8-10 billion light-years, it presents an easier target for study. "We only expect to see one burst per decade this close," said Frail. The precise measurement of the object's position allowed the scientists to show that one theoretical model for GRBs can be ruled out. This model, proposed in 2000, says that the radio-wave energy emitted by the GRB comes from "cannonballs" of material shot from the explosion at extremely high speeds. "The 'cannonball model' predicted that we should see the radio-emitting object move across the sky by a specific amount. We have not seen that motion," Taylor said. The currently standard "fireball model" of GRBs

  15. Off-Axis Neutrino Scattering in GRB Central Engines

    CERN Document Server

    George, N D; McGhee, J M; Miller, W A; George, Nathan D.; Kheyfets, Arkady; Ghee, John M. Mc; Miller, Warner A.

    2003-01-01

    The search for an understanding of an energy source great enough to explain the gamma-ray burst (GRB) phenomena has attracted much attention from the astrophysical community since its discovery. In this paper we extend the work of K. Asano and T. Fukuyama, and J. D. Salmonson and J. R. Wilson, and analyze the off-axis contributions to the energy-momentum deposition rate (MDR) from the neutrino anti-neutrino collisions above a rotating black hole/thin accretion disk system. Our calculations are performed by imaging the accretion disk at a specified observer using the full geodesic equations, and calculating the cumulative MDR from the scattering of all pairs of neutrinos and anti-neutrinos arriving at the observer. Our results shed light on the beaming efficiency of GRB models of this kind. Although we confirm Asano and Fukuyama's conjecture as to the constancy of the beaming for small angles away from the axis; nevertheless, we find the dominant contribution to the MDR comes from near the surface of the disk ...

  16. Early-Time Observations of the GRB 050319 Optical Transient

    CERN Document Server

    Quimby, R M; Yost, S A; Aharonian, F; Akerlof, C W; Alatalo, K; Ashley, M C B; Goegues, E; Guever, T; Horns, D; Kehoe, R L; Kiziloglu, U; McKay, T A; Oezel, M; Phillips, A; Schaefer, B E; Smith, D A; Swan, H F; Vestrand, W T; Wheeler, J C; Wren, J; Kiziloglu, Ue.

    2006-01-01

    We present the unfiltered ROTSE-III light curve of the optical transient associated with GRB 050319 beginning 4 s after the cessation of gamma-ray activity. We fit a power-law function to the data using the revised trigger time given by Chincarini et al. (2005), and a smoothly broken power-law to the data using the original trigger disseminated through the GCN notices. Including the RAPTOR data from Wozniak et al. (2005), the best fit power-law indices are alpha=-0.854 (+/- 0.014) for the single power-law and alpha_1=-0.364 (+/- 0.020), alpha_2= -0.881 (+/- 0.030), with a break at t_b = 418 (+/- 30) s for the smoothly broken fit. We discuss the fit results with emphasis placed on the importance of knowing the true start time of the optical transient for this multi-peaked burst. As Swift continues to provide prompt GRB locations, it becomes more important to answer the question, "when does the afterglow begin" to correctly interpret the light curves.

  17. Discovery of GRB 020405 and its Underlying Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Price, P A; Berger, E; Fox, D W; Bloom, J S; Djorgovski, S G; Frail, D A; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; McCarthy, P; Reichart, D E; Sari, R; Yost, S A; Jerjen, H; Flint, K; Phillips, A; Warren, B E; Axelrod, T S; Chevalier, R A; Halpern, J P; Holtzmann, J A; Kimble, R A; Schmidt, B P; Wheeler, J C; Frontera, F; Costa, E; Piro, L; Hurley, K; Cline, T; Guidorzi, C; Montanari, E; Mazets, E; Golenetskii, S V; Mitrofanov, I G; Anfimov, D; Kozyrev, A B; Litvak, M; Sanin, A; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Shinohara, C; Gal-Yam, A; Ofek, E O; Lipkin, Yu M

    2002-01-01

    We present the discovery of GRB 020405 made with the Inter-Planetary Network (IPN). With a duration of 60 s, the burst appears to be a typical long duration event. We observed the 75-square acrminute IPN error region with the Mount Stromlo Observatory's 50-inch robotic telescope and discovered a transient source which subsequently decayed and was also associated with a variable radio source. We identify this source as the afterglow of GRB 020405. Subsequent observations by other groups found varying polarized flux and established a redshift of 0.690 to the host galaxy. Motivated by the low redshift we triggered observations with WFPC2 on-board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Modeling the early ground-based data with a jet model, we find a clear red excess over the decaying optical lightcurves that is present between day 10 and day 50 (the last HST epoch). This "bump" has the spectral and temporal features expected of an underlying supernova (SN). In particular, the red color of the putative SN is similar to...

  18. GRB cosmology through the Ep,i-intensity correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amati, L.; Sawant, D. S.; Della Valle, M.

    Despite they are not standard candles, the investigation of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) as a tool for measuring the geometry and expansion rate of the Universe is strongly motivated by their unique combination of huge luminosity, up to more than 10/53 erg/s, with a redshift distribution extending up to more than z = 9. In recent years, several attempts to exploit the correlation between the photon energy at which the vFv spec- trum peaks (peak energy) and the radiated energy (or luminosity) for standardizing GRBs and using them to estimate cosmological parameters have been made. These studies show that already with the present data-set, GRBs can provide a significant and independent confirmation of ΛM ˜ 0.3 for a flat ΛCDM. The investigation of the correlation of Ep,i with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion of and accuracy for estimating ΛM further confirms its reliability and effectiveness for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology. Current (e.g., Swift, Fermi/GBM, Konus-WIND) and forthcoming GRB experiments (e.g., CALET/GBM, SVOM, Lomonosov/UFFO) will allow us to constrain ΛM with an accuracy comparable to that currently exhibited by Type Ia supernovae and to study the properties of dark energy and their evolution with time.

  19. Early afterglow detection in the Swift observations of GRB 050801

    CERN Document Server

    De Pasquale, M; Page, M J; Burrows, D N; Blustin, A J; Zane, S; Mason, K O; Roming, P W A; Palmer, D; Gehrels, N; Zhang, B; Pasquale, Massimiliano De

    2007-01-01

    We present results of Swift optical, UV and X-ray observations of the afterglow of GRB 050801. The source is visible over the full optical, UV and X-ray energy range of the Swift UVOT and XRT instruments.Both optical and X-ray lightcurves exhibit a broad plateau (\\Delta t/t ~ 1) during the first few hundred seconds after the gamma-ray event. We investigate the multiwavelength spectral and timing properties of the afterglow, and we suggest that the behaviour at early times is compatible with an energy injection by a newly born magnetar with a period of a few tenths of a millisecond, which keeps the forward shock refreshed over this short interval by irradiation. Reverse shock emission is not observed. Its suppression might be due to GRB ejecta being permeated by high magnetic fields, as expected for outflows powered by a magnetar.Finally, the multiwavelength study allows a determination of the burst redshift, z=1.56.

  20. Probing GRB environments with time variability: ULTRASPEC fast imaging of GRB 080210

    CERN Document Server

    De Cia, A; Björnsson, G; Vreeswijk, P M; Dhillon, V S; Marsh, T R; Chapman, R; Fynbo, J P U; Ledoux, C; Littlefair, S P; Malesani, D; Schulze, S; Smette, A; Zafar, T; Gudmundsson, E H

    2010-01-01

    We present high time resolution (1.09 s) photometry of GRB 080210 obtained with ULTRASPEC mounted on the ESO/3.6-m telescope, starting 68.22 min after the burst and lasting for 26.45 min. The light curve is smooth on both short (down to 2.18 s) and long time scales, confirmed by a featureless power spectrum. On top of the fireball power-law decay, bumps and wiggles at different time scales can, in principle, be produced by density fluctuations in the circumburst medium, substructures in the jet or by refreshed shocks. Comparing our constraints with variability limits derived from kinematic arguments, we exclude under-density fluctuations producing flux dips larger than 1 per cent with time scales \\Deltat > 9.2 min (2 per cent on \\Deltat > 2.3 min for many fluctuating regions). In addition, we study the afterglow VLT/FORS2 spectrum, the optical-to-X-ray spectral energy distribution (SED) and the time decay. The SED is best fit with a broken power law with slopes {\\beta}opt = 0.71 \\pm 0.01 and {\\beta}X = 1.59 \\...

  1. The Remarkable Afterglow of GRB 061007: Implications for Optical Flashes and GRB Fireballs

    CERN Document Server

    Mundell, C G; Guidorzi, C; Kobayashi, S; Steele, I A; Malesani, D; Amati, L; D'Avanzo, P; Bersier, D F; Gomboc, A; Rol, E; Bode, M F; Carter, D; Mottram, C J; Monfardini, A; Smith, R J; Malhotra, S; Wang, J; Bannister, N; O'Brien, P T; Tanvir, N R

    2006-01-01

    We present a multiwavelength analysis of Swift GRB 061007. The 2-m robotic Faulkes Telescope South (FTS) began observing 137 s after the onset of the gamma-ray emission, when the optical counterpart was already decaying from R~10.3 mag, and continued observing for the next 5.5 hours. These observations begin during the final gamma-ray flare and continue through and beyond a long, soft tail of gamma-ray emission whose flux shows an underlying simple power law decay identical to that seen at optical and X-ray wavelengths, with temporal slope alpha~1.7. This remarkably simple decay in all of these bands is rare for Swift bursts, which often show much more complex light curves. We suggest the afterglow emission begins as early as 30-100 s and is contemporaneous with the on-going variable prompt emission from the central engine, but originates from a physically distinct region dominated by the forward shock. The afterglow continues unabated until at least ~10^5 seconds showing no evidence of a break. The observed ...

  2. Effect of GRB spectra on the empirical luminosity correlations and the GRB Hubble diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Hai-Nan; Chang, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in a wide energy range can usually be well described by the Band function, which is a two smoothly jointed power laws cutting at a breaking energy. Below the breaking energy, the Band function reduces to a cut-off power law, while above the breaking energy it is a simple power law. However, for some detectors (such as the Swift-BAT) whose working energy is well below or just near the breaking energy, the observed spectra can be fitted to cut-off power law with enough precision. Besides, since the energy band of Swift-BAT is very narrow, the spectra of most GRBs can be fitted well even using a simple power law. In this paper, with the most up-to-date sample of Swift-BAT GRBs, we study the effect of different spectral models on the empirical luminosity correlations, and further investigate the effect on the reconstruction of GRB Hubble diagram. We mainly focus on two luminosity correlations, i.e., the Amati relation and Yonetoku relation. We calculate these two luminosity ...

  3. On the Evolution of the Apparent Size of Gamma-Ray Burst Remnants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ting-Ting Gao; Yong-Feng Huang

    2006-01-01

    The remnants of two gamma-ray bursts, GRB 030329 and GRB 041227, have been resolved by Very Long Baseline Interferometry observations. The radio counterparts were observed to expand with time. These observations provide an important way to test the dynamics of the standard fireball model. We show that the observed size evolution of these two events cannot be explained by a simple jet model, rather, it can be satisfactorily explained by the two-component jet model. It strongly hints that gamma-ray burst ejecta may have complicated structures.

  4. Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory for observation of early photons from gamma ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, I. H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the space project of Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) which will observe early optical photons from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a sub-second optical response, for the first time. The UFFO will probe the early optical rise of GRBs, opening a completely new frontier in GRB and trans......We describe the space project of Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) which will observe early optical photons from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with a sub-second optical response, for the first time. The UFFO will probe the early optical rise of GRBs, opening a completely new frontier in GRB...

  5. Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (uffo) for Observation of Early Photons from Gamma Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, I. H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2013-01-01

    One of the least documented and understood aspects of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) is the rise phase of the optical light curve. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) is an effort to address this question through extraordinary opportunities presented by a series of space missions including a small sp......-observatory for rapid optical response to bright gamma-ray bursts, the first part of our GRB and rapid-response long-term program. We describe the early photon science, the space mission of UFFO-pathfinder, and our plan for the next step....

  6. GRB-081029: A Step Towards Understanding Multiple Afterglow Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland Stephen T.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the unusual optical light curve of the gamma-ray burst-081029 at a redshift of z = 3.8474. We combine X-ray and optical observations from (Swift) with optical and infrared data from REM to obtain a detailed data set extending from approx 10(exp 2)s to approx 10(exp 5)s after the BAT trigger, and from approx.10 keV to 16,000 AA. The X-ray afterglow showed a shallow initial decay followed by u rapid decay after about 18,000 s. The optical afterglow, however, shows an uncharecteristic rise at about 5000 s that has no corresponding feature in the X-ray light curve. The data are not consistent with a single-component jet. It is possible that there are multiple physical components contributing to the afterglow of GRB-081029.

  7. Analysis of GRB 080319B and GRB 050904 within the fireshell model: evidence for a broader spectral energy distribution

    CERN Document Server

    Patricelli, Barbara; Bianco, Carlo Luciano; Caito, Letizia; de Barros, Gustavo; Izzo, Luca; Ruffini, Remo; Vereshchagin, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    (Shortened) GRB080319B, with an isotropic energy E_{iso}=1.32x10^{54}erg, and GRB050904, with E_{iso}=1.04x10^{54}erg, offer the possibility of studying the spectral properties of the prompt radiation of two of the most energetic Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). This allows us to probe the validity of the fireshell model for GRBs beyond 10^{54}erg, well outside the energy range where it has been successfully tested up to now (10^{49}-10^{53}erg). We find that in the low energy region, the prompt emission spectra observed by Swift BAT reveals more power than theoretically predicted. The opportunities offered by these observations to improve the fireshell model are outlined. One of the distinguishing features of the fireshell model is that it relates the observed spectra to the spectrum in the comoving frame of the fireshell. Originally, a fully radiative condition and a comoving thermal spectrum were adopted. An additional power-law in the comoving thermal spectrum is required [...] in the fireshell model for GRBs 080...

  8. Spatially-resolved dust properties of the GRB 980425 host galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Michałowski, Michał J; Palazzi, E; Savaglio, S; Gentile, G; Rasmussen, J; Baes, M; Basa, S; Bianchi, S; Berta, S; Burlon, D; Ceron, J M Castro; Covino, S; Cuby, J -G; D'Elia, V; Ferrero, P; Gotz, D; Hjorth, J; Koprowski, M P; Borgne, D Le; Floc'h, E Le; Malesani, D; Murphy, T; Pian, E; Piranomonte, S; Rossi, A; Sollerman, J; Tanvir, N R; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Watson, D; van der Werf, P; Vergani, S D; Xu, D

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a tool to study star formation in the Universe, so it is crucial to investigate whether their host galaxies and immediate environments are in any way special compared with other star-forming galaxies. Here we present spatially resolved maps of dust emission of the host galaxy of the closest known GRB 980425 at z=0.0085 using our new high-resolution observations from Herschel, APEX, ALMA and ATCA. We modeled the spectral energy distributions of the host and of the star-forming region displaying the Wolf-Rayet signatures in the spectrum (WR region), located 800 pc away from the GRB position. The host is characterised by low dust content and high fraction of UV-visible star-formation, similar to other dwarf galaxies. Such galaxies are abundant in the local universe, so it is not surprising to find a GRB in one of them, assuming the correspondence between the GRB rate and star-formation. The WR region contributes substantially to the host emission at the far-infrared,...

  9. Is GRB 050904 at z=6.3 absorbed by dust?

    CERN Document Server

    Stratta, G; Maiolino, R

    2011-01-01

    Claim of dust extinction for this GRB has been debated in the past. We suggest that the discrepant results occur primarily because most of previous studies have not simultaneously investigated the X-ray to near-IR spectral energy distribution of this GRB. The difficulty with this burst is that the X-ray afterglow is dominated by strong flares at early times and is poorly monitored at late times. In addition, the Z band photometry, which is the most sensitive to dust extinction, has been found to be affected by strong systematics. In this paper we carefully re-analyze the Swift/XRT afterglow observations of this GRB, using extensive past studies of X-ray flare properties when computing the X-ray afterglow flux level and exploiting the recent reanalysis of the optical (UV rest frame) data of the same GRB. We extract the X-ray to optical/near-IR afterglow SED for the three epochs where the best spectral coverage is available: 0.47, 1.25, and 3.4 days after the trigger. A spectral power-law model has been fitted ...

  10. GRB off-axis afterglows and the emission from the accompanying supernovae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathirgamaraju, Adithan; Barniol Duran, Rodolfo; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    Gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows are likely produced in the shock that is driven as the GRB jet interacts with the external medium. Long-duration GRBs are also associated with powerful supernovae (SNe). We consider the optical and radio afterglows of long GRBs for both blasts viewed along the jet axis (`on-axis' afterglows) and misaligned observes (`off-axis' afterglows). Comparing the optical emission from the afterglow with that of the accompanying SN, using SN 1998bw as an archetype, we find that only a few per cent of afterglows viewed off-axis are brighter than the SN. For observable optical off-axis afterglows, the viewing angle is at most twice the half-opening angle of the GRB jet. Radio off-axis afterglows should be detected with upcoming radio surveys within a few hundred Mpc. We propose that these surveys will act as `radio triggers', and that dedicated radio facilities should follow-up these sources. Follow-ups can unveil the presence of the radio SN remnant, if present. In addition, they can probe the presence of a mildly relativistic component, either associated with the GRB jet or the SN ejecta, expected in these sources.

  11. The low-extinction afterglow in the solar-metallicity host galaxy of GRB 110918A

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, J; Greiner, J; Savaglio, S; E., F Olivares; Rau, A; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Sánchez-Ramírez, R; Wiersema, K; Schady, P; Kann, D A; Filgas, R; Nardini, M; Berger, E; Fox, D; Gorosabel, J; Klose, S; Levan, A; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Rossi, A; Schmidl, S; Sudilovsky, V; Tanvir, N R; Thöne, C C

    2013-01-01

    Galaxies selected through long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) could be of fundamental importance when mapping the star formation history out to the highest redshifts. Before using them as efficient tools in the early Universe, however, the environmental factors that govern the formation of GRBs need to be understood. Metallicity is theoretically thought to be a fundamental driver in GRB explosions and energetics, but is still, even after more than a decade of extensive studies, not fully understood. This is largely related to two phenomena: a dust-extinction bias, that prevented high-mass and thus likely high-metallicity GRB hosts to be detected in the first place, and a lack of efficient instrumentation, that limited spectroscopic studies including metallicity measurements to the low-redshift end of the GRB host population. The subject of this work is the very energetic GRB 110918A, for which we measure one of the largest host-integrated metallicities, ever, and the highest stellar mass for z<1.9. This presents ...

  12. Jet or shock breakout? The low-luminosity GRB 060218

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Christopher M.; Chevalier, Roger A.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a model for the low-luminosity gamma-ray burst GRB 060218 that plausibly accounts for multiwavelength observations to day 20. The model components are: (1) a long-lived (tj ˜ 3000 s) central engine and accompanying low-luminosity (Lj ˜ 1047 erg s-1), mildly relativistic (γ ˜ 10) jet; (2) a low-mass (˜4 × 10-3 M⊙) envelope surrounding the progenitor star; and (3) a modest amount of dust (AV ˜ 0.1 mag) in the circumstellar or interstellar environment. Blackbody emission from the transparency radius in a low-power jet outflow can fit the prompt thermal X-ray emission, and the non-thermal X-rays and gamma-rays may be produced via Compton scattering of thermal photons from hot leptons in the jet interior or the external shocks. The later mildly relativistic phase of this outflow can produce the radio emission via synchrotron radiation from the forward shock. Meanwhile, interaction of the associated SN 2006aj with a circumstellar envelope extending to ˜1013 cm can explain the early optical emission. The X-ray afterglow can be interpreted as a light echo of the prompt emission from dust at ˜30 pc. Our model is a plausible alternative to that of Nakar, who recently proposed shock breakout of a jet smothered by an extended envelope as the source of prompt emission. Both our results and Nakar's suggest that bursts such as GRB 060218 may originate from unusual progenitors with extended circumstellar envelopes, and that a jet is necessary to decouple the prompt emission from the supernova.

  13. Non-photonic emission from gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E

    2006-01-01

    gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are likely sources of ultra-high energy, >10^{19} eV, protons and high energy, >1 TeV, neutrinos. Large volume detectors of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) and high energy neutrinos, which are already operating and are being expanded, may allow to test in the coming few years the predictions of the GRB model for high energy proton and neutrino production. Detection of the predicted signals will allow to identify the sources of UHECRs and will provide a unique probe, which may allow to resolve open questions related to the underlying physics of GRB models. Moreover, detection of GRB neutrinos will allow to test for neutrino properties (e.g., flavor oscillations for which tau's would be a unique signature, and coupling to gravity) with an accuracy many orders of magnitude better than is currently possible.

  14. Gamma-ray bursts at high and very high energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piron, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence of a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future. xml:lang="fr"

  15. Gamma-Ray Bursts at high and very high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Piron, F

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are extra-galactic and extremely energetic transient emissions of gamma rays, which are thought to be associated with the death of massive stars or the merger of compact objects in binary systems. Their huge luminosities involve the presence a newborn stellar-mass black hole emitting a relativistic collimated outflow, which accelerates particles and produces non-thermal emissions from the radio domain to the highest energies. In this article, I review recent progresses in the understanding of GRB jet physics above 100 MeV, based on Fermi observations of bright GRBs. I discuss the physical implications of these observations and their impact on GRB modeling, and I present some prospects for GRB observation at very high energies in the near future.

  16. On Magnetic Field Amplification in Gamma-Ray Burst Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, E G

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic fields play a dual role in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). First, GRB and afterglow spectra (the latter interpreted as emission from external shocks) imply synchrotron radiation in a magnetic field that is a significant fraction of equipartition with the particle energy density. Second, magnetized rotators with $\\sim 10^{15}$ Gauss field may power GRB by transporting Poynting flux to large distances where it dissipates and also drives an external shock. The field amplification at external shocks and in the engine involve separate processes. External shock fields are likely either seeded by a pre-GRB wind, or are amplified by two-stream plasma instabilities with MHD turbulence playing a subsequent role. In the engine, the large scale fields are likely produced by MHD helical dynamos, since flux accretion cannot easily compete with turbulent diffusion, and because structures must be large enough to rise to coronae before diffusing. Why helical dynamos are feasible, and their relation to the magnetorotational ...

  17. Optical, Infrared, and Ultraviolet Observations of the X-Ray Flash GRB 050416A

    CERN Document Server

    Holland, S T; Gorosabel, J; Hjorth, J; Schady, P; Thomsen, B; Augusteijn, T; Blustin, A J; Breeveld, A; De Pasquale, M; Fynbo, J P U; Gehrels, N; Gronwall, C; Hunsberger, S; Ivanushkina, M; Landsman, W B; Laursen, P; McGowan, K; Mangano, V; Markwardt, C B; Marshall, F; Mason, K O; Moretti, A; Page, M J; Poole, T; Roming, P; Rosen, S; Still, M

    2006-01-01

    We present ultraviolet, optical, and infrared photometry of the afterglow of the X-ray flash GRB 050416A taken between approximately 100 seconds and 36 days after the burst. We find an intrinsic spectral slope between 1930 Angstrom and 22,200 Angstrom of -1.14 +/- 0.20 and a decay rate of -0.86 +/- 0.15. There is no evidence for a change in the decay rate between approximately 0.7 and 4.7 days after the burst. Our data implies that there is no spectral break between the optical and X-ray bands between 0.7 and 4.7 days after the burst, and is consistent with the cooling break being redward of the K_s band (22,200 Angstrom) at 0.7 days. The combined ultraviolet/optical/infrared spectral energy distribution shows no evidence for a significant amount of extinction in the host galaxy along the line of sight to GRB 050416A. Our data suggest that the extragalactic extinction along the line of sight to the burst is only approximately A_V = 0.2 mag, which is significantly less than the extinction expected from the hyd...

  18. The ultra-long GRB 111209A - II. Prompt to afterglow and afterglow properties

    CERN Document Server

    Stratta, G; Atteia, J L; Boër, M; Coward, D M; De Pasquale, M; Howell, E; Klotz, A; Oates, S; Piro, L

    2013-01-01

    The "ultra-long" Gamma Ray Burst GRB 111209A at redshift z=0.677, is so far the longest GRB ever observed, with rest frame prompt emission duration of ~4 hours. In order to explain the bursts exceptional longevity, a low metallicity blue supergiant progenitor has been invoked. In this work, we further investigate this peculiar burst by performing a multi-band temporal and spectral analysis of both the prompt and the afterglow emission. We use proprietary and publicly available data from Swift, Konus Wind, XMM-Newton, TAROT as well as from other ground based optical and radio telescopes. We find some peculiar properties that are possibly connected to the exceptional nature of this burst, namely: i) an unprecedented large optical delay of 410+/-50 s is measured between the peak epochs of a marked flare observed also in gamma-rays after about 2 ks from the first Swift/BAT trigger; ii) if the optical and X-ray/gamma-ray photons during the prompt emission share a common origin, as suggested by their similar tempor...

  19. Hubble Space Telescope Observations of the Afterglow, Supernova and Host Galaxy Associated with the Extremely Bright GRB 130427A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levan, A.J.; Tanvir, N. R.; Fruchter, A. S.; Hjorth, J.; Pian, E.; Mazzali, P.; Hounsell, R. A.; Perley, D. A.; Cano, Z.; Graham, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pe'er, A.; Misra, K.; Wiersema, K.

    2014-01-01

    We present Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the exceptionally bright and luminous Swift gamma-ray burst, GRB 130427A. At z=0.34 this burst affords an excellent opportunity to study the supernova and host galaxy associated with an intrinsically extremely luminous burst (E(sub iso) greater than 10(exp 54) erg): more luminous than any previous GRB with a spectroscopically associated supernova. We use the combination of the image quality, UV capability and and invariant PSF of HST to provide the best possible separation of the afterglow, host and supernova contributions to the observed light approximately 17 rest-frame days after the burst utilising a host subtraction spectrum obtained 1 year later. Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) grism observations show that the associated supernova, SN 2013cq, has an overall spectral shape and luminosity similar to SN 1998bw (with a photospheric velocity, vph approximately 15,000 kilometers per second). The positions of the bluer features are better matched by the higher velocity SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second), but SN 2010bh (vph approximately 30,000 kilometers per second but this SN is significantly fainter, and fails to reproduce the overall spectral shape, perhaps indicative of velocity structure in the ejecta. We find that the burst originated approximately 4 kpc from the nucleus of a moderately star forming (1 Solar Mass yr(exp-1)), possibly interacting disc galaxy. The absolute magnitude, physical size and morphology of this galaxy, as well as the location of the GRB within it are also strikingly similar to those of GRB980425SN 1998bw. The similarity of supernovae and environment from both the most luminous and least luminous GRBs suggests broadly similar progenitor stars can create GRBs across six orders of magnitude in isotropic energy.

  20. The supernova-gamma-ray burst-jet connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjorth, Jens

    2013-06-13

    The observed association between supernovae and gamma-ray bursts represents a cornerstone in our understanding of the nature of gamma-ray bursts. The collapsar model provides a theoretical framework for this connection. A key element is the launch of a bipolar jet (seen as a gamma-ray burst). The resulting hot cocoon disrupts the star, whereas the (56)Ni produced gives rise to radioactive heating of the ejecta, seen as a supernova. In this discussion paper, I summarize the observational status of the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection in the context of the 'engine' picture of jet-driven supernovae and highlight SN 2012bz/GRB 120422A--with its luminous supernova but intermediate high-energy luminosity--as a possible transition object between low-luminosity and jet gamma-ray bursts. The jet channel for supernova explosions may provide new insights into supernova explosions in general.

  1. Simultaneous optical/gamma-ray observations of GRB 121217's prompt emission

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, J; Schmidl, S; Greiner, J; Gruber, D; Oates, S; Kobayashi, S; Zhang, B; Cummings, J R; Filgas, R; Gehrels, N; Grupe, D; Kann, D A; Klose, S; Krühler, T; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Rau, A; Rossi, A; Siegel, M; Schady, P; Sudilovsky, V; Tanga, M; Varela, K

    2013-01-01

    Since the advent of the Swift satellite it has been possible to obtain precise localisations of GRB positions of sub-arcsec accuracy within seconds, facilitating ground-based robotic telescopes to automatically slew to the target within seconds. This has yielded a plethora of observational data for the afterglow phase of the GRB, but the quantity of data (<2 keV) covering the initial prompt emission still remains small. Only in a handful of cases has it been possible obtain simultaneous coverage of the prompt emission in a multi-wavelength regime (gamma-ray to optical), as a result of: observing the field by chance prior to the GRB (e.g. 080319B/naked-eye burst), long-prompt emission (e.g., 080928, 110205A) or triggered on a pre-cursor (e.g., 041219A, 050820A, 061121). This small selection of bursts have shown both correlated and uncorrelated gamma-ray and optical light curve behaviour, and the multi-wavelength emission mechanism remains far from resolved (i.e. single population synchrotron self-Component,...

  2. The Rapidly Flaring Afterglow of the Very Bright and Energetic GRB 070125

    CERN Document Server

    Updike, Adria C; Nysewander, Melissa C; Fruchter, Andrew S; Kann, D Alexander; Klose, Sylvio; Milne, Peter A; Williams, G Grant; Zheng, Weikang; Hergenrother, Carl W; Prochaska, Jason X; Halpern, Jules P; Mirabal, Nestor; Thorstensen, John R; van der Horst, Alexander J; Starling, Rhaana L C; Racusin, Judith L; Burrows, David N; Kuin, N P M; Roming, Peter W A; Bellm, Eric; Hurley, Kevin; Li, Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V; Blake, Cullen; Starr, Dan; Falco, Emilio E; Brown, Warren R; Dai, Xinyu; Deng, Jinsong; Xin, Liping; Qiu, Yulei; Wei, Jianyan; Urata, Yuji; Nanni, Domenico; Maiorano, Elisabetta; Palazzi, Eliana; Greco, Giuseppe; Bartolini, Corrado; Guarnieri, Adriano; Piccioni, Adalberto; Pizzichini, Graziella; Terra, Federica; Misra, Kuntal; Bhatt, B C; Anupama, G C; Fan, X; Jiang, L; Wijers, Ralph A M J; Reichart, Dan E; Eid, Hala A; Bryngelson, Ginger; Puls, Jason; Goldthwaite, R C; Hartmann, Dieter H

    2008-01-01

    We report on multi-wavelength observations, ranging from the X-ray to radio wave bands, of the IPN-localized gamma-ray burst GRB 070125. Spectroscopic observations reveal the presence of absorption lines due to O I, Si II, and C IV, implying a likely redshift of z = 1.547. The well-sampled light curves, in particular from 0.5 to 4 days after the burst, suggest a jet break at 3.7 days, corresponding to a jet opening angle of ~7.0 degrees, and implying an intrinsic GRB energy in the 1 - 10,000 keV band of around E = (6.3 - 6.9)x 10^(51) erg (based on the fluences measured by the gamma-ray detectors of the IPN network). GRB 070125 is among the brightest afterglows observed to date. The spectral energy distribution implies a host extinction of Av < 0.9 mag. Two rebrightening episodes are observed, one with excellent time coverage, showing an increase in flux of 56% in ~8000 seconds. The evolution of the afterglow light curve is achromatic at all times. Late-time observations of the afterglow do not show eviden...

  3. No supernovae detected in two long-duration gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, D; Fynbo, J P U; Thöne, C C; Sollerman, J

    2007-05-15

    There is strong evidence that long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are produced during the collapse of a massive star. In the standard version of the collapsar model, a broad-lined and luminous Type Ic core-collapse supernova (SN) accompanies the GRB. This association has been confirmed in observations of several nearby GRBs. Recent observations show that some long-duration GRBs are different. No SN emission accompanied the long-duration GRBs 060505 and 060614 down to limits fainter than any known Type Ic SN and hundreds of times fainter than the archetypal SN 1998bw that accompanied GRB 980425. Multi-band observations of the early afterglows, as well as spectroscopy of the host galaxies, exclude the possibility of significant dust obscuration. Furthermore, the bursts originated in star-forming galaxies, and in the case of GRB 060505, the burst was localized to a compact star-forming knot in a spiral arm of its host galaxy. We find that the properties of the host galaxies, the long duration of the bursts and, in the case of GRB 060505, the location of the burst within its host, all imply a massive stellar origin. The absence of an SN to such deep limits therefore suggests a new phenomenological type of massive stellar death.

  4. Astrobiological Effects of Gamma-ray Bursts in the Milky Way Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowanlock, Michael G.

    2016-11-01

    A planet having protective ozone within the collimated beam of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) may suffer ozone depletion, potentially causing a mass extinction event to existing life on a planet’s surface and oceans. We model the dangers of long GRBs to planets in the Milky Way and utilize a static statistical model of the Galaxy, which matches major observable properties, such as the inside-out star formation history (SFH), metallicity evolution, and three-dimensional stellar number density distribution. The GRB formation rate is a function of both the SFH and metallicity. However, the extent to which chemical evolution reduces the GRB rate over time in the Milky Way is still an open question. Therefore, we compare the damaging effects of GRBs to biospheres in the Milky Way using two models. One model generates GRBs as a function of the inside-out SFH. The other model follows the SFH, but generates GRB progenitors as a function of metallicity, thereby favoring metal-poor host regions of the Galaxy over time. If the GRB rate only follows the SFH, the majority of the GRBs occur in the inner Galaxy. However, if GRB progenitors are constrained to low-metallicity environments, then GRBs only form in the metal-poor outskirts at recent epochs. Interestingly, over the past 1 Gyr, the surface density of stars (and their corresponding planets), which survive a GRB is still greatest in the inner galaxy in both models. The present-day danger of long GRBs to life at the solar radius (R ⊙ = 8 kpc) is low. We find that at least ∼65% of stars survive a GRB over the past 1 Gyr. Furthermore, when the GRB rate was expected to have been enhanced at higher redshifts, such as z ≳ 0.5, our results suggest that a large fraction of planets would have survived these lethal GRB events.

  5. SEARCH FOR GAMMA-RAYS FROM THE UNUSUALLY BRIGHT GRB 130427A WITH THE HAWC GAMMA-RAY OBSERVATORY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysekara, A. U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Alfaro, R. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, México D. F. (Mexico); Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R. [CEFyMAP, Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Álvarez, J. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Cotti, U.; De León, C. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Solares, H. A. Ayala [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States); Barber, A. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Baughman, B. M.; Braun, J. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Bautista-Elivar, N. [Universidad Politécnica de Pachuca, Municipio de Zempoala, Hidalgo (Mexico); BenZvi, S. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Rosales, M. Bonilla; Carramiñana, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Caballero-Mora, K. S. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, México D. F. (Mexico); Castillo, M.; Cotzomi, J. [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Ciudad Universitaria, Puebla (Mexico); De la Fuente, E., E-mail: dirk.lennarz@gatech.edu [Departamento de Física, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierías, Universidad de Guadalajara, Guadalajara (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC collaboration; and others

    2015-02-20

    The first limits on the prompt emission from the long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A in the >100 GeV energy band are reported. GRB 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift z ≲ 0.5 and featured the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The energy spectrum extends at least up to 95 GeV, clearly in the range observable by the High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory, a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. The burst occurred under unfavorable observation conditions, low in the sky and when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, eight different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC detector, which will be completed soon. The detection rate of the full HAWC detector may be as high as one to two GRBs per year. A detection could provide important information regarding the high energy processes at work and the observation of a possible cut-off beyond the Fermi Large Area Telescope energy range could be the signature of gamma-ray absorption, either in the GRB or along the line of sight due to the extragalactic background light.

  6. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, V; Goldstein, A; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Gibby, M H; Greiner, J; Gruber, D; Jenke, P; Kippen, R M; Pelassa, V; Xiong, S; Yu, H -F; Bhat, P N; Burgess, J M; Byrne, D; Fitzpatrick, G; Foley, S; Giles, M M; Guiriec, S; van der Horst, A J; von Kienlin, A; McBreen, S; McGlynn, S; Tierney, D; Zhang, B -B

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in July, 2008. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network (IPN), to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1 degree, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.7 degree Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14 degrees. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y-axis better l...

  7. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Goldstein, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Meegan, C. A.; Jenke, P.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL (United States); Preece, R. D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Greiner, J.; Yu, H.-F. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Kippen, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States); Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S., E-mail: valerie@nasa.gov [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); and others

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  8. A search for kilonova emission associated with GRB 130603B: the smoking gun signature of a compact binary merger event

    CERN Document Server

    Tanvir, N R; Fruchter, A S; Hjorth, J; Wiersema, K; Tunnicliffe, R; Postigo, A de Ugarte

    2013-01-01

    The nature of short duration gamma-ray bursts (S-GRBs) represents one of the great unsolved mysteries of astrophysics today. While a favoured model for their origin is the merger of two compact objects (e.g., neutron stars) this lacks a smoking gun signature to date. However, these mergers are expected to create radioactive species, including heavy r-process elements, which should result in a faint, fast transient in the days following the burst, a so-called kilonova. Recent calculations suggest much energy comes out in the near-infrared in the days following the initial burst. Here we report a search for such an event accompanying GRB 130603B, the first S-GRB to have a firm redshift established directly from the afterglow. At z=0.36 the faint transient is expected to peak a few days after the burst at an H-band magnitude of ~25. Observing with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) nine days post-burst, we indeed find a source at the location of the burst, with these properties, although we cannot yet say whether ...

  9. The bright gamma-ray burst of 2000 February 10: A case study of an optically dark gamma-ray burst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piro, L.; Frail, D.A.; Gorosabel, J.;

    2002-01-01

    The gamma-ray burst GRB 000210 had the highest gamma-ray peak flux of any event localized by BeppoSAX as yet, but it did not have a detected optical afterglow, despite prompt and deep searches down to R-lim approximate to 23.5. It is therefore one of the events recently classified as dark GRBs, w...

  10. Multi-wavelength observations of afterglow of GRB 080319B and the modeling constraints

    CERN Document Server

    Pandey, S B; Jelínek, M; Kamble, Atish P; Gorosabel, J; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Prins, S; Oreiro, R; Chantry, V; Trushkin, S; Bremer, M; Winters, J M; Pozanenko, A; Krugly, Yu; Slyusarev, I; Kornienko, G; Erofeeva, A; Misra, K; Ramprakash, A N; Mohan, V; Bhattacharya, D; Volnova, A; Plá, J; Ibrahimov, M; Im, M; Volvach, A; Wijers, R A M J

    2009-01-01

    We present observations of the afterglow of GRB 080319B at optical, mm and radio frequencies from a few hours to 67 days after the burst. Present observations along with other published multi-wavelength data have been used to study the light-curves and spectral energy distributions of the burst afterglow. The nature of this brightest cosmic explosion has been explored based on the observed properties and it's comparison with the afterglow models. Our results show that the observed features of the afterglow fits equally good with the Inter Stellar Matter and the Stellar Wind density profiles of the circum-burst medium. In case of both density profiles, location of the maximum synchrotron frequency $\

  11. Effects of Goldstone Bosons on Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Tu, Huitzu

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most energetic explosion events in the universe. An amount of gravitational energy of the order of the rest-mass energy of the Sun is released from a small region, within seconds or longer. This should lead to the formation of a fireball of temperature in the MeV range, consisting of electrons/positrons, photons, and a small fraction of baryons. We exploit the potential of GRB fireballs for being a laboratory for testing particle physics beyond the Standard Model, where we find that Weinberg's Higgs portal model serves as a good candidate for this purpose. Due to the resonance effects, the Goldstone bosons can be rapidly produced by electron-positron annihilation process in the initial fireballs of the gamma-ray bursts. On the other hand, the mean free path of the Goldstone bosons is larger than the size of the GRB initial fireballs, so they are not coupled to the GRB's relativistic flow and can lead to significant energy loss. Using generic values for the GRB initial fireball ...

  12. GRB 130427A and SN 2013cq: A Multi-wavelength Analysis of An Induced Gravitational Collapse Event

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, R; Kovacevic, M; Bianco, C L; Enderli, M; Muccino, M; Penacchioni, A V; Pisani, G B; Rueda, J A

    2014-01-01

    GRB 130427A, one of the most energetic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever observed, has the largest $\\gamma$-ray fluence and the longest lasting simultaneous optical, X-ray, $\\gamma$-ray and GeV observations in the past 40 years. We apply to GRB 130427A the induced gravitational collapse (IGC) paradigm for GRBs associated to supernovae (SNe). On May 2, 2013, we predicted (GCN 14526) the forthcoming emergence of a supernova associated with GRB 130427A on the ground of a first look at Episode 3. Later, SN 2013cq was successfully detected on May 13. Here, we use the simultaneous observations by Swift, NuStar and Fermi satellites to probe our IGC paradigm in the "terra incognita" of this most energetic GRB. First, we verified that GRB 130427A is indeed an IGC event by identifying the expected scaling laws and power-law behavior of Episode 3 X-ray ($0.3$-$10$~keV) emission. Then, we turn to the optical, $\\gamma$-ray and high energy light curves finding, unexpectedly, a power-law behavior similar to the soft X-ray one. A...

  13. Molecular Hydrogen in the Damped Lyman-alpha System towards GRB 120815A at z=2.36

    CERN Document Server

    Krühler, T; Fynbo, J P U; Vreeswijk, P M; Schmidl, S; Malesani, D; Christensen, L; De Cia, A; Hjorth, J; Jakobsson, P; Kann, D A; Kaper, L; Vergani, S D; Afonso, P M J; Covino, S; Postigo, A de Ugarte; D'Elia, V; Filgas, R; Goldoni, P; Greiner, J; Hartoog, O E; Milvang-Jensen, B; Nardini, M; Piranomonte, S; Rossi, A; Sánchez-Ramírez, R; Schady, P; Schulze, S; Sudilovsky, V; Tanvir, N R; Tagliaferri, G; Watson, D J; Wiersema, K; Wijers, R A M J; Xu, D

    2013-01-01

    [Abridged] Molecular hydrogen H_2 is a key requirement for star-formation, frequently observed along sightlines in the Galaxy and to the Magellanic Clouds, but notoriously hard to detect directly beyond z ~ 0. In the DLAs associated with long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are tightly linked to vigorous star-formation, H_2 has remained largely elusive, and has been unequivocally detected only towards GRB 080607 and possibly towards GRB 060206. Here, we present the discovery of H_2-rich gas, including the presence of vibrationally-excited H_2^* in the optical spectrum of the afterglow of GRB 120815A at z=2.36 obtained with X-shooter at the VLT. The galactic environment of GRB 120815A is characterized by a strong DLA with log(N(H)/cm^-2) = 21.95 +/- 0.10, prominent H_2 absorption in the Lyman-Werner bands (log(N(H_2)/cm^-2) = 20.53 +/- 0.04) and thus a molecular gas fraction log f(H_2)=-1.14 +/- 0.10. The distance d between the absorbing neutral gas and GRB 120815A is constrained via photo-excitation modeling o...

  14. The warm, the excited, and the molecular gas: GRB 121024A shining through its star-forming galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Friis, M; Krühler, T; Fynbo, J P U; Ledoux, C; Vreeswijk, P M; Malesani, D; Gorosabel, J; Starling, R L C; Jakobsson, P; Varela, K; Watson, D J; Wiersema, K; Drachmann, A P; Trotter, A; Thöne, C C; Postigo, A de Ugarte; D'Elia, V; Elliott, J; Maturi, M; Goldoni, P; Greiner, J; Haislip, J; Kaper, L; Knust, F; LaCluyze, A; Milvang-Jensen, B; Reichart, D; Schulze, S; Sudilovsky, V; Vergani, S D

    2014-01-01

    We present the first reported case of the simultaneous metallicity determination of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxy, from both afterglow absorption lines as well as strong emission-line diagnostics. Using spectroscopic and imaging observations of the afterglow and host of the long-duration GRB121024A at z = 2.30, we give one of the most complete views of a GRB host/environment to date. We observe a strong damped Ly-alpha absorber (DLA) with a hydrogen column density of log N(HI) = 21.80+/-0.15, H_2 absorption in the Lyman-Werner bands (molecular fraction of log(f) ~ -1.4; fourth solid detection of molecular hydrogen in a GRB-DLA), the nebular emission lines H-alpha, H-beta, [OII], [OIII] and [NII], as well as a large variety of metal absorption lines. We find a GRB host galaxy that is highly star-forming (SFR ~ 40 Msolar/yr), with a dust-corrected metallicity along the line of sight of [Zn/H]corr = -0.5+/-0.2 ([O/H] ~ -0.3 from emission lines), and a depletion factor of refractory elements of [Zn/Fe] = 0....

  15. SVOM: a new mission for Gamma-Ray Burst Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Gotz, D; Basa, S; Wei, J; Zhang, S N; Atteia, J -L; Barret, D; Cordier, B; Claret, A; Deng, J; Fan, X; Hu, J Y; Huang, M; Mandrou, P; Mereghetti, S; Qiu, Y; Wu, B

    2009-01-01

    We present the SVOM (Space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor) mission, that is being developed in cooperation between the Chinese National Space Agency (CNSA), the Chinese Academy of Science (CAS) and the French Space Agency (CNES). Its scientific objectives include the study of the GRB phenomenon, GRB physics and progenitors, cosmology, and fundamental physics. SVOM is designed to detect all known types of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), to provide fast and reliable GRB positions, to measure the broadband spectral characteristics and temporal properties of the GRB prompt emission. This will be obtained in first place thanks to a set of four space flown instruments. A wide field (~2 sr) coded mask telescope (ECLAIRs), operating in the 4-250 keV energy range, will provide the triggers and localizations, while a gamma-ray non-imaging spectrometer (GRM), sensitive in the 50 keV-5 MeV domain, will extend the prompt emission energy coverage. After a satellite slew, in order to place the GRB direction ...

  16. Population III stars and the Long Gamma Ray Burst rate

    CERN Document Server

    Campisi, M A; Salvaterra, R; Ciardi, B

    2011-01-01

    Because massive, low-metallicity population III (PopIII) stars may produce very powerful long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs), high-redshift GRB observations could probe the properties of the first stars. We analyze the correlation between early PopIII stars and LGRBs by using cosmological N-body/hydrodynamical simulations, which include detailed chemical evolution, cooling, star formation, feedback effects and the transition between PopIII and more standard population I/II (PopII/I) stars. From the Swift observed rate of LGRBs, we estimate the fraction of black holes that will produce a GRB from PopII/I stars to be in the range 0.0286, becoming as high has 40% at z>10. Finally, we study the properties of the galaxies hosting our sample of GRB3. We find that the average metallicity of the galaxies hosting a GRB3 is typically higher than the critical metallicity used to select the PopIII stars, due to the efficiency in polluting the gas above such low values. We also find that the highest probability of finding a GRB...

  17. Hadronic Models for the Extra Spectral Component in the short GRB 090510

    CERN Document Server

    Asano, Katsuaki; Mészáros, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A short gamma-ray burst GRB 090510 detected by {\\it Fermi} shows an extra spectral component between 10 MeV and 30 GeV, an addition to a more usual low-energy ($<10$ MeV) Band component. In general, such an extra component could originate from accelerated protons. In particular, inverse Compton emission from secondary electron-positron pairs and proton synchrotron emission are competitive models for reproducing the hard spectrum of the extra component in GRB 090510. Here, using Monte Carlo simulations, we test the hadronic scenarios against the observed properties. To reproduce the extra component around GeV with these models, the proton injection isotropic-equivalent luminosity is required to be larger than $10^{55}$ erg$ / $s. Such large proton luminosities are a challenge for the hadronic models.

  18. The luminosity and stellar mass functions of GRB host galaxies: Insight into the metallicity bias

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, Michele; Jimenez, Raul

    2014-01-01

    [Abridged] Long-Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are powerful probes of the star formation history of the Universe, but the correlation between the two depends on the highly debated presence and strength of a metallicity bias. To investigate this correlation, we use a phenomenological model that successfully describes star formation rates, luminosities and stellar masses of star forming galaxies, and apply it to GRB production. We predict the comoving GRB rate and luminosities/stellar masses of host galaxies depending on the presence (or absence) of a metallicity bias, highlighting that apparent conflicts among previous studies might disappear following a comprehensive data-model comparison. We conclude that: (1) Our best fitting model includes a moderate metallicity bias, broadly consistent with the large majority of the long-duration GRBs in metal-poor environments originating from a collapsar (~83%), but with a secondary contribution from a metal-independent production channel, such as binary evolution; (2...

  19. Extremely narrow spectrum of GRB110920A: further evidence for localised, subphotospheric dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Iyyani, S; Ahlgren, B; Burgess, J M; Larsson, J; Pe'er, A; Lundman, C; Axelsson, M; McGlynn, S

    2015-01-01

    Much evidence points towards that the photosphere in the relativistic outflow in GRBs plays an important role in shaping the observed MeV spectrum. However, it is unclear whether the spectrum is fully produced by the photosphere or whether a substantial part of the spectrum is added by processes far above the photosphere. Here we make a detailed study of the $\\gamma-$ray emission from single pulse GRB110920A which has a spectrum that becomes extremely narrow towards the end of the burst. We show that the emission can be interpreted as Comptonisation of thermal photons by cold electrons in an unmagnetised outflow at an optical depth of $\\tau \\sim 20$. The electrons receive their energy by a local dissipation occurring close to the saturation radius. The main spectral component of GRB110920A and its evolution is thus, in this interpretation, fully explained by the emission from the photosphere including localised dissipation at high optical depths.

  20. The Interpretation of the Multi-wavelength Afterglow Emission of Short GRB 140903A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Wei, Da-Ming

    2017-01-01

    GRB 140903A, a short duration γ-ray burst (SGRB) detected by Swift, is characterized by its long-lasting radio emission among SGRBs. In addition to the ∼ {10}6 s radio afterglow emission, the afterglow of GRB 140903A displays a plateau from 103 s to 7× {10}3 {{s}} in the X-rays. In this work, we attribute the X-ray plateau to the energy injection into the decelerating blast wave and then model the later radio/optical/X-ray afterglow emission within the standard fireball afterglow model. The afterglow emission has been well reproduced with reasonable physical parameters, including a jet half-opening angle of ∼0.05.

  1. Gamma Ray Bursts in the HAWC Era

    CERN Document Server

    Mészáros, Peter; Murase, Kohta; Fox, Derek; Gao, He; Senno, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe, and are among the most promising for detecting multiple non-electromagnetic signals, including cosmic rays, high energy neutrinos and gravitational waves. The multi-GeV to TeV gamma-ray range of GRB could have significant contributions from hadronic interactions, mixed with more conventional leptonic contributions. This energy range is important for probing the source physics, including overall energetics, the shock parameters and the Lorentz factor. We discuss some of the latest observational and theoretical developments in the field.

  2. Properties of $\\gamma$-Ray Burst Classes

    CERN Document Server

    Hakkila, J; Roiger, R J; Mallozzi, R S; Pendleton, G N; Meegan, C A; Hakkila, Jon; Haglin, David J.; Roiger, Richard J.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    The three gamma-ray burst (GRB) classes identified by statistical clustering analysis (Mukherjee et al. 1998) are examined using the pattern recognition algorithm C4.5 (Quinlan 1986). Although the statistical existence of Class 3 (intermediate duration, intermediate fluence, soft) is supported, the properties of this class do not need to arise from a distinct source population. Class 3 properties can easily be produced from Class 1 (long, high fluence, intermediate hardness) by a combination of measurement error, hardness/intensity correlation, and a newly-identified BATSE bias (the fluence duration bias). Class 2 (short, low fluence, hard) does not appear to be related to Class 1.

  3. GRB 060117: Reverse + forward shock solution

    CERN Document Server

    Jel'inek, M; Kubánek, P; Hudec, R; Nekola, M F; Rídky, J; Grygar, J; Jel\\'inek, Martin; Prouza, Michael; Kub\\'anek, Petr; Hudec, Ren\\'e; Nekola, Martin F.; Ridky, Jan; Grygar, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    We present a discovery and observation of an extraordinarily bright prompt optical emission of the GRB 060117 obtained by a wide-field camera atop the robotic telescope FRAM of the Pierre Auger Observatory from 2 to 10 minutes after the GRB. We found rapid average temporal flux decay of alpha = -1.7 +/- 0.1 and a peak brightness R = 10.1 mag. We interpret the shape of the lightcurve as a transition between reverse and forward shock emission.

  4. Terrestrial implications of cosmological gamma-ray burst models

    CERN Document Server

    Thorsett, S E

    1995-01-01

    The observation by the BATSE instrument on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory that gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are distributed isotropically around the Earth but nonuniformly in distance has led to the widespread conclusion that GRBs are most likely to be at cosmological distances, making them the most luminous sources known in the Universe. If bursts arise from events that occur in normal galaxies, such as neutron star binary inspirals, then they will also occur in our Galaxy about every hundred thousand to million years. The gamma-ray flux at the Earth due to a Galactic GRB would far exceed that from even the largest solar flares. The absorption of this radiation in the atmosphere would substantially increase the stratospheric nitric oxide concentration through photodissociation of N_2, greatly reducing the ozone concentration for several years through NO_x catalysis, with important biospheric effects due to increased solar ultraviolet flux. A nearby GRB may also leave traces in anomalous radionuclide abundances...

  5. Correlation between sphere distributions of gamma-ray bursts and CMB fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhodanov, O. V.; Sokolov, V. V.; Khabibullina, M. L.

    2016-06-01

    Distribution of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) from catalogs of the BATSE and BeppoSAX space observatories relative to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data by Planck space mission is studied. Three methods were applied for data analysis: (1) a histogram of CMB signal values in GRB directions, (2) mosaic correlation maps calculated for GRB locations and CMB distribution, (3) calculation of an average response in the area of "average GRB population" on the CMB map. A correlation between GRB locations and CMB fluctuations was detected which can be interpreted as systematic effects in the process of observations. Besides, in the averaged areas of CMB maps, a difference between the distributions of average fluctuations for short and long GRBs was detected which can be caused by different natures of these events.

  6. Feasibility of a Small, Rapid Optical-to-IR Response, Next Generation Gamma Ray Burst Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Grossan, B; Bogomolov, V V; Svertilov, S I; Vedenkin, N N; Panasyuk, M; Goncharov, B; Rozhkov, G; Saleev, K; Grobovskoj, E; Krasnov, A S; Morozenko, V S; Osedlo, V I; Rogkov, E; Vachenko, T V; Linder, E V

    2013-01-01

    We present motivations for and study feasibility of a small, rapid optical to IR response gamma ray burst (GRB) space observatory. By analyzing existing GRB data, we give realistic detection rates for X-ray and optical/IR instruments of modest size under actual flight conditions. Given new capabilities of fast optical/IR response (about 1 s to target) and simultaneous multi-band imaging, such an observatory can have a reasonable event rate, likely leading to new science. Requiring a Swift-like orbit, duty cycle, and observing constraints, a Swift-BAT scaled down to 190 square cm of detector area would still detect and locate about 27 GRB per yr. for a trigger threshold of 6.5 sigma. About 23 percent of X-ray located GRB would be detected optically for a 10 cm diameter instrument (about 6 per yr. for the 6.5 sigma X-ray trigger).

  7. Study of GRB Light-curve Decay Indices in the Afterglow Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Vecchio, Roberta; Dainotti, Maria Giovanna; Ostrowski, Michał

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we study the distribution of temporal power-law decay indices, α, in the gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow phase, fitted for 176 GRBs (139 long GRBs, 12 short GRBs with extended emission, and 25 X-ray flashes) with known redshifts. These indices are compared with the temporal decay index, α W , derived with the light-curve fitting using the Willingale et al. model. This model fitting yields similar distributions of α W to the fitted α, but for individual bursts a difference can be significant. Analysis of (α, L a ) distribution, where L a is the characteristic luminosity at the end of the plateau, reveals only a weak correlation of these quantities. However, we discovered a significant regular trend when studying GRB α values along the Dainotti et al. correlation between L a and the end time of the plateau emission in the rest frame, {T}a* , hereafter LT correlation. We note a systematic variation of the α parameter distribution with luminosity for any selected {T}a* . We analyze this systematics with respect to the fitted LT correlation line, expecting that the presented trend may allow us to constrain the GRB physical models. We also attempted to use the derived correlation of α ({T}a) versus {L}a({T}a) to diminish the luminosity scatter related to the variations of α along the LT distribution, a step forward in the effort of standardizing GRBs. A proposed toy model accounting for this systematics applied to the analyzed GRB distribution results in a slight increase of the LT correlation coefficient.

  8. Modeling The GRB Host Galaxy Mass Distribution: Are GRBs Unbiased Tracers of Star Formation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocevski, Daniel; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; West, Andrew A.; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept. /MIT, MKI; Modjaz, Maryam; /UC, Berkeley, Astron. Dept.

    2009-08-03

    We model the mass distribution of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) host galaxies given recent results suggesting that GRBs occur in low metallicity environments. By utilizing measurements of the redshift evolution of the mass-metallicity (M-Z) relationship for galaxies, along with a sharp host metallicity cut-off suggested by Modjaz and collaborators, we estimate an upper limit on the stellar mass of a galaxy that can efficiently produce a GRB as a function of redshift. By employing consistent abundance indicators, we find that sub-solar metallicity cut-offs effectively limit GRBs to low stellar mass spirals and dwarf galaxies at low redshift. At higher redshifts, as the average metallicity of galaxies in the Universe falls, the mass range of galaxies capable of hosting a GRB broadens, with an upper bound approaching the mass of even the largest spiral galaxies. We compare these predicted limits to the growing number of published GRB host masses and find that extremely low metallicity cut-offs of 0.1 to 0.5 Z{sub {circle_dot}} are effectively ruled out by a large number of intermediate mass galaxies at low redshift. A mass function that includes a smooth decrease in the efficiency of producing GRBs in galaxies of metallicity above 12+log(O/H){sub KK04} = 8.7 can, however, accommodate a majority of the measured host galaxy masses. We find that at z {approx} 1, the peak in the observed GRB host mass distribution is inconsistent with the expected peak in the mass of galaxies harboring most of the star formation. This suggests that GRBs are metallicity biased tracers of star formation at low and intermediate redshifts, although our model predicts that this bias should disappear at higher redshifts due to the evolving metallicity content of the universe.

  9. The circumburst environment of a FRED GRB: study of the prompt emission and X-ray/optical afterglow of GRB 051111

    CERN Document Server

    Guidorzi, C; Kobayashi, S; Mundell, C G; Rol, E; Bode, M F; Carter, D; La Parola, V; Melandri, A; Monfardini, A; Mottram, C J; O'Brien, P T; Page, K L; Sakamoto, T; Smith, R J; Steele, I A; Tanvir, N R

    2006-01-01

    We report a multi-wavelength analysis of the prompt emission and early afterglow of GRB051111 and discuss its properties in the context of current fireball models. The detection of GRB051111 by the Burst Alert Telescope on-board Swift triggered early BVRi' observations with the 2-m robotic Faulkes Telescope North in Hawaii, as well as X-ray observations with the Swift X-Ray Telescope. The prompt gamma-ray emission shows a classical FRED profile. The optical afterglow light curves are fitted with a broken power law, with alpha_1=0.35 to alpha_2=1.35 and a break time around 12 minutes after the GRB. Although contemporaneous X-ray observations were not taken, a power law connection between the gamma-ray tail of the FRED temporal profile and the late XRT flux decay is feasible. Alternatively, if the X-ray afterglow tracks the optical decay, this would represent one of the first GRBs for which the canonical steep-shallow-normal decay typical of early X-ray afterglows has been monitored optically. We present a deta...

  10. Fireballs and cannonballs confront the afterglow of GRB 991208

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, S; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon; Rujula, Alvaro De

    2003-01-01

    Galama et al. have recently reported their follow-up measurements of the radio afterglow (AG) of the Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) 991208, up to 293 days after burst, and their reanalysis of the broad-band AG, in the framework of standard fireball models. They advocate a serious revision of their prior analysis and conclusions, based on optical data and on their earlier observations during the first two weeks of the AG. We comment on their work and fill a lacuna: these authors have overlooked the possibility of comparing their new data to the available predictions of the cannonball (CB) model, based --like their incorrect predictions-- on the first round of data. The new data are in good agreement with these CB-model predictions. This is in spite of the fact that, in comparison to the fireball models, the CB model is much simpler, much more predictive, has many fewer parameters, practically no free choices... and it describes well --on a universal basis-- all the measured AGs of GRBs of known redshift.

  11. Are GRB Blackbodies an Artifact of Spectral Evolution?

    CERN Document Server

    Burgess, J Michael

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra with multi-component emission models has become an important part of the field. In particular, multi-component analysis where one component is a blackbody representing emission from a photosphere has enabled both a more detailed understanding of the energy content of the jet as well as the ability to examine the dynamic structure of the outflow. While the existence of a blackbody-like component has been shown to be significant and not a byproduct of background fluctuations, it is very possible that it can be an artifact of spectral evolution of a single component that is being poorly resolved in time. Herein, this possibility is tested by simulating a single component evolving in time and then folding the spectra through the $Fermi$ detector response to generate time-tagged event Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) data. We then fit both the time integrated and resolved generated spectral data with a multi-component model using standard tools. It is found that in {\\it t...

  12. Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (uffo) for Observation of Early Photons from Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, I. H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jorgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chen, P.; Choi, Y. J.; Connell, P.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Eyles, C.; Grossan, B.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Jung, A.; Jeong, S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. B.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, Y. W.; Krasnov, A. S.; Lee1, J.; Lim, H.; Linder, E. V.; Liu, T.-C.; Lund, N.; Min, K. W.; Na, G. W.; Nam, J. W.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Ripa, J.; Reglero, V.; Rodrigo, J. M.; Smoot, G. F.; Suh, J. E.; Svertilov, S.; Vedenkin, N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Yashin, I.

    2013-12-01

    One of the least documented and understood aspects of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) is the rise phase of the optical light curve. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) is an effort to address this question through extraordinary opportunities presented by a series of space missions including a small spacecraft observatory. The UFFO is equipped with a fast-response Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) which uses rapidly moving mirror or mirror arrays to redirect the optical beam rather than slewing the entire spacecraft to aim the optical instrument at the GRB position. The UFFO will probe the early optical rise of GRBs with a sub-second response, for the first time, opening a completely new frontier in GRB and transient studies, the only GRB system which can point and measure on these time scales. Its fast response measurements of the optical emission of dozens of GRB each year will provide unique probes of the burst mechanism, shock breakouts in core-collapse supernovae, tidal disruptions around black holes, test Lorentz violation, be the electromagnetic counterpart to neutrino and gravitational wave signatures of the violent universe, and verify the prospect of GRB as a new standard candle potentially opening up the z>10 universe. As a first step, we employ a motorized slewing stage in SMT which can point to the event within 1s after X-ray trigger, in the UFFO-pathfinder payload onboard the Lomonosov satellite to be launched in 2012. The pathfinder was a small and limited, yet remarkably powerful micro-observatory for rapid optical response to bright gamma-ray bursts, the first part of our GRB and rapid-response long-term program. We describe the early photon science, the space mission of UFFO-pathfinder, and our plan for the next step.

  13. EDGE: Explorer of diffuse emission and gamma-ray burst explosions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Den Herder, J.W.; Hermsen, W.; Hoevers, H.

    2007-01-01

    How structures of various scales formed and evolved from the early Universe up to present time is a fundamental question of astrophysics. EDGE1 will trace the cosmic history of the baryons from the early generations of massive stars by Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) explosions, through the period of galaxy......, will provide key results in many important fields. These scientific goals are feasible with a medium class mission using existing technology combined with innovative instrumental and observational capabilities by: (a) observing with fast reaction Gamma-Ray Bursts with a high spectral resolution (R - 500...... with a FOV of 1/4 of the sky, which will trigger the fast repointing to the GRB. Extension of its energy response up to 1 MeV will be achieved with a GRB detector with no imaging capability. This mission is proposed to ESA as part of the Cosmic Vision call. We will briefly review the science drivers...

  14. Short GRB 130603B: Discovery of a jet break in the optical and radio afterglows, and a mysterious late-time X-ray excess

    CERN Document Server

    Fong, Wen-fai; Metzger, Brian D; Margutti, Raffaella; Chornock, Ryan; Migliori, Giulia; Foley, Ryan J; Zauderer, B Ashley; Lunnan, Ragnhild; Laskar, Tanmoy; Desch, Steven J; Meech, Karen J; Sonnett, Sarah; Dickey, Claire M; Hedlund, Anne M; Harding, Paul

    2013-01-01

    We present radio, optical/NIR, and X-ray observations of the afterglow of the short-duration 130603B, and uncover a break in the radio and optical bands at 0.5 d after the burst, best explained as a jet break with an inferred jet opening angle of 4-8 deg. GRB 130603B is only the third short GRB with a radio afterglow detection to date, and the first time that a jet break is evident in the radio band. We model the temporal evolution of the spectral energy distribution to determine the burst explosion properties and find an isotropic-equivalent kinetic energy of (0.6-1.7) x 10^51 erg and a circumburst density of 5 x 10^-3-30 cm^-3. From the inferred opening angle of GRB 130603B, we calculate beaming-corrected energies of Egamma (0.5-2) x 10^49 erg and EK (0.1-1.6) x 10^49 erg. Along with previous measurements and lower limits we find a median short GRB opening angle of 10 deg. Using the all-sky observed rate of 10 Gpc^-3 yr^-1, this implies a true short GRB rate of 20 yr^-1 within 200 Mpc, the Advanced LIGO/VIR...

  15. Neutrino astronomy and gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Waxman, E

    2007-01-01

    The construction of large volume detectors of high energy, >1 TeV, neutrinos is mainly driven by the search for extra-Galactic neutrino sources. The existence of such sources is implied by observations of ultra-high energy, >10^{19} eV, cosmic-rays, the origin of which is a mystery. In this lecture I briefly discuss the expected extra-Galactic neutrino signal and the current state of the experimental efforts. Neutrino emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which are likely sources of both high energy protons and neutrinos, is discussed in some detail. The detection of the predicted GRB neutrino signal, which may become possible in the coming few years, will allow one to identify the sources of ultra-high energy cosmic-rays and to resolve open questions related to the underlying physics of GRB models. Moreover, detection of GRB neutrinos will allow one to test for neutrino properties (e.g. flavor oscillations and coupling to gravity) with an accuracy many orders of magnitude better than is currently possible.

  16. Solving the missing GRB neutrinos and the GRB-SN puzzles

    CERN Document Server

    Fargion, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    We argue that any GRB model where the progenitor is made by high relativistic hadronic interactions shock waves, and later on by electron-pairs feeding gamma jets, is necessarily leading to an average high neutrino over photon fluency ratio well above unity, mostly above several thousands. The present observed average highest energy ICECUBE neutrino energy fluency is at most comparable to the gamma-X in GRB one. Therefore no hadronic GRB, Fireball or even any earliest hadronic thin precessing Jet, may fit the observation. We therefore imagine a novel electronic thin spinning and precessing jet, fed in late binary system, able to avoid the overcrowded neutrino tails foreseen in hadronic GRB models. In some occasion such an electronic model may lead to an explosion that shines during a GRB with an (apparent) late SN-like event.

  17. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Unique Five-Week VLT Study of the Polarisation of a Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow "Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs)" are certainly amongst the most dramatic events known in astrophysics. These short flashes of energetic gamma-rays, first detected in the late 1960's by military satellites, last from less than one second to several minutes. GRBs have been found to be situated at extremely large ("cosmological") distances. The energy released in a few seconds during such an event is larger than that of the Sun during its entire lifetime of more than 10,000 million years. The GRBs are indeed the most powerful events since the Big Bang known in the Universe, cf. ESO PR 08/99 and ESO PR 20/00. During the past years circumstantial evidence has mounted that GRBs signal the collapse of extremely massive stars, the so-called hypernovae. This was finally demonstrated some months ago when astronomers, using the FORS instrument on ESO's Very Large Telescope (VLT), documented in unprecedented detail the changes in the spectrum of the light source ("the optical afterglow") of the gamma-ray burst GRB 030329 (cf. ESO PR 16/03). A conclusive and direct link between cosmological gamma-ray bursts and explosions of very massive stars was provided on this occasion. Gamma-Ray Burst GRB 030329 was discovered on March 29, 2003 by NASA's High Energy Transient Explorer spacecraft. Follow-up observations with the UVES spectrograph at the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope at the Paranal Observatory (Chile) showed the burst to have a redshift of 0.1685 [1]. This corresponds to a distance of about 2,650 million light-years, making GRB 030329 the second-nearest long-duration GRB ever detected. The proximity of GRB 030329 resulted in very bright afterglow emission, permitting the most extensive follow-up observations of any afterglow to date. A team of astronomers [2] led by Jochen Greiner of the Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik (Germany) decided to make use of this unique opportunity to study the

  18. GRB990123 Evidence that the $\\gamma$ Rays Come from a Central Engine

    CERN Document Server

    Fenimore, E E; Wu, B; Wu, Bobing

    1999-01-01

    GRB990123 was a long complex gamma-ray burst with an optical transient that started early within the gamma-ray phase. The peak and power law decay of the early optical emission strongly indicates the presence of a decelerating relativistic shell during that phase. Prior to this burst, it was not known if the shell decelerated during the burst, so an external shock origin for the gamma rays was still possible. If the gamma-rays are produced in the external shock, then the pulse widths should reflect the observed deceleration of the shell and increase by about 2.3. We analyze the fine time structure observed in the gamma-ray data from BATSE and determine that the width of the peaks do not increase as expected for a decelerating shell; the later pulses are, at most, a factor of 1.15 longer than the earlier pulses. We also analyze the variability to determine what fraction of the shell's surface could be involved in the production of the gamma rays, the so-called surface filling factor. For GRB990123 we find a fi...

  19. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Djorgovski, S G; Kulkarni, S R; Sari, R; Bloom, J S; Galama, T J; Harrison, F A; Price, P A; Fox, D; Reichart, D; Yost, S; Berger, E; Diercks, A H; Goodrich, R; Chaffee, F H

    2001-01-01

    Cosmic gamma-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean gamma-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 10^51 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host gal...

  20. Gamma-ray bursts and Population III stars

    CERN Document Server

    Toma, Kenji; Bromm, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are ideal probes of the epoch of the first stars and galaxies. We review the recent theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of the first (so-called Population III) stars, in light of their viability of providing GRB progenitors. We proceed to discuss possible unique observational signatures of such bursts, based on the current formation scenario of long GRBs. These include signatures related to the prompt emission mechanism, as well as to the afterglow radiation, where the surrounding intergalactic medium might imprint a telltale absorption spectrum. We emphasize important remaining uncertainties in our emerging theoretical framework.

  1. Varying Faces of Photospheric Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Axelsson, M

    2015-01-01

    Among the more than 1000 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, a large fraction show narrow and hard spectra inconsistent with non-thermal emission, signifying optically thick emission from the photosphere. However, only a few of these bursts have spectra consistent with a pure Planck function. We will discuss the observational features of photospheric emission in these GRBs as well as in the ones showing multi-component spectra. We interpret the observations in light of models of subphotospheric dissipation, geometrical broadening and multi-zone emission, and show what we can learn about the dissipation mechanism and properties of GRB jets.

  2. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Population III Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma, Kenji; Yoon, Sung-Chul; Bromm, Volker

    2016-12-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are ideal probes of the epoch of the first stars and galaxies. We review the recent theoretical understanding of the formation and evolution of the first (so-called Population III) stars, in light of their viability of providing GRB progenitors. We proceed to discuss possible unique observational signatures of such bursts, based on the current formation scenario of long GRBs. These include signatures related to the prompt emission mechanism, as well as to the afterglow radiation, where the surrounding intergalactic medium might imprint a telltale absorption spectrum. We emphasize important remaining uncertainties in our emerging theoretical framework.

  3. Supernovae and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livio, Mario; Panagia, Nino; Sahu, Kailash

    2001-07-01

    Participants; Preface; Gamma-ray burst-supernova relation B. Paczynski; Observations of gamma-ray bursts G. Fishman; Fireballs T. Piran; Gamma-ray mechanisms M. Rees; Prompt optical emission from gamma-ray bursts R. Kehoe, C. Akerlof, R. Balsano, S. Barthelmy, J. Bloch, P. Butterworth, D. Casperson, T. Cline, S. Fletcher, F. Frontera, G. Gisler, J. Heise, J. Hills, K. Hurley, B. Lee, S. Marshall, T. McKay, A. Pawl, L. Piro, B. Priedhorsky, J. Szymanski and J. Wren; X-ray afterglows of gamma-ray bursts L. Piro; The first year of optical-IR observations of SN1998bw I. Danziger, T. Augusteijn, J. Brewer, E. Cappellaro, V. Doublier, T. Galama, J. Gonzalez, O. Hainaut, B. Leibundgut, C. Lidman, P. Mazzali, K. Nomoto, F. Patat, J. Spyromilio, M. Turatto, J. Van Paradijs, P. Vreeswijk and J. Walsh; X-ray emission of Supernova 1998bw in the error box of GRB980425 E. Pian; Direct analysis of spectra of type Ic supernovae D. Branch; The interaction of supernovae and gamma-ray bursts with their surroundings R. Chevalier; Magnetars, soft gamma-ray repeaters and gamma-ray bursts A. Harding; Super-luminous supernova remnants Y. -H. Chu, C. -H. Chen and S. -P. Lai; The properties of hypernovae: SNe Ic 1998bw, 1997ef, and SN IIn 1997cy K. Nomoto, P. Mazzali, T. Nakamura, K. Iwanmoto, K. Maeda, T. Suzuki, M. Turatto, I. Danziger and F. Patat; Collapsars, Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Supernovae S. Woosley, A. MacFadyen and A. Heger; Pre-supernova evolution of massive stars N. Panagia and G. Bono; Radio supernovae and GRB 980425 K. Weiler, N. Panagia, R. Sramek, S. Van Dyk, M. Montes and C. Lacey; Models for Ia supernovae and evolutionary effects P. Hoflich and I. Dominguez; Deflagration to detonation A. Khokhlov; Universality in SN Iae and the Phillips relation D. Arnett; Abundances from supernovae F. -K. Thielemann, F. Brachwitz, C. Freiburghaus, S. Rosswog, K. Iwamoto, T. Nakamura, K. Nomoto, H. Umeda, K. Langanke, G. Martinez-Pinedo, D. Dean, W. Hix and M. Strayer; Sne, GRBs, and the

  4. The Metallicity and Dust Content of a Redshift 5 Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sparre, M.; Hartoog, O.E.; Krühler, T.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Watson, D.J.; Wiersema, K.; D'Elia, V.; Zafar, T.; Afonso, P.M.J.; Covino, S.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Flores, H.; Goldoni, P.; Greiner, J.; Hjorth, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Kaper, L.; Klose, S.; Levan, A.J.; Malesani, D.; Milvang-Jensen, B.; Nardini, M.; Piranomonte, S.; Sollerman, J.; Sánchez-Ramírez, R.; Schulze, S.; Tanvir, N.R.; Vergani, S.D.; Wijers, R.A.M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the afterglows of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow the study of star-forming galaxies across most of cosmic history. Here we present observations of GRB 111008A, from which we can measure metallicity, chemical abundance patterns, dust-to-metals ratio (DTM), and extinction of the GR

  5. Dust extinction in high-z galaxies with gamma-ray burst afterglow spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elíasdóttir, Á.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Hjorth, J.

    2009-01-01

    We report the clear detection of the 2175 Å dust absorption feature in the optical afterglow spectrum of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB 070802 at a redshift of z = 2.45. This is the highest redshift for a detected 2175 Å dust bump to date, and it is the first clear detection of the 2175 Å bump in ...

  6. Gamma-ray bursts from stellar remnants - Probing the universe at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A.M.J. Wijers; J.S. Bloom; J.S. Bagla; P. Natarajan

    1998-01-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) releases an amount of energy similar to that of a supernova explosion, which combined with its rapid variability suggests an origin related to neutron stars or black holes. Since these compact stellar remnants form from the most massive stars not long after their birth, GRBs

  7. EDGE: explorer of diffuse emission and gamma-ray burst explosions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Herder, J.W.; Piro, L.; Ohashi, T.; Amati, L.; Atteia, J.; Barthelmy, S.D.; Barbera, M.; Barret, D.; Basso, S.; de Boer, M.; Borgani, S.; Boyarskiy, O.; Branchini, E.; Branduardi-Raymont, G.; Briggs, M.; Brunetti, G.; Budtz-Jorgensenf, C.; Burrows, D.N.; Campana, S.; Caroli, E.; Chincarini, G.; Christensen, F.; Cocchi, M.; Comastri, A.; Corsi, A.; Cotroneo, V.; Conconi, P.; Colasanti, L.; Cusamano, G.; Rosa, A.; Del Santo, M.; Ettori, S.; Ezoe, Y.; Ferrari, L.; Feroci, M.; Finger, M.; Fishman, G.; Fujimoto, R.; Galeazzi, M.; Galli, A.; Gatti, F.; Gehrels, N.; Gendre, B.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Giommi, P.; Girardi, M.; Guzzo, L.; Haardt, F.; Hepburn, I.; Hermsen, W.; Hoevers, H.; Holland, A.; in 't Zand, J.J.M.; Ishisaki, Y.; Kawahara, H.; Kawai, N.; Kaastra, J.; Kippen, M.; de Korte, P.A.J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Kusenko, A.; Labanti, C.; Lieu, R.; Macculi, C.; Makishima, K.; Matt, G.; Mazotta, P.; McCammon, D.; Méndez, M.; Mineo, T.; Mitchell, S.; Mitsuda, K.; Molendi, S.; Moscardini, L.; Mushotzky, R.; Natalucci, L.; Nicastro, F.; O'Brien, P.; Osborne, J.; Paerels, F.; Page, M.; Paltani, S.; Pareschi, G.; Perinati, E.; Perola, C.; Ponman, T.; Rasmussen, A.; Roncarelli, M.; Rosati, P.; Ruchayskiy, O.; Quadrini, E.; Sakurai, I.; Salvaterra, R.; Sasaki, S.; Wijers, R.; et al., [Unknown

    2007-01-01

    How structures of various scales formed and evolved from the early Universe up to present time is a fundamental question of astrophysics. EDGE will trace the cosmic history of the baryons from the early generations of massive stars by Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) explosions, through the period of galaxy cl

  8. ESA's Integral detects closest cosmic gamma-ray burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    5 August 2004 A gamma-ray burst detected by ESA's Integral gamma-ray observatory on 3 December 2003 has been thoroughly studied for months by an armada of space and ground-based observatories. Astronomers have now concluded that this event, called GRB 031203, is the closest cosmic gamma-ray burst on record, but also the faintest. This also suggests that an entire population of sub-energetic gamma-ray bursts has so far gone unnoticed... Gamma ray burst model hi-res Size hi-res: 22 KB Credits: CXC/M. Weiss Artist impression of a low-energy gamma-ray burst This illustration describes a model for a gamma-ray burst, like the one detected by Integral on 3 December 2003 (GRB 031203). A jet of high-energy particles from a rapidly rotating black hole interacts with surrounding matter. Observations with Integral on 3 December 2003 and data on its afterglow, collected afterwards with XMM-Newton, Chandra and the Very Large Array telescope, show that GRB 031203 radiated only a fraction of the energy of normal gamma-ray bursts. Like supernovae, gamma-ray bursts are thought to be produced by the collapse of the core of a massive star. However, while the process leading to supernovae is relatively well understood, astronomers still do not know what happens when a core collapses to form a black hole. The discovery of 'under-energetic' gamma-ray bursts, like GRB 031203, should provide valuable clues as to links between supernovae, black holes and gamma-ray bursts. Lo-res JPG (22 Kb) Hi-res TIFF (5800 Kb) Cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are flashes of gamma rays that can last from less than a second to a few minutes and occur at random positions in the sky. A large fraction of them is thought to result when a black hole is created from a dying star in a distant galaxy. Astronomers believe that a hot disc surrounding the black hole, made of gas and matter falling onto it, somehow emits an energetic beam parallel to the axis of rotation. According to the simplest picture, all GRBs

  9. GRB 060714: No Clear Dividing Line Between Prompt Emission and X-Ray Flares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krimm, Hans A.; /NASA, Goddard /Universities Space Research Assoc.; Granot, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Marshal, F.; /NASA, Goddard; Perri, M.; /ASDC, Frascati; Barthelmy, S.D.; /NASA, Goddard; Burrows, D.N.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.; Gehrels, N.; /NASA, Goddard; Meszaros, P.; Morris, D.; /Penn State U., Astron. Astrophys.

    2007-02-26

    The long gamma-ray burst GRB 060714 was observed to exhibit a series of five X-ray flares beginning {approx} 70 s after the burst trigger T{sub 0} and continuing until {approx} T{sub 0} + 200 s. The first two flares were detected by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift satellite, before Swift had slewed to the burst location, while the last three flares were strongly detected by the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) but only weakly detected by the BAT. This burst provides an unusual opportunity to track a complete sequence of flares over a wide energy range. The flares were very similar in their light curve morphology, showing power-law rise and fall components, and in most cases significant sub-structure. The flares also showed strong evolution with time, both spectrally and temporally. The small time scale and large amplitude variability observed are incompatible with an external shock origin for the flares, and support instead late time sporadic activity either of the central source or of localized dissipation events within the outflow. We show that the flares in GRB 060714 cannot be the result of internal shocks in which the contrast in the Lorentz factor of the colliding shells is very small, and that this mechanism faces serious difficulties in most Swift GRBs. The morphological similarity of the flares and the prompt emission and the gradual and continual evolution of the flares with time makes it difficult and arbitrary to draw a dividing line between the prompt emission and the flares.

  10. Decay of the GRB 990123 optical afterglow: implications for the fireball model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Tirado; Zapatero-Osorio; Caon; Cairos; Hjorth; Pedersen; Andersen; Gorosabel; Bartolini; Guarnieri; Piccioni; Frontera; Masetti; Palazzi; Pian; Greiner; Hudec; Sagar; Pandey; Mohan; Yadav; Nilakshi; Bjornsson; Jakobsson; Burud; et

    1999-03-26

    Broad-band (ultraviolet to near-infrared) observations of the intense gamma ray burst GRB 990123 started approximately 8.5 hours after the event and continued until 18 February 1999. When combined with other data, in particular from the Robotic Telescope and Transient Source Experiment (ROTSE) and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), evidence emerges for a smoothly declining light curve, suggesting some color dependence that could be related to a cooling break passing the ultraviolet-optical band at about 1 day after the high-energy event. The steeper decline rate seen after 1.5 to 2 days may be evidence for a collimated jet pointing toward the observer.

  11. Photospheric Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pe'er, Asaf

    2016-01-01

    A major breakthrough in our understanding of gamma-ray bursts (GRB) prompt emission physics occurred in the last few years, with the realization that a thermal component accompanies the over-all non-thermal prompt spectra. This thermal part is important by itself, as it provides direct probe of the physics in the innermost outflow regions. It further has an indirect importance, as a source of seed photons for inverse-Compton scattering, thereby it contributes to the non-thermal part as well. In this short review, we highlight some key recent developments. Observationally, although so far it was clearly identified only in a minority of bursts, there are indirect evidence that thermal component exists in a very large fraction of GRBs, possibly close to 100%. Theoretically, the existence of thermal component have a large number of implications as a probe of underlying GRB physics. Some surprising implications include its use as a probe of the jet dynamics, geometry and magnetization.

  12. Short-Duration Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Edo

    2013-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) display a bimodal duration distribution, with a separation between the short- and long-duration bursts at about 2 sec. The progenitors of long GRBs have been identified as massive stars based on their association with Type Ic core-collapse supernovae, their exclusive location in star-forming galaxies, and their strong correlation with bright ultraviolet regions within their host galaxies. Short GRBs have long been suspected on theoretical grounds to arise from compact object binary mergers (NS-NS or NS-BH). The discovery of short GRB afterglows in 2005, provided the first insight into their energy scale and environments, established a cosmological origin, a mix of host galaxy types, and an absence of associated supernovae. In this review I summarize nearly a decade of short GRB afterglow and host galaxy observations, and use this information to shed light on the nature and properties of their progenitors, the energy scale and collimation of the relativistic outflow, and the properties ...

  13. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Should cosmologists care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laros, J. G.

    1996-03-01

    Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) locations are distributed isotropically on the sky, but the intensity distribution of the bursts seems clearly incompatible with spatial homogeneity. Of the scenarios that attempt to provide an explanation, there are two that enjoy current popularity: (1) GRBs are produced by high-velocity neutron stars that have formed an extended (˜100 kpc) spherical halo or “corona” around our galaxy. (2) The bursters are at cosmological distances, with redshifts near unity for the weaker events. The major evidence used to argue for or against each of these scenarios remains inconclusive. Assuming, not unreasonably, that the cosmological scenario is correct, one can discuss the advantages and disadvantages of studying GRBs as opposed to other objects at moderate redshift. We find that the advantages of GRBs-high intensity, penetrating radiation, rapid variability, and no expected source evolution-are offset by observational difficulties pertaining to the extraction of cosmological information from GRB data. If the cosmological scenario proves to be correct and if the observational difficulties are overcome, then cosmologists certainly should care.

  14. $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts the Four Crises

    CERN Document Server

    Tavani, M

    1998-01-01

    We discuss some open problems concerning the origin and the emission mechanism of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in light of recent developments. If GRBs originate at extragalactic distances, we are facing four crises: (1) an energy crisis, models have to account for more than 10^{53} ergs of energy emitted in the gamma-ray energy band; (2) a spectral crisis, emission models have to account for the surprising `smoothness' of GRB broad-band spectra, with no indication of the predicted spectral `distorsions' caused by inverse Compton scattering in large radiation energy density media, and no evidence for beaming; (3) an afterglow crisis, relativistic shock models have to explain the complexity of the afterglow behavior, the longevity of optical transients detectable up to six months after the burst, the erratic behavior of the radio emission, and the lack of evidence for substantial beaming as indicated by recent searches for GRB afterglows in the X-ray band; (4) a population crisis, from data clearly indicating that ...

  15. Swift observations of gamma-ray bursts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2007-05-15

    Since its launch on 20 November 2004, the Swift mission has been detecting approximately 100 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) each year, and immediately (within approx. 90s) starting simultaneous X-ray and UV/optical observations of the afterglow. It has already collected an impressive database, including prompt emission to higher sensitivities than BATSE, uniform monitoring of afterglows and a rapid follow-up by other observatories notified through the GCN. Advances in our understanding of short GRBs have been spectacular. The detection of X-ray afterglows has led to accurate localizations and the conclusion that short GRBs can occur in non-star-forming galaxies or regions, whereas long GRBs are strongly concentrated within the star-forming regions. This is consistent with the NS merger model. Swift has greatly increased the redshift range of GRB detection. The highest redshift GRBs, at z approximately 5-6, are approaching the era of reionization. Ground-based deep optical spectroscopy of high redshift bursts is giving metallicity measurements and other information on the source environment to a much greater distance than other techniques. The localization of GRB 060218 to a nearby galaxy, and the association with SN 2006aj, added a valuable member to the class of GRBs with detected supernova.

  16. Dust-to-metal ratios in damped Lyman-α absorbers. Fresh clues to the origins of dust and optical extinction towards γ-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cia, A.; Ledoux, C.; Savaglio, S.; Schady, P.; Vreeswijk, P. M.

    2013-12-01

    Motivated by the anomalous dust-to-metal ratios derived in the literature for γ-ray burst (GRB) damped Lyman-α absorbers (DLAs), we measure these ratios using the dust-depletion pattern observed in UV/optical afterglow spectra associated with the interstellar medium (ISM) at the GRB host-galaxy redshifts. Our sample consists of 20 GRB absorbers and a comparison sample of 72 DLAs toward quasars (QSOs) with redshift 1.2 extinction AV increases steeply with the column density of iron in dust, N(Fe)dust, calculated from relative metal abundances, confirming that dust extinction is mostly occurring in the host galaxy ISM. Most GRB-DLAs display log N(Fe)dust > 14.7, above which several QSO-DLAs reveal molecular hydrogen, making GRB-DLAs promising candidates for molecular detection and study.

  17. GRB060602B = Swift J1749.4-2807: an unusual transiently accreting neutron-star X-ray binary

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnands, Rudy; Cackett, Ed M; Starling, Rhaana L C; Remillard, Ron A

    2007-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Swift BAT and XRT data of GRB060602B, which is most likely an accreting neutron star in a binary system and not a gamma-ray burst. Our analysis shows that the BAT burst spectrum is consistent with a thermonuclear flash (type-I X-ray burst) from the surface of an accreting neutron star in a binary system. The X-ray binary nature is further confirmed by the report of a detection of a faint point source at the position of the XRT counterpart of the burst in archival XMM-Newton data approximately 6 years before the burst and in more recent XMM-Newton data obtained at the end of September 2006 (nearly 4 months after the burst). Since the source is very likely not a gamma-ray burst, we rename the source Swift J1749.4-2807, based on the Swift/BAT discovery coordinates. Using the BAT data of the type-I X-ray burst we determined that the source is at most at a distance of 6.7+-1.3 kpc. For a transiently accreting X-ray binary its soft X-ray behaviour is atypical: its 2-10 keV X-ray lumino...

  18. Gamma-ray burst afterglows as probes of their host galaxies and the cosmos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucchiara, Antonino

    2010-12-01

    Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs) represent the sole class of catastrophic phenomena seen over almost the entire history of the Universe. Their extreme luminosities in high energy gamma-ray radiation make them readily detectable, even with relatively small satellite-based detectors, out to the earliest cosmic epochs. Moreover, the brilliance of their fading afterglow light, routinely observed in X-ray, optical, near-infrared, and radio wavelengths, allows them to be exploited -- for hours, days, or weeks -- as cosmic lighthouses, probing the conditions of gas and dust along the line of sight, through their host galaxies and the cosmos at large. Since the November 2004 launch of Swift, this GRB-focused NASA mission has discovered more than 500 GRBs, in almost all cases reporting the burst coordinates to ground-based observers within seconds of the event. The availability of prompt burst positions from Swift, combined with promptly-reported flux measurements from instruments on Swift and an array of ground-based robotic telescopes, have enabled targeted spectroscopic campaigns that have gathered detailed observations of the young, bright afterglows of hundreds of these events. This thesis reports the results of my own efforts over the past 5 years, analyzing imaging and spectroscopic observations of Swift-detected GRBs as triggered according to my own requests, or as gathered from public data archives. In Chapter 2, I discuss our follow-up campaign for GRB090429B, one of our best "extreme redshift" (z > 8) candidates. This burst followed closely on the spectroscopicallyconfirmed z = 8.2 GRB090423, and our multiwavelength observations and SED modeling demonstrate the value and limitation of such studies, in cases where a spectroscopic redshift cannot be gathered in a timely fashion. I also address the importance of such extreme-redshift events from a cosmological perspective. In Chapter 3, I use high-resolution GRB afterglow spectra to study the properties of intervening

  19. A supra-massive magnetar central engine for short GRB 130603B

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yi-Zhong; Xu, Dong; Jin, Zhi-Ping; Wu, Xue-Feng; Wei, Da-Ming; Zhang, Bing

    2013-01-01

    We show that the peculiar early optical and in particular X-ray afterglow emission of the short duration burst GRB 130603B can be explained by continuous energy injection into the blastwave from a supra-massive magnetar central engine. The observed energetics and temporal/spectral properties of the late infrared bump (i.e., the "kilonova") are also found consistent with emission from the ejecta launched during an NS-NS merger and powered by a magnetar central engine. The isotropic-equivalent kinetic energies of both the GRB blastwave and the kilonova are about $E_{\\rm k}\\sim 10^{51}$ erg, consistent with being powered by a near-isotropic magnetar wind. However, this relatively small value demands that most of the initial rotational energy of the magnetar $(\\sim {\\rm a~ few \\times 10^{52}~ erg})$ is carried away by gravitational wave radiation. Our results suggest that (i) the progenitor of GRB 130603B would be a NS-NS binary system, whose merger product would be a supra-massive neutron star that lasted for ab...

  20. The GRB Redshift Distribution: Implications for Abundance Evolution, Star Formation, and Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Melia, Fulvio; Wei, Da-Ming; Feng, Long-Long

    2013-01-01

    It has been claimed that the \\emph{Swift} long gamma-ray bursts (LGRBs) do not trace the star formation history (SFH) in $\\Lambda$CDM. In this paper, we confirm that the latest \\emph{Swift} sample of GRBs reveals an increasing evolution in the GRB rate relative to the star formation rate (SFR) at high redshifts. One may eliminate the observed discrepancy between the GRB rate and the SFR by assuming a modest evolution, parameterized as $(1+z)^{0.5}$---an effect that perhaps implies a cosmic evolution in metallicity. However, we find a relatively higher metallicity cut of $Z=0.68Z_{\\odot}$ than was seen in previous studies, which suggested that LGRBs occur preferentially in metal poor environments, i.e., $Z\\sim0.1-0.3Z_{\\odot}$. Here, we use a simple power-law approximation to the high-\\emph{z} ($\\ga 3.8$) SFH, i.e., $R_{\\rm SF}\\propto[(1+z)/4.8]^{\\alpha}$, to examine how the high-\\emph{z} SFR may be impacted by a possible abundance evolution in the \\emph{Swift} GRB sample. For an expansion history consistent w...

  1. Optical and near-infrared observations of SN 2013dx associated with GRB 130702A

    CERN Document Server

    Toy, V L; Silverman, J M; Butler, N R; Cucchiara, A; Watson, A M; Bersier, D; Perley, D A; Margutti, R; Bellm, E; Bloom, J S; Cao, Y; Capone, J I; Clubb, K; Corsi, A; de Diego, J A; Filippenko, A V; Fox, O D; Gal-Yam, A; Gehrels, N; Georgiev, L; González, J J; Kasliwal, M M; Kelly, P L; Kulkarni, S R; Kutyrev, A S; Lee, W H; Prochaska, J X; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Richer, M G; Román, C; Singer, L; Stern, D; Troja, E; Veilleux, S

    2015-01-01

    We present optical and near-infrared light curves and optical spectra of SN 2013dx, associated with the nearby (redshift 0.145) gamma-ray burst GRB 130702A. The prompt isotropic gamma-ray energy released from GRB 130702A is measured to be $E_{\\gamma,\\mathrm{iso}} = 6.4_{-1.0}^{+1.3} \\times 10^{50}$erg (1keV to 10MeV in the rest frame), placing it intermediate between low-luminosity GRBs like GRB 980425/SN 1998bw and the broader cosmological population. We compare the observed $g^{\\prime}r^{\\prime}i^{\\prime}z^{\\prime}$ light curves of SN 2013dx to a SN 1998bw template, finding that SN 2013dx evolves $\\sim20$% faster (steeper rise time), with a comparable peak luminosity. Spectroscopically, SN 2013dx resembles other broad-lined Type Ic supernovae, both associated with (SN 2006aj and SN 1998bw) and lacking (SN 1997ef, SN 2007I, and SN 2010ah) gamma-ray emission, with photospheric velocities around peak of $\\sim$21,000 km s$^{-1}$. We construct a quasi-bolometric ($g^{\\prime}r^{\\prime}i^{\\prime}z^{\\prime}yJH$) li...

  2. Gemini Spectroscopy of the Short GRB 130603B Afterglow and Host

    CERN Document Server

    Cucchiara, A; Perley, D A; Cenko, S B; Werk, J; Cao, Y; Bloom, J S; Cobb, B E

    2013-01-01

    We present early optical photometry and spectroscopy of the afterglow and host galaxy of the bright short-duration gamma-ray burst \\grb. Using our target-of-opportunity program on the Gemini South telescope, our prompt optical spectra reveal a strong trace from the afterglow superimposed on continuum and emission lines from the $z = 0.3568 \\pm 0.0005$ host galaxy. The combination of a relatively bright optical afterglow ($r^{\\prime} = 21.52$ at $\\Delta t = 8.4$\\,hr), together with an observed offset of 0\\farcs9 from the host nucleus (4.8 kpc projected distance at $z = 0.3568$), allow us to extract a relatively clean spectrum dominated by afterglow light -- the first \\textit{bona fide} short-duration GRB for which this has been possible. Furthermore, the spatially resolved spectrum allows us to constrain the properties of the explosion site directly, and compare these with the host galaxy nucleus, as well as other short-duration GRB host galaxies. We find that while the host is a relatively luminous ($L \\appro...

  3. The shock break-out of GRB 060218/SN 2006aj

    CERN Document Server

    Campana, S; Blustin, A J; Brown, P; Burrows, D N; Chincarini, G; Cummings, J R; Cusumano, G; Valle, M D; Malesani, D; Mészáros, P; Nousek, J A; Page, M; Sakamoto, T; Waxman, E; Zhang, B; Dai, Z G; Gehrels, N; Immler, S; Marshall, F E; Mason, K O; Moretti, A; O'Brien, P T; Osborne, J P; Page, K L; Romano, P; Roming, P W A; Tagliaferri, G; Cominsky, L R; Giommi, P; Godet, O; Kennea, J A; Krimm, H; Angelini, L; Barthelmy, S D; Boyd, P T; Palmer, D M; Wells, A A; White, N E

    2006-01-01

    Supernovae (SNe) share with Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) the property of being the most powerful explosions in the Universe after the Big Bang. The link between GRBs and exploding massive stars has been established on the basis of a handful of objects associated with bright, energetic, Type Ic SNe. Here we report Swift observations of the recent GRB 060218 (at a redshift of $z=0.0331$) and its connection to SN 2006aj. GRB 060218 is exceptional in several respects. It is under-luminous in gamma-rays and extremely long. It shows a delayed non-thermal X-ray emission which fades and conceals a soft, brightening, optically-thick thermal (about two million degrees) component that expands and shifts into the optical/UV band as time passes. We interpret these features as arising from the break out of a shock driven by a mildly relativistic shell into the dense wind surrounding the progenitor. Swift observations triggered by this GRB allow us for the first time to catch a SN in the act of exploding, and to directly observe...

  4. GRB off-axis afterglows and the emission from the accompanying supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Kathirgamaraju, Adithan; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) afterglows are likely produced in the shock that is driven as the GRB jet interacts with the external medium. Long duration GRBs are also associated with powerful supernovae (SN). We consider the optical and radio afterglows of long GRBs for both blasts viewed along the jet axis ("on-axis" afterglows) and misaligned observes ("off-axis" afterglows). Comparing the optical emission from the afterglow with that of the accompanying SN, using SN 1998bw as an archetype, we find that only a few percent of afterglows viewed off-axis are brighter than the SN. For observable optical off-axis afterglows the viewing angle is at most twice the half-opening angle of the GRB jet. Radio off-axis afterglows should be detected with upcoming radio surveys within a few hundred Mpc. We propose that these surveys will act as "radio triggers," and that dedicated radio facilities should follow-up these sources. Follow-ups can unveil the presence of the radio supernova remnant, if present. In addition, they can ...

  5. The Fast and Faint SN 2010bh Associated with GRB 100316D

    CERN Document Server

    Bufano, Filomena; Sollerman, Jesper; Benetti, Stefano; Pignata, Giuliano; Valenti, Stefano; Covino, Stefano; D'Avanzo, Paolo; Malesani, Daniele; Cappellaro, Enrico; Della Valle, Massimo; Fynbo, Johan; Hjorth, Jens; Mazzali, Paolo A; Reichart, Daniel E; Starling, Rhaana L C; Turatto, Massimo; Vergani, Susanna D; Wiersema, Klass; Amati, Lorenzo; Bersier, David; Campana, Sergio; Cano, Zach; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J; Chincarini, Guido; D'Elia, Valerio; Postigo, Antonio de Ugarte; Deng, Jinsong; Ferrero, Patrizia; Filippenko, Alexei V; Goldoni, Paolo; Gorosabel, Javier; Greiner, Jochen; Hammer, Francois; Jakobsson, Pall; Kaper, Lex; Kawabata, Koji S; Klose, Sylvio; Levan, Andrew J; Maeda, Keiichi; Masetti, Nicola; Milvang-Jensen, Bo; Mirabel, Felix I; Moller, Palle; Nomoto, Kenichi; Palazzi, Eliana; Piranomonte, Silvia; Salvaterra, Ruben; Stratta, Giulia; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Tanaka, Masaomi; Wijers, Ralph A M J

    2011-01-01

    We present the spectroscopic and photometric evolution of the nearby (redshift 0.059) spectroscopically confirmed Type Ic supernova, SN 2010bh, associated with a soft, long-duration gamma-ray burst (X-ray flash) GRB 100316D. Intensive follow-up observations of SN 2010bh were performed at the ESO Very Large Telescope (VLT), using the X-shooter and FORS2 instruments. Owing to the detailed temporal coverage and the extended wavelength range (300-2500 nm), we obtained an unprecedentedly rich spectral sequence among the hypernovae, making SN 2010bh one of the best studied representatives of this SN class. We find that SN 2010bh has a more rapid rise to maximum brightness (8.0+/-1.0 days) and a fainter absolute peak luminosity (L(bol)~3e42 ergs) than previously observed SN events associated with GRBs. Our estimate of the ejected (56)Ni mass is 0.12+/-0.02 Msun. From the broad spectral features we measure large expansion velocities, higher than those of SNe 1998bw (GRB 980425) and 2006aj (GRB 060218). The light-curv...

  6. GRB follow-up observations in the East-Asian region

    CERN Document Server

    Urata, Y; Ip, W H; Qiu, Y; Hu, J Y; Zhou, X; Tamagawa, T; Onda, K; Makishima, K; Zhou, Xn.

    2005-01-01

    In 2004, we established a Japan-Taiwan-China collaboration for GRB study in the East-Asian region. This serves as a valuable addition to the world-wide optical and infrared follow-up network, because the East-Asia region would otherwise be blank. We have been carrying out imaging and spectroscopic follow-up observations at Lulin (Taiwan), Kiso (Japan), WIDGET (Japan) and Xinglong (China). From Xinglong and Kiso, we can locate candidates and obtain early time spectra for afterglows. While WIDGET provides early time observations before the burst, the high-time resolution for multi-band light curves can be obtained at Lulin. With the data from these sites, we can obtain detailed information about the light curve and redshift of GRBs, which are important to understand the mechanism of the afterglows. Up to March 2005, ten follow-up observations have been provided by this East-Asia cooperation. Two optical afterglows were detected, GRB 040924 and GRB 041006. The results of the two detected afterglows are reported ...

  7. INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations of the weak GRB 030227

    CERN Document Server

    Mereghetti, S; Tiengo, A; Beckmann, V; Borkowski, J J; Courvoisier, Thierry J L; Von Kienlin, A; Schönfelder, V; Roques, J P; Bouchet, L; Ubertini, P; Castro-Tirado, A J; Lebrun, F; Paul, J; Lund, N; Hesse, M M; Hermsen, W; Den Hartog, P; Winkler, C

    2003-01-01

    We present INTEGRAL and XMM-Newton observations of the prompt gamma-ray emission and the X-ray afterglow of GRB030227, the first GRB for which the quick localization obtained with the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System (IBAS) has led to the discovery of X-ray and optical afterglows. GRB030227 had a duration of about 20 s and a peak flux of 1.1 photons cm^-2 s^-1 in the 20-200 keV energy range. The time averaged spectrum can be fit by a single power law with photon index about 2 and we find some evidence for a hard to soft spectral evolution. The X-ray afterglow has been detected starting only 8 hours after the prompt emission, with a 0.2-10 keV flux decreasing as t^-1 from 1.3x10e-12 to 5x10e-13 erg cm^-2 s^-1. The afterglow spectrum is well described by a power law with photon index 1.94+/-0.05 modified by a redshifted neutral absorber with column density of several 10e22 cm^-2. A possible emission line at 1.67 keV could be due to Fe for a redshift z=3, consistent with the value inferred from the absorption.

  8. GRB 110715A: The peculiar multiwavelength evolution of the first afterglow detected by ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Ramírez, R; Jóhannesson, G; Murphy, Tara; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Gorosabel, J; Kann, D A; Krühler, T; Oates, S R; Japelj, J; Thöne, C C; Lundgren, A; Perley, D A; Malesani, D; Monsalvo, I de Gregorio; Castro-Tirado, A J; D'Elia, V; Fynbo, J P U; Garcia-Appadoo, D; Goldoni, P; Greiner, J; Hu, Y -D; Jelínek, M; Jeong, S; Kamble, A; Klose, S; Kuin, N P M; Llorente, A; Martín, S; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Rossi, A; Schady, P; Sparre, M; Sudilovsky, V; Tello, J C; Updike, A; Wiersema, K; Zhang, B -B

    2016-01-01

    We present the extensive follow-up campaign on the afterglow of GRB 110715A at 17 different wavelengths, from X-ray to radio bands, starting 81 seconds after the burst and extending up to 74 days later. We performed for the first time a GRB afterglow observation with the ALMA observatory. We find that the afterglow of GRB 110715A is very bright at optical and radio wavelengths. We use optical and near infrared spectroscopy to provide further information about the progenitor's environment and its host galaxy. The spectrum shows weak absorption features at a redshift $z$ = 0.8225, which reveal a host galaxy environment with low ionization, column density and dynamical activity. Late deep imaging shows a very faint galaxy, consistent with the spectroscopic results. The broadband afterglow emission is modelled with synchrotron radiation using a numerical algorithm and we determine the best fit parameters using Bayesian inference in order to constrain the physical parameters of the jet and the medium in which the ...

  9. The radiative efficiency of relativistic jet and wind: A case study of GRB 070110

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Shuang; Zhong, Shu-Qing; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-01-01

    A rapidly spinning, strongly magnetized neutron star is invoked as the central engine for some Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), especially, the $"$internal plateau$"$ feature of X-ray afterglow. However, for these $"$internal plateau$"$ GRBs, how to produce their prompt emission remains an open question. Two different physical process have been proposed in the literature, (1) a new-born neutron star is surrounded by a hyper-accreting and neutrino cooling disk, the GRB jet can be powered by neutrino annihilation aligning the spin axis; (2) a differentially rotating millisecond pulsar was formed due to different angular velocity between the interior core and outer shell parts of the neutron star, which can power an episodic GRB jet. In this paper, by analyzing the data of one peculiar GRB 070110 (with internal plateau), we try to test which model being favored. By deriving the physical parameters of magnetar with observational data, the parameter regime for initial period ($P_{0\\rm }$) and surface polar cap magnetic fi...

  10. Multicolor observations of the afterglow of the short/hard GRB 050724

    CERN Document Server

    Malesani, D; D'Avanzo, P; D'Elia, V; Fugazza, D; Piranomonte, S; Ballo, L; Campana, S; Stella, L; Tagliaferri, G; Antonelli, L A; Chincarini, G; Della Valle, M; Goldoni, P; Guidorzi, C; Israel, G L; Lazzati, D; Melandri, A; Romano, P; Stratta, G; Vergani, S D

    2007-01-01

    New information on short/hard gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is being gathered thanks to the discovery of their optical and X-ray afterglows. However, some key aspects are still poorly understood, including the collimation level of the outflow, the duration of the central engine activity, and the properties of the progenitor systems. We want to constrain the physical properties of the short GRB 050724 and of its host galaxy, in turn drawing some inferences on the global short GRB population. We present optical observations of the afterglow of GRB 050724 and of its host galaxy, significantly expanding the existing dataset for this event. We compare our results with models, complementing them with available measurements in the literature. Including X-ray data, we study the afterglow light curve and spectrum. We also present observations of the host galaxy. The observed optical emission was likely related to the large flare observed in the X-ray light curve. The apparent steep decay was therefore not due to the jet eff...

  11. Can gamma ray bursts be used as effective tracers of star formation to high Z?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckman, John; Giammanco, Corrado

    Long duration gamma ray bursts (GRB's) have been identified as originating in type II SNa explosions, produced during the late stage evolution of massive stars. As the lifetimes of their progenitors are so short the GRB rate per unit (comoving) volume of space, on scales which include significant numbers of galaxies, could be proportional to the star formation rate (SFR), at least to the formation rate of massive stars. Unfortunately both theory and observation imply that those SNe which give rise to gamma ray bursts occur in stars of low metallicity, less than half an order of magnitude lower than solar. Here we examine the evidence and show that although some workers believe that it is possible to use local galaxies with GRB's to calibrate the SFR in more distant galaxies others claim that this may be possible given independent ways of determining the metallicities of the distant galaxies, while others suggest that it is too difficult, at least with present measurements, to use GRB's to determine the SFR at values of redshift higher than 5. We conclude that although their intrinsic power gives GRB's the facility to guide observers towards star forming galaxies, only by also using complementary indicators will we be able to make plausible determinations of the SFR as a function of epoch beyond z = 5, i.e. during the first 2 Gyr after the Big Bang.

  12. GRB 060714: No Clear Dividing Line Between Prompt Emission and X-ray Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Krimm, H A; Marshal, F; Perri, M; Barthelmy, S D; Burrows, D N; Gehrels, N; Mészáros, P; Morris, D

    2007-01-01

    The long gamma-ray burst GRB 060714 was observed to exhibit a series of five X-ray flares beginning ~70 s after the burst trigger T0 and continuing until T0 + ~200 s. The first two flares were detected by the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift satellite, before Swift had slewed to the burst location, while the last three flares were strongly detected by the X-Ray Telescope (XRT) but only weakly detected by the BAT. This burst provides an unusual opportunity to track a complete sequence of flares over a wide energy range. The flares were very similar in their light curve morphology, showing power-law rise and fall components, and in most cases significant sub-structure. The flares also showed strong evolution with time, both spectrally and temporally. The small time scale and large amplitude variability observed are incompatible with an external shock origin for the flares, and support instead late time sporadic activity either of the central source or of localized dissipation events within the outflow. ...

  13. Unveiling the Secrets of Metallicity and Massive Star Formation Using DLAs along Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Cucchiara, A; Rafelski, M; Kocevski, D; Prochaska, J X; Cooke, R J; Becker, G D

    2014-01-01

    We present the largest, publicly available, sample of Damped Lyman-$\\alpha$ systems (DLAs) along Gamma-ray Bursts (GRB) line of sights in order to investigate the environmental properties of long GRBs in the $z=1.8-6$ redshift range. Compared with the most recent quasar DLAs sample (QSO-DLA), our analysis shows that GRB-DLAs probe a more metal enriched environment at $z\\gtrsim3$, up to $[X/H]\\sim-0.5$. In the $z=2-3$ redshift range, despite the large number of lower limits, there are hints that the two populations may be more similar (only at 90\\% significance level). Also at \\hiz, the GRB-DLA average metallicity seems to decline at a shallower rate than the QSO-DLAs: GRB-DLA hosts may be polluted with metals at least as far as $\\sim 2$kpc from the GRB explosion site, probably due to previous star-formation episodes and/or supernovae explosions. This shallow metallicity trend, extended now up to $z\\sim5$, confirms previous results that GRB hosts are star-forming and have, on average, higher metallicity than t...

  14. Imprints of Electron-Positron Winds on the Multiwavelength Afterglows of Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, J. J.; Wu, X. F.; Huang, Y. F.; Li, L.; Dai, Z. G.

    2016-07-01

    Optical rebrightenings in the afterglows of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are unexpected within the framework of the simple external shock model. While it has been suggested that the central engines of some GRBs are newly born magnetars, we aim to relate the behaviors of magnetars to the optical rebrightenings. A newly born magnetar will lose its rotational energy in the form of Poynting-flux, which may be converted into a wind of electron-positron pairs through some magnetic dissipation processes. As proposed by Dai, this wind will catch up with the GRB outflow and a long-lasting reverse shock (RS) would form. By applying this scenario to GRB afterglows, we find that the RS propagating back into the electron-positron wind can lead to an observable optical rebrightening and a simultaneous X-ray plateau (or X-ray shallow decay). In our study, we select four GRBs (i.e., GRB 080413B, GRB 090426, GRB 091029, and GRB 100814A), of which the optical afterglows are well observed and show clear rebrightenings. We find that they can be well interpreted. In our scenario, the spin-down timescale of the magnetar should be slightly smaller than the peak time of the rebrightening, which can provide a clue to the characteristics of the magnetar.

  15. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite mission for gamma-ray burst multi-wavelength observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schanne, S.; Atteia, J.-L.; Barret, D.; Basa, S.; Boer, M.; Casse, F.; Cordier, B.; Daigne, F.; Klotz, A.; Limousin, O.; Manchanda, R.; Mandrou, P.; Mereghetti, S.; Mochkovitch, R.; Paltani, S.; Paul, J.; Petitjean, P.; Pons, R.; Ricker, G.; Skinner, G.

    2006-11-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB)—at least those with a duration longer than a few seconds—are the most energetic events in the Universe and occur at cosmological distances. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite, to be launched in 2009, will provide multi-wavelength observations of GRB, to study their astrophysics and to use them as cosmological probes. Furthermore, in 2009 ECLAIRs is expected to be the only space-borne instrument capable of providing a GRB trigger in near real-time with sufficient localization accuracy for GRB follow-up observations with the powerful ground-based spectroscopic telescopes available by then. A “Phase A study” of the ECLAIRs project has recently been launched by the French Space Agency CNES, aiming at a detailed mission design and selection for flight in 2006. The ECLAIRs mission is based on a CNES micro-satellite of the “Myriade” family and dedicated ground-based optical telescopes. The satellite payload combines a 2 sr field-of-view coded aperture mask gamma-camera using 6400 CdTe pixels for GRB detection and localization with 10 arcmin precision in the 4 50 keV energy band, together with a soft X-ray camera for onboard position refinement to 1 arcmin. The ground-based optical robotic telescopes will detect the GRB prompt/early afterglow emission and localize the event to arcsec accuracy, for spectroscopic follow-up observations.

  16. The trigger function of the space borne gamma-ray burst telescope ECLAIRs

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, S; Gotz, D; Gros, A; Kestener, P; Le Provost, H; L'Huillier, B; Mur, M

    2007-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) sign energetic explosions in the Universe, occurring at cosmological distances. Multi-wavelength observations of GRB allow to study their properties and to use them as cosmological tools. In 2012 the space borne gamma-ray telescope ECLAIRs is expected to provide accurate GRB localizations on the sky in near real-time, necessary for ground-based follow-up observations. Led by CEA Saclay, France, the project is currently in its technical design phase. ECLAIRs is optimized to detect highly red-shifted GRB thanks to a 4 keV low energy threshold. A coded mask telescope with a 1024 cm^2 detection plane of 80x80 CdTe pixels permanently observes a 2 sr sky field. The on-board trigger detects GRB using count-rate increase monitors on multiple time-scales and cyclic images. It computes sky images in the 4-50 keV energy range by de-convolving detector plane images with the mask pattern and localizes newly detected sources with <10 arcmin accuracy. While individual GRB photons are available hour...

  17. INTERPRETATION OF THE UNPRECEDENTEDLY LONG-LIVED HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION OF GRB 130427A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Ruoyu; Wang Xiangyu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu Xuefeng [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-08-20

    High-energy photons (>100 MeV) are detected by the Fermi/Large Area Telescope from GRB 130427A up to almost one day after the burst, with an extra hard spectral component discovered in the high-energy afterglow. We show that this hard spectral component arises from afterglow synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission. This scenario can explain the origin of >10 GeV photons detected up to {approx}30, 000 s after the burst, which would be difficult to explain via synchrotron radiation due to the limited maximum synchrotron photon energy. The lower energy multi-wavelength afterglow data can be fitted simultaneously by the afterglow synchrotron emission. The implication of detecting the SSC emission for the circumburst environment is discussed.

  18. Early Optical Polarization of Forward Shock Afterglow of GRB 091208B

    CERN Document Server

    Uehara, T; Kawabata, K S; Chiyonobu, S; Fukazawa, Y; Ikejiri, Y; Inoue, T; Itoh, R; Komatsu, T; Miyamoto, H; Mizuno, T; Nagae, O; Nakaya, H; Ohsugi, T; Sakimoto, K; Sasada, M; Tanaka, H; Uemura, M; Yamanaka, M; Yamashita, T; Yamazaki, R; Yoshida, M

    2012-01-01

    We report that the optical polarization in the afterglow of GRB 091208B is measured at t = 149 - 706 s after the burst trigger, and the polarization degree is P = 10.4% +/- 2.5%. The optical light curve at this time shows a power-law decay with index -0.75 +/- 0.02, which is interpreted as the forward shock synchrotron emission, and thus this is the first detection of the early-time optical polarization in the forward shock (rather than that in the reverse shock reported by Steele et al. (2009). This detection disfavors the afterglow model in which the magnetic fields in the emission region are random on the plasma skin depth scales, such as amplified by the plasma instabilities, e.g., Weibel instability. We suggest that the fields are amplified by the magnetohydrodynamic instabilities, which would be tested by future observations of the temporal changes of the polarization degrees and angles for other bursts.

  19. Probing for Leptonic Signatures from GRB030329 with AMANDA-II

    CERN Document Server

    Stamatikos, M; Achterberg, A; Ahrens, J; Atlee, D W; Bahcall, J N; Bai, X; Baret, B; Bartelt, M; Bay, R; Barwick, S W; Beattie, K; Becka, T; Becker, K H; Becker, J K; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Blaufuss, E; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Boser, S; Botner, O; Bouchta, A; Braun, J; Burgess, C; Burgess, T; Castermans, T; Chirkin, D; Clem, J; Conrad, J; Cooley, J; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Davour, A; Day, C T; De Clercq, C; Desiati, P; De Young, T R; Dreyer, J; Duvoort, M R; Edwards, W R; Ehrlich, R; Ekstrom, P; Ellsworth, R W; Evenson, P A; Fazely, A R; Feser, T; Filimonov, K; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Ganugapati, R; Geenen, H; Gerhardt, L; Greene, M G; Grullon, S; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J; Gro, A; Gunasingha, R M; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hardtke, D; Hardtke, R; Harenberg, T; Hart, J E; Hauschildt, T; Hays, D; Heise, J; Helbing, K; Hellwig, M; Herquet, P; Hill, G C; Hodges, J; Hoffman, K D; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Hughey, B; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hundertmark, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jones, A; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K H; Karle, A; Kawai, H; Kelley, J L; Kestel, M; Kitamura, N; Klein, S R; Klepser, S; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Krasberg, M; Kühn, K; Kujawski, E; Landsman, H; Lang, R; Leich, H; Liubarsky, I; Lundberg, J; Madsen, J; Marciniewski, P; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McCauley, T; McParland, C P; Meli, A; Messarius, T; Mészáros, P; Minor, R H; Miocinovic, P; Miyamoto, H; Mokhtarani, A; Montaruli, T; Morey, A; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Munich, K; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Niessen, P; Nygren, D R; Ogelman, H; Olbrechts, P; Olivas, A; Patton, S; Peña-Garay, C; Perez de los Heros, C; Pieloth, D; Pohl, A C; Porrata, R; Pretz, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Razzaque, S; Refflinghaus, F; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richter, S; Rizzo, A; Robbins, S; Rott, C; Rutledge, D; Sander, H G; Schlenstedt, S; Schneider, D; Schwarz, R; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Silvestri, A; Smith, A J; Solarz, M; Song, C; Sopher, J E; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stanev, T; Steffen, P; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stoufer, M; Stoyanov, S; Sulanke, K H; Sullivan, G W; Sumner, T J; Taboada, I; Tarasova, O; Tepe, A; Thollander, L; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Turcan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Voigt, B; Wagner, W; Walck, C; Waldmann, H; Walter, M; Wang, Y R; Wendt, C; Wiebusch, C; Wikström, G; Williams, D; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Woschnagg, K; Xu, X W; Yoshida, S; Yodh, G; Kurtzweil, J; Clarke, M J; Stamatikos, Michael; Kurtzweil, Jenny; Clarke, Melanie J.

    2005-01-01

    The discovery of high-energy (TeV-PeV) neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) would shed light on their intrinsic microphysics by confirming hadronic acceleration in the relativistic jet; possibly revealing an acceleration mechanism for the highest energy cosmic rays. We describe an analysis featuring three models based upon confronting the fireball phenomenology with ground-based and satellite observations of GRB030329, which triggered the High Energy Transient Explorer (HETE-II). Contrary to previous diffuse searches, the expected discrete muon neutrino energy spectra for models 1 and 2, based upon an isotropic and beamed emission geometry, respectively, are directly derived from the fireball description of the prompt gamma-ray photon energy spectrum, whose spectral fit parameters are characterized by the Band function, and the spectroscopically observed redshift, based upon the associated optical transient (OT) afterglow. For comparison, we also consider a model (3) based upon averaged burst parameters and...

  20. GRB 980425 host: [CII], [OI] and CO lines reveal recent enhancement of star formation due to atomic gas inflow

    CERN Document Server

    Michałowski, Michał J; Wardlow, J L; Karska, A; Messias, H; van der Werf, P; Hunt, L K; Baes, M; Castro-Tirado, A J; Gentile, G; Hjorth, J; Floc'h, E Le; Martinez, R Perez; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Rasmussen, J; Rizzo, J R; Rossi, A; Sanchez-Portal, M; Schady, P; Sollerman, J; Xu, D

    2016-01-01

    We have recently suggested that gas accretion can be studied using host galaxies of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We obtained the first ever far-infrared (FIR) line observations of a GRB host, namely Herschel/PACS resolved [CII] 158 um and [OI] 63 um spectroscopy, as well as APEX CO(2-1) and ALMA CO(1-0) observations of the GRB 980425 host. It has elevated [CII]/FIR and [OI]/FIR ratios and higher values of star formation rate (SFR) derived from line ([CII], [OI], Ha) than from continuum (UV, IR, radio) indicators. [CII] emission exhibits a normal morphology, peaking at the galaxy center, whereas [OI] is concentrated close to the GRB position and the nearby Wolf-Rayet region. The high [OI] flux indicates high radiation field and gas density. The [CII]/CO luminosity ratio of the GRB 980425 host is close to the highest values found for local star-forming galaxies. Its CO-derived molecular gas mass is low given its SFR and metallicity, but the [CII]-derived molecular gas mass is close to the expected value. The [OI] a...

  1. Search for high-energy muon neutrinos from the "naked-eye" GRB 080319B with the IceCube neutrino telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.

    2009-01-01

    We report on a search with the IceCube detector for high-energy muon neutrinos from GRB 080319B, one of the brightest gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever observed. The fireball model predicts that a mean of 0.1 events should be detected by IceCube for a bulk Lorentz boost of the jet of 300. In both...... the direct on-time window of 66 s and an extended window of about 300 s around the GRB, no excess was found above background. The 90% CL upper limit on the number of track-like events from the GRB is 2.7, corresponding to a muon neutrino fluence limit of 9.5x10^-3 erg cm^-2 in the energy range between 120 Te...

  2. Delayed energy injection model for gamma-ray burst afterglows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, J. J.; Huang, Y. F.; Yu, Y. B. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, X. F., E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2013-12-10

    The shallow decay phase and flares in the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are widely believed to be associated with the later activation of the central engine. Some models of energy injection involve a continuous energy flow since the GRB trigger time, such as the magnetic dipole radiation from a magnetar. However, in the scenario involving a black hole accretion system, the energy flow from the fall-back accretion may be delayed for a fall-back time ∼t {sub fb}. Thus, we propose a delayed energy injection model. The delayed energy would cause a notable rise to the Lorentz factor of the external shock, which will 'generate' a bump in the multiple band afterglows. If the delayed time is very short, our model degenerates to the previous models. Our model can explain the significant re-brightening in the optical and infrared light curves of GRB 081029 and GRB 100621A. A considerable fall-back mass is needed to provide the later energy; this indicates that GRBs accompanied with fall-back material may be associated with a low energy supernova so that the fraction of the envelope can survive during eruption. The fall-back time can give meaningful information on the properties of GRB progenitor stars.

  3. A method to localize gamma-ray bursts using POLAR

    CERN Document Server

    Suarez-Garcia, E; Hajdas, W; Lamanna, G; Lechanoine-Leluc, C; Marcinkowski, R; Mtchedlishvili, A; Orsi, S; Pohl, M; Produit, N; Rapin, D; Rybka, D; Vialle, J -P; 10.1016/j.nima.2010.10.006

    2010-01-01

    The hard X-ray polarimeter POLAR aims to measure the linear polarization of the 50-500 keV photons arriving from the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The position in the sky of the detected GRBs is needed to determine their level of polarization. We present here a method by which, despite of the polarimeter incapability of taking images, GRBs can be roughly localized using POLAR alone. For this purpose scalers are attached to the output of the 25 multi-anode photomultipliers (MAPMs) that collect the light from the POLAR scintillator target. Each scaler measures how many GRB photons produce at least one energy deposition above 50 keV in the corresponding MAPM. Simulations show that the relative outputs of the 25 scalers depend on the GRB position. A database of very strong GRBs simulated at 10201 positions has been produced. When a GRB is detected, its location is calculated searching the minimum of the chi2 obtained in the comparison between the measured scaler pattern and the database. This GRB lo...

  4. A Kinematic Model for Gamma Ray Bursts and Symmetric Jets

    CERN Document Server

    Thulasidas, M

    2005-01-01

    Gamma ray bursts (GRB) occur at random points in the sky at cosmological distances. The spectra evolve through X-ray, optical region to possibly radio frequency. Though there are some models, the origin and time evolution of GRB are not well understood. Extragalactic radio sources also exhibit a baffling array of features that are poorly understood -- the core emission in ultraviolet region, lobes in RF range, transient gamma and X-ray emissions etc. These two phenomena appear to be very different, but the time evolution of the core emission of radio sources is essentially the same as GRBs, though with different time constants. Here, we present a model unifying GRB and roughly symmetric radio sources based on light travel time effect and superluminality. An object, moving across our field of vision at superluminal speeds, will appear to us as two objects receding from a single point. The time evolution of the Doppler shifted radiation of such a superluminal object bears remarkable similarity to that of GRB an...

  5. Application of Jitter Radiation: Gamma-ray Burst Prompt Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, J

    2013-01-01

    A high-degree of polarization of gamma-ray burst (GRB) prompt emission has been confirmed in recent years. In this paper, we apply jitter radiation to study the polarization feature of GRB prompt emission. In our framework, relativistic electrons are accelerated by turbulent acceleration. Random and small-scale magnetic fields are generated by turbulence. We further determine that the polarization property of GRB prompt emission is governed by the configuration of the random and small-scale magnetic fields. A two-dimensional compressed slab, which contains stochastic magnetic fields, is applied in our model. If the jitter condition is satisfied, the electron deflection angle in the magnetic field is very small and the electron trajectory can be treated as a straight line. A high-degree of polarization can be achieved when the angle between the line of sight and the slab plane is small. Moreover, micro-emitters with mini-jet structure are considered to be within a bulk GRB jet. The jet "off-axis" effect is int...

  6. Cosmic Evolution of Long Gamma-Ray Burst Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Deng, Can-Min; Guo, Bei-Bei; Lu, Rui-Jing; Wang, Yuan-Zhu; Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng; Liang, En-Wei

    2016-01-01

    The cosmic evolution of gamma-ray burst (GRB) luminosity is essential for revealing the GRB physics and for using GRBs as cosmological probes. We investigate the luminosity evolution of long GRBs with a large sample of 258 {\\em Swift}/BAT GRBs. Parameterized the peak luminosity of individual GRBs evolves as $L_{\\rm p}\\propto{\\rm }(1+z)^{k}$, we get $k=1.49\\pm0.19$ using the non-parametric $\\tau$ statistics method without considering observational biases of GRB trigger and redshift measurement. By modeling these biases with the observed peak flux and characterizing the peak luminosity function of long GRBs as a smoothly broken power-law with a break that evolves as $L_{\\rm b}\\propto (1+z)^{k_{\\rm b}}$, we obtain $k_{\\rm b}=1.14^{+0.99}_{-0.47}$ through simulations based on assumption that the long GRB rate follows the star formation rate (SFR) incorporating with cosmic metallicity history. The derived $k$ and $k_b$ values are systematically smaller than that reported in previous papers. By removing the observa...

  7. Gamma-Ray Bursts and Marine Primary Producers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Brian; Neale, P. J.

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB) have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through long-term depletion of stratospheric ozone, leading to greatly increased solar ultraviolet (UV) irradiance at the surface. It has been suggested that a GRB may have initiated the late Ordovician mass extinction - one of the "big five" known extinctions. Past efforts by our group to estimate the biological impact of a GRB have used a simplified Beer-Lambert calculation with an ozone column density to estimate surface UV irradiance. Biological damage was then computed by combining the irradiance with a biological weighting function (BWF) for DNA damage. We are currently engaged in a project to greatly increase the accuracy of these estimates, with a focus on the impact on primary producers in the Earth's oceans. These organisms make up the base of the marine food web and produce half the world's oxygen. Our approach features full radiative transfer modeling to determine surface UV irradiance, combined with newly measured biological weighting functions for some of the most abundant marine primary producers. Here, we report on preliminary results of this study, including computed spectral irradiance at the surface and in ocean water under conditions following a GRB, along with the impact on primary productivity as computed using preliminary BWF results. This work is supported by NASA's Astrobiology: Exobiology and Evolutionary Biology program, grant #NNX09AM85G.

  8. On the magnetisation of gamma-ray burst blast waves

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoine, Martin; Wang, Xiang-Yu

    2013-01-01

    The origin of magnetic fields that permeate the blast waves of gamma-ray bursts is a long-standing problem. The present paper argues that in four GRBs revealing extended emission at >100 MeV, with follow-up in the radio, optical and X-ray domains at later times, this magnetisation can be described as the partial decay of the microturbulence that is generated in the shock precursor. Assuming that the extended high energy emission can be interpreted as synchrotron emission of shock accelerated electrons, we model the multi-wavelength light curves of GRB 090902B, GRB 090323, GRB 090328 and GRB 110731A, using a simplified then a full synchrotron calculation with power law decaying microturbulence \\epsilon_B \\propto t^{\\alpha_t} (t denotes the time since injection through the shock, in the comoving blast frame). We find that these models point to a consistent value of the decay exponent -0.5 < \\alpha_t < -0.4.

  9. VERITAS OBSERVATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DETECTED BY SWIFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acciari, V. A.; Benbow, W. [Fred Lawrence Whipple Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Amado, AZ 85645 (United States); Aliu, E.; Errando, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Barnard College, Columbia University, NY 10027 (United States); Arlen, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Aune, T. [Santa Cruz Institute for Particle Physics and Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Beilicke, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V. [Department of Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Bradbury, S. M. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Byrum, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Cannon, A.; Collins-Hughes, E. [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Cesarini, A.; Connolly, M. P. [School of Physics, National University of Ireland Galway, University Road, Galway (Ireland); Christiansen, J. L. [Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 94307 (United States); Ciupik, L. [Astronomy Department, Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Cui, W. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Duke, C. [Department of Physics, Grinnell College, Grinnell, IA 50112-1690 (United States); Falcone, A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Lab, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); and others

    2011-12-10

    We present the results of 16 Swift-triggered Gamma-ray burst (GRB) follow-up observations taken with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System (VERITAS) telescope array from 2007 January to 2009 June. The median energy threshold and response time of these observations were 260 GeV and 320 s, respectively. Observations had an average duration of 90 minutes. Each burst is analyzed independently in two modes: over the whole duration of the observations and again over a shorter timescale determined by the maximum VERITAS sensitivity to a burst with a t{sup -1.5} time profile. This temporal model is characteristic of GRB afterglows with high-energy, long-lived emission that have been detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi satellite. No significant very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray emission was detected and upper limits above the VERITAS threshold energy are calculated. The VERITAS upper limits are corrected for gamma-ray extinction by the extragalactic background light and interpreted in the context of the keV emission detected by Swift. For some bursts the VHE emission must have less power than the keV emission, placing constraints on inverse Compton models of VHE emission.

  10. The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift MIDEX Mission

    CERN Document Server

    Barthelmy, S D; Cummings, J R; Fenimore, E E; Gehrels, N; Hullinger, D; Krimm, H A; Markwardt, C B; Palmer, D M; Parsons, A; Sato, G; Suzuki, M; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Tüller, J

    2005-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) is one of 3 instruments on the Swift MIDEX spacecraft to study gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The BAT first detects the GRB and localizes the burst direction to an accuracy of 1-4 arcmin within 20 sec after the start of the event. The GRB trigger initiates an autonomous spacecraft slew to point the two narrow field-of-view (FOV) instruments at the burst location within 20-70 sec so to make follow-up x-ray and optical observations. The BAT is a wide-FOV, coded-aperture instrument with a CdZnTe detector plane. The detector plane is composed of 32,768 pieces of CdZnTe (4x4x2mm), and the coded-aperture mask is composed of approximately 52,000 pieces of lead (5x5x1mm) with a 1-m separation between mask and detector plane. The BAT operates over the 15-150 keV energy range with approximately 7 keV resolution, a sensitivity of approximately 10E-8 erg*cm^-2*s^-1, and a 1.4 sr (half-coded) FOV. We expect to detect >100 GRBs/yr for a 2-year mission. The BAT also performs an all-sky hard x-ray s...

  11. Search for gamma ray burst quasi simultaneous optical emission with BOOTES-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Cerón, J. M.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Soldán, J.; Hudec, R.; Bernas, M.; Páta, P.; Mateo Sanguino, T. J.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Berná, J. Á; Nekola, M.; Gorosabel, J.; de la Morena, B. A.; Más-Hesse, J. M.; Giménez, Á.; Torres Riera, J.

    The Burst Observer and Optical Transient Exploring System experiment (BOOTES) has been designed to provide an automatic real time observing response to the detection of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). It achieves such response by using wide field cameras attached to small robotic telescopes and imaging in the B,I and R bands. To date we have obtained images for about 50 events with the Wide Field Camera (WFC), starting, in several ocasions, 3 minutes after the burst commenced. One of the last searches resulted in the detection of an optical transient, candidate to be the optical counterpart of the GRB 000313, although such relation has not been established to absolute certainty yet.

  12. A search for thermal X-ray signatures in Gamma-Ray Bursts I: Swift bursts with optical supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Starling, R L C; Pe'er, A; Beardmore, A P; Osborne, J P

    2012-01-01

    The X-ray spectra of Gamma-Ray Bursts can generally be described by an absorbed power law. The landmark discovery of thermal X-ray emission in addition to the power law in the unusual GRB 060218, followed by a similar discovery in GRB 100316D, showed that during the first thousand seconds after trigger the soft X-ray spectra can be complex. Both the origin and prevalence of such spectral components still evades understanding, particularly after the discovery of thermal X-ray emission in the classical GRB 090618. Possibly most importantly, these three objects are all associated with optical supernovae, begging the question of whether the thermal X-ray components could be a result of the GRB-SN connection, possibly in the shock breakout. We therefore performed a search for blackbody components in the early Swift X-ray spectra of 11 GRBs that have or may have associated optical supernovae, accurately recovering the thermal components reported in the literature for GRBs 060218, 090618 and 100316D. We present the ...

  13. Discovery and redshift of an optical afterglow in 71 square degrees iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, Leo P; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Perley, Daniel A; Ofek, Eran O; Brown, Duncan A; Nugent, Peter E; Kulkarni, S R; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A; Bellm, Eric; Mulchaey, John; Arcavi, Iair; Barlow, Tom; Bloom, Joshua S; Cao, Yi; Gehrels, Neil; Horesh, Assaf; Masci, Frank J; McEnery, Julie; Rau, Arne; Surace, Jason A; Yaron, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130702A, identified upon searching 71 square degrees surrounding the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) localization. Discovered and characterized by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), iPTF13bxl is the first afterglow discovered solely based on a GBM localization. Real-time image subtraction, machine learning, human vetting, and rapid response multi-wavelength follow-up enabled us to quickly narrow a list of 27,004 optical transient candidates to a single afterglow-like source. Detection of a new, fading X-ray source by Swift and a radio counterpart by CARMA and the VLA confirmed the association between iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A. Spectroscopy with the Magellan and Palomar 200-inch telescopes showed the afterglow to be at a redshift of z=0.145, placing GRB 130702A among the lowest redshift GRBs detected to date. The prompt gamma-ray energy release and afterglow luminosity are intermediate between typical cosmological...

  14. Effects of conversions for high energy neutrinos originating from cosmological $\\gamma$-ray burst fireballs

    CERN Document Server

    Athar, H

    1999-01-01

    We study neutrino conversions in the recently envisaged source of high energy ($E \\geq 10^{6}$ GeV) neutrinos, that is, in the vicinity of cosmological gamma-ray burst fireballs (GRB). We consider mainly the possibility of neutrino conversions due to an interplay of neutrino transition magnetic moment, $\\mu$, and the violation of equivalence principle (VEP), parameterized by $\\Delta f$, in a reasonable strength of magnetic field in the vicinity of the GRB. We point out that for $\\Delta f \\sim 10^{-25}(\\delta m^2/1 {eV}^2)$, a resonant spin-flavour precession between $\\bar{\

  15. Search for neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Baikal neutrino telescope NT200

    CERN Document Server

    Avrorin, A

    2009-01-01

    We present an analysis of neutrinos detected with the Baikal neutrino telescope NT200 for correlations with gamma-ray bursts (GRB). No neutrino events correlated with GRB were observed. Assuming a Waxman-Bahcall spectrum, a neutrino flux upper limit of {\\bf $E^2 \\Phi < 1.1 \\times 10^{-6}cm^{-2}s^{-1}sr^{-1}GeV$} was obtained. We also present the Green's Function fluence limit for this search, which extends two orders of magnitude beyond the energy range of the Super-Kamiokande limit.

  16. Could bright γ-ray burst optical transients have been recorded historically?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Richard G. Strom; Fu-Yuan Zhao; Cheng-Min Zhang

    2012-01-01

    The brightest optical flash from a γ-ray burst (GRB) was,briefly,a nakedeye object.Several other GRBs have produced optical transients only slightly fainter.We argue that,based upon the recently accumulated data from hundreds of GRB transients,many such optical events should have been visible to the unaided eye in the course of human history.The most likely repositories of such observations are historical records from the Orient,and we have located and discuss a number of candidates.We also consider the value of such observations,should any very likely ones be uncovered,to modern astrophysics.

  17. Constraining the Jet Structure of Gamma-Ray Bursts from Viewing Angle Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, N; Bartos, I

    2015-01-01

    The angular dependence of emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRB) is of fundamental importance in understanding the underlying physical mechanisms, as well as in multimessenger search efforts. We examine the prospects of using reconstructed GRB jet opening angles and off-axis observer angles in determining the jet structure. We show that the reconstructed angles by Ryan et al. (2015) are inconsistent with uniform jet structure. We further calculate the number of GRBs with accurately reconstructed opening and observer angles necessary to differentiate between some phenomenological non-uniform structures.

  18. A comprehensive radio view of the extremely bright gamma-ray burst 130427A

    OpenAIRE

    van der Horst, A. J.; Paragi, Z.; De Bruyn, A. G.; Granot, J.; Kouveliotou, C; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Curran, P. A.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Anderson, G. A.; Fender, R. P.; Yang, J.; Strom, R. G.

    2014-01-01

    GRB130427A was extremely bright as a result of occurring at low redshift whilst the energetics were more typical of high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). We collected well-sampled light curves at 1.4 and 4.8 GHz of GRB 130427A with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT); and we obtained its most accurate position with the European Very Long Baseline Interferometry Network (EVN). Our flux density measurements are combined with all the data available at radio, optical and X-ray freque...

  19. Short GRB 130603B: Discovery of a jet break in the optical and radio afterglows, and a mysterious late-time X-ray excess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fong, W.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Chornock, R.; Migliori, G.; Zauderer, B. A.; Lunnan, R.; Laskar, T. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Metzger, B. D. [Department of Physics and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Foley, R. J. [Astronomy Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Desch, S. J. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, P.O. Box 871404, Tempe, AZ 85287-1404 (United States); Meech, K. J.; Sonnett, S. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Dickey, C.; Hedlund, A. [Pomona College, 610 N. College Ave., Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Harding, P. [Department of Astronomy, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106-7215 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    We present radio, optical/NIR, and X-ray observations of the afterglow of the short-duration Swift and Konus-Wind GRB 130603B, and uncover a break in the radio and optical bands at ≈0.5 day after the burst, best explained as a jet break with an inferred jet opening angle of ≈4°-8°. GRB 130603B is only the third short GRB with a radio afterglow detection to date, and represents the first time that a jet break has been evident in the radio band. We model the temporal evolution of the spectral energy distribution to determine the burst explosion properties and find an isotropic-equivalent kinetic energy of ≈(0.6-1.7) × 10{sup 51} erg and a circumburst density of ≈5 × 10{sup –3}-30 cm{sup –3}. From the inferred opening angle of GRB 130603B, we calculate beaming-corrected energies of E {sub γ} ≈ (0.5-2) × 10{sup 49} erg and E {sub K} ≈ (0.1-1.6) × 10{sup 49} erg. Along with previous measurements and lower limits we find a median opening angle of ≈10°. Using the all-sky observed rate of 10 Gpc{sup –3} yr{sup –1}, this implies a true short GRB rate of ≈20 yr{sup –1} within 200 Mpc, the Advanced LIGO/VIRGO sensitivity range for neutron star binary mergers. Finally, we uncover evidence for significant excess emission in the X-ray afterglow of GRB 130603B at ≳ 1 day and conclude that the additional energy component could be due to fall-back accretion or spin-down energy from a magnetar formed following the merger.

  20. Testing Einstein's Equivalence Principle with Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Jun-Jie; Wu, Xue-Feng; Mészáros, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of Einstein's Equivalence Principle (EEP) can be tested with the observed time delays between correlated particles or photons that are emitted from astronomical sources. Assuming as a lower limit that the time delays are caused mainly by the gravitational potential of the Milky Way, we prove that fast radio bursts (FRBs) of cosmological origin can be used to constrain the EEP with high accuracy. Taking FRB 110220 and two possible FRB/gamma-ray burst (GRB) association systems (FRB/GRB 101011A and FRB/GRB 100704A) as examples, we obtain a strict upper limit on the differences of the parametrized post-Newtonian parameter $\\gamma$ values as low as $\\left[\\gamma(1.23\\; \\rm GHz)-\\gamma(1.45\\; \\rm GHz)\\right]<4.36\\times10^{-9}$. This provides the most stringent limit up to date on the EEP through the relative differential variations of the $\\gamma$ parameter at radio energies, improving by 1 to 2 orders of magnitude the previous results at other energies based on supernova 1987A and GRBs.

  1. Study of GRB light curve decay indices in the afterglow phase

    CERN Document Server

    Del Vecchio, Roberta; Ostrowski, Michał

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the distribution of temporal power-law decay indices, $\\alpha$, in the Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) afterglow phase, fitted for $176$ GRBs (139 long GRBs, 12 short GRBs {\\it with extended emission} and 25 X-Ray Flashes (XRFs)) with known redshifts. These indices are compared to the values of characteristic afterglow luminosity, $L_a$, the time, $T_a^*$, and the decay index, $\\alpha_W$, derived with global light curve fitting using the \\cite{willingale07} model. This model fitting yields similar distributions of $\\alpha_W$ to the fitted $\\alpha$, but for individual bursts a difference can be significant. Analysis of the ($\\alpha$, $L_a$) distribution reveals only a weak correlation of these quantities. However, we discovered a significant regular trend when studying GRB $\\alpha$ values along the $L_a$ versus $T_a^*$ (LT) distribution, with systematic variation of $\\alpha$ parameter distribution with luminosity for any selected $T_a^*$. We analyze this systematics with respect to the fitted LT co...

  2. Shock break-out: how a GRB revealed the beginnings of a supernova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blustin, Alexander J

    2007-05-15

    In February 2006, Swift caught a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the act of turning into a supernova, and made the first ever direct observations of the break-out and early expansion of a supernova shock wave. GRB 060218 began with an exceptionally long burst of non-thermal gamma-rays, lasting over 2000s, as a jet erupted through the surface of the star. While this was in progress, an optically-thick thermal component from the shock wave of the supernova explosion grew to prominence, and we were able to track the mildly relativistic expansion of this shell as the blackbody peak moved from the X-rays into the UV and optical bands. The initial radius of the shock implied that it was a blue supergiant that had exploded, but the lack of hydrogen emission lines in the supernova spectrum indicated a more compact star. The most likely scenario is that the shock ploughed into the massive stellar wind of a Wolf-Rayet progenitor, with the shock breaking-out and becoming visible to us once it reached the radius where the wind became optically-thin. I present the Swift observations of this landmark event, and discuss the new questions and answers it leaves us with.

  3. Swift and Suzaku Observations of the X-Ray Afterglow from the GRB 060105

    CERN Document Server

    Tashiro, M S; Angelini, L; Barthelmy, S; Gehrels, N; Ishikawa, N; Kaluzienski, L J; Kawai, N; Kelley, R L; Kinugasa, K; Kodaira, H; Kohmura, T; Kubota, K; Maeda, Y; Maeno, S; Murakami, H; Murakami, T; Nakagawa, Y E; Nakazawa, K; Nousek, J; Okuno, S; Onda, K; Reeves, J N; Ricker, G; Sato, G; Sonoda, E; Suzuki, M; Takahashi, T; Tamagawa, T; Torii, K; Ueda, Y; Urata, Y; Yamaoka, K; Yamauchi, M; Yonetoku, D; Yoshida, A; Yoshinari, S

    2006-01-01

    Results are presented of early X-ray afterglow observations of GRB 060105 by Swift and Suzaku. The bright, long gamma-ray burst GRB 060105 triggered the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) at 06:49:28 on 5 January 2006. The Suzaku team commenced a pre-planned target of opportunity observation at 19 ks (5.3 hr) after the Swift trigger. Following the prompt emission and successive very steep decay, a shallow decay was observed from T_0+187 s to T_0+1287 s. After an observation gap during T_0 +(1.5-3) ks, an extremely early steep decay was observed in T_0+(4-30) ks. The lightcurve flattened again at T_0+30 ks, and another steep decay followed from T_0+50 ks to the end of observations. Both steep decays exhibited decay indices of 2.3 - 2.4. This very early break, if it is a jet break, is the earliest case among X-ray afterglow observations, suggesting a very narrow jet whose opening angle is well below 1 degree. The unique Suzaku/XIS data allow us to set very tight upper limits on line emission or absorption in thi...

  4. Investigating the impact of optical selection effects on observed rest frame prompt GRB properties

    CERN Document Server

    Turpin, Damien; Dezalay, Jean-Pascal; Atteia, Jean-Luc; Klotz, Alain; Dornic, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Measuring gamma-ray burst (GRB) properties in their rest-frame is crucial to understand the physics at work in gamma-ray bursts. This can only be done for GRBs with known redshift. Since redshifts are usually measured from the optical spectrum of the afterglow, correlations between prompt and afterglow emissions may introduce biases in the distribution of rest-frame properties of the prompt emission. Our analysis is based on a sample of 90 GRBs with good optical follow-up and well measured prompt emission. 76 of them have a measure of redshift and 14 have no redshift. We estimate their optical brightness with their R magnitude measured two hours after the trigger and compare the rest frame prompt properties of different classes of GRB afterglow brightness. We find that the optical brightness of GRBs in our sample is mainly driven by their intrinsic afterglow luminosity. We show that GRBs with low and high afterglow optical fluxes have similar Epi , Eiso , Liso , indicating that the rest-frame distributions co...

  5. ESTIMATING LONG GRB JET OPENING ANGLES AND REST-FRAME ENERGETICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, Adam [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Connaughton, Valerie [Science and Technology Institute, Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Briggs, Michael S.; Burns, Eric, E-mail: adam.m.goldstein@nasa.gov [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    We present a method to estimate the jet opening angles of long duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) using the prompt gamma-ray energetics and an inversion of the Ghirlanda relation, which is a correlation between the time-integrated peak energy of the GRB prompt spectrum and the collimation-corrected energy in gamma-rays. The derived jet opening angles using this method and detailed assumptions match well with the corresponding inferred jet opening angles obtained when a break in the afterglow is observed. Furthermore, using a model of the predicted long GRB redshift probability distribution observable by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), we estimate the probability distributions for the jet opening angle and rest-frame energetics for a large sample of GBM GRBs for which the redshifts have not been observed. Previous studies have only used a handful of GRBs to estimate these properties due to the paucity of observed afterglow jet breaks, spectroscopic redshifts, and comprehensive prompt gamma-ray observations, and we potentially expand the number of GRBs that can be used in this analysis by more than an order of magnitude. In this analysis, we also present an inferred distribution of jet breaks which indicates that a large fraction of jet breaks are not observable with current instrumentation and observing strategies. We present simple parameterizations for the jet angle, energetics, and jet break distributions so that they may be used in future studies.

  6. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory’s space GRB mission and science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, H.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. The Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) is a space mission to detect the early moments of an explosion from Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), thus enhancing our understanding of the GRB mechanism. It consists of the UFFO Burst & Trigger telescope (UBAT) for the recognition of GRB positions using...... (FOV) and is composed of the coded mask, a hopper and a detector module. The SMT has a fast rotatable mirror which allows a fast UV-optical detection after the trigger. The telescope is a modified Ritchey-Chr´etien telescope with the aperture size of 10 cm diameter, and an image intensifier readout...... by CCD. The UFFO pathfinder is scheduled to launch into orbit on 2012 June by the Lomonosov spacecraft. It is a scaled-down version of UFFO in order to make the first systematic study of early UV/optical light curves, including the rise phase of GRBs. We expect UBAT to trigger ∼44 GRBs/yr and expect SMT...

  7. GRB110721A: AN EXTREME PEAK ENERGY AND SIGNATURES OF THE PHOTOSPHERE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Axelsson, M. [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baldini, L.; Bellazzini, R.; Bregeon, J. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Pisa, I-56127 Pisa (Italy); Barbiellini, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Brigida, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Bruel, P. [Laboratoire Leprince-Ringuet, Ecole polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Buehler, R.; Cameron, R. A.; Chiang, J.; Claus, R. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Caliandro, G. A. [Institut de Ciencies de l' Espai (IEEE-CSIC), Campus UAB, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Caraveo, P. A. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Cecchi, C.; D' Ammando, F. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Chaves, R. C. G. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA-IRFU/CNRS/Universite Paris Diderot, Service d' Astrophysique, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Chekhtman, A. [Center for Earth Observing and Space Research, College of Science, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Conrad, J. [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Cutini, S., E-mail: magnusa@astro.su.se, E-mail: moretti@particle.kth.se, E-mail: felix@particle.kth.se, E-mail: josefin.larsson@astro.su.se, E-mail: james.m.burgess@nasa.gov [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center, I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); and others

    2012-10-01

    GRB110721A was observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope using its two instruments, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The burst consisted of one major emission episode which lasted for {approx}24.5 s (in the GBM) and had a peak flux of (5.7 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The time-resolved emission spectrum is best modeled with a combination of a Band function and a blackbody spectrum. The peak energy of the Band component was initially 15 {+-} 2 MeV, which is the highest value ever detected in a GRB. This measurement was made possible by combining GBM/BGO data with LAT Low Energy events to achieve continuous 10-100 MeV coverage. The peak energy later decreased as a power law in time with an index of -1.89 {+-} 0.10. The temperature of the blackbody component also decreased, starting from {approx}80 keV, and the decay showed a significant break after {approx}2 s. The spectrum provides strong constraints on the standard synchrotron model, indicating that alternative mechanisms may give rise to the emission at these energies.

  8. The central engine of GRB 130831A and the energy breakdown of a relativistic explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pasquale, M.; Oates, S. R.; Racusin, J. L.; Kann, D. A.; Zhang, B.; Pozanenko, A.; Volnova, A. A.; Trotter, A.; Frank, N.; Cucchiara, A.; Troja, E.; Sbarufatti, B.; Butler, N. R.; Schulze, S.; Cano, Z.; Page, M. J.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Gorosabel, J.; Lien, A.; Fox, O.; Littlejohns, O.; Bloom, J. S.; Prochaska, J. X.; de Diego, J. A.; Gonzalez, J.; Richer, M. G.; Román-Zúñiga, C.; Watson, A. M.; Gehrels, N.; Moseley, H.; Kutyrev, A.; Zane, S.; Hoette, V.; Russell, R. R.; Rumyantsev, V.; Klunko, E.; Burkhonov, O.; Breeveld, A. A.; Reichart, D. E.; Haislip, J. B.

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous explosions in the Universe, yet the nature and physical properties of their energy sources are far from understood. Very important clues, however, can be inferred by studying the afterglows of these events. We present optical and X-ray observations of GRB 130831A obtained by Swift, Chandra, Skynet, Reionization And Transients Infra-Red camera, Maidanak, International Scientific Optical-Observation Network, Nordic Optical Telescope, Liverpool Telescope and Gran Telescopio Canarias. This burst shows a steep drop in the X-ray light curve at ≃105 s after the trigger, with a power-law decay index of α ˜ 6. Such a rare behaviour cannot be explained by the standard forward shock (FS) model and indicates that the emission, up to the fast decay at 105 s, must be of `internal origin', produced by a dissipation process within an ultrarelativistic outflow. We propose that the source of such an outflow, which must produce the X-ray flux for ≃1 d in the cosmological rest frame, is a newly born magnetar or black hole. After the drop, the faint X-ray afterglow continues with a much shallower decay. The optical emission, on the other hand, shows no break across the X-ray steep decrease, and the late-time decays of both the X-ray and optical are consistent. Using both the X-ray and optical data, we show that the emission after ≃105 s can be explained well by the FS model. We model our data to derive the kinetic energy of the ejecta and thus measure the efficiency of the central engine of a GRB with emission of internal origin visible for a long time. Furthermore, we break down the energy budget of this GRB into the prompt emission, the late internal dissipation, the kinetic energy of the relativistic ejecta, and compare it with the energy of the associated supernova, SN 2013 fu.

  9. The anatomy of a long gamma-ray burst: a simple classification scheme for the emission mechanism(s)

    CERN Document Server

    Bégué, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Ultra-relativistic motion and efficient conversion of kinetic energy to radiation are required by gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations, yet they are difficult to simultaneously achieve. Three leading mechanisms have been proposed to explain the observed emission emanating from GRB outflows: radiation from either relativistic internal or external shocks, or thermal emission from a photosphere. Previous works were dedicated to independently treating these three mechanisms and arguing for a sole, unique origin of the prompt emission of gamma-ray bursts. In contrast, herein, we first explain why all three models are valid mechanisms and that a contribution from each of them is expected in the prompt phase. Additionally, we show that a single parameter, the dimensionless entropy of the GRB outflow, determines which mechanism contributes the most to the emission. More specifically, internal shocks dominate for low values of the dimensionless entropy, external shocks for intermediate values and finally, photospheric e...

  10. Mergers of Charged Black Holes: Gravitational-wave Events, Short Gamma-Ray Bursts, and Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing

    2016-08-01

    The discoveries of GW150914, GW151226, and LVT151012 suggest that double black hole (BH-BH) mergers are common in the universe. If at least one of the two merging black holes (BHs) carries a certain amount of charge, possibly retained by a rotating magnetosphere, the inspiral of a BH-BH system would drive a global magnetic dipole normal to the orbital plane. The rapidly evolving magnetic moment during the merging process would drive a Poynting flux with an increasing wind power. The magnetospheric activities during the final phase of the merger would make a fast radio burst (FRB) if the BH charge can be as large as a factor of \\hat{q}˜ ({10}-9{--}{10}-8) of the critical charge Q c of the BH. At large radii, dissipation of the Poynting flux energy in the outflow would power a short-duration high-energy transient, which would appear as a detectable short-duration gamma-ray burst (GRB) if the charge can be as large as \\hat{q}˜ ({10}-5{--}{10}-4). The putative short GRB coincident with GW150914 recorded by Fermi GBM may be interpreted with this model. Future joint GW/GRB/FRB searches would lead to a measurement or place a constraint on the charges carried by isolate BHs.

  11. More Gamma-ray Bursts from the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michael; Fermi GBM Team Team

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Team has developed an offline search for weak gamma-ray bursts which were not already detected in-orbit as ``triggers''. This search is ``untargeted'', searching all of the GBM data without guidance from other observations. The initial version of the search has been operational from January 2016, finding several likely short GRBs per month that are posted to a webpage. The GBM individual photon data are binned to various timescales, a background model is created and the binned data are searched for significant signals above the background that are coincident in two or more detectors. The current search has a latency of several days because several steps require manual intervention. An improved version will be fully automatic so that the latency in detecting candidates will be dominated by the few hours delay in receiving the data. The new version of the search will also include additional detection algorithms to increase the GRB detection rate and will also detect some long GRBs. We will report the candidates via the Gamma-ray Coordinates Network (GCN). These prompt GRB detections and localization should aid multi-messenger observations, in some cases refining localizations on timescales useful for followup observations.

  12. The emission mechanism in magnetically dominated GRB outflows

    CERN Document Server

    Beniamini, Paz

    2014-01-01

    We consider the conditions within Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) emission region that is Poynting flux dominated. Due to the enormous magnetic energy density, relativistic electrons will cool in such a region extremely rapidly via synchrotron. As there is no known mechanism that can compete with synchrotron it must be the source of the prompt sub-MeV emission. This sets strong limits on the size and Lorentz factor of the outflow. Furthermore, synchrotron cooling is too efficient. It overproduces optical and X-ray as compared with the observations. This overproduction of low energy emission can be avoided if the electrons are re-accelerated many times ($\\gtrsim 5\\times 10^4$) during each pulse (or are continuously heated) or if they escape the emitting region before cooling down. We explore the limitations of both models, practically ruling out the later and demonstrating that the former requires two different acceleration mechanisms as well as an extremely large magnetic energy to Baryonic energy ratio. To be viable, ...

  13. Modeling the early multiwavelength emission in GRB130427A

    CERN Document Server

    Fraija, Nissim; Veres, Péter

    2016-01-01

    One of the most powerful gamma-ray bursts, GRB 130427A was swiftly detected from GeV $\\gamma$-rays to optical wavelengths. In the GeV band, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope observed the highest-energy photon ever recorded of 95 GeV, and a bright peak in the early phase followed by emission temporally extended for more than 20 hours. In the optical band, a bright flash with a magnitude of $7.03\\pm 0.03$ in the time interval from 9.31 s to 19.31 s after the trigger was reported by RAPTOR in r-band. We study the origin of the GeV $\\gamma$-ray emission, using the multiwavelength observation detected in X-ray and optical bands. The origin of the temporally extended LAT, X-ray and optical flux is naturally interpreted as synchrotron radiation and the 95-GeV photon and the integral flux upper limits placed by the HAWC observatory are consistent with synchrotron self-Compton from an adiabatic forward shock propagating into the stellar wind of its progenitor. The extreme LAT ...

  14. MODELING THE EARLY MULTIWAVELENGTH EMISSION IN GRB 130427A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraija, N.; Lee, W. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 70-264, Cd. Universitaria, DF 04510, México (Mexico); Veres, P., E-mail: nifraija@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: wlee@astro.unam.mx, E-mail: pv0004@uah.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2016-02-20

    One of the most powerful gamma-ray bursts, GRB 130427A was swiftly detected from GeV γ-rays to optical wavelengths. In the GeV band, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope observed the highest-energy photon ever recorded of 95 GeV and a bright peak in the early phase followed by emission temporally extended for more than 20 hr. In the optical band, a bright flash with a magnitude of 7.03 ± 0.03 in the time interval from 9.31 to 19.31 s after the trigger was reported by RAPTOR in r band. We study the origin of the GeV γ-ray emission, using the multiwavelength observation detected in X-ray and optical bands. The origin of the temporally extended LAT, X-ray, and optical flux is naturally interpreted as synchrotron radiation, and the 95 GeV photon and the integral flux upper limits placed by the high-altitude water Cerenkov observatory are consistent with synchrotron self-Compton from an adiabatic forward shock propagating into the stellar wind of its progenitor. The extreme LAT peak and the bright optical flash are explained through synchrotron self-Compton and synchrotron emission from the reverse shock, respectively, when the ejecta evolves in the thick-shell regime and carries a significant magnetic field.

  15. Swift captures the spectrally evolving prompt emission of GRB 070616

    CERN Document Server

    Starling, R L C; Willingale, R; Page, K L; Osborne, J P; De Pasquale, M; Nakagawa, Y E; Kuin, N P M; Onda, K; Norris, J P; Ukwatta, T N; Kodaka, N; Burrows, D N; Kennea, J A; Page, M J; Perri, M; Markwardt, C B

    2007-01-01

    The origins of Gamma-ray Burst prompt emission are currently not well understood and in this context long, well-observed events are particularly important to study. We present the case of GRB 070616, analysing the exceptionally long-duration multipeaked prompt emission, and later afterglow, captured by all the instruments on-board Swift and by Suzaku WAM. The high energy light curve remained generally flat for several hundred seconds before going into a steep decline. Spectral evolution from hard to soft is clearly taking place throughout the prompt emission, beginning at 285 s after the trigger and extending to 1200 s. We track the movement of the spectral peak energy, whilst observing a softening of the low energy spectral slope. The steep decline in flux may be caused by a combination of this strong spectral evolution and the curvature effect. We investigate origins for the spectral evolution, ruling out a superposition of two power laws and considering instead an additional component dominant during the l...

  16. LAGOVirtual: A Collaborative Environment for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Camacho, R; Diaz, G; Guada, C; Hamar, V; Hoeger, H; Melfo, A; Nunez, L A; Perez, Y; Quintero, C; Rosales, M; Torrens, R

    2009-01-01

    We present the LAGOVirtual Project: an ongoing project to develop platform to collaborate in the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO). This continental-wide observatory is devised to detect high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, by using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) at high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). This platform will allow LAGO collaboration to share data, and computer resources through its different sites. This environment has the possibility to generate synthetic data by simulating the showers through AIRES application and to store/preserve distributed data files collected by the WCD at the LAGO sites. The present article concerns the implementation of a prototype of LAGO-DR adapting DSpace, with a hierarchical structure (i.e. country, institution, followed by collections that contain the metadata and data files), for the captured/simulate...

  17. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, Disha, E-mail: sawant@fe.infn.it [University of Ferrara, Via Saragat-1, Block C, Ferrara 44122 (Italy); University of Nice, 28 Avenue Valrose, Nice 06103 (France); IRAP Erasmus PhD Program, European Union and INAF - IASF Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna 41125 (Italy); Amati, Lorenzo, E-mail: amati@iasfbo.inaf.it [INAF - IASF Bologna, Via P. Gobetti 101, Bologna 41125 (Italy); ICRANet, Piazzale Aldo Moro-5, Rome 00185 (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 10{sup 54} erg of energy isotropically (E{sub iso}) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ∼ 0.01 up to ∼ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (E{sub p,i}) and the “intensity” is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the E{sub p,i} – E{sub iso} correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density Ω{sub M} being ∼ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of E{sub p,i} with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of Ω{sub M}. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  18. GRB physics and cosmology with peak energy-intensity correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, Disha; Amati, Lorenzo

    2015-12-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) are immensely energetic explosions radiating up to 1054 erg of energy isotropically (Eiso) and they are observed within a wide range of redshift (from ˜ 0.01 up to ˜ 9). Such enormous power and high redshift point at these phenomena being highly favorable to investigate the history and evolution of our universe. The major obstacle in their application as cosmological study-tools is to find a way to standardize the GRBs, for instance similar to SNe Ia. With respect to this goal, the correlation between spectral peak energy (Ep,i) and the "intensity" is a positively useful and investigated criterion. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that, through the Ep,i - Eiso correlation, the current data set of GRBs can already contribute to the independent evidence of the matter density ΩM being ˜ 0.3 for a flat universe scenario. We try to inspect and compare the correlations of Ep,i with different intensity indicators (e.g., radiated energy, average and peak luminosity, bolometric vs. monochromatic quantities, etc.) both in terms of intrinsic dispersion and precise estimation of ΩM. The outcome of such studies are further analyzed in verifying the reliability of the correlations for both GRB physics and their standardization for cosmology.

  19. Prompt emission from GRB 150915A in the GeV energy range detected at ground by the New-Tupi detector

    CERN Document Server

    Augusto, C R A; de Oliveira, M N; Nepomuceno, A A; Kopenkin, V; Sinzi, T

    2016-01-01

    Since 2014, a new detector (New-Tupi) consisting of four plastic scintillators ($150 \\times 75 \\times 5 cm^3$) placed in pairs and located in Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, has been used for the search of transient solar events and photomuons from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). On September 15, 2015, at 21:18:24 UT, the Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) triggered and located GRB 150915A (trigger 655721). The GRB light curve shows a weak complex structure of long duration $T_{90}=164.7 \\pm 49.7 $ sec, and a fluence in the 15-150 keV band of $8.0 \\pm 1.8 \\times 10^{-7}erg/cm^2$. GRB 150915A was fortuitously located in the field of view of the New-Tupi detector, and a search for prompt emission in the GeV energy range is presented here. The analysis was made using the "scaler" or "single-particle" technique. The New-Tupi detector registered a muon excess peak of 6.1s duration with a signal significance $6.9\\sigma$, the signal was within the T90 duration of the Swift BAT GRB, with an estimated fluence $4.8 \\times 10^...

  20. Keck Observations of 160 Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Perley, Daniel A; Prochaska, Jason X

    2013-01-01

    We present a preliminary data release from our multi-year campaign at Keck Observatory to study the host galaxies of a large sample of Swift-era gamma-ray bursts via multi-color ground-based optical imaging and spectroscopy. With over 160 targets observed to date (and almost 100 host detections, most of which have not previously been reported in the literature) our effort represents the broadest GRB host survey to date. While targeting was heterogeneous, our observations span the known diversity of GRBs including short bursts, long bursts, spectrally soft GRBs (XRFs), ultra-energetic GRBs, X-ray faint GRBs, dark GRBs, SN-GRBs, and other sub-classes. We also present a preview of our database (currently available online via a convenient web interface) including a catalog of multi-color photometry, redshifts and line ID's. Final photometry and reduced imaging and spectra will be available in the near future.

  1. Gamma-ray burst engines may have no memory

    CERN Document Server

    Baldeschi, A

    2014-01-01

    A sizeable fraction of gamma-ray burst (GRB) time profiles consist of a temporal sequence of pulses. The nature of this stochastic process carries information on how GRB inner engines work. The so-called interpulse time defines the interval between adjacent pulses, excluding the long quiescence periods during which the signal drops to the background level. It was found by many authors in the past that interpulse times are lognormally distributed, at variance with the exponential case that is expected for a memoryless process. We investigated whether the simple hypothesis of a temporally uncorrelated sequence of pulses is really to be rejected, as a lognormal distribution necessarily implies. We selected and analysed a number of multi--peaked CGRO/BATSE GRBs and simulated similar time profiles, with the crucial difference that we assumed exponentially distributed interpulse times, as is expected for a memoryless stationary Poisson process. We then identified peaks in both data sets using a novel peak search al...

  2. A Possible Conection Between Magnetars and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Allen

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We argue that magnetars, neutron stars with strong magnetic fields, can be the powerhouses behind some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs, thanks to effects only possible in presence of high magnetic fields. The production of axions in supernova cores by pair anihilation e+e- -> a is possible in such intense magnetic fields. A fraction of the ~ 1053 erg of binding energy of the newly created neutron star escapes with this axion flux. However, axions in high magnetic fields decay through a -> e+e- with mean life tau ~ 10-4 s, therefore close to the magnetar, producing the relativistic shock with ~ 1051 erg ("fireball" and the GRB. At least one GRB was coincident with an "anomalous" supernova Ic, supporting this scenario.

  3. Gamma Ray Burst as Sources of Exotic Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, Ian; De Pree, Erin; Tennyson, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We consider the possible production of stable lightest first level KK particle (LKP) in baryonic gamma ray bursts (GRB) out flows. We numerically computed the energy-dependent cross-sections of Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations for the Standard Model gauge bosons, photon and Z. Next, we determined the feasibility of producing these KK excitations in gamma-ray emitting regions of GRBs. We found that a GRB fireball that accelerates baryons to energies greater than 10^14 eV could produce KK excitations out to approximately 10^12 cm from the central engine, indicating that GRBs may be a significant source of the LKP. Finally, we explore the potential observational consequences of our results.

  4. Variable Ly alpha sheds light on the environment surrounding GRB 090426

    CERN Document Server

    Thöne, C C; Lazzati, D; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Fynbo, J P U; Christensen, L; Levan, A J; Aloy, M A; Hjorth, J; Jakobsson, P; Levesque, E M; Malesani, D; Milvang-Jensen, B; Roming, P W A; Tanvir, N R; Wiersema, K; Gladders, M; Wuyts, E; Dahle, H

    2011-01-01

    Long duration gamma-ray bursts are commonly associated with the deaths of massive stars. Spectroscopic studies using the afterglow as a light source provide a unique opportunity to unveil the medium surrounding it, probing the densest region of their galaxies. This material is usually in a low ionisation state and at large distances from the burst site, hence representing the normal interstellar medium in the galaxy. Here we present the case of GRB 090426 at z=2.609, whose optical spectrum indicates an almost fully ionised medium together with a low column density of neutral hydrogen. For the first time, we also observe variations in the Ly alpha absorption line. Photoionisation modeling shows that we are probing material from the vicinity of the burst (~80 pc). The host galaxy is a complex of two luminous interacting galaxies, which might suggest that this burst could have occurred in an isolated star-forming region outside its host galaxy created in the interaction of the two galaxies.

  5. Gamma-ray-burst beaming and gravitational-wave observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Holz, Daniel E

    2013-11-01

    Using the observed rate of short-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) it is possible to make predictions for the detectable rate of compact binary coalescences in gravitational-wave detectors. We show that the nondetection of mergers in the existing LIGO/Virgo data constrains the beaming angles and progenitor masses of gamma-ray bursts, although these limits are fully consistent with existing expectations. We make predictions for the rate of events in future networks of gravitational-wave observatories, finding that the first detection of a neutron-star-neutron-star binary coalescence associated with the progenitors of short GRBs is likely to happen within the first 16 months of observation, even in the case of only two observatories (e.g., LIGO-Hanford and LIGO-Livingston) operating at intermediate sensitivities (e.g., advanced LIGO design sensitivity, but without signal recycling mirrors), and assuming a conservative distribution of beaming angles (e.g., all GRBs beamed within θ(j) = 30°). Less conservative assumptions reduce the waiting time until first detection to a period of weeks to months, with an event detection rate of >/~10/yr. Alternatively, the compact binary coalescence model of short GRBs can be ruled out if a binary is not seen within the first two years of operation of a LIGO-Hanford, LIGO-Livingston, and Virgo network at advanced design sensitivity. We also demonstrate that the gravitational wave detection rate of GRB triggered sources (i.e., those seen first in gamma rays) is lower than the rate of untriggered events (i.e., those seen only in gravitational waves) if θ(j)≲30°, independent of the noise curve, network configuration, and observed GRB rate. The first detection in gravitational waves of a binary GRB progenitor is therefore unlikely to be associated with the observation of a GRB.

  6. Search for TeV Gamma-ray Emission from GRB 100621A, an extremely bright GRB in X-rays, with H.E.S.S

    CERN Document Server

    Abramowski, A; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; O'Brien, P T; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tam, P H T; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2014-01-01

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 100621A, at the time the brightest X-ray transient ever detected by Swift-XRT in the $0.3\\textrm{--}10$ keV range, has been observed with the H.E.S.S. imaging air Cherenkov telescope array, sensitive to gamma radiation in the very-high-energy (VHE, $>100$ GeV) regime. Due to its relatively small redshift of $z\\sim0.5$, the favourable position in the southern sky and the relatively short follow-up time ($<700 \\rm{s}$ after the satellite trigger) of the H.E.S.S. observations, this GRB could be within the sensitivity reach of the H.E.S.S. instrument. The analysis of the H.E.S.S. data shows no indication of emission and yields an integral flux upper limit above $\\sim$380 GeV of $4.2\\times10^{-12} \\rm cm^{-2}s^{-1}$ (95 % confidence level), assuming a simple Band function extension model. A comparison to a spectral-temporal model, normalised to the prompt flux at sub-MeV energies, constraints the existence of a temporally extended and strong additional hard power law, as has been ...

  7. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Pulses and Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loredo, Thomas J.; Hakkila, J. E.; Broadbent, M.; Wasserman, I. M.; Wolpert, R. L.

    2013-04-01

    We describe ongoing work on two projects that are enabling more thorough and accurate use of archival BATSE data for elucidating the nature of GRB sources; the methods and tools we are developing will also be valuable for analyzing data from other missions. The first project addresses modeling the spectro-temporal behavior of prompt gamma ray emission from GRBs by modeling gamma ray count and event data with a population of pulses, with the population drawn from one or more families of single-pulse kernels. Our approach is built on a multilevel nonparametric probabilistic framework we have dubbed "Bayesian droplets," and offers several important advances over previous pulse decomposition approaches: (1) It works in the pulse-confusion regime, quantifying uncertainty in the number, locations, and shapes of pulses, even when there is strong overlap. (2) It can self-consistently model pulse behavior across multiple spectral bands. (3) It readily handles a variety of spatio-temporal kernel shapes. (4) It reifies the idea of a burst as a population of pulses, enabling explicit modeling and estimation of the pulse population distribution. We describe the framework and present analyses of prototypical simple and complex GRB light curves. The second project aims to enable accurate demographic modeling of GRBs using the BATSE catalog. We present new calculations of the BATSE sky exposure, encompassing the full duration of the BATSE catalog for the first time, with many improvements over the currently available exposure map. A similar calculation of the detection efficiency is in progress. We also describe public Python software enabling access and accurate modeling of BATSE GRB data. The software enables demographic studies (e.g., modeling log N - log S distributions) with accurate accounting of both selection effects and measurement errors. It also enables spectro-temporal modeling of detailed data from individual GRBs. These projects are supported by NASA through the AISR

  8. Gamma-ray bursts from stellar remnants probing the Universe at high redshift

    CERN Document Server

    Wijers, R A M J; Bagla, J S; Natarajan, P; Wijers, Ralph A.M.J.; Bloom, Joshua S.; Bagla, Jasjeet S.; Natarajan, Priyamvada

    1997-01-01

    A gamma-ray burst (GRB) releases an amount of energy similar to that of a supernova explosion, which combined with its rapid variability suggests an origin related to neutron stars or black holes. Since these compact stellar remnants form from the most massive stars not long after their birth, gamma-ray bursts should trace the star formation rate in the Universe; we show that the GRB flux distribution is consistent with this. Because of the strong evolution of the star formation rate with redshift, it follows that the dimmest known bursts have $z\\sim6$, much above the value usually quoted and beyond the most distant quasars. This explains the absence of bright galaxies in well-studied gamma-ray burst error boxes. The increased distances imply a peak luminosity of $8.3 \\times 10^{51} erg/s$ and a rate density of 0.025 per million years per galaxy. These values are 20 times higher and 150 times lower, respectively, than follow from fits with non-evolving GRB rates. This means that GRBs are either caused by a mu...

  9. Gamma-Ray Bursts in Circumstellar Shells: A Possible Explanation for Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Mesler, Robert A; Lloyd-Ronning, Nicole M; Fryer, Chris L; Pihlström, Ylva M

    2012-01-01

    It is now generally accepted that long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are due to the collapse of massive rotating stars. The precise collapse process itself, however, is not yet fully understood. Strong winds, outbursts, and intense ionizing UV radiation from single stars or strongly interacting binaries are expected to destroy the molecular cloud cores that give birth to them and create highly complex circumburst environments for the explosion. Such environments might imprint features on GRB light curves that uniquely identify the nature of the progenitor and its collapse. We have performed numerical simulations of realistic environments for a variety of long-duration GRB progenitors with ZEUS-MP and have developed an analytical method for calculating detailed GRB light curves in these profiles. We find that, in the context of the standard afterglow model, massive shells around GRBs produce strong signatures in their light curves, and that this clearly distinguishes them from those occurring in uniform med...

  10. The metallicity and dust content of a redshift 5 gamma-ray burst host galaxy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, M.; Hartoog, O. E.; Krühler, T.

    2014-01-01

    Observations of the afterglows of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) allow the study of star-forming galaxies across most of cosmic history. Here we present observations of GRB 111008A from which we can measure metallicity, chemical abundance patterns, dust-to-metals ratio and extinction of the GRB host...... galaxy at z=5.0. The host absorption system is a damped Lyman-alpha absorber (DLA) with a very large neutral hydrogen column density of log N(HI)/cm^(-2) = 22.30 +/- 0.06, and a metallicity of [S/H]= -1.70 +/- 0.10. It is the highest redshift GRB with such a precise metallicity measurement. The presence...

  11. Optimal Coaddition of Imaging Data for Rapidly Fading Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglows

    CERN Document Server

    Morgan, A N; Roming, P W A; Nousek, J A; Koch, T S; Breeveld, A A; de Pasquale, M; Holland, S T; Kuin, N P M; Page, M J; Still, M

    2008-01-01

    We present a technique for optimal coaddition of image data for rapidly varying sources, with specific application to gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Unweighted coaddition of rapidly fading afterglow lightcurve data becomes counterproductive relatively quickly. It is better to stop coaddition of the data once noise dominates late exposures. A better alternative is to optimally weight each exposure to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the final coadded image data. By using information about GRB lightcurves and image noise characteristics, optimal image coaddition increases the probability of afterglow detection and places the most stringent upper limits on non-detections. For a temporal power law flux decay typical of GRB afterglows, optimal coaddition has the greatest potential to improve the S/N of afterglow imaging data (relative to unweighted coaddition), when the decay rate is high, the source count rate is low, and the background rate is high. The optimal coaddition technique is demonstrated ...

  12. The bright optical flash from GRB 060117

    CERN Document Server

    Jel'inek, M; Kubánek, P; Hudec, R; Nekola, M; Grygar, J; Castro-Tirado, A J; Gorosabel, J; Hrabovsk'y, M; Mandat, D; Nosek, D; Palatka, M; Pandey, S B; Pech, M; Schovanek, P; De Postigo, A U; Vítek, S; Jel\\'inek, Martin; Prouza, Michael; Kub\\'anek, Petr; Hudec, Ren\\'e; Nekola, Martin; R}\\'idk\\'y, Jan {; Grygar, Ji{r}\\'i; Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Gorosabel, Javier; Hrabovsk\\'y, Miroslav; Mand\\'at, Du{s}an; Nosek, Dalibor; Palatka, Miroslav; Pandey, Shashi B.; Pech, Miroslav; Schov\\'anek, Petr; S}m\\'ida, Radom\\'ir {; Postigo, Antonio de Ugarte; V\\'itek, Stanislav

    2006-01-01

    We present a discovery and observation of an extraordinarily bright prompt optical emission of the GRB 060117 obtained by a wide-field camera atop the robotic telescope FRAM of the Pierre Auger Observatory from 2 to 10 minutes after the GRB. We found rapid average temporal flux decay of alpha = -1.7 +- 0.1 and a peak brightness R = 10.1 mag. Later observations by other instruments set a strong limit on the optical and radio transient fluxes, unveiling an unexpectedly rapid further decay. We present an interpretation featuring a relatively steep electron-distribution parameter p ~ 3.0 and providing a straightforward solution for the overall fast decay of this optical transient as a transition between reverse and forward shock.

  13. The Second SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Baumgartner, W. H.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.; Ukwatta, T. N.; Zhang, B.

    2012-01-01

    We present the second Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) catalog of gamma-ray bursts. (GRBs), which contains 476 bursts detected by the BAT between 2004 December 19 and 2009 December 21. This catalog (hereafter the BAT2 catalog) presents burst trigger time, location, 90% error radius, duration, fluence, peak flux, time-averaged spectral parameters and time-resolved spectral parameters measured by the BAT. In the correlation study of various observed parameters extracted from the BAT prompt emission data, we distinguish among long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs), short-duration GRBs (S-GRBs), and short-duration GRBs with extended emission (S-GRBs with E.E.) to investigate differences in the prompt emission properties. The fraction of L-GRBs, S-GRBs and S-GRBs with E.E. in the catalog are 89%, 8% and 2% respectively. We compare the BAT prompt emission properties with the BATSE, BeppoSAX and HETE-2 GRB samples.. We also correlate the observed prompt emission properties with the redshifts for the GRBs with known redshift. The BAT T(sub 90) and T(sub 50) durations peak at 70 s and 30 s, respectively. We confirm that the spectra of the BAT S-GRBs are generally harder than those of the L-GRBs.

  14. RADIO FLARES FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopač, D.; Mundell, C. G.; Kobayashi, S.; Virgili, F. J. [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Harrison, R. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Japelj, J.; Gomboc, A. [Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Guidorzi, C. [Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, University of Ferrara, Via Saragat, 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Melandri, A., E-mail: D.Kopac@ljmu.ac.uk [INAF/Brera Astronomical Observatory, via Bianchi 46, I-23807, Merate (Italy)

    2015-06-20

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks (RSs) in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy, and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parameterization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. and Melandri et al. in which the typical frequency of the RS was suggested to lie at radio rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct RS radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1–1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later optical peaks, high isotropic energies, lower circumburst medium densities, and at observing frequencies that are less prone to synchrotron self-absorption effects—typically above a few GHz. Given recent detections of polarized prompt gamma-ray and optical RS emission, we suggest that detection of polarized radio/millimeter emission will unambiguously confirm the presence of low-frequency RSs at early time.

  15. Radio flares from gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kopac, D; Kobayashi, S; Virgili, F J; Harrison, R; Japelj, J; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A

    2015-01-01

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parametrization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. (2007) and Melandri et al. (2010) in which the typical frequency of the reverse shock was suggested to lie at radio, rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct reverse-shock radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1 -- 1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later opt...

  16. Constraining the energy budget of GRB 080721

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Starling, R.L.C.; Rol, E.; van der Horst, A.J.; Yoon, S.C.; Pal'shin, V.; Ledoux, C.; Page, K.L.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Wiersema, K.; Tanvir, N.R.; Jakobsson, P.; Guidorzi, C.; Curran, P.A.; Levan, A.J.; O'Brien, P.T.; Osborne, J.P.; Svinkin, D.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Oosting, T.; Howarth, I.D.

    2009-01-01

    We follow the bright, highly energetic afterglow of Swift-discovered GRB 080721 at z = 2.591 out to 36 d or 3 x 10(6) s since the trigger in the optical and X-ray bands. We do not detect a break in the late-time light curve inferring a limit on the opening angle of theta(j) >= 7 degrees.3 and settin

  17. SYNCHROTRON ORIGIN OF THE TYPICAL GRB BAND FUNCTION—A CASE STUDY OF GRB 130606B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Briggs, Michael S. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Connaughton, Valerie, E-mail: binbin.zhang@uah.edu [Science and Technology Institute, Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2016-01-10

    We perform a time-resolved spectral analysis of GRB 130606B within the framework of a fast-cooling synchrotron radiation model with magnetic field strength in the emission region decaying with time, as proposed by Uhm and Zhang. The data from all time intervals can be successfully fit by the model. The same data can be equally well fit by the empirical Band function with typical parameter values. Our results, which involve only minimal physical assumptions, offer one natural solution to the origin of the observed GRB spectra and imply that, at least some, if not all, Band-like GRB spectra with typical Band parameter values can indeed be explained by synchrotron radiation.

  18. Energy Injections in Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Y. B.; Wu, X. F.; Huang, Y. F.; Xu, M.

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we will introduce some special events, such as GRBs 081029, 100814A and 111209A. Unexpected features, such as multiple X-ray flares and significant optical rebrightenings, are observed in their afterglow light curves, unveiling the late-time activities of the central engines. Here, we will summarize our previous numerical results of these three bursts by using the energy injection model. Especially, we will focus on GRB 100814A, with an early-time shallow decay phase and a late-time significant rebrightening in its optical afterglow light curve. To explain the complex multi-band afterglow emission of GRB 100814A, we invoke a magnetar with spin evolution as its central engine. We argue that the optical shallow decay phase and the X-ray plateau are due to energy injection from t he magnetar in its early spin-down stage, while the significant optical rebrightening observed at late time naturally comes from the spin-up process of the magnetar, which is caused by subsequent fall back accretion.

  19. The SVOM gamma-ray burst mission

    CERN Document Server

    Cordier, B; Atteia, J -L; Basa, S; Claret, A; Daigne, F; Deng, J; Dong, Y; Godet, O; Goldwurm, A; Götz, D; Han, X; Klotz, A; Lachaud, C; Osborne, J; Qiu, Y; Schanne, S; Wu, B; Wang, J; Wu, C; Xin, L; Zhang, B; Zhang, S -N

    2015-01-01

    We briefly present the science capabilities, the instruments, the operations, and the expected performance of the SVOM mission. SVOM (Space-based multiband astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) is a Chinese-French space mission dedicated to the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the next decade. The SVOM mission encompasses a satellite carrying four instruments to detect and localize the prompt GRB emission and measure the evolution of the afterglow in the visible band and in X-rays, a VHF communication system enabling the fast transmission of SVOM alerts to the ground, and a ground segment including a wide angle camera and two follow-up telescopes. The pointing strategy of the satellite has been optimized to favor the detection of GRBs located in the night hemisphere. This strategy enables the study of the optical emission in the first minutes after the GRB with robotic observatories and the early spectroscopy of the optical afterglow with large telescopes to measure the redshifts. The study of GRBs in the...

  20. The Nature of Gamma Ray Burst Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Cano, Zach

    2012-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and Supernovae (SNe) are among the brightest and most energetic physical processes in the universe. It is known that core-collapse SNe arise from the gravitational collapse and subsequent explosion of massive stars (the progen- itors of nearby core-collapse SNe have been imaged and unambiguously identified). It is also believed that the progenitors of long-duration GRBs (L-GRBs) are massive stars, mainly due to the occurrence and detection of very energetic core-collapse su- pernovae that happen both temporally and spatially coincident with most L-GRBs. However many outstanding questions regarding the nature of these events exist: How massive are the progenitors? What evolutionary stage are they at when they explode? Do they exist as single stars or in binary systems (or both, and to what fractions)? The work presented in this thesis attempts to further our understanding at the types of progenitors that give rise to long-duration GRB supernovae (GRB-SNe). This work is based on optical ...

  1. Blueshifting may explain the gamma ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Krasiński, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that the basic observed properties of the gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are accounted for if one assumes that the GRBs arise by blueshifting the emission radiation of hydrogen and helium generated during the last scattering epoch. The blueshift generator for a single GRB is a Lema\\^{\\i}tre -- Tolman (L--T) region with a nonconstant bang-time function $t_B(r)$ matched into a Friedmann background. Blueshift visible to the observer arises \\textit{only on radial rays} that are emitted in the L--T region. The paper presents three L--T models with different Big Bang profiles, adapted for the highest and the lowest end of the GRB frequency range. The models account for: (1) The observed frequency range of the GRBs; (2) Their limited duration; (3) The afterglows; (4) Their hypothetical collimation into narrow jets; (5) The large distances to their sources; (6) The multitude of the observed GRBs. Properties (2), (3) and (6) are accounted for only qualitatively. With a small correction of the parameters of the mo...

  2. Gamma-Ray Bursts Above 1 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Baring, M G

    1997-01-01

    One of the principal results obtained by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory relating to the study of gamma-ray bursts was the detection by the EGRET instrument of energetic ($>$100 MeV) photons from a handful of bright bursts. The most extreme of these was the single 18 GeV photon from the GRB940217 source. Given EGRET's sensitivity and limited field of view, the detection rate implies that such high energy emission may be ubiquitous in bursts. Hence expectations that bursts emit out to at least TeV energies are quite realistic, and the associated target-of-opportunity activity of the TeV gamma-ray community is well-founded. This review summarizes the observations and a handful of theoretical models for generating GeV--TeV emission in bursts sources, outlining possible ways that future positive detections could discriminate between different scenarios. The power of observations in the GeV--TeV range to distinguish between spectral structure intrinsic to bursts and that due to the intervening medium between sou...

  3. TORTORA discovery of Naked-Eye Burst fast optical variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, Grigory; Karpov, Sergey; Bondar, Sergey; Greco, Giuseppe; Guarnieri, Adriano; Bartolini, Corrado; Piccioni, Adalberto; Molinari, Emilio; Chincarini, Guido

    2008-10-01

    Features characterizing gamma-ray bursts in the different spectral bands may be a clue for the nature of their inner engine. Up to now, only several bursts have been observed in optical band during the gamma activity, and the only one-GRB080319B-was covered from rise till fall with high temporal resolution. Here we discuss these data, acquired with TORTORA fast wide-field monitoring optical camera, as well as results of its analysis. The camera observed the position of Naked-Eye Burst, GRB080318B, before, during and after the trigger. It detected the fast rise of optical emission, which reached the peak of V 5.3 at the eighteenth second, had a complex evolution till T+43s and monotonously faded then. The brightest part of the light curve contains two 15-20 s segments with different fluxes, each having two clearly-seen peaks of 5-8 s duration; all four peaks look quasi-periodic with separation of 9 s. There is no clear evidence of any sub-second variability. However, there are signs of quasi-periodic variability on 1s time scale at around the last peak (T+40 till T+50). The general properties of the optical light curve and its variability time scales look similar to the gamma one, but there is no clear correlation between them. This raises serious problems in interpretation of mechanisms generating such variability.

  4. VERITAS Observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts Detected by Swift

    CERN Document Server

    Acciari, V A; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Christiansen, J L; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Duke, C; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Guenette, R; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Hughes, G; Hui, C M; Humensky, T B; Jackson, D J; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Madhavan, A S; Maier, G; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Moriarty, P; Newbold, M D; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Şentürk, G D; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Swordy, S P; Tešić, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Varlotta, A; Vassiliev, V V; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Williams, D A; Wood, M

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of sixteen Swift-triggered GRB follow-up observations taken with the VERITAS telescope array from January, 2007 to June, 2009. The median energy threshold and response time of these observations was 260 GeV and 320 s, respectively. Observations had an average duration of 90 minutes. Each burst is analyzed independently in two modes: over the whole duration of the observations and again over a shorter time scale determined by the maximum VERITAS sensitivity to a burst with a t^-1.5 time profile. This temporal model is characteristic of GRB afterglows with high-energy, long-lived emission that have been detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi satellite. No significant VHE gamma-ray emission was detected and upper limits above the VERITAS threshold energy are calculated. The VERITAS upper limits are corrected for gamma-ray extinction by the extragalactic background light (EBL) and interpreted in the context of the keV emission detected by Swift. For some bursts the VH...

  5. Gamma ray bursts and their afterglows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicuesa Guelbenzu, A.

    2017-03-01

    Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) were among the greatest mysteries in modern astrophysics. They were first observed 50 years ago but it took three decades before optical counterparts could be found and the underlying physical phenomena studied in detail. GRB research represents currently one of the most rapidly growing areas in extragalactic astronomy. This is due in large part to the numerous connections that GRBs have with other disciplines like cosmology, supernovae, stellar evolution, nuclear physics, astroparticle and gravitational wave astronomy. Therefore, their study is of great importance to understand various astrophysical phenomena such as the formation of the first stars, the chemical evolution and the expansion of the Universe. Since gamma radiation can travel along cosmological distances without being affected by any possible intervening absorption, GRBs can be detected from the most distant universe, reaching redshifts up to z = 10 or more.

  6. Search for gravitational-wave bursts associated with gamma-ray bursts using data from LIGO Science Run 5 and Virgo Science Run 1

    CERN Document Server

    Abbott, B P; Acernese, F; Adhikari, R; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allen, G; Alshourbagy, M; Amin, R S; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Antonucci, F; Aoudia, S; Arain, M A; Araya, M; Armandula, H; Armor, P; Arun, K G; Aso, Y; Aston, S; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Barker, C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barriga, P; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Bauer, Th S; Behnke, B; Beker, M; Benacquista, M; Betzwieser, J; Beyersdorf, P T; Bigotta, S; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birindelli, S; Biswas, R; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Boccara, C; Bodiya, T P; Bogue, L; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Brau, J E; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Broeck, C Van Den; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brummit, A; Brunet, G; Budzyński, R; Bulik, T; Bullington, A; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burmeister, O; Buskulic, D; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campagna, E; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Carbognani, F; Cardenas, L; Caride, S; Castaldi, G; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chalermsongsak, T; Chalkley, E; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chatterji, S; Chelkowski, S; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Christensen, N; Chung, C T Y; Clark, D; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cokelaer, T; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R C; Corda, C; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Coulon, J -P; Coward, D; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Culter, R M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dari, A; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Davier, M; Davies, G; Daw, E J; Day, R; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Degallaix, J; del Prete, M; Dergachev, V; Desai, S; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Díaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doomes, E E; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Dueck, J; Duke, I; Dumas, J -C; Dwyer, J G; Echols, C; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Espinoza, E; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Faltas, Y; Fan, Y; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Flaminio, R; Flasch, K; Foley, S; Forrest, C; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Franzen, A; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fyffe, M; Galdi, V; Gammaitoni, L; Garofoli, J A; Garufi, F; Gemme, G; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gholami, I; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Goda, K; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; González, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Goeßzetler, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Granata, M; Granata, V; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, M; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grimaldi, F; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grünewald, S; Günther, M; Guidi, G; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hage, B; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G D; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Heefner, J; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hirose, E; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Hoyland, D; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Huttner, S H; Ingram, D R; Isogai, T; Ito, M; Ivanov, A; Jaranowski, P; Johnson, B; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; de la Jordana, L Sancho; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kanner, J; Kasprzyk, D; Katsavounidis, E; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Ya; Khan, R; Khazanov, E; King, P; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Kopparapu, R; Koranda, S; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; La Penna, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lazzarini, A; Lei, H; Lei, M; Leindecker, N; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, C; Lin, H; Lindquist, P E; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lodhia, D; Longo, M; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lu, P; Lubinski, M; Lucianetti, A; Lück, H; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Mackowski, J -M; Mageswaran, M; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Markowitz, J; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Matzner, R A; Mavalvala, N; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McHugh, M; McIntyre, G; McKechan, D J A; McKenzie, K; Mehmet, M; Melatos, A; Melissinos, A C; Mendell, G; Menéndez, D F; Menzinger, F; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Michel, C; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minelli, J; Minenkov, Y; Mino, Y; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Miyakawa, O; Moe, B; Mohan, M; Mohanty, S D; Mohapatra, S R P; Moreau, J; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morgia, A; Morioka, T; Mors, K; Mosca, S; Moscatelli, V; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; MowLowry, C; Müller, G; Muhammad, D; Mühlen, H zur; Mukherjee, S; Mukhopadhyay, H; Mullavey, A; Müller-Ebhardt, H; Munch, J; Murray, P G; Myers, E; Myers, J; Nash, T; Nelson, J; Neri, I; Newton, G; Nishizawa, A; Nocera, F; Numata, K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Ogin, G H; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pagliaroli, G; Palomba, C; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Parameshwaraiah, V; Pardi, S; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patel, P; Pedraza, M; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Persichetti, G; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pietka, M; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Pletsch, H J; Plissi, M V; Poggiani, R; Postiglione, F; Prato, M; Principe, M; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Punken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Quetschke, V; Raab, F J; Rabaste, O; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raics, Z; Rainer, N; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Re, V; Reed, C M; Reed, T; Regimbau, T; Rehbein, H; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Ricci, F; Riesen, R; Riles, K; Rivera, B; Roberts, P; Robertson, N A; Robinet, F; Robinson, C; Robinson, E L; Rocchi, A; Roddy, S; Rolland, L; Rollins, J; Romano, J D; Romano, R; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Röver, C; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Russell, P; Ryan, K; Sakata, S; Salemi, F; Sandberg, V; Sannibale, V; Santamaría, L; Saraf, S; Sarin, P; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Sato, S; Satterthwaite, M; Saulson, P R; Savage, R; Savov, P; Scanlan, M; Schilling, R; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R; Schulz, B; Schutz, B F; Schwinberg, P; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Searle, A C; Sears, B; Seifert, F; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sergeev, A; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Shoemaker, D H; Sibley, A; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Sinha, S; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Slutsky, J; Van der Sluys, M V; Smith, J R; Smith, M R; Smith, N D; Somiya, K; Sorazu, B; Stein, A; Stein, L C; Steplewski, S; Stochino, A; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Strigin, S; Stroeer, A; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, K -X; Sung, M; Sutton, Patrick J; Swinkels, B; Szokoly, G P; Talukder, D; Tang, L; Tanner, D B; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, J R; Taylor, R; Terenzi, R; Thacker, J; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thüring, A; Tokmakov, K V; Toncelli, A; Tonelli, M; Torres, C; Torrie, C; Tournefier, E; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trias, M; Trummer, J; Ugolini, D; Ulmen, J; Urbanek, K; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Vallisneri, M; Brand, J F J van den; van der Putten, S; Vass, S; Vaulin, R; Vavoulidis, M; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; van Veggel, A A; Veitch, J; Veitch, P; Veltkamp, C; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Villar, A; Vinet, J -Y; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vyachanin, S P; Waldman, S J; Wallace, L; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weidner, A; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Wen, L; Wen, S; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; Whitcomb, S E; Whiting, B F; Wilkinson, C; Willems, P A; Williams, H R; Williams, L; Willke, B; Wilmut, I; Winkelmann, L; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Woan, G; Wooley, R; Worden, J; Wu, W; Yakushin, I; Yamamoto, H; Yan, Z; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zanolin, M; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zotov, N; Zucker, M E; Zweizig, J

    2009-01-01

    We present the results of a search for gravitational-wave bursts associated with 137 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) that were detected by satellite-based gamma-ray experiments during the fifth LIGO science run and first Virgo science run. The data used in this analysis were collected from 2005 November 4 to 2007 October 1, and most of the GRB triggers were from the Swift satellite. The search uses a coherent network analysis method that takes into account the different locations and orientations of the interferometers at the three LIGO-Virgo sites. We find no evidence for gravitational-wave burst signals associated with this sample of GRBs. Using simulated short-duration (<1 s) waveforms, we set upper limits on the amplitude of gravitational waves associated with each GRB. We also place lower bounds on the distance to each GRB under the assumption of a fixed energy emission in gravitational waves, with typical limits of D ~ 15 Mpc (E_GW^iso / 0.01 M_o c^2)^1/2 for emission at frequencies around 150 Hz, where the ...

  7. Evolutions and Calibrations of Long Gamma-Ray-burst Luminosity Correlations Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guo-Jian; Yu, Hai; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Xia, Jun-Qing; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2017-02-01

    Luminosity correlations of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are extensively proposed as an effective complementarity to trace the Hubble diagram of the universe at high redshifts, which is of great importance to explore properties of dark energy. Recently, several empirical luminosity correlations have been statistically proposed from GRB observations. However, to treat a GRB as the distance indicator, there are two key issues: the redshift evolution of luminosity correlations and their calibrations. In this paper, we choose the Amati relation, the correlation between the peak spectra energy and the equivalent isotropic energy of GRBs ({E}{{p}}{--}{E}{iso}) as an example and find that the current GRB data set implies that there could be a evolution of the luminosity correlation with respect to the redshift. Therefore, we propose an extended Amati relation with two extra redshift-dependent terms to correct the redshift evolution of the GRB relation. Second, we carefully check the reliability of the calibration method using the low-redshift GRB data. Importantly, we find that the low-redshift calibration method does not take whole correlations between {{{Ω }}}{{m}} and coefficients into account. Neglecting this correlation information can break the degeneracies and obtain the biased constraint on {{{Ω }}}{{m}}, which is very sensitive to values of parameters for the calibration. A small shift in the parameters of the “calibrated” relation could significantly change the final constraint on {{{Ω }}}{{m}} in the low-redshift calibration method. Finally, we simulate several GRB samples with different statistical errors and find that, in order to correctly recover the fiducial value of {{{Ω }}}{{m}}, using the low-redshift calibration method, we need a large number of GRB samples with high precisions.

  8. The Observer's Guide to the Gamma-Ray Burst-Supernova Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano, Z.; Wang, S.-Q.; Dai, Z.-G.; Wu, X.-F.

    2016-10-01

    In this review we present a progress report of the connection between long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and their accompanying supernovae (SNe). The analysis is from the point of view of an observer, with much of the emphasis placed on how observations, and the modelling of observations, have constrained what we known about GRB-SNe. We discuss their photometric and spectroscopic properties, their role as cosmological probes, including their measured luminosity-decline relationships, and how they can be used to measure the Hubble constant. We present a statistical analysis of their bolometric properties, and use this to determine the properties of the "average" GRB-SNe: which has a kinetic energy of EK≈2.5×10^52 erg, an ejecta mass of Mej≈6 M⊙, a nickel mass of MNi≈0.4 M⊙, a peak photospheric velocity of vph≈21,000 km s-1, a peak bolometric luminosity of Lp≈1×10^43 erg s-1, and it reaches peak bolometric light in tp≈13 days. We discuss their geometry, consider the various physical processes that are thought to power the luminosity of GRB-SNe, and whether differences exist between GRB-SNe and the SNe associated with ultra-long duration GRBs. We discuss how observations of the environments of GRB-SNe further constrain the physical properties of their progenitor stars, and give an overview of the current theoretical paradigms of their suspected central engines. We also present an overview of the radioactively powered transients that have been photometrically associated with short-duration GRBs. We conclude the review by discussing what additional research is needed to further our understanding of GRB-SNe, in particular the role of binary-formation channels and the connection of GRB-SNe with superluminous SNe (abridged).

  9. THE ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURST 111209A: THE COLLAPSE OF A BLUE SUPERGIANT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gendre, B.; Cutini, S.; D' Elia, V. [ASI Science Data Center, via Galileo Galilei, I-00044 Frascati (Italy); Stratta, G. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, OAR-INAF, via Frascati 33, I-00040, Monte Porzio Catone (Italy); Atteia, J. L.; Klotz, A. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, Toulouse (France); Basa, S. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille) UMR 7326, F-13388, Marseille (France); Boeer, M. [CNRS, ARTEMIS, UMR 7250, Boulevard de l' Observatoire, BP 4229, F-06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Coward, D. M.; Howell, E. J [University of Western Australia, School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Piro, L., E-mail: bruce.gendre@gmail.com [Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali di Roma, INAF, via fosso del cavaliere 100, I-00133 Roma (Italy)

    2013-03-20

    We present optical, X-ray and gamma-ray observations of GRB 111209A, observed at a redshift of z = 0.677. We show that this event was active in its prompt phase for about 25000 s, making it the longest burst ever observed. This rare event could have been detected up to z {approx} 1.4 in gamma-rays. Compared to other long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), GRB 111209A is a clear outlier in the energy-fluence and duration plane. The high-energy prompt emission shows no sign of a strong blackbody component, the signature of a tidal disruption event, or a supernova shock breakout. Given the extreme longevity of this event, and lack of any significant observed supernova signature, we propose that GRB 111209A resulted from the core-collapse of a low-metallicity blue supergiant star. This scenario is favored because of the necessity to supply enough mass to the central engine over a duration of thousands of seconds. Hence, we suggest that GRB 111209A could have more in common with population III stellar explosions, rather than those associated with normal long GRBs.

  10. The 3rd Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Six Years

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, P Narayana; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S; Briggs, Michael S; Burgess, J Michael; Burns, Eric; Chaplin, Vandiver; Cleveland, William H; Collazzi, Andrew C; Connaughto, Valerie; Diekmann, Anne M; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Gibby, Melissa H; Giles, Misty M; Goldstein, Adam M; Greiner, Jochen; Jenke, Peter A; Kippen, R Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Mailyan, Bagrat; McBreen, Sheila; Pelassa, Veronique; Preece, Robert D; Roberts, Oliver J; Sparke, Linda S; Stanbro, Matthew; Veres, Peter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Xiong, Shaolin; Younes, George; Yu, Hoi-Fung; Zhang, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Since its launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has triggered and located on average approximately two gamma-ray bursts (GRB) every three days. Here we present the third of a series of catalogs of GRBs detected by GBM, extending the second catalog by two more years, through the middle of July 2014. The resulting list includes 1405 triggers identified as GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected GRBs. For each GRB the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux and fluence are derived. The latter two quantities are calculated for the 50-300~keV energy band, where the maximum energy release of GRBs in the instrument reference system is observed, and also for a broader energy band from 10-1000 keV, exploiting the full energy range of GBM's low-energy NaI(Tl) detectors. Using statistical methods to assess clustering, we find that the hardness and duration of GRB...

  11. Polarization of gamma-ray bursts in the dissipative photosphere model

    CERN Document Server

    Lundman, Christoffer; Beloborodov, Andrei M

    2016-01-01

    The MeV spectral peak of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is best explained as photospheric emission from a dissipative relativistic jet. The observed non-blackbody spectrum shows that sub-photospheric dissipation involves both thermal plasma heating and injection of nonthermal particles, which quickly cool through inverse Compton scattering and emission of synchrotron radiation. Synchrotron photons emitted around and above the photosphere are predicted to dominate the low-energy part of the GRB spectrum, starting from roughly a decade in energy below the MeV peak. We show that this leads to a unique polarization signature: a rise in GRB polarization toward lower energies. We compute the polarization degree of GRB radiation as a function of photon energy for a generic jet model, and show the predictions for GRBs 990123, 090902B and 110721A. The expected polarization is significant in the X-ray band, in particular for bursts similar to GRB 090902B. Radiation in the MeV peak (and at higher energies) is unpolarized as lo...

  12. Detection of three Gamma-Ray Burst host galaxies at $z\\sim6$

    CERN Document Server

    McGuire, J T W; Levan, A J; Trenti, M; Stanway, E R; Shull, J M; Wiersema, K; Perley, D A; Starling, R L C; Bremer, M; Stocke, J T; Hjorth, J; Rhoads, J E; Levesque, E M; Robertson, B; Fynbo, J P U; Ellis, R S; Fruchter, A S; Perna, R

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts allow us to pinpoint and study star-forming galaxies in the early universe, thanks to their immense luminosities and association with deaths of massive stars. We present {\\em Hubble Space Telescope} Wide Field Camera 3 detections of three {\\em Swift} GRBs lying at redshifts $z = 5.913$ (GRB 130606A), $z = 6.295$ (GRB 050904), and $z = 6.327$ (GRB 140515A) in the F140W (wide-$JH$ band, $\\lambda_{\\rm{obs}}\\sim1.4\\,\\mu m$) filter. The hosts have magnitudes (corrected for Galactic extinction) of $m_{\\rm{\\lambda_{obs},AB}}= 26.26^{+0.12}_{-0.14}, 27.63^{+0.16}_{-0.18},$ and $28.23^{+0.24}_{-0.30}$ respectively. In all three cases the probability of chance coincidence of lower redshift galaxies is $\\lesssim1.5\\%$, indicating that the detected galaxies are most likely the GRB hosts. These are the first detections of high redshift ($z > 5$) GRB host galaxies in emission. The galaxies have luminosities in the range $0.1-0.7\\,L^{*}_{z=6}$ (with $M_{1600}^{*}=-20.95\\pm0.12$), along with half-light radii...

  13. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite mission for gamma-ray burst multi-wavelength observations

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, S; Barret, D; Basa, S; Boër, M; Casse, F; Cordier, B; Daigne, F; Klotz, A; Limousin, O; Manchanda, R; Mandrou, P; Mereghetti, S; Mochkovitch, R; Paltani, S; Paul, J; Petitjean, P; Pons, R; Ricker, G; Skinner, G K

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRB), at least those with a duration longer than a few seconds are the most energetic events in the Universe and occur at cosmological distances. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite, to be launched in 2009, will provide multi-wavelength observations of GRB, to study their astrophysics and to use them as cosmological probes. Furthermore in 2009 ECLAIRs is expected to be the only space borne instrument capable of providing a GRB trigger in near real-time with sufficient localization accuracy for GRB follow-up observations with the powerful ground based spectroscopic telescopes available by then. A "Phase A study" of the ECLAIRs project has recently been launched by the French Space Agency CNES, aiming at a detailed mission design and selection for flight in 2006. The ECLAIRs mission is based on a CNES micro-satellite of the "Myriade" family and dedicated ground-based optical telescopes. The satellite payload combines a 2 sr field-of-view coded aperture mask gamma-camera using 6400 CdTe pixels for GRB ...

  14. Gamma Ray Burst and star formation rates: The physical origin for the redshift evolution of their ratio

    CERN Document Server

    Trenti, M; Tacchella, S

    2013-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) and galaxies at high redshift represent complementary probes of the star formation history of the Universe. In fact, both the GRB rate and the galaxy luminosity density are connected to the underlying star formation. Here, we combine a star formation model for the evolution of the galaxy luminosity function from z=0 to z=10 with a metallicity-dependent efficiency for GRB formation to simultaneously predict the comoving GRB rate. Our model sheds light on the physical origin of the empirical relation often assumed between GRB rate and luminosity density-derived star formation rate: Rgrb(z) = \\epsilon(z)*SFR_{obs}(z), with \\epsilon(z) (1+z)^{1.2}. At z0. Models with total suppression of GRB formation at log(Z/Zsun)>0 are disfavored. At z>4, most of the star formation happens in low-metallicity hosts with nearly saturated efficiency of GRB production per unit stellar mass. However at the same epoch, galaxy surveys miss an increasing fraction of the predicted luminosity density because of f...

  15. Imprints of Electron-positron Winds on the Multi-wavelength Afterglows of Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Geng, J J; Huang, Y F; Li, L; Dai, Z G

    2016-01-01

    Optical re-brightenings in the afterglows of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are unexpected within the framework of the simple external shock model. While it has been suggested that the central engines of some GRBs are newly born magnetars, we aim to relate the behaviors of magnetars to the optical re-brightenings. A newly born magnetar will lose its rotational energy in the form of Poynting-flux, which may be converted into a wind of electron-positron pairs through some magnetic dissipation processes. As proposed by Dai (2004), this wind will catch up with the GRB outflow and a long-lasting reverse shock would form. By applying this scenario to GRB afterglows, we find that the reverse shock propagating back into the electron-positron wind can lead to an observable optical re-brightening and a simultaneous X-ray plateau (or X-ray shallow decay). In our study, we select four GRBs, i.e., GRB 080413B, GRB 090426, GRB 091029, and GRB 100814A, of which the optical afterglows are well observed and show clear re-bright...

  16. The low-extinction afterglow in the solar-metallicity host galaxy of gamma-ray burst 110918A

    CERN Document Server

    Elliott, J; Greiner, J; Savaglio, S; E., F Olivares; Rau, A; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Sánchez-Ramírez, R; Wiersema, K; Schady, P; Kann, D A; Filgas, R; Nardini, M; Berger, E; Fox, D; Gorosabel, J; Klose, S; Levan, A; Guelbenzu, A Nicuesa; Rossi, A; Schmidl, S; Sudilovsky, V; Tanvir, N R; Thöne, C C

    2013-01-01

    Metallicity is theoretically thought to be a fundamental driver in gamma-ray burst (GRB) explosions and energetics, but is still, even after more than a decade of extensive studies, not fully understood. This is largely related to two phenomena: a dust-extinction bias, that prevented high-mass and thus likely high-metallicity GRB hosts to be detected in the first place, and a lack of efficient instrumentation, that limited spectroscopic studies including metallicity measurements to the low-redshift end of the GRB host population. The subject of this work is the very energetic GRB 110918A, for which we measure a redshift of z=0.984. GRB 110918A gave rise to a luminous afterglow with an intrinsic spectral slope of b=0.70, which probed a sight-line with little extinction (A_V=0.16 mag) typical of the established distributions of afterglow properties. Photometric and spectroscopic follow-up observations of the galaxy hosting GRB 110918A, including optical/NIR photometry with GROND and spectroscopy with VLT/X-shoo...

  17. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite for multi-wavelength studies of gamma-ray burst prompt emission

    CERN Document Server

    Schanne, S; Barret, D; Basa, S; Boër, M; Cordier, B; Daigne, F; Ealet, A; Goldoni, P; Klotz, A; Limousin, O; Mandrou, P; Mochkovitch, R; Paltani, S; Paul, J; Petitjean, P; Pons, R; Skinner, G K

    2004-01-01

    The cosmological revolution of 1997 has established that (at least long duration) gamma-ray bursts (GRB) are among the most energetic events in the Universe and occur at cosmological distances. The ECLAIRs micro-satellite, to be launched in 2009, will provide multi-wavelength observations for astrophysical studies of GRB and for their possible use as cosmological probes. It is expected to be the only space borne GRB trigger available for ground based robotic telescopes operational at that time. This paper presents the ECLAIRs project and its status. An X/gamma-ray camera onboard ECLAIRs with a wide field of view of 2 sr, will detect ~100 GRB/yr in the 4-50 keV energy range, localize the GRB with a precision of ~10 arcmin on the sky, and transmit this information to the ground in near real-time, as a GRB trigger for ground based optical telescopes. Inspired by the INTEGRAL imager IBIS, it is based on a CdTe detection plane covering 1000 cm^2, placed 35 cm below a coded mask. An optical camera, sensitive to mag...

  18. Polarization in Gamma-Ray Bursts Produced by Pinch Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei Wu; Li Chen; Ti-Pei Li

    2005-01-01

    Large-voltage, high-temperature plasma columns produced by pinch discharge can generate γ-ray flashes with energy spectra and spectral evolution consistent with what are observed in γ-ray bursts (GRBs), and the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) during the discharge process can produce high linear polarization. Our calculation indicates that the observed polarization depends on the angle between the line-of-sight to the GRB and the direction of the pinch discharge, but only weakly depends on observed γ-ray energy.

  19. Statistical Properties of Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jie-Min Chen; Jin Zhang; Lan-Wei Jia; En-Wei Liang

    2014-09-01

    A statistical analysis of gamma-ray burst host galaxies is presented and a clear metallicity-stellar mass relation is found in our sample. A trend that a more massive host galaxy tends to have a higher star-formation rate is also found. No correlation is found between V and H. GRB host galaxies at a higher redshift also tend to have a higher star formation rate, however, even in the same redshift, the star formation rate may vary for three orders of magnitude.

  20. Prompt, early, and afterglow optical observations of five gamma-ray bursts (GRBs 100901A, 100902A, 100905A, 100906A, and 101020A)

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbovskoy, E S; Lipunov, V M; Kornilov, V G; Belinski, A A; Shatskiy, N I; Tyurina, N V; Kuvshinov, D A; Balanutsa, P V; Chazov, V V; Kuznetsov, A; Zimnukhov, D S; Kornilov, M V; Sankovich, A V; Krylov, A; Ivanov, K I; Chvalaev, O; Poleschuk, V A; Konstantinov, E N; Gress, O A; Yazev, S A; Budnev, N M; Krushinski, V V; Zalozhnich, I S; Popov, A A; Tlatov, A G; Parhomenko, A V; Dormidontov, D V; Sennik, V; Yurkov, V V; Sergienko, Yu P; Varda, D; Kudelina, I P; Castro-Tirado, A J; Gorosabel, J; Sánchez--Ramírez, R; Jelinek, M; Tello, J C

    2011-01-01

    We present results of the prompt, early, and afterglow optical observations of five gamma-ray bursts, GRBs 100901A, 100902A, 100905A, 100906A, and 101020A, made with the Mobile Astronomical System of TElescope-Robots in Russia (MASTER-II net), the 1.5-m telescope of Sierra-Nevada Observatory, and the 2.56-m Nordic Optical Telescope. For two sources, GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A, we detected optical counterparts and obtained light curves starting before cessation of gamma-ray emission, at 113 s and 48 s after the trigger, respectively. Observations of GRB 100906A were conducted with two polarizing filters. Observations of the other three bursts gave the upper limits on the optical flux; their properties are briefly discussed. More detailed analysis of GRB 100901A and GRB 100906A supplemented by Swift data provides the following results and indicates different origins of the prompt optical radiation in the two bursts. The light curves patterns and spectral distributions suggest a common production site of the pr...