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Sample records for burst can monitors

  1. The Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Meegan, Charles; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Greiner, Jochen; Hoover, Andrew S; van der Horst, Alexander J; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, R Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McBreen, Sheila; Paciesas, W S; Preece, Robert; Steinle, Helmut; Wallace, Mark S; Wilson, Robert B; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2009-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) will significantly augment the science return from the Fermi Observatory in the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). The primary objective of GBM is to extend the energy range over which bursts are observed downward from the energy range of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on Fermi into the hard X-ray range where extensive previous data exist. A secondary objective is to compute burst locations on-board to allow re-orientiong the spacecraft so that the LAT can observe delayed emission from bright bursts. GBM uses an array of twelve sodium iodide scintillators and two bismuth germanate scintillators to detect gamma rays from ~8 keV to ~40 MeV over the full unocculted sky. The on-board trigger threshold is ~0.7 photons/cm2/s (50-300 keV, 1 s peak). GBM generates on-board triggers for ~250 GRBs per year.

  2. Multi-Index Monitoring and Evaluation on Rock Burst in Yangcheng Mine

    OpenAIRE

    Yunliang Tan; Yanchun Yin; Shitan Gu; Zhiwei Tian

    2015-01-01

    Based on the foreboding information monitoring of the energy released in the developing process of rock burst, prediction system for rock burst can be established. By using microseismic method, electromagnetic radiation method, and drilling bits method, rock burst in Yangcheng Mine was monitored, and a system of multi-index monitoring and evaluation on rock burst was established. Microseismic monitoring and electromagnetic radiation monitoring were early warning method, and drilling bits moni...

  3. Monitoring burst (M-burst) — A novel framework of failure localization in all-optical mesh networks

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Mohammed L.

    2011-10-10

    Achieving instantaneous and precise failure localization in all-optical wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks has been an attractive feature of network fault management systems, and is particularly important when failure-dependent protection is employed. The paper introduces a novel framework of real-time failure localization in all-optical WDM mesh networks, called monitoring-burst (m-burst), which aims to initiate a graceful compromise between consumed monitoring resources and monitoring delay. Different from any previously reported solution, the proposed m-burst framework has a single monitoring node (MN) which launches optical bursts along a set of pre-defined close-loop routes, called monitoring cycles (m-cycles), to probe the links along the m-cycles. Bursts along different m-cycles are kept non-overlapping through any link of the network. By identifying the lost bursts due to single link failure events only, the MN can unambiguously localize the failed link in at least 3-connected networks. We will justify the feasibility and applicability of the proposed m-burst framework in the scenario of interest. To avoid possible collision among optical bursts launched by the MN, we define the problem of collision-free scheduling and formulate it into an integer linear program (ILP) in order to minimize the monitoring delay. Numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework and the proposed solution.

  4. Earth Occultation Monitoring with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique (EOT). Each time a source in our catalog is occulted by (or exits occultation by) the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors for daily monitoring. Light curves, updated daily, are available on our website http://heastro.phys.lsu.edu/gbm. Our software is also capable of performing the Earth occultation monitoring using up to 128 energy bands, or any combination of those bands, using our 128-channel, 4-s CSPEC data. The GBM BGO detectors, sensitive from about 200 keV to 40 keV, can also be used with this technique. In our standard application of the EOT, we use a catalog of sources to drive the measurements. To ensure that our catalog is complete, our team has developed an Earth occultation imaging method. In this talk, I will describe both techniques and the current data products available. I will highlight recent and important results from the GBM EOT, including the current status of our observations of hard X-ray variations in the Crab Nebula.

  5. Fermi/GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR OBSERVATIONS OF SGR J0501+4516 BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGR J0501+4516, detected with the gamma-ray burst monitor on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during 13 days of the source's activation in 2008 (August 22- September 3). We find that the T90 durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T90 values estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of ∼124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two blackbody functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that Epeak decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of ∼30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10-6 erg cm-2 s-1, increasing steadily afterward. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550-5418 and 1806-20. The isotropic luminosity, Liso, corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4-1.5 x 1040 erg s-1).

  6. Detecting pipe bursts by monitoring water demand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Van der Roer, M.; Sperber, V.

    2012-01-01

    An algorithm which compares measured and predicted water demands to detect pipe bursts was developed and tested on three data sets of water demand and reported pipe bursts of three years. The algorithm proved to be able to detect bursts where the water loss exceeds 30% of the average water demand in

  7. Long X-ray burst monitoring with INTEGRAL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binary systems. In the frame of the INTEGRAL observational Key Programme over the Galactic Center a good number of the known X-ray bursters are frequently being monitored. An international....... Of special interest are low luminosity bursting sources that exhibit X-ray bursts of very different durations allowing to study the transition from a hydrogen-rich bursting regime to a pure helium regime and from helium burning to carbon burning. I will present results obtained from INTEGRAL archive...

  8. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thermonuclear bursts on the surface of accreting neutron stars in low mass X-ray binaries have been studied for many years and have in a few cases confirmed theoretical models of nuclear ignition and burning mechanisms. The large majority of X-ray bursts last less than 100s. A good number of the...... known X-ray bursters are frequently observed by INTEGRAL, in particular in the frame of the Key Programmes. Taking advantage of the INTEGRAL instrumentation, an international collaboration led by the JEM-X team at the Danish National Space Institute has been monitoring the occurrence of uncommon burst...... events lasting more than a few minutes. Of special interest are exceptional X-ray bursts which duration about a few tens of minutes is intermediate between usual short bursts and hour long superbursts. The processes driving such long bursts are not yet fully understood: depending on the composition of...

  9. Validation of the GLAST Burst Monitor Instrument Response Simulation Software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) comprises 12 NaI and 2 BGO detectors dispersed about the GLAST spacecraft. The GBM instrument simulation software must generate an accurate response function database for all detectors in their flight configuration to optimize the mission science return. Before science analysis codes use the response database, we must confirm that our simulation codes and models can reproduce laboratory observations. To validate the simulation effort, Monte Carlo results are compared to calibrated laboratory measurements collected with a variety of radiation sources

  10. INTEGRAL monitoring of unusually long X-ray bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Falanga, M.; Kuulkers, E.;

    2008-01-01

    exceptional burst events lasting more than ~10 minutes. Half of the dozen so-called intermediate long bursts registered so far have been observed by INTEGRAL. The goal is to derive a comprehensive picture of the relationship between the nuclear ignition processes and the accretion states of the system leading......X-ray bursts are thermonuclear explosions on the surface of accreting neutron stars in X-ray binaries. As most of the known X-ray bursters are frequently observed by INTEGRAL, an international collaboration have been taking advantage of its instrumentation to specifically monitor the occurrence of...

  11. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts Using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Gibby, M. H.; Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Jenke, P.; Kippen, R. M.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Yu, H.-F.; Bhat, P. N.; Burgess, J. M.; Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Giles, M. M.; Guiriec, S.; van der Horst, A. J.; von Kienlin, A.; McBreen, S.; McGlynn, S.; Tierney, D.; Zhang, B.-B.

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  12. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Burgess, J. M. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Goldstein, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP12, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Meegan, C. A.; Jenke, P.; Pelassa, V.; Xiong, S.; Bhat, P. N. [CSPAR, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL (United States); Preece, R. D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Gibby, M. H. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); Greiner, J.; Yu, H.-F. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Gruber, D. [Planetarium Südtirol, Gummer 5, I-39053 Karneid (Italy); Kippen, R. M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM 87545 (United States); Byrne, D.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S., E-mail: valerie@nasa.gov [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); and others

    2015-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis.

  13. Localization of Gamma-Ray Bursts using the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Connaughton, V; Goldstein, A; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Gibby, M H; Greiner, J; Gruber, D; Jenke, P; Kippen, R M; Pelassa, V; Xiong, S; Yu, H -F; Bhat, P N; Burgess, J M; Byrne, D; Fitzpatrick, G; Foley, S; Giles, M M; Guiriec, S; van der Horst, A J; von Kienlin, A; McBreen, S; McGlynn, S; Tierney, D; Zhang, B -B

    2014-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in July, 2008. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network (IPN), to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1 degree, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.7 degree Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14 degrees. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y-axis better l...

  14. LOCALIZATION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS USING THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 1400 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since it began science operations in 2008 July. We use a subset of over 300 GRBs localized by instruments such as Swift, the Fermi Large Area Telescope, INTEGRAL, and MAXI, or through triangulations from the InterPlanetary Network, to analyze the accuracy of GBM GRB localizations. We find that the reported statistical uncertainties on GBM localizations, which can be as small as 1°, underestimate the distance of the GBM positions to the true GRB locations and we attribute this to systematic uncertainties. The distribution of systematic uncertainties is well represented (68% confidence level) by a 3.°7 Gaussian with a non-Gaussian tail that contains about 10% of GBM-detected GRBs and extends to approximately 14°. A more complex model suggests that there is a dependence of the systematic uncertainty on the position of the GRB in spacecraft coordinates, with GRBs in the quadrants on the Y axis better localized than those on the X axis

  15. How Else Can We Detect Fast Radio Bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Lorimer, Duncan R.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss possible electromagnetic signals accompanying Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) that are expected in the scenario where FRBs originate in neutron star magnetospheres. For models involving Crab-like giant pulses, no appreciable contemporaneous emission is expected at other wavelengths. However, magnetar giant flares, driven by the reconfiguration of the magnetosphere, can produce both contemporaneous bursts at other wavelengths as well as afterglow-like emission. We conclude that the best chances are: (i) prompt short GRB-like emission, (ii) a contemporaneous optical flash that can reach naked eye peak luminosity (but only for a few milliseconds), and (iii) a high-energy afterglow emission. Case (i) could be tested by coordinated radio and high-energy experiments. Case (ii) could be seen in a coordinated radio-optical surveys, e.g., by the Palomar Transient Factory in a 60 s frame as a transient object of m = 15–20 mag with an expected optical detection rate of about 0.1 hr‑1, an order of magnitude higher than in radio. Shallow, but large-area sky surveys such as ASAS-SN and EVRYSCOPE could also detect prompt optical flashes from the more powerful Lorimer-burst clones. The best constraints on the optical to radio power for this kind of emission could be provided by future observations with facilities like Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. Case (iii) might be seen in relatively rare cases that the relativistically ejected magnetic blob is moving along the line of sight.

  16. THE FERMI-GBM X-RAY BURST MONITOR: THERMONUCLEAR BURSTS FROM 4U 0614+09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, M.; Chakrabarty, D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Preece, R. [CSPAR and Physics Department, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Jenke, P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, NL-1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S. [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Beklen, E. [Physics Department, Suleyman Demirel University, 32260 Isparta (Turkey); Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 {+-} 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  17. The Fermi-GBM X-Ray Burst Monitor: Thermonuclear Bursts from 4U 0614+09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Jenke, P.; van der Horst, A. J.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Chakrabarty, D.; Beklen, E.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, M. S.; Finger, M.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; von Kienlin, A.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the NS interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09 when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12 ± 3 days (68% confidence interval) between 2010 March and 2011 March, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 days (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bursters and briefly discuss the constraints on ignition models. Interestingly, we find that the burst energies in 4U 0614+09 are on average between those of normal duration bursts and those measured in long/intermediate bursts. Such a continuous distribution in burst energy provides a new observational link between normal and long/intermediate bursts. We suggest that the apparent bimodal distribution that defined normal and long/intermediate duration bursts during the last decade could be due to an observational bias toward detecting only the longest and most energetic bursts from slowly accreting NSs.

  18. How else can we detect Fast Radio Bursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Lyutikov, Maxim

    2016-01-01

    We discuss possible electromagnetic signals accompanying Fast Radio Bursts (FRBs) that are expected in the scenario where FRBs originate in neutron star magnetospheres. For models involving Crab-like giant pulses, no appreciable contemporaneous emission is expected at other wavelengths. Magnetar giant flares, driven by the reconfiguration of the magnetosphere, however, can produce both contemporaneous bursts at other wavelengths as well as afterglow-like emission. We conclude that the best chances are: (i) prompt short GRB-like emission; (ii) a contemporaneous optical flash that can reach naked eye peak luminosity (but only for a few milliseconds); (iii) a high energy afterglow emission. Case (i) could be tested by coordinated radio and high-energy experiments. Case (ii) could be seen by the Palomar Transient Factory in a 60-second frame as a transient object of $m=15-20$ magnitude with an expected optical detection rate of about 0.1~hr$^{-1}$, an order of magnitude higher than in radio. EVRYSCOPE could also ...

  19. The Fermi-GBM X-ray burst monitor: thermonuclear bursts from 4U 0614+09

    CERN Document Server

    Linares, M; Jenke, P; van der Horst, A J; Camero-Arranz, A; Kouveliotou, C; Chakrabarty, D; Beklen, E; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Finger, M; Paciesas, W; Preece, R; von Kienlin, A; Wilson-Hodge, C A

    2012-01-01

    Thermonuclear bursts from slowly accreting neutron stars (NSs) have proven difficult to detect, yet they are potential probes of the thermal properties of the neutron star interior. During the first year of a systematic all-sky search for X-ray bursts using the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope we have detected 15 thermonuclear bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary 4U 0614+09, when it was accreting at nearly 1% of the Eddington limit. We measured an average burst recurrence time of 12+/-3 d (68% confidence interval) between March 2010 and March 2011, classified all bursts as normal duration bursts and placed a lower limit on the recurrence time of long/intermediate bursts of 62 d (95% confidence level). We discuss how observations of thermonuclear bursts in the hard X-ray band compare to pointed soft X-ray observations, and quantify such bandpass effects on measurements of burst radiated energy and duration. We put our results for 4U 0614+09 in the context of other bu...

  20. Do the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and Swift Burst Alert Telescope see the Same Short Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Eric; Connaughton, Valerie; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Lien, Amy; Briggs, Michael S.; Goldstein, Adam; Pelassa, Veronique; Troja, Eleonora

    2016-02-01

    Compact binary system mergers are expected to generate gravitational radiation detectable by ground-based interferometers. A subset of these, the merger of a neutron star with another neutron star or a black hole, are also the most popular model for the production of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) trigger on short GRBs (SGRBs) at rates that reflect their relative sky exposures, with the BAT detecting 10 per year compared to about 45 for GBM. We examine the SGRB populations detected by Swift BAT and Fermi GBM. We find that the Swift BAT triggers on weaker SGRBs than Fermi GBM, providing they occur close to the center of the BAT field of view, and that the Fermi GBM SGRB detection threshold remains flatter across its field of view. Overall, these effects combine to give the instruments the same average sensitivity, and account for the SGRBs that trigger one instrument but not the other. We do not find any evidence that the BAT and GBM are detecting significantly different populations of SGRBs. Both instruments can detect untriggered SGRBs using ground searches seeded with time and position. The detection of SGRBs below the on-board triggering sensitivities of Swift BAT and Fermi GBM increases the possibility of detecting and localizing the electromagnetic counterparts of gravitational wave (GW) events seen by the new generation of GW detectors.

  1. SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor during Its Most Prolific Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderHorst, A. J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Gorgone, N. M.; Kaneko, Y.; Baring, M. G.; Guiriec, S.; Gogus, E,; Granot, J.; Watts, A. L.; Lin, L.; Bhat, P. N.; Bissaldi, E.; Chaplin, V. L.; Finger, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M.; Goldstein, A.; Gruber, D.; Harding, A. K.; McEnery, J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Wilson-Hodge, C.

    2012-01-01

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties.We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J15505418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E(sub peak) and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BBfits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature.We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  2. SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS DETECTED WITH THE FERMI GAMMA-RAY BURST MONITOR DURING ITS MOST PROLIFIC ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van der Horst, A. J.; Finger, M. H. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Gorgone, N. M. [Connecticut College, New London, CT 06320 (United States); Kaneko, Y.; Goegues, E.; Lin, L. [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Guiriec, S.; Bhat, P. N.; Chaplin, V. L.; Goldstein, A. [University of Alabama, Huntsville, CSPAR, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Granot, J. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Watts, A. L. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bissaldi, E.; Gruber, D. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gehrels, N.; Harding, A. K. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gibby, M. H.; Giles, M. M., E-mail: A.J.VanDerHorst@uva.nl [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States); and others

    2012-04-20

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in 2009 January, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles, and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law (PL) with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two blackbody (BB) functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model, we find a mean PL index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlation between the Comptonized E{sub peak} and the burst fluence and average flux. For the BB+BB fits, we find that the fluences and emission areas of the two BB functions are correlated. The low-temperature BB has an emission area comparable to the neutron star surface area, independent of the temperature, while the high-temperature BB has a much smaller area and shows an anti-correlation between emission area and temperature. We compare the properties of these bursts with bursts observed from other SGR sources during extreme activations, and discuss the implications of our results in the context of magnetar burst models.

  3. The CALET Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM)

    CERN Document Server

    Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Sakamoto, Takanori; Takahashi, Ichiro; Hara, Takumi; Yamamoto, Tatsuma; Kawakubo, Yuta; Inoue, Ry ota; Terazawa, Shunsuke; Fujioka, Rie; Senuma, Kazumasa; Nakahira, Satoshi; Tomida, Hiroshi; Ueno, Shiro; Torii, Shoji; Cherry, Michael L; Ricciarini, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The CALET Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (CGBM) is the secondary scientific instrument of the CALET mission on the International Space Station (ISS), which is scheduled for launch by H-IIB/HTV in 2014. The CGBM provides a broadband energy coverage from 7 keV to 20 MeV, and simultaneous observations with the primary instrument Calorimeter (CAL) in the GeV - TeV gamma-ray range and Advanced Star Camera (ASC) in the optical for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and other X-gamma-ray transients. The CGBM consists of two kinds of scintillators: two LaBr$_3$(Ce) (7 keV - 1 MeV) and one BGO (100 keV - 20 MeV) each read by a single photomultiplier. The LaBr$_3$(Ce) crystal, used in space for the first time here for celestial gamma-ray observations, enables GRB observations over a broad energy range from low energy X-ray emissions to gamma rays. The detector performance and structures have been verified using the bread-board model (BBM) via vibration and thermal vacuum tests. The CALET is currently in the development phase of the prot...

  4. FERMI/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor upper limits assuming a magnetar origin for the repeating Fast Radio Burst source, FRB 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, George; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Gogus, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Spitler et al. (2016, 10.1038/nature17168) reported a repeating Fast Radio Burst source, FRB 121102, with a rate of about 3 bursts/hr. We searched the FERMI/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) for possible gamma-ray counterparts for these events.

  5. SGR J1550-5418 bursts detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its most prolific activity

    CERN Document Server

    van der Horst, A J; Gorgone, N M; Kaneko, Y; Baring, M G; Guiriec, S; Gogus, E; Granot, J; Watts, A L; Lin, L; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Chaplin, V L; Connaughton, V; Finger, M H; Gehrels, N; Gibby, M H; Giles, M M; Goldstein, A; Gruber, D; Harding, A K; Kaper, L; von Kienlin, A; van der Klis, M; McBreen, S; Mcenery, J; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Pe'er, A; Preece, R D; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Rau, A; Wachter, S; Wilson-Hodge, C; Woods, P M; Wijers, R A M J

    2012-01-01

    We have performed detailed temporal and time-integrated spectral analysis of 286 bursts from SGR J1550-5418 detected with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) in January 2009, resulting in the largest uniform sample of temporal and spectral properties of SGR J1550-5418 bursts. We have used the combination of broadband and high time-resolution data provided with GBM to perform statistical studies for the source properties. We determine the durations, emission times, duty cycles and rise times for all bursts, and find that they are typical of SGR bursts. We explore various models in our spectral analysis, and conclude that the spectra of SGR J1550-5418 bursts in the 8-200 keV band are equally well described by optically thin thermal bremsstrahlung (OTTB), a power law with an exponential cutoff (Comptonized model), and two black-body functions (BB+BB). In the spectral fits with the Comptonized model we find a mean power-law index of -0.92, close to the OTTB index of -1. We show that there is an anti-correlati...

  6. What can NuSTAR do for X-ray bursts?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Tomsick, John; Chakrabarty, Deepto;

    2012-01-01

    Unstable thermonuclear burning on the surface of accreting neutron stars is commonly observed as type I X-ray bursts. The flux released during some strong bursts can temporarily exceed the Eddington limit, driving the neutron star photosphere to such large radii that heavy-element ashes of nuclear...

  7. What can NuSTAR do for X-ray bursts?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chenevez, Jérôme; Tomsick, J.; Chakrabarty, D.;

    Unstable thermonuclear burning on the surface of accreting neutron stars is commonly observed as type I X-ray bursts. The flux released during some strong bursts can temporarily exceed the Eddington limit, driving the neutron star photosphere to such large radii that heavy-element ashes of nuclear...

  8. The Fermi-GBM X-ray burst monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, M.; Fermi GBM X-ray Burst Collaboration

    2010-12-01

    We discuss the first results of the Fermi-GBM all-sky search for X-ray bursts. The very large field of view and X-ray response of the Fermi-GBM make it a unique instrument to study rare, bright and short-lived X-ray bursts. We are performing a systematic search that exploits such capabilities. We present results on long/intermediate type I X-ray bursts, an unusual kind of thermonuclear bursts from accreting neutron stars, and show how Fermi-GBM is giving for the first time robust measurements of their recurrence time.

  9. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor as a Transient Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Fermi GBM Team

    2016-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) performs well as a transient monitor in the 8 keV to 1 MeV range using the publicly available continuous data products. With GBM, we use the Earth occultation technique successfully monitor long-term hard X-ray variations in the Crab Nebula, bright transients such as the black hole binary V404 Cyg, which flared brightly in Jun 2015, and a catalog of 200+ sources. The catalog includes X-ray binaries, active galaxies, and the Sun which we monitor for variations on timescales from days to years, supporting multi wavelength campaigns and triggering other instruments. We monitor the pulse frequency and pulsed flux for 37 accreting pulsars with a high (~50% duty cycle), including Be/X-ray binaries such as V0332+53, which underwent a giant outburst in summer 2015. Through daily searches, we detect X-ray bursts from neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries. I will present highlights of these transient monitoring efforts, demonstrating significant science gains using GBM continuous data products.

  10. Real-Time Supernova Neutrino Burst Monitor at Super-Kamiokande

    OpenAIRE

    Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.(University of Tokyo, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, Kamioka Observatory, Kamioka, Japan); Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y

    2016-01-01

    We present a real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande (SK). Detecting supernova explosions by neutrinos in real time is crucial for giving a clear picture of the explosion mechanism. Since the neutrinos are expected to come earlier than light, a fast broadcasting of the detection may give astronomers a chance to make electromagnetic radiation observations of the explosions right at the onset. The role of the monitor includes a fast announcement of the neutrino burst dete...

  11. Real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, K.; Haga, Y.; Hayato, Y.; Ikeda, M.; Iyogi, K.; Kameda, J.; Kishimoto, Y.; Miura, M.; Moriyama, S.; Nakahata, M.; Nakano, Y.; Nakayama, S.; Sekiya, H.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Takeda, A.; Tanaka, H.; Tomura, T.; Ueno, K.; Wendell, R. A.; Yokozawa, T.; Irvine, T.; Kajita, T.; Kametani, I.; Kaneyuki, K.; Lee, K. P.; McLachlan, T.; Nishimura, Y.; Richard, E.; Okumura, K.; Labarga, L.; Fernandez, P.; Berkman, S.; Tanaka, H. A.; Tobayama, S.; Gustafson, J.; Kearns, E.; Raaf, J. L.; Stone, J. L.; Sulak, L. R.; Goldhaber, M.; Carminati, G.; Kropp, W. R.; Mine, S.; Weatherly, P.; Renshaw, A.; Smy, M. B.; Sobel, H. W.; Takhistov, V.; Ganezer, K. S.; Hartfiel, B. L.; Hill, J.; Keig, W. E.; Hong, N.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Akiri, T.; Himmel, A.; Scholberg, K.; Walter, C. W.; Wongjirad, T.; Ishizuka, T.; Tasaka, S.; Jang, J. S.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Smith, S. N.; Hasegawa, T.; Ishida, T.; Ishii, T.; Kobayashi, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakamura, K.; Oyama, Y.; Sakashita, K.; Sekiguchi, T.; Tsukamoto, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Bronner, C.; Hirota, S.; Huang, K.; Ieki, K.; Kikawa, T.; Minamino, A.; Murakami, A.; Nakaya, T.; Suzuki, K.; Takahashi, S.; Tateishi, K.; Fukuda, Y.; Choi, K.; Itow, Y.; Mitsuka, G.; Mijakowski, P.; Hignight, J.; Imber, J.; Jung, C. K.; Yanagisawa, C.; Wilking, M. J.; Ishino, H.; Kibayashi, A.; Koshio, Y.; Mori, T.; Sakuda, M.; Yamaguchi, R.; Yano, T.; Kuno, Y.; Tacik, R.; Kim, S. B.; Okazawa, H.; Choi, Y.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Suda, Y.; Totsuka, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Martens, K.; Marti, Ll.; Vagins, M. R.; Martin, J. F.; de Perio, P.; Konaka, A.; Chen, S.; Zhang, Y.; Connolly, K.; Wilkes, R. J.

    2016-08-01

    We present a real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande (SK). Detecting supernova explosions by neutrinos in real time is crucial for giving a clear picture of the explosion mechanism. Since the neutrinos are expected to come earlier than light, a fast broadcasting of the detection may give astronomers a chance to make electromagnetic radiation observations of the explosions right at the onset. The role of the monitor includes a fast announcement of the neutrino burst detection to the world and a determination of the supernova direction. We present the online neutrino burst detection system and studies of the direction determination accuracy based on simulations at SK.

  12. Real-Time Supernova Neutrino Burst Monitor at Super-Kamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    Abe, K; Hayato, Y; Ikeda, M; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Kishimoto, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakano, Y; Nakayama, S; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Tanaka, H; Tomura, T; Ueno, K; Wendell, R A; Yokozawa, T; Irvine, T; Kajita, T; Kametani, I; Kaneyuki, K; Lee, K P; McLachlan, T; Nishimura, Y; Richard, E; Okumura, K; Labarga, L; Fernandez, P; Berkman, S; Tanaka, H A; Tobayama, S; Gustafson, J; Kearns, E; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Goldhaber, M; Carminati, G; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Weatherly, P; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Takhistov, V; Ganezer, K S; Hartfiel, B L; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Hong, N; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Akiri, T; Himmel, A; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Jang, J S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Smith, S N; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Bronner, C; Hirota, S; Huang, K; Ieki, K; Kikawa, T; Minamino, A; Murakami, A; Nakaya, T; Suzuki, K; Takahashi, S; Tateishi, K; Fukuda, Y; Choi, K; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Mijakowski, P; Hignight, J; Imber, J; Jung, C K; Yanagisawa, C; Wilking, M J; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Koshio, Y; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Yamaguchi, R; Yano, T; Kuno, Y; Tacik, R; Kim, S B; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Suda, Y; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Martens, K; Marti, Ll; Vagins, M R; Martin, J F; de Perio, P; Konaka, A; Chen, S; Zhang, Y; Connolly, K; Wilkes, R J

    2016-01-01

    We present a real-time supernova neutrino burst monitor at Super-Kamiokande (SK). Detecting supernova explosions by neutrinos in real time is crucial for giving a clear picture of the explosion mechanism. Since the neutrinos are expected to come earlier than light, a fast broadcasting of the detection may give astronomers a chance to make electromagnetic radiation observations of the explosions right at the onset. The role of the monitor includes a fast announcement of the neutrino burst detection to the world and a determination of the supernova direction. We present the online neutrino burst detection system and studies of the direction determination accuracy based on simulations at SK.

  13. Multi-Impairment WDM Optical Performance Monitoring for Burst Switched Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Baker-Meflah, L.; Thomsen, B.C.; Mitchell, J. E.; Bayvel, P.

    2010-01-01

    We present an analytical investigation of a performance monitoring scheme capable of simultaneously monitoring Chromatic Dispersion, Polarization Mode Dispersion and Optical Signal to Noise Ratio at 40 Gbit/s on timescales that are appropriate to optical burst switched networks. This analysis supports previously published experimental results which showed that this technique is scalable to WDM network monitoring.

  14. Anomalies in low-energy Gamma-Ray Burst spectra with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Tierney, Dave; Preece, Robert D; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Guiriec, Sylvain; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Burgess, J Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; McGlynn, Sinead; Paciesas, William S; Pelassa, Veronique; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    A Band function has become the standard spectral function used to describe the prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). However, deviations from this function have previously been observed in GRBs detected by BATSE and in individual GRBs from the \\textit{Fermi} era. We present a systematic and rigorous search for spectral deviations from a Band function at low energies in a sample of the first two years of high fluence, long bursts detected by the \\textit{Fermi} Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). The sample contains 45 bursts with a fluence greater than 2$\\times10^{-5}$ erg / cm$^{2}$ (10 - 1000 keV). An extrapolated fit method is used to search for low-energy spectral anomalies, whereby a Band function is fit above a variable low-energy threshold and then the best fit function is extrapolated to lower energy data. Deviations are quantified by examining residuals derived from the extrapolated function and the data and their significance is determined via comprehensive simulations which account for the ...

  15. Time resolved spectroscopy of SGR J1550–5418 bursts detected with Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550–5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E peak, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ∼ – 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10–5 erg s–1 cm–2. Above this flux value, the E peak–flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ∼1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area–kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R 2∝kT –4, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10–5.5 erg s–1 cm–2). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R max ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R max as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550–5418, B int ≳ 4.5 × 1015 G.

  16. Time Resolved Spectroscopy of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts Detected with Fermi/Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Baring, M. G.; Granot, J.; Watts, A. L.; Bhat, P. N.; Collazzi, A.; Gehrels, N.; Gorgone, N.; Göğüş, E.; Gruber, D.; Grunblatt, S.; Huppenkothen, D.; Kaneko, Y.; von Kienlin, A.; van der Klis, M.; Lin, L.; Mcenery, J.; van Putten, T.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2014-04-01

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550-5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E peak, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ~ - 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10-5 erg s-1 cm-2. Above this flux value, the E peak-flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ~1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area-kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R 2vpropkT -4, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10-5.5 erg s-1 cm-2). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R max ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R max as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418, B int >~ 4.5 × 1015 G.

  17. All-Sky Earth Occultation Observations with the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A; Bhat, P N; Briggs, M S; Chaplin, V; Connaughton, V; Camero-Arranz, A; Case, G; Cherry, M; Rodi, J; Finger, M H; Jenke, P; Haynes, R H

    2009-01-01

    Using the Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on-board Fermi, we are monitoring the hard X-ray/soft gamma ray sky using the Earth occultation technique. Each time a source in our catalog enters or exits occultation by the Earth, we measure its flux using the change in count rates due to the occultation. Currently we are using CTIME data with 8 energy channels spanning 8 keV to 1 MeV for the GBM NaI detectors and spanning 150 keV to 40 MeV for the GBM BGO detectors. Our preliminary catalog consists of galactic X-ray binaries, the Crab Nebula, and active galactic nuclei. In addition, to Earth occultations, we have observed numerous occultations with Fermi's solar panels. We will present early results. Regularly updated results can be found on our website http://gammaray.nsstc.nasa.gov/gbm/science/occultation

  18. The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor: Results from the first two years

    OpenAIRE

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Collaboration, for the Fermi GBM

    2011-01-01

    In the first two years since the launch of the Fermi Observatory, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected over 500 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), of which 18 were confidently detected by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) above 100 MeV. Besides GRBs, GBM has triggered on other transient sources, such as Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs), Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) and solar flares. Here we present the science highlights of the GBM observations.

  19. Characterization of the Relationship between Intracranial Pressure and Electroencephalographic Monitoring in Burst Suppressed Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Mark; Vespa, Paul; Pouratian, Nader; Gonzalez, Nestor R.; Hu, Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Objective To characterize the relationship between ICP and EEG Methods Simultaneous ICP and EEG data were obtained from burst-suppressed patients and segmented by EEG bursts. Segments were categorized as increasing/decreasing and peak/valley to investigate relationship between ICP changes and EEG burst duration. A generalized ICP response was obtained by averaging all segments time-aligned at burst onsets. A vasodilatation index (VDI) was derived from the ICP pulse waveform and calculated on a sliding interval to investigate cerebrovascular changes post-burst. Results Data from two patients contained 309 bursts. 246 ICP segments initially increased, of which 154 peaked. 63 ICP segments decreased, and zero reached a valley. The change in ICP (0.54±0.85mmHg) was significantly correlated with the burst duration (pVDI for increasing segments was significantly elevated (median 0.56, IQR 0.31, p<0.001) and correlated with burst duration (p<0.001). Conclusions Changes in the ICP and pulse-waveform shape after EEG burst suggest that these signals can be related within the context of neurovascular coupling. Significance Existence of a physiological relationship between ICP and EEG may allow the study of neurovascular coupling in acute brain injury patients. PMID:25142827

  20. Do the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and Swift Burst Alert Telescope see the Same Short Gamma-Ray Bursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, Eric; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Lien, Amy; Briggs, Michael S; Goldstein, Adam; Pelassa, Veronique; Troja, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Compact binary system mergers are expected to generate gravitational radiation detectable by ground-based interferometers. A subset of these, the merger of a neutron star with another neutron star or a black hole, are also the most popular model for the production of short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) trigger on short GRBs (SGRBs) at rates that reflect their relative sky exposures, with the BAT detecting 10 per year compared to about 45 for GBM. We examine the SGRB populations detected by Swift BAT and Fermi GBM. We find that the Swift BAT triggers on weaker SGRBs than Fermi GBM, providing they occur close to the center of the BAT field-of-view, and that the Fermi GBM SGRB detection threshold remains flatter across its field-of-view. Overall, these effects combine to give the instruments the same average sensitivity, and account for the SGRBs that trigger one instrument but not the other. We do not find any evidence that the BAT and...

  1. Continued Radio Monitoring of the Gamma Ray Burst 991208

    CERN Document Server

    Galama, T J; Sari, R; Berger, E; Taylor, G B; Kulkarni, S R

    2003-01-01

    We present radio observations of the afterglow of the bright gamma-ray burst GRB 991208 at frequencies of 1.4, 4.9 and 8.5 GHz, taken between two weeks and 300 days after the burst. The well-sampled radio light curve at 8.5 GHz shows that the peak flux density peaked about 10 days after the burst and decayed thereafter as a power-law t^-1.07. This decay rate is more shallow than the optical afterglow with t^-2.2, which was measured during the first week. These late-time data are combined with extensive optical, millimeter and centimeter measurements and fitted to the standard relativistic blast wave model. In agreement with previous findings, we find that an isotropic explosion in a constant density or wind-blown medium cannot explain these broadband data without modifying the assumption of a single power-law slope for the electron energy distribution. A jet-like expansion provides a reasonable fit to the data. In this case, the flatter radio light curve compared to the optical may be due to emission from an ...

  2. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy of the 3 Brightest and Hardest Short Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with the FGST Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Guiriec, Sylvain; Connaugthon, Valerie; Kara, Erin; Daigne, Frederic; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; van der Horst, Alexander J; Paciesas, William; Meegan, Charles A; Bhat, P N; Foley, Suzanne; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2010-01-01

    From July 2008 to October 2009, the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST) has detected 320 Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). About 20% of these events are classified as short based on their T90 duration below 2 s. We present here for the first time time-resolved spectroscopy at timescales as short as 2 ms for the three brightest short GRBs observed with GBM. The time-integrated spectra of the events deviate from the Band function, indicating the existence of an additional spectral component, which can be fit by a power-law with index ~-1.5. The time-integrated Epeak values exceed 2 MeV for two of the bursts, and are well above the values observed in the brightest long GRBs. Their Epeak values and their low-energy power-law indices ({\\alpha}) confirm that short GRBs are harder than long ones. We find that short GRBs are very similar to long ones, but with light curves contracted in time and with harder spectra stretched towards higher energies. In our time-resolved spectrosco...

  3. Time resolved spectroscopy of SGR J1550–5418 bursts detected with Fermi/gamma-ray burst monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younes, G. [Universities Space Research Association, 6767 Old Madison Pike, Suite 450, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); Kouveliotou, C.; Collazzi, A. [Astrophysics Office, ZP 12, NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, A. J.; Watts, A. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Van der Klis, M.; Van Putten, T. [Astronomical Institute " Anton Pannekoek," University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baring, M. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, J. [Department of Natural Sciences, The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Raánana 43537 (Israel); Bhat, P. N.; Gorgone, N. [University of Alabama in Huntsville CSPAR, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, N.; Mcenery, J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Göğüş, E.; Kaneko, Y.; Lin, L. [Sabancı University, Orhanlı-Tuzla, İstanbul 34956 (Turkey); Gruber, D.; Von Kienlin, A. [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Grunblatt, S. [University of Hawaii at Manoa, 2500 Campus Road, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); and others

    2014-04-10

    We report on a time-resolved spectroscopy of the 63 brightest bursts of SGR J1550–5418, detected with the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor during its 2008-2009 intense bursting episode. We performed spectral analysis down to 4 ms timescales to characterize the spectral evolution of the bursts. Using a Comptonized model, we find that the peak energy, E {sub peak}, anti-correlates with flux, while the low-energy photon index remains constant at ∼ – 0.8 up to a flux limit F ≈ 10{sup –5} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}. Above this flux value, the E {sub peak}–flux correlation changes sign, and the index positively correlates with the flux reaching ∼1 at the highest fluxes. Using a two blackbody model, we find that the areas and fluxes of the two emitting regions correlate positively. Further, we study here for the first time the evolution of the temperatures and areas as a function of flux. We find that the area–kT relation follows the lines of constant luminosity at the lowest fluxes, R {sup 2}∝kT {sup –4}, with a break at the higher fluxes (F > 10{sup –5.5} erg s{sup –1} cm{sup –2}). The area of the high-kT component increases with the flux while its temperature decreases, which we interpret as being due to an adiabatic cooling process. The area of the low-kT component, on the other hand, appears to saturate at the highest fluxes, toward R {sub max} ≈ 30 km. Assuming that crust quakes are responsible for soft gamma repeater (SGR) bursts and considering R {sub max} as the maximum radius of the emitting photon-pair plasma fireball, we relate this saturation radius to a minimum excitation radius of the magnetosphere, and we put a lower limit on the internal magnetic field of SGR J1550–5418, B {sub int} ≳ 4.5 × 10{sup 15} G.

  4. An assessment of burst strength distribution data for monitoring quality of condom stocks in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Free, M J; Hutchings, J; Lubis, F; Natakusumah, R

    1986-03-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted on condoms to examine the changes that occur over time in indicators of condom burst strength, and to determine the relationship between laboratory-assessed condom burst strength and breakage during use in a developing country setting. Three groups of unaged condoms purchased directly from the manufacturer were used: one group exposed to UV light for 10 hours; one group exposed for five hours; and one group unexposed. A sample of each of these groups was tested according to ISO condom air burst test protocols. The remaining condoms were individually packaged in coded polyethylene bags for shipment to the developing country study site. Also used in the study was a group of condoms that had been aged for over 40 months under field conditions in a tropical climate; a sample from this group was tested by the ISO air burst test protocol and the remainder distributed to the study site. One-hundred-thirty Indonesian urban males participated in the double-blind study. Volunteers were not relying on the condom for contraceptive purposes. Each volunteer was given one individually packaged untreated condom, one condom from each treatment group, and four condoms aged in the field. Study participants were instructed to return all used condoms. Each condom that was returned after use was examined for breakage, and the unbroken condoms were subjected to an air inflation test to determine volume and pressure at burst. A comparison of the air burst volume data for a sample of unused and used condoms from the same treatment group indicates that most of the condoms that broke during use had air burst volumes below 11 liters. Therefore, a significant downward shift in the burst strength distribution as measured in the laboratory is likely to result in an increased breakage rate during use. A Condom Deterioration Index calculated from regular periodic testing of stored condom stocks is a convenient and sensitive means of monitoring trends in the

  5. Meteor Burst Remote Monitoring System Deployment at US DOE Hanford Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper details the efforts associated with the design and installation of a Meteor Burst system at the 200-BP-1 Prototype Barrier located at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site. The existing monitoring data collection and transmission system at the 200-BP-1 location is cellular phone-based. This system required manual data retrieval and was faced with costly upgrades due to ongoing changes in cellular phone technology. The Meteor Burst system on the other hand offers automated transmission of large amounts of monitoring data with minimal infrastructure and easy real-time access to data by facility personnel via user-friendly web pages. Under this project, a meteor burst data collection and transmission system was successfully designed and installed. This system collects and transmits data from 4 water balance monitoring stations and 13 time-domain reflectometry probes located atop the 200-BP-1 Prototype Barrier. The field system employs several data-loggers plus meteor burst components and 900-megahertz radios. In addition to the field design and installation, system programming was performed to successfully interface the components of the field system and to facilitate communication with the Internet server. Lastly, user-friendly web pages were developed to facilitate real-time access to data. (authors)

  6. Indication of radio frequency interference (RFI) sources for solar burst monitoring in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi, Z. S.; Abidin, Z. Z.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Shariff, N. N. M.

    2012-06-01

    Apart of monitoring the Sun project, the Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) surveying in the region of (1-1200) MHz has been conducted. The main objective of this surveying is to test and qualify the potential of monitoring a continuous radio emission of Solar in Malaysia. This work is also an initiative of International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) project where Malaysia is one of the country that participate a e-Callisto Spectrometer network in order to study the behavior of Solar radio burst in frequency of (45-800) MHz region which will be install in this October. Detail results will indicate the potential of monitoring a solar in Malaysia.

  7. Probing the Nature of Short Swift Bursts via Deep INTEGRAL Monitoring of GRB 050925

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, T.; Barbier, L.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Cummings, J. R.; Fenimore, E. E.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; Markwardt, C. B.; Palmer, D. M.; Parsons, A. M.; Sato, G.; Stamatikos, M.; Tueller, J.

    2010-01-01

    We present results from Swift, XMM-Newton, and deep INTEGRAL monitoring in the region of GRB 050925. This short Swift burst is a candidate for a newly discovered soft gamma-ray repeater (SGR) with the following observational burst properties: 1) galactic plane (b=-0.1 deg) localization, 2) 150 msec duration, and 3) a blackbody rather than a simple power-law spectral shape (with a significance level of 97%). We found two possible X-ray counterparts of GRB 050925 by comparing the X-ray images from Swift XRT and XMM-Newton. Both X-ray sources show the transient behavior with a power-law decay index shallower than -1. We found no hard X-ray emission nor any additional burst from the location of GRB 050925 in approximately 5 Ms of INTEGRAL data. We discuss about the three BATSE short bursts which might be associated with GRB 050925, based on their location and the duration. Assuming GRB 050925 is associated with the H(sub II), regions (W 58) at the galactic longitude of 1=70 deg, we also discuss the source frame properties of GRB 050925.

  8. Quasi -Periodic Pulsations in Solar Flares: new clues from the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, D; Bissaldi, E; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Greiner, J; van der Horst, A J; Kanbach, G; Rau, A; Bhat, P N; Diehl, R; von Kienlin, A; Kippen, R M; Meegan, C A; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Wilson-Hodge, C

    2011-01-01

    In the last four decades it has been observed that solar flares show quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) from the lowest, i.e. radio, to the highest, i.e. gamma-ray, part of the electromagnetic spectrum. To this day, it is still unclear which mechanism creates such QPPs. In this paper, we analyze four bright solar flares which show compelling signatures of quasi-periodic behavior and were observed with the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (\\gbm) onboard the Fermi satellite. Because GBM covers over 3 decades in energy (8 keV to 40 MeV) it can be a key instrument to understand the physical processes which drive solar flares. We tested for periodicity in the time series of the solar flares observed by GBM by applying a classical periodogram analysis. However, contrary to previous authors, we did not detrend the raw light curve before creating the power spectral density spectrum (PSD). To assess the significance of the frequencies we made use of a method which is commonly applied for X-ray binaries and Seyfert galaxies. This...

  9. Who can monitor the court interpreter's performance?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinsen, Bodil

    2009-01-01

      Who can monitor the court interpreter's performance? Results of a case study This paper presents the results of a case study of an unusual interpreting event in a Danish courtroom setting. During the trial, the interpreter's non-normative performance was explicitly criticised by the audience and...... the conflict about her competence was negotiated. Because of this unusual constellation, combined with a multi-method approach, this single case study can shed some light on the question of the participants' ability to monitor the interpreter's performance. Legal professional users of interpreters...... proceedings are far less transparent for the legal participants than they normally assume. This problem, in turn, stresses the importance of a) the interpreter's competence and self-awareness and b) the use of check interpreters.  ...

  10. Can black-hole neutrino-cooled disks power short gamma-ray bursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Tong; Hou, Shu-Jin; Gu, Wei-Min

    2015-01-01

    Stellar-mass black holes (BHs) surrounded by neutrino-dominated accretion flows (NDAFs) are the plausible candidates to power gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) via neutrinos emission and their annihilation. The progenitors of short-duration GRBs (SGRBs) are generally considered to be compact binaries mergers. According to the simulation results, the disk mass of the NDAF has been limited after merger events. We can estimate such disk mass by using the current SGRB observational data and fireball model. The results show that the disk mass of a certain SGRB mainly depends on its output energy, jet opening angle, and central BH characteristics. Even for the extreme BH parameters, some SGRBs require massive disks, which approach or exceed the limits in simulations. We suggest that there may exist alternative magnetohydrodynamic processes or some mechanisms increasing the neutrino emission to produce SGRBs with the reasonable BH parameters and disk mass.

  11. Rest-frame properties of gamma-ray bursts observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, David

    2012-01-01

    In this talk I present the main spectral and temporal properties of Fermi/GBM gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with known redshift. Key properties of these GRBs in the rest-frame of the progenitor are investigated to better understand the intrinsic nature of these events. The sample comprises 47 GRBs with measured redshift that were observed by GBM until May 2012. 39 sources belong to the long-duration population and 8 events were classified as short bursts. For all of these events we derive, where possible, the intrinsic peak energy in the {\

  12. Rest-frame properties of 32 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, D; von Kienlin, A; Rau, A; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Goldstein, A; van der Horst, A J; Nardini, M; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, E; Burgess, J M; Chaplin, V L; Diehl, R; Fishman, G J; Fitzpatrick, G; Foley, S; Gibby, M H; Giles, M M; Guiriec, S; Kippen, R M; Kouveliotou, C; Lin, L; McBreen, S; Meegan, C A; E., F Olivares; Paciesas, W S; Preece, R D; Tierney, D; Wilson-Hodge, C

    2011-01-01

    Aims: In this paper we study the main spectral and temporal properties of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by Fermi/GBM. We investigate these key properties of GRBs in the rest-frame of the progenitor and test for possible intra-parameter correlations to better understand the intrinsic nature of these events. Methods: Our sample comprises 32 GRBs with measured redshift that were observed by GBM until August 2010. 28 of them belong to the long-duration population and 4 events were classified as short/hard bursts. For all of these events we derive, where possible, the intrinsic peak energy in the $\

  13. How gravitational-wave observations can shape the gamma-ray burst paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By reaching through shrouding blastwaves, efficiently discovering off-axis events and probing the central engine at work, gravitational wave (GW) observations will soon revolutionize the study of gamma-ray bursts. Already, analyses of GW data targeting gamma-ray bursts have helped constrain the central engines of selected events. Advanced GW detectors with significantly improved sensitivities are under construction. After outlining the GW emission mechanisms from gamma-ray burst progenitors (binary coalescences, stellar core collapses, magnetars and others) that may be detectable with advanced detectors, we review how GWs will improve our understanding of gamma-ray burst central engines, their astrophysical formation channels and the prospects and methods for different search strategies. We place special emphasis on multimessenger searches. To achieve the most scientific benefit, GW, electromagnetic and neutrino observations should be combined to provide greater discriminating power and science reach. (topical review)

  14. The First Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flash (TGF) Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Michael; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Zhang, Binbin; Bhat, Narayana; Fishman, Gerald; Roberts, Oliver; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Shelia; Grove, Eric; Chekhtman, Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    We present summary results from the first catalog of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Space Telescope. The catalog reports parameters for over 2700 TGFs. Since the launch of Fermi in 2008 the TGF detection sensitivity of GBM has been improved several times, both in the flight software and in ground analysis. Starting in 2010 July individual photons were downloaded for portions of the orbits, enabling an off-line search that found weaker and shorter TGFs. Since 2012 November 26 this telemetry mode has been extended to continuous coverage. The TGF sample is reliable, with cosmic rays rejected using data both from Fermi GBM and from the Large Area Telescope on Fermi. The online catalog include times (UTC and solar), spacecraft geographic positions, durations, count intensities and Bayesian Block durations. The catalog includes separate tables for bright TGFs detected by the flight software and for Terrestrial Electron Beams (TEBs).

  15. Improved limits on sterile neutrino dark matter using full-sky Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.C.Y. Ng; S. Horiuchi; J.M. Gaskins; M. Smith; R. Preece

    2015-01-01

    A sterile neutrino of similar to keV mass is a well-motivated dark matter candidate. Its decay generates an x-ray line that offers a unique target for x-ray telescopes. For the first time, we use the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to search for sterile neut

  16. Can life survive Gamma-Ray Bursts in the high-redshift universe?

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Nearby Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a possible cause of mass extinctions on Earth. Due to the higher event rate of GRBs at higher redshifts, it has been speculated that life as we know it may not survive above a certain redshift (e.g. $z>0.5$). We examine the duty cycle of lethal (life-threatening) GRBs in the solar neighborhood, in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies and GRB host galaxies, with the dependence of the long GRB rate on star formation and metallicity pr...

  17. Can Gamma-Ray Bursts Be Used to Measure Cosmology? A Further Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, D; Liang, E W

    2005-01-01

    Two different methods of measuring cosmology with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been proposed since a tight relation between the energy of a GRB jet (E_gamma,jet}) and its peak energy of the nu F_nu spectrum measured in the cosmological rest frame (E'_p), i.e., (E_{gamma,jet}/10^{50} ergs)=C (E'_p/100 keV)^a, was recently reported, where a and C are dimensionless parameters. In Method I, this relation is recalibrated as cosmology varies. We apply this method to a latest high-redshift sample of 17 observed GRBs, and obtain Omega_M=0.16_{-0.14}^{+0.46} at the 1 sigma confidence level for a flat universe. Furthermore, we make simulations on the basis of the observed GRB sample to study the ability of a cosmological probe by using a sample of 157 pseudo bursts, being comparable to the gold sample of type-Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), and obtain Omega_M=0.29_{-0.04}^{+0.20} (1 sigma) for a flat universe, which is consistent with the cosmic concordance model of Omega_M=0.27, Omega_Lambda=0.73 (chi^2_dof=176.00/155\\approx ...

  18. ALFABURST: A realtime fast radio burst monitor for the Arecibo telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Chennamangalam, Jayanth; MacMahon, David; Armour, Wes; Cobb, Jeff; Lorimer, Duncan; Rajwade, Kaustubh; Siemion, Andrew; Werthimer, Dan; Williams, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) constitute an emerging class of fast radio transient whose origin continues to be a mystery. Realizing the importance of increasing coverage of the search parameter space, we have designed, built, and deployed a realtime monitor for FRBs at the 305-m Arecibo radio telescope. Named 'ALFABURST', it is a commensal instrument that is triggered whenever the 1.4 GHz seven-beam Arecibo $L$-Band Feed Array (ALFA) receiver commences operation. The ongoing commensal survey we are conducting using ALFABURST has an instantaneous field of view of 0.02 sq. deg. within the FWHM of the beams, with the realtime software configurable to use up to 300 MHz of bandwidth. We search for FRBs with dispersion measure up to 2560 cm$^{-3}$ pc and pulse widths ranging from 0.128 ms to 16.384 ms. Commissioning observations performed over the past few months have demonstrated the capability of the instrument in detecting single pulses from known pulsars. In this paper, I describe the instrument and the associated ...

  19. Can life survive Gamma-Ray Bursts in the high-redshift universe?

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Nearby Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a possible cause of mass extinctions on Earth. Due to the higher event rate of GRBs at higher redshifts, it has been speculated that life as we know it may not survive above a certain redshift (e.g. $z>0.5$). We examine the duty cycle of lethal (life-threatening) GRBs in the solar neighborhood, in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies and GRB host galaxies, with the dependence of the long GRB rate on star formation and metallicity properly taken into account. We find that the number of lethal GRBs attacking Earth within the past 500 Myr ($\\sim$ epoch of the Ordovician mass extinction) is $0.93$. The number of lethal GRBs hitting a certain planet increases with redshift, thanks to the increasing star formation rate and decreasing metallicity in high-$z$ galaxies. Taking 1 per 500 Myr as a conservative duty cycle for life to survive, as evidenced by our existence, we find that there are still a good fraction of SDSS galaxies beyond $z=0.5$ where the GR...

  20. Can Life Survive Gamma-Ray Bursts in the High-redshift Universe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Zhang, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Nearby gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been proposed as a possible cause of mass extinctions on Earth. Due to the higher event rate of GRBs at higher redshifts, it has been speculated that life as we know it may not survive above a certain redshift (e.g., z\\gt 0.5). We examine the duty cycle of lethal (life-threatening) GRBs in the solar neighborhood, in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxies, and GRB host galaxies, with the dependence of the long GRB rate on star formation and metallicity properly taken into account. We find that the number of lethal GRBs attacking Earth within the past 500 Myr (˜epoch of the Ordovician mass extinction) is 0.93. The number of lethal GRBs hitting a certain planet increases with redshift, as a result of the increasing star formation rate (SFR) and decreasing metallicity in high-z galaxies. Taking 1 per 500 Myr as a conservative duty cycle for life to survive, as evidenced by our existence, we find that there is still a good fraction of SDSS galaxies beyond z=0.5 where the GRB rate at half-mass radius is lower than this value. We derive the fraction of such benign galaxies as a function of redshift through Monte Carlo simulations, and we find that the fraction is ˜ 50% at z˜ 1.5 and ˜ 10% even at z˜ 3. The mass distribution of benign galaxies is dominated by Milky Way-like ones, due to their commonness, relatively large mass, and low SFR. GRB host galaxies are among the most dangerous ones.

  1. Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor detection of SGR J1550-5418

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Y; Kouveliotou, C; Granot, J; Ramirez-Ruiz, E

    2010-01-01

    SGR J1550-5418 exhibited three active bursting episodes in 2008 October and in 2009 January and March, emitting hundreds of typical Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in soft gamma-rays. The second episode was especially intense, and our untriggered burst search on Fermi/GBM data (8-1000 keV) revealed ~450 bursts emitted over 24 hours during the peak of this activity. Using the GBM data, we identified a ~150-s-long enhanced persistent emission during 2009 January 22 that exhibited intriguing timing and spectral properties: (i) clear pulsations up to ~110 keV at the spin period of the neutron star, (ii) an additional (to a power-law) blackbody component required for the enhanced emission spectra with kT ~ 17 keV, (iii) pulsed fraction that is strongly energy dependent and highest in the 50-74 keV energy band. A total isotropic-equivalent energy emitted during this enhanced emission is estimated to be 2.9 x 10^{40}(D/5 kpc)^2 erg. The estimated area of the blackbody emitting region of ~0.046(D/5 kpc)^2 km^2 is th...

  2. Magnetar Twists: Fermi/Gamma ray Burst Monitor (GBM) detection of SGR 1550-5418

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, Y; Kouveliotou, C; Ramirez-Ruiz, E; Granot, J; van der Horst, A J; Watts, A L; Finger, M H; Gehrels, N; Pe'er, A; van der Klis, M; von Kienlin, A; Wachter, S; Wilson-Hodge, C A; Woods, P M

    2009-01-01

    SGR 1550-5418 (previously known as AXP 1E 1547.0-5408) went into three active bursting episodes in 2008 October and in 2009 January and March, emitting hundreds of typical Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in soft gamma rays. The second episode was especially intense, and our untriggered burst search on Fermi/GBM data (8-1000 keV) revealed ~450 bursts emitted over 24 hours during the peak of this activity. Using the GBM data, we identified a ~150-s-long enhanced persistent emission during 2009 January 22 that exhibited intriguing timing and spectral properties: (i) clear pulsations up to ~110 keV at the spin period of the neutron star (P ~2.07 s, the fastest of all magnetars), (ii) an additional (to a power-law) blackbody component required for the enhanced emission spectra with kT ~17 keV, (iii) pulsed fraction that is strongly energy dependent and highest in the 50-74 keV energy band. A total isotropic-equivalent energy emitted during this enhanced emission is estimated to be 4.3 x 10^{40} ergs. We conclude ...

  3. THE MISSING LINK: MERGING NEUTRON STARS NATURALLY PRODUCE JET-LIKE STRUCTURES AND CAN POWER SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe, releasing in less than one second the energy emitted by our Galaxy over one year. Despite decades of observations, the nature of their 'central engine' remains unknown. Considering a binary of magnetized neutron stars and solving the Einstein equations, we show that their merger results in a rapidly spinning black hole surrounded by a hot and highly magnetized torus. Lasting over 35 ms and much longer than previous simulations, our study reveals that magnetohydrodynamical instabilities amplify an initially turbulent magnetic field of ∼1012 G to produce an ordered poloidal field of ∼1015 G along the black hole spin axis, within a half-opening angle of ∼300, which may naturally launch a relativistic jet. The broad consistency of our ab initio calculations with SGRB observations shows that the merger of magnetized neutron stars can provide the basic physical conditions for the central engine of SGRBs.

  4. Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor measurements of duration distributions of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, Norisuke; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Ohno, Masanori; Sugita, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Ryuuji; Nishioka, Yusuke; Hurley, Kevin; Hanabata, Yoshitaka; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Enomoto, Junichi; Fujinuma, Takeshi; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Iwakiri, Wataru; Kawano, Takafumi; Kokubun, Motohide; Makishima, Kazuo; Matsuoka, Shunsuke; Nagayoshi, Tsutomu; Nakagawa, Yujin E.; Nakaya, Souhei; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Takeda, Sawako; Terada, Yukikatsu; Urata, Yuji; Yabe, Seiya; Yasuda, Tetsuya; Yamauchi, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    We report on the T90 and T50 duration distributions and their relations with spectral hardness using 1464 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), which were observed by the Suzaku Wide-band All-sky Monitor (WAM) from 2005 August 4 to 2010 December 29. The duration distribution is clearly bimodal in three energy ranges (50-120, 120-250, and 250-550 keV), but is unclear in the 550-5000 keV range, probably because of the limited sample size. The WAM durations decrease with energy according to a power-law index of -0.058(-0.034, +0.033). The hardness-duration relation reveals the presence of short-hard and long-soft GRBs. The short:long event ratio tends to be higher with increasing energy. We compared the WAM distribution with ones measured by eight other GRB instruments. The WAM T90 distribution is very similar to those of INTEGRAL/SPI-ACS and Granat/PHEBUS, and least likely to match the Swift/BAT distribution. The WAM short:long event ratio (0.25:0.75) is much different from Swift/BAT (0.08:0.92), but is almost the same as CGRO/BATSE (0.25:0.75). To explain this difference for BAT, we examined three effects: BAT trigger types, energy dependence of the duration, and detection sensitivity differences between BAT and WAM. As a result, we found that the ratio difference could be explained mainly by energy dependence including soft extended emissions for short GRBs and much better sensitivity for BAT which can detect weak/long GRBs. The reason for the same short:long event ratio for BATSE and WAM was confirmed by calculation using the trigger efficiency curve.

  5. Study On Burst Location Technology under Steady-state in Water Distribution System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianpin; Li, Shuping; Wang, Shaowei; He, Fang; He, Zhixun; Cao, Guodong

    2010-11-01

    According to the characteristics of hydraulic information under the state of burst in water distribution system, to get the correlation of monitoring values and burst location and locate the position of burst on time by mathematical fitting. This method can effectively make use of the information of SCADA in water distribution system to active locating burst position. A new idea of burst location in water distribution systems to shorten the burst time, reduce the impact on urban water supply, economic losses and waste of water resources.

  6. Exploring Event and Status Based Phenological Monitoring in Citizen Science Projects: Lessons Learned from Project BudBurst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D.; Henderson, S.; Newman, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Citizen science projects in ecology are in a unique position to address the needs of both the science and education communities. Such projects can provide needed data to further understanding of ecological processes at multiple spatial scales while also increasing public understanding of the importance of the ecological sciences. Balancing the needs of both communities, it is important that citizen science programs also provide different 'entry' points to appeal to diverse segments of society. In the case of NEON's Project BudBurst, a national plant phenology citizen science program, two approaches were developed to address the ongoing challenge to recruitment and retention of participants. Initially, Project BudBurst was designed to be an event-based phenology program. Participants were asked to identify a plant and report on the timing of specific phenoevents throughout the year. This approach requires a certain level of participation, which while yielding useful results, is not going to appeal to the broadest audience possible. To broaden participation, in 2011 and 2012, Project BudBurst added campaigns targeted at engaging individuals in making simple status-based reports of a plant they chose. Three targeted field campaigns were identified to take advantage of times when people notice changes to plants in their environment, using simple status-based protocols: Fall Into Phenology, Cherry Blossom Blitz, and Summer Solstice Snapshot. The interest and participation in these single report phenological status-based campaigns exceeded initial expectations. For example, Fall Into Phenology attracted individuals who otherwise had not considered participating in an ongoing field campaign. In the past, observations of fall phenology events submitted to Project BudBurst had been limited. By providing the opportunity for submitting simple, single reports, the number of both new participants and submitted observations increased significantly.

  7. The missing link: Merging neutron stars naturally produce jet-like structures and can power short Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Rezzolla, Luciano; Baiotti, Luca; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Aloy, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    Short Gamma-Ray Bursts (SGRBs) are among the most luminous explosions in the universe, releasing in less than one second the energy emitted by our Galaxy over one year. Despite decades of observations, the nature of their "central-engine" remains unknown. Considering a generic binary of magnetized neutron stars and solving Einstein equations, we show that their merger results in a rapidly spinning black hole surrounded by a hot and highly magnetized torus. Lasting over 35 ms and much longer than previous simulations, our study reveals that magnetohydrodynamical instabilities amplify an initially turbulent magnetic field of ~ 10^{12} G to produce an ordered poloidal field of ~ 10^{15} G along the black-hole spin-axis, within a half-opening angle of ~ 30 deg, which may naturally launch a relativistic jet. The broad consistency of our ab-initio calculations with SGRB observations shows that the merger of magnetized neutron stars can provide the basic physical conditions for the central-engine of SGRBs.

  8. Preservation watch : what to monitor and how scout can help

    OpenAIRE

    Faria, Luís

    2013-01-01

    Apresentação efetuada no "Digital Preservation Advanced Practitioner Training", em Glasgow, Reino Unido, 2013 This training session is about Scout. Scout is a digital preservation watch system that allows you to be notified whenever some significant event in the world can bring you harm or profit. Scout gathers information from all around the world and curates it using link data technology. Then you can define questions that cross-link information. The system frequently monitors the your q...

  9. Compton scattering in terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected with the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Fitzpatrick, Gerard; McBreen, Sheila; Briggs, Michael S; Foley, Suzanne; Tierney, David; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Connaughton, Valerie; Stanbro, Matthew; Xiong, Shaolin; Dwyer, Joseph; Fishman, Gerald J; Roberts, Oliver J; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are short intense flashes of gamma rays associated with lightning activity in thunderstorms. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) process, theoretical predictions for the temporal and spectral evolution of TGFs are compared to observations made with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Assuming a single source altitude of 15 km, a comparison of simulations to data is performed for a range of empirically chosen source electron variation time scales. The data exhibit a clear softening with increased source distance, in qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The simulated spectra follow this trend in the data, but tend to underestimate the observed hardness. Such a discrepancy may imply that the basic RREA model is not sufficient. Alternatively, a TGF beam that is tilted with respect to the zenith could produce an evolution with source distance that is compatible with the da...

  10. Can we properly model the neutron monitor count rate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Agnieszka; Usoskin, Ilya G.; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.; Mishev, Alexander L.; Corti, Claudio; Bindi, Veronica

    2015-09-01

    Neutron monitors provide continuous measurements of secondary nucleonic particles produced in the atmosphere by the primary cosmic rays and form the main tool to study the heliospheric modulation of cosmic rays. In order to study cosmic rays using the world network of neutron monitor and needs to be able to model the neutron monitor count rate. Earlier it was difficult because of the poorly known yield function, which has been essentially revisited recently. We have presented a verification of the new yield function of the standard neutron monitor (NM) using a recently released data on the direct in situ measurements of the galactic cosmic rays energy spectrum during 2006-2009 (the period of the record high cosmic ray flux) by Payload for Antimatter Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics spaceborne spectrometer, and on NM latitude surveys performed during the period of 1994-2007, including periods of high solar activity. We found a very good agreement between the measured count rates of sea level NMs and the modeled ones in very different conditions: from low to high solar activity and from polar to tropical regions. This implies that the count rate of a sea level neutron monitor can be properly modeled in all conditions, using the new yield function.

  11. Continuous monitoring can improve single-photon probability

    OpenAIRE

    Raghunathan, Shesha; Brun, Todd

    2010-01-01

    An engineering technique using continuous quantum measurement together with a change detection algorithm is proposed to improve the probability of single photon emission for a quantum-dot based single-photon source. The technique involves continuous monitoring of the emitter, integrating the measured signal, and a simple change detection circuit to decide when to stop pumping. The idea is to pump just long enough such that the emitter $+$ cavity system is in a state that can emit at most one ...

  12. Burst Detector Sensitivity: Past, Present & Future

    OpenAIRE

    Band, David L.

    2006-01-01

    I compare the burst detection sensitivity of CGRO's BATSE, Swift's BAT, the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) and EXIST as a function of a burst's spectrum and duration. A detector's overall burst sensitivity depends on its energy sensitivity and set of accumulations times Delta t; these two factors shape the detected burst population. For example, relative to BATSE, the BAT's softer energy band decreases the detection rate of short, hard bursts, while the BAT's longer accumulation times increase the...

  13. Monitoring the burst-out of Enteromorpha prolifera in the Yellow Sea of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiying; Peng, Hongchun; Zhang, Hui; Huang, Chunlin

    2012-10-01

    In the eve of the Beijing Olympics Games, Qingdao in China, as the host city of OSC of Beijing 2008 Olympic Games, was surrounded by Enteromorpha prolifera, which was followed with interest by whole China and the world. The Enteromorpha often comes from other ocean, monitoring the drifting path of the Enteromorpha will become very important.The Study area is mainly the Yellow Sea. And the data sources are Terra MODIS 1B images from 2000-2010 years. The data preprocessing include BOW-TIE processing, image registration, clip, merge, and masking. And the NDVI was selected as the index of derived Enteromorpha prolifera information, to get the range of Enteromorpha prolifera, and get that of dynamic change with time, and monitor the drifting path of the Enteromorpha.

  14. Improved limits on sterile neutrino dark matter using full-sky Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kenny C. Y.; Horiuchi, Shunsaku; Gaskins, Jennifer M.; Smith, Miles; Preece, Robert

    2015-08-01

    A sterile neutrino of ˜keV mass is a well-motivated dark matter candidate. Its decay generates an x-ray line that offers a unique target for x-ray telescopes. For the first time, we use the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope to search for sterile neutrino decay lines; our analysis covers the energy range 10-25 keV (sterile neutrino mass 20-50 keV), which is inaccessible to x-ray and gamma-ray satellites such as Chandra, Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and INTEGRAL. The extremely wide field of view of the GBM enables a large fraction of the Milky Way dark matter halo to be probed. After implementing careful data cuts, we obtain ˜53 days of full-sky observational data. We observe an excess of photons towards the Galactic center, as expected from astrophysical emission. We search for sterile neutrino decay lines in the energy spectrum, and find no significant signal. From this, we obtain upper limits on the sterile neutrino mixing angle as a function of mass. In the sterile neutrino mass range 25-40 keV, we improve upon previous upper limits by approximately an order of magnitude. Better understanding of detector and astrophysical backgrounds, as well as detector response, will further improve the sensitivity of a search with the GBM.

  15. Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs) Observed with the Fermi-Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor: The First Hundred TGFs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, G J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Bhat, P. N.

    2010-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi) is now detecting 2.1 TGFs per week. At this rate, nearly a hundred TGFs will have been detected by the time of this Meeting. This rate has increased by a factor of 8 since new flight software was uploaded to the spacecraft in November 2009 in order to increase the sensitivity of GBM to TGFs. The high time resolution (2 microseconds) allows temporal features to be resolved so that some insight may be gained on the origin and transport of the gamma-ray photons through the atmosphere. The absolute time of the TGFs, known to several microseconds, also allows accurate correlations of TGFs with lightning networks and other lightning-related phenomena. The thick bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM system have observed photon energies from TGFs at energies above 40 MeV. New results on the some temporal aspects of TGFs will be presented.

  16. Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) Observed with the Fermi-Gamma-ray Burst Monitor: Temporal and Spectral Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, G. J.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, W.; Wilson-Hodge, C.; Bhat, P. N.

    2010-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope Observatory (Fermi) was detecting 2.1 TGFs per week. This rate has increased by a factor of 8 since new flight software was uploaded to the spacecraft in November 2009 in order to increase the sensitivity of GBM to TGFs. Further upgrades to Fermi-GBM to allow observations of weaker TGFs are in progress. The high time resolution (2 s) allows temporal features to be resolved so that some insight may be gained on the origin and transport of the gamma-ray photons through the atmosphere. The absolute time of the TGFs, known to several microseconds, also allows accurate correlations of TGFs with lightning networks and other lightning-related phenomena. The thick bismuth germanate (BGO) scintillation detectors of the GBM system have observed photon energies from TGFs at energies above 40 MeV. New results on the some temporal aspects of TGFs will be presented along with spectral characteristics and properties of several electron-positron TGF events that have been identified.

  17. Pulse properties of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor

    CERN Document Server

    Foley, Suzanne; Briggs, Michael S; Connaughton, Valerie; Tierney, David; McBreen, Sheila; Dwyer, Joseph; Chaplin, Vandiver L; Bhat, P Narayana; Byrne, David; Cramer, Eric; Fishman, Gerald J; Xiong, Shaolin; Greiner, Jochen; Kippen, R Marc; Meegan, Charles A; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D; von Kienlin, Andreas; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has triggered on over 300 terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) since its launch in June 2008. With 14 detectors, GBM collects on average ~100 counts per triggered TGF, enabling unprecedented studies of the time profiles of TGFs. Here we present the first rigorous analysis of the temporal properties of a large sample of TGFs (278), including the distributions of the rise and fall times of the individual pulses and their durations. A variety of time profiles are observed with 19 of TGFs having multiple pulses separated in time and 31 clear cases of partially overlapping pulses. The effect of instrumental dead time and pulse pileup on the temporal properties are also presented. As the observed gamma ray pulse structure is representative of the electron flux at the source, TGF pulse parameters are critical to distinguish between relativistic feedback discharge and lightning leader models. We show that at least 67% of TGFs at satellite ...

  18. GLAST's GBM Burst Trigger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Band, D.; Briggs, M.; Connaughton, V.; Kippen, M.; Preece, R.

    2003-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) will detect and localize bursts for the GLAST mission, and provide the spectral and temporal context in the traditional 10 keV to 25 MeV band for the high energy observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT). The GBM will use traditional rate triggers in up to three energy bands, and on a variety of timescales between 16 ms and 16 s.

  19. Scheduling start time in CDMA burst admission

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuge, L; Li, VOK

    2002-01-01

    Burst transmission protocols have been proposed in the next generation CDMA cellular systems to support short-time high-speed data communications. The existing burst admission algorithm considers only the current interference condition in the system. The burst transmission request will be rejected if the interference in the system will exceed the acceptable level with the burst admitted. In this paper we propose a new burst admission algorithm where a currently-unacceptable burst request can ...

  20. Can airborne ultrasound monitor bubble size in chocolate?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerated chocolate products consist of solid chocolate with the inclusion of bubbles and are a popular consumer product in many countries. The volume fraction and size distribution of the bubbles has an effect on their sensory properties and manufacturing cost. For these reasons it is important to have an online real time process monitoring system capable of measuring their bubble size distribution. As these products are eaten by consumers it is desirable that the monitoring system is non contact to avoid food contaminations. In this work we assess the feasibility of using an airborne ultrasound system to monitor the bubble size distribution in aerated chocolate bars. The experimental results from the airborne acoustic experiments were compared with theoretical results for known bubble size distributions using COMSOL Multiphysics. This combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to develop a greater understanding of how ultrasound propagates through aerated chocolate and to assess the feasibility of using airborne ultrasound to monitor bubble size distribution in these systems. The results indicated that a smaller bubble size distribution would result in an increase in attenuation through the product

  1. Can airborne ultrasound monitor bubble size in chocolate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, N.; Hazlehurst, T.; Povey, M.; Vieira, J.; Sundara, R.; Sandoz, J.-P.

    2014-04-01

    Aerated chocolate products consist of solid chocolate with the inclusion of bubbles and are a popular consumer product in many countries. The volume fraction and size distribution of the bubbles has an effect on their sensory properties and manufacturing cost. For these reasons it is important to have an online real time process monitoring system capable of measuring their bubble size distribution. As these products are eaten by consumers it is desirable that the monitoring system is non contact to avoid food contaminations. In this work we assess the feasibility of using an airborne ultrasound system to monitor the bubble size distribution in aerated chocolate bars. The experimental results from the airborne acoustic experiments were compared with theoretical results for known bubble size distributions using COMSOL Multiphysics. This combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to develop a greater understanding of how ultrasound propagates through aerated chocolate and to assess the feasibility of using airborne ultrasound to monitor bubble size distribution in these systems. The results indicated that a smaller bubble size distribution would result in an increase in attenuation through the product.

  2. Thermonuclear burst oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Watts, Anna L

    2012-01-01

    Burst oscillations, a phenomenon observed in a significant fraction of Type I (thermonuclear) X-ray bursts, involve the development of highly asymmetric brightness patches in the burning surface layers of accreting neutron stars. Intrinsically interesting as nuclear phenomena, they are also important as probes of dense matter physics and the strong gravity, high magnetic field environment of the neutron star surface. Burst oscillation frequency is also used to measure stellar spin, and doubles the sample of rapidly rotating (above 10 Hz) accreting neutron stars with known spins. Although the mechanism remains mysterious, burst oscillation models must take into account thermonuclear flame spread, nuclear processes, rapid rotation, and the dynamical role of the magnetic field. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the observational properties of burst oscillations, an assessment of the status of the theoretical models that are being developed to explain them, and an overview of how they can be used to...

  3. Can Urine Lamivudine Be Used to Monitor Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Agibothu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Patient adherence to treatment is an important factor in the effectiveness of antiretroviral regimens. Adherence to treatment could be monitored by estimation of antiretroviral drugs in biological fluids. We aimed to obtain information on the quantity and duration of excretion of lamivudine in urine following oral administration of a single dose of 300 mg and to assess its suitability for adherence monitoring purposes. Spot urine samples were collected before dosing and at 4, 8, 12, 24, 28, 32, 48, 72, and 96 hours post dosing from 10 healthy subjects, and lamivudine was estimated by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC. Lamivudine values were expressed as a ratio of urine creatinine. About 91% of the ingested drug was excreted by 24 hours, and the concentration thereafter in urine was very negligible. A lamivudine value of 0.035 mg/mg creatinine or less at 48 hours is suggestive of a missed dose in the last 24 hours. The study findings showed that estimation of urine lamivudine in spot specimens could be useful in monitoring patient adherence to antiretroviral treatment. However, this needs to be confirmed on a larger sample size and among patients on once-daily and twice-daily treatment regimens.

  4. Can we probe the Lorentz factor of gamma-ray bursts from GeV-TeV spectra integrated over internal shocks?

    CERN Document Server

    Aoi, Junichi; Takahashi, Keitaro; Ioka, Kunihito; Nagataki, Shigehiro

    2009-01-01

    We revisit the high-energy spectral cutoff originating from the electron-positron pair creation in the prompt phase of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with numerical and analytical calculations. We show that the conventional exponential cutoff should be drastically modified to a steepened power-law in practical observations that integrate emissions from different internal shocks. Since the steepening is tiny for observations, this "smearing" effect can generally reduce the previous estimates of the Lorentz factor of the GRB outflows. We apply our formulation to GRB 080916C, recently detected by the LAT detector on the Fermi satellite, and find that the minimum Lorentz factor can be ~600 (or even smaller values), which is below but consistent with the previous result of ~900. Observing the steepening energy (so-called "pair-break energy") is crucial to diagnose the Lorentz factor and/or the emission site in the future observations.

  5. How long does a burst burst?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (∼hours) in γ-rays than typical long GRBs (∼minutes), and it has recently been proposed that these 'ultra-long GRBs' may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g., blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations suggest that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with X-Ray Telescope observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to determine whether ultra-long GRBs are unusual events. We define burst duration t burst based on both γ-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using γ-ray observations alone. We find that t burst can be reliably measured in 343 GRBs. Within this 'good' sample, 21.9% GRBs have t burst ≳ 103 s and 11.5% GRBs have t burst ≳ 104 s. There is an apparent bimodal distribution of t burst in this sample. However, when we consider an 'undetermined' sample (304 GRBs) with t burst possibly falling in the gap between GRB duration T 90 and the first X-ray observational time, as well as a selection effect against t burst falling into the first Swift orbital 'dead zone' due to observation constraints, the intrinsic underlying t burst distribution is consistent with being a single component distribution. We found that the existing evidence for a separate ultra-long GRB population is inconclusive, and further multi-wavelength observations are needed to draw a firmer conclusion. We also discuss the theoretical implications of our results. In particular, the central engine activity duration of GRBs is generally much longer than the γ-ray T 90 duration and it does not even correlate with T 90. It would be premature to make a direct connection between T 90 and the size of the progenitor star.

  6. Gamma bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Vela satellite series has recently detected gamma bursts in the 0.2-1.5MeV energy range. These bursts last an average of from 0.1 to 10s and have a fine time structure, with pulses lasting less than several tens of milliseconds. With simultaneous observations from different satellites it has been possible to determine the spatial origin of some of the bursts. No correlation, however, has been made with known objects. In spite of the fragmentary character of the information received to date, several theories have already been proposed to account for these phenomena

  7. Can systemically generated reactive oxygen species help to monitor disease activity in generalized vitiligo? A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richeek Pradhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generalized vitiligo is a disease with unpredictable bursts of activity, goal of treatment during the active phase being to stabilize the lesions. This emphasizes the need for a prospective marker for monitoring disease activity to help decide the duration of therapy. Aims and Objectives: In the present study, we examined whether reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in erythrocytes can be translated into a marker of activity in vitiligo. Materials and Methods: Level of intracellular ROS was measured flow cytometrically in erythrocytes from venous blood of 21 patients with generalized vitiligo and 21 healthy volunteers using the probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Results: The levels of ROS differed significantly between patients and healthy controls, as well as between active versus stable disease groups. In the active disease group, ROS levels were significantly lower in those being treated with systemic steroids than those that were not. ROS levels poorly correlated with disease duration or body surface area involved. Conclusion: A long-term study based on these findings can be conducted to further validate the potential role of ROS in monitoring disease activity vitiligo.

  8. Burst Suppression: A Review and New Insights

    OpenAIRE

    Jonathan Dillon Kenny; M. Brandon Westover; ShiNung Ching; Brown, Emery N.; Ken Solt

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is a pattern of brain electrical activity characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude bursts and electrical silence. Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Finally, we report the...

  9. Two-dimensional burst identification codes and their use in burst correction

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    A new class of codes, called burst identification codes, is defined and studied. These codes can be used to determine the patterns of burst errors. Two-dimensional burst correcting codes can be easily constructed from burst identification codes. The resulting class of codes is simple to implement and has lower redundancy than other comparable codes. The results are pertinent to the study of radiation effects on VLSI RAM chips, which can cause two-dimensional bursts of errors.

  10. Can the bump in the composite spectrum of GRB 910503 be an emission line feature of gamma-ray bursts?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Ping Qin; Fu-Wen Zhang

    2005-01-01

    Appearing in the composite spectral data of BATSE, EGRET and COMPTEL for GRB 910503, there is a bump at around 1600keV. We perform a statistical analysis on the spectral data, trying to find out if the bump could be accounted for by a blue-shifted and significantly broadened rest frame line due to the Doppler effect of an expanding fireball surface. We made an F-test and adopted previously proposed criteria. The study reveals that the criteria are well satisfied and the feature can be interpreted as the blue shifted 6.4 keV line. From the fit with this line taken into account, we find the Lorentz factor of this source to be Γ = 116+9-9 (at the 68% confident level,△X2 = 1) and the rest frame spectral peak energy to be EO,p= 2.96+0.24-0.18 keV. Although the existence of the emission line feature requires other independent tests to confirm, the analysis suggests that it is feasible to detect emission line features in the high energy range of GRB spectra when taking into account the Doppler effect of fireball expansion.

  11. TARGET-SPECIFIC OUTPUT PATTERNS CAN BE PREDICTED BY THE DISTRIBUTION OF REGULAR-SPIKING AND BURSTING PYRAMIDAL NEURONS IN THE SUBICULUM

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Yujin; Spruston, Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Pyramidal neurons in the subiculum project to a variety of cortical and subcortical areas in the brain to convey information processed in hippocampus. Previous studies have shown that two groups of subicular pyramidal neurons – regular-spiking and bursting neurons – are distributed in an organized fashion along the proximal-distal axis, with more regular-spiking neurons close to CA1 (proximal) and more bursting neurons close to presubiculum (distal). Anatomically, neurons projecting to some t...

  12. Advanced Communications Technology Satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal experiment control and monitor software maintenance manual, version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    The Experiment Control and Monitor (EC&M) software was developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenter's terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various investigations by government agencies, universities, and industry. The EC&M software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitoring (C&PM) software system of the HBR-LET. The EC&M software allows users to initialize, control, and monitor the instrumentation within the HBR-LET using a predefined sequence of commands. Besides instrument control, the C&PM software system is also responsible for computer communication between the HBR-LET and the ACTS NASA Ground Station and for uplink power control of the HBR-LET to demonstrate power augmentation during rain fade events. The EC&M Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 (NASA-CR-189160) outlines the commands required to install and operate the EC&M software. Input and output file descriptions, operator commands, and error recovery procedures are discussed in the document. The EC&M Software Maintenance Manual, Version 1.0 (NASA-CR-189161) is a programmer's guide that describes current implementation of the EC&M software from a technical perspective. An overview of the EC&M software, computer algorithms, format representation, and computer hardware configuration are included in the manual.

  13. Advanced communications technology satellite high burst rate link evaluation terminal experiment control and monitor software user's guide, version 1.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    The Experiment Control and Monitor (EC&M) software was developed at NASA Lewis Research Center to support the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) High Burst Rate Link Evaluation Terminal (HBR-LET). The HBR-LET is an experimenter's terminal to communicate with the ACTS for various investigations by government agencies, universities, and industry. The EC&M software is one segment of the Control and Performance Monitoring (C&PM) software system of the HBR-LET. The EC&M software allows users to initialize, control, and monitor the instrumentation within the HBR-LET using a predefined sequence of commands. Besides instrument control, the C&PM software system is also responsible for computer communication between the HBR-LET and the ACTS NASA Ground Station and for uplink power control of the HBR-LET to demonstrate power augmentation during rain fade events. The EC&M Software User's Guide, Version 1.0 (NASA-CR-189160) outlines the commands required to install and operate the EC&M software. Input and output file descriptions, operator commands, and error recovery procedures are discussed in the document.

  14. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Westergaard, Niels Jørgen Stenfeldt

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  15. X-ray bursts observed with JEM-X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Chenevez, Jérôme; Lund, Niels;

    2006-01-01

    We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found.......We report on the search for X-ray bursts in the JEM-X X-ray monitor on INTEGRAL during the first two years of operations. More than 350 bursts from 25 different type-I X-ray burst sources were found....

  16. Follow the BAT: Monitoring Swift BAT FoV for Prompt Optical Emission from Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ukwatta, T N; Dhuga, K S; Gehrels, N

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the feasibility of implementing a system called 'Follow the BAT' that will coordinate ground-based robotic optical and near infrared (NIR) telescopes to monitor the Swift BAT field-of-view (FoV). The system will optimize the monitoring locations in the BAT FoV based on individual robotic telescopes' location, FoV, sensitivity and local weather conditions. The aim is to perform coordinated BAT FoV monitoring by professional as well as amateur astronomers around the world. The scientific goal of the proposed system is to facilitate detection of prompt optical and NIR emission from GRBs, especially from short duration GRBs. We have performed a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the feasibility of the project.

  17. Understanding the Long-Term Spectral Variability of Cygnus X-1 with Burst and Transient Source Experiment and All-Sky Monitor Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.; Poutanen, Juri; Paciesas, William S.; Wen, Lin-Qing

    2002-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of all observations of Cyg X-1 by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE; 20-300 keV) and by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer all-sky monitor (ASM; 1.5-12 keV) until 2002 June, including approximately 1200 days of simultaneous data. We find a number of correlations between fluxes and hardnesses in different energy bands. In the hard (low) spectral state, there is a negative correlation between the ASM 1.5-12 keV flux and the hardness at any energy. In the soft (high) spectral state, the ASM flux is positively correlated with the ASM hardness but uncorrelated with the BATSE hardness. In both spectral states, the BATSE hardness correlates with the flux above 100 keV, while it shows no correlation with the 20-100 keV flux. At the same time, there is clear correlation between the BATSE fluxes below and above 100 keV. In the hard state, most of the variability can be explained by softening the overall spectrum with a pivot at approximately 50 keV. There is also another, independent variability pattern of lower amplitude where the spectral shape does not change when the luminosity changes. In the soft state, the variability is mostly caused by a variable hard (Comptonized) spectral component of a constant shape superposed on a constant soft blackbody component. These variability patterns are in agreement with the dependencies of the rms variability on the photon energy in the two states. We also study in detail recent soft states from late 2000 until 2002. The last of them has lasted thus far for more than 200 days. Their spectra are generally harder in the 1.5-5 keV band and similar or softer in the 3-12 keV band than the spectra of the 1996 soft state, whereas the rms variability is stronger in all the ASM bands. On the other hand, the 1994 soft state transition observed by BATSE appears very similar to the 1996 one. We interpret the variability patterns in terms of theoretical Comptonization

  18. Burst propagation in Texas Helimak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, F. A. C.; Toufen, D. L.; Guimarães-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L.; Gentle, K. W.

    2016-05-01

    We present investigations of extreme events (bursts) propagating in the Texas Helimak, a toroidal plasma device in which the radial electric field can be changed by application of bias. In the experiments analyzed, a large grid of Langmuir probes measuring ion saturation current fluctuations is used to study the burst propagation and its dependence on the applied bias voltage. We confirm previous results reported on the turbulence intermittency in the Texas Helimak, extending them to a larger radial interval with a density ranging from a uniform decay to an almost uniform value. For our analysis, we introduce an improved procedure, based on a multiprobe bidimensional conditional averaging method, to assure precise determination of burst statistical properties and their spatial profiles. We verify that intermittent bursts have properties that vary in the radial direction. The number of bursts depends on the radial position and on the applied bias voltage. On the other hand, the burst characteristic time and size do not depend on the applied bias voltage. The bias voltage modifies the vertical and radial burst velocity profiles differently. The burst velocity is smaller than the turbulence phase velocity in almost all the analyzed region.

  19. Simulation and communication analysis of the monitoring system for hydraulic support pressure based on CAN bus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Huawei; Luo, Ming; Zhang, Xin; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    In order to realize online real-time monitoring of the hydraulic bracket support, improve the existing communication system, and improve the reliability of data transmission, this paper set up the communication simulation system and platform to simulate the coal mine communication based CAN bus. Based on the design and analysis of system hardware and software, this paper completed the construction of the whole hardware and the debugging of communication system. The debug end can communicate simulate by the CAN protocol simulation device, and realized the work of the entire communication system. Experiments showed that the monitoring system can work reliably.

  20. Fermi/GBM Observations of SGRJ0501 + 4516 Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Baring, Matthew G.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Guiriec, Sylvain; Woods, Peter M.; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki; Scargle, Jeffrey; Granot, Jonathan; Preece, Robert; von Kienlin, Andreas; Chaplin, Vandiver; Watts, Anna L.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Zhang, Shuang Nan; Bhat, Narayan; Finger, Mark H.; Gehrels. Neil; Harding, Alice; Kaper, Lex; Kaspi, Victoria; Mcenery, Julie; Meegan, Charles A.; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    We present our temporal and spectral analyses of 29 bursts from SGRJ0501+4516, detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope during the 13 days of the source activation in 2008 (August 22 to September 3). We find that the T(sub 90) durations of the bursts can be fit with a log-normal distribution with a mean value of approx. 123 ms. We also estimate for the first time event durations of Soft Gamma Repeater (SGR) bursts in photon space (i.e., using their deconvolved spectra) and find that these are very similar to the T(sub 90)s estimated in count space (following a log-normal distribution with a mean value of approx. 124 ms). We fit the time-integrated spectra for each burst and the time-resolved spectra of the five brightest bursts with several models. We find that a single power law with an exponential cutoff model fits all 29 bursts well, while 18 of the events can also be fit with two black body functions. We expand on the physical interpretation of these two models and we compare their parameters and discuss their evolution. We show that the time-integrated and time-resolved spectra reveal that E(sub peak) decreases with energy flux (and fluence) to a minimum of approx. 30 keV at F = 8.7 x 10(exp -6)erg/sq cm/s, increasing steadily afterwards. Two more sources exhibit a similar trend: SGRs J1550 - 5418 and 1806 - 20. The isotropic luminosity, L(sub iso), corresponding to these flux values is roughly similar for all sources (0.4 - l.5 x 10(exp 40) erg/s.

  1. An interface of ethernet and radiation monitoring network based on CAN bus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It introduces an interface between radiation monitoring network based on CAN bus and Ethernet. The system used GM pipe to detect γ ray, employed LPC2294 as the core processor. As the main control chip, Ethernet controller DM9000 constructs hardware circuit between Ethernet and multi-CAN gateway. It transmitted the data detected by CAN but to the main control center through Ethernet for the total display of data and diagrams. (authors)

  2. Interference Resilience of Burst-by-burst Adaptive Modems

    OpenAIRE

    Torrance, J.M.; Hanzo, L.; Keller, T

    1997-01-01

    Adaptive modulation can achieve channel capacity gains by adapting t h e number of bits per transmission symbol on a burst-by-burst basis, in harmony with channel quality fluctuations. In this treatise their interference resilience is quantified and the modem mode switching levels are determined under interfered conditions. The associated performance curves are portrayed in Figures 6, 7 and 8 for target bit error rates of 1 and 0.01 %, respectively. The corresponding modem mode switching leve...

  3. A left-in-place group milk sampler can improve disease monitoring in dairy herds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clarke, T.; Deveraux, R.S.; Madison, N.; Hannah, M.C.; Ridge, S.E.; Ryan, L.; Wientjes, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    A novel milk sampler (MilkThief) is described. It can collect representative samples of milk to be used for disease monitoring from groups of cows during a milking session. The maximum dilution of each individual cow¿s milk did not exceed a 1 : 45 limit when we tested the sampler in a range of Austr

  4. Propofol and sevoflurane induce distinct burst suppression patterns in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Jonathan D.; Westover, M. Brandon; Ching, ShiNung; Brown, Emery N.; Solt, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Burst suppression is an EEG pattern characterized by alternating periods of high-amplitude activity (bursts) and relatively low amplitude activity (suppressions). Burst suppression can arise from several different pathological conditions, as well as from general anesthesia. Here we review current algorithms that are used to quantify burst suppression, its various etiologies, and possible underlying mechanisms. We then review clinical applications of anesthetic-induced burst suppression. Final...

  5. Gamma-Ray Burst Physics with GLAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Omodei, N.; /INFN, Pisa

    2006-10-06

    The Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) is an international space mission that will study the cosmos in the energy range 10 keV-300 GeV, the upper end of which is one of the last poorly observed region of the celestial electromagnetic spectrum. The ancestor of the GLAST/LAT was the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) detector, which flew onboard the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO). The amount of information and the step forward that the high energy astrophysics made thanks to its 9 years of observations are impressive. Nevertheless, EGRET uncovered the tip of the iceberg, raising many questions, and it is in the light of EGRET's results that the great potential of the next generation gamma-ray telescope can be appreciated. GLAST will have an imaging gamma-ray telescope, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) vastly more capable than instruments own previously, as well as a secondary instrument, the GLAST Bursts Monitor, or GBM, to augment the study of gamma-ray bursts. Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) science is one of the most exciting challenges for the GLAST mission, exploring the high energy emission of one of the most intense phenomena in the sky, shading light on various problems: from the acceleration of particles to the emission processes, to more exotic physics like Quantum Gravity effect. In this paper we report the work done so far in the simulation development as well as the study of the LAT sensitivity to GRB.

  6. Cost-based burst dropping strategy in optical burst switching networks

    OpenAIRE

    Klusek, Bartlomiej; Murphy, John; Barry, Liam P.

    2005-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is a new paradigm for future all-optical networks. Intentional burst dropping is one of techniques used to achieve desired quality of service. In this paper we note that some bursts are more likely to cause contention. We propose a cost function that can be used to predict the likelihood that a given burst will interfere with other traffic, then we explain how, by using this information a new burst dropping strategy can be designed. We compare our method with a r...

  7. SWIFT and BATSE bursts' classification

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, I; Balazs, L G; Tusnady, G; Veres, P

    2009-01-01

    Two classes of gamma-ray bursts were identified in the BATSE catalogs characterized by their durations. There were also some indications for the existence of a third type of gamma-ray bursts. Swift satellite detectors have different spectral sensitivity than pre-Swift ones for GRBs. Therefore in this paper we analyze the bursts' duration distribution and also the duration-hardness bivariate distribution, published in The First BAT Catalog. Similarly to the BATSE data, to explain the BAT GRBs' duration distribution three components are needed. Although, the relative frequencies of the groups are different than they were in the BATSE GRB sample, the difference in the instrument spectral sensitivities can explain this bias in a natural way. This means theoretical models may have to explain three different type of gamma-ray bursts.

  8. Design and research of safety monitor and control system based on CAN BUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Order to protect machine operator under danger work area in producing-manufacturing industry, we present a distributed safety monitor and control system based on CAN BUS technology. The detection signal is collected based on the photo-voltage characteristics of the infrared sensor and it was processed with the core of AT89C51. The microprocessor controls the CAN BUS controller SJA1000/transceiver PCA82C250 to structure CAN BUS communication system to transmit the data. Through the serial interface MAX232 connected main controller with each control node, PC can monitor and control each machine in real time and renew control scheme. This paper introduces composition principle and the methods of hardware design in detail. Experiments shown that the system has yield control precision of 0.1 mm, defend distance more than 15 m and the measurement accuracy of 100%. Moreover, it can realize to reform FA431 and monitor cotton-breaking, yarn-breaking and product quality. Productivity is improved about 25%-35%. (authors)

  9. On technology of electromagnetic radiation monitoring and treatment on rock burst in island working face%孤岛工作面冲击地压电磁辐射监测与治理技术研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈杨

    2014-01-01

    Taking the 1304 island working face in Yangcheng Mine as the example,based on the principle of electromagnetic radiation predicting rock burst and combining with support pres-sure distribution law in island working face,the paper analyzes the electromagnetic radiation mo-nitoring method and layout of measuring points.By using a variety of monitoring and treatment means centered on the electromagnetic radiation monitoring technology,a new technical method of monitoring and controlling for rock burst in island working face is established,including elec-tromagnetic radiation warning,rock burst hazard identification by drilling cuttings method,un-loading pressure by deep-hole blasting in coal and electromagnetic radiation testing the stress re-lease effect,which has obtained good effectiveness.%以阳城煤矿1304孤岛工作面为例,基于电磁辐射预测冲击地压原理,结合孤岛工作面支承压力分布规律,分析了电磁辐射监测方法及测点布置方式,通过采用以电磁辐射监测技术为核心的多种监测与治理手段,建立了电磁辐射预警→钻屑法危险识别→煤体深孔爆破卸压→电磁辐射卸压效果检验的孤岛工作面冲击地压危险监测与治理技术,并取得了良好的效果。

  10. Cell culture device and microchamber which can be monitored using nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Celda-Muñoz, Bernardo; Esteve-Moya, Vicent; Sancho-Bielsa, Francisco; Villa Sanz, Rosa; Fernández Ledesma, Luis José; Berganzo Ruiz, Javier

    2010-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a cell culture device and microchamber which can be monitored using nuclear magnetic resonance and other imaging techniques, in which the culture microchamber is encapsulated and housed inside a chip. The microchamber and the device are easy for the user to handle, allowing same to be handled or repositioned without requiring complex mounting operations. In addition, the invention allows cultures to be studied for long periods, great...

  11. Disinhibition Bursting of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin J Lobb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc dopaminergic neurons receive strong tonic inputs from GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr and globus pallidus (GP, and glutamatergic neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. The presence of these tonic inputs raises the possibility that phasic disinhibition may trigger phasic bursts in dopaminergic neurons. We first applied constant NMDA and GABAA conductances onto a two-compartment single cell model of the dopaminergic neuron (Kuznetsov et al., 2006. The model exhibited disinhibition bursting upon stepwise removal of inhibition. A further bifurcation analysis suggests that disinhibition may be more robust than excitation alone in that for most levels of NMDA conductance, the cell remains capable of bursting even after a complete removal of inhibition, whereas too much excitatory input will drive the cell into depolarization block. To investigate the network dynamics of disinhibition, we used a modified version of an integrate-and-fire based model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al., 2006. Synaptic activity generated in the network was delivered to the two-compartment single cell dopaminergic neuron. Phasic activation of the D1-expressing medium spiny neurons in the striatum (D1STR produced disinhibition bursts in dopaminergic neurons through the direct pathway (D1STR to SNpr to SNpc. Anatomical studies have shown that D1STR neurons have collaterals that terminate in GP. Adding these collaterals to the model, we found that striatal activation increased the intra-burst firing frequency of the disinhibition burst as the weight of this connection was increased. Our studies suggest that striatal activation is a robust means by which disinhibition bursts can be generated by SNpc dopaminergic neurons, and that recruitment of the indirect pathway via collaterals may enhance disinhibition bursting.

  12. Characterisation and monitoring of the Excavation Disturbed Zone (EDZ) in fractured gneisses of the Roselend underground laboratory: permeability measurements, transport property changes and related radon bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassermann, Jérôme; Sabroux, Jean-Christophe; Richon, Patrick; Pontreau, Sébastien; Guillon, Sophie; Pili, Eric

    2010-05-01

    pressure measurements between an obturated borehole and the tunnel is conducted to monitor the possible modifications of the transport properties of the EDZ due to hydraulical and/or mechanical sollicitations of the nearby Roselend reservoir lake. As radon level is controlled by emanation and transport path through the medium. The observed bursts of radon should be due to changes of the radon transport properties (Trique et al. 1999) of the EDZ. A correlation between the differential pressure variations and radon bursts is clearly observed. Radon bursts seem to be related to overpressure events that take place in the instrumented borehole. Which external sollicitations, hydraulical or mechanical, or both, induce such a behaviour? References Bossart, P., Meier, P. M., Moeri, A., Trick, T., and J.-C. Mayor (2002). Geological and hydraulic characterisation of the excavation disturbed zone in the Opalinus Clay of the Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, Engineering Geology, 66, 19-38. Dezayes, C., and T. Villemin (2002). Etat de la fracturation dans la galerie CEA de Roselend et analyse de la déformation cassante dans le massif du Méraillet, technical report, Lab. de Geodyn. de Chaisnes Alp., Univ. de Savoie, Savoie, France. Jakubick, A. T., and T. Franz (1993). Vacuum testing of the permeability of the excavation damaged zone, Rock Mech. Rock Engng., 26(2), 165-182. Patriarche, D., Pili, E., Adler, P. M., and J.-F. Thovert (2007). Stereological analysis of fractures in the Roselend tunnel and permeability determination, Water Resour. Res., 43, W09421. Richon, P., Perrier, F., Sabroux, J.-C., Trique, M., Ferry, C., Voisin, V., and E. Pili (2004). Spatial and time variations of radon-222 concentration in the atmosphere of a dead-end horizontal tunnel, J. Environ. Radioact., 78, 179-198. Richon, P., Perrier, F., Pili, E., and J.-C. Sabroux (2009). Detectability and significance of the 12hr barometric tide in radon-222 signal, dripwater flow rate, air temperature and carbon dioxide

  13. New Results on the Spectral Evolution of Magnetar Bright Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, George A.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A.; GBM Magnetar Team

    2013-04-01

    Magnetars are isolated neutron stars characterized by long spin periods (2-12 s) and large spin down rates, implying a very strong magnetic field, B>10E14 G. Magnetars exhibit short bursts of hard X-/soft gamma-rays with luminosities ranging from 10E37 to 10E41 erg/s. The magnetar SGR J1550-5418 entered an extremely active bursting episode, starting on 2008 October 03 until 2009 April 17, during which Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) observed several hundred bursts from this source. Such wealth of bursts resulted in the largest catalog of detailed temporal and spectral results for SGR J1550-5418. Here, we discuss new results from time-resolved spectral analysis of the brightest bursts from this source. Our analysis, together with the comparison of our results with other magnetar bursts, enabled us to put strong constraints on the theories underlying the magnetar bursts emission mechanism.

  14. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazzi, A. C.; Kouveliotou, C.; van der Horst, A. J.; Younes, G. A.; Kaneko, Y.; Göğüş, E.; Lin, L.; Granot, J.; Finger, M. H.; Chaplin, V. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Watts, A. L.; von Kienlin, A.; Baring, M. G.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Gibby, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.; van der Klis, M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2015-05-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550-5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  15. The Five Year Fermi/GBM Magnetar Burst Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Collazzi, A C; van der Horst, A J; Younes, G A; Kaneko, Y; Gogus, E; Lin, L; Granot, J; Finger, M H; Chaplin, V L; Huppenkothen, D; Watts, A L; von Kienlin, A; Baring, M G; Gruber, D; Bhat, P N; Gibby, M H; Gehrels, N; McEnery, J; van der Klis, M; Wijers, R A M J

    2015-01-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, giving the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from July 2008 to June 2013. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550-5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7.

  16. Which Epeak? The Characteristic Energy of Gamma-ray Burst Spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Robert; Goldstein, Adam; Bhat, Narayana; Stanbro, Matthew; Hakkila, Jon; Blalock, Dylan

    2016-04-01

    A characteristic energy of individual gamma-ray burst (GRB) spectra can in most cases be determined from the peak energy of the energy density spectra (ν {{ F }}ν ), called “{E}{{peak}}.” Distributions of {E}{{peak}} have been compiled for time-resolved spectra from bright GRBs, as well as time-averaged spectra and peak flux spectra for nearly every burst observed by the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory Burst And Transient Source Experiment and the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Even when determined by an instrument with a broad energy band, such as GBM (8 keV to 40 MeV), the distributions themselves peak at around 240 keV in the observer’s frame, with a spread of roughly a decade in energy. {E}{{peak}} can have considerable evolution (sometimes greater than one decade) within any given burst, as amply demonstrated by single pulses in GRB 110721A and GRB 130427A. Meanwhile, several luminosity or energy relations have been proposed to correlate with either the time-integrated or peak flux {E}{{peak}}. Thus, when discussing correlations with {E}{{peak}}, the question arises, “Which {E}{{peak}}?” A single burst may be characterized by any of a number of values for {E}{{peak}} that are associated with it. Using a single-pulse simulation model with spectral evolution as a proxy for the type of spectral evolution observed in many bursts, we investigate how the time-averaged {E}{{peak}} emerges from the spectral evolution within a single pulse, how this average naturally correlates with the peak flux derived {E}{{peak}} in a burst, and how the distribution in {E}{{peak}} values from many bursts derives its surprisingly narrow width.

  17. Burst investigation on zircaloy-4 claddings in inert environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Burst investigations on zircaloy-4 cladding in argon environment. • Clad wall displacement measurement. • Effect of internal overpressure and heating rate on burst parameters. • Semi-empirical correlation for burst stress has been proposed. - Abstract: An extensive burst investigation has been carried out on the zircaloy-4 claddings in an inert environment to simulate clad burst during a postulated loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA) conditions. The parameters varied during the burst experiments were heating rate and internal overpressure. The temperature, internal overpressure and ballooning data were monitored online and recorded during the heating process of burst specimen. In addition, post-experiment measurements were also conducted on the burst specimen to determine various burst parameters–burst strains and burst stress. A semi-empirical correlation was developed to predict the burst stress for a given burst temperature. A reasonable agreement between the predicted and experimental data has been observed. The proposed correlation was also compared with available established correlation for steam environment

  18. Gamma ray bursts observed with WATCH‐EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, Niels; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    The WATCH wide field x‐ray monitor has the capability of independently locating bright Gamma Ray Bursts to 1° accuracy. We report the preliminary positions of 12 Gamma Ray Bursts observed with the WATCH monitor flown on the ES spacecraft EURECA during its 11 month mission. Also the recurrence of...

  19. A Character Segmentation Proposal for High-Speed Visual Monitoring of Expiration Codes on Beverage Cans

    OpenAIRE

    José C. Rodríguez-Rodríguez; Alexis Quesada-Arencibia; Roberto Jr. Moreno-Díaz; Carmelo R. García

    2016-01-01

    Expiration date labels are ubiquitous in the food industry. With the passage of time, almost any food becomes unhealthy, even when well preserved. The expiration date is estimated based on the type and manufacture/packaging time of that particular food unit. This date is then printed on the container so it is available to the end user at the time of consumption. MONICOD (MONItoring of CODes); an industrial validator of expiration codes; allows the expiration code printed on a drink can to be ...

  20. Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

    OpenAIRE

    Brdar, Vedran; Kopp, Joachim; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stell...

  1. Sensing the danger. Can tsunami early warning systems benefit from test ban monitoring?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An editorial in the February 2005 edition of the Magazine for European Research pointed to the very issue of responsibility: Improvements are always possible, of course, but the very nature of a 'natural disaster' is that while not entirely absolving humans of responsibility it surpasses our means to deal with and even understand the forces at work. But science can help enhance our knowledge. For if there is one subject that the Asian tragedy has highlighted, it is the importance of putting in place coordinated early warning systems for earthquakes and, in particular, the absence of effective monitoring of tsunamis in the Indian Ocean. A concerted effort is now being made to develop a coordinated system of systems - bringing together organizations and initiatives that together can put in place an early warning system. The Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO), set-up to monitor adherence to the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty, is one organization seen to contribute to a coordinated early warning system

  2. A Character Segmentation Proposal for High-Speed Visual Monitoring of Expiration Codes on Beverage Cans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José C. Rodríguez-Rodríguez

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Expiration date labels are ubiquitous in the food industry. With the passage of time, almost any food becomes unhealthy, even when well preserved. The expiration date is estimated based on the type and manufacture/packaging time of that particular food unit. This date is then printed on the container so it is available to the end user at the time of consumption. MONICOD (MONItoring of CODes; an industrial validator of expiration codes; allows the expiration code printed on a drink can to be read. This verification occurs immediately after printing. MONICOD faces difficulties due to the high printing rate (35 cans per second and problematic lighting caused by the metallic surface on which the code is printed. This article describes a solution that allows MONICOD to extract shapes and presents quantitative results for the speed and quality.

  3. How Long does a Burst Burst?

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Bin-Bin; Murase, Kohta; Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael S

    2013-01-01

    Several gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) last much longer (~ hours) in gamma-rays than typical long GRBs (~ minutes), and recently it was proposed that these "ultra-long GRBs" may form a distinct population, probably with a different (e.g. blue supergiant) progenitor than typical GRBs. However, Swift observations have suggested that many GRBs have extended central engine activities manifested as flares and internal plateaus in X-rays. We perform a comprehensive study on a large sample of Swift GRBs with XRT observations to investigate GRB central engine activity duration and to check whether ultra-long GRBs are special. We define burst duration t_{burst} based on both gamma-ray and X-ray light curves rather than using gamma-ray observations only. We show that the distribution of t_{burst} peaks at ~ 320s for the entire sample, with 17.6% GRBs having t_{burst} > 10^3 s and 5.4% GRBs having t_{burst} > 10^4 s. The distribution shows a tail at the long t_{burst} end. The existence of a separate population is not ruled ou...

  4. Binary tree-based fault location algorithm for optical burst switching network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ru-yan; LIU Dan; PENG Huan-jia; LV Ke-wei

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes an effective method of fault location based on a binary tree for optical burst switching (OBS) network. To minimize the monitoring cost, we divide the network into several monitor domains by introducing monitoring-cycle algorithms. In order to generate an exclusive code, we modify the monitoring cycle algorithm when two nodes have the same code. Through the binary tree algorithm, a pre-computation of faults in the OBS network can be achieved. When a fault happens, we can locate it immediately and accurately. Examples have proved that the algorithm has general applicability.

  5. Can acute MPI substitute for serial troponin monitoring in the assessment of acute chest pain?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Current management of patients presenting to the Emergency Department with acute chest pain with normal or non-diagnostic ECGs involves monitoring of troponin levels on arrival and after 6-8 hours. This study investigates whether acute Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI) in the Emergency Department setting can substitute for serial troponin enzyme monitoring. One consultant read all MPI scans. Both visual (blinded apart from the sex of the subject) and CEqual analysis (supine only) were used for image interpretation. MPI scans were classified as normal, equivocal or abnormal. The peak troponin level during the chest pain admission was classified as normal (2 μg/1). 140 patients have been enrolled in the study from July 2000 to January 2002. 4 were excluded due to poor scan quality or previous MI. The sensitivity of MPI for troponin elevation was 65%. The negative predictive value of a normal scan was 91%. In 5 of the 9 false negative scans, pain had resolved at the time of tracer injection. These preliminary findings suggest that acute MPI should not be used in place of serial troponin measurement in the evaluation of patients presenting to the Emergency Department with acute chest pain. However it may have a complimentary role by identifying some patients with unstable angina without troponin elevation and by earlier identification of infarction or ischaemia. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  6. The interplay between uncertainty monitoring and working memory: Can metacognition become automatic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutinho, Mariana V C; Redford, Joshua S; Church, Barbara A; Zakrzewski, Alexandria C; Couchman, Justin J; Smith, J David

    2015-10-01

    The uncertainty response has grounded the study of metacognition in nonhuman animals. Recent research has explored the processes supporting uncertainty monitoring in monkeys. It has revealed that uncertainty responding, in contrast to perceptual responding, depends on significant working memory resources. The aim of the present study was to expand this research by examining whether uncertainty monitoring is also working memory demanding in humans. To explore this issue, human participants were tested with or without a cognitive load on a psychophysical discrimination task that included either an uncertainty response (allowing the participant to decline difficult trials) or a middle-perceptual response (labeling the same intermediate trial levels). The results demonstrated that cognitive load reduced uncertainty responding, but increased middle responding. However, this dissociation between uncertainty and middle responding was only observed when participants either lacked training or had very little training with the uncertainty response. If more training was provided, the effect of load was small. These results suggest that uncertainty responding is resource demanding, but with sufficient training, human participants can respond to uncertainty either by using minimal working memory resources or by effectively sharing resources. These results are discussed in relation to the literature on animal and human metacognition. PMID:25971878

  7. What can we learn from ultrasonic velocities monitoring during hydraulic fracturing of tight shale ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortin, Jérôme; Stanchits, Sergei

    2016-04-01

    Methods of prediction the size and aperture of created hydraulic fracture are essential for a proper design of unconventional reservoir well stimulation. Several theoretical models describing hydraulic fracture propagation have been developed. However, there is a lack of direct field measurements of hydraulic fracture dimensions, verifying results of these models. Monitoring of elastic wave parameters may be a useful tool to estimate fracture dimensions. Indeed, the elastic wave velocity in a medium containing a fracture is sensitive to the fracture geometry and its conditions: dry fracture or saturated with fluid. In this paper, we focus on ultrasonic velocities monitoring during hydraulic fracturing of tight shale. We report the results of hydraulic fracturing of Niobrara shale outcrop block of 279 x 279 x 381 mm size from Colorado, USA. In this experiment, the block was loaded in a polyaxial loading frame made by TerraTek, a Schlumberger Company. Stresses were applied to the rock blocks independently in three directions using flat jacks. Then viscous fluid was injected into borehole at a constant flow rate. 20 PZT sensors were embedded into pockets drilled in the rock. They were used for registration of Acoustic Emission (AE) signals and for periodical ultrasonic transmissions to measure P-wave velocities in different directions. Our results show that ultrasonic measurements can be useful for understanding the mechanics of the crack growth. More precisely, from the evolution of the P-velocities and their amplitudes during the loading, we are able: (i) to estimate the velocity of the hydraulic fracture which was found to be 0.15 mm/s (that is close to the fracture velocity inferred from the dynamic of AE spatial evolution). (ii) In addition, the evolution of the P-velocities during the loading shows that a liquid-free crack always precedes the liquid front. In our experiment, the lag is estimated to be 15 mm. (iii) Finally, at fixed distances from the borehole

  8. Dark Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Brdar, Vedran; Liu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    Many theories of dark matter (DM) predict that DM particles can be captured by stars via scattering on ordinary matter. They subsequently condense into a DM core close to the center of the star and eventually annihilate. In this work, we trace DM capture and annihilation rates throughout the life of a massive star and show that this evolution culminates in an intense annihilation burst coincident with the death of the star in a core collapse supernova. The reason is that, along with the stellar interior, also its DM core heats up and contracts, so that the DM density increases rapidly during the final stages of stellar evolution. We argue that, counterintuitively, the annihilation burst is more intense if DM annihilation is a p-wave process than for s-wave annihilation because in the former case, more DM particles survive until the supernova. If among the DM annihilation products are particles like dark photons that can escape the exploding star and decay to Standard Model particles later, the annihilation bu...

  9. Bursts in intermittent aeolian saltation

    CERN Document Server

    Carneiro, M V; Herrmann, H J

    2014-01-01

    Close to the onset of Aeolian particle transport through saltation we find in wind tunnel experiments a regime of intermittent flux characterized by bursts of activity. Scaling laws are observed in the time delay between each burst and in the measurements of the wind fluctuations at the critical Shields number $\\theta_c$. The time delay between each burst decreases on average with the increase of the Shields number until saltation becomes non-intermittent and the sand flux becomes continuous. A numerical model for saltation including the wind-entrainment from the turbulent fluctuations can reproduce these observations and gives insight about their origin. We present here also for the first time measurements showing that with feeding it becomes possible to sustain intermittent flux even below the threshold $\\theta_c$ for natural saltation initiation.

  10. Quasi-periodic Oscillations and Broadband Variability in Short Magnetar Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L.; Uttley, Phil; van der Horst, Alexander J.; van der Klis, Michiel; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Göǧüş, Ersin; Granot, Jonathan; Vaughan, Simon; Finger, Mark H.

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. However, with only three giant flares ever recorded, and only two with data of sufficient quality to search for QPOs, such analysis is seriously data limited. We set out a procedure for doing QPO searches in the far more numerous, short, less energetic magnetar bursts. The short, transient nature of these bursts requires the implementation of sophisticated statistical techniques to make reliable inferences. Using Bayesian statistics, we model the periodogram as a combination of red noise at low frequencies and white noise at high frequencies, which we show is a conservative approach to the problem. We use empirical models to make inferences about the potential signature of periodic and QPOs at these frequencies. We compare our method with previously used techniques and find that although it is on the whole more conservative, it is also more reliable in ruling out false positives. We illustrate our Bayesian method by applying it to a sample of 27 bursts from the magnetar SGR J0501+4516 observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and we find no evidence for the presence of QPOs in any of the bursts in the unbinned spectra, but do find a candidate detection in the binned spectra of one burst. However, whether this signal is due to a genuine quasi-periodic process, or can be attributed to unmodeled effects in the noise is at this point a matter of interpretation.

  11. QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS AND BROADBAND VARIABILITY IN SHORT MAGNETAR BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huppenkothen, Daniela; Watts, Anna L.; Uttley, Phil; Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Van der Klis, Michiel [Astronomical Institute ' ' Anton Pannekoek' ' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Office of Science and Technology, ZP12, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Goegues, Ersin [Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I -Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Granot, Jonathan [The Open University of Israel, 1 University Road, P.O. Box 808, Ra' anana 43537 (Israel); Vaughan, Simon [X-Ray and Observational Astronomy Group, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Finger, Mark H., E-mail: D.Huppenkothen@uva.nl [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    The discovery of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in magnetar giant flares has opened up prospects for neutron star asteroseismology. However, with only three giant flares ever recorded, and only two with data of sufficient quality to search for QPOs, such analysis is seriously data limited. We set out a procedure for doing QPO searches in the far more numerous, short, less energetic magnetar bursts. The short, transient nature of these bursts requires the implementation of sophisticated statistical techniques to make reliable inferences. Using Bayesian statistics, we model the periodogram as a combination of red noise at low frequencies and white noise at high frequencies, which we show is a conservative approach to the problem. We use empirical models to make inferences about the potential signature of periodic and QPOs at these frequencies. We compare our method with previously used techniques and find that although it is on the whole more conservative, it is also more reliable in ruling out false positives. We illustrate our Bayesian method by applying it to a sample of 27 bursts from the magnetar SGR J0501+4516 observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and we find no evidence for the presence of QPOs in any of the bursts in the unbinned spectra, but do find a candidate detection in the binned spectra of one burst. However, whether this signal is due to a genuine quasi-periodic process, or can be attributed to unmodeled effects in the noise is at this point a matter of interpretation.

  12. IPN localizations of Konus short gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Pal'shin, V D; Svinkin, D S; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Mazets, E P; Oleynik, P P; Ulanov, M V; Cline, T; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Trombka, J; McClanahan, T; Starr, R; Goldsten, J; Gold, R; Rau, A; von Kienlin, A; Savchenko, V; Smith, D M; Hajdas, W; Barthelmy, S D; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Krimm, H; Palmer, D; Yamaoka, K; Ohno, M; Fukazawa, Y; Hanabata, Y; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Briggs, M S; Kippen, R M; Kouveliotou, C; Meegan, C; Fishman, G; Connaughton, V; Boer, M; Guidorzi, C; Frontera, F; Montanari, E; Rossi, F; Feroci, M; Amati, L; Nicastro, L; Orlandini, M; Monte, Del; Costa, E; Donnarumma, I; Evangelista, Y; Lapshov, I; Lazzarotto, F; Pacciani, L; Rapisarda, M; Soffitta, P; Di Cocco, G; Fuschino, F; Galli, M; Labanti, C; Marisaldi, M; Atteia, J -L; Vanderspek, R; Ricker, G

    2013-01-01

    Between the launch of the GGS Wind spacecraft in 1994 November and the end of 2010, the Konus-Wind experiment detected 314 short-duration gamma-ray bursts (including 24 bursts which can be classified as short bursts with extended emission). During this period, the IPN consisted of up to eleven spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 276 bursts were obtained. We present the IPN localization data on these events.

  13. ESTIMATE OF BURSTING PRESSURE OF MILD STEEL PRESSURE VESSEL AND PRESENTATION OF BURSTING FORMULA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Chuanxiang

    2006-01-01

    In order to get more precise bursting pressure formula of mild steel, hundreds of bursting experiments of mild steel pressure vessels such as Q235(Gr.D) and 20R(1020) are done. Based on statistical data of bursting pressure and modification of Faupel formula, a more precise modified formula is given out according to the experimental data. It is proved to be more accurate after examining other bursting pressure value presented in many references. This bursting formula is very accurate in these experiments using pressure vessels with different diameter and shell thickness.Obviously, this modified bursting formula can be used in mild steel pressure vessels with different diameter and thickness of shell.

  14. Phantom bursting is highly sensitive to noise and unlikely to account for slow bursting in beta-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Gram

    2007-01-01

    cells are subjected to stochastic fluctuations in plasma membrane currents, which are likely to disturb the bursting mechanism and transform medium bursters into spikers or very fast bursters. We present a polynomial, minimal, phantom burster model and show that noise modifies the plateau fraction and......-called compound bursting can be converted to apparent slow bursting by noise, which could explain why compound bursting and mixed Ca oscillations are seen mainly in intact islets....

  15. The safety parameters monitoring system for the coal mine based on CAN bus communication and intelligent data acquisition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Guangfu; Chu Wangwen; Balbir S.Dhillon; He Wenbiao

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,a monitoring and controlling system for the safety in production and environmental parameters of a small and medium-sized coal mine has been developed after analyzing the current domestic coal production and securi-ty conditions.The client computer can convert the analog signal about the safety in production and environmental param-eters detected from the monitoring terminal into digital signal,and then,send the signal to the coal mine safety monito-ring centre.This information can be analyzed,judged,and diagnosed by the monitoring-management-controUing soft-ware for helping the manager and technical workers to control the actual underground production and security situations.The system has many advantages including high reliability,better performance of real-time monitoring,faster data com-municating and good practicability,and it can effectively prevent the occurrence of safety incidents in coal mines.

  16. A Burst-by-Burst Adaptive Joint-Detection Based CDMA Speech Transceiver

    OpenAIRE

    How, HT; Liew, TH; Kuan, EL; Hanzo, L.

    2001-01-01

    A burst-by-burst adaptive speech transceiver is proposed, which can drop its source coding rate and speech quality under transceiver control in order to invoke a more error resilient modem mode amongst less favourable channel conditions. The novel, high-quality, Adaptive Multi-Rate (AMR) speech codec [5], operated at bit rates of 4.75 and 10.2 kbps and combined with sourcesensitivity-matched Redundant Residue Number Systems (RRNS) based channel codes. Burst-by-burst adaptive Joint-Detection b...

  17. Hydrate Monitoring using Capacitive Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Bayati, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Gas hydrates are of particular interest in petroleum industry since their formation during oil-production can be a major risk factor. Gas hydrates can block pipelines, interrupt production, and in worst case even cause bursting flow lines. There are a few strategies available to monitor the hydrocarbon flow in pipelines in order to give an early warning system against hydrate formation. A potential technique is to monitor changes in the dielectric properties of the flow, and relate these to h...

  18. SDSS Pre-Burst Observations of Recent Gamma-Ray Burst Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Cool, R J; Brinkmann, J; Eisenstein, D J; Hogg, D W; Schlegel, D J; Schneider, D P; Vanden Berk, Daniel E; Berk, Daniel E. Vanden; Blanton, Michael R.; Cool, Richard J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hogg, David W.; Schlegel, David J.; Schneider, Donald P.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometry and spectroscopy in the fields of 24 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by Swift, including bursts localized by Swift, HETE-2, and INTEGRAL, after December 2004. After this bulk release, we plan to provide individual releases of similar data shortly after the localization of future bursts falling in the SDSS survey area. These data provide a solid basis for the astrometric and photometric calibration of follow-up afterglow searches and monitoring. Furthermore, the images provided with this release will allow observers to find transient objects up to a magnitude fainter than possible with Digitized Sky Survey image comparisons.

  19. Burst Fragmentation Model Based on Sequential Burst Allocation Algorithm for Mobile WiMAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaid G. Ali

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available the downlink Bandwidth resources of WiMAX are allocated by the burst allocation algorithm. The algorithm is responsible for calculating the appropriate location of a number of the smallest unit of bandwidth which is called the slot for all users within the downlink subframe in the form of bursts. Resource wastage in the form of unused and unallocated slots is a real common problem accompanies resource management in the burst allocation algorithms. This paper investigates the Sequential Burst Allocation (SBA that based on sequential slot allocation and burst fragmentation. An analytical model of frame utilization has been derived. Moreover, this paper presents criteria of burst fragmentation and investigates the effect of burst fragmentation to the allocation efficiency. It has been observed from the results that the SBA algorithm outperforms the Standard (ST algorithm in term of number of users and resource wastage reduction per frame. The research results illustrates that burst fragmentation can enhance the proportion of frame utilization with minor effect to the overhead size. As well as, the results are useful to be a heuristic guide line for MAC layer scheduler to decide the best burst size that can be used.

  20. Closest Gamma Ray Burst Providing Scientists With Crucial Test for Burst Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    -ray observations, visible light from GRB 030329 was observed by 65 telescopes around the world. At its brightest, the visible light from this burst was detectable with moderate-sized amateur telescopes. Gamma Ray Bursts were first detected in 1967 by a satellite monitoring compliance with the 1963 atmospheric nuclear test-ban treaty. For three decades thereafter, astronomers were unable to determine their distances from Earth, and thus were unable to begin understanding the physics underlying the explosions. In 1997, the first distance measurements were made to GRBs, and the NSF's Very Large Array (VLA) detected the first radio emission from a GRB afterglow. Once scientists determined that GRBs originate in distant galaxies and that they probably occur in regions of those galaxies where stars are actively forming, some 200 proposed models for what causes GRBs were reduced to a handful of viable models. Most scientists now believe that GRBs arise from a violent explosion that ends the life of a star much more massive than the Sun. Whereas such an explosion as a typical supernova leaves a dense neutron star, a GRB explosion leaves a black hole, a concentration of mass with gravitational pull so strong that not even light can escape it. The VLBA is a continent-wide system of ten radio- telescope antennas, ranging from Hawaii in the west to the U.S. Virgin Islands in the east, providing the greatest resolving power, or ability to see fine detail, in astronomy. Dedicated in 1993, the VLBA is operated from the NRAO's Array Operations Center in Socorro, New Mexico. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation, operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  1. The 2006-2007 Active Phase of Anomalous X-Ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts,and Burst Spectral Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavriil, Fotis P.; Dib, Rim; Kaspi, Victoria M.

    2011-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in > 11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 0.4 - 1.8 x 10(exp 3) s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT approx 2 - 9 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus two emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of (1.9+/-0.4) x 10(exp -7) Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a net spin-down of the pulsar. Within the framework of the magnetar model, the net spin-down of the star could be explained by regions of the superfluid that rotate. slower than the rest. The bursts, flux enhancements, and pulse morphology changes can be explained as arising from crustal deformations due to stresses imposed by the highly twisted internal magnetic field. However, unlike other AXP outbursts, we cannot account for a major twist being implanted in the magnetosphere.

  2. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy, trap...

  3. Can satellite-based monitoring techniques be used to quantify volcanic CO2 emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Carn, Simon A.; Kuze, Akihiko; Kataoka, Fumie; Shiomi, Kei; Goto, Naoki; Popp, Christoph; Ajiro, Masataka; Suto, Hiroshi; Takeda, Toru; Kanekon, Sayaka; Sealing, Christine; Flower, Verity

    2014-05-01

    Since 2010, we investigate and improve possible methods to regularly target volcanic centers from space in order to detect volcanic carbon dioxide (CO2) point source anomalies, using the Japanese Greenhouse gas Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Our long-term goals are: (a) better spatial and temporal coverage of volcano monitoring techniques; (b) improvement of the currently highly uncertain global CO2 emission inventory for volcanoes, and (c) use of volcanic CO2 emissions for high altitude, strong point source emission and dispersion studies in atmospheric science. The difficulties posed by strong relief, orogenic clouds, and aerosols are minimized by a small field of view, enhanced spectral resolving power, by employing repeat target mode observation strategies, and by comparison to continuous ground based sensor network validation data. GOSAT is a single-instrument Earth observing greenhouse gas mission aboard JAXA's IBUKI satellite in sun-synchronous polar orbit. GOSAT's Fourier-Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) has been producing total column XCO2 data since January 2009, at a repeat cycle of 3 days, offering great opportunities for temporal monitoring of point sources. GOSAT's 10 km field of view can spatially integrate entire volcanic edifices within one 'shot' in precise target mode. While it doesn't have any spatial scanning or mapping capability, it does have strong spectral resolving power and agile pointing capability to focus on several targets of interest per orbit. Sufficient uncertainty reduction is achieved through comprehensive in-flight vicarious calibration, in close collaboration between NASA and JAXA. Challenges with the on-board pointing mirror system have been compensated for employing custom observation planning strategies, including repeat sacrificial upstream reference points to control pointing mirror motion, empirical individualized target offset compensation, observation pattern simulations to minimize view angle azimuth. Since summer 2010

  4. Fatigue in aerostructures--where structural health monitoring can contribute to a complex subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, Christian; Buderath, Matthias

    2007-02-15

    An overview of the aircraft design and maintenance process is given with specific emphasis on the fatigue design as well as the phenomenon of the ageing aircraft observed over the life cycle. The different measures taken to guarantee structural integrity along the maintenance process are addressed. The impact of structural health monitoring as a means of possibly revolutionizing the current aircraft structural monitoring and design process is emphasized and comparison is made to jet engines and helicopters, where health monitoring has already found the respective breakthrough. PMID:17255052

  5. Can Pelvis Angle be Monitored From Seat Support Forces in Healthy Subjects?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geffen, van Paul; Veltink, Peter H.; Koopman, Bart F.J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Individuals who cannot functionally reposition themselves often need dynamic seating interventions that change body posture from automatic chair adjustments. Pelvis alignment directly affects sitting posture, and systems that adjust and monitor pelvis angle simultaneously might be applicable to cont

  6. An Intelligent Segmented Burst Assembly Mechanism in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Yi-Yuan; ZHANG Jian-Guo

    2008-01-01

    We focus on the burst assembly mechanism and propose a new intelligent method in which the burst is assembled from several internet protocol (IP) packets in which the number of IP packets is changed according to the traffic load and the burst is segmented into several parts, called the ISOBS mechanism. The average burst assembly time of the ISOBS mechanism decreases as compared with the fixed-assembly-time and fixed-assembly-time-and-length mechanisms. The loss ratio decreases 50% as compared with the general optical burst switching (OBS) mechanism. The last segment can carry high quality of service (QOS) information. We can achieve that the loss ratio of the last segment is almost zero when the traffic load is less than 0.05. When the traffic load is 0.9, the loss ratio of the last segment is 0.0041. The ISOBS can support to transmit different QOS data.

  7. An Intelligent Segmented Burst Assembly Mechanism in Optical Burst Switching Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We focus on the burst assembly mechanism and propose a new intelligent method in which the burst is assembled from several internet protocol (IP) packets in which the number of IP packets is changed according to the traffic load and the burst is segmented into several parts, called the ISOBS mechanism. The average burst assembly time of the ISOBS mechanism decreases as compared with the fixed-assembly-time and fixed-assembly-time-and-length mechanisms. The loss ratio decreases 50% as compared with the general optical burst switching (OBS) mechanism. The last segment can carry high quality of service (QOS) information. We can achieve that the loss ratio of the last segment is almost zero when the traffic load is less than 0.05. When the traffic load is 0.9, the loss ratio of the last segment is 0.0041. The ISOBS can support to transmit different QOS data. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  8. CAN AUSTROPOTAMOBIUS ITALICUS MERIDIONALIS BE USED AS A MONITORING INSTRUMENT IN CENTRAL ITALY? PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCALICI M.

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Attributing the term bioindicator to a species complex such as Austropotamobius pallipes is complicated, considering that the meaning given to a bioindicator can vary according to the geographic position, and that A. pallipes species complex has been divided into 2 species and 5 subspecies, the possibility of using A. i. meridionalis as a bioindicator in watercourses of Central Italy was evaluated. To this end, we analysed the structure and abundance of a number of crayfish populations and then compared them to the water quality of the corresponding watercourses, using E.B.I. (Extended Biotic Index. This index provides information on water quality through an analysis of the macrobenthos community. The watercourses are assigned to various classes (from I to V, increasing the degrees of alteration. This study was carried out in several watercourses near Rome. The abundance of crayfish was found to be greatest in those tracts that are assessed as class I, where the populations seem well structured with individuals of various sizes and the sex ratio is approximately 1:1. In contrast, in class II we found a reduced presence of specimens, mostly in bad conditions. No crayfish specimens were observed in watercourses designated as class III. In light of these preliminary results, it does not seem possible to consider A. i. meridionalis as a bioindicator, given that one of the typical characteristics of a biological indicator (wide distribution is not met. Though these results illustrate the possibility of using A. i. meridionalis populations as an excellent monitoring instrument in Central Italy.

  9. From Enigma to Tool: Gamma-Ray Burst Reveals Secrets of Host Galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Five years ago, astronomers knew almost nothing about Gamma Ray Bursts. Now, a team of observers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope has used a gamma-ray burst as a powerful tool to unveil the nature of the galaxy in which it occurred, more than 7 billion light-years away. VLA Images of GRB980703 Host Galaxy "We believe that gamma-ray bursts may become one of the best available tools for studying the history of star formation in the universe," said Edo Berger, a graduate student at Caltech. Berger worked with Caltech astronomy professor Shri Kulkarni and Dale Frail, an astronomer at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, New Mexico, to study a gamma-ray burst first seen on July 3, 1998. The astronomers presented their results at the American Astronomical Society's meeting in Pasadena, CA. "For the first time, we've seen the host galaxy of a gamma-ray burst with a radio telescope," Berger said. "Previously, gamma-ray-burst host galaxies have been seen with optical telescopes, but detecting this galaxy with a radio telescope has given us new clues about the nature of the galaxy itself -- clues we couldn't have gotten any other way," he added. For example, based on optical-telescope studies, astronomers estimated that new stars are forming in the host galaxy at the rate of about the mass equivalent of 20 suns per year. However, data from the radio observations show that the actual star-formation rate is 25 times greater -- the mass equivalent of 500 suns per year. "With the VLA, we are seeing the entire region of star formation in this galaxy, including the areas so dusty that visible light can't get out," said Frail. Gamma-ray bursts are the most powerful explosions since the Big Bang. First discovered in 1967 by a satellite launched to monitor compliance with the atmospheric nuclear test ban treaty, gamma-ray bursts remained one of astronomy's premier mysteries for 30 years. For three decades

  10. Rock Burst Mechanics: Insight from Physical and Mathematical Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Vacek, J.; J. Chocholoušová

    2008-01-01

    Rock burst processes in mines are studied by many groups active in the field of geomechanics. Physical and mathematical modelling can be used to better understand the phenomena and mechanisms involved in the bursts. In the present paper we describe both physical and mathematical models of a rock burst occurring in a gallery of a coal mine.For rock bursts (also called bumps) to occur, the rock has to possess certain particular rock burst properties leading to accumulation of energy and the pot...

  11. Observations of cosmic gamma ray bursts with WATCH on EURECA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren; Lund, N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.

    1995-01-01

    19 Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts were detected by the WATCH wide field X-ray monitor during the 11 months flight of EURECA. The identification of the bursts were complicated by a high frequency of background of events caused by high energy cosmic ray interactions in the detector and by low energy......, trapped particle streams. These background events may simulate the count rate increases characteristic of cosmic gamma bursts. For 12 of the detected events, their true cosmic nature have been confirmed through consistent localizations of the burst sources based on several independent WATCH data sets. The...... derived positions of the bursts are reported. Additionally, most of the events have been confirmed by coincident detections with instruments on other spacecrafts. The features of two of the bursts and the results of searches for related events in the optical are described....

  12. First Very Low Frequency detection of short repeated bursts from magnetar SGR J1550-5418

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Y T; Bertoni, F C P; Fagundes, P R; Chau, J; Schuch, N J; Hayakawa, M; Hobara, Y; Terasawa, T; Takahashi, T

    2010-01-01

    We report on the first detection of ionospheric disturbances caused by short repeated gamma-ray bursts from the magnetar SGR J1550-5418. Very low frequency (VLF) radio wave data obtained in South America clearly show sudden amplitude and phase changes at the corresponding times of eight SGR bursts. Maximum amplitude and phase changes of the VLF signals appear to be correlated with the gamma-ray fluence. On the other hand, VLF recovery timescales do not show any significant correlation with the fluence, possibly suggesting that the bursts' spectra are not similar to each other. In summary, the Earth's ionosphere can be used as a very large gamma-ray detector and the VLF observations provide us with a new method to monitor high energy astrophysical phenomena without interruption such as Earth Occultation.

  13. Linking burst-only X-ray binary sources to faint X-ray transients

    OpenAIRE

    Campana, S.

    2009-01-01

    Burst-only sources are X-ray sources showing up only during short bursts but with no persistent emission (at least with the monitoring instrument which led to their discovery). These bursts have spectral characteristics consistent with thermonuclear (type I) burst from the neutron star surface, linking burst-only sources to neutron star X-ray binary transients. We have carried out a series of snapshot observations of the entire sample of burst-only sources with the Swift satellite. We found a...

  14. Monitoring the Long-Term Performance of Engineered Containment Systems for Radioactive Waste: What can We Learn From Ecological Monitoring Approaches?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ecological interactions as they are expressed over decades and centuries in respect to federal long-term monitoring programs, and to delineate how multifaceted sets of ecological data can be used to interpret the overall integrity of ecosystems. Furthermore, important components of these programs will be identified that may have merit in the design of long-term monitoring programs for hazardous chemical and radioactive waste sites. (authors)

  15. What can stable isotope analysis of top predator tissues contribute to monitoring of tundra ecosystems?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ehrich, D.; Ims, R.A.; Yoccoz, N.G.; Lecomte, N.; Killengreen, S.T.; Fuglei, E.; Rodnikova, A.Y.; Ebbinge, B.S.; Menyushina, I.E.; Nolet, Bart; Prokovsky, I.G.; Popov, I.Y.; Schmidt, N.M.; Sokolov, A.; Sokolova, N.A.; Sokolov, V.A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how climate change and increasing human impacts may exert pressure on ecosystems and threaten biodiversity requires efficient monitoring programs. Indicator species have been proposed as useful tools, and predators and their diet may be particularly suitable. The vast and remote arctic

  16. Post Launch Monitoring of food products : what can be learned from pharmacovigilance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Puijenbroek, E P; Hepburn, P A; Herd, T M; van Grootheest, A C

    2007-01-01

    Post Launch Monitoring (PLM) is one of the new approaches that are used in assessing the safety of novel foods or ingredients. It shares a close resemblance with procedures applied in the field of medicines, where Post Marketing Surveillance (PMS) has been carried out since the beginning of the 1960

  17. Bursts of intermediate ions in atmospheric air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hõrrak, U.; Salm, J.; Tammet, H.

    1998-06-01

    The mobility spectrum of air ions has been measured at Tahkuse Observatory in Estonia for several years. The average concentration of intermediate ions with mobilities of 0.05-0.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 in atmospheric air is about 50 cm-3. On the level of this low background, high concentration bursts of intermediate air ions occur occasionally. A burst can be followed by subsequent evolution of intermediate ions into larger ones. To explain the bursts of intermediate air ions, two hypotheses can be advanced: (1)A burst of neutral particles occurs due to homogeneous nucleation, and the particles are charged by the attachment of cluster ions. (2) The cluster ions grow by ion-induced nucleation in proper environmental conditions.

  18. Cosmological parametrization of $\\gamma$ ray burst models

    CERN Document Server

    Linder, E V

    1996-01-01

    Using three parametrizations of the gamma ray burst count data comparison is made to cosmological source models. While simple models can fit and faint end slope constraints, the addition of a logarithmic count range variable describing the curvature of the counts shows that models with no evolution or evolution power law in redshift with index less than 10 fail to satisfy simultaneously all three descriptors of the burst data. The cosmological source density that would be required for a fit is illustrated.

  19. TEMPORAL DECONVOLUTION STUDY OF LONG AND SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURST LIGHT CURVES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Connaughton, Valerie; Paciesas, William; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Fishman, Gerald [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander J.; Meegan, Charles A. [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Institute of Astro and Particle Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Diehl, Roland; Foley, Suzanne; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fitzpatrick, Gerard [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M. [Jacobs Technology, Inc., Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); and others

    2012-01-10

    The light curves of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are believed to result from internal shocks reflecting the activity of the GRB central engine. Their temporal deconvolution can reveal potential differences in the properties of the central engines in the two populations of GRBs which are believed to originate from the deaths of massive stars (long) and from mergers of compact objects (short). We present here the results of the temporal analysis of 42 GRBs detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We deconvolved the profiles into pulses, which we fit with lognormal functions. The distributions of the pulse shape parameters and intervals between neighboring pulses are distinct for both burst types and also fit with lognormal functions. We have studied the evolution of these parameters in different energy bands and found that they differ between long and short bursts. We discuss the implications of the differences in the temporal properties of long and short bursts within the framework of the internal shock model for GRB prompt emission.

  20. Temporal Deconvolution study of Long and Short Gamma-Ray Burst Light curves

    CERN Document Server

    Bhat, P N; Connaughton, Valerie; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; van der Horst, Alexander J; Paciesas, William; Meegan, Charles A; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Burgess, Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty M; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Guiriec, Sylvain; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kippen, Marc; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    The light curves of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) are believed to result from internal shocks reflecting the activity of the GRB central engine. Their temporal deconvolution can reveal potential differences in the properties of the central engines in the two populations of GRBs which are believed to originate from the deaths of massive stars (long) and from mergers of compact objects (short). We present here the results of the temporal analysis of 42 GRBs detected with the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor onboard the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We deconvolved the profiles into pulses, which we fit with lognormal functions. The distributions of the pulse shape parameters and intervals between neighboring pulses are distinct for both burst types and also fit with lognormal functions. We have studied the evolution of these parameters in different energy bands and found that they differ between long and short bursts. We discuss the implications of the differences in the temporal properties of long and short bursts within t...

  1. QKD-Based Secured Burst Integrity Design for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A. M.; Sivasubramanian, A.; Parvathavarthini, B.

    2016-03-01

    The field of optical transmission has undergone numerous advancements and is still being researched mainly due to the fact that optical data transmission can be done at enormous speeds. It is quite evident that people prefer optical communication when it comes to large amount of data involving its transmission. The concept of switching in networks has matured enormously with several researches, architecture to implement and methods starting with Optical circuit switching to Optical Burst Switching. Optical burst switching is regarded as viable solution for switching bursts over networks but has several security vulnerabilities. However, this work exploited the security issues associated with Optical Burst Switching with respect to integrity of burst. This proposed Quantum Key based Secure Hash Algorithm (QKBSHA-512) with enhanced compression function design provides better avalanche effect over the conventional integrity algorithms.

  2. Focal mechanism caused by fracture or burst of a coal pillar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO An-ye; DOU Lin-ming; CHEN Guo-xiang; GONG Si-yuan; WANG Yu-gang; LI Zhi-hua

    2008-01-01

    As a regional, real-time and dynamic method, microseismic monitoring technology is quite an appropriate technology for forecasting geological hazards, such as rock bursts, mine tremors, coal and gas outbursts and can even be used to prevent or at least reduce these disasters. The study of the focal mechanisms of different seismic sources is the prerequisite and basis for forecasting rock burst by microseismic monitoring technology. Based on the analysis on the mechanism and fracture course of coal pillars where rock bursts occur mostly, the equivalent point source model of the seismicity caused by a coal pillar was created. Given the model, the seismic displacement equation of a coal pillar was analyzed and the seismic mechanism was pointed out by seismic wave theory. The course of the fracture of the coal pillar was simulated closely in the laboratory and the equivalent microseismic signals of the fractures of the coal pillar were acquired using a TDS-6 experimental system. The results show that, by the pressure and friction of a medium near the seismic source, both a compression wave and a shear wave will be emitted and shear fracture will be induced at the moment of breakage. The results can be used to provide an academic basis to forecast and prevent rock bursts or tremors in a coal pillar.

  3. A GMPLS/OBS network architecture enabling QoS-aware end-to-end burst transport

    OpenAIRE

    Pedroso, Pedro; Perelló Muntan, Jordi; Spadaro, Salvatore; Careglio, Davide; Solé Pareta, Josep; Klinkowski, Miroslaw

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a Generalized Multi-Protocol Label Switching (GMPLS)-enabled Optical Burst Switched (OBS) network architecture featuring end-to-end QoS-aware burst transport services. This is achieved by setting up burst Label Switched Paths (LSPs) properly dimensioned to match specific burst drop probability requirements. These burst LSPs are used for specific guaranteed QoS levels, whereas the remaining network capacity can be left for best-effort burst support. Aiming to ensure...

  4. How Sandia's automated on-line monitoring system can cut emergency diesel costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a system that could reduce the need for additional back-up power equipment at nuclear power plants by automatically monitoring the starting ability of emergency diesel generators. The equipment has arisen out of US DoE efforts on nuclear plant life extension, which have been looking at predicting equipment performance as a means of reducing equipment surveillance testing, maintenance and malfunctions. (author)

  5. How Enhancing Atmospheric Monitoring and Modelling can be Effective for the Stockholm Convention on POPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Guardans

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The presence of toxic substances such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs in the environment, and in organisms including humans, is a serious public health and environmental problem, even at low levels and poses a challenging scientific problem. The Stockholm Convention on POPs (SC entered into force in 2004 and is a large international effort under the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP to facilitate cooperation in monitoring, modeling and the design of effective and fair ways to deal with POPs globally. This paper is a contribution to the ongoing effectiveness evaluation (EE work aimed at the assessment and enhancement of the effectiveness of the actions undertaken under the SC. First we consider some aspects related to the monitoring of POPs in the environment and then briefly review modeling frameworks that have been used to simulate long range transport (LRT of POPs. In the final sections we describe the institutional arrangements providing the conditions for this work to unfold now and some suggestions for it in the future. A more effective use of existing monitoring data could be made if scientists who deposited them in publicly available and supervised sites were rewarded in academic and professional terms. We also suggest the development of multi-media, nested, Lagrangian models to improve the understanding of changes over time in the environment and individual organisms.

  6. The link between coherent burst oscillations, burst spectral evolution and accretion state in 4U 1728-34

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Guobao; Zamfir, Michael; Cumming, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Coherent oscillations and the evolution of the X-ray spectrum during thermonuclear X-ray bursts in accreting neutron-star X-ray binaries have been studied intensively but separately. We analysed all the X-ray bursts of the source 4U 1728-34 with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We found that the presence of burst oscillations can be used to predict the behaviour of the blackbody radius during the cooling phase of the bursts. If a burst shows oscillations, during the cooling phase the blackbody radius remains more or less constant for ~2 - ~8s, whereas in bursts that do not show oscillations the blackbody radius either remains constant for more than ~2 - ~8s or it shows a rapid (faster than ~2s) decrease and increase. Both the presence of burst oscillations and the time-dependent spectral behaviour of the bursts are affected by accretion rate. We also found that the rise time and convexity of the bursts' light curve are different in bursts with and without oscillations in 4U 1728--34. Bursts with oscillations ...

  7. FRBCAT: The Fast Radio Burst Catalogue

    CERN Document Server

    Petroff, E; Jameson, A; Keane, E F; Bailes, M; Kramer, M; Morello, V; Tabbara, D; van Straten, W

    2016-01-01

    Here we present a catalogue of known Fast Radio Burst (FRB) sources in the form of an online catalogue, FRBCAT. The catalogue includes information about the instrumentation used for the observations for each detected burst, the measured quantities from each observation, and model-dependent quantities derived from observed quantities. To aid in consistent comparisons of burst properties such as width and signal-to-noise ratios we have reprocessed all the bursts for which we have access to the raw data, with software which we make available. The originally derived properties are also listed for comparison. The catalogue is hosted online as a MySQL database which can also be downloaded in tabular or plain text format for off-line use. This database will be maintained for use by the community for studies of the FRB population as it grows.

  8. High Energy Neutrinos from the Gravitational Wave event GW150914 possibly associated with a short Gamma-Ray Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Moharana, Reetanjali; Gupta, Nayantara; Meszaros, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-energy neutrino (HEN) and gravitational wave (GW) can probe astrophysical sources in addition to electromagnetic observations. Multimessenger studies can reveal nature of the sources which may not be discerned from one type of signal alone. We discuss HEN emission in connection with the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (ALIGO) event GW150914 which could be associated with a short gamma-ray burst (GRB) detected by the $Fermi$ Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) 0.4 s after the GW event and within localization uncertainty of the GW event. We calculate HEN flux from this short GRB, GW150914-GBM, and show that non-detection of a high-energy starting event (HESE) by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory can constrain the total isotropic-equivalent jet energy of this short burst to be less than $3\\times 10^{52}$ erg.

  9. SVOM gamma ray monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The space-based multi-band astronomical Variable Object Monitor(SVOM) mission is dedicated to the detection,localization and broad-band study of gamma-ray bursts(GRBs) and other high-energy transient phenomena.The gamma ray monitor(GRM) onboard is designed to observe GRBs up to 5 MeV.With this instrument,one of the key GRB parameters,Epeak,can be easily measured in the hard X-ray band.It can achieve a detection rate of 100 GRBs per year which ensures the scientific output of SVOM.

  10. Can Weather Radars Help Monitoring and Forecasting Wind Power Fluctuations at Large Offshore Wind Farms?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trombe, Pierre-Julien; Pinson, Pierre; Madsen, Henrik;

    2011-01-01

    The substantial impact of wind power fluctuations at large offshore wind farms calls for the development of dedicated monitoring and prediction approaches. Based on recent findings, a Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) was installed at Horns Rev with the aim of improving predictability, controlability...... and potentially maintenance planning. Additional images are available from a Doppler radar covering the same area. The parallel analysis of rain events detection and of regime sequences in wind (and power) fluctuations demonstrates the interest of employing weather radars for a better operation and...

  11. Investigation of Primordial Black Hole Bursts Using Interplanetary Network Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Hurley, K.; MacGibbon, J. H.; Svinkin, D. S.; Aptekar, R. L.; Golenetskii, S. V.; Frederiks, D. D.; Pal'shin, V. D.; Goldsten, J.; Boynton, W.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Rau, A.; von Kienlin, A.; Zhang, X.; Connaughton, V.; Yamaoka, K.; Ohno, M.; Ohmori, N.; Feroci, M.; Frontera, F.; Guidorzi, C.; Cline, T.; Gehrels, N.; Krimm, H. A.; McTiernan, J.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating primordial black holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the distance to GRBs using detections from widely separated, non-imaging spacecraft. This method can determine the actual distance to the burst if it is local. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short-duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 1013–1018 cm (7–105 au) range, which are consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming that these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate lower limits on the PBH burst evaporation rate in the solar neighborhood.

  12. Can students evaluate their understanding of cause-and-effect relations? The effects of diagram completion on monitoring accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Mariëtte H; de Bruin, Anique B H; van Gog, Tamara; van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G; Dunlosky, John

    2014-09-01

    For effective self-regulated study of expository texts, it is crucial that learners can accurately monitor their understanding of cause-and-effect relations. This study aimed to improve adolescents' monitoring accuracy using a diagram completion task. Participants read six texts, predicted performance, selected texts for restudy, and were tested for comprehension. Three groups were compared, in which learners either completed causal diagrams immediately after reading, completed them after a delay, or received no-diagram control instructions. Accuracy of predictions of performance was highest for learning of causal relations following delayed diagram completion. Completing delayed diagrams focused learners specifically on their learning of causal relations, so this task did not improve monitoring of learning of factual information. When selecting texts for restudy, the participants followed their predictions of performance to the same degree, regardless of monitoring accuracy. Fine-grained analyses also showed that, when completing delayed diagrams, learners based judgments on diagnostic cues that indicated actual understanding of connections between events in the text. Most important, delayed diagram completion can improve adolescents' ability to monitor their learning of cause-and-effect relations. PMID:24977937

  13. Can readers ignore implausibility? Evidence for nonstrategic monitoring of event-based plausibility in language comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isberner, Maj-Britt; Richter, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    We present evidence for a nonstrategic monitoring of event-based plausibility during language comprehension by showing that readers cannot ignore the implausibility of information even if it is detrimental to the task at hand. In two experiments using a Stroop-like paradigm, participants were required to provide positive and negative responses independent of plausibility in an orthographical task (Experiment 1) or a nonlinguistic color judgment task (Experiment 2) to target words that were either plausible or implausible in their context. We expected a nonstrategic assessment of plausibility to interfere with positive responses to implausible words. ANOVAs and linear mixed models analyses of the response latencies revealed a significant interaction of plausibility and required response that supported this prediction in both experiments, despite the use of two very different tasks. Moreover, it could be shown that the effect was not driven by the differential predictability of plausible and implausible words. These results suggest that plausibility monitoring is an inherent component of information processing. PMID:23165201

  14. Can pelvis angle be monitored from seat support forces in healthy subjects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geffen, Paul van; Veltink, Peter H; Koopman, Bart F J M

    2009-03-01

    Individuals who cannot functionally reposition themselves often need dynamic seating interventions that change body posture from automatic chair adjustments. Pelvis alignment directly affects sitting posture, and systems that adjust and monitor pelvis angle simultaneously might be applicable to control body posture in sitting. The present study explores whether it is feasible to monitor pelvis angle from seat support forces. Pelvis angle estimation was based on equivalent "two-force member" loading for which pelvis orientation equals the orientation of the equivalent contact force. Theoretical evaluation was done to derive important conditions for practical application. An instrumented wheelchair was developed for experimental validation in healthy subjects. Seat support forces were measured, and mechanical analysis was done to derive the equivalent contact force from which we estimated the pelvis angle. Model analysis showed a significant influence of pelvis mass, hip force, and lumbar torque on the relation between the actual pelvis angle and the predicted pelvis angle. Proper force compensation and minimal lumbar torque seemed important for accurate pelvis angle estimations. Experimental evaluation showed no body postures that involved a clear relation between the pelvis angle and the orientation of the equivalent contact force. Findings suggest that pelvis angle could not be estimated in healthy individuals under the described experimental seating conditions. Validation experiments with impaired individuals must be performed under different seating conditions to provide a better understanding whether the principle is of interest for clinical application. PMID:19154073

  15. Can Commercial Digital Cameras Be Used as Multispectral Sensors? A Crop Monitoring Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Roux

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The use of consumer digital cameras or webcams to characterize and monitor different features has become prevalent in various domains, especially in environmental applications. Despite some promising results, such digital camera systems generally suffer from signal aberrations due to the on-board image processing systems and thus offer limited quantitative data acquisition capability. The objective of this study was to test a series of radiometric corrections having the potential to reduce radiometric distortions linked to camera optics and environmental conditions, and to quantify the effects of these corrections on our ability to monitor crop variables. In 2007, we conducted a five-month experiment on sugarcane trial plots using original RGB and modified RGB (Red-Edge and NIR cameras fitted onto a light aircraft. The camera settings were kept unchanged throughout the acquisition period and the images were recorded in JPEG and RAW formats. These images were corrected to eliminate the vignetting effect, and normalized between acquisition dates. Our results suggest that 1 the use of unprocessed image data did not improve the results of image analyses; 2 vignetting had a significant effect, especially for the modified camera, and 3 normalized vegetation indices calculated with vignetting-corrected images were sufficient to correct for scene illumination conditions. These results are discussed in the light of the experimental protocol and recommendations are made for the use of these versatile systems for quantitative remote sensing of terrestrial surfaces.

  16. Physical activity intensity can be accurately monitored by smartphone global positioning system 'app'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Brett Ashley; Bruce, Lyndell; Benson, Amanda Clare

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring physical activity is important to better individualise health and fitness benefits. This study assessed the concurrent validity of a smartphone global positioning system (GPS) 'app' and a sport-specific GPS device with a similar sampling rate, to measure physical activity components of speed and distance, compared to a higher sampling sport-specific GPS device. Thirty-eight (21 female, 17 male) participants, mean age of 24.68, s = 6.46 years, completed two 2.400 km trials around an all-weather athletics track wearing GPSports Pro™ (PRO), GPSports WiSpi™ (WISPI) and an iPhone™ with a Motion X GPS™ 'app' (MOTIONX). Statistical agreement, assessed using t-tests and Bland-Altman plots, indicated an (mean; 95% LOA) underestimation of 2% for average speed (0.126 km·h(-1); -0.389 to 0.642; p exercise as medicine. PMID:26505223

  17. Observation of the huge neutron bursts in Tien-Shan neutron super monitor in the cores of extensive air showers with energy above 3 PeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Investigations being carried out at the NM64 type neutron supermonitor [1] based on the shower installation of the Tien-Shan mountain station of the Lebedev Physical Institute, have led to the discovery of an anomalous delay of the neutron signals in EAS cores [2]. The essence of this phenomenon consists of the following. The NM64 monitor (just as all other types of neutron monitors) registers the evaporation neutrons from nuclear fission produced by high energy hadrons (with energies above 100 MeV) within the lead monitor's generator. Before detection, these evaporation neutrons, created with energies of a few MeV, are thermalized to the energies about 10-2 eV) diffusing inside the monitor. The diffusion process results in an exponential time distribution of the neutron signals with a characteristic relaxation time of about 360-400 μs. Such a picture is reproduced with high accuracy when EAS with an energy below 3 PeV passes through the monitor. However, at energies above 3 PeV a small part of the showers (of about 2-3% of the whole) has a prolonged shape of the intensity of neutron signals. The fraction of such anomalous showers rapidly increases with increasing energy, and reaches about 20-30% at an EAS energy of about 10 PeV. An attempt to explain this effect as a result of neutron signal losses in registration channels [3] leads to a contradiction with the existing models of EAS development in the atmosphere, because the hadron multiplicities, necessary for an explanation of the experimental time distribution of the intensity of neutron signals, prove to be two to three orders of magnitude higher than the values predicted by the models. It should be noted that the observed effect has a threshold character: it starts to become apparent in the energy region above 3 PeV, where a characteristic knee in primary cosmic ray spectrum, of still unknown nature, is present. In the same energy region, a wide range of unexplained phenomena are also observed in

  18. Optimal Codes for the Burst Erasure Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2010-01-01

    Deep space communications over noisy channels lead to certain packets that are not decodable. These packets leave gaps, or bursts of erasures, in the data stream. Burst erasure correcting codes overcome this problem. These are forward erasure correcting codes that allow one to recover the missing gaps of data. Much of the recent work on this topic concentrated on Low-Density Parity-Check (LDPC) codes. These are more complicated to encode and decode than Single Parity Check (SPC) codes or Reed-Solomon (RS) codes, and so far have not been able to achieve the theoretical limit for burst erasure protection. A block interleaved maximum distance separable (MDS) code (e.g., an SPC or RS code) offers near-optimal burst erasure protection, in the sense that no other scheme of equal total transmission length and code rate could improve the guaranteed correctible burst erasure length by more than one symbol. The optimality does not depend on the length of the code, i.e., a short MDS code block interleaved to a given length would perform as well as a longer MDS code interleaved to the same overall length. As a result, this approach offers lower decoding complexity with better burst erasure protection compared to other recent designs for the burst erasure channel (e.g., LDPC codes). A limitation of the design is its lack of robustness to channels that have impairments other than burst erasures (e.g., additive white Gaussian noise), making its application best suited for correcting data erasures in layers above the physical layer. The efficiency of a burst erasure code is the length of its burst erasure correction capability divided by the theoretical upper limit on this length. The inefficiency is one minus the efficiency. The illustration compares the inefficiency of interleaved RS codes to Quasi-Cyclic (QC) LDPC codes, Euclidean Geometry (EG) LDPC codes, extended Irregular Repeat Accumulate (eIRA) codes, array codes, and random LDPC codes previously proposed for burst erasure

  19. Modeling gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxham, Amanda

    central engine activity and compare the model results with the observational data. We show that the observed X-ray flare phenomenology can be explained within the internal shock model. The number, width and occurring time of flares are then used to diagnose the central engine activity, putting constraints on the energy, ejection time, width and number of ejected shells. We find that the observed X-ray flare time history generally reflects the time history of the central engine, which reactivates multiple times after the prompt emission phase with progressively reduced energy. This shell model code can be used to constrain broadband observations of GRB 090926A, which showed two flares in both the Swift UVOT and XRT bands. Using the prompt emission fluence to constrain the total energy contained in the blastwave, the internal shock model requires that Lorentz factors of the shells causing flares must be less than the Lorentz factor of the blastwave when the shells are ejected. Recent observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) revealed a power law decay feature of the high energy emission (above 100 MeV), which led to the suggestion that it originates from an external shock. We analyze four GRBs (080916C, 090510, 090902B and 090926A) jointly detected by Fermi LAT and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), which have high quality lightcurves in both instrument energy bands. Using the MeV prompt emission (GBM) data, we can record the energy output from the central engine as a function of time. Assuming a constant radiative efficiency, we are able to track energy accumulation in the external shock using our internal/external shell model code and show that the late time lightcurves fit well within the external shock model, but the early time lightcurves are dominated by the internal shock component which has a shallow decay phase due to the initial pile-up of shells onto the blast wave.

  20. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hillaris, Alexander; Nindos, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In this work we study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts which extend to the hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type IV IP bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprised 48 Interplanetary type IV bursts observed by the Wind/WAVES in the 13.825 MHz?20 KHz frequency range. The dynamic spec tra of the RSTN, DAM, ARTEMIS-IV, CULGOORA, Hiraiso and IZMIRAN Radio-spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona; these were supplemented with SXR ?ux recordings from GOES and CME data from LASCO. Positional information for the coronal bursts were obtained by the Nan\\c{c}ay radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs and SXR ?ares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact; their duration was on average 106 min. This type of events were, mostly, associated with M and X class ?ares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs; 32 of these events had CME...

  1. Full System Bifurcation Analysis of Endocrine Bursting Models

    OpenAIRE

    Rieß, Thorsten; Sherman, Arthur; Tsaneva-Atanasova, KT; Osinga, HM

    2010-01-01

    Plateau bursting is typical of many electrically excitable cells, such as endocrine cells that secrete hormones and some types of neurons that secrete neurotransmitters. Although in many of these cell types the bursting patterns are regulated by the interplay between voltage-gated calcium channels and calcium-sensitive potassium channels, they can be very different. For example, in insulin-secreting pancreatic β-cells, plateau bursting is characterized by well-defined spikes during the depola...

  2. Are designers making the most of new bursting disc devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent years have seen significant advances in the technology of bursting discs for protecting plants against excess pressure. The recently developed scored reverse buckling discs burst within an accuracy of +- 3 percent. Also the pressure can rise to 90 percent of the disc's minimum burst pressure without affecting its performance. It is argued that it would now be a desirable feature in modern PWRs to update rupture disc design. (author)

  3. Safe oxygen saturation targeting and monitoring in preterm infants: can we avoid hypoxia and hyperoxia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola, Augusto; Golombek, Sergio G; Montes Bueno, María Teresa; Lemus-Varela, Lourdes; Zuluaga, Claudia; Domínguez, Fernando; Baquero, Hernando; Young Sarmiento, Alejandro E; Natta, Diego; Rodriguez Perez, Jose M; Deulofeut, Richard; Quiroga, Ana; Flores, Gabriel Lara; Morgues, Mónica; Pérez, Alfredo García-Alix; Van Overmeire, Bart; van Bel, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is a neonatal health hazard that should be avoided in clinical practice. In this review, an international team of neonatologists and nurses assessed oxygen saturation (SpO2) targeting in preterm infants and evaluated the potential weaknesses of randomised clinical trials. Conclusion SpO2 of 85–89% can increase mortality and 91–95% can cause hyperoxia and ill effects. Neither of these ranges can be recommended, and wider intermediate targets, such as 87–94% or 88–94%, may be safer. PMID:24838096

  4. Safe oxygen saturation targeting and monitoring in preterm infants: can we avoid hypoxia and hyperoxia?

    OpenAIRE

    Sola, Augusto; Golombek, Sergio G.; Montes Bueno, María Teresa; Lemus-Varela, Lourdes; Zuluaga, Claudia; Domínguez, Fernando; Baquero, Hernando; Young Sarmiento, Alejandro E; Natta, Diego; Rodriguez Perez, Jose M; Deulofeut, Richard; Quiroga, Ana; Flores, Gabriel Lara; Morgues, Mónica; Pérez, Alfredo García-Alix

    2014-01-01

    Oxygen is a neonatal health hazard that should be avoided in clinical practice. In this review, an international team of neonatologists and nurses assessed oxygen saturation (SpO2) targeting in preterm infants and evaluated the potential weaknesses of randomised clinical trials. Conclusion SpO2 of 85–89% can increase mortality and 91–95% can cause hyperoxia and ill effects. Neither of these ranges can be recommended, and wider intermediate targets, such as 87–94% or 88–94%, may be safer.

  5. Can we improve the clinical utility of respiratory rate as a monitored vital sign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liangyou; Reisner, Andrew T; Gribok, Andrei; McKenna, Thomas M; Reifman, Jaques

    2009-06-01

    Respiratory rate (RR) is a basic vital sign, measured and monitored throughout a wide spectrum of health care settings, although RR is historically difficult to measure in a reliable fashion. We explore an automated method that computes RR only during intervals of clean, regular, and consistent respiration and investigate its diagnostic use in a retrospective analysis of prehospital trauma casualties. At least 5 s of basic vital signs, including heart rate, RR, and systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressures, were continuously collected from 326 spontaneously breathing trauma casualties during helicopter transport to a level I trauma center. "Reliable" RR data were identified retrospectively using automated algorithms. The diagnostic performances of reliable versus standard RR were evaluated by calculation of the receiver operating characteristic curves using the maximum-likelihood method and comparison of the summary areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUCs). Respiratory rate shows significant data-reliability differences. For identifying prehospital casualties who subsequently receive a respiratory intervention (hospital intubation or tube thoracotomy), standard RR yields an AUC of 0.59 (95% confidence interval, 0.48-0.69), whereas reliable RR yields an AUC of 0.67 (0.57-0.77), P < 0.05. For identifying casualties subsequently diagnosed with a major hemorrhagic injury and requiring blood transfusion, standard RR yields an AUC of 0.60 (0.49-0.70), whereas reliable RR yields 0.77 (0.67-0.85), P < 0.001. Reliable RR, as determined by an automated algorithm, is a useful parameter for the diagnosis of respiratory pathology and major hemorrhage in a trauma population. It may be a useful input to a wide variety of clinical scores and automated decision-support algorithms. PMID:19008777

  6. Monitoring informovanosti veřejnosti pro problém syndromu CAN

    OpenAIRE

    HANZÁLKOVÁ, Simona

    2010-01-01

    My Bachelor Thesis consists of two parts ? a theoretical and empirical part. In the theoretical part I have briefly described the significant information related to the CAN syndrome. When compiling the theoretical part I have worked with written sources and web sites references. In the empirical part I have investigated in a questionnaire research the people?s awareness of CAN syndrome in the Town of Kolín. The questionnaire contained 16 questions, of which 8 were closed, 4 were open and 4 we...

  7. Interplanetary Type IV Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillaris, A.; Bouratzis, C.; Nindos, A.

    2016-08-01

    We study the characteristics of moving type IV radio bursts that extend to hectometric wavelengths (interplanetary type IV or type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts) and their relationship with energetic phenomena on the Sun. Our dataset comprises 48 interplanetary type IV bursts observed with the Radio and Plasma Wave Investigation (WAVES) instrument onboard Wind in the 13.825 MHz - 20 kHz frequency range. The dynamic spectra of the Radio Solar Telescope Network (RSTN), the Nançay Decametric Array (DAM), the Appareil de Routine pour le Traitement et l' Enregistrement Magnetique de l' Information Spectral (ARTEMIS-IV), the Culgoora, Hiraso, and the Institute of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation (IZMIRAN) Radio Spectrographs were used to track the evolution of the events in the low corona. These were supplemented with soft X-ray (SXR) flux-measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) and coronal mass ejections (CME) data from the Large Angle and Spectroscopic Coronagraph (LASCO) onboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO). Positional information of the coronal bursts was obtained by the Nançay Radioheliograph (NRH). We examined the relationship of the type IV events with coronal radio bursts, CMEs, and SXR flares. The majority of the events (45) were characterized as compact, their duration was on average 106 minutes. This type of events was, mostly, associated with M- and X-class flares (40 out of 45) and fast CMEs, 32 of these events had CMEs faster than 1000 km s^{-1}. Furthermore, in 43 compact events the CME was possibly subjected to reduced aerodynamic drag as it was propagating in the wake of a previous CME. A minority (three) of long-lived type {IV}_{{IP}} bursts was detected, with durations from 960 minutes to 115 hours. These events are referred to as extended or long duration and appear to replenish their energetic electron content, possibly from electrons escaping from the corresponding coronal

  8. Implications of fast radio bursts for superconducting cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highly beamed, short-duration electromagnetic bursts could be produced by superconducting cosmic string (SCS) loops oscillating in cosmic magnetic fields. We demonstrated that the basic characteristics of SCS bursts such as the electromagnetic frequency and the energy release could be consistently exhibited in the recently discovered fast radio bursts (FRBs). Moreover, it is first showed that the redshift distribution of the FRBs can also be well accounted for by the SCS burst model. Such agreements between the FRBs and SCS bursts suggest that the FRBs could originate from SCS bursts and thus they could provide an effective probe to study SCSs. The obtained values of model parameters indicate that the loops generating the FRBs have a small length scale and they are mostly formed in the radiation-dominated cosmological epoch

  9. Power Density Spectra of $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Beloborodov, A M

    1999-01-01

    Power density spectra (PDSs) of long gamma-ray bursts provide useful information on GRBs, indicating their self-similar temporal structure. The best power-law PDSs are displayed by the longest bursts (T_90 > 100 s) in which the range of self-similar time scales covers more than 2 decades. Shorter bursts have apparent PDS slopes more strongly affected by statistical fluctuations. The underlying power law can then be reproduced with high accuracy by averaging the PDSs for a large sample of bursts. This power-law has a slope alpha\\approx -5/3 and a sharp break at 1 Hz. The power-law PDS provides a new sensitive tool for studies of gamma-ray bursts. In particular, we calculate the PDSs of bright bursts in separate energy channels. The PDS flattens in the hard channel (h\

  10. A Repeating Fast Radio Burst

    CERN Document Server

    Spitler, L G; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-01-01

    Fast Radio Bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measures (i.e. integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of the fast radio bursts has led several authors to hypothesise that they originate in cataclysmic astrophysical events. Here we report the detection of ten additional bursts from the direction of FRB121102, using the 305-m Arecibo telescope. These new bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and wh...

  11. Energy sources in gamma-ray burst models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taam, Ronald E.

    1987-01-01

    The current status of energy sources in models of gamma-ray bursts is examined. Special emphasis is placed on the thermonuclear flash model which has been the most developed model to date. Although there is no generally accepted model, if the site for the gamma-ray burst is on a strongly magnetized neutron star, the thermonuclear model can qualitatively explain the energetics of some, but probably not all burst events. The critical issues that may differentiate between the possible sources of energy for gamma-ray bursts are listed and briefly discussed.

  12. Monitoring Wildlife-Vehicle Collisions in the Information Age: How Smartphones Can Improve Data Collection

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Daniel D.; Bissonette, John A.; Cramer, Patricia C.; Green, Ashley D.; Davis, Scott T.; Patrick J. Jackson; Coster, Daniel C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Currently there is a critical need for accurate and standardized wildlife-vehicle collision data, because it is the underpinning of mitigation projects that protect both drivers and wildlife. Gathering data can be challenging because wildlife-vehicle collisions occur over broad areas, during all seasons of the year, and in large numbers. Collecting data of this magnitude requires an efficient data collection system. Presently there is no widely adopted system that is both efficien...

  13. The Etiology and Outcome Analysis of Neonatal Burst Suppression EEG

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lian; ZHOU Yanxia; XU Sanqing

    2007-01-01

    The neonatal burst suppression is a severe EEG pattern and always demonstrates serious damage of nerve system. But the outcome of these patients depends on the different etiology. A total of 256 cases of video EEG recordings were analyzed in order to summarize the etiology and outcome of burst suppression. The results showed that some patients in all 17 cases of burst suppression showed EEG improvement. The etiology was the dominant factor in long term outcome. It was sug-gested that effective video EEG monitoring is helpful for etiologic study and prognosis evaluation.

  14. Mixed Burst Error Correcting Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Sethi, Amita

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we construct codes which are an improvement on the previously known block wise burst error correcting codes in terms of their error correcting capabilities. Along with different bursts in different sub-blocks, the given codes also correct overlapping bursts of a given length in two consecutive sub-blocks of a code word. Such codes are called mixed burst correcting (mbc) codes.

  15. Can we monitor groundwater head variation from space? Coupling ERS spaceborne microwave observations to groundwater dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Sutanudjaja, E.H.; Jong, S M; Van Geer, F. C.; M. F. P. Bierkens

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether the time series of a remote sensing based soil moisture product, referred as the European Remote Sensing Soil Water Index (ERS SWI), correlates to in-situ observations of groundwater heads; and can thus be used for groundwater head prediction. As a test-bed we used the Rhine-Meuse basin, where we have collected thousands of groundwater head time series. Here we performed a correlation analysis between the time series of groundwater heads a...

  16. Fast radio burst/gamma-ray burst cosmography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, both theoretical arguments and observational evidence suggested that a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) could be associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). If such FRB/GRB association systems are commonly detected in the future, the combination of dispersion measures (DM) derived from FRBs and redshifts derived from GRBs makes these systems a plausible tool to conduct cosmography. We quantify uncertainties in deriving the redshift-dependent DMIGM as a function of z and test how well dark energy models can be constrained with Monte Carlo simulations. We show that with several tens of FRB/GRB systems potentially detected in a decade or so, one may reach reasonable constraints on wCDM models. When combined with Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) data, unprecedented constraints on the dark energy equation of state may be achieved, thanks to the prospects of detecting FRB/GRB systems at relatively high redshifts. The ratio between the mean value and luminosity distance (D L(z)) is insensitive to dark energy models. This gives the prospect of applying SN Ia data to calibrate using a relatively small sample of FRB/GRB systems, allowing a reliable constraint on the baryon inhomogeneity distribution as a function of redshift. The methodology developed in this paper can also be applied if the FRB redshifts can be measured by other means. Some caveats of putting this method into practice are also discussed.

  17. Diagnostics From Three Rising Submillimeter Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Ai-Hua; Wang, Xin-Dong

    2015-01-01

    In the paper we investigate three novel rising submillimeter (THz) bursts occurred sequentially in a super-Active Region NOAA 10486. The average rising rate of the flux density above 200 GHz is only 20 sfu/GHz (corresponding spectral index $\\alpha$ of 1.6) for the THz spectral components of 2003 October 28 and November 4 bursts, while it can attain values of 235 sfu/GHz ($\\alpha$=4.8) for 2003 November 2 burst. The steeply rising THz spectrum can be produced by a population of high relativistic electrons with a low-energy cutoff of 1 MeV , while it only requires a low-energy cutoff of 30 keV for the two slowly rising THz bursts, via gyrosynchrotron (GS) radiation based on our numerical simulations of burst spectra in the magnetic dipole field case. The electron density variation is much larger in the THz source than that in microwave (MW) one. It is interesting that the THz source radius decreased by 20--50$\\%$ during the decay phase for the three events, but the MW one increased by 28$\\%$ for the 2003 Novemb...

  18. Can we monitor groundwater head variation from space? Coupling ERS spaceborne microwave observations to groundwater dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutanudjaja, E. H.; de Jong, S. M.; van Geer, F. C.; Bierkens, M. F. P.

    2012-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether the time series of a remote sensing based soil moisture product, referred as the European Remote Sensing Soil Water Index (ERS SWI), correlates to in-situ observations of groundwater heads; and can thus be used for groundwater head prediction. As a test-bed we used the Rhine-Meuse basin, where we have collected thousands of groundwater head time series. Here we performed a correlation analysis between the time series of groundwater heads and ERS SWI spatio-temporal maps of profile soil moisture content. Results show that there is a significant correlation between ERS SWI and groundwater heads. Correlation is strongest in areas with shallow groundwater. The correlation improves for most areas, including those with deep groundwater tables, if we account for the lag time (i.e. the response time of water from the upper unsaturated soil moisture zone to the saturated deeper groundwater bodies) by adding a time delay to the correlation analysis. We further investigated the possibility of using the ERS SWI to predict or estimate groundwater heads in two exercises in which we used the ERS SWI as the input of a transfer function-noise (TFN) model. (1) As a first exercise we focused on forecasting in time. For this, we calibrated the parameters of a TFN model to the head time series within the period 1995-2000 by embedding it in a Kalman filter algorithm. Once calibrated, we validated the TFN one-step-ahead forecasts for the period 2004-2007 in order to assess their prediction skill in time. (2) In a second exercise, we focused on spatio-temporal prediction. Here, we sampled the calibrated TFN parameters, derived in the first exercise, from a few selected head measurement locations. We then used these sampled TFN parameters to fit a spatial regression model with landscape attributes derived from a digital elevation model as input. The fitted regression model was subsequently used to estimate TFN parameters in all

  19. Can environmental DNA (eDNA) be used for detection and monitoring of introduced crab species in the Baltic Sea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsström, Tiia; Vasemägi, Anti

    2016-08-15

    The need to detect and monitor introduced marine species has increased with the increasing number of marine invasions. To complement standard detection and monitoring techniques, new approaches using environmental DNA (eDNA) have recently been developed. However, most of the eDNA work has focused on vertebrate species in spatially limited freshwater habitats while benthic invertebrates in coastal environments have received much less attention. Here, we evaluated the suitability of the eDNA approach for detecting benthic, hard-shelled, crustacean mud crab species in a brackish water environment. We demonstrated for the first time that eDNA from an introduced mud crab Rhithropanopeus harrisii can be successfully amplified in aquarium water samples and detected in the brackish water environment. However, the detection rate was rather low. This suggests that in contrast to freshwater vertebrates, it may be more challenging to develop a highly sensitive eDNA method for detecting crustacean species in a marine environment. PMID:27261280

  20. A mechanism for fast radio bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, Gustavo E; Vieyro, Florencia L

    2015-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are mysterious transient sources likely located at cosmological distances. The derived brightness temperatures exceed by many orders of magnitude the self-absorption limit of incoherent synchrotron radiation, implying the operation of a coherent emission process. We propose a radiation mechanism for fast radio bursts where the emission arises from collisionless Bremsstrahlung in strong plasma turbulence excited by relativistic electron beams. We discuss possible astrophysical scenarios in which this process might operate. The emitting region is a turbulent plasma hit by a relativistic jet, where Langmuir plasma waves produce a concentration of intense electrostatic soliton-like regions (cavitons). The resulting radiation is coherent and, under some physical conditions, can be polarised and have a power-law distribution in energy. We obtain radio luminosities in agreement with the inferred values for fast radio bursts. The timescale of the radio flare in some cases can be extremely fast, of t...

  1. Broad-band solar bursts of the spike type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Observations of high-resolution dynamic spectra of solar broad-band spike bursts (BSB), consisting of the instantaneous brightening of the continuum in the entire spectrograph range of 175-235 MHz, are reported. In noise storms events of the BSB type are rarely encountered and have the form of individual bursts with an average duration of 0.1-0.2 sec or groups of such bursts connected with type III bursts at lower frequencies. Series of aperiodic BSB structures unconnected with type III bursts and observed together with one-second pulsations and fiber bursts, predominate in type IV bursts. In noise storms BSB bursts can be emitted by electrons accelerated instantaneously as a result of the reconnection of magnetic fields, both in a small source (about 10 to the 8th cm) with a broad velocity dispersion and in an extended source (about 5 x 10 to the 9th cm). Structures of the BSB type in type IV bursts may be the result of the scattering of Langmuir waves on whistlers in a large height range. 30 references

  2. Broad-band solar bursts of the spike type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakunin, L.M.; Chernov, G.P.

    1985-10-01

    Observations of high-resolution dynamic spectra of solar broad-band spike bursts (BSB), consisting of the instantaneous brightening of the continuum in the entire spectrograph range of 175-235 MHz, are reported. In noise storms events of the BSB type are rarely encountered and have the form of individual bursts with an average duration of 0.1-0.2 sec or groups of such bursts connected with type III bursts at lower frequencies. Series of aperiodic BSB structures unconnected with type III bursts and observed together with one-second pulsations and fiber bursts, predominate in type IV bursts. In noise storms BSB bursts can be emitted by electrons accelerated instantaneously as a result of the reconnection of magnetic fields, both in a small source (about 10 to the 8th cm) with a broad velocity dispersion and in an extended source (about 5 x 10 to the 9th cm). Structures of the BSB type in type IV bursts may be the result of the scattering of Langmuir waves on whistlers in a large height range. 30 references.

  3. Investigation of Primordial Black Hole Bursts using Interplanetary Network Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ukwatta, T N; MacGibbon, J H; Svinkin, D S; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Pal'shin, V D; Goldsten, J; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Rau, A; Kienlin, A; Zhang, X; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Meegan, C; Yamaoka, K; Fukazawa, Y; Ohno, M; Ohmori, N; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Feroci, M; Frontera, F; Guidorzi, C; Barthelmy, S; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Cummings, J; Krimm, H A; Smith, D M; McTiernan, J

    2015-01-01

    The detection of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) in the solar neighborhood would have very important implications for GRB phenomenology. The leading theories for cosmological GRBs would not be able to explain such events. The final bursts of evaporating Primordial Black Holes (PBHs), however, would be a natural explanation for local GRBs. We present a novel technique that can constrain the minimum distance to gamma-ray bursts using detections from widely separated spacecraft. We applied this method to constrain distances to a sample of 36 short duration GRBs detected by the Interplanetary Network (IPN) that show observational properties that are expected from PBH evaporations. These bursts have minimum possible distances in the 10^13-10^18 cm (7-10^5 AU) range, consistent with the expected PBH energetics and with a possible origin in the solar neighborhood, although none of the bursts can be unambiguously demonstrated to be local. Assuming these bursts are real PBH events, we estimate for the first time lower limits ...

  4. The Swift Gamna-Ray Burst Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil

    2005-01-01

    Swift is a NASA Explorer mission that will be launched in late 2004. It is a multiwavelength observatory for transient astronomy. The goals of the mission are to determine the origin of gamma-ray bursts and their afterglows and use bursts to probe the early Universe. The mission will also perform a hard x-ray survey at the 1 milliCrab level and will continuously monitor the sky for transients. A wide-field gamma-ray camera will detect more than a hundred GRBs per year to 3 times fainter than BATSE. Sensitive narrow-field X-ray and UV/optical telescopes will be pointed at the burst location in 20 to 70 sec by an autonomously controlled "swift" spacecraft. For each burst, arcsec positions will be determined and optical/UV/X-ray/gamma-ray spectrophotometry performed. The instrumentation is a combination of existing flight-spare hardware and design from XMM and Spectrum-X/JET-X contributed by collaborators in the UK and Italy and development of a coded-aperture camera with a large-area (-0.5 square meter) CdZnTe detector array. The ground station in Malindi is contributed by the Italian Space Agency. Key components of the mission are vigorous follow-up and outreach programs to engage the astronomical community and public in Swift.

  5. A repeating fast radio burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L. G.; Scholz, P.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Bogdanov, S.; Brazier, A.; Camilo, F.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Crawford, F.; Deneva, J.; Ferdman, R. D.; Freire, P. C. C.; Kaspi, V. M.; Lazarus, P.; Lynch, R.; Madsen, E. C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Patel, C.; Ransom, S. M.; Seymour, A.; Stairs, I. H.; Stappers, B. W.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zhu, W. W.

    2016-03-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star.

  6. A repeating fast radio burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitler, L G; Scholz, P; Hessels, J W T; Bogdanov, S; Brazier, A; Camilo, F; Chatterjee, S; Cordes, J M; Crawford, F; Deneva, J; Ferdman, R D; Freire, P C C; Kaspi, V M; Lazarus, P; Lynch, R; Madsen, E C; McLaughlin, M A; Patel, C; Ransom, S M; Seymour, A; Stairs, I H; Stappers, B W; van Leeuwen, J; Zhu, W W

    2016-03-10

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration astronomical radio pulses of unknown physical origin that appear to come from extragalactic distances. Previous follow-up observations have failed to find additional bursts at the same dispersion measure (that is, the integrated column density of free electrons between source and telescope) and sky position as the original detections. The apparent non-repeating nature of these bursts has led to the suggestion that they originate in cataclysmic events. Here we report observations of ten additional bursts from the direction of the fast radio burst FRB 121102. These bursts have dispersion measures and sky positions consistent with the original burst. This unambiguously identifies FRB 121102 as repeating and demonstrates that its source survives the energetic events that cause the bursts. Additionally, the bursts from FRB 121102 show a wide range of spectral shapes that appear to be predominantly intrinsic to the source and which vary on timescales of minutes or less. Although there may be multiple physical origins for the population of fast radio bursts, these repeat bursts with high dispersion measure and variable spectra specifically seen from the direction of FRB 121102 support an origin in a young, highly magnetized, extragalactic neutron star. PMID:26934226

  7. GeV emission from Gamma Ray Bursts: a radiative fireball?

    CERN Document Server

    Ghisellini, G; Nava, L

    2009-01-01

    We study the emission observed at energies >100 MeV of 11 Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) until October 2009. The GeV emission has three main properties: (i) its duration is longer than the duration of the softer emission detected by the Gamma Burst Monitor (GBM) onboard Fermi; (ii) its spectrum is consistent with F(v) propto v^(-1) and does not show strong spectral evolution; (iii) for the brighest bursts, the flux detected by the LAT decays as a power law with a typical slope: t^(-1.5). We argue that the observed >0.1 GeV flux can be interpreted as afterglow emission shortly following the start of the prompt emission as seen at smaller frequencies. The decay slope is what expected if the fireball emission is produced in the radiative regime, i.e. all dissipated energy is radiated away. We also argue that the detectability in the GeV energy range depends on the bulk Lorentz factor Gamma of the bursts, being strongly favoured in the case of large Gamma. This implies th...

  8. High Energy Observations of XRF 030723: Evidence for an Off-axis Gamma-Ray Burst?

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, N R; Suzuki, M; Kawai, N; Lamb, D Q; Graziani, C; Donaghy, T Q; Dullighan, A; Vanderspek, R; Crew, G B; Ford, P; Ricker, G; Atteia, J L; Yoshida, A; Shirasaki, Y; Tamagawa, T; Torii, K; Matsuoka, M; Fenimore, E E; Galassi, M; Doty, J; Villaseñor, J D; Prigozhin, G Y; Jernigan, J G; Barraud, C; Boër, M; Dezalay, J P; Olive, J F; Hurley, K; Levine, A; Martel, F; Morgan, E; Woosley, S E; Cline, T; Braga, J; Manchanda, R K; Pizzichini, G

    2004-01-01

    We report High Energy Transient Explorer 2 (HETE-2) Wide Field X-ray Monitor/French Gamma Telescope observations of XRF030723 along with observations of the XRF afterglow made using the 6.5m Magellan Clay telescope and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. The observed peak energy E_pk_obs of the nu F_nu burst spectrum is found to lie within (or below) the WXM 2-25 keV passband at 98.5% confidence, and no counts are detected above 30 keV. Our best fit value is E_pk_obs=8.4+3.5/-3.4 keV. The ratio of X-ray to Gamma-ray flux for the burst follows a correlation found for GRBs observed with HETE-2, and the duration of the burst is similar to that typical of long-duration GRBs. If we require that the burst isotropic equivalent energy E_iso and E_pk_rest satisfy the relation discovered by Amati et al. (2002), a redshift of z=0.38+0.36/-0.18 can be determined, in agreement with constraints determined from optical observations. We are able to fit the X-ray afterglow spectrum and to measure its temporal fade. Although the be...

  9. Adaptive Kalman Filter Based on Adjustable Sampling Interval in Burst Detection for Water Distribution System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doo Yong Choi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid detection of bursts and leaks in water distribution systems (WDSs can reduce the social and economic costs incurred through direct loss of water into the ground, additional energy demand for water supply, and service interruptions. Many real-time burst detection models have been developed in accordance with the use of supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA systems and the establishment of district meter areas (DMAs. Nonetheless, no consideration has been given to how frequently a flow meter measures and transmits data for predicting breaks and leaks in pipes. This paper analyzes the effect of sampling interval when an adaptive Kalman filter is used for detecting bursts in a WDS. A new sampling algorithm is presented that adjusts the sampling interval depending on the normalized residuals of flow after filtering. The proposed algorithm is applied to a virtual sinusoidal flow curve and real DMA flow data obtained from Jeongeup city in South Korea. The simulation results prove that the self-adjusting algorithm for determining the sampling interval is efficient and maintains reasonable accuracy in burst detection. The proposed sampling method has a significant potential for water utilities to build and operate real-time DMA monitoring systems combined with smart customer metering systems.

  10. Observation of solar radio bursts using swept-frequency radiospectrograph in 20 - 40 MHz band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new station for the observation of solar decametric radio bursts has been developed at Miyagi Vocational Training College in Tsukidate, Miyagi, Japan. Using the swept frequency radiospectrograph covering a frequency range from 20 MHz to 40 MHz within 200 msec, with bandwidth of 30 kHz, the radio outbursts from the sun have been currently monitored with colored dynamic spectrum display. After July 1982, successful observations provide the data which include all types of solar radio bursts such as type I, II, III, IV and V in the decametric wavelength range. In addition to these typical radio bursts, rising tone bursts with fast drift rate followed by strong type III bursts and a series of bursts repeating rising and falling tone bursts with slow drift rate have been observed. (author)

  11. Variable protostellar accretion with episodic bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Vorobyov, Eduard I

    2015-01-01

    We present the latest development of the disk gravitational instability and fragmentation model, originally introduced by us to explain episodic accretion bursts in the early stages of star formation. Using our numerical hydrodynamics model with improved disk thermal balance and star-disk interaction, we computed the evolution of protostellar disks formed from the gravitational collapse of prestellar cores. In agreement with our previous studies, we find that cores of higher initial mass and angular momentum produce disks that are more favorable to gravitational instability and fragmentation, while a higher background irradiation and magnetic fields moderate the disk tendency to fragment. The protostellar accretion in our models is time-variable, thanks to the nonlinear interaction between different spiral modes in the gravitationally unstable disk, and can undergo episodic bursts when fragments migrate onto the star owing to the gravitational interaction with other fragments or spiral arms. Most bursts occur...

  12. A Shotgun Model for $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Heinz, S

    1999-01-01

    We propose that gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are produced by a shower of heavy blobs running into circumstellar material at highly relativistic speeds. The gamma ray emission is produced in the shocks these bullets drive into the surrounding medium. The short term variability seen in GRBs is set by the slowing-down time of the bullets while the overall duration of the burst is set by the lifetime of the central engine. A requirement of this model is that the ambient medium be dense, consistent with a strong stellar wind. In contrast to other external shock scenarios, the efficiency of the shock can be close to unity.

  13. Taming desynchronized bursting with delays in the Macaque cortical network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Qing-Yun; Murks Aleksandra; Perc Matja(z); Lu Qi-Shao

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory coupled bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons are considered as constitutive units of the Macaque cortical network. In the absence of information transmission delay the bursting activity is desynchronized, giving rise to spatiotemporally disordered dynamics. This paper shows that the introduction of finite delays can lead to the synchroization of bursting and thus to the emergence of coherent propagating fronts of excitation in the space-time domain.Moreover, it shows that the type of synchronous bursting is uniquely determined by the delay length, with the transitions from one type to the other occurring in a step-like manner depending on the delay. Interestingly, as the delay is tuned close to the transition points, the synchronization deteriorates, which implies the coexistence of different bursting attractors. These phenomena can be observed be different but fixed coupling strengths, thus indicating a new role for information transmission delays in realistic neuronal networks.

  14. Benchmarking of hospital information systems: Monitoring of discharge letters and scheduling can reveal heterogeneities and time trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckholt Markus

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monitoring of hospital information system (HIS usage can provide insights into best practices within a hospital and help to assess time trends. In terms of effort and cost of benchmarking, figures derived automatically from the routine HIS system are preferable to manual methods like surveys, in particular for repeated analysis. Methods Due to relevance for quality management and efficient resource utilization we focused on time-to-completion of discharge letters (assessed by CT-plots and usage of patient scheduling. We analyzed these parameters monthly during one year at a major university hospital in Germany. Results We found several distinct patterns of discharge letter documentation indicating a large heterogeneity of HIS usage between different specialties (completeness 51 – 99%, delays 0 – 90 days. Overall usage of scheduling increased during the observation period by 62%, but again showed a considerable variation between departments. Conclusion Regular monitoring of HIS key figures can contribute to a continuous HIS improvement process.

  15. Spike-type broad-band solar bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-resolution dynamical spectra of solar broad-band spike bursts (BSB) have been observed. They represent an instantaneous brightening of the continuum emission in the range 175-235 MHz. In the noise stoms the BSB-type events occur seldom and have the form of either individual bursts with the average lifetime of 0.1-0.2 s or the groups of such bursts, related with type 3 bursts at lower frequencies. In type 4 bursts, the series of nonperiodic structures of BSB predominate. They are not related with type 3 bursts, but are observed together with the second pulsations and fiber bursts. In the noise storms, the BSB can be excited by electrons instantaneously accelerated owing to the magnetic field reconnection. The group delay leads to a negative frequency drift approximately -600 MHz/s in small sources and positive drift approximately 300 MHz/s in the extended ones. Such a high drift velocity cannot compensate the moderate frequency drift associated with the exciter motion in the corona. The BSB-structure in type 4 bursts can be the result of scattering of the Langmuir waves on the whistlers in a large height interval

  16. Neutrino Balls and Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Holdom, B

    1994-01-01

    We propose a mechanism by which the neutrino emission from a supernova-type explosion can be converted into a gamma-ray burst of total energy $\\sim 10^{50}$ ergs. This occurs naturally if the explosion is situated inside a ball of trapped neutrinos, which in turn may lie at a galactic core. There are possible unique signatures of this scenario.

  17. Leader neurons in population bursts of 2D living neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eytan and Marom (2006 J. Neurosci. 26 8465-76) recently showed that the spontaneous bursting activity of rat neuron cultures includes 'first-to-fire' cells that consistently fire earlier than others. Here, we analyze the behavior of these neurons in long-term recordings of spontaneous activity of rat hippocampal and rat cortical neuron cultures from three different laboratories. We identify precursor events that may either subside ('aborted bursts') or can lead to a full-blown burst ('pre-bursts'). We find that the activation in the pre-burst typically has a first neuron ('leader'), followed by a localized response in its neighborhood. Locality is diminished in the bursts themselves. The long-term dynamics of the leaders is relatively robust, evolving with a half-life of 23-34 h. Stimulation of the culture alters the leader distribution, but the distribution stabilizes within about 1 h. We show that the leaders carry information about the identity of the burst, as measured by the signature of the number of spikes per neuron in a burst. The number of spikes from leaders in the first few spikes of a precursor event is furthermore shown to be predictive with regard to the transition into a burst (pre-burst versus aborted burst). We conclude that the leaders play a role in the development of the bursts and conjecture that they are part of an underlying sub-network that is excited first and then acts as a nucleation center for the burst

  18. The development of a burst criterion for Zircaloy fuel cladding under LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A burst criterion model, which assumes that deformation is controlled by steady-state creep, has been developed for a thin-walled cladding, in this case Zircaloy-4, subjected to a differential pressure and high temperature. The creep equation is integrated to obtain a burst time at the singularity of the strain. Once that urst time is known, the burst temperature and burst pressure can be calculated from the known temperature and pressure histories. A further relationship between burst stress and burst temperature is used to calculate the burst strain. Comparison with measured burst data shows good agreement between theory and experiment. It was found that, if the heating rate is constant, the burst temperature increases with decreasing stress, and that, if the stress level is constant, the burst temperature increases with increasing heating rate. It was also found that anisotropy alters the burst temperature and burst strain, and that thest conditions in the α-Zr temperature range have no influence on the burst data. (orig.)

  19. THE INTERPLANETARY NETWORK SUPPLEMENT TO THE BeppoSAX GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 1996 July and 2002 April, one or more spacecraft of the interplanetary network detected 786 cosmic gamma-ray bursts that were also detected by the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor and/or Wide-Field X-Ray Camera experiments aboard the BeppoSAX spacecraft. During this period, the network consisted of up to six spacecraft, and using triangulation, the localizations of 475 bursts were obtained. We present the localization data for these events.

  20. The Fermi–GBM Three-year X-Ray Burst Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, P. A.; Linares, M.; Connaughton, V.; Beklen, E.; Camero-Arranz, A.; Finger, M. H.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all-sky gamma-ray monitor well known in the gamma-ray burst (GRB) community. Although GBM excels in detecting the hard, bright extragalactic GRBs, its sensitivity above 8 keV and its all-sky view make it an excellent instrument for the detection of rare, short-lived Galactic transients. In 2010 March, we initiated a systematic search for transients using GBM data. We conclude this phase of the search by presenting a three-year catalog of 1084 X-ray bursts. Using spectral analysis, location, and spatial distributions we classified the 1084 events into 752 thermonuclear X-ray bursts, 267 transient events from accretion flares and X-ray pulses, and 65 untriggered gamma-ray bursts. All thermonuclear bursts have peak blackbody temperatures broadly consistent with photospheric radius expansion (PRE) bursts. We find an average rate of 1.4 PRE bursts per day, integrated over all Galactic bursters within about 10 kpc. These include 33 and 10 bursts from the ultra-compact X-ray binaries 4U 0614+09 and 2S 0918-549, respectively. We discuss these recurrence times and estimate the total mass ejected by PRE bursts in our Galaxy.

  1. Risk evaluation of rock burst through theory of static and dynamic stresses superposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振雷; 蔡武; 窦林名; 何江; 王桂峰; 丁言露

    2015-01-01

    Rock burst is one of the most catastrophic dynamic hazards in coal mining. A static and dynamic stresses superposition-based (SDSS-based) risk evaluation method of rock burst was proposed to pre-evaluate rock burst risk. Theoretical basis of this method is the stress criterion incurring rock burst and rock burst risk is evaluated according to the closeness degree of the total stress (due to the superposition of static stress in the coal and dynamic stress induced by tremors) with the critical stress. In addition, risk evaluation criterion of rock burst was established by defining the “Satisfaction Degree” of static stress. Furthermore, the method was used to pre-evaluate rock burst risk degree and prejudge endangered area of an insular longwall face in Nanshan Coal Mine in China. Results show that rock burst risk is moderate at advance extent of 97 m, strong at advance extent of 97−131 m, and extremely strong (i.e. inevitable to occur) when advance extent exceeds 131 m (mining is prohibited in this case). The section of two gateways whose floor abuts 15−3 coal seam is a susceptible area prone to rock burst. Evaluation results were further compared with rock bursts and tremors detected by microseismic monitoring. Comparison results indicate that evaluation results are consistent with microseismic monitoring, which proves the method’s feasibility.

  2. Can we detect, monitor, and characterize volcanic activity using 'off the shelf' webcams and low-light cameras?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrild, M.; Webley, P. W.; Dehn, J.

    2015-12-01

    The ability to detect and monitor precursory events, thermal signatures, and ongoing volcanic activity in near-realtime is an invaluable tool. Volcanic hazards often range from low level lava effusion to large explosive eruptions, easily capable of ejecting ash to aircraft cruise altitudes. Using ground based remote sensing to detect and monitor this activity is essential, but the required equipment is often expensive and difficult to maintain, which increases the risk to public safety and the likelihood of financial impact. Our investigation explores the use of 'off the shelf' cameras, ranging from computer webcams to low-light security cameras, to monitor volcanic incandescent activity in near-realtime. These cameras are ideal as they operate in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum, are relatively cheap to purchase, consume little power, are easily replaced, and can provide telemetered, near-realtime data. We focus on the early detection of volcanic activity, using automated scripts that capture streaming online webcam imagery and evaluate each image according to pixel brightness, in order to automatically detect and identify increases in potentially hazardous activity. The cameras used here range in price from 0 to 1,000 and the script is written in Python, an open source programming language, to reduce the overall cost to potential users and increase the accessibility of these tools, particularly in developing nations. In addition, by performing laboratory tests to determine the spectral response of these cameras, a direct comparison of collocated low-light and thermal infrared cameras has allowed approximate eruption temperatures to be correlated to pixel brightness. Data collected from several volcanoes; (1) Stromboli, Italy (2) Shiveluch, Russia (3) Fuego, Guatemala (4) Popcatépetl, México, along with campaign data from Stromboli (June, 2013), and laboratory tests are presented here.

  3. BROADBAND SPECTRAL INVESTIGATIONS OF SGR J1550-5418 BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Kaneko, Yuki [Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I University, Orhanl Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I Tuzla, Istanbul 34956 (Turkey); Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Granot, Jonathan [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Kouveliotou, Chryssa [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Van der Horst, Alexander; Watts, Anna L. [Astronomical Institute ' Anton Pannekoek' , University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, 1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Gruber, David; Von Kienlin, Andreas [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Postfach 1312, D-85748 Garching bei Mnchen (Germany); Younes, George [USRA, National Space Science and Technology Center, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Gehrels, Neil, E-mail: linlin@sabanciuniv.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  4. Broadband Spectral Investigations of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Goegues, Ersin; Baring, Matthew G.; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Younes, George; Watts, Anna L.; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT windowed timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with either a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5-200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT-GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbody or even a multi-blackbody signal. Using the Swift and RXTE timing ephemeris for SGR J1550-5418 we construct the distribution of the XRT burst counts with spin phase and find that it is not correlated with the persistent X-ray emission pulse phase from SGR J1550-5418. These results indicate that the burst emitting sites on the neutron star need not to be co-located with hot spots emitting the bulk of the persistent X-ray emission. Finally, we show that there is a significant pulse phase dependence of the XRT burst counts, likely demonstrating that the surface magnetic field of SGR J1550-5418 is not uniform over the emission zones, since it is anticipated that regions with stronger surface magnetic field could trigger bursts more efficiently.

  5. Models for Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors and Central Engines

    CERN Document Server

    Woosley, S E

    2011-01-01

    Most gamma-ray bursts are made during the deaths of massive stars. Here the environmental circumstances, stellar evolutionary paths, and explosion physics that might produce the bursts are reviewed. Neither of the two leading models - collapsar and millisecond magnetar - can be excluded, and both may operate in progenitor stars of different masses, metallicities, and rotation rates. Potential diagnostics are discussed and uncertainties highlighted. Both models are capable of producing a wide variety of transients whose properties vary with both stellar properties and viewing angle. Some of these are reviewed including the possibility of very long (days) low luminosity bursts, so far undiscovered, short hard bursts from massive stellar progenitors, and bursts from very massive Population III stars.

  6. Do Gamma-Ray Bursts Come from the Oort Cloud?

    CERN Document Server

    Clarke, T E; Tremaine, S; Tremaine, adn S.

    1993-01-01

    We examine the possibility that gamma-ray bursts arise from sources in the Oort comet cloud, basing most of our arguments on accepted models for the formation and spatial distribution of the cloud. We identify three severe problems with such models: (1) There is no known mechanism for producing bursts that can explain the observed burst rate and energetics without violating other observational constraints. (2) The bright source counts cannot be reconciled with standard models for the phase-space distribution of objects in the Oort cloud. (3) The observed isotropy of the available burst data is inconsistent with the expected angular distribution of sources in the Oort cloud. We therefore assert that Oort cloud models of gamma-ray bursts are extremely implausible.

  7. Evaluating the risk of coal bursts in underground coal mines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mark Christopher⇑; Gauna Michael

    2016-01-01

    Coal bursts involve the sudden, violent ejection of coal or rock into the mine workings. They are almost always accompanied by a loud noise, like an explosion, and ground vibration. Bursts are a particular haz-ard for miners because they typically occur without warning. Despite decades of research, the sources and mechanics of these events are not well understood, and therefore they are difficult to predict and control. Experience has shown, however, that certain geologic and mining factors are associated with an increased likelihood of a coal burst. A coal burst risk assessment consists of evaluating the degree to which these risk factors are present, and then identifying appropriate control measures to mitigate the hazard. This paper summarizes the U.S. and international experience with coal bursts, and describes the known risk factors in detail. It includes a framework that can be used to guide the risk assessment process.

  8. Introduction to Optical Burst Switching

    OpenAIRE

    KERNÁCS János; SZILÁGYI Szabolcs

    2010-01-01

    Optical Burst Switching (OBS) isconsidered a popular switching paradigm for therealization of all-optical networks due to the balance itoffers between the coarse-grained Optical CircuitSwitching (OSC) and fine-grained Optical PacketSwitching (OPS). Given that the data are switched allopticallyat the burst level, Optical Burst Switchingcombines the transparency of Optical CircuitSwitching with the benefits of statistical multiplexingin Optical Packet Switching.

  9. Precursors in gamma-ray bursts detected by the Fermi-LAT and GBM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Sylvia; Fermi Large Area Telescope Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    Many aspects of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) remain mysterious more than 40 years after their initial discovery. However, observations of GRBs by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) have uncovered new information about the observed properties and the underlying physics. In a small minority (roughly 5-20%), a dim, temporally distinct precursor peak occurs before the brightest part of the prompt emission in the keV-MeV range. The origin of precursors is still unknown, and studies of precursors can probe the formation of the GRB central engine and/or the nature of the jets that produce the emission. We present a systematic search for precursor emission in LAT and GBM data, and the temporal and spectral properties and energetics of the population of GRBs with precursors.

  10. Sky Coverage and Burst Repetition

    OpenAIRE

    Band, David L.

    1996-01-01

    To investigate the repeater content of gamma ray burst samples I develop two models where sources burst at a constant average rate. I find that the sky coverage affects the number of repeaters in a sample predominantly through the detector livetime, and that the number of bursts in the sample is the primary parameter. Thus the repeater content of burst samples should be compared within the context of a repetition model; a direct comparison between two samples is possible only if the samples h...

  11. UWB dual burst transmit driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Zumstein, James M.; Vigars, Mark L.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2012-04-17

    A dual burst transmitter for ultra-wideband (UWB) communication systems generates a pair of precisely spaced RF bursts from a single trigger event. An input trigger pulse produces two oscillator trigger pulses, an initial pulse and a delayed pulse, in a dual trigger generator. The two oscillator trigger pulses drive a gated RF burst (power output) oscillator. A bias driver circuit gates the RF output oscillator on and off and sets the RF burst packet width. The bias driver also level shifts the drive signal to the level that is required for the RF output device.

  12. Can individualized weight monitoring using the HeartPhone algorithm improve sensitivity for clinical deterioration of heart failure?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ledwidge, Mark T

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated poor sensitivity of guideline weight monitoring in predicting clinical deterioration of heart failure (HF). This study aimed to evaluate patterns of remotely transmitted daily weights in a high-risk HF population and also to compare guideline weight monitoring and an individualized weight monitoring algorithm.

  13. NEW BURST ASSEMBLY AND SCHEDULING TECHNIQUE FOR OPTICAL BURST SWITCHING NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    V.KAVITHA; Palanisamy, V.

    2013-01-01

    The Optical Burst Switching is a new switching technology that efficiently utilizes the bandwidth in the optical layer. The key areas to be concentrated in Optical Burst Switching (OBS) networks are the burst assembly and burst scheduling i.e., assignment of wavelengths to the incoming bursts. This study presents a New Burst Assembly and Scheduling (NBAS) technique in a simultaneous multipath transmission for burst loss recovery in OBS networks. A Redundant Burst Segmentation (RBS) is used fo...

  14. The sharpness of gamma-ray burst prompt emission spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; van Eerten, Hendrik J.; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Narayana Bhat, P.; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.

    2015-11-01

    Context. We study the sharpness of the time-resolved prompt emission spectra of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Aims: We aim to obtain a measure of the curvature of time-resolved spectra that can be compared directly to theory. This tests the ability of models such as synchrotron emission to explain the peaks or breaks of GBM prompt emission spectra. Methods: We take the burst sample from the official Fermi GBM GRB time-resolved spectral catalog. We re-fit all spectra with a measured peak or break energy in the catalog best-fit models in various energy ranges, which cover the curvature around the spectral peak or break, resulting in a total of 1113 spectra being analyzed. We compute the sharpness angles under the peak or break of the triangle constructed under the model fit curves and compare them to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. Results: We find that 35% of the time-resolved spectra are inconsistent with the single-electron synchrotron function, and 91% are inconsistent with the Maxwellian synchrotron function. The single temperature, single emission time, and location blackbody function is found to be sharper than all the spectra. No general evolutionary trend of the sharpness angle is observed, neither per burst nor for the whole population. It is found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to % of the peak flux. Conclusions: Our results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed GRB prompt spectra. Because any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically thin

  15. VizieR Online Data Catalog: The five year Fermi/GBM magnetar burst catalog (Collazzi+, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazzi, A. C.; Kouveliotou, C.; van den Horst, A. J.; Younes, G. A.; Kaneko, Y.; Gogus, E.; Lin, L.; Granot, J.; Finger, M. H.; Chaplin, V. L.; Huppenkothen, D.; Watts, A. L.; Kienlin, A. V.; Baring, M. G.; Gruber, D.; Bhat, P. N.; Gibby, M. H.; Gehrels, N.; McEnery, J.; van der Klis, M.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2015-07-01

    Since launch in 2008, the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has detected many hundreds of bursts from magnetar sources. While the vast majority of these bursts have been attributed to several known magnetars, there is also a small sample of magnetar-like bursts of unknown origin. Here, we present the Fermi/GBM magnetar catalog, providing the results of the temporal and spectral analyses of 440 magnetar bursts with high temporal and spectral resolution. This catalog covers the first five years of GBM magnetar observations, from 2008 July to 2013 June. We provide durations, spectral parameters for various models, fluences, and peak fluxes for all the bursts, as well as a detailed temporal analysis for SGR J1550-5418 bursts. Finally, we suggest that some of the bursts of unknown origin are associated with the newly discovered magnetar 3XMM J185246.6+0033.7. (3 data files).

  16. Automatic recognition of type III solar radio bursts. Automated radio burst identification system method and first observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Because of the rapidly increasing role of technology, including complicated electronic systems, spacecraft, etc., modern society has become more vulnerable to a set of extraterrestrial influences (space weather) and requires continuous observation and forecasts of space weather. The major space weather events like solar flares and coronal mass ejections are usually accompanied by solar radio bursts, which can be used for a real-time space weather forecast. Coronal type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency and near its harmonic by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. These bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time, the typical duration of the coronal burst being about 1-3 s. This paper presents a new method developed to detect coronal type III bursts automatically and its implementation in a new Automated Radio Burst Identification System (ARBIS), which is working in real-time. The central idea of the implementation is to use the Radon transform for more objective detection of the bursts as approximately straight lines in dynamic spectra. Preliminary tests of the method with the use of the spectra obtained during 13 days show that the performance of the current implementation is quite high, ∼84%, while no false positives are observed and 23 events not listed previously are found. The first automatically detected coronal type III radio bursts are presented.

  17. Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Meszaros, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day ,last typically lOs of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  18. Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, Neil; Mészáros, Péter

    2012-08-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, typically last for tens of seconds, and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this Review, we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglow.

  19. Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Gehrels, Neil; 10.1126/science.1216793

    2012-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are bright flashes of gamma-rays coming from the cosmos. They occur roughly once per day, last typically 10s of seconds and are the most luminous events in the universe. More than three decades after their discovery, and after pioneering advances from space and ground experiments, they still remain mysterious. The launch of the Swift and Fermi satellites in 2004 and 2008 brought in a trove of qualitatively new data. In this review we survey the interplay between these recent observations and the theoretical models of the prompt GRB emission and the subsequent afterglows.

  20. The Spectral Sharpness Angle of Gamma-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Greiner, Jochen; Sari, Re'em; Bhat, P Narayana; von Kienlin, Andreas; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D

    2016-01-01

    We explain the results of Yu et al. (2015b) of the novel sharpness angle measurement to a large number of spectra obtained from the Fermi gamma-ray burst monitor. The sharpness angle is compared to the values obtained from various representative emission models: blackbody, single-electron synchrotron, synchrotron emission from a Maxwellian or power-law electron distribution. It is found that more than 91% of the high temporally and spectrally resolved spectra are inconsistent with any kind of optically thin synchrotron emission model alone. It is also found that the limiting case, a single temperature Maxwellian synchrotron function, can only contribute up to 58+23 -18% of the peak flux. These results show that even the sharpest but non-realistic case, the single-electron synchrotron function, cannot explain a large fraction of the observed spectra. Since any combination of physically possible synchrotron spectra added together will always further broaden the spectrum, emission mechanisms other than optically...

  1. Spatiotemporal chaos from bursting dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenstein, Igal; De Decker, Yannick [Nonlinear Physical Chemistry Unit and Interdisciplinary Center for Nonlinear Phenomena and Complex Systems (CENOLI), Faculté des Sciences, Université libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Campus Plaine, C.P. 231, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-08-14

    In this paper, we study the emergence of spatiotemporal chaos from mixed-mode oscillations, by using an extended Oregonator model. We show that bursting dynamics consisting of fast/slow mixed mode oscillations along a single attractor can lead to spatiotemporal chaotic dynamics, although the spatially homogeneous solution is itself non-chaotic. This behavior is observed far from the Hopf bifurcation and takes the form of a spatiotemporal intermittency where the system locally alternates between the fast and the slow phases of the mixed mode oscillations. We expect this form of spatiotemporal chaos to be generic for models in which one or several slow variables are coupled to activator-inhibitor type of oscillators.

  2. Monitor

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — A custom-built, dual-language (English and Spanish) system (http://www.monitor.net.co/) developed by DevTech that debuted in January 2011. It features a central PMP...

  3. Fermi/GBM and BATSE Gamma-Ray Bursts: comparison of the spectral properties

    OpenAIRE

    Nava, Lara; Ghirlanda, Giancarlo; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Celotti, Annalisa

    2010-01-01

    The Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board Fermi allows to study the spectra of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) over an unprecedented wide energy range (8 keV - 35 MeV). We compare the spectral properties of short and long GRBs detected by the GBM (up to March 2010) with those of GRBs detected by the BATSE instrument on board the CGRO. GBM and BATSE long bursts have similar distributions of fluence (F), Epeak and peak flux (P) but GBM bursts have a slightly harder low-energy spectral index \\alpha wit...

  4. Comparison of WATCH and IPN Locations of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, K.; Lund, Niels; Brandt, Søren; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Sommer, M.; Lapshov, I.; Laros, J.; Klebesadel, R.; Fishman, G.; Kouveliotou, C.; Meegan, C.; Cline, T.; Boer, M.; Niel, M.

    The WATCH all sky monitors aboard the Granat and EURECA spacecraft have the capability of independently localizing gamma‐ray bursts to error circles whose 3 sigma radii are 1 degree or less. These are the most accurate single‐experiment localizations currently achievable. In those cases where both...... WATCH and one or more experiments from the IPN detect a burst, the localizations may be refined considerably. We have identified approximately 35 bursts between 1991 and 1993 in this category. Some were detected by WATCH, Ulysses, PVO, and BATSE, and so on. We present and compare the locations of some...... of these bursts....

  5. K+ channels and the microglial respiratory burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, R; Roy, L; Zhu, X; Schlichter, L C

    2001-04-01

    Microglial activation following central nervous system damage or disease often culminates in a respiratory burst that is necessary for antimicrobial function, but, paradoxically, can damage bystander cells. We show that several K+ channels are expressed and play a role in the respiratory burst of cultured rat microglia. Three pharmacologically separable K+ currents had properties of Kv1.3 and the Ca2+/calmodulin-gated channels, SK2, SK3, and SK4. mRNA was detected for Kv1.3, Kv1.5, SK2, and/or SK3, and SK4. Protein was detected for Kv1.3, Kv1.5, and SK3 (selective SK2 and SK4 antibodies not available). No Kv1.5-like current was detected, and confocal immunofluorescence showed the protein to be subcellular, in contrast to the robust membrane localization of Kv1.3. To determine whether any of these channels play a role in microglial activation, a respiratory burst was stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and measured using a single cell, fluorescence-based dihydrorhodamine 123 assay. The respiratory burst was markedly inhibited by blockers of SK2 (apamin) and SK4 channels (clotrimazole and charybdotoxin), and to a lesser extent, by the potent Kv1.3 blocker agitoxin-2. PMID:11245596

  6. Short duration gamma ray bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Patrick Das Gupta

    2004-10-01

    After a short review of gamma ray bursts (GRBs), we discuss the physical implications of strong statistical correlations seen among some of the parameters of short duration bursts (90 < 2 s). Finally, we conclude with a brief sketch of a new unified model for long and short GRBs.

  7. Burst Mode Transmission in GPON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Liang-chuan; ZHANG Yan-gan; LI Ling; XU Da-xiong

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a newly approved standard G.984 for Gigabit-capable Passive Optical Networks (GPON) is introduced. Technical challenges about high-speed burst-mode data transmission in GPON are discussed and key issues such as Forward Error Correction (FEC), timing to uplink performance of burst mode are high-lighted.

  8. Thermonuclear bursts from slowly and rapidly accreting neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Manuel

    2012-07-01

    Models of thermonuclear burning on accreting neutron stars predict different ignition regimes, depending mainly on the mass accretion rate per unit area. For more than three decades, testing these regimes observationally has met with only partial success. I will present recent results from the Fermi-GBM all-sky X-ray burst monitor, which is yielding robust measurements of recurrence time of rare and highly energetic thermonuclear bursts at the lowest mass accretion rates. I will also present RXTE observations of thermonuclear bursts at high mass accretion rates, including the discovery of millihertz quasi-periodic oscillations and several bursting regimes in a neutron star transient and 11 Hz X-ray pulsar. This unusual neutron star, with higher magnetic field and slower rotation than any other known burster, showed copious bursting activity when the mass accretion rate varied between 10% and 50% of the Eddington rate. I will discuss the role of fuel composition and neutron star spin in setting the burst properties of this system, and the possible implications for the rest of thermonuclear bursters.

  9. Temporal and spectral evolution of runaway electron bursts in TEXTOR disruptions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forster, M.; Finken, K. H.; Kudyakov, T.; Willi, O. [Institut fuer Laser- und Plasmaphysik, Heinrich-Heine-Universitaet Duesseldorf, Universitaetsstr. 1, 40225 Duesseldorf (Germany); Lehnen, M. [Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Xu, Y. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Ecole Royale Militaire-Koninklijke Militaire School, Avenue de la Renaissance 30, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Zeng, L. [Institut fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 1126, Hefei 230031 (China); Collaboration: TEXTOR Team

    2012-09-15

    Novel observations of the burst-like runaway electron losses in tokamak disruptions are reported. The runaway bursts are temporally resolved and first-time measurements of the corresponding runaway energy spectra are presented. A characteristic shape and burst to burst changes of the spectra are found. The runaway energy content of the disruptions and the conversion of the predisruptive magnetic energy are estimated. The radial decay of the runaways can be approximated by an exponential distribution. Deriving from the measurements, resistive tearing modes or kink modes are suggested to trigger the formation of the bursts.

  10. Dark gamma-ray bursts: possible role of multiphoton processes

    CERN Document Server

    Perel'man, Mark E

    2009-01-01

    The absence of optical afterglow at some gamma-ray bursts (so called dark bursts) requires analyses of physical features of this phenomenon. It is shown that such singularity can be connected with multiphoton processes of frequencies summation in the Rayleigh- Jeans part of spectra, their pumping into higher frequencies. It can be registered most probably on young objects with still thin plasma coating, without further thermalization, i.e. soon after a prompt beginning of the explosive activity.

  11. Bursts and shocks in a continuum shell model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, K.H.; Bohr, Tomas; Jensen, M.H.; Olesen, P.

    1998-01-01

    We study a burst event, i.e., the evolution of an initial condition having support only in a finite interval of k-space, in the continuum shell model due to Parisi. We show that the continuum equation without forcing or dissipation can be explicitly written in characteristic form and that the right...... and left moving parts can be solved exactly. When this is supplemented by the approximate shock condition it is possible to find the symptotic form of the burst....

  12. Connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions for stochastic models of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intrinsic stochasticity of gene expression can lead to large variability in protein levels for genetically identical cells. Such variability in protein levels can arise from infrequent synthesis of mRNAs which in turn give rise to bursts of protein expression. Protein expression occurring in bursts has indeed been observed experimentally and recent studies have also found evidence for transcriptional bursting, i.e. production of mRNAs in bursts. Given that there are distinct experimental techniques for quantifying the noise at different stages of gene expression, it is of interest to derive analytical results connecting experimental observations at different levels. In this work, we consider stochastic models of gene expression for which mRNA and protein production occurs in independent bursts. For such models, we derive analytical expressions connecting protein and mRNA burst distributions which show how the functional form of the mRNA burst distribution can be inferred from the protein burst distribution. Additionally, if gene expression is repressed such that observed protein bursts arise only from single mRNAs, we show how observations of protein burst distributions (repressed and unrepressed) can be used to completely determine the mRNA burst distribution. Assuming independent contributions from individual bursts, we derive analytical expressions connecting means and variances for burst and steady-state protein distributions. Finally, we validate our general analytical results by considering a specific reaction scheme involving regulation of protein bursts by small RNAs. For a range of parameters, we derive analytical expressions for regulated protein distributions that are validated using stochastic simulations. The analytical results obtained in this work can thus serve as useful inputs for a broad range of studies focusing on stochasticity in gene expression

  13. Quantum key based burst confidentiality in optical burst switched networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balamurugan, A M; Sivasubramanian, A

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The transfer of optical switching paradigm to optical burst switching faces serious downfall in the fields of burst aggregation, routing, authentication, dispute resolution, and quality of service (QoS). This paper deals with employing RC4 (stream cipher) to encrypt and decrypt bursts thereby ensuring the confidentiality of the burst. Although the use of AES algorithm has already been proposed for the same issue, by contrasting the two algorithms under the parameters of burst encryption and decryption time, end-to-end delay, it was found that RC4 provided better results. This paper looks to provide a better solution for the confidentiality of the burst in OBS networks. PMID:24578663

  14. Neutron Stars and Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Sudip

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star approaching EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. +k Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts - modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. +k Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  15. Understanding Neutron Stars using Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of thermonuclear X-ray bursts can be very useful to constrain the spin rate, mass and radius of a neutron star = EOS model of high density cold matter in the neutron star cores. Extensive observation and analysis of the data from the rising portions of the bursts = modeling of burst oscillations and thermonuclear flame spreading. Theoretical study of thermonuclear flame spreading on the rapidly spinning neutron stars should be done considering all the main physical effects (including magnetic field, nuclear energy generation, Coriolis effect, strong gravity, etc.).

  16. The Fermi GBM gamma-ray burst time-resolved spectral catalog: brightest bursts in the first four years

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Greiner, Jochen; Bhat, P Narayana; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Cleveland, William H; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Mailyan, Bagrat; Meegan, Charles A; Paciesas, William S; Rau, Arne; Roberts, Oliver J; Veres, Péter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Zhang, Bin-Bin; van Eerten, Hendrik J

    2016-01-01

    We aim to obtain high-quality time-resolved spectral fits of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We perform time-resolved spectral analysis with high temporal and spectral resolution of the brightest bursts observed by Fermi GBM in its first 4 years of mission. We present the complete catalog containing 1,491 spectra from 81 bursts with high spectral and temporal resolution. Distributions of parameters, statistics of the parameter populations, parameter-parameter and parameter-uncertainty correlations, and their exact values are obtained and presented as main results in this catalog. We report a criterion that is robust enough to automatically distinguish between different spectral evolutionary trends between bursts. We also search for plausible blackbody emission components and find that only 3 bursts (36 spectra in total) show evidence of a pure Planck function. It is observed that the averaged time-resolved low-energy power-law...

  17. The Fermi GBM gamma-ray burst time-resolved spectral catalog: brightest bursts in the first four years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hoi-Fung; Preece, Robert D.; Greiner, Jochen; Narayana Bhat, P.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S.; Cleveland, William H.; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Mailyan, Bagrat; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Rau, Arne; Roberts, Oliver J.; Veres, Péter; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Zhang, Bin-Bin; van Eerten, Hendrik J.

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We aim to obtain high-quality time-resolved spectral fits of gamma-ray bursts observed by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. Methods: We performed time-resolved spectral analysis with high temporal and spectral resolution of the brightest bursts observed by Fermi GBM in its first four years of mission. Results: We present the complete catalog containing 1491 spectra from 81 bursts with high spectral and temporal resolution. Distributions of parameters, statistics of the parameter populations, parameter-parameter and parameter-uncertainty correlations, and their exact values are obtained and presented as main results in this catalog. We report a criterion that is robust enough to automatically distinguish between different spectral evolutionary trends between bursts. We also search for plausible blackbody emission components and find that only three bursts (36 spectra in total) show evidence of a pure Planck function. It is observed that peak energy and the averaged, time-resolved power-law index at low energy are slightly harder than the time-integrated values. Time-resolved spectroscopic results should be used instead of time-integrated results when interpreting physics from the observed spectra. Tables A.1 and B.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/588/A135

  18. Is GeV Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts of External Shock Origin?

    CERN Document Server

    Maxham, Amanda; Zhang, Bing

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) revealed a power law decay feature of the high energy emission (above 100 MeV), which led to the suggestion that it originates from a (probably radiative) external shock. We analyze four GRBs (080916C, 090510, 090902B and 090926A) jointly detected by Fermi LAT and Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), which have high quality lightcurves in both instrument energy bands. Using the MeV prompt emission (GBM) data, we can record the energy output from the central engine as a function of time. Assuming a constant radiative efficiency, we are able to track energy accumulation in the external shock using our internal/external shell model code. By solving for the early evolution of both an adiabatic and a radiative blastwave, we calculate the high energy emission lightcurve in the LAT band and compare it with the observed one for each burst. The late time LAT light curves after T90 can be well fit by the model. However, due to continuous e...

  19. Full system bifurcation analysis of endocrine bursting models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsaneva-Atanasova, Krasimira; Osinga, Hinke M; Riess, Thorsten; Sherman, Arthur

    2010-06-21

    Plateau bursting is typical of many electrically excitable cells, such as endocrine cells that secrete hormones and some types of neurons that secrete neurotransmitters. Although in many of these cell types the bursting patterns are regulated by the interplay between voltage-gated calcium channels and calcium-sensitive potassium channels, they can be very different. We investigate so-called square-wave and pseudo-plateau bursting patterns found in endocrine cell models that are characterized by a super- or subcritical Hopf bifurcation in the fast subsystem, respectively. By using the polynomial model of Hindmarsh and Rose (Proceedings of the Royal Society of London B 221 (1222) 87-102), which preserves the main properties of the biophysical class of models that we consider, we perform a detailed bifurcation analysis of the full fast-slow system for both bursting patterns. We find that both cases lead to the same possibility of two routes to bursting, that is, the criticality of the Hopf bifurcation is not relevant for characterizing the route to bursting. The actual route depends on the relative location of the full-system's fixed point with respect to a homoclinic bifurcation of the fast subsystem. Our full-system bifurcation analysis reveals properties of endocrine bursting that are not captured by the standard fast-slow analysis. PMID:20307553

  20. Radio fiber bursts and fast magnetoacoustic wave trains

    CERN Document Server

    Karlický, M; Jelínek, P

    2012-01-01

    We present a model for dm-fiber bursts that is based on assuming fast sausage magnetoacoustic wave trains that propagate along a dense vertical filament or current sheet. Eight groups of dm-fiber bursts that were observed during solar flares were selected and analyzed by the wavelet analysis method. To model these fiber bursts we built a semi-empirical model. We also did magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a propagation of the magnetoacoustic wave train in a vertical and gravitationally stratified current sheet. In the wavelet spectra of the fiber bursts computed at different radio frequencies we found the wavelet tadpoles, whose head maxima have the same frequency drift as the drift of fiber bursts. It indicates that the drift of these fiber bursts can be explained by the propagating fast sausage magnetoacoustic wave train. Using new semi-empirical and magnetohydrodynamic models with a simple radio emission model we generated the artificial radio spectra of the fiber bursts, which are similar to the observed ...

  1. Can pH and electrical conductivity monitoring reveal spatial and temporal patterns in wetland geochemical processes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Gerla

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate reactions and equilibria play a dominant role in the biogeochemical function of many wetlands. The US Geological Survey PHREEQC computer code was used to model geochemical reactions that may be typical for wetlands with water budgets characterized by: (a input dominated by direct precipitation, (b interaction with groundwater, (c variable degrees of reaction with organic carbon, and (d different rates of evapotranspiration. Rainfall with a typical composition was progressively reacted with calcite and organic carbon at various rates and proportions using PHREEQC. Contrasting patterns of the results suggest that basic water quality data collected in the field can reveal differences in the geochemical processes in wetlands. Given a temporal record, these can signal subtle changes in surrounding land cover and use. To demonstrate this, temperature, pH, and electrical conductivity (EC were monitored for three years in five large wetlands comprising 48 sample sites in northwest Minnesota. EC and pH of samples ranged greatly – from 23 to 1300 μS cm−1 and 5.5 to 9. The largest range in pH was observed in small beach ridge wetlands, where two clusters are apparent: (1 low EC and a wide range of pH and (2 higher pH and EC. Large marshes within a glacial lake – till plain have a broad range of pH and EC, but depend on the specific wetland. Outlying data typically occurred in altered or disturbed areas. The inter-annual and intra-wetland consistency of the results suggests that each wetland system hosts characteristic geochemical conditions.

  2. Monitoring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ložek, Vojen; Němec, J.

    Praha : Consult, 2003 - (Němec, J.), s. 111-115 ISBN 80-902132-4-3 Grant ostatní: Magistrát hlavního města Prahy(CZ) DAG/67/04/000176/2001 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3013912 Keywords : monitoring * environmental quality * Prague Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy

  3. Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its main source of fuel. To keep your blood sugar level on target and avoid problems with your eyes, kidneys, heart and feet, you should eat right ... better. And monitoring doesn’t stop at measuring blood sugar levels. Because ... blood testing) Eye health (eye exams) Foot health (foot exams and ...

  4. The Arecibo Fast Radio Burst: Dense Circum-burst Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, S R; Neill, J D

    2015-01-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRB) has been extensively debated. Here we investigate FRB121102, detected at Arecibo telescope and remarkable for its unusually large spectral index. After extensive study we conclude that the spectral index is caused by a nebula with free-free absorption. We find that putative nebula must lie beyond the Milky Way. We conclude that FRBs are of extra-galactic origin and that they arise in dense star-forming regions. The challenge with extra-galactic models is the the high volumetric rate of FRBs. This high rate allows us to eliminate all models of catastrophic stellar deaths. Hyper-giant flares from young magnetars emerge as the most likely progenitors. Some of the consequences are: (i) Intergalactic FRB models can be safely ignored. (ii) The rich ISM environment of young magnetars can result in significant contribution to DM, Rotation Measure (RM) and in some cases to significant free-free optical depth. (iii) The star-forming regions in the host galaxies can contribute signi...

  5. Powerful Radio Burst Indicates New Astronomical Phenomenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    . "It was a bit of luck that the survey included some observations of the sky surrounding the clouds," Narkevic said. It was from those "flanking" observations that the mysterious radio burst appeared in the data. The burst of radio waves was strong by astronomical standards, but lasted less than five milliseconds. The signal was spread out, with higher frequencies arriving at the telescope before the lower frequencies. This effect, called dispersion, is caused by the signal passing through ionized gas in interstellar and intergalactic space. The amount of this dispersion, the astronomers said, indicates that the signal likely originated about three billion light-years from Earth. No previously-detected cosmic radio burst has the same set of characteristics. "This burst represents an entirely new astronomical phenomenon," Bailes said. The astronomers estimate on the basis of their results that hundreds of similar events should occur over the sky each day. "Few radio surveys have the necessary sensitivity to such short-duration bursts, which makes them notoriously difficult to detect with current instruments," added Crawford. The next generation of radio telescopes currently under development should be able to detect many of these bursts across the sky. Although the nature of the mysterious new object is unclear, the astronomers have some ideas of what may cause such a burst. One idea is that it may be part of the energy released when a pair of superdense neutron stars collide and merge. Such an event is thought by some scientists to be the cause of one type of gamma-ray burst, but the only radio emission seen so far from these has been from the long-lived "afterglow" that follows the original burst. Another, more exotic, candidate is a burst of energy from an evaporating black hole. Black holes, concentrations of mass so dense that not even light can escape their powerful gravity, can lose mass and energy through a process proposed by famed British physicist Stephen

  6. Supercollapsars and their X-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Komissarov, S S

    2009-01-01

    The very first stars in the Universe can be very massive, frequently reaching $10^3M_\\odot$. If born in large numbers such massive stars can have strong impact on the subsequent star formation producing strong ionising radiation and contaminating the primordial gas with heavy elements. They would leave behind massive black holes that could act as seeds for growing supermassive black holes of active galactic nuclei. Given the anticipated fast rotation such stars would end their live as supermassive collapsars and drive powerful magnetically-dominated jets. In this letter we investigate the possibility of observing the bursts of high-energy emission similar to the Long Gamma Ray Bursts associated with normal collapsars. We show that during the collapse of supercollapsars, the Blandford-Znajek mechanism can extract up to $10^{56}$erg at a rate of few$\\times10^{52}$erg/s. Due to the higher intrinsic time scale and higher redshift the observed burst duration increases by a factor of $\\simeq 1000$ and can reach one...

  7. Contention avoidance using dual-fuzzy assembly threshold algorithm in optical burst switching networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jiu-ru; WANG Gang; JIA Shi-lou

    2009-01-01

    To avoid burst contention efficiently, on the basis of feedback-based source flow-rate control (SFC) strategy, a novel fuzzy-control-based assembly algorithm, called dual-fuzzy assembly threshold (DFAT), is proposed in an optical burst switching network.In our algorithm, according to the variations of burst assembly period and the interarrival of burst control packet, the traffic states of edge-switching nodes and core-switching nodes are first obtained.Then, the assembly threshold of bursts is set dynamically in order to operate the source traffic management from the information of traffic states.The performance of DFAT algorithm on burst loss prob-ability is evaluated, and simulation results show that, compared with conventional assembly algorithms, the pro-posed scheme can constrain the birth of burst contention efficiently, when being a heavy load state of network.

  8. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-03-07

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  9. Concept for LEU Burst Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and performance of a proposed LEU burst reactor are sketched. Salient conclusions reached are the following: size would be ~1,500 kg or greater, depending on the size of the central cavity; internal stresses during burst require split rings for relief; the reactor would likely require multiple control and safety rods for fine control; the energy spectrum would be comparable to that of HEU machines; and burst yields and steady-state power levels will be significantly greater in an LEU reactor.

  10. Analysis of Burst Assembly Modeling for Optical Burst Switched Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhumika Patel

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have study the current state of the technology, the Optical burst Switched (OBS network is the most practical in all-optical architecture. Here we define how Burst Assembly will carried out and also here in the network architecture each node is consist of Core router and Edge router. Moreover we define challenges faced at practical implementation of OBS and proposed its unique solution at the node as Delay model.

  11. Observing a Burst with Sunglasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-11-01

    polarisation properties of the afterglow of GRB 030329 as it developed after the explosion. Hypernovae, the source of GRBs, are indeed so far away that they can only be seen as unresolved points of light. To probe their spatial structure, astronomers have thus to rely on a trick: polarimetry (see ESO PR 23/03). Polarimetry works as follows: light is composed of electromagnetic waves which oscillate in certain directions (planes). Reflection or scattering of light favours certain orientations of the electric and magnetic fields over others. This is why polarising sunglasses can filter out the glint of sunlight reflecting off a pond. The radiation in a gamma-ray burst is generated in an ordered magnetic field, as so-called synchrotron radiation [3]. If the hypernova is spherically symmetric, all orientations of the electromagnetic waves will be present equally and will average out, so there will be no net polarisation. If, however, the gas is not ejected symmetrically, but into a jet, a slight net polarisation will be imprinted on the light. This net polarisation will change with time since the opening angle of the jet widens with time, and we see a different fraction of the emission cone. Studying the polarisation properties of the afterglow of a gamma-ray burst thus allows to gain knowledge about the underlying spatial structures and the strength and orientation of the magnetic field in the region where the radiation is generated. " And doing this over a long period of time, as the afterglow fades and evolves, provides us with a unique diagnostic tool for gamma-ray burst studies ", says Jochen Greiner . Although previous single measurements of the polarisation of GRB's optical afterglow exist, no detailed study has ever been done of the evolution of polarisation with time. This is indeed a very demanding task, only possible with an extremely stable instrument on the largest telescope... and a sufficient bright optical afterglow. As soon as GRB 030329 was detected, the team of

  12. Quantification in MALDI-MS imaging: what can we learn from MALDI-selected reaction monitoring and what can we expect for imaging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Tiffany; Lesur, Antoine; Varesio, Emmanuel; Hopfgartner, Gérard

    2015-03-01

    Quantification by mass spectrometry imaging (Q-MSI) is one of the hottest topics of the current discussions among the experts of the MS imaging community. If MSI is established as a powerful qualitative tool in drug and biomarker discovery, its reliability for absolute and accurate quantification (QUAN) is still controversial. Indeed, Q-MSI has to deal with several fundamental aspects that are difficult to control, and to account for absolute quantification. The first objective of this manuscript is to review the state-of-the-art of Q-MSI and the current strategies developed for absolute quantification by direct surface sampling from tissue sections. This includes comments on the quest for the perfect matrix-matched standards and signal normalization approaches. Furthermore, this work investigates quantification at a pixel level to determine how many pixels must be considered for accurate quantification by ultraviolet matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI), the most widely used technique for MSI. Particularly, this study focuses on the MALDI-selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in rastering mode, previously demonstrated as a quantitative and robust approach for small analyte and peptide-targeted analyses. The importance of designing experiments of good quality and the use of a labeled compound for signal normalization is emphasized to minimize the signal variability. This is exemplified by measuring the signal for cocaine and a tryptic peptide (i.e., obtained after digestion of a monoclonal antibody) upon different experimental conditions, such as sample stage velocity, laser power and frequency, or distance between two raster lines. Our findings show that accurate quantification cannot be performed on a single pixel but requires averaging of at least 4-5 pixels. The present work demonstrates that MALDI-SRM/MSI is quantitative with precision better than 10-15 %, which meets the requirements of most guidelines (i.e., in bioanalysis or toxicology) for

  13. Real Life Science with Dandelions and Project BudBurst

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Project BudBurst is a national citizen-science project that tracks bloom times and other phenological data for plants across the country. Data from Project BudBurst are being used to measure the effects of climate change. Students can participate in this project by watching any of the plants on the list, including the common dandelion, which makes the program easy and accessible to everyone. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education

  14. Models for Gamma-Ray Burst Progenitors and Central Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Woosley, S E

    2011-01-01

    Most gamma-ray bursts are made during the deaths of massive stars. Here the environmental circumstances, stellar evolutionary paths, and explosion physics that might produce the bursts are reviewed. Neither of the two leading models - collapsar and millisecond magnetar - can be excluded, and both may operate in progenitor stars of different masses, metallicities, and rotation rates. Potential diagnostics are discussed and uncertainties highlighted. Both models are capable of producing a wide ...

  15. The Mesoscopic Modeling of Burst Suppression during Anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Liley, David T. J.; Walsh, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The burst-suppression pattern is well recognized as a distinct feature of the mammalian electroencephalogram (EEG) waveform. Consisting of alternating periods of high amplitude oscillatory and isoelectric activity, it can be induced in health by deep anesthesia as well as being evoked by a range of pathophysiological processes that include coma and anoxia. While the electroencephalographic phenomenon and clinical implications of burst suppression have been studied extensively, the physiologic...

  16. Real Life Science with Dandelions and Project BudBurst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A. Johnson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Project BudBurst is a national citizen-science project that tracks bloom times and other phenological data for plants across the country. Data from Project BudBurst are being used to measure the effects of climate change. Students can participate in this project by watching any of the plants on the list, including the common dandelion, which makes the program easy and accessible to everyone.

  17. Real Life Science with Dandelions and Project BudBurst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Katherine A

    2016-03-01

    Project BudBurst is a national citizen-science project that tracks bloom times and other phenological data for plants across the country. Data from Project BudBurst are being used to measure the effects of climate change. Students can participate in this project by watching any of the plants on the list, including the common dandelion, which makes the program easy and accessible to everyone. Journal of Microbiology & Biology Education. PMID:27047605

  18. Temporal Shaping of High Peak Power Pulse Trains from a Burst-Mode Laser System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Körner

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown in the past that pulsed laser systems operating in the so-called “burst mode” are a beneficial approach to generate high peak power laser pulses at high repetition rates suitable for various applications. So far, most high-energy burst-mode laser systems put great effort into generating a homogeneous energy distribution across the burst duration, e.g., by shaping the pump pulse. In this work, we present a new shaping technique, which is able to produce arbitrary energy distributions within the burst by pre-shaping the seed pulse burst with a Pockels cell. Furthermore, this technique allows for the precompensation of any static modulations across the burst, which may be introduced during the subsequent amplification process. Therefore, a pulse burst with a uniform energy distribution can also be generated. The method is tested with an ultra-short pulse burst mode laser amplifier system producing bursts of a 1 ms duration with a pulse repetition rate of 1 MHz and a maximum output power of 800 W during the burst. Furthermore, a method to predict the influence of the amplifier on a non-uniformly shaped burst is presented and successfully tested to produce a pre-defined pulse shape after amplification.

  19. FERMIGBRST - Fermi GBM Burst Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This table lists all of the triggers observed by a subset of the 14 GBM detectors (12 NaI and 2 BGO) which have been classified as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Note...

  20. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2015-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of stability function in the incoherent (i.e. disorder), coherent, chimera and multi-chimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multi-chimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is i...

  1. A population study of type II bursts in the Rapid Burster

    CERN Document Server

    Bagnoli, T; D'Angelo, C R; Galloway, D K

    2015-01-01

    Type II bursts are thought to arise from instabilities in the accretion flow onto a neutron star in an X-ray binary. Despite having been known for almost 40 years, no model can yet satisfactorily account for all their properties. To shed light on the nature of this phenomenon and provide a reference for future theoretical work, we study the entire sample of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer data of type II bursts from the Rapid Burster (MXB 1730-335). We find that type II bursts are Eddington-limited in flux, that a larger amount of energy goes in the bursts than in the persistent emission, that type II bursts can be as short as 0.130 s, and that the distribution of recurrence times drops abruptly below 15-18 s. We highlight the complicated feedback between type II bursts and the NS surface thermonuclear explosions known as type I bursts, and between type II bursts and the persistent emission. We review a number of models for type II bursts. While no model can reproduce all the observed burst properties and explain...

  2. Research and Development of Hybrid Electric Vehicles CAN-Bus Data Monitor and Diagnostic System through OBD-II and Android-Based Smartphones

    OpenAIRE

    Yalian Yang; Baolin Chen; Lin Su; Datong Qin

    2013-01-01

    With the rapid development of the smartphone market, future cars seem to have more connections with intelligent cell phone and Internet. Intelligent transportation system (ITS) and telematics system have become research focus in recent years. There is an increasing demand for remote monitoring and diagnostic system as the further research of hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) goes on. In this paper, a remote controller area network bus (CAN-Bus) data monitor and diagnostic system for HEV is presen...

  3. Nonrelativistic phase in γ-ray burst afterglows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of multiband afterglows definitely shows that most γ-ray bursts are of cosmological origin. γ-ray bursts are found to be one of the most violent explosive phenomena in the Universe, in which astonishing ultra-relativistic motions are involved.In this article, the multiband observational characteristics of γ-ray bursts and their afterglows are briefly reviewed. The standard model of γ-ray bursts, i.e. the fireball model, is described. Emphasis is then put on the importance of the nonrelativistic phase of afterglows. The concept of deep Newtonian phase is elaborated. A generic dynamical model applicable in both the relativistic and nonrelativistic phases is introduced. Based on these elaborations, the overall afterglow behaviors, from the very early stages to the very late stages, can be conveniently calculated.

  4. Mining Gamma-Ray Burst Data

    OpenAIRE

    Hakkila, Jon; Roiger, Richard J.; Haglin, David J.; Mallozzi, Robert S.; Pendleton, Geoffrey N.; Meegan, Charles A.

    2000-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts provide what is probably one of the messiest of all astrophysical data sets. Burst class properties are indistinct, as overlapping characteristics of individual bursts are convolved with effects of instrumental and sampling biases. Despite these complexities, data mining techniques have allowed new insights to be made about gamma-ray burst data. We demonstrate how data mining techniques have simultaneously allowed us to learn about gamma-ray burst detectors and data collectio...

  5. Activity from Magnetar Candidate 4U 0142+61: Bursts and Emission Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Gavriil, Fotis P; Kaspi, Victoria M

    2007-01-01

    After 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months. During the active phase, several bursts were detected, and many aspects of the X-ray emission changed. We report on the discovery of six X-ray bursts, the first ever seen from this AXP in ~10 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) monitoring. All the bursts occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The bursts had the canonical fast rise slow decay profiles characteristic of SGR/AXP bursts. The burst durations ranged from 8-3x10^3 s as characterized by T90,these are very long durations even when compared to the broad T90 distributions of other bursts from SGRs and AXPs. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by simple blackbodies, with temperature kT ~2-6 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum consisting of at least three emission lines with possible additional emission and absorption lines. The most significant feature was...

  6. Swift-BAT: The First Year of Gamma-Ray Burst Detections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimm, Hans A.

    2006-01-01

    The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) on the Swift has been detecting gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) since Dec. 17,2004 and automated burst alerts have been distributed since Feb. 14,2005. Since commissioning the BAT has triggered on more than 100 GRBs, nearly all of which have been followed up by the narrow-field instruments on Swift through automatic repointing, and by ground and other satellite telescopes after rapid notification. Within seconds of a trigger the BAT produces and relays to the ground a position good to three arc minutes and a four channel light curve. A full ten minutes of event data follows on subsequent ground station passes. The burst archive has allowed us to determine ensemble burst parameters such as fluence, peak flux and duration. An overview of the properties of BAT bursts and BAT'S performance as a burst monitor will be presented in this talk. BAT is a coded aperture imaging system with a wide (approx.2 sr) field of view consisting of a large coded mask located 1 m above a 5200 cm2 array of 32.768 CdZnTe detectors. All electronics and other hardware systems on the BAT have been operating well since commissioning and there is no sign of any degradation on orbit. The flight and ground software have proven similarly robust and allow the real time localization of all bursts and the rapid derivation of burst light curves, spectra and spectral fits on the ground.

  7. Creep Burst Testing of a Woven Inflatable Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selig, Molly M.; Valle, Gerard D.; James, George H.; Oliveras, Ovidio M.; Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.

    2015-01-01

    A woven Vectran inflatable module 88 inches in diameter and 10 feet long was tested at the NASA Johnson Space Center until failure from creep. The module was pressurized pneumatically to an internal pressure of 145 psig, and was held at pressure until burst. The external environment remained at standard atmospheric temperature and pressure. The module burst occurred after 49 minutes at the target pressure. The test article pressure and temperature were monitored, and video footage of the burst was captured at 60 FPS. Photogrammetry was used to obtain strain measurements of some of the webbing. Accelerometers on the test article measured the dynamic response. This paper discusses the test article, test setup, predictions, observations, photogrammetry technique and strain results, structural dynamics methods and quick-look results, and a comparison of the module level creep behavior to the strap level creep behavior.

  8. High-energy emission from bright gamma-ray bursts using Fermi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the scientific objectives of one of the present NASA missions, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST), is the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fermi's payload comprises two science instruments, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). GBM was designed to detect and localize bursts for the Fermi mission. By means of an array of 12 NaI(Tl) (8 keV to 1 MeV) and two BGO (0.2 to 40 MeV) scintillation detectors, GBM extends the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the LAT instrument into the traditional range of current GRB databases. The physical detector response of the GBM instrument to GRBs has been determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground individual detector calibration measurements. The GBM detectors have been calibrated from 10 keV to 17.5 MeV using various gamma sources, and the detector response has been derived by simulations over the entire energy range (8 keV to 40 MeV) using GEANT. The GBM instrument has been operating successfully in orbit since June 11, 2008. The total trigger count from the time GBM triggering was enabled in July 2008 through December 2009 is 655, and about 380 of these triggers were classified as GRBs. Moreover, GBM detected several bursts in common with the LAT. These amazing detections mainly fulfill the primary science goal of GBM, which is the joint analysis of spectra and time histories of GRBs observed by both Fermi instruments. For every trigger, GBM provides near-real time on-board burst locations to permit repointing of the spacecraft and to obtain LAT observations of delayed emission from bursts. GBM and LAT refined locations are rapidly disseminated to the scientific community, often permitting extensive multiwavelength follow-up observations by NASA's Swift mission or other space- based observatories, and by numerous ground-based telescopes, thus allowing redshift determinations. Calculations of LAT upper limits are mainly based

  9. High-energy emission from bright gamma-ray bursts using Fermi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta

    2010-05-25

    Among the scientific objectives of one of the present NASA missions, the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (FGST), is the study of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Fermi's payload comprises two science instruments, the Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM). GBM was designed to detect and localize bursts for the Fermi mission. By means of an array of 12 NaI(Tl) (8 keV to 1 MeV) and two BGO (0.2 to 40 MeV) scintillation detectors, GBM extends the energy range (20 MeV to > 300 GeV) of the LAT instrument into the traditional range of current GRB databases. The physical detector response of the GBM instrument to GRBs has been determined with the help of Monte Carlo simulations, which are supported and verified by on-ground individual detector calibration measurements. The GBM detectors have been calibrated from 10 keV to 17.5 MeV using various gamma sources, and the detector response has been derived by simulations over the entire energy range (8 keV to 40 MeV) using GEANT. The GBM instrument has been operating successfully in orbit since June 11, 2008. The total trigger count from the time GBM triggering was enabled in July 2008 through December 2009 is 655, and about 380 of these triggers were classified as GRBs. Moreover, GBM detected several bursts in common with the LAT. These amazing detections mainly fulfill the primary science goal of GBM, which is the joint analysis of spectra and time histories of GRBs observed by both Fermi instruments. For every trigger, GBM provides near-real time on-board burst locations to permit repointing of the spacecraft and to obtain LAT observations of delayed emission from bursts. GBM and LAT refined locations are rapidly disseminated to the scientific community, often permitting extensive multiwavelength follow-up observations by NASA's Swift mission or other space- based observatories, and by numerous ground-based telescopes, thus allowing redshift determinations. Calculations of LAT upper limits are

  10. Adventures in Parenting: How Responding, Preventing, Monitoring, Mentoring, and Modeling Can Help You Be a Successful Parent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Institutes of Health (DHHS), Bethesda, MD.

    This guide presents RPM3, a no-frills approach to parenting. The acronym RPM3 stands for Responding to your child in an appropriate manner, Preventing risky behavior problems, Monitoring your child's contact with his or her surrounding world, Mentoring your child to support and encourage desired behaviors, and Modeling your own behavior to provide…

  11. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Can Uncover Mistakes in Self-Treatment of Hypoglycemia in Patients with Type I Diabetes Mellitus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brož, J.; Urbanová, J.; Janíčková Žďárská, D.; Doničová, V.; Brabec, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 63, Supplement 1 (2014), A221-A221. ISSN 0012-1797. [American Diabetes Association. Scientific Sessions /74./. 13.06.2014-17.06.2014, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : continuous monitoring * type I diabetes * semiparametric modeling Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  12. Continuous Glucose Monitoring Can Uncover Mistakes in Self-Treatment of Hypoglycemia in Patients with Type I Diabetes Mellitus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brož, J.; Urbanová, J.; Janíčková Žďárská, D.; Doničová, V.; Brabec, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 16, Supplement 1 (2014), A35-A35. ISSN 1520-9156. [American Diabetes Association. Scientific Sessions /74./. 13.06.2014-17.06.2014, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : continuous monitoring * type I diabetes * semiparametric modeling Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  13. Collision between Neutron Stars and Asteroids as a Mechanism for Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Y F

    2015-01-01

    As a new kind of radio transient sources detected at $\\sim 1.4$ GHz, fast radio bursts are specially characterized by their short durations and high intensities. Although only ten events are detected so far, fast radio bursts may actually frequently happen at a rate of $\\sim 10^{3}$ --- $10^4~\\rm{sky}^{-1}~\\rm{day}^{-1}$. We suggest that fast radio bursts can be produced by the collisions between neutron stars and asteroids. This model can naturally explain the millisecond duration of fast radio bursts. The energetics and event rate can also be safely accounted for. Fast radio bursts thus may be one side of the multifaces of the neutron star-small body collision events, which are previously expected to lead to X-ray/gamma-ray bursts or glitch/anti-glitches.

  14. A Novel Experimental Technique to Simulate Pillar Burst in Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, M. C.; Zhao, F.; Cai, M.; Du, S.

    2015-09-01

    Pillar burst is one type of rockburst that occurs in underground mines. Simulating the stress change and obtaining insight into the pillar burst phenomenon under laboratory conditions are essential for studying the rock behavior during pillar burst in situ. To study the failure mechanism, a novel experimental technique was proposed and a series of tests were conducted on some granite specimens using a true-triaxial strainburst test system. Acoustic emission (AE) sensors were used to monitor the rock fracturing process. The damage evolution process was investigated using techniques such as macro and micro fracture characteristics observation, AE energy evolution, and b value analysis and fractal dimension analysis of cracks on fragments. The obtained results indicate that stepped loading and unloading simulated the pillar burst phenomenon well. Four deformation stages are divided as initial stress state, unloading step I, unloading step II, and final burst. It is observed that AE energy has a sharp increase at the initial stress state, accumulates slowly at unloading steps I and II, and increases dramatically at peak stress. Meanwhile, the mean b values fluctuate around 3.50 for the first three deformation stages and then decrease to 2.86 at the final stage, indicating the generation of a large amount of macro fractures. Before the test, the fractal dimension values are discrete and mainly vary between 1.10 and 1.25, whereas after failure the values concentrate around 1.25-1.35.

  15. Broadband Spectral Investigations of SGR J1550-5418 Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Lin; Baring, Matthew G; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Kaneko, Yuki; van der Horst, Alexander; Gruber, David; von Kienlin, Andreas; Younes, George; Watts, Anna L; Gehrels, Neil

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of our broadband spectral analysis of 42 SGR J1550-5418 bursts simultaneously detected with the Swift/X-ray Telescope (XRT) and the Fermi/Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), during the 2009 January active episode of the source. The unique spectral and temporal capabilities of the XRT Windowed Timing mode have allowed us to extend the GBM spectral coverage for these events down to the X-ray domain (0.5-10 keV). Our earlier analysis of the GBM data found that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra were described equally well with a Comptonized model or with two blackbody functions; the two models were statistically indistinguishable. Our new broadband (0.5 - 200 keV) spectral fits show that, on average, the burst spectra are better described with two blackbody functions than with the Comptonized model. Thus, our joint XRT/GBM analysis clearly shows for the first time that the SGR J1550-5418 burst spectra might naturally be expected to exhibit a more truly thermalized character, such as a two-blackbo...

  16. Are Gamma-ray Bursts Universal?

    OpenAIRE

    Eichler, David; Levinson, Amir

    2006-01-01

    It is noted that the Liang-Zhang correlation can be accounted for with the viewing angle interpretation proposed earlier. The Ghirlanda correlation, recently generalized by Nava et al (2006) to a wind profile, can be accounted for by the viewing angle interpretation accordingly generalized to a wind profile. Most of the scatter in the spectra and time-integrated brightness in $\\gamma$-ray bursts (GRB) can thus be accounted for by variation in two parameters, 1) the viewing angle and 2) the je...

  17. Evaluation of Burst Loss Rate of an Optical Burst Switching (OBS) Network with Wavelength Conversion Capability

    OpenAIRE

    Reza, Md. Shamim; Hossain, Md. Maruf; Majumder, Satya Prasad

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a new analytical model for calculating burst loss rate (BLR) in a slotted optical burst switched network. The analytical result leads to a framework which provides guidelines for optical burst switched networks. Wavelength converter is used for burst contention resolution. The effect of several design parameters such as burst arrival probability, wavelength conversion capability, number of slots per burst and number of wavelengths is incorporated on the above performance m...

  18. A Fast Radio Burst Host Galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Keane, E F; Bhandari, S; Barr, E; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Kramer, M; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Eatough, R P; Stappers, B W; Totani, T; Honma, M; Furusawa, H; Hattori, T; Morokuma, T; Niino, Y; Sugai, H; Terai, T; Tominaga, N; Yamasaki, S; Yasuda, N; Allen, R; Cooke, J; Jencson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kaplan, D L; Tingay, S J; Williams, A; Wayth, R; Chandra, P; Perrodin, D; Berezina, M; Mickaliger, M; Bassa, C

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, millisecond duration radio signals originating from distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called Fast Radio Bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. While every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, none before now have had a redshift measurement, due to the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we present the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting $\\sim 6$ days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy's redshift to be $z=0.492\\pm0.008$. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionised baryons in the intergalactic medium of $\\Omega_{\\mathrm{IGM}}=4.9 \\pm 1.3\\%$, in agreement with the expectation from WMAP, and i...

  19. Composite-flywheel burst-containment study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapowith, A D; Handy, W E

    1982-04-08

    A key component impacting total flywheel energy storage system weight is the containment structure. This report addresses the factors that shape this structure and define its design criteria. In addition, containment weight estimates are made for the several composite flywheel designs of interest so that judgements can be made as to the relative weights of their containment structure. The requirements set down for this program were that all containment weight estimates be based on a 1 kWh burst. It should be noted that typical flywheel requirements for regenerative braking of small automobiles call for deliverable energies of 0.25 kWh. This leads to expected maximum burst energies of 0.5 kWh. The flywheels studied are those considered most likely to be carried further for operational design. These area: The pseudo isotropic disk flywheel, sometimes called the alpha ply; the SMC molded disk; either disk with a carbon ring; the subcircular rim with cruciform hub; and Avco's bi-directional circular weave disk. The flywheel materials for the disk are S-glass; the subcircular rim is Kevlar over S-glass. Test data on flywheel bursts and containment failures were analyzed. Recommendations are made for further testing.

  20. High-risk prescribing and monitoring in primary care: how common is it, and how can it be improved?

    OpenAIRE

    Dreischulte, Tobias; Guthrie, Bruce

    2012-01-01

    The safety of medication use in primary care is an area of increasing concern for health systems internationally. Systematic reviews estimate that 3–4% of all unplanned hospital admissions are due to preventable drug-related morbidity, the majority of which have been attributed to shortcomings in the prescribing and monitoring stages of the medication use process. We define high-risk prescribing as medication prescription by professionals, for which there is evidence of significant risk of ha...

  1. A Retroactive-Burst Framework for Automated Intrusion Response System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Shameli-Sendi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present an adaptive and cost-sensitive model to prevent security intrusions. In most automated intrusion response systems, response selection is performed locally based on current threat without using the knowledge of attacks history. Another challenge is that a group of responses are applied without any feedback mechanism to measure the response effect. We address these problems through retroactive-burst execution of responses and a Response Coordinator (RC mechanism, the main contributions of this work. The retroactive-burst execution consists of several burst executions of responses with, at the end of each burst, a mechanism for measuring the effectiveness of the applied responses by the risk assessment component. The appropriate combination of responses must be considered for each burst execution to mitigate the progress of the attack without necessarily running the next round of responses, because of the impact on legitimate users. In the proposed model, there is a multilevel response mechanism. To indicate which level is appropriate to apply based on the retroactive-burst execution, we get help from a Response Coordinator mechanism. The applied responses can improve the health of Applications, Kernel, Local Services, Network Services, and Physical Status. Based on these indexes, the RC gives a general overview of an attacker’s goal in a distributed environment.

  2. The host galaxy of a fast radio burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, E F; Johnston, S; Bhandari, S; Barr, E; Bhat, N D R; Burgay, M; Caleb, M; Flynn, C; Jameson, A; Kramer, M; Petroff, E; Possenti, A; van Straten, W; Bailes, M; Burke-Spolaor, S; Eatough, R P; Stappers, B W; Totani, T; Honma, M; Furusawa, H; Hattori, T; Morokuma, T; Niino, Y; Sugai, H; Terai, T; Tominaga, N; Yamasaki, S; Yasuda, N; Allen, R; Cooke, J; Jencson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kaplan, D L; Tingay, S J; Williams, A; Wayth, R; Chandra, P; Perrodin, D; Berezina, M; Mickaliger, M; Bassa, C

    2016-02-25

    In recent years, millisecond-duration radio signals originating in distant galaxies appear to have been discovered in the so-called fast radio bursts. These signals are dispersed according to a precise physical law and this dispersion is a key observable quantity, which, in tandem with a redshift measurement, can be used for fundamental physical investigations. Every fast radio burst has a dispersion measurement, but none before now have had a redshift measurement, because of the difficulty in pinpointing their celestial coordinates. Here we report the discovery of a fast radio burst and the identification of a fading radio transient lasting ~6 days after the event, which we use to identify the host galaxy; we measure the galaxy's redshift to be z = 0.492 ± 0.008. The dispersion measure and redshift, in combination, provide a direct measurement of the cosmic density of ionized baryons in the intergalactic medium of ΩIGM = 4.9 ± 1.3 per cent, in agreement with the expectation from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe, and including all of the so-called 'missing baryons'. The ~6-day radio transient is largely consistent with the radio afterglow of a short γ-ray burst, and its existence and timescale do not support progenitor models such as giant pulses from pulsars, and supernovae. This contrasts with the interpretation of another recently discovered fast radio burst, suggesting that there are at least two classes of bursts. PMID:26911781

  3. Narrowband frequency-drift structures in solar type IV bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Yukio; Ono, Takayuki; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Misawa, Hiroaki; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Katoh, Yuto; Masuda, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi

    2013-12-01

    We have established the Zao Solar Radiospectrograph (ZSR), a new solar radio observation system, at the Zao observatory of Tohoku University, Japan. We observed narrowband fine structures with type IV bursts with ZSR on 2 and 3 November 2008. The observed fine structures are similar to fiber bursts in terms of the drift rates and the existence of emission and absorption stripes. Statistical analysis of the drift rates, however, shows that the observed fine structures are different from the ordinary fiber bursts as regards the sense and the magnitude of their drift rates. First, the observed drift rates include both positive and negative rates, whereas ordinary fiber bursts are usually characterized by negative drift rates. Second, the absolute values of the observed drift rates are tens of MHz s-1, whereas the typical drift rate of fiber bursts at 325 MHz is approximately -9 MHz s-1. In addition, all fine structures analyzed have narrow emission bands of less than 17 MHz. We also show that the observed narrowband emission features with drift rates of approximately 40 MHz s-1 can be interpreted as the propagation of whistler-mode waves, which is the same process as that underlying fiber bursts.

  4. Gamma-ray burst spectral diagnostics in the GLAST era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectra obtained above 100 MeV by the EGRET experiment aboard the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory for a handful of gamma-ray bursts has given no indication of any spectral attenuation that might preclude detection of bursts at higher energies. With the discovery of optical afterglows and counterparts to bursts in the last few years, enabling the determination of significant redshifts for these sources, it is anticipated that profound spectral attenuation will arise in the GLAST energy band of 30 MeV-300 GeV for many if not most bursts. An important goal will be to discriminate between such extrinsic absorption, due to the cosmic infra-red background, and that which arises internally in GRBs. This paper explores expectations for the spectral properties in the GLAST band for bursts, in particular how attenuation of photons by pair creation internal to the source modifies the spectrum to produce distinctive signatures. The energy of spectral breaks and the associated spectral indices provide valuable information that can constrain the bulk Lorentz factor of the GRB outflow at a given time. Moreover, distinct temporal behavior is present for internal attenuation, and is easily distinguished from extrinsic absorption. These characteristics define palpable observational goals for both the GLAST mission and ground-based Cerenkov telescopes, and strongly impact the observability of bursts above 1 GeV

  5. Adaptation to visual stimulation modifies the burst firing property of V1 neurons%Adaptation to visual stimulation modifies the burst firing property of V1neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Long LIU; Ke WANG; Jian-Jun MENG; Tian-Miao HUA; Zhen LIANG; Min-Min XI

    2013-01-01

    The mean firing rate of visual cortical neurons is reduced after prolonged visual stimulation,but the underlying process by which this occurs as well as the biological significance of this phenomenon remains unknown.Computational neuroscience studies indicate that high-frequency bursts in stimulus-driven responses can be transmitted across synapses more reliably than isolated spikes,and thus may carry accurate stimulus-related information.Our research examined whether or not adaptation affects the burst firing property of visual cortical neurons by examining changes in the burst firing changes of V1 neurons during adaptation to the preferred visual stimulus.The results show that adaptation to prolonged visual stimulation significantly decreased burst frequency (bursts/s) and burst length (spikes/burst),but increased burst duration and the interspike interval within bursts.These results suggest that the adaptation of V1 neurons to visual stimulation may result in a decrease of feedforward response gain but an increase of functional activities from lateral and/or feedback connections,which could lead to a reduction in the effectiveness of adapted neurons in transmitting information to its driven neurons.

  6. Signal processing of macro pulse monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam current signal processing system for long burst beam is now under development at JAERI FEL superconducting linac. The system utilizes core current monitors already installed and enables simultaneous monitoring of the long burst beam current along the linac. (author)

  7. Constraints on the hadronic content of gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IceCube High-energy Neutrino Telescope has been collecting data since 2006. Conversely, hundreds of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected by the GRB Monitor on board Fermi since its launch in 2008. So far no neutrino event has been associated with a GRB, despite many models predicting the generation of high-energy neutrinos through GRB photon interaction with PeV protons in the GRB jet. We use the non-detection of neutrinos to constrain the hadronic content of GRB jets independent of jet model parameters. Assuming a generic particle spectrum of E –α with α = 2, we find that the ratio of the energy carried by pions to that in electrons has to be small f π/fe ≲ 0.24 at 95% confidence level. A distribution of spectral slopes can lower f π/fe by orders of magnitude. Another limit, independent of neutrinos, is obtained if one ascribes the measured Fermi/Large Area Telescope GeV gamma-ray emission to pair-photon cascades of high-energy photons resulting from (the same photon-hadronic interactions and subsequent) neutral pion decays. Based on the generally observed MeV-to-GeV GRB fluence ratio of ≈10, we show that f π/fe ≲ 0.3. In some bursts, this ratio is as low as unity, f π/fe ≲ 0.03. These findings add to mounting doubts regarding the presence of PeV protons in GRB jets.

  8. Detection of bursts in neuronal spike trains by the mean inter-spike interval method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Chen; Yong Deng; Weihua Luo; Zhen Wang; Shaoqun Zeng

    2009-01-01

    Bursts are electrical spikes firing with a high frequency, which are the most important property in synaptic plasticity and information processing in the central nervous system. However, bursts are difficult to identify because bursting activities or patterns vary with phys-iological conditions or external stimuli. In this paper, a simple method automatically to detect bursts in spike trains is described. This method auto-adaptively sets a parameter (mean inter-spike interval) according to intrinsic properties of the detected burst spike trains, without any arbitrary choices or any operator judgrnent. When the mean value of several successive inter-spike intervals is not larger than the parameter, a burst is identified. By this method, bursts can be automatically extracted from different bursting patterns of cultured neurons on multi-electrode arrays, as accurately as by visual inspection. Furthermore, significant changes of burst variables caused by electrical stimulus have been found in spontaneous activity of neuronal network. These suggest that the mean inter-spike interval method is robust for detecting changes in burst patterns and characteristics induced by environmental alterations.

  9. Slit burst test of tubes for evaluation of J-R curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work evaluates the J-R curves obtained from the slit burst tests and small compact tension specimens from medium carbon steel (A106 Gr C) seamless tubes. The slit burst tests were carried out using a custom-built test setup with unloading compliance as the crack growth monitoring method. The results from these two types of tests and the relation between them is used to examine the issue of transferability of specimen J-R curve to the burst test conditions in the tubes. The J-R curves obtained from small specimen and burst tests of tubes agree with each other over a very small crack growth region (Δa ∼ 0.7 mm). The internal pressure predicted by the J initiation value obtained from the curved compact tension specimens agree well with the burst data. The fracture morphology and nature of crack growth front is different for these two cases. (author)

  10. The transient gamma-ray spectrometer: A new high resolution detector for gamma-ray burst spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS) to be flown aboard the WIND spacecraft is primarily designed to perform high resolution spectroscopy of transient gamma-ray events, such as cosmic γ-ray bursts and solar flares, over the energy range 20 keV to 10 MeV with an expected spectroscopic resolution of E/δE = 500. The detector itself consists of a 215 cm3 high purity n-type Ge crystal kept at cryogenic temperatures by a passive radiative cooler. The geometric field of view defined by the cooler is 170 degrees. To avoid continuous triggers caused by soft solar events, a thin Be/Cu sun-shield around the sides of the cooler has been provided. A passive Mo/Pb occulter, which modulates signals from within ±5 degrees of the ecliptic plane at the spacecraft spin frequency, is used to identify and study solar flares, as well as emission from the galactic plane and center. Thus, in addition to transient event measurements, the instrument will allow the search for possible diffuse background lines and monitor the 511 keV positron annihilation radiation from the galactic center. In order to handle the typically large burst count rates which can be in excess of 100 kHz, burst data are stored directly in an on-board 2.75 Mbit burst memory with an absolute timing accuracy of ±1.5 ms after ground processing. This capacity is sufficient to store the entire spectral data set of all but the largest bursts. The experiment is scheduled to be launched on a Delta II launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral in the fall of 1993

  11. Thermodynamic order parameters and statistical-mechanical measures for characterization of the burst and spike synchronizations of bursting neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Yoon; Lim, Woochang

    2015-11-01

    We are interested in characterization of population synchronization of bursting neurons which exhibit both the slow bursting and the fast spiking timescales, in contrast to spiking neurons. Population synchronization may be well visualized in the raster plot of neural spikes which can be obtained in experiments. The instantaneous population firing rate (IPFR) R(t) , which may be directly obtained from the raster plot of spikes, is often used as a realistic collective quantity describing population behaviors in both the computational and the experimental neuroscience. For the case of spiking neurons, realistic thermodynamic order parameter and statistical-mechanical spiking measure, based on R(t) , were introduced in our recent work to make practical characterization of spike synchronization. Here, we separate the slow bursting and the fast spiking timescales via frequency filtering, and extend the thermodynamic order parameter and the statistical-mechanical measure to the case of bursting neurons. Consequently, it is shown in explicit examples that both the order parameters and the statistical-mechanical measures may be effectively used to characterize the burst and spike synchronizations of bursting neurons.

  12. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  13. Question No. 5: What Role Can Satellites Take, as a Complement to Ground Based Measurement Systems, to Provide Sustained Observations to Monitor GHG Emissions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahine, Moustafa; Olsen, Edward

    2011-01-01

    What role can satellites take, as a complement to ground based measurement systems, to provide sustained observations to monitor GHG emissions (e.g., CO2, CH4, O3, N2O, CFC s, NH3, and NF3) that contribute to global warming?

  14. QUANTITATION OF INTRACELLULAR NAD(P)H IN LIVING CELLS CAN MONITOR AN IMBALANCE OF DNA SINGLE STRAND BREAK REPAIR IN REAL TIME

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantitation of intracellular NAD(P)H in living cells can monitor an imbalance of DNA single strand break repair in real time.ABSTRACTDNA single strand breaks (SSBs) are one of the most frequent DNA lesions in genomic DNA generated either by oxidative stress or du...

  15. Theta, alpha and beta burst transcranial magnetic stimulation: brain modulation in tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk De Ridder, Elsa van der Loo, Karolien Van der Kelen, Tomas Menovsky, Paul van de Heyning, Aage Moller

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some forms of tinnitus are considered to be auditory phantom phenomena related to reorganization and hyperactivity of the auditory central nervous system. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS is a non-invasive tool capable of modulating human brain activity, using single pulse or burst stimuli. Burst rTMS has only been performed in the theta range, and has not been used clinically. The authors analyze whether burst TMS at theta (5 Hz, alpha (10 Hz and beta (20 Hz frequencies can temporarily suppress narrow band noise/white noise tinnitus, which has been demonstrated to be intractable to tonic stimulation. Methods: rTMS is performed both in tonic and burst mode in 46 patients contralateral to the tinnitus side, at 5, 10 and 20 Hz. Fourteen placebo negative rTMS responders are further analyzed. Results: In 5 patients, maximal tinnitus suppression is obtained with theta, in 2 with alpha and in 7 with beta burst stimulation. Burst rTMS suppresses narrow band/white tinnitus much better than tonic rTMS t(13=6.4, p<.000. Women experience greater suppression of their tinnitus with burst stimulation than men, t(12=2.9, p<.05. Furthermore left sided tinnitus is perceived as more distressing on the TQ than right sided tinnitus, t(12=3.2, p<.01. The lower the tinnitus pitch the more effectively rTMS suppresses tinnitus(r=-0.65, p<0.05. Discussion: Burst rTMS can be used clinically, not only theta burst, but also alpha and beta burst. Burst rTMS is capable of suppressing narrow band/white noise tinnitus very much better than tonic rTMS. This could be due the simple fact that burst neuromodulation is more powerful than tonic neuromodulation or to a differential effect of burst and tonic stimulation on the lemniscal and extralemniscal auditory system. In some patients only alpha or beta burst rTMS is capable of suppressing tinnitus, and theta burst not. Therefore in future rTMS studies it could be worthwhile not to limit burst

  16. PEAK FLUX DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR RADIO TYPE-I BURSTS FROM HIGHLY RESOLVED SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar radio type-I bursts were observed on 2011 January 26 by high resolution observations with the radio telescope AMATERAS in order to derive their peak flux distributions. We have developed a two-dimensional auto burst detection algorithm that can distinguish each type-I burst element from complex noise storm spectra that include numerous instances of radio frequency interference (RFI). This algorithm removes RFI from the observed radio spectra by applying a moving median filter along the frequency axis. Burst and continuum components are distinguished by a two-dimensional maximum and minimum search of the radio dynamic spectra. The analysis result shows that each type-I burst element has one peak flux without double counts or missed counts. The peak flux distribution of type-I bursts derived using this algorithm follows a power law with a spectral index between 4 and 5.

  17. Peak Flux Distributions of Solar Radio Type-i Bursts from Highly Resolved Spectral Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, K.; Masuda, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Tsuchiya, F.; Morioka, A.; Misawa, H.

    2013-05-01

    Solar radio type-I bursts were observed on 2011 January 26 by high resolution observations with the radio telescope AMATERAS in order to derive their peak flux distributions. We have developed a two-dimensional auto burst detection algorithm that can distinguish each type-I burst element from complex noise storm spectra that include numerous instances of radio frequency interference (RFI). This algorithm removes RFI from the observed radio spectra by applying a moving median filter along the frequency axis. Burst and continuum components are distinguished by a two-dimensional maximum and minimum search of the radio dynamic spectra. The analysis result shows that each type-I burst element has one peak flux without double counts or missed counts. The peak flux distribution of type-I bursts derived using this algorithm follows a power law with a spectral index between 4 and 5.

  18. FAST TCP over optical burst switched networks: Modeling and stability analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Shihada, Basem

    2013-04-01

    FAST TCP is important for promoting data-intensive applications since it can cleverly react to both packet loss and delay for detecting network congestion. This paper provides a continuous time model and extensive stability analysis of FAST TCP congestion-control mechanism in bufferless Optical Burst Switched Networks (OBS). The paper first shows that random burst contentions are essential to stabilize the network, but cause throughput degradation in FAST TCP flows when a burst with all the packets from a single round is dropped. Second, it shows that FAST TCP is vulnerable to burst delay and fails to detect network congestion due to the little variation of round-trip time, thus unstable. Finally it shows that introducing extra delays by implementing burst retransmission stabilizes FAST TCP over OBS. The paper proves that FAST TCP is not stable over barebone OBS. However, it is locally, exponentially, and asymptotically stable over OBS with burst retransmission.

  19. A POSSIBLE CONNECTION BETWEEN FAST RADIO BURSTS AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs), a new type of cosmological transient discovered recently, is not known. It has been suggested that FRBs can be produced when a spinning supra-massive neutron star loses centrifugal support and collapses to a black hole. Here, we suggest that such implosions can happen in supra-massive neutron stars shortly (hundreds to thousands of seconds) after their births, and an observational signature of such implosions may have been observed in the X-ray afterglows of some long and short gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Within this picture, a small fraction of FRBs would be physically connected to GRBs. We discuss possible multi-wavelength electromagnetic signals and gravitational wave signals that might be associated with FRBs, and propose an observational campaign to unveil the physical nature of FRBs. In particular, we strongly encourage a rapid radio follow-up observation of GRBs starting from 100 s after a GRB trigger

  20. Neurodegeneration severity can be predicted from early microglia alterations monitored in vivo in a mouse model of chronic glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Bosco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Microglia serve key homeostatic roles, and respond to neuronal perturbation and decline with a high spatiotemporal resolution. The course of all chronic CNS pathologies is thus paralleled by local microgliosis and microglia activation, which begin at early stages of the disease. However, the possibility of using live monitoring of microglia during early disease progression to predict the severity of neurodegeneration has not been explored. Because the retina allows live tracking of fluorescent microglia in their intact niche, here we investigated their early changes in relation to later optic nerve neurodegeneration. To achieve this, we used the DBA/2J mouse model of inherited glaucoma, which develops progressive retinal ganglion cell degeneration of variable severity during aging, and represents a useful model to study pathogenic mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell decline that are similar to those in human glaucoma. We imaged CX3CR1+/GFP microglial cells in vivo at ages ranging from 1 to 5 months by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy (cSLO and quantified cell density and morphological activation. We detected early microgliosis at the optic nerve head (ONH, where axonopathy first manifests, and could track attenuation of this microgliosis induced by minocycline. We also observed heterogeneous and dynamic patterns of early microglia activation in the retina. When the same animals were aged and analyzed for the severity of optic nerve pathology at 10 months of age, we found a strong correlation with the levels of ONH microgliosis at 3 to 4 months. Our findings indicate that live imaging and monitoring the time course and levels of early retinal microgliosis and microglia activation in glaucoma could serve as indicators of future neurodegeneration severity.

  1. US Army Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Burst Detection System (NBDS) was developed to meet the Army requirements of an unattended, automatic nuclear burst reporting system. It provides pertinent data for battlefield commanders on a timely basis with high reliability

  2. Preemption window for burst differentiation in OBS

    OpenAIRE

    Klinkowski, Miroslaw; Careglio, Davide; Morató, Daniel; Solé Pareta, Josep

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel control architecture for optical burst switching networks to efficiently apply burst preemption without the resources overbooking, which is specific to conventional OBS. Simulation results prove the effectiveness of this proposal.

  3. The Fermi-GBM 3-year X-ray Burst Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Jenke, P A; Connaughton, V; Beklen, E; Camero-Arranz, A; Finger, M H; Wilson-Hodge, C A

    2016-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is an all sky gamma-ray monitor well known in the gamma-ray burst community. Although GBM excels in detecting the hard, bright extragalactic GRBs, its sensitivity above 8 keV and all-sky view make it an excellent instrument for the detection of rare, short-lived Galactic transients. In March 2010, we initiated a systematic search for transients using GBM data. We conclude this phase of the search by presenting a 3 year catalog of 1084 non-solar events. Using spectral analysis, location and spatial distributions we subdivided the 1084 events into 752 thermonuclear X-ray bursts, 267 transient events from accretion flares and X-ray pulses, and 65 untriggered gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Light Dawns on Dark Gamma-ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are among the most energetic events in the Universe, but some appear curiously faint in visible light. The biggest study to date of these so-called dark gamma-ray bursts, using the GROND instrument on the 2.2-metre MPG/ESO telescope at La Silla in Chile, has found that these gigantic explosions don't require exotic explanations. Their faintness is now fully explained by a combination of causes, the most important of which is the presence of dust between the Earth and the explosion. Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), fleeting events that last from less than a second to several minutes, are detected by orbiting observatories that can pick up their high energy radiation. Thirteen years ago, however, astronomers discovered a longer-lasting stream of less energetic radiation coming from these violent outbursts, which can last for weeks or even years after the initial explosion. Astronomers call this the burst's afterglow. While all gamma-ray bursts [1] have afterglows that give off X-rays, only about half of them were found to give off visible light, with the rest remaining mysteriously dark. Some astronomers suspected that these dark afterglows could be examples of a whole new class of gamma-ray bursts, while others thought that they might all be at very great distances. Previous studies had suggested that obscuring dust between the burst and us might also explain why they were so dim. "Studying afterglows is vital to further our understanding of the objects that become gamma-ray bursts and what they tell us about star formation in the early Universe," says the study's lead author Jochen Greiner from the Max-Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics in Garching bei München, Germany. NASA launched the Swift satellite at the end of 2004. From its orbit above the Earth's atmosphere it can detect gamma-ray bursts and immediately relay their positions to other observatories so that the afterglows could be studied. In the new study, astronomers combined Swift

  5. A unified model for two modes of bursting in GnRH neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Spencer; Moenter, Suzanne M; Khadra, Anmar

    2016-06-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons exhibit at least two intrinsic modes of action potential burst firing, referred to as parabolic and irregular bursting. Parabolic bursting is characterized by a slow wave in membrane potential that can underlie periodic clusters of action potentials with increased interspike interval at the beginning and at the end of each cluster. Irregular bursting is characterized by clusters of action potentials that are separated by varying durations of interburst intervals and a relatively stable baseline potential. Based on recent studies of isolated ionic currents, a stochastic Hodgkin-Huxley (HH)-like model for the GnRH neuron is developed to reproduce each mode of burst firing with an appropriate set of conductances. Model outcomes for bursting are in agreement with the experimental recordings in terms of interburst interval, interspike interval, active phase duration, and other quantitative properties specific to each mode of bursting. The model also shows similar outcomes in membrane potential to those seen experimentally when tetrodotoxin (TTX) is used to block action potentials during bursting, and when estradiol transitions cells exhibiting slow oscillations to irregular bursting mode in vitro. Based on the parameter values used to reproduce each mode of bursting, the model suggests that GnRH neurons can switch between the two through changes in the maximum conductance of certain ionic currents, notably the slow inward Ca(2+) current I s, and the Ca(2+) -activated K(+) current I KCa. Bifurcation analysis of the model shows that both modes of bursting are similar from a dynamical systems perspective despite differences in burst characteristics. PMID:26975615

  6. Long Type I X-ray Bursts and Neutron Star Interior Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Cumming, Andrew; Macbeth, Jared; Zand, J. J. M. in't; Page, Dany

    2005-01-01

    Superbursts are very energetic Type I X-ray bursts discovered in recent years by long term monitoring of X-ray bursters, believed to be due to unstable ignition of carbon in the deep ocean of the neutron star. A number of "intermediate duration" bursts have also been observed, probably associated with ignition of a thick helium layer. We investigate the sensitivity of these long X-ray bursts to the thermal profile of the neutron star crust and core. We first compare cooling models of superbur...

  7. Emergent synchronous bursting of oxytocin neuronal network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Rossoni

    Full Text Available When young suckle, they are rewarded intermittently with a let-down of milk that results from reflex secretion of the hormone oxytocin; without oxytocin, newly born young will die unless they are fostered. Oxytocin is made by magnocellular hypothalamic neurons, and is secreted from their nerve endings in the pituitary in response to action potentials (spikes that are generated in the cell bodies and which are propagated down their axons to the nerve endings. Normally, oxytocin cells discharge asynchronously at 1-3 spikes/s, but during suckling, every 5 min or so, each discharges a brief, intense burst of spikes that release a pulse of oxytocin into the circulation. This reflex was the first, and is perhaps the best, example of a physiological role for peptide-mediated communication within the brain: it is coordinated by the release of oxytocin from the dendrites of oxytocin cells; it can be facilitated by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin into the hypothalamus, and it can be blocked by injection of tiny amounts of oxytocin antagonist. Here we show how synchronized bursting can arise in a neuronal network model that incorporates basic observations of the physiology of oxytocin cells. In our model, bursting is an emergent behaviour of a complex system, involving both positive and negative feedbacks, between many sparsely connected cells. The oxytocin cells are regulated by independent afferent inputs, but they interact by local release of oxytocin and endocannabinoids. Oxytocin released from the dendrites of these cells has a positive-feedback effect, while endocannabinoids have an inhibitory effect by suppressing the afferent input to the cells.

  8. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG: THE FIRST TWO YEARS

    OpenAIRE

    Paciesas, W. S.; Meegan, C. A.; Kienlin, von, A.; Bhat, P.N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M S; Burgess, M; Chaplin, V.; Connaughton, V.; Diehl, R.; Fishman, G. J.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Gibby, H., M.; Giles, M

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to enhance the scientific return from Fermi in studying gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In its first two years of operation GBM triggered on 491 GRBs. We summarize the criteria used for triggering and quantify the general characteristics of the triggered GRBs, including their locations, durations, peak flux, and fluence. This catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are availab...

  9. Periodicities in gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma ray burst models based on magnetic neutron stars face a problem of account for the scarcity of observed periods. Both this scarcity and the typical period found when any is detected are explained if the neutron stars are accreting in binary systems

  10. The Birthplaces of Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Young, P A; Young, Patrick A.

    2007-01-01

    We use population synthesis to construct distributions of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) for different proposed progenitor models. We use a description of star formation that takes into account the evolution of metallicity with redshift and galaxy mass, the evolution of galaxy mass with redshift, and the star formation rate with galaxy mass and redshift. We compare predicted distributions with redshift and metallicity to observations of GRB host galaxies and find that the the simple models cannot produce the observed distributions, but that current theoretical models can reproduce the observations within some constraints on the fraction of fallback black holes that produce GRBs.

  11. 基于 CAN 总线的分布式太阳能电站远程监控系统设计%Remote monitoring system of distributed solar photovoltaic power station based on CAN bus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志群

    2015-01-01

    Because of the relatively independent operation of each node in distributed PV power ststion,the work environment parameters discreteness,monitoring data and the transmission distance are far greater than the traditional centralized PV power station.There is much work in the main control,so the original monitoring system is hard to achieve the corresponding functions.The high reliability of the system is based on CAN bus,and the design of a consistent distributed photovoltaic power plant characteristics of remote data monitoring system can realize the efficient and safe operation of power plant,which has an application value.%分布式光伏电站由于各节点相对独立运行,工作环境参数离散性大,监控数据量和传输距离等指标远大于传统集控式光伏电站,主控端的工作压力增大,原有监控系统难以很好实现相应功能。文中基于高可靠性的 CAN总线,设计了一款符合分布式光伏电站特点的远程数据监控系统,可实现电站高效安全运行,具有应用价值。

  12. Can we monitor the bare soil freeze-thaw process using GNSS-R?: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuerui; Jin, Shuanggen

    2014-11-01

    GNSS-R has recently emerged as a new prosperous remote sensing tool in ocean surface, snow/ice surface and land surface. In this paper, the possible application in sensing the bare soil freeze-thaw process is investigated with GNSS-R. The Fresnel reflectivity from the wave synthesis technique is used to get the circular polarization reflectivity. Large differences are found for the Fresnel reflectivities at V, H, RR polarizations during bare soil freeze-thaw process, but there are almost no differences as for LR polarization. Therefore if a special GNSS-R receiver is designed, the reflected signals of RR polarization should be efficiently used. For GPS multipath reflectometry, the improved Fresnel reflectivity is inserted into the fully polarimetric forward multipath model to get the simulated GPS L1 observables: SNR, carrier phase multipath error and pseudorange code multipath error, which are used to estimate the bare soil freeze-thaw process. Compared to the thawed soil, the amplitudes of GPS observables are smaller for the frozen soil. Therefore, it is possible to monitor bare soil freeze-thaw process with ground geodetic GPS receivers.

  13. Estimating Redshifts for Long Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Limin

    2009-01-01

    We are constructing a program to estimate the redshifts for GRBs from the original Swift light curves and spectra, aiming to get redshifts for the Swift bursts \\textit{without} spectroscopic or photometric redshifts. We derive the luminosity indicators from the light curves and spectra of each burst, including the lag time between low and high photon energy light curves, the variability of the light curve, the peak energy of the spectrum, the number of peaks in the light curve, and the minimum rise time of the peaks. These luminosity indicators can each be related directly to the luminosity, and we combine their independent luminosities into one weighted average. Then with our combined luminosity value, the observed burst peak brightness, and the concordance redshift-distance relation, we can derive the redshift for each burst. In this paper, we test the accuracy of our method on 107 bursts with known spectroscopic redshift. The reduced $\\chi^2$ of our best redshifts ($z_{best}$) compared with known spectrosc...

  14. Bursts generate a non-reducible spike-pattern code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo G Eyherabide

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available On the single-neuron level, precisely timed spikes can either constitute firing-rate codes or spike-pattern codes that utilize the relative timing between consecutive spikes. There has been little experimental support for the hypothesis that such temporal patterns contribute substantially to information transmission. Using grasshopper auditory receptors as a model system, we show that correlations between spikes can be used to represent behaviorally relevant stimuli. The correlations reflect the inner structure of the spike train: a succession of burst-like patterns. We demonstrate that bursts with different spike counts encode different stimulus features, such that about 20% of the transmitted information corresponds to discriminating between different features, and the remaining 80% is used to allocate these features in time. In this spike-pattern code, the "what" and the "when" of the stimuli are encoded in the duration of each burst and the time of burst onset, respectively. Given the ubiquity of burst firing, we expect similar findings also for other neural systems.

  15. Bursting oscillations, bifurcation and synchronization in neuronal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We investigate bursting oscillations and related bifurcation in the modified Morris-Lecar neuron. → Two types of fast-slow bursters are analyzed in detail. → We show the properties of some crucial bifurcation points. → Synchronization transition and the neural excitability are explored in the coupled bursters. - Abstract: This paper investigates bursting oscillations and related bifurcation in the modified Morris-Lecar neuron. It is shown that for some appropriate parameters, the modified Morris-Lecar neuron can exhibit two types of fast-slow bursters, that is 'circle/fold cycle' bursting and 'subHopf/homoclinic' bursting with class 1 and class 2 neural excitability, which have different neuro-computational properties. By means of the analysis of fast-slow dynamics and phase plane, we explore bifurcation mechanisms associated with the two types of bursters. Furthermore, the properties of some crucial bifurcation points, which can determine the type of the burster, are studied by the stability and bifurcation theory. In addition, we investigate the influence of the coupling strength on synchronization transition and the neural excitability in two electrically coupled bursters with the same bursting type. More interestingly, the multi-time-scale synchronization transition phenomenon is found as the coupling strength varies.

  16. An internally consistent gamma ray burst time history phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A phenomenology for gamma ray burst time histories is outlined. Order of their generally chaotic appearance is attempted, based on the speculation that any one burst event can be represented above 150 keV as a superposition of similarly shaped increases of varying intensity. The increases can generally overlap, however, confusing the picture, but a given event must at least exhibit its own limiting characteristic rise and decay times if the measurements are made with instruments having adequate temporal resolution. Most catalogued observations may be of doubtful or marginal utility to test this hypothesis, but some time histories from Helios-2, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and other instruments having one-to several-millisecond capabilities appear to provide consistency. Also, recent studies of temporally resolved Solar Maximum Mission burst energy spectra are entirely compatible with this picture. The phenomenology suggested here, if correct, may assist as an analytic tool for modelling of burst processes and possibly in the definition of burst source populations.

  17. Dark Gamma-Ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new method for the classification of optically dark gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), based on the X-ray and optical-to-X-ray spectral indices of GRB afterglows, and utilizing the spectral capabilities of Swift. This method depends less on model assumptions than previous methods, and can be used as a quick diagnostic tool to identify optically sub-luminous bursts. With this method we can also find GRBs that are extremely bright at optical wavelengths. We show that the previously suggested correlation between the optical darkness and the X-ray/gamma-ray brightness is merely an observational selection effect.

  18. Fuzzy-Based Adaptive Hybrid Burst Assembly Technique for Optical Burst Switched Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Abubakar Muhammad Umaru; Muhammad Shafie Abd Latiff; Yahaya Coulibaly

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) paradigm is perceived as an intermediate switching technology for future all-optical networks. Burst assembly that is the first process in OBS is the focus of this paper. In this paper, an intelligent hybrid burst assembly algorithm that is based on fuzzy logic is proposed. The new algorithm is evaluated against the traditional hybrid burst assembly algorithm and the fuzzy adaptive threshold (FAT) burst assembly algorithm via simulation. Simulation results sh...

  19. X-ray spectra of bursting neutron stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global properties of type-I x-ray bursts can be successfully accounted for by the thermonuclear shell flash model of accreting neutron stars. According to this model, the luminosity of a relatively large burst approaches to the Eddington luminosity. We calculate the atmospheric structure and the photon energy spectrum of x-ray bursting neutron star taking account of comptonization. From the x-ray spectrum, theoretical color temperature-luminosity diagram is obtained. Observational color temperature-luminosity diagram of x-ray burster is constructed using data of Japanese x-ray sutellite Tenma. Comparing our theoretical diagram with observational ones, we can estimate a mass-radius relation of neutron stars and distances to the galactic center. (Mori, K.)

  20. Can we monitor heart attack in the troponin era: evidence from a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rankin Jamie M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Troponins (highly sensitive biomarkers of myocardial damage increase counts of myocardial infarction (MI in clinical practice, but their impact on trends in admission rates for MI in National statistics is uncertain. Methods Cases coded as MI or other cardiac diagnoses in the Hospital Morbidity Data Collection (MI-HMDC in Western Australia in 1998 and 2003 were classified using revised criteria for MI developed by an International panel convened by the American Heart Association (AHA criteria using information on symptoms, ECGs and cardiac biomarkers abstracted from samples of medical notes. Age-sex standardized rates of MI-HMDC were compared with rates of MI based on AHA criteria including troponins (MI-AHA or traditional biomarkers only (MI-AHAck. Results Between 1998 and 2003, rates of MI-HMDC decreased by 3.5% whereas rates of MI-AHA increased by 17%, a difference largely due to increased false-negative cases in the HMDC associated with marked increased use of troponin tests in cardiac admissions generally, and progressively lower test thresholds. In contrast, rates of MI-AHAck declined by 18%. Conclusions Increasing misclassification of MI-AHA by the HMDC may be due to reluctance by clinicians to diagnose MI based on relatively small increases in troponin levels. These influences are likely to continue. Monitoring MI using AHA criteria will require calibration of commercially available troponin tests and agreement on lower diagnostic thresholds for epidemiological studies. Declining rates of MI-AHAck are consistent with long-standing trends in MI in Western Australia, suggesting that neither MI-HMDC nor MI-AHA reflect the true underlying population trends in MI.

  1. Maxi observations of long X-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Serino, Motoko; Tamagawa, Toru; Sakamoto, Takanori; Nakahira, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Masaru; Yamaoka, Kazutaka; Negoro, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    We report nine long X-ray bursts from neutron stars, detected with Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI). Some of these bursts lasted for hours, and hence are qualified as superbursts, which are prolonged thermonuclear flashes on neutron stars and are relatively rare events. MAXI observes roughly 85% of the whole sky every 92 minutes in the 2-20 keV energy band, and has detected nine bursts with a long e-folding decay time, ranging from 0.27 to 5.2 hours, since its launch in 2009 August until 2015 August. The majority of the nine events were found to originate from transient X-ray sources. The persistent luminosities of the sources, when these prolonged bursts were observed, were lower than 1% of the Eddington luminosity for five of them and lower than 20% for the rest. This trend is contrastive to the 18 superbursts observed before MAXI, all but two of which originated from bright persistent sources. The distribution of the total emitted energy, i.e., the product of e-folding time and luminosity, of these bu...

  2. Simplifying ART cohort monitoring: Can pharmacy stocks provide accurate estimates of patients retained on antiretroviral therapy in Malawi?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tweya Hannock

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Routine monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART is crucial for measuring program success and accurate drug forecasting. However, compiling data from patient registers to measure retention in ART is labour-intensive. To address this challenge, we conducted a pilot study in Malawi to assess whether patient ART retention could be determined using pharmacy records as compared to estimates of retention based on standardized paper- or electronic based cohort reports. Methods Twelve ART facilities were included in the study: six used paper-based registers and six used electronic data systems. One ART facility implemented an electronic data system in quarter three and was included as a paper-based system facility in quarter two only. Routine patient retention cohort reports, paper or electronic, were collected from facilities for both quarter two [April–June] and quarter three [July–September], 2010. Pharmacy stock data were also collected from the 12 ART facilities over the same period. Numbers of ART continuation bottles recorded on pharmacy stock cards at the beginning and end of each quarter were documented. These pharmacy data were used to calculate the total bottles dispensed to patients in each quarter with intent to estimate the number of patients retained on ART. Information for time required to determine ART retention was gathered through interviews with clinicians tasked with compiling the data. Results Among ART clinics with paper-based systems, three of six facilities in quarter two and four of five facilities in quarter three had similar numbers of patients retained on ART comparing cohort reports to pharmacy stock records. In ART clinics with electronic systems, five of six facilities in quarter two and five of seven facilities in quarter three had similar numbers of patients retained on ART when comparing retention numbers from electronically generated cohort reports to pharmacy stock records. Among

  3. $\\gamma$-ray bursts as the birth-cries of black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, P; Maartens, R; Joshi, Pankaj; Dadhich, Naresh; Maartens, Roy

    2000-01-01

    The origin of cosmic gamma-ray bursts remains one of the most intriguing puzzles in astronomy. We suggest that purely general relativistic effects in the collapse of massive stars could account for these bursts. The late formation of closed trapped surfaces can occur naturally, allowing the escape of huge energy from curvature-generated fireballs, before these are hidden within a black hole.

  4. Gamma-Ray Bursts: The End Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Don

    1997-11-01

    The nature of gamma-ray bursts has been one of the greatest unsolved mysteries in astrophysics for more than a quarter century. A major reason for this is that no definite counterparts to the bursts could be found at other wavelengths, despite intense efforts spanning more than two decades. Consequently, the study of gamma-ray bursts has been isolated from the rest of astronomy. Scientists studying them have had only the laws of physics and the bursts themselves to guide them in attempting to solve the burst mystery. All of this changed dramatically with the discovery earlier this year of fading X-ray and optical sources in the arcminute-sized positional error boxes of several gamma-ray bursts. For the first time, temporal, as well as spatial, coincidence could be used to associate these X-ray and optical sources with the gamma-ray bursts. As a result, the odds are great that the fading X-ray and optical sources are counterparts of the bursts, and that the study of gamma-ray bursts has finally been connected with the rest of astronomy. In this talk, we describe the dramatic new information about the nature of gamma-ray bursts that the X-ray, optical, and radio observations of the fading sources have provided, and emphasize the implications that this information has for the distance scale to the bursts.

  5. Quantum Key Based Burst Confidentiality in Optical Burst Switched Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Balamurugan, A. M.; A. Sivasubramanian

    2014-01-01

    The optical burst switching (OBS) is an emergent result to the technology concern that could achieve a feasible network in future. They are endowed with the ability to meet the bandwidth requirement of those applications that require intensive bandwidth. There are more domains opening up in the OBS that evidently shows their advantages and their capability to face the future network traffic. However, the concept of OBS is still far from perfection facing issues in case of security threat. The...

  6. Bubbles and Monetary Policy: To Burst or not to Burst?

    OpenAIRE

    König, Philipp; POTHIER, David

    2015-01-01

    The question of whether monetary policy should target asset prices remains a contentious issue. Prior to the 2007/08 financial crisis, central banks opted for a wait-and-see approach, remaining passive during the build-up of asset price bubbles but actively seeking to stabilize prices and output after they burst. The macroeconomic and financial turbulence that followed the subprime housing bubble has led to a renewed debate concerning monetary policy’s role in maintaining financial stability....

  7. ARE ULTRA-LONG GAMMA-RAY BURSTS DIFFERENT?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of a number of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with duration exceeding 1000 s has opened the debate on whether these bursts form a new class of sources, the so-called ultra-long GRBs, or if they are rather the tail of the distribution of the standard long GRB duration. Using the long GRB sample detected by Swift, we investigate the statistical properties of long GRBs and compare them with the ultra-long burst properties. We compute the burst duration of long GRBs using the start epoch of the so-called ''steep decay'' phase detected with Swift/XRT. We discuss also the differences observed in their spectral properties. We find that ultra-long GRBs are statistically different from the standard long GRBs with typical burst duration less than 100-500 s, for which a Wolf-Rayet star progenitor is usually invoked. Together with the presence of a thermal emission component we interpret this result as indication that the usual long GRB progenitor scenario cannot explain the extreme duration of ultra-long GRBs, their energetics, as well as the mass reservoir and size that can feed the central engine for such a long time

  8. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development. PMID:27034844

  9. Diagnosing the Intermittent Failures in a Vehicle& Intelligent Vehicle Control and Monitoring Using CAN and ARM 7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SippeeBharadwaj

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the modern insecure world vehicle safety is a challenging task. This paper presents a design of a system which will prevent the vehicle from accidents and diagnose the intermittent failures in a vehicle by using CAN protocol and ARM7 with the help of sensors .With the help of BLUETOOTH and GSM connect to an android mobile and develop anGoogle app for vehicle parameters and send to vehicle maintenance dept.

  10. Can reading rate acceleration improve error monitoring and cognitive abilities underlying reading in adolescents with reading difficulties and in typical readers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz-Kraus, Tzipi; Breznitz, Zvia

    2014-01-28

    Dyslexia is characterized by slow, inaccurate reading and by deficits in executive functions. The deficit in reading is exemplified by impaired error monitoring, which can be specifically shown through neuroimaging, in changes in Error-/Correct-related negativities (ERN/CRN). The current study aimed to investigate whether a reading intervention program (Reading Acceleration Program, or RAP) could improve overall reading, as well as error monitoring and other cognitive abilities underlying reading, in adolescents with reading difficulties. Participants with reading difficulties and typical readers were trained with the RAP for 8 weeks. Their reading and error monitoring were characterized both behaviorally and electrophysiologically through a lexical decision task. Behaviorally, the reading training improved "contextual reading speed" and decreased reading errors in both groups. Improvements were also seen in speed of processing, memory and visual screening. Electrophysiologically, ERN increased in both groups following training, but the increase was significantly greater in the participants with reading difficulties. Furthermore, an association between the improvement in reading speed and the change in difference between ERN and CRN amplitudes following training was seen in participants with reading difficulties. These results indicate that improving deficits in error monitoring and speed of processing are possible underlying mechanisms of the RAP intervention. We suggest that ERN is a good candidate for use as a measurement in evaluating the effect of reading training in typical and disabled readers. PMID:24316242

  11. Gamma ray bursts of black hole universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T. X.

    2015-07-01

    Slightly modifying the standard big bang theory, Zhang recently developed a new cosmological model called black hole universe, which has only a single postulate but is consistent with Mach's principle, governed by Einstein's general theory of relativity, and able to explain existing observations of the universe. In the previous studies, we have explained the origin, structure, evolution, expansion, cosmic microwave background radiation, quasar, and acceleration of black hole universe, which grew from a star-like black hole with several solar masses through a supermassive black hole with billions of solar masses to the present state with hundred billion-trillions of solar masses by accreting ambient matter and merging with other black holes. This study investigates gamma ray bursts of black hole universe and provides an alternative explanation for the energy and spectrum measurements of gamma ray bursts according to the black hole universe model. The results indicate that gamma ray bursts can be understood as emissions of dynamic star-like black holes. A black hole, when it accretes its star or merges with another black hole, becomes dynamic. A dynamic black hole has a broken event horizon and thus cannot hold the inside hot (or high-frequency) blackbody radiation, which flows or leaks out and produces a GRB. A star when it collapses into its core black hole produces a long GRB and releases the gravitational potential energy of the star as gamma rays. A black hole that merges with another black hole produces a short GRB and releases a part of their blackbody radiation as gamma rays. The amount of energy obtained from the emissions of dynamic star-like black holes are consistent with the measurements of energy from GRBs. The GRB energy spectra derived from this new emission mechanism are also consistent with the measurements.

  12. Gamma Ray Bursts Cook Book I: Formulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ziaeepour, Houri

    2008-01-01

    Since the suggestion of relativistic shocks as the origin of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in early 90's, the mathematical formulation of this process has stayed at phenomenological level. One of the reasons for the slow development of theoretical works in this domain has been the simple power-law behaviour of the afterglows hours or days after the prompt gamma-ray emission. Nowadays with the launch of the Swift satellite, gamma-ray bursts can be observed in multi-wavelength from a few tens of seconds after trigger onward. These observations have leaded to the discovery of features unexplainable by the simple formulation of the shocks and emission processes used up to now. But "devil is in details" and some of these features may be explained with a more detailed formulation of phenomena and without adhoc addition of new processes. Such a formulation is the goal of this work. We present a consistent formulation of the collision between two spherical relativistic shells. The model can be applied to both internal and ...

  13. Star bursts and giant HII regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massive star formation bursts occur in a variety of galactic environments and can temporarily dominate the light output of a galaxy even when a relatively small proportion of its mass is involved. Inferences about their ages, the IMF and its dependence on chemical composition are still somewhat wobbly owing to an excess of unknowns, but certain things can be deduced from emission spectra of associated H II regions when due regard is paid to the effects of chemical composition and ionization parameter: In particular, largest ionization parameters and effective temperatures of exciting stars, at any given oxygen abundance, are anti-correlated with the abundance, and the second effect suggests an increasing proportion of more massive stars at lower abundances, although this is not yet satisfactorily quantified. A new blue compact galaxies could be very young, but it is equally possible that there is an older population of low surface brightness. Some giant H II regions may be self-polluted with nitrogen and helium due to winds from massive stars in the associated burst. (orig.)

  14. Type II and Type III Radio Bursts and their Correlation with Solar Energetic Proton Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, L. M.; Ledbetter, K.

    2015-08-01

    Using the Wind/WAVES radio observations from 2010 to 2013, we present an analysis of the 123 decametric–hectometric (DH) type II solar radio bursts during this period, the associated type III burst properties, and their correlation with solar energetic proton (SEP) properties determined from analysis of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations. We present a useful catalog of the type II burst, type III burst, Langmuir wave, and proton flux properties for these 123 events, which we employ to develop a statistical relationship between the radio properties and peak proton flux that can be used to forecast SEP events. We find that all SEP events with a peak \\gt 10 MeV flux above 15 protons cm‑2 s‑1 sr‑1 are associated with a type II burst and virtually all SEP events, 92%, are also associated with a type III radio burst. Based on a principal component analysis, the radio burst properties that are most highly correlated with the occurrence of gradual SEP events and account for the most variance in the radio properties are the type III burst intensity and duration. Further, a logistic regression analysis with the radio-derived principal component (dominated by the type III and type II radio burst intensity and type III duration) obtains SEP predictions approaching the human forecaster rates, with a false alarm rate of 22%, a probability of detection of 62%, and with 85% of the classifications correct. Therefore, type III radio bursts that occur along with a DH type II burst are shown to be an important diagnostic that can be used to forecast SEP events.

  15. Nanoemulsions obtained via bubble-bursting at a compound interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jie; Roché, Matthieu; Vigolo, Daniele; Arnaudov, Luben N.; Stoyanov, Simeon D.; Gurkov, Theodor D.; Tsutsumanova, Gichka G.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-08-01

    Bursting of bubbles at an air/liquid interface is a familiar occurrence relevant to foam stability, cell cultures in bioreactors and ocean-atmosphere mass transfer. In the latter case, bubble-bursting leads to the dispersal of sea-water aerosols in the surrounding air. Here we show that bubbles bursting at a compound air/oil/water-with-surfactant interface can disperse submicrometre oil droplets in water. Dispersal results from the detachment of an oil spray from the bottom of the bubble towards water during bubble collapse. We provide evidence that droplet size is selected by physicochemical interactions between oil molecules and the surfactants rather than by hydrodynamics. We demonstrate the unrecognized role that this dispersal mechanism may play in the fate of the sea surface microlayer and of pollutant spills by dispersing petroleum in the water column. Finally, our system provides an energy-efficient route, with potential upscalability, for applications in drug delivery, food production and materials science.

  16. Size of the top jet drop produced by bubble bursting

    CERN Document Server

    Ghabache, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    As a bubble bursts at a liquid-air interface, a tiny liquid jet rises and can release the so-called \\textit{jet drops}. In this paper, the size of the top jet drop produced by a bubble bursting is investigated experimentally. We determine, and discuss, the first scaling law enabling the determination of the top jet drop size as a function of the corresponding mother bubble radius and the liquid properties (viscosity, surface tension, density), along with its regime of existence. Furthermore, in the aim of decoupling experimentally the effects of bubble collapse and jet dynamics on the drop detachment, we propose a new scaling providing the top drop size only as a function of the jet velocity and liquid parameters. In particular, this allows us to untangle the intricate roles of viscosity, gravity and surface tension in the \\textit{end-pinching} of the bubble bursting jet.

  17. A review of solar type III radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar type III radio bursts are an important diagnostic tool in the understanding of solar accelerated electron beams. They are a signature of propagating beams of nonthermal electrons in the solar atmosphere and the solar system. Consequently, they provide information on electron acceleration and transport, and the conditions of the background ambient plasma they travel through. We review the observational properties of type III bursts with an emphasis on recent results and how each property can help identify attributes of electron beams and the ambient background plasma. We also review some of the theoretical aspects of type III radio bursts and cover a number of numerical efforts that simulate electron beam transport through the solar corona and the heliosphere. (mini-volume: solar radiophysics — recent results on observations and theories: invited reviews)

  18. Numerical Simulations of Gamma-Ray Burst Explosions

    CERN Document Server

    Lazzati, Davide; López-Cámara, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts are a complex, non-linear system that evolves very rapidly through stages of vastly different conditions. They evolve from scales of few hundred kilometers where they are very dense and hot to cold and tenuous on scales of parsecs. As such, our understanding of such a phenomenon can truly increase by combining theoretical and numerical studies adopting different numerical techniques to face different problems and deal with diverse conditions. In this review, we will describe the tremendous advancement in our comprehension of the bursts phenomenology through numerical modeling. Though we will discuss studies mainly based on jet dynamics across the progenitor star and the interstellar medium, we will also touch upon other problems such as the jet launching, its acceleration, and the radiation mechanisms. Finally, we will describe how combining numerical results with observations from Swift and other instruments resulted in true understanding of the bursts phenomenon and the challenges still lyi...

  19. New Canards Bursting and Canards Periodic-Chaotic Sequence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOOER Chi-Feng; XU Jian-Xue; ZHANG Xin-Hua

    2009-01-01

    A trajectory following the repelling branch of an equilibrium or a periodic orbit is called a canards solution. Using a continuation method, we find a new type of canards bursting which manifests itself in an alternation between the oscillation phase following attracting the limit cycle branch and resting phase following a repelling fixed point branch in a reduced leech neuron model. Via periodic-chaotic alternating of infinite times, the number of windings within a canards bursting can approach infinity at a Gavrilov-Shilnikov homoclinic tangency bifurcation of a simple saddle limit cycle.

  20. Varying Faces of Photospheric Emission in Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Axelsson, M

    2015-01-01

    Among the more than 1000 gamma-ray bursts observed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, a large fraction show narrow and hard spectra inconsistent with non-thermal emission, signifying optically thick emission from the photosphere. However, only a few of these bursts have spectra consistent with a pure Planck function. We will discuss the observational features of photospheric emission in these GRBs as well as in the ones showing multi-component spectra. We interpret the observations in light of models of subphotospheric dissipation, geometrical broadening and multi-zone emission, and show what we can learn about the dissipation mechanism and properties of GRB jets.

  1. Single blood-Hg samples can result in exposure misclassification: temporal monitoring within the Japanese community (United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuchiya Ami

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most prominent non-occupational source of exposure to methylmercury is the consumption of fish. In this study we examine a fish consuming population to determine the extent of temporal exposure and investigate the extent to which single time estimates of methylmercury exposure based on blood-Hg concentration can provide reliable estimates of longer-term average exposure. Methods Blood-mercury levels were obtained from a portion of the Arsenic Mercury Intake Biometric Study (AMIBS cohort. Specifically, 56 Japanese women residing in the Puget Sound area of Washington State, US were sampled on three occasions across a one-year period. Results An average of 135 days separated samples, with mean blood-mercury levels for the visits being 5.1, 6.6 and 5.0 μg/l and geometric means being 2.7, 4.5 and 3.1 μg/l. The blood-mercury levels in this group exceed national averages with geometric means for two of the visits being between the 90th and 95th percentiles of nationally observed levels and the lowest geometric mean being between the 75th and 90th percentile. Group means were not significantly different across sampling periods suggesting that exposure of combined subjects remained relatively constant. Comparing intra-individual results over time did not reveal a strong correlation among visits (r = 0.19, 0.50, 0.63 between 1st and 2nd, 2nd and 3rd, and 1st and 3rd sample results, respectively. In comparing blood-mercury levels across two sampling interval combinations (1st and 2nd, 2nd and 3rd, and 1st and 3rd visits, respectively, 58% (n = 34, 53% (n = 31 and 29% (n = 17 of the individuals had at least a 100% difference in blood-Hg levels. Conclusions Point estimates of blood-mercury, when compared with three sample averages, may not reflect temporal variability and individual exposures estimated on the basis of single blood samples should be treated with caution as indicators of long-term exposure

  2. 48. Can early 24 hours Holter monitoring predict obstructive coronary artery lesions in patients with low risk acute coronary syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Taha

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Identification of patients at increased risk of death due to acute coronary syndrome (ACS can add to risk stratification and guide the next step in the management of those patients. Altered HRV has been associated with adverse outcomes in heart disease, but this has not been established in patients with acute chest pain.This study aimed to create a non-invasive, economical and risk-free method in the clinical evaluation and diagnosis of significant CAD among patients with unstable angina.Twenty-four-hour Holter recordings of 100 patients with ACS were initiated within 24 hours of admission at the emergency department; stress ECG was done for all patients while coronary angiography was done only for patients with abnormal stress test. Time domain, frequency domain, and nonlinear HRV were examined.The mean SDNN was statistically significantly lower in patients with abnormal stress test, many time and frequency domain HRV parameters was statistically lower in patients with significant coronary arteries obstruction. HRV measured close to the ACS onset may assist in risk stratification. HRV parameters may provide additional, incremental prognostic information to established assessment guidelines and possible early intervention in those patients.

  3. Re-examination of the lymphocytotoxic crossmatch in liver transplantation: can C4d stains help in monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunz, J; Ruppert, K M; Cajaiba, M M; Isse, K; Bentlejewski, C A; Minervini, M; Nalesnik, M A; Randhawa, P; Rubin, E; Sasatomi, E; de Vera, M E; Fontes, P; Humar, A; Zeevi, A; Demetris, A J

    2012-01-01

    C4d-assisted recognition of antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues (FFPE) from donor-specific antibody-positive (DSA+) renal allograft recipients prompted study of DSA+ liver allograft recipients as measured by lymphocytotoxic crossmatch (XM) and/or Luminex. XM results did not influence patient or allograft survival, or cellular rejection rates, but XM+ recipients received significantly more prophylactic steroids. Endothelial C4d staining strongly correlates with XM+ (<3 weeks posttransplantation) and DSA+ status and cellular rejection, but not with worse Banff grading or treatment response. Diffuse C4d staining, XM+, DSA+ and ABO- incompatibility status, histopathology and clinical-serologic profile helped establish an isolated AMR diagnosis in 5 of 100 (5%) XM+ and one ABO-incompatible, recipients. C4d staining later after transplantation was associated with rejection and nonrejection-related causes of allograft dysfunction in DSA- and DSA+ recipients, some of whom had good outcomes without additional therapy. Liver allograft FFPE C4d staining: (a) can help classify liver allograft dysfunction; (b) substantiates antibody contribution to rejection; (c) probably represents nonalloantibody insults and/or complete absorption in DSA- recipients and (d) alone, is an imperfect AMR marker needing correlation with routine histopathology, clinical and serologic profiles. Further study in late biopsies and other tissue markers of liver AMR with simultaneous DSA measurements are needed. PMID:21992553

  4. Detection of Spectral Evolution in the Bursts Emitted During the 2008-2009 Active Episode of SGR J1550 - 5418

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Gruber, David; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Granot, Jonathan; Baring, Matthew G.; Gogus, Ersin; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Kaneko, Yuki; Lin, Lin; Watts, Anna L.; Bhat, Narayana; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Greiner, Jochen; Meegan, Charles A.; Paciesas, William S.; Preece, Robert D.; Rau, Arne

    2012-01-01

    In early October 2008, the Soft Gamma Repeater SGRJ1550 - 5418 (1E1547.0 - 5408, AXJ155052 - 5418, PSR J1550 - 5418) became active, emitting a series of bursts which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) after which a second especially intense activity period commenced in 2009 January and a third, less active period was detected in 2009 March-April. Here we analyze the GBM data of all the bursts from the first and last active episodes. We performed temporal and spectral analysis for all events and found that their temporal characteristics are very similar to the ones of other SGR bursts, as well the ones reported for the bursts of the main episode (average burst durations 170ms). In addition, we used our sample of bursts to quantify the systematic uncertainties of the GBM location algorithm for soft gamma-ray transients to less than or equal to 8 degrees. Our spectral analysis indicates significant spectral evolution between the first and last set of events. Although the 2008 October events are best fit with a single blackbody function, for the 2009 bursts an Optically Thin Thermal Bremsstrahlung (OTTB) is clearly preferred. We attribute this evolution to changes in the magnetic field topology of the source, possibly due to effects following the very energetic main bursting episode.

  5. A Search for Early Optical Emission at Gamma-Ray Burst Locations by the Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI)

    CERN Document Server

    Buffington, A; Jackson, B V; Hick, P P; Smith, A C; Buffington, Andrew; Band, David L.; Jackson, Bernard V.; Smith, Aaron C.

    2006-01-01

    The Solar Mass Ejection Imager (SMEI) views nearly every point on the sky once every 102 minutes and can detect point sources as faint as R~10th magnitude. Therefore, SMEI can detect or provide upper limits for the optical afterglow from gamma-ray bursts in the tens of minutes after the burst when different shocked regions may emit optically. Here we provide upper limits for 58 bursts between 2003 February and 2005 April.

  6. The 2006-2007 Active Phase of Anomalous X-ray Pulsar 4U 0142+61: Radiative and Timing Changes, Bursts, and Burst Spectral Features

    CERN Document Server

    Gavriil, Fotis P; Kaspi, Victoria M

    2009-01-01

    After at least 6 years of quiescence, Anomalous X-ray Pulsar (AXP) 4U 0142+61 entered an active phase in 2006 March that lasted several months and included six X-ray bursts as well as many changes in the persistent X-ray emission. The bursts, the first seen from this AXP in >11 years of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer monitoring, all occurred in the interval between 2006 April 6 and 2007 February 7. The burst durations ranged from 8-3x10^3 s. The first five burst spectra are well modeled by blackbodies, with temperatures kT ~ 2-6 keV. However, the sixth burst had a complicated spectrum that is well characterized by a blackbody plus three emission features whose amplitude varied throughout the burst. The most prominent feature was at 14.0 keV. Upon entry into the active phase the pulsar showed a significant change in pulse morphology and a likely timing glitch. The glitch had a total frequency jump of 1.9+/-0.4 x 10^-7 Hz, which recovered with a decay time of 17+/-2 days by more than the initial jump, implying a n...

  7. BudBurst Buddies: Introducing Young Citizen Scientists to Plants and Environmental Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, D.; Gardiner, L. S.; Henderson, S.

    2011-12-01

    As part of Project BudBurst, the BudBurst Buddies recently moved to the National Ecological Network (NEON) as part of its Education and Public Engagement efforts. The BudBurst Buddies (www.budburstbuddies.org) were created to engage elementary school age children in the science of observing plants and the timing of phenological (life cycle) events. BudBurst Buddies is a part of the Project BudBurst national citizen science initiative (www.budburst.org), which allows individuals to engage in the scientific process, contributing to a better understanding of climate change while increasing public awareness of phenology and the impacts of climate change on plants. As a first step towards engaging the next generation of citizen scientists, BudBurst Buddies provides the opportunity for children to gain experience with scientific research and increases awareness of how plants change throughout the year. Hundreds of young students have participated in the inaugural year of BudBurst Buddies. Children can participate in BudBurst Buddies on their own, with their families, or in formal or informal education settings. The program was recently highlighted by education staff at the New York Hall of Science and numerous classrooms have been implementing this resource as part of their curriculum. Each child who participates creates a journal about a plant of his or her choosing, makes observations of the plant over the growing season and submits findings online, earning an official BudBurst Buddies certificate. An online storybook for kids tells how two children, Lily and Sage, observed plants in their neighborhood and became BudBurst Buddies. This presentation will provide an overview of the BudBurst Buddies resources including a new implementation guide and will also share feedback from the first year of implementation.

  8. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Emre eKapucu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates interspike interval thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  9. Structure and evolution of solar radio bursts at 26.4 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-two individual solar bursts occurring in the interval of June to August 1975, were analyzed. A double Gaussian source brightness model (core-halo) was found to give a better fit to the visibility data than a single Gaussian model. Typical core half-power diameters (E-W x N-S) were found to be about 10' x 9' for type III bursts, 16' x 10' for type V bursts, 6' x 14' for type II bursts and 14' x 14' for type IV bursts. The halo diameters range from approximately 25' to 40'. The apparent velocities of the emitting regions are about .1 approx. .5c (c = speed of light) for type III and type V bursts, approx. 2.2 x 103 km/sec for type II bursts and approx. 580 km/sec for one type IV burst. Source structure parameters as a function of the solar longitude of the flare location suggest that the type III burst structure is not entirely compatible with models which assume that the apparent source brightness distribution is due to an intrinsic point source that is broadened by scattering. A model assuming a large intrinsic emitting region (400 of longitude at the second harmonic plasma level) without scattering effects is shown to be more consistent with the observations. It was found that the type V burst brightness distribution can be explained as an isotropic point source emitting at second harmonic level which undergoes scattering by an inhomogeneous solar corona of rms electron fluctuation ΔN/sub e/N/sub e/ approx. 1%. Several type V bursts exhibited a loop type motion suggestive of the source region motion constrained to move on closed field lines. The possibility of a common shock front origin for the type II, IV event on August 21, 1975, is discussed

  10. Bursting Bubbles and Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven P. Wrenn, Stephen M. Dicker, Eleanor F. Small, Nily R. Dan, Michał Mleczko, Georg Schmitz, Peter A. Lewin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses various interactions between ultrasound, phospholipid monolayer-coated gas bubbles, phospholipid bilayer vesicles, and cells. The paper begins with a review of microbubble physics models, developed to describe microbubble dynamic behavior in the presence of ultrasound, and follows this with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict inertial cavitation profiles. Predicted sensitivities of inertial cavitation to changes in the values of membrane properties, including surface tension, surface dilatational viscosity, and area expansion modulus, indicate that area expansion modulus exerts the greatest relative influence on inertial cavitation. Accordingly, the theoretical dependence of area expansion modulus on chemical composition - in particular, poly (ethylene glyclol (PEG - is reviewed, and predictions of inertial cavitation for different PEG molecular weights and compositions are compared with experiment. Noteworthy is the predicted dependence, or lack thereof, of inertial cavitation on PEG molecular weight and mole fraction. Specifically, inertial cavitation is predicted to be independent of PEG molecular weight and mole fraction in the so-called mushroom regime. In the “brush” regime, however, inertial cavitation is predicted to increase with PEG mole fraction but to decrease (to the inverse 3/5 power with PEG molecular weight. While excellent agreement between experiment and theory can be achieved, it is shown that the calculated inertial cavitation profiles depend strongly on the criterion used to predict inertial cavitation. This is followed by a discussion of nesting microbubbles inside the aqueous core of microcapsules and how this significantly increases the inertial cavitation threshold. Nesting thus offers a means for avoiding unwanted inertial cavitation and cell death during imaging and other applications such as sonoporation. A review of putative sonoporation mechanisms is then presented

  11. The Fermi view of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelsson, Magnus; Fermi/LAT Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    The Fermi mission has brought great advances in the study of GRBs. Over 1500 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM), and more than 100 of these are also detected by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) above 30 MeV. These high-energy detections have revealed previously unknown features in GRB spectra, including additional components and spectral cut-offs, as well as delayed and long-lived GeV emission. Interpretation of these new features has proven to be a source of vigorous debate within the GRB community. I will review recent Fermi-LAT observations of GRBs, ranging from the detection of the long-lived GRB 130427A to the broad-band fits of simultaneous X-ray and gamma-ray data, and what they reveal about the origin of the high-energy emission from GRBs.

  12. Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts in the Fermi era

    CERN Document Server

    Vianello, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    The Fermi observatory, with its Gamma-Ray Bursts monitor (GBM) and Large Area Telescope (LAT), is observing Gamma-ray Bursts with unprecedented spectral coverage and sensitivity, from ~10 keV to > 300 GeV. In the first 3 years of the mission it observed emission above 100 MeV from 35 GRBs, an order of magnitude gain with respect to previous observations in this energy range. In this paper we review the main results obtained on such sample, highlighting also the relationships with the low-energy features (as measured by the GBM), and with measurements from observatories at other wavelengths. We also briefly discuss prospects for detection of GRBs by future Very-High Energy observatories such as HAWC and CTA, and by Gravitational Wave experiments.

  13. Pulse Phase Dependence of the Magnetar Bursts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chetana Jain; Anjan Dutta; Biswajit Paul

    2007-12-01

    We report here results from a study of X-ray bursts from 3 magnetar candidates (SGR 1806–20, SGR 1900+14 and AXP 1E 2259+586). We have searched for a pulse phase dependence of the X-ray burst rate from these sources. X-ray light curves were obtained with the Proportional Counter Array on-board the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer during the periods of intense burst activity in these sources. On detailed analysis of the three sources, we found a very significant burst rate for all pulsar phases. However, some locations appear to produce bursts slightly more often, rendering the non-isotropic distribution. Only in the case of SGR 1900+14, there is a clear pulse phase dependence of burst rate.

  14. Bursting for enhanced ablation of materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendow, Sami; Rea, Edward; Kosa, Nadhir; Bengtsson, Magnus; Shakir, Sami

    2014-03-01

    A significant enhancement in the rate of material removal is demonstrated using a nanosecond-pulsed UV fiber laser in multi-pulsing burst mode, as compared to the case without bursting. Percussion drilling and scribing of thin-film and bulk material tests show that, in general, laser bursts with increased pulse count and reduced pulse spacing show higher rates of material removal. A considerable improvement in removal rate is demonstrated, when bursting is applied to scribing of mono-crystalline silicon (m-Si) and up to 30% in percussion drilling speed. Likewise, improved material removal is demonstrated for scribing of thin film of indium tin oxide (ITO) on glass or metal film on sapphire. Examples of material processing are given with and without bursting at similar experimental conditions of average power, scan speed, and burst/pulse energies. Experimental results included are for m-Si, ITO thin films on glass, and metal films on sapphire.

  15. Burst of Fast Ion Loss in DIII-D Quiescent H-mode Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y. B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; West, W. P.; Burrell, K. H.

    2008-11-01

    High frequency bursts are observed in the fast ion loss collectors during DIII-D counter-injection quiescent H-mode plasmas. The typical frequency lies in hundreds kHz range, which is much higher than the Edge Harmonic Oscillation (EHO). The occurrence of the burst is usually correlated with the presence of the EHO but not always. Comparative studies show that the burst is more sensitive to the perpendicular than tangential injected beams. The amplitude of the bursting can be actively controlled by several factors, such as the plasma outer gap to the vessel midplane, current ramping in internal error field correction coils, and electron cyclotron resonance heating. Co-injection quiescent H-mode does not show any such kind of burst. Neutron flux and fast ion deuterium alpha (FIDA) measurements data will also be presented.

  16. Duration distributions for different softness groups of gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Qinx, Y -P; Fan, J H; Su, C -Y; Lu, R -J

    2010-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are divided into two classes according to their durations. We investigate if the softness of bursts plays a role in the conventional classification of the objects. We employ the BATSE (Burst and Transient Source Experiment) catalog and analyze the duration distributions of different groups of GRBs associated with distinct softness. Our analysis reveals that the conventional classification of GRBs with the duration of bursts is influenced by the softness of the objects. There exits a bimodality in the duration distribution of GRBs for each group of bursts and the time position of the dip in the bimodality histogram shifts with the softness parameter. Our findings suggest that the conventional classification scheme should be modified by separating the two well-known populations in different softness groups, which would be more reasonable than doing so with a single sample. According to the relation between the dip position and the softness parameter, we get an empirical function that can...

  17. Bursting in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky Reaction added with Phenol in a Batch Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The classic Belousov-Zhabotinski reaction was modified by adding phenol as a second organic substrate that kinetically competes with the malonic acid in the reduction of Ce4+ to Ce3+ and in the removal of molecular bromine of the reaction mixture. The oscillating reaction of two substrates exhibited burst firing and an oscillatory period of long duration. Analysis of experimental data shows an increasing of the bursting phenomenon, with a greater spiking in the burst firing and with a longer quiescent state, as a function of the initial phenol concentration increase. It was hypothesized that the bursting phenomenon can be explained introducing a redox cycle between the reduced phenolic species (hydroxyphenols) and the oxidized ones (quinones). The hypothesis was experimentally and numerically tested and from the results it is possible to conclude that the bursting phenomenon exhibited by the oscillating reaction of two substrates is mainly driven by a p-di-hydroxy-benzene/p-benzoquinone redox cycle (author)

  18. Solution To The Gamma Ray Burst Mystery?

    CERN Document Server

    Dar, Arnon

    1996-01-01

    Photoexcitation and ionization of partially ionized heavy atoms in highly relativistic flows by interstellar photons, followed by their reemission in radiative recombination and decay, boost star-light into beamed $\\gamma$ rays along the flow direction. Repeated excitation/decay of highly relativistic baryonic ejecta from merger or accretion induced collapse of neutron stars in dense stellar regions (DSRs), like galactic cores, globular clusters and super star-clusters, can convert enough kinetic energy in such events in distant galaxies into cosmological gamma ray bursts (GRBs). The model predicts remarkably well all the main observed temporal and spectral properties of GRBs. Its success strongly suggests that GRBs are $\\gamma$ ray tomography pictures of DSRs in galaxies at cosmological distances with unprecedented resolution: A time resolution of $dt\\sim 1~ms$ in a GRB can resolve stars at a Hubble distance which are separated by only $D\\sim 10^{10}cm$. This is equivalent to the resolving power of an optica...

  19. On the energy dependence of the persistent and bursting emission in GX 17+2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiele, Holger; Yu, Wenfei

    2015-08-01

    In neutron star X-ray binaries X-ray bursts related to thermonuclear events on the surface of the neutron star (so-called type-I bursts) are observed. The Z-source GX 17+2 is known to show thermonuclear bursts on short (about 10s) and long (> 100s) time scales. Based on RXTE data, Kuulkers et al. (2002) showed that during bursts in GX 17+2 persistent black-body emission is present.Here we present the results of our study of XMM-Newton observations of GX 17+2. XMM-Newton data allow us to cover energies below 3 keV that are not accessible to RXTE, and they provide a higher energy resolution compared to RXTE data. From our XMM-Newton study we can confirm the presence of persistent black-body emission during X-ray bursts. Furthermore, we studied the evolution of the burst in narrow energy bands and investigated the spectral evolution of the bursting emission during decay. We discuss the implications of our findings on the origin of the persistent and bursting emission.

  20. Spectral structures and their generation mechanisms for solar radio type-I bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fine spectral structures of solar radio type-I bursts were observed by the solar radio telescope AMATERAS. The spectral characteristics, such as the peak flux, duration, and bandwidth, of the individual burst elements were satisfactorily detected by the highly resolved spectral data of AMATERAS with the burst detection algorithm that is improved in this study. The peak flux of the type-I bursts followed a power-law distribution with a spectral index of 2.9-3.3, whereas their duration and bandwidth were distributed more exponentially. There were almost no correlations between the peak flux, duration, and bandwidth. That means there was no similarity in the shapes of the burst spectral structures. We defined the growth rate of a burst as the ratio between its peak flux and duration. There was a strong correlation between the growth rate and peak flux. These results suggest that the free energy of type-I bursts that is originally generated by nonthermal electrons is modulated in the subsequent stages of the generation of nonthermal electrons, such as plasma wave generation, radio wave emissions, and propagation. The variation of the timescale of the growth rate is significantly larger than that of the coronal environments. These results can be explained by the situation wherein the source region may have the inhomogeneity of an ambient plasma environment, such as the boundary of open and closed field lines, and the superposition of entire emitted bursts was observed by the spectrometer.

  1. Transcriptional Bursting in Gene Expression: Analytical Results for General Stochastic Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Niraj; Singh, Abhyudai; Kulkarni, Rahul V.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression in individual cells is highly variable and sporadic, often resulting in the synthesis of mRNAs and proteins in bursts. Such bursting has important consequences for cell-fate decisions in diverse processes ranging from HIV-1 viral infections to stem-cell differentiation. It is generally assumed that bursts are geometrically distributed and that they arrive according to a Poisson process. On the other hand, recent single-cell experiments provide evidence for complex burst arrival processes, highlighting the need for analysis of more general stochastic models. To address this issue, we invoke a mapping between general stochastic models of gene expression and systems studied in queueing theory to derive exact analytical expressions for the moments associated with mRNA/protein steady-state distributions. These results are then used to derive noise signatures, i.e. explicit conditions based entirely on experimentally measurable quantities, that determine if the burst distributions deviate from the geometric distribution or if burst arrival deviates from a Poisson process. For non-Poisson arrivals, we develop approaches for accurate estimation of burst parameters. The proposed approaches can lead to new insights into transcriptional bursting based on measurements of steady-state mRNA/protein distributions. PMID:26474290

  2. Electron cyclotron maser emission in coronal arches and solar radio type V bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar radio type V bursts were classified as a special spectral class based on their moderately long duration, wide bandwidth, and sense of polarization opposite of associated type III bursts. However, type V bursts are also closely related to the preceding type III bursts. They have an approximately equal source height and the same dispersion of position with frequency. Electron cyclotron maser (ECM) instability driven by beam electrons has been used to explain type III bursts in recent years. We propose ECM emission as the physical process of type V solar radio bursts. According to the observed properties of type V and III bursts, we propose that energetic electrons in excited type V continuum are trapped in coronal loops, which are adjacent to the open field lines traced by type III electrons. With the proposed magnetic field configuration and the ECM emission mechanism, the observed properties of type V bursts, such as long duration, wide bandwidth, and opposite sense of polarization can be reasonably explained by our model.

  3. United assembly algorithm for optical burst switching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinhui Yu(于金辉); Yijun Yang(杨教军); Yuehua Chen(陈月华); Ge Fan(范戈)

    2003-01-01

    Optical burst switching (OBS) is a promising optical switching technology. The burst assembly algorithm controls burst assembly, which significantly impacts performance of OBS network. This paper provides a new assembly algorithm, united assembly algorithm, which has more practicability than conventional algorithms. In addition, some factors impacting selections of parameters of this algorithm are discussed and the performance of this algorithm is studied by computer simulation.

  4. Ballerina - pirouettes in search of gamma bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Søren Kristian; Lund, Niels; Pedersen, Henrik; Hjorth, J.

    1999-01-01

    The cosmological origin of gamma ray bursts has now been established with reasonable certainty, Many more bursts will need to be studied to establish the typical distance scale, and to map out the large diversity in properties which have been indicated by the first handful of events. We are...... proposing Ballerina, a small satellite to provide accurate positions and new data on the gamma-ray bursts. We anticipate a detection rate an order of magnitude larger than obtained from Beppo-SAX....

  5. Comparison of filters for detecting gravitational wave bursts in interferometric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filters developed in order to detect short bursts of gravitational waves in interferometric detector outputs are compared according to three main points. Conventional receiver operating characteristics (ROC) are first built for all the considered filters and for three typical burst signals. Optimized ROC are shown for a simple pulse signal in order to estimate the best detection efficiency of the filters in the ideal case, while realistic ones obtained with filters working with several 'templates' show how detection efficiencies can be degraded in a practical implementation. Second, estimations of biases and statistical errors on the reconstruction of the time of arrival of pulse-like signals are then given for each filter. Such results are crucial for future coincidence studies between gravitational wave detectors but also with neutrino or optical detectors. As most of the filters require a pre-whitening of the detector noise, the sensitivity to a nonperfect noise whitening procedure is finally analyzed. For this purpose lines of various frequencies and amplitudes are added to a Gaussian white noise and the outputs of the filters are studied in order to monitor the excess of false alarms induced by the lines. The comparison of the performances of the different filters finally show that they are complementary rather than competitive

  6. Bubble burst as jamming phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Nishinari, Katsuhiro; Saito, Yukiko Umeno; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    2010-01-01

    Recently research on bubble and its burst attract much interest of researchers in various field such as economics and physics. Economists have been regarding bubble as a disorder in prices. However, this research strategy has overlooked an importance of the volume of transactions. In this paper, we have proposed a bubble burst model by focusing the transactions incorporating a traffic model that represents spontaneous traffic jam. We find that the phenomenon of bubble burst shares many similar properties with traffic jam formation by comparing data taken from US housing market. Our result suggests that the transaction could be a driving force of bursting phenomenon.

  7. Bursting behaviour in coupled Josephson junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongray, Thotreithem; Balakrishnan, J; Dana, Syamal K

    2015-12-01

    We report an interesting bow-tie shaped bursting behaviour in a certain parameter regime of two resistive-capacitative shunted Josephson junctions, one in the oscillatory and the other in the excitable mode and coupled together resistively. The burst emerges in both the junctions and they show near-complete synchronization for strong enough couplings. We discuss a possible bifurcation scenario to explain the origin of the burst. An exhaustive study on the parameter space of the system is performed, demarcating the regions of bursting from other solutions. PMID:26723143

  8. Burst Fragmentation Model Based on Sequential Burst Allocation Algorithm for Mobile WiMAX

    OpenAIRE

    Zaid G. Ali; Prof. R. B. Ahmad; Dr. Abid Yahya

    2013-01-01

    the downlink Bandwidth resources of WiMAX are allocated by the burst allocation algorithm. The algorithm is responsible for calculating the appropriate location of a number of the smallest unit of bandwidth which is called the slot for all users within the downlink subframe in the form of bursts. Resource wastage in the form of unused and unallocated slots is a real common problem accompanies resource management in the burst allocation algorithms. This paper investigates the Sequential Burst ...

  9. Gamma-Ray Bursts 2012 Conference

    Science.gov (United States)

    It is a pleasure to announce the next combined Fermi/Swift GRB conference covering recent advances in all aspects of gamma-ray burst observations and theory. This conference will be held in Munich, Germany, on 7-11 May 2012, and follows similar previous combined Fermi/Swift meetings in Huntsville (Oct. 2008) and Annapolis (Nov. 2010). Gamma-ray bursts are the most energetic explosions in the Universe and are thought to be the birth signatures of black holes. This is an exciting time in the GRB field as various missions provide a wealth of new data on this still puzzling phenomenon. The Fermi misson provides unprecedented spectral coverage over 7 decades in energy, and among others discovered new spectral components which challenge our standard picture of the prompt emission. The Swift mission continuous to swiftly monitor and locate GRBs in multiple wavebands, providing the basis for all ground-based follow-up observations towards redshift measurements and afterglow and host property investigations. AGILE, INTEGRAL, Suzaku and Konus continue to provide crucial information on GRB properties, and the MAXI mission provides an all sky X-ray monitoring of transients. There is also growing capability for follow-up observations by ground-based telescopes at basically all wavelengths. Besides the classical optical/infrared/radio observations, searches are underway for TeV emission, neutrinos and gravitational waves. Moreover, new experiments are expected to have returned first data, among others POGO on the prompt polarization properties, UFFO on very early optical emission, or ALMA on sub-millimeter properties. And last but not least, the unexpected is bringing us child-like astonishments at least once per year with a "GRB-trigger" which turns out to be not related to GRBs. Complementing all these new observational results, a huge theoretical effort is underway to understand the GRB phenomenon and keep up with the constant new puzzles coming from the data. This conference

  10. The first gamma-ray bursts in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the ultimate cosmic lighthouses, capable of illuminating the universe at its earliest epochs. Could such events probe the properties of the first stars at z ∼ 20, the end of the cosmic Dark Ages? Previous studies of Population III (Pop III) GRBs only considered explosions in the diffuse relic H II regions of their progenitors or bursts that are far more energetic than those observed to date. However, the processes that produce GRBs at the highest redshifts likely reset their local environments, creating much more complicated structures than those in which relativistic jets have been modeled so far. These structures can greatly affect the luminosity of the afterglow and hence the redshift at which it can be detected. We have now simulated Pop III GRB afterglows in H II regions, winds, and dense shells ejected by the star during the processes that produce the burst. We find that GRBs with E iso,γ = 1051-1053 erg will be visible at z ≳ 20 to the next generation of near infrared and radio observatories. In many cases, the environment of the burst, and hence progenitor type, can be inferred from the afterglow light curve. Although some Pop III GRBs are visible to Swift and the Very Large Array now, the optimal strategy for their detection will be future missions like the proposed EXIST and JANUS missions with large survey areas and onboard X-ray and infrared telescopes that can track their near-infrared flux from the moment of the burst, thereby identifying their redshifts.

  11. Beyond initiation-limited translational bursting: the effects of burst size distributions on the stability of gene expression

    KAUST Repository

    Kuwahara, Hiroyuki

    2015-11-04

    A main source of gene expression noise in prokaryotes is translational bursting. It arises from efficient translation of mRNAs with low copy numbers, which makes the production of protein copies highly variable and pulsatile. To obtain analytical solutions, previous models to capture this noise source had to assume translation to be initiation-limited, representing the burst size by a specific type of a long-tail distribution. However, there is increasing evidence suggesting that the initiation is not the rate-limiting step in certain settings, for example, under stress conditions. Here, to overcome the limitations imposed by the initiation-limited assumption, we present a new analytical approach that can evaluate biological consequences of the protein burst size with a general distribution. Since our new model can capture the contribution of other factors to the translational noise, it can be used to analyze the effects of gene expression noise in more general settings. We used this new model to analytically analyze the connection between the burst size and the stability of gene expression processes in various settings. We found that the burst size with different distributions can lead to quantitatively and qualitatively different stability characteristics of protein abundance and can have non-intuitive effects. By allowing analysis of how the stability of gene expression processes changes based on various distributions of translational noise, our analytical approach is expected to enable deeper insights into the control of cell fate decision-making, the evolution of cryptic genetic variations, and fine-tuning of gene circuits.

  12. Westerly Wind Bursts, ENSO Asymmetry, and Tropical Pacific Decadal Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, A. F. Z.; McPhaden, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past half century, epochs of enhanced and suppressed ENSO activity have coincided with changes in mean trade wind strength (tropical Pacific mean state) and westerly wind burst variability. Previous research has considered this westerly wind burst variability as state-dependent noise forcing for ENSO. In agreement with the observations, we find that in the current generation of coupled climate models, the westerly wind burst variability is highly correlated with decadal and multi-decadal scale Pacific mean state variability as well as ENSO variability. However, precisely how concurrent changes to ENSO, the tropical Pacific mean state, and westerly wind burst variability is still an open question. Our previous research has shown that there is a relationship between the magnitude of the state-dependence of the noise forcing and ENSO amplitude asymmetry (i.e. that the El Nino events have a larger temperature anomaly than the La Nina events) . In turn, ENSO amplitude asymmetry can produce a signal on the tropical Pacific mean state on multi-decadal timescales. Here, we develop a systematic method to investigate the hypothesis that the inherent randomness of the state-dependent noise forcing of ENSO can explain the coincident changes in ENSO variability and the tropical Pacific mean state, using a hierarchy of coupled models, from conceptual to intermediate to coupled GCMs.

  13. 基于CAN总线的破碎机控制系统设计%Design of remote intelligent monitoring system based on CAN fieldbus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张海英; 林桂娟

    2011-01-01

    The article puts forward a distributed control system based on CAN fieldbus, MITSUBISHI QOOCPU PLC and CAN bus is used in the system. MITSUBISHI GTI575-VNBA touch screen is used to monitor the product line. It achieves remotely to monitor intelligently system and diagnose fault in crusher product line. The actual application shows that the distributed control system is simple, reliable and good real-time. Meanwhile it decrease the site operation personnel and improve safety and productivity.%提出的基于CAN总线监控系统,采用了三菱Q00CPUPLC、CAN总线,三菱GT1575-VNBA触摸屏对生产线进行控制,多种监测信号通过分布式I/O组件经过CAN总线传送至PLC,实现了废钢破碎机生产线远程智能监控与故障诊断。系统应用表明,该系统简洁、可靠、实时性强,减少了现场操作人员,提高了安全性和生产效率。

  14. 1-Imino Nitroxide Pyrene, a Burst-type H+ Fluorescent Switch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun LI; Hong Mei WANG; Hui Min MA; De Qing ZHANG; Shao Xiang XIONG

    2005-01-01

    1-Imino nitroxide pyrene 1 has been characterized as a H+ fluorescent switch. The effects of various interfering species, solvents and the irradiation of ultraviolet light on the fluorescence intensity of 1 are also investigated. 1 fluoresces weakly in the 85% ethanol media containing no more than 4.5×10-5 mol/L of H+ (HCl), but can produce a burst increase of about 4times in the fluorescence intensity when the concentration of H+ is increased to or over 4.9×10-5mol/L. The extremely sharp response of 1 to H+ occurs only within such a narrow concentration range. Moreover, the decrease of H+ concentration through adding sodium hydroxide causes the fluorescence quenching, suggesting that 1 may serve as a fluorescent switch for monitoring the concentration change of H+ around the point of 4.5× 10-5 mol/L.

  15. Automated 1.3-m near-infrared telescope system triggered by gamma-ray burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Toshio; Yonetoku, Daisuke; Kinoshita, Shin; Masui, Hiroki; Okuno, Shinya; Yoshinari, Satoru; Kidamura, Takashi; Tanabe, Sachiko; Yokota, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Nakagawa, Takao; Nakamura, Takashi

    2006-06-01

    The design for robotic telescopes to observe Gamma-Ray Burst (GRB) afterglows and the results of observations are presented. Quickly fading bright GRB flashes and afterglows provide a good tool to study an extremely early universe. However, most large ground-based telescopes cannot afford to follow-up the afterglows and flashes quickly within a few hours since a GRB explosion. We re-modeled the existing middle-class 1.3 m ø telescope of the near infrared band at ISAS in Japan to match for the above requirement. We also set a small telescope of 30 cm diameter with a conventional CCD. These telescopes can monitor afterglows quickly within a few minutes in J, H, Ks and R band with a grism spectrometer.

  16. COSMOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS OF FAST RADIO BURST/GAMMA-RAY BURST ASSOCIATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If a small fraction of fast radio bursts (FRBs) are associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), as recently suggested by Zhang, the combination of redshift measurements of GRBs and dispersion measure (DM) measurements of FRBs opens a new window to study cosmology. At z < 2 where the universe is essentially fully ionized, detections of FRB/GRB pairs can give an independent measurement of the intergalactic medium portion of the baryon mass fraction, Ω b f IGM, of the universe. If a good sample of FRB/GRB associations are discovered at higher redshifts, the free electron column density history can be mapped, which can be used to probe the reionization history of both hydrogen and helium in the universe. We apply our formulation to GRBs 101011A and 100704A that each might have an associated FRB, and constrained Ω b f IGM to be consistent with the value derived from other methods. The methodology developed here is also applicable, if the redshifts of FRBs not associated with GRBs can be measured by other means

  17. 应用拱顶沉降监测技术预报软弱围岩隧道突泥突水%The Application of the Monitoring Techniques for Vault Settlement to the Forecast of Water and. Mud Burst from the Soft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史付生

    2011-01-01

    In soft-rocked tunnels, water will build up pressure which may lead to the deformation of the surrounding rock of the tunnel, as a result of which the possibility of water and mud burst may be predicted by monitoring the displacement rate of the vault nea%在隧道软弱岩层中存在具有一定压力的水体会使周边围岩产生变形,因此可通过监测临近掌子面的拱顶位移速率来推测前方是否可能发生突水突泥。具体过程为通过统计已有测量的拱顶下沉速率量与突水突泥的事件发生的相关度,得出一个阈值。然后,根据这个阈值来推测前方是否可能发生突泥突水。石林软岩隧道的应用实例说明此方法具体可行,为超前地质预报提供了一个新的途径。

  18. Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnappa, Vijayakumar; Raveesha, K. H.; Subramanian, K. R.

    Coronal magnetic fields from multiple type II bursts Vijayakumar H Doddamani1*, Raveesha K H2 and Subramanian3 1Bangalore University, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 2CMR Institute of Technology, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India 3 Retd, Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, Karnataka state, India Abstract Magnetic fields play an important role in the astrophysical processes occurring in solar corona. In the solar atmosphere, magnetic field interacts with the plasma, producing abundant eruptive activities. They are considered to be the main factors for coronal heating, particle acceleration and the formation of structures like prominences, flares and Coronal Mass Ejections. The magnetic field in solar atmosphere in the range of 1.1-3 Rsun is especially important as an interface between the photospheric magnetic field and the solar wind. Its structure and time dependent change affects space weather by modifying solar wind conditions, Cho (2000). Type II doublet bursts can be used for the estimation of the strength of the magnetic field at two different heights. Two type II bursts occur sometimes in sequence. By relating the speed of the type II radio burst to Alfven Mach Number, the Alfven speed of the shock wave generating type II radio burst can be calculated. Using the relation between the Alfven speed and the mean frequency of emission, the magnetic field strength can be determined at a particular height. We have used the relative bandwidth and drift rate properties of multiple type II radio bursts to derive magnetic field strengths at two different heights and also the gradient of the magnetic field in the outer corona. The magnetic field strength has been derived for different density factors. It varied from 1.2 to 2.5 gauss at a solar height of 1.4 Rsun. The empirical relation of the variation of the magnetic field with height is found to be of the form B(R) = In the present case the power law index ‘γ’ varied from -3 to -2 for variation of

  19. Heliospheric Origin of $\\gamma$-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Li Ti Pei

    1997-01-01

    Systematic variations of average observational characteristics and correlation properties between different parameters of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with time from 1991 April to 1994 September are revealed. It is hard to explain the observed long-term variability by variations of experimental conditions. The variability of GRB properties with the time scale of months to years, together with the similarity between GRBs, solar hard X-ray flares and terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, may indicate an origin of GRBs, at least partly, within the heliosphere. Large-voltage and high-temperature pinch plasma columns produced by disruptive electrical discharges in the outer heliosphere can generate hard X-ray and gamma-ray flashes with energy spectra and spectral evolution characters consistent with that observed in GRBs.

  20. The ``Christmas burst'' GRB 101225A revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thöne, C. C.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Fryer, C. L.; Kann, D. A.

    2015-03-01

    Long GRBs are related to the death of massive stars and reveal themselves through synchrotron emission from highly relativistic jets. The `Christmas Burst' GRB 101225A was an exceptionally long GRB with a thermal afterglow, very different from the standard GRB. Initially, no spectroscopic redshift could be obtained and SED modeling yielded z=0.33. A plausible model was a He-NS star merger where the He-star had ejected part of its envelope in the common envelope phase during inspiral. The interaction between the jet and the previously ejected shell can explains the thermal emission. We obtained deep spectroscopy of the host galaxy which leads to a correction of the redshift to z=0.847. Despite the higher redshift, our model is still valid and theoretically better justified than the alternative suggestion of a blue supergiant progenitor proposed by Levan et al. (2014) for several ``ultra-long'' GRBs.

  1. Super Luminous Supernova and Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo

    2012-01-01

    We use a simple analytical model to derive a closed form expression for the bolometric light-curve of super-luminus supernovae (SLSNe) powered by a plastic collision between the fast ejecta from ordinary core collapse supernovae (SNe) of type Ib/c and slower massive circum-stellar shells, ejected in major eruptions of their progenitor stars during the late stage of their life preceding their SN explosion. We demonstrate that this expression reproduces well the bolometric luminosity of SLSNe with and without an observed gamma ray burst (GRB), and requires only a modest amount ($M\\lsim 0.1\\,M_\\odot$) of radioactive $^{56}$Ni synthesized in the SN explosion in order to explain their late-time luminosity. Ordinary stripped-envelope SNe of type Ib/c, rather than 'hypernovae', can produce most of the SLSNe and long duration GRBs.

  2. Gamma-Ray Bursts as Cosmological Tools

    CERN Document Server

    Petrosian, Vahe; Ryde, Felix

    2009-01-01

    In recent years there has been considerable activity in using gamma-ray bursts as cosmological probes for determining global cosmological parameters complementing results from type Ia supernovae and other methods. This requires a characteristics of the source to be a standard candle. We show that contrary to earlier indications the accumulated data speak against this possibility. Another method would be to use correlation between a distance dependent and a distance independent variable to measure distance and determine cosmological parameters as is done using Cepheid variables and to some extent Type Ia supernovae. Many papers have dealt with the use of so called Amati relation, first predicted by Lloyd, Petrosian and Mallozzi, or the Ghirlanda relation for this purpose. We have argued that these procedure involve many unjustified assumptions which if not true could invalidate the results. In particular, we point out that many evolutionary effects can affect the final outcome. In particular, we demonstrate th...

  3. Directivity of X radiation of solar bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the directivity of X radiation of solar bursts, the investigation into distributions of X-ray splashes over the range lambda=0.5-3 and 1-8 A in heliolongitudinal and intensity was carried on. The integral distribution of splashes in intensity has the exponential form with the exponent α approximately 1.1 and the bend on low intensities. In heliolongitudinal distribution the east-west asymmetry is observed. The absence of directivity of splash radiation is concluded on the basis of investigation of peculiarities of splash distribution functions in heliolongitude and intensity. The observed east-west asymmetry can't be connected with directivity, but is conditioned by probably by statistic fluctuations of the number of splashes

  4. BudBurst Buddies: A New Tool for Engaging the Youngest Citizen Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, L. S.; Henderson, S.; Ward, D.

    2010-12-01

    BudBurst Buddies (www.budburstbuddies.org) introduces elementary school age children to the science of observing plants and the timing of phenological (life cycle) events. BudBurst Buddies is a new part of the Project BudBurst national citizen science initiative (www.budburst.org), which allows individuals to engage in the scientific process, contributing to a better understanding of climate change while increasing public awareness of phenology and the impacts of climate change on plants. As a first step towards engaging the next generation of citizen scientists, BudBurst Buddies provides the opportunity for children to gain experience with scientific research and increases awareness of how plants change throughout the year. Children can participate in BudBurst Buddies on their own, with their families, or in formal or informal education settings. Each child who participates creates a journal about a plant of his or her choosing, makes observations of the plant over the growing season and submits findings online, earning an official BudBurst Buddies certificate. An online storybook for kids tells how two children, Lily and Sage, observed plants in their neighborhood and became BudBurst Buddies. This presentation will provide an overview of the BudBurst Buddies newly developed resources. BudBurst Buddies is a part of Project BudBurst, a national citizen science program coordinated by the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) and the Chicago Botanic Garden. Funding for this resource was provided by NEON, NSF, NASA, and the National Geographic Education Foundation.

  5. Real burst traffic amplification in optically gain clamped amplifier

    OpenAIRE

    Ennser, Karin; Taccheo, Stefano; Careglio, Davide; Solé Pareta, Josep; Aracil Rico, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Optical burst amplification in a gain-stabilized amplifier is theoretically investigated using real burst traffic data. The results show that excellent performance are obtained for WDM transmission with negligible interplay due to burst arrival statistics.

  6. Coding Bounds for Multiple Phased-Burst Correction and Single Burst Correction Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Wai Han

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, two upper bounds on the achievable code rate of linear block codes for multiple phased-burst correction (MPBC) are presented. One bound is constrained to a maximum correctable cyclic burst length within every subblock, or equivalently a constraint on the minimum error free length or gap within every phased-burst. This bound, when reduced to the special case of a bound for single burst correction (SBC), is shown to be the Abramson bound when the cyclic burst length is less than ...

  7. Fatigue experiment on bursting disk device in non-active heat discharging system of chinese experimentation fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passive residual heat removal system is very important for faster reactors to ensure its safety. Bursting disk is one passive discharging device under over-pressure. Action performance of the bursting diak is carried out by adding fatigue loads repeatedly in this paper. The load stress is 80% of the nominal bursting pressure of the bursting disk, and the load cycles is over 105. The experimental result shows that the action pressure difference before and after the fatigue experiment of the bursting disk is less than 1.5%, which indicates that the fatigue resistance of the bursting disk for the passive residual heat removal system is excellent, and it can ensure the reliable work of the passive system. (authors)

  8. Unveiling the population of orphan Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Ghirlanda, G; Campana, S; Vergani, S D; Japelj, J; Bernardini, M G; Burlon, D; D'Avanzo, P; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A; Nappo, F; Paladini, R; Pescalli, A; Salafia, O S; Tagliaferri, G

    2015-01-01

    Gamma Ray Bursts are detectable in the gamma-ray band if their jets are oriented towards the observer. However, for each GRB with a typical theta_jet, there should be ~2/theta_jet^2 bursts whose emission cone is oriented elsewhere in space. These off-axis bursts can be eventually detected when, due to the deceleration of their relativistic jets, the beaming angle becomes comparable to the viewing angle. Orphan Afterglows (OA) should outnumber the current population of bursts detected in the gamma-ray band even if they have not been conclusively observed so far at any frequency. We compute the expected flux of the population of orphan afterglows in the mm, optical and X-ray bands through a population synthesis code of GRBs and the standard afterglow emission model. We estimate the detection rate of OA by on-going and forthcoming surveys. The average duration of OA as transients above a given limiting flux is derived and described with analytical expressions: in general OA should appear as daily transients in o...

  9. Burst Oscillation Probes of Neutron Stars and Nuclear Burning with LOFT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmayer, Tod

    2012-01-01

    X-ray brightness oscillations during thermonuclear X-ray bursts--burst oscillations--have provided a new probe of neutron star spins as well as of the dependent nuclear burning processes. The frequency drift and amplitude evolution of the oscillations observed during bursts can in principle place constraints on the physics of thermonuclear flame spreading and the dynamics of the burning atmosphere. I use simulations appropriate to LOFT to explore the precision with which the time dependence of the oscillation frequency can be inferred. This can test, for example, different models for the frequency drift, such as up-lift versus geostrophic drift. I also explore the precision with which asymptotic frequencies can be constrained in order to estimate the capability for LOFT to detect the Doppler shifts induced by orbital motion of the neutron star from a sample of bursts at different orbital phases.

  10. Time-Integrated Gamma-Ray Burst Synchrotron Spectra from Blast Wave/Cloud Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Chiang, James

    1998-01-01

    We show that the spectral shape of the low energy tails found for the time-integrated spectra of gamma-ray bursts, even in the absence of strong synchrotron cooling, can be significantly softer than the $\

  11. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiriac, Alexandre; Blumberg, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10-15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet) sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves); accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches-and their associated spindle bursts-occur exclusively during REM (active) sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems. PMID:27119028

  12. Rock Burst Intensity Classification Based on the Radiated Energy with Damage Intensity at Jinping II Hydropower Station, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bing-Rui; Feng, Xia-Ting; Li, Qing-Peng; Luo, Ru-Zhou; Li, Shaojun

    2015-01-01

    Based on the radiated energy of 133 rock bursts monitored by a microseismic technique at the Jinping II hydropower station, in Sichuan province, China, we analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of qualitative classification methods for the rock burst intensity. Then, we investigated the characteristics, magnitude, and laws of the radiated energy, as well as the relationship between the rock burst radiated energy and intensity. Then, we selected the energy as an evaluation index for the rock burst intensity classification, and proposed a new rock burst intensity quantitative classification method, which utilized the hierarchical clustering analysis technique with the complete-linkage method. Next, we created a new set of criteria for the quantitative classification of the rock burst intensity based on radiated energy and surrounding rock damage severity. The new criteria classified the rock burst intensity into five levels: extremely intense, intense, moderate, weak, and none, and the common logarithms of the radiated energy of each level were >7 lg( E/J), >4 lg( E/J) and 2 lg( E/J) and 1 lg( E/J) and <2 lg( E/J), and <1 lg( E/J), respectively. Finally, we investigated the factors influencing the classification, and verified its feasibility and applicability via several practical rock burst examples.

  13. CT Burst Error Weight Enumerator of Array Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Irfan Siap

    2008-01-01

    Recently, CT burst errors originally dened for block codes havebeen generalized to CT burst errors for array codes [6]. In order to establish aRieger's type bound for array codes with respect to CT burst errors. Here, weintroduce a CT burst error weight enumerator whose coecients represent thenumber of CT burst errors of a particular weight. The method of obtainingthe CT burst error weight enumerator is obtained by generating function likeapproach and it does not involve solving equations as ...

  14. The SVOM gamma-ray burst mission

    CERN Document Server

    Cordier, B; Atteia, J -L; Basa, S; Claret, A; Daigne, F; Deng, J; Dong, Y; Godet, O; Goldwurm, A; Götz, D; Han, X; Klotz, A; Lachaud, C; Osborne, J; Qiu, Y; Schanne, S; Wu, B; Wang, J; Wu, C; Xin, L; Zhang, B; Zhang, S -N

    2015-01-01

    We briefly present the science capabilities, the instruments, the operations, and the expected performance of the SVOM mission. SVOM (Space-based multiband astronomical Variable Objects Monitor) is a Chinese-French space mission dedicated to the study of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) in the next decade. The SVOM mission encompasses a satellite carrying four instruments to detect and localize the prompt GRB emission and measure the evolution of the afterglow in the visible band and in X-rays, a VHF communication system enabling the fast transmission of SVOM alerts to the ground, and a ground segment including a wide angle camera and two follow-up telescopes. The pointing strategy of the satellite has been optimized to favor the detection of GRBs located in the night hemisphere. This strategy enables the study of the optical emission in the first minutes after the GRB with robotic observatories and the early spectroscopy of the optical afterglow with large telescopes to measure the redshifts. The study of GRBs in the...

  15. IMAGING DIAGNOSIS OF THORACOLUMBAR BURST FRACTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-yang Dai

    2004-01-01

    Objective To review imaging use in the diagnosis ofthoracolumbar burst fractures and to determine the diagnostic value of different imaging methods.Methods One hundred and fourteen patients with 120 thoracolumbar burst fractures were retrospectively reviewed. Plain radiographs were available in all cases; CT scans and MRI were obtained in 96 and 74 cases, respectively.Results A total of 27 burst fractures were misdiagnosed as other types of fractures on radiographs alone, and accounted for 22.5% of all fractures. The results indicated that plain radiographs often fail to delineate the pathological features of thoracolumbar burst fractures, leading to delay in diagnosis.Conclusion In regard to thoracolumbar injury diagnosis, burst fractures should be differentiated from compression fractures. CT should be routinely indicated and MRI examination, when necessary, may be simultaneously considered.

  16. Bright 30 THz Impulsive Solar Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufmann, P; Marcon, R; Kudaka, A S; Cabezas, D P; Cassiano, M M; Francile, C; Fernandes, L O T; Ramirez, R F Hidalgo; Luoni, M; Marun, A; Pereyra, P; de Souza, R V

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive 30 THz continuum bursts have been recently observed in solar flares, utilizing small telescopes with a unique and relatively simple optical setup concept. The most intense burst was observed together with a GOES X2 class event on October 27, 2014, also detected at two sub-THz frequencies, RHESSI X-rays and SDO/HMI and EUV. It exhibits strikingly good correlation in time and in space with white light flare emission. It is likely that this association may prove to be very common. All three 30 THz events recently observed exhibited intense fluxes in the range of 104 solar flux units, considerably larger than those measured for the same events at microwave and sub-mm wavelengths. The 30 THz burst emission might be part of the same spectral burst component found at sub-THz frequencies. The 30 THz solar bursts open a promising new window for the study of flares at their origin

  17. Diver monitoring by ultrasonic digital data telemetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, B; Bateman, S C

    1994-07-01

    A through-water ultrasonic data telemetry system using burst-mode frequency shift keying (FSK) is described. The system can be adapted for the transmission of data from various sensors, but it has been designed principally for monitoring the respiratory rate, heart rate, temperature and depth of a free-swimming diver over a range of up to 300 metres. This application requires the transmission of low rate digital signals through water from a moving source to a receiver that is either stationary or moving. PMID:7952660

  18. Measurement of the time structure of a coherent synchrotron radiation burst in NewSUBARU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, Yoshihiko

    2008-05-01

    The time structure of a burst of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted from a high-peak-current beam in the electron storage ring NewSUBARU has been investigated. The source of this CSR burst is fine time structure in a bunch produced by longitudinal beam instability. This burst is unstable but very easy to obtain, so it can be used for some experimental applications with appropriate averaging of data. With an averaging period of 10 ms, the fluctuation of the integrated power was about 10%.

  19. Stochastic bursts in the kinetics of gene expression with regulation by long non-coding RNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2010-09-01

    One of the main recent breakthroughs in cellular biology is a discovery of numerous non-coding RNAs (ncR-NAs). We outline abilities of long ncRNAs and articulate that the corresponding kinetics may frequently exhibit stochastic bursts. For example, we scrutinize one of the generic cases when the gene transcription is regulated by competitive attachment of ncRNA and protein to a regulatory site. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that in this case one can observe huge long transcriptional bursts consisting of short bursts.

  20. Redshift and spatial distribution of the intermediate gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, I; Postigo, A de Ugarte; Balazs, L G; Veres, P

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important task of the Gamma-Ray Burst field is the classification of the bursts. Many researches have proven the existence of the third kind (intermediate duration) of GRBs in the BATSE data. Recent works have analyzed BeppoSax and Swift observations and can also identify three types of GRBs in the data sets. However, the class memberships are probabilistic we have enough observed redshifts to calculate the redshift and spatial distribution of the intermediate GRBs. They are significantly farther than the short bursts and seems to be closer than the long ones.

  1. Posttranslationally caused bioluminescence burst of the Escherichia coli luciferase reporter strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ideguchi, Yamato; Oshikoshi, Yuta; Ryo, Masashi; Motoki, Shogo; Kuwano, Takashi; Tezuka, Takafumi; Aoki, Setsuyuki

    2016-01-01

    We continuously monitored bioluminescence from a wild-type reporter strain of Escherichia coli (lacp::luc+/WT), which carries the promoter of the lac operon (lacp) fused with the firefly luciferase gene (luc+). This strain showed a bioluminescence burst when shifted into the stationary growth phase. Bioluminescence profiles of other wild-type reporter strains (rpsPp::luc+ and argAp::luc+) and gene-deletion reporter strains (lacp::luc+/crp- and lacp::luc+/lacI-) indicate that transcriptional regulation is not responsible for generation of the burst. Consistently, changes in the luciferase protein levels did not recapitulate the profile of the burst. On the other hand, dissolved oxygen levels increased over the period across the burst, suggesting that the burst is, at least partially, caused by an increase in intracellular oxygen levels. We discuss limits of the firefly luciferase when used as a reporter for gene expression and its potential utility for monitoring metabolic changes in cells. PMID:26506945

  2. Astronomers Detect Powerful Bursting Radio Source Discovery Points to New Class of Astronomical Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    transients has been very exciting for our students,” Hyman added. Participating in this research program has inspired at least two of Hyman?s students — Jennifer Neureuther and Mariana Lazarova — to pursue graduate studies in astronomy. This project was supported at Sweet Briar College by funding from Research Corporation and the Jeffress Foundation. Basic research in radio astronomy at NRL is supported by the Office of Naval Research. Further Research Hyman and his NRL colleagues plan to continue monitoring the Galactic center and search for the source again with the VLA and other X-ray and radio telescopes. They are also developing (with Dr. Kent Wood of NRL) a model that attempts to account for the radio bursts as a new type of outburst from a class of sources known as “magnetars.” NRL is also contributing to an effort to build the world’s largest and most sensitive low-frequency telescope, called the Long Wavelength Array (LWA), which may revolutionize future searches for other radio transient sources. Current plans call for the LWA, which is being developed by the University of New Mexico-led Southwest Consortium, to be sited in New Mexico, not far from the VLA. “One of the key advantages of observing at long radio wavelengths,” explained NRL astronomer, Dr. Namir Kassim, “is that the field-of-view is so large that a single observation can efficiently detect transient phenomena over a large region.” “When completed, the LWA may uncover hundreds of previously unknown radio transients, some of which may be examples of Jupiter-like planets orbiting other stars,” Kassim added. Jupiter is the most famous example of a nearby radio transient. About Sweet Briar College Sweet Briar College is consistently ranked among the nation’s top liberal arts colleges.ÿ Founded in 1901 as an independent undergraduate college for women, Sweet Briar continues its commitment to the education of women, offering a full range of liberal arts majors, including subjects

  3. Methods and results of a search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts using the GEO600, LIGO, and Virgo detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Aasi, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Ajith, P; Alemic, A; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Amariutei, D; Andersen, M; Anderson, R A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C; Areeda, J S; Ast, S; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Augustus, H; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P T; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barbet, M; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Belczynski, C; Bell, A S; Bell, C; Bergmann, G; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biscans, S; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, Sukanta; Bosi, L; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brückner, F; Buchman, S; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burman, R; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Bustillo, J Calderón; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannon, K C; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Castaldi, G; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Celerier, C; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S S Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, D E; Clark, J A; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colla, A; Collette, C; Colombini, M; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coulon, J -P; Countryman, S; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Croce, R P; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, C; Dahl, K; Canton, T Dal; Damjanic, M; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M; Dickson, J; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dolique, V; Dominguez, E; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S; Eberle, T; Edo, T; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H -B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Endrőczi, G; Essick, R; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fournier, J -D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S; Garufi, F; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gordon, N; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S; Goßler, S; Gouaty, R; Gräf, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grover, K; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guido, C J; Gushwa, K; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, J; Hall, E D; Hamilton, W; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanke, M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hart, M; Hartman, M T; Haster, C -J; Haughian, K; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Holt, K; Hopkins, P; Horrom, T; Hoske, D; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hu, Y; Huerta, E; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh, M; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; Jang, H; Jaranowski, P; Ji, Y; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, K; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karlen, J; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Keiser, G M; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, C; Kim, K; Kim, N G; Kim, N; Kim, S; Kim, Y -M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kline, J; Koehlenbeck, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, A; Kumar, D Nanda; Kumar, P; Kumar, R; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Larson, S; Lasky, P D; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, J; Lee, P J; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Roux, A Le; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B; Lewis, J; Li, T G F; Libbrecht, K; Libson, A; Lin, A C; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Lockett, V; Lodhia, D; Loew, K; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; Lopez, E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J; Lubinski, M J; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Ma, Y; Macdonald, E P; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Maga\; Magee, R; Mageswaran, M; Maglione, C; Mailand, K; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Manca, G M; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mangini, N M; Mansell, G; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A; Maros, E; Marque, J; Martelli, F; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martinelli, L; Martynov, D; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; May, G; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McLin, K; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Mehmet, M; Meidam, J; Meinders, M; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mercer, R A; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Meyer, M S; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Minenkov, Y; Mingarelli, C M F; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moe, B; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morgado, N; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Mukherjee, S; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nagy, M F; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nelemans, G; Neri, I; Neri, M; Newton, G; Nguyen, T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A H; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E N; Nuttall, L K; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Omar, S; Oppermann, P; Oram, R; O'Reilly, B; Ortega, W; O'Shaughnessy, R; Osthelder, C; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Padilla, C; Pai, A; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Paoletti, F; Papa, M A; Paris, H; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Pedraza, M; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Phelps, M; Pichot, M; Pickenpack, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poeld, J; Poggiani, R; Poteomkin, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Privitera, S; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Rácz, I; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rajalakshmi, G; Rakhmanov, M; Ramet, C; Ramirez, K; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; 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Stebbins, J; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Stephens, B C; Steplewski, S; Stevenson, S; Stone, R; Stops, D; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Susmithan, S; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tao, J; Tarabrin, S P; Taylor, R; Tellez, G; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Tse, M; Tshilumba, D; Tuennermann, H; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Beuzekom, M; Brand, J F J van den; Broeck, C Van Den; van der Sluys, M V; van Heijningen, J; van Veggel, A A; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vincent-Finley, R; Vinet, J -Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Vousden, W D; Vyachanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, M; Wang, X; Ward, R L; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L -W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Wessels, P; West, M; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Wiesner, K; Wilkinson, C; Williams, K; Williams, L; Williams, R; Williams, T D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wiseman, A G; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Wolovick, N; Worden, J; Wu, Y; Yablon, J; Yakushin, I; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yang, H; Yoshida, S; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J -P; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, L; Zhao, C; Zhu, H; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S; Zweizig, J; Cain, J; Fotopoulos, N; Gill, C; Jones, G; Patel, P; Rogstad, S; Trias, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz-1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. We introduce the method of a linear search grid to analyse GRB events with large sky localisation uncertainties such as the localisations provided by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). Coherent searches for gravitational waves (GWs) can be computationally intensive when the GRB sky position is not well-localised, due to the corrections required for the difference in arrival time between detectors. Using a linear search grid we are able to reduce the computational cost of the analysis by a factor of O(10) for GBM events. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our analysis pipeline can improve upon the sky localisation of GRBs detected by the GBM, if a high-frequency GW signal is observed in coincidence. We use the linear search grid method in a search for GWs associated with 129 GRBs observed...

  4. Emergence of spatially heterogeneous burst suppression in a neural field model of electrocortical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo eBojak

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Burst suppression in the electroencephalogram (EEG is a well described phenomenon that occurs during deep anaesthesia, as well as in a variety of congenital and acquired brain insults. Classically it is thought of as spatially synchronous, quasi-periodic bursts of high amplitude EEG separated by low amplitude activity. However, its characterisation as a ``global brain state'' has been challenged by recent results obtained with intracranial electrocortigraphy. Not only does it appear that burst suppression activity is highly asynchronous across cortex, but also that it may occur in isolated regions of circumscribed spatial extent. Here we outline a realistic neural field model for burst suppression by adding a slow process of synaptic resource depletion and recovery, which is able to reproduce qualitatively the empirically observed features during general anaesthesia at the whole cortex level. Simulations reveal heterogeneous bursting over the model cortex and complex spatiotemporal dynamics during simulated anaesthetic action, and provide forward predictions of neuroimaging signals for subsequent empirical comparisons and more detailed characterisation.Because burst suppression corresponds to a dynamical end-point of brain activity, theoretically accounting for its spatiotemporal emergence will vitally contribute to efforts aimed at clarifying whether a common physiological trajectory is induced by the actions of general anaesthetic agents. We have taken a first step in this direction by showing that a neural field model can qualitatively match recent experimental data that indicate spatial differentiation of burst suppression activity across cortex.

  5. Estimates for Lorentz factors of gamma-ray bursts from early optical afterglow observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peak time of optical afterglow may be used as a proxy to constrain the Lorentz factor Γ of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) ejecta. We revisit this method by including bursts with optical observations that started when the afterglow flux was already decaying; these bursts can provide useful lower limits on Γ. Combining all analyzed bursts in our sample, we find that the previously reported correlation between Γ and the burst luminosity L γ does not hold. However, the data clearly show a lower bound Γmin that increases with L γ. We suggest an explanation for this feature: explosions with large jet luminosities and Γ < Γmin suffer strong adiabatic cooling before their radiation is released at the photosphere; they produce weak bursts, barely detectable with present instruments. To test this explanation, we examine the effect of adiabatic cooling on the GRB location in the L γ – Γ plane using a Monte Carlo simulation of the GRB population. Our results predict detectable on-axis 'orphan' afterglows. We also derive upper limits on the density of the ambient medium that decelerates the explosion ejecta. We find that the density in many cases is smaller than expected for stellar winds from normal Wolf-Rayet progenitors. The burst progenitors may be peculiar massive stars with weaker winds, or there might exist a mechanism that reduces the stellar wind a few years before the explosion.

  6. An Evaluation Method for the Bursting Characteristics of Coal Under the Effect of Loading Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitao, Li; Hongwei, Zhou; Yaodong, Jiang; Hongwei, Wang

    2016-08-01

    Changes in loading rate can affect the strength performance and bursting characteristics of coal. Coal samples from the same source were subject to mechanical tests for multi-loading rates. These tests were carried out to determine changes in evaluation indicators for the law of bursting liability due to increases in the loading rate. The results show that indicators, including the uniaxial compressive strength and the bursting energy index, first increased and then decreased with the increase in loading rate. The value of the loading rate, which corresponds to the strength turning point, is named the "critical loading rate". The results of evaluating the bursting liability of coal (from the same source) show all the possibilities. The critical loading rate corresponds to the highest bursting liability. The "loading rate sensitivity" is proposed to describe the comprehensive response of the bursting characteristics to the loading rate. This index, combined with the scale conversion method, makes the field application of laboratory experimentation possible. This method for evaluating the bursting liability of coal under the effect of loading rate was systematically established and shows good applicability.

  7. Type II and Type III Radio Bursts and their Correlation with Solar Energetic Proton Events

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, L M

    2015-01-01

    Using the Wind/WAVES radio observations from 2010-2013, we present an analysis of the 123 decametric-hectometric (DH) type II solar radio bursts during this period, the associated type III burst properties, and their correlation with solar energetic proton (SEP) properties determined from analysis of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) observations. We present a useful catalog of the type II burst, type III burst, Langmuir wave, and proton flux properties for these 123 events, which we employ to develop a statistical relationship between the radio properties and peak proton flux that can be used to forecast SEP events. We find that all SEP events with a peak > 10 MeV flux above 15 pfu are associated with a type II burst and virtually all SEP events, 92%, are also associated with a type III radio burst. Based on a principal component analysis, the radio burst properties that are most highly correlated with the occurrence of gradual SEP events and account for the most variance in the ra...

  8. Mechanism of Rock Burst Occurrence in Specially Thick Coal Seam with Rock Parting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian-chao; Jiang, Fu-xing; Meng, Xiang-jun; Wang, Xu-you; Zhu, Si-tao; Feng, Yu

    2016-05-01

    Specially thick coal seam with complex construction, such as rock parting and alternative soft and hard coal, is called specially thick coal seam with rock parting (STCSRP), which easily leads to rock burst during mining. Based on the stress distribution of rock parting zone, this study investigated the mechanism, engineering discriminant conditions, prevention methods, and risk evaluation method of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP through setting up a mechanical model. The main conclusions of this study are as follows. (1) When the mining face moves closer to the rock parting zone, the original non-uniform stress of the rock parting zone and the advancing stress of the mining face are combined to intensify gradually the shearing action of coal near the mining face. When the shearing action reaches a certain degree, rock burst easily occurs near the mining face. (2) Rock burst occurrence in STCSRP is positively associated with mining depth, advancing stress concentration factor of the mining face, thickness of rock parting, bursting liability of coal, thickness ratio of rock parting to coal seam, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal, whereas negatively associated with shear strength. (3) Technologies of large-diameter drilling, coal seam water injection, and deep hole blasting can reduce advancing stress concentration factor, thickness of rock parting, and difference of elastic modulus between rock parting and coal to lower the risk of rock burst in STCSRP. (4) The research result was applied to evaluate and control the risk of rock burst occurrence in STCSRP.

  9. Estimates for Lorentz factors of gamma-ray bursts from early optical afterglow observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hascoët, Romain; Beloborodov, Andrei M. [Physics Department and Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, 538 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Daigne, Frédéric; Mochkovitch, Robert, E-mail: hascoet@astro.columbia.edu [Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, UMR 7095 Université Pierre et Marie Curie-CNRS, 98 bis boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-02-10

    The peak time of optical afterglow may be used as a proxy to constrain the Lorentz factor Γ of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) ejecta. We revisit this method by including bursts with optical observations that started when the afterglow flux was already decaying; these bursts can provide useful lower limits on Γ. Combining all analyzed bursts in our sample, we find that the previously reported correlation between Γ and the burst luminosity L {sub γ} does not hold. However, the data clearly show a lower bound Γ{sub min} that increases with L {sub γ}. We suggest an explanation for this feature: explosions with large jet luminosities and Γ < Γ{sub min} suffer strong adiabatic cooling before their radiation is released at the photosphere; they produce weak bursts, barely detectable with present instruments. To test this explanation, we examine the effect of adiabatic cooling on the GRB location in the L {sub γ} – Γ plane using a Monte Carlo simulation of the GRB population. Our results predict detectable on-axis 'orphan' afterglows. We also derive upper limits on the density of the ambient medium that decelerates the explosion ejecta. We find that the density in many cases is smaller than expected for stellar winds from normal Wolf-Rayet progenitors. The burst progenitors may be peculiar massive stars with weaker winds, or there might exist a mechanism that reduces the stellar wind a few years before the explosion.

  10. Observations of the Bursting Activity of the 6.7GHz Methanol Maser in G33.641-0.228

    CERN Document Server

    Fujisawa, Kenta; Nagadomi, Yoshito; Kimura, Saki; Shimomura, Tadashi; Takase, Genta; Sugiyama, Koichiro; Motogi, Kazuhito; Niinuma, Kotaro; Hirota, Tomoya; Yonekura, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    We have observed bursting variability of the 6.7 GHz methanol maser of G33.641-0.228. Five bursts were detected in the observation period of 294 days from 2009 to 2012. The typical burst is a large flux density rise in about one day followed by a slow fall. A non-typical burst observed in 2010 showed a large and rapid flux density enhancement from the stable state, but the rise and fall of the flux density were temporally symmetric and a fast fluctuation continued 12 days. On average, the bursts occurred once every 59 days, although bursting was not periodic. Since the average power required for causing the burst of order of 10^21 Js^-1 is far smaller than the luminosity of G33.641-0.228, a very small fraction of the source's power would be sufficient to cause the burst occasionally. The burst can be explained as a solar-flare like event in which the energy is accumulated in the magnetic field of the circumstellar disk, and is released for a short time. However, the mechanism of the energy release and the dus...

  11. The Case of the Disappearing Spindle Burst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Tiriac

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are brief cortical oscillations at 10–15 Hz that occur predominantly during non-REM (quiet sleep in adult mammals and are thought to contribute to learning and memory. Spindle bursts are phenomenologically similar to sleep spindles, but they occur predominantly in early infancy and are triggered by peripheral sensory activity (e.g., by retinal waves; accordingly, spindle bursts are thought to organize neural networks in the developing brain and establish functional links with the sensory periphery. Whereas the spontaneous retinal waves that trigger spindle bursts in visual cortex are a transient feature of early development, the myoclonic twitches that drive spindle bursts in sensorimotor cortex persist into adulthood. Moreover, twitches—and their associated spindle bursts—occur exclusively during REM (active sleep. Curiously, despite the persistence of twitching into adulthood, twitch-related spindle bursts have not been reported in adult sensorimotor cortex. This raises the question of whether such spindle burst activity does not occur in adulthood or, alternatively, occurs but has yet to be discovered. If twitch-related spindle bursts do occur in adults, they could contribute to the calibration, maintenance, and repair of sensorimotor systems.

  12. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  13. Modification of gravitational redshift of x-ray burst produced by pulsar surface magnetoplasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Jun; Ji Pei-Yong

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,the propagation of x-ray bursts in the magnetoplasma of pulsar magnetosphere is discussed.The electromagnetic interaction between x-ray bursts and magnetoplasma is described as some geometry.The electromagnetic effects of surface superstrong magnetic field and dynamic effects of outflowing magnetoplasma of pulsars are treated as an optical metric.The Gordon metric is introduced to represent the gravitational metric and optical metric.So the propagation of x-ray bursts in magnetoplasma of pulsars can be described as x-ray bursts transmitting in an effective space characterized by Gordon metric.The modification of gravitational redshift,attributed to the flowing magnetoplasma of pulsars,is obtained and it is shown that the modification is of redshift and can reach the same magnitude as the gravitational redshift for ordinary pulsars.

  14. Synchronization and rhythm dynamics of a neuronal network consisting of mixed bursting neurons with hybrid synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xia; Xi, Wenqi

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, burst synchronization and rhythm dynamics of a small-world neuronal network consisting of mixed bursting types of neurons coupled via inhibitory-excitatory chemical synapses are explored. Two quantities, the synchronization parameter and average width factor, are used to characterize the synchronization degree and rhythm dynamics of the neuronal network. Numerical results show that the percentage of the inhibitory synapses in the network is the major factor for we get a similarly bell-shaped dependence of synchronization on it, and the decrease of the average width factor of the network. We also find that not only the value of the coupling strength can promote the synchronization degree, but the probability of random edges adding to the small-world network also can. The ratio of the long bursting neurons has little effect on the burst synchronization and rhythm dynamics of the network.

  15. Constraints on the Photon Mass with Fast Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Zhang, Song-Bo; Gao, He; Wei, Jun-Jie; Zou, Yuan-Chuan; Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Zi-Gao; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are radio bursts characterized by millisecond durations, high Galactic latitude positions, and high dispersion measures. Very recently, the cosmological origin of FRB 150418 has been confirmed by Keane et al., and FRBs are now strong competitors as cosmological probes. The simple sharp feature of the FRB signal is ideal to probe some of the fundamental laws of physics. Here we show that by analyzing the delay time between different frequencies, the FRB data can place stringent upper limits on the rest mass of the photon. For FRB 150418 at z = 0.492, one can potentially reach {m}γ ≤slant 5.2× {10}-47 g, which is 1020 times smaller than the rest mass of electron and is about 103 times smaller than that obtained using other astrophysical sources with the same method.

  16. Constraints on the Photon Mass with Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Gao, He; Wei, Jun-Jie; Zou, Yuan-Chuan; Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing; Dai, Zi-Gao; Mészáros, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are radio bursts characterized by millisecond durations, high Galactic latitude positions, and anomalously high dispersion measures. Very recently, the cosmological origin of FRB 150418 has been confirmed, and FRBs are now strong competitors as cosmological probes. The simple sharp feature of the FRB signal is ideal for them to probe some of the fundamental laws of physics. Here we show that by analyzing the delay time between different frequencies, the FRB data can place stringent upper limits on the rest mass of the photon. For FRB 150418, one can potentially reach $m_{\\gamma} \\leq 1.6 \\times 10^{-48}$ g, which is $10^{21}$ times smaller than the rest mass of electron, and is about $10^4$ times smaller than that obtained using other astrophysical sources using the same method.

  17. Flash-Heating of Circumstellar Clouds by $\\gamma$ Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Dermer, C D; Dermer, Charles D.; Boettcher, Markus

    2000-01-01

    The blast-wave model for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) has been called intoquestion by observations of spectra from GRBs that are harder than can beproduced through optically thin synchrotron emission. If GRBs originate fromthe collapse of massive stars, then circumstellar clouds near burst sourceswill be illuminated by intense gamma radiation, and the electrons in theseclouds will be rapidly scattered to energies as large as several hundred keV.Low-energy photons that subsequently pass through the hot plasma will bescattered to higher energies, hardening the intrisic spectrum. This effectresolves the "line-of-death" objection to the synchrotron shock model.Illuminated clouds near GRBs will form relativistic plasmas containing largenumbers of electron-positron pairs that can be detected within ~ 1-2 days ofthe explosion before expanding and dissipating. Localized regions of pairannihilation radiation in the Galaxy would reveal past GRB explosions.

  18. Gamma-Ray Bursts: Jets and Energetics

    CERN Document Server

    Frail, D A

    2003-01-01

    The relativistic outflows from gamma-ray bursts are now thought to be narrowly collimated into jets. After correcting for this jet geometry there is a remarkable constancy of both the energy radiated by the burst and the kinetic energy carried by the outflow. Gamma-ray bursts are still the most luminous explosions in the Universe, but they release energies that are comparable to supernovae. The diversity of cosmic explosions appears to be governed by the fraction of energy that is coupled to ultra-relativistic ejecta.

  19. EXIST's Gamma-Ray Burst Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Band, D. L.; Grindlay, J. E.; Hong, J.; Fishman, G.; Hartmann, D. H.; Garson III, A.; Krawczynski, H.; Barthelmy, S.; Gehrels, N.; Skinner, G.

    2007-01-01

    We use semi-analytic techniques to evaluate the burst sensitivity of designs for the EXIST hard X-ray survey mission. Applying these techniques to the mission design proposed for the Beyond Einstein program, we find that with its very large field-of-view and faint gamma-ray burst detection threshold, EXIST will detect and localize approximately two bursts per day, a large fraction of which may be at high redshift. We estimate that EXIST's maximum sensitivity will be ~4 times greater than that...

  20. Burst conditions of explosive volcanic eruptions recorded on microbarographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, M.M.; Chouet, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    Explosive volcanic eruptions generate pressure disturbances in the atmosphere that propagate away either as acoustic or as shock waves, depending on the explosivity of the eruption. Both types of waves are recorded on microbarographs as 1- to 0.1-hertz N-shaped signals followed by a longer period coda. These waveforms can be used to estimate burst pressures end gas concentrations in explosive volcanic eruptions and provide estimates of eruption magnitudes.

  1. The luminosity function of Swift long gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Xiao-Feng; Cheng, K S; Zheng, Xiao-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The formation rate of long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) could follow the cosmic star formation rate (SFR) incorporating with cosmic metallicity evolution. Therefore, the luminosity function (LF) of GRBs can in principle be explored by modeling the redshift-luminosity distributions of {\\it Swift} observed GRBs. For an assumed LF form as $\\Phi_z(L)\\propto e^{-L_p/L}\\left({L/L_p}\\right)^{-\

  2. The Origin of Behavioral Bursts in Decision-Making Circuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Amanda Sorribes; Armendariz, Beatriz G.; Diego Lopez-Pigozzi; Cristina Murga; de Polavieja, Gonzalo G.

    2011-01-01

    From ants to humans, the timing of many animal behaviors comes in bursts of activity separated by long periods of inactivity. Recently, mathematical modeling has shown that simple algorithms of priority-driven behavioral choice can result in bursty behavior. To experimentally test this link between decision-making circuitry and bursty dynamics, we have turned to Drosophila melanogaster. We have found that the statistics of intervals between activity periods in endogenous activity-rest switche...

  3. THE ENGINES BEHIND SUPERNOVAE AND GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRYER, CHRISTOPHER LEE [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-23

    The authors review the different engines behind supernova (SNe) and gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), focusing on those engines driving explosions in massive stars: core-collapse SNe and long-duration GRBs. Convection and rotation play important roles in the engines of both these explosions. They outline the basic physics and discuss the wide variety of ways scientists have proposed that this physics can affect the supernova explosion mechanism, concluding with a review of the current status in these fields.

  4. Adaptive Kalman Filter Based on Adjustable Sampling Interval in Burst Detection for Water Distribution System

    OpenAIRE

    Doo Yong Choi; Seong-Won Kim; Min-Ah Choi; Zong Woo Geem

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection of bursts and leaks in water distribution systems (WDSs) can reduce the social and economic costs incurred through direct loss of water into the ground, additional energy demand for water supply, and service interruptions. Many real-time burst detection models have been developed in accordance with the use of supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems and the establishment of district meter areas (DMAs). Nonetheless, no consideration has been given to how frequen...

  5. SROSS C-2 Detections of Gamma Ray Bursts and the SGR 1627-41

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S. Sinha; P. Sreekumar; K. Kasturirangan

    2002-03-01

    The GRB monitor (GRBM) on board the Indian SROSS C-2 satellite has detected 53 classical gamma ray bursts since its launch in May, 1994 till its re-entry in July, 2001. For a subset of 26 events, locations were obtained from simultaneous observations by other gamma-ray detectors in space. The sky distribution of these 26 SROSS C-2 bursts is consistent with isotropy. The distribution of event durations shows evidence for bimodality. There is an evidence for a moderate hardness ratio-intensity (HIC) correlation in the data. The SROSS C-2 GRBM has also detected three episodes of emission from the SGR 1627-41.

  6. THE FERMI GBM GAMMA-RAY BURST CATALOG: THE FIRST TWO YEARS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paciesas, William S.; Bhat, P. N.; Briggs, Michael S.; Burgess, J. Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Goldstein, Adam; Guiriec, Sylvain [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research, University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Meegan, Charles A.; Van der Horst, Alexander J. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Von Kienlin, Andreas; Diehl, Roland; Foley, Suzanne; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Bissaldi, Elisabetta [Institute of Astro and Particle Physics, University Innsbruck, Technikerstrasse 25, 6176 Innsbruck (Austria); Fishman, Gerald J. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Fitzpatrick, Gerard [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Belfield, Stillorgan Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty [Jacobs Technology, Inc., 1525 Perimeter Pkwy NW, Huntsville, AL 35806 (United States); and others

    2012-03-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to enhance the scientific return from Fermi in studying gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In its first two years of operation GBM triggered on 491 GRBs. We summarize the criteria used for triggering and quantify the general characteristics of the triggered GRBs, including their locations, durations, peak flux, and fluence. This catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center.

  7. The Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Two Years

    CERN Document Server

    Paciesas, William S; von Kienlin, Andreas; Bhat, P N; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Briggs, Michael S; Burgess, J Michael; Chaplin, Vandiver; Connaughton, Valerie; Diehl, Roland; Fishman, Gerald J; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne; Gibby, Melissa; Giles, Misty; Goldstein, Adam; Greiner, Jochen; Gruber, David; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J; Kippen, R Marc; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Lichti, Giselher; Lin, Lin; McBreen, Sheila; Preece, Robert D; Rau, Arne; Tierney, Dave; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen

    2012-01-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to enhance the scientific return from Fermi in studying gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In its first two years of operation GBM triggered on 491 GRBs. We summarize the criteria used for triggering and quantify the general characteristics of the triggered GRBs, including their locations, durations, peak flux, and fluence. This catalog is an official product of the Fermi GBM science team, and the data files containing the complete results are available from the High-Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center (HEASARC).

  8. The Second Fermi GBM Gamma-Ray Burst Catalog: The First Four Years

    OpenAIRE

    Kienlin, von, A.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.; Bhat, P.N.; Bissaldi, E.; Briggs, M S; Burgess, J. M.; Byrne, D.; Chaplin, V.; Cleveland, W.; Connaughton, V.; Collazzi, A.C.; Fitzpatrick, G.; Foley, S.; Gibby, M.

    2014-01-01

    This is the second of a series of catalogs of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) observed with the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM). It extends the first two-year catalog by two more years, resulting in an overall list of 953 GBM triggered GRBs. The intention of the GBM GRB catalog is to provide information to the community on the most important observables of the GBM detected GRBs. For each GRB the location and main characteristics of the prompt emission, the duration, peak flux and fluence are deri...

  9. Interference of daratumumab in monitoring multiple myeloma patients using serum immunofixation electrophoresis can be abrogated using the daratumumab IFE reflex assay (DIRA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Otten, Henny G; El Haddad, Omar; Axel, Amy; Sasser, A Kate; Croockewit, Sandra; Jacobs, Joannes F M

    2016-06-01

    Daratumumab is a fully human anti-CD38 IgG1-κ monoclonal antibody (mAb) currently being evaluated in several Phase 2 and 3 clinical studies for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). In this clinical case study we demonstrate that daratumumab can be detected as an individual monoclonal band in serum immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE). M-protein follow-up by IFE is part of the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) criteria to assess treatment response. Therefore, it is crucial that the daratumumab band is not confused with the endogenous M-protein of the patient during IFE interpretation. Moreover, a significant number of IgG-κ M-proteins co-migrate with daratumumab. Co-migration introduces a bias in the M-protein quantification since pharmacokinetic studies show that daratumumab peak plasma concentrations reach up to 1 g/L. More importantly, co-migration can mask clearance of the M-protein by IFE which is necessary for classification of complete response by IMWG criteria (negative serum IFE). For optimal M-protein monitoring the laboratory specialist needs to be informed when patients receive daratumumab, and it is essential that the laboratory specialist is aware that a slow migrating band in the γ-region in those patients may be derived from the daratumumab. A daratumumab specific IFE reflex assay (DIRA) has been developed and can be utilized to abrogate interference. The here described mAb interference is not limited to daratumumab, and as therapeutic antibodies gain approval and enter into common clinical practice, laboratory specialists will need additional processes to characterize IFE interference and distinguish endogenous M-protein from therapeutic antibodies. PMID:26812873

  10. Burst suppression probability algorithms: state-space methods for tracking EEG burst suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Chemali, Jessica; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L; Solt, Ken; Brown, Emery N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. Burst suppression is an electroencephalogram pattern in which bursts of electrical activity alternate with an isoelectric state. This pattern is commonly seen in states of severely reduced brain activity such as profound general anesthesia, anoxic brain injuries, hypothermia and certain developmental disorders. Devising accurate, reliable ways to quantify burst suppression is an important clinical and research problem. Although thresholding and segmentation algorithms readily ident...

  11. Directivity of low-frequency solar type 3 radio bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence rate of type 3 solar bursts in the frequency range 4.9 MHz to 30 kHz was analyzed as a function of burst intensity and burst arrival direction. Results show that the occurrence rate of bursts falls off with increasing flux and the distribution of burst arrival directions at each frequency shows a significantly larger number of bursts observed west of the earth--sun line than east of it. This western excess in occurrence rate appears to be correlated with the direction of the average interplanetary magnetic field, and is interpreted as beaming of the observed burst radiation along the magnetic field direction

  12. Long Burst Error Correcting Codes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Long burst error mitigation is an enabling technology for the use of Ka band for high rate commercial and government users. Multiple NASA, government, and...

  13. Relativistic effects in gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to recent models of the sources of gamma-ray bursts the extremely energetic emission is caused by shells expanding with ultrarelativistic velocity. With the recent identification of optical sources at the positions of some gamma-ray bursts these ''fireball'' models have acquired an actuality that invites to use them as a motivating application when teaching special relativity. We demonstrate several relativistic effects associated with these models which are very pronounced due to the great velocity of the shell. For example a burst lasting for a month in the rest frame of an element of the shell lasts for a few seconds only, in the rest frame of our detector. It is shown how the observed properties of a burst are modified by aberration and the Doppler effect. The apparent luminosity as a function of time is calculated. Modifications due to the motion of the star away from the observer are calculated. (Author)

  14. Design of assembly control algorithm based on burst-size feedback for optical burst switching network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minglei Fu; Zichun Le

    2009-01-01

    A novel assembly control algorithm named burst-size feedback adaptive assembly period(BFAAP)is proposed.The major difference between BFAAP and other similar adaptive assembly algorithms is that the control curve of BFAAP is dynamically adjusted according to the feedback of outgoing burst size.BFAAP is compared with two typical algorithms fixed assembly period(FAP)aild min-burst length max assembly period(MBMAP)in simulation in terms of burst size distribution and assembly period.Moreover,the transmission control protocol(TCP)performance over BFAAP is also considered and simulated.

  15. ESA's Integral detects closest cosmic gamma-ray burst

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-08-01

    5 August 2004 A gamma-ray burst detected by ESA's Integral gamma-ray observatory on 3 December 2003 has been thoroughly studied for months by an armada of space and ground-based observatories. Astronomers have now concluded that this event, called GRB 031203, is the closest cosmic gamma-ray burst on record, but also the faintest. This also suggests that an entire population of sub-energetic gamma-ray bursts has so far gone unnoticed... Gamma ray burst model hi-res Size hi-res: 22 KB Credits: CXC/M. Weiss Artist impression of a low-energy gamma-ray burst This illustration describes a model for a gamma-ray burst, like the one detected by Integral on 3 December 2003 (GRB 031203). A jet of high-energy particles from a rapidly rotating black hole interacts with surrounding matter. Observations with Integral on 3 December 2003 and data on its afterglow, collected afterwards with XMM-Newton, Chandra and the Very Large Array telescope, show that GRB 031203 radiated only a fraction of the energy of normal gamma-ray bursts. Like supernovae, gamma-ray bursts are thought to be produced by the collapse of the core of a massive star. However, while the process leading to supernovae is relatively well understood, astronomers still do not know what happens when a core collapses to form a black hole. The discovery of 'under-energetic' gamma-ray bursts, like GRB 031203, should provide valuable clues as to links between supernovae, black holes and gamma-ray bursts. Lo-res JPG (22 Kb) Hi-res TIFF (5800 Kb) Cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are flashes of gamma rays that can last from less than a second to a few minutes and occur at random positions in the sky. A large fraction of them is thought to result when a black hole is created from a dying star in a distant galaxy. Astronomers believe that a hot disc surrounding the black hole, made of gas and matter falling onto it, somehow emits an energetic beam parallel to the axis of rotation. According to the simplest picture, all GRBs

  16. A stable aberrant immunophenotype characterizes nearly all cases of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma in blood and can be used to monitor response to therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duvic Madeleine

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal variations in the expression level of some commonly expressed T-cell antigens are a feature of many T-cell malignancies. Methods We sought to assess the frequency of such abnormal antigen expression by flow cytometry in peripheral blood (PB samples from patients with mycosis fungoides (MF and Sézary syndrome (SS. We correlated presence of morphologically identifiable tumor cells on PB smear with the frequency of abnormalities in the level of expression of CD3, CD4, CD7, CD8 and CD26. We also examined the degree of stability of these abnormal findings in tumor cells over the course of disease. The flow cytometric findings in 100 PB samples from 44 patients, including 38 who had multiple sequential PB samples (2–8 samples each, were assessed. Results Abnormalities were seen in the expression level of one or more T-cell markers in 41 cases (93% including CD3 in 34% of patients, CD4 in 54%, CD26 in 86% and CD 45 in 40% (10 cases tested. In all but 2 cases, the abnormal T-cell immunophenotype remained similar over the course of treatment and correlated with the relative numbers of tumor cells counted on PB smear. Conclusions Using a standard T-cell panel, stable phenotypically aberrant T-cell populations representing the tumor are detected in the vast majority of involved PB samples in MF/SS and can be used to monitor response to therapy.

  17. Black Hole Lensing and Wave Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Gogberashvili, Merab

    2016-01-01

    It is shown that close to a black hole horizon wave equations have real-valued exponentially time-dependent solutions and to investigate strong gravitational lensing we need to introduce an effective negative cosmological constant between the Schwarzschild and photon spheres. Then exponentially amplified reflected waves from this effective AdS space could explain properties of some gamma ray bursts, fast radio bursts and gravitational waves.

  18. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Massimo Della [INAF-Napoli, Capodimonte Observatory, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); International Center for Relativistic Astrophysics Network, Piazzale della Repubblica 10, I-65122, Pescara (Italy)

    2015-12-17

    I’ll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ∼ 0.4% − 3%.

  19. Autaptic Connections Shift Network Excitability and Bursting

    OpenAIRE

    Wiles, Laura; Gu, Shi; Pasqualetti, Fabio; Bassett, Danielle S.; Meaney, David F.

    2016-01-01

    Network architecture forms a critical constraint on neuronal function. Here we examine the role of structural autapses, when a neuron synapses onto itself, in driving network-wide bursting behavior. Using a simple spiking model of neuronal activity, we study how autaptic connections affect activity patterns, and evaluate if neuronal degree or controllability are significant factors that affect changes in bursting from these autaptic connections. We observed that adding increasing numbers of a...

  20. Supernovae and gamma-ray bursts connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Massimo Della

    2015-12-01

    I'll review the status of the Supernova/Gamma-Ray Burst connection. Several pieces of evidence suggest that long duration Gamma-ray Bursts are associated with bright SNe-Ic. However recent works suggest that GRBs might be produced in tight binary systems composed of a massive carbon-oxygen cores and a neutron star companion. Current estimates of the SN and GRB rates yield a ratio GRB/SNe-Ibc in the range ˜ 0.4% - 3%.

  1. MIRAX sensitivity for Gamma Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacahui, J. R.; Penacchioni, A. V.; Braga, J.; Castro, M. A.; D'Amico, F.

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present the detection capability of the MIRAX (Monitor e Imageador de RAios-X) experiment for Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs). MIRAX is an X-ray astronomy mission designed to perform a wide band hard X-ray (10-200 keV) survey of the sky, especially in the Galactic plane. With a total detection area of 169 cm2, large field of view (FoV, 20 ° × 20 °), angular resolution of 1°45‧ and good spectral and time resolution (∼8% at 60 keV, 10 μs), MIRAX will be optimized for the detection and study of transient sources, such as accreting neutron stars (NS), black holes (BH), Active Galactic Nuclei (AGNs), and both short and long GRBs. This is especially important because MIRAX is expected to operate in an epoch when probably no other hard X-ray wide-field imager will be active. We have performed detailed simulations of MIRAX GRB observations using the GEANT4 package, including the background spectrum and images of GRB sources in order to provide accurate predictions of the sensitivity for the expected GRB rate to be observed. MIRAX will be capable of detecting ∼44 GRBs per year up to redshifts of ∼4.5. The MIRAX mission will be able to contribute significantly to GRB science by detecting a large number of GRBs per year with wide band spectral response. The observations will contribute mainly to the part of GRB spectra where a thermal emission is predicted by the Fireball model. We also discuss the possibility of detecting GRB afterglows in the X-ray band with MIRAX.

  2. Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Mannheim, K

    2000-01-01

    The observed fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays are used to infer the maximum allowed high-energy neutrino flux allowed for Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), following Mannheim, Protheroe, and Rachen (2000). It is shown that if GRBs produce the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, they should contribute (a) at least 10% of the extragalactic gamma ray background between 3 MeV and 30 GeV, contrary to their observed energy flux which is only a minute fraction of this flux, and (b) a cumulative neutrino flux a factor of 20 below the AMANDA (Neutrino 2000) limit on isotropic neutrinos. This could have two implications, either GRBs do not produce the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays or that the GRBs are strongly beamed and emit most of their power at energies well above 100 GeV implausibly increasing the energy requirements, but consistent with the marginal detections of a few low-redshift GRBs by MILAGRITO, HEGRA-AIROBICC, and the Tibet-Array. All crucial measurements to test the models will be available in the next few years. Thes...

  3. Gamma-ray Burst Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, F Y; Liang, E W

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are the most luminous electromagnetic explosions in the Universe, which emit up to $8.8\\times10^{54}$ erg isotropic equivalent energy in the hard X-ray band. The high luminosity makes them detectable out to the largest distances yet explored in the Universe. GRBs, as bright beacons in the deep Universe, would be the ideal tool to probe the properties of high-redshift universe: including the cosmic expansion and dark energy, star formation rate, the reionization epoch and the metal enrichment history of the Universe. In this article, we review the luminosity correlations of GRBs, and implications for constraining the cosmological parameters and dark energy. Observations show that the progenitors of long GRBs are massive stars. So it is expected that long GRBs are tracers of star formation rate. We also review the high-redshift star formation rate derived from GRBs, and implications for the cosmic reionization history. The afterglows of GRBs generally have broken power-law spectra, so it...

  4. Meteor burst communications improvement study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, David

    1993-07-01

    Two identical Meteor Burst Radio Terminals were developed, fabricated, and delivered to the Air Force. Each is controlled by a PC computer in a menu driven manner. The mode of operation is full duplex. The RF frequency range is 40 to 60 MHz with tuning increments of 25 KHz. Data rates are 4, 8, 16, 32, 64, 128, 256, and 512 kbps. Modulation is coherent Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) and incoherent Differential Phase Shift Keying (DPSK). Protocol includes Automatic Repeat Request (ARQ) with source and destination addressing, message number, start of message, and end of message. Messages are packetized, and Reed Solomon (R-S) coding is an option. The ARQ is under the control of a Cyclic Redundancy Check Code (CRCC) which detects binary errors within each packet. The terminal is intended to increase meteor trail availability and data throughput by several orders of magnitude--by operating with new antennas that provide much higher gains without sacrificing meteor trail acquisition performance.

  5. Detection of spectral evolution in the bursts emitted during the 2008-2009 active episode of SGR J1550 - 5418

    CERN Document Server

    von Kienlin, Andreas; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Granot, Jonathan; Baring, Matthew G; Göğüş, Ersin; Huppenkothen, Daniela; Kaneko, Yuki; Lin, Lin; Watts, Anna L; Bhat, P Narayana; Guiriec, Sylvain; van der Horst, Alexander J; Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Greiner, Jochen; Meegan, Charles A; Paciesas, William S; Preece, Robert D; Rau, Arne

    2012-01-01

    In early October 2008, the Soft Gamma Repeater SGRJ1550 - 5418 (1E 1547.0 - 5408, AXJ155052 - 5418, PSR J1550 - 5418) became active, emitting a series of bursts which triggered the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) after which a second especially intense activity period commenced in 2009 January and a third, less active period was detected in 2009 March-April. Here we analyze the GBM data all the bursts from the first and last active episodes. We performed temporal and spectral analysis for all events and found that their temporal characteristics are very similar to the ones of other SGR bursts, as well the ones reported for the bursts of the main episode (average burst durations \\sim 170 ms). In addition, we used our sample of bursts to quantify the systematic uncertainties of the GBM location algorithm for soft gamma-ray transients to < 8 deg. Our spectral analysis indicates significant spectral evolution between the first and last set of events. Although the 2008 October events are best fit with a sin...

  6. Fast Mapping of Terahertz Bursting Thresholds and Characteristics at Synchrotron Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Brosi, Miriam; Blomley, Edmund; Bründermann, Erik; Caselle, Michele; Hiller, Nicole; Kehrer, Benjamin; Nasse, Michael J; Rota, Lorenzo; Schedler, Manuel; Schönfeldt, Patrik; Schuh, Marcel; Schwarz, Markus; Weber, Marc; Müller, Anke-Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Dedicated optics with extremely short electron bunches enable synchrotron light sources to generate intense coherent THz radiation. The high degree of spatial compression in this so-called low-alpha optics entails a complex longitudinal dynamics of the electron bunches, which can be probed studying the fluctuations in the emitted terahertz radiation caused by the micro-bunching instability ("bursting"). This article presents a "quasi-instantaneous" method for measuring the bursting characteristics by simultaneously collecting and evaluating the information from all bunches in a multi-bunch fill, reducing the measurement time from hours to seconds. This speed-up allows systematic studies of the bursting characteristics for various accelerator settings within a single fill of the machine, enabling a comprehensive comparison of the measured bursting thresholds with theoretical predictions by the bunched-beam theory. This paper introduces the method and presents first results obtained at the ANKA synchrotron radi...

  7. Model interpretation of type III radio burst characteristics. I - Spatial aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, M. J.; Stone, R. G.

    1988-01-01

    The ways that the finite size of the source region and directivity of the emitted radiation modify the observed characteristics of type III radio bursts as they propagate through the interplanetary medium are investigated. A simple model that simulates the radio source region is developed to provide insight into the spatial behavior of the parameters that characterize radio bursts. The model is used to demonstrate that observed radio azimuths are systematically displaced from the geometric centroid of the exciter electron beam in such a way as to cause trajectories of the radio bursts to track back to the observer at low frequencies, rather than to follow expected Archimedean spiral-like paths. The source region model is used to investigate the spatial behavior of the peak intensities of radio bursts, and it is found that the model can qualitatively account for both the frequency dependence and the east-west asymmetry of the observed peak flux densities.

  8. Solar type III radio bursts modulated by homochromous Alfvén waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solar type III radio bursts and their production mechanisms have been intensively studied in both theory and observation and are believed to be the most important signatures of electron acceleration in active regions. Recently, Wu et al. proposed that the electron-cyclotron maser emission (ECME) driven by an energetic electron beam could be responsible for producing type III bursts and pointed out that turbulent Alfvén waves can greatly influence the basic process of ECME via the oscillation of these electrons in the wave fields. This paper investigates effects of homochromous Alfvén waves (HAWs) on ECME driven by electron beams. Our results show that the growth rate of the O-mode wave will be significantly modulated by HAWs. We also discuss possible application to the formation of fine structures in type III bursts, such as so-called solar type IIIb radio bursts.

  9. Kilometer-wave type III burst - Harmonic emission revealed by direction and time of arrival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, H.; Haddock, F. T.; Potter, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    A type III solar burst was observed at seven frequencies between 3.5 MHz and 80 kHz by the Michigan experiment aboard the IMP-6 satellite. From the data burst direction of arrival as well as time of arrival can be determined. These quantities are predicted, using simple models whose parameters are varied to obtain a good fit to the observations. It is found that between 3.5 MHz and 230 kHz the observed radiation was emitted at the fundamental of the local plasma frequency, while below 230 kHz it was emitted at the second harmonic. The exciter particles that produced the burst onset and burst peak have velocities of 0.27 and 0.12, respectively, in units of the velocity of light.

  10. Fast radio bursts: the last sign of supramassive neutron stars

    CERN Document Server

    Falcke, Heino

    2013-01-01

    Several fast radio bursts have been discovered recently, showing a bright, highly dispersed millisecond radio pulse. The high dispersion suggests sources at cosmological distances, implying an extremely high radio luminosity. We propose that a fast radio burst represents the final signal of a supramassive rotating neutron star that collapses to a black hole due to magnetic braking. The neutron star is initially above the critical mass for non-rotating models and is supported by rapid rotation. As magnetic braking constantly reduces the spin, the neutron star will suddenly collapse to a black hole several thousand to million years after its birth. We discuss several formation scenarios for supramassive neutron stars and estimate the possible observational signatures making use of the results of recent numerical general-relativistic calculations. While the collapse will hide the stellar surface behind an event horizon, the magnetic-field lines will snap violently. This can turn an almost ordinary pulsar into a ...

  11. Fast Radio Bursts from the Inspiral of Double Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie-Shuang; Yang, Yuan-Pei; Wu, Xue-Feng; Dai, Zi-Gao; Wang, Fa-Yin

    2016-05-01

    In this Letter, we propose that a fast radio burst (FRB) could originate from the magnetic interaction between double neutron stars (NSs) during their final inspiral within the framework of a unipolar inductor model. In this model, an electromotive force is induced on one NS to accelerate electrons to an ultra-relativistic speed instantaneously. We show that coherent curvature radiation from these electrons moving along magnetic field lines in the magnetosphere of the other NS is responsible for the observed FRB signal, that is, the characteristic emission frequency, luminosity, duration, and event rate of FRBs can be well understood. In addition, we discuss several implications of this model, including double-peaked FRBs and possible associations of FRBs with short-duration gamma-ray bursts and gravitational-wave events.

  12. Gravitational Wave Constraints on the Progenitors of Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Callister, Thomas; Weinstein, Alan

    2016-01-01

    The nature of fast radio bursts (FRBs) remains enigmatic. Highly energetic radio pulses of millisecond duration, fast radio bursts are observed with dispersion measures consistent with an extragalactic source. A variety of models have been proposed to explain their origin. One popular class of theorized FRB progenitor is the coalescence of compact binaries composed of neutron stars and/or black holes. We demonstrate that measurements made by the LIGO and Virgo gravitational wave observatories can be leveraged to severely constrain the validity of FRB binary coalescence models. Existing measurements rule out binary black holes as FRB progenitors, and results from Advanced LIGO's O1 and O2 observing runs will either confirm or strongly rule out binary neutron star and neutron star-black hole progenitors.

  13. REDUCING BURST PACKET LOSS THROUGH ROUTE-FREE FORWARDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Hailong; Guo Yunfei; Cheng Dongnian; Zhang Jianwei

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that today's inter-domain routing protocol,Border Gateway Protocol (BGP),converges slowly during network failures. Due to the distribution nature of Internet routing decisions and the rate-limiting timer Minimum Route Advertisement Interval (MRAI) of BGP,unavoidable convergence latency is introduced in reaction to network changes. During the period of convergence temporarily routing table inconsistencies cause short-term routing blackholes and loops which result in widespread temporary burst packet loss. In this paper,we present ROute-Free Forwarding (ROFF) - a novel technique for packet delivering continuously during periods of convergence. With slightly modifications on IP packet header and BGP,route loops and blackholes can be avoided. Our preliminary evaluation demonstrates that ROFF succeeds in reducing the number of Autonomous Systems (ASes) which experience burst packet loss and the duration of packet loss.

  14. Narrowband Gyrosynchrotron Bursts: Probing Electron Acceleration in Solar Flares

    CERN Document Server

    Fleishman, Gregory D; Kontar, Eduard P; Gary, Dale E

    2016-01-01

    Recently, in a few case studies we demonstrated that gyrosynchrotron microwave emission can be detected directly from the acceleration region when the trapped electron component is insignificant. For the statistical study reported here, we have identified events with steep (narrowband) microwave spectra that do not show a significant trapped component and at the same time show evidence of source uniformity, which simplifies the data analysis greatly. Initially, we identified a subset of more than 20 radio bursts with such narrow spectra, having low- and high-frequency spectral indices larger than 3 in absolute value. A steep low-frequency spectrum implies that the emission is nonthermal (for optically-thick thermal emission, the spectral index cannot be steeper than 2), and the source is reasonably dense and uniform. A steep high-frequency spectrum implies that no significant electron trapping occurs; otherwise a progressive spectral flattening would be observed. Roughly half of these radio bursts have RHESSI...

  15. How Soft Gamma Repeaters May Make Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Katz, J I

    2015-01-01

    The high brightness of Fast Radio Bursts requires coherent emission by particles "bunched" by plasma instability at powers far in excess of those of pulsar spindown. Dissipation of magnetic energy in a neutron star magnetosphere, as in popular models of Soft Gamma Repeaters, can meet the energy requirement and produces an electron-positron pair plasma. Annihilation gamma rays are scattered by cooler plasma, producing a broad beam of electrons. The resulting electron distribution function is unstable to the "bump-on-tail" plasma instability. Electron plasma waves grow exponentially, scattering on density gradients to produce propagating electromagnetic waves, in analogy to Solar Type III Radio Bursts. Galactic SGR may make Galactic FRB, many orders of magnitude brighter than FRB at "cosmological" distances, that could be observed by radio telescopes out of beam or by modest arrays of dipole antennas.

  16. Gamma-ray bursts: learning about the birth of black holes and opening new frontiers for cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, a satellite devoted to the study of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), is now fully operational and detects about 100 GRBs per year, as the first year of operation demonstrated. Since its launch (20 November 2004), Swift has monitored with the narrow-field X-ray telescope (XRT) 75 afterglows (out of 97 GRBs), starting just a few minutes after the GRB onset. Together with the events detected by HETE-II and INTEGRAL, Swift gives us a unique position to unveil the details of these enigmatic events, which likely identify the birth of black holes. GRBs are also useful cosmological tools, and can be used as powerful, distant beacons to trace the history and evolution of the early Universe. All of this can be accomplished by the use of Swift, coupled to large ground-based telescopes. In this article we describe some of the fresh, exciting results obtained in the field. (orig.)

  17. Gamma-ray bursts: learning about the birth of black holes and opening new frontiers for cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chincarini, G. [Univ. degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca (Italy); INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Fiore, F.; Antonelli, A.; Stella, L. [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma (Italy); Valle, M. della [INAF - Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri (Italy); Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Tagliaferri, G. [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Cusumano, G. [INAF/IASF Palermo (Italy); Giommi, P. [ASI Science Data Center (Italy); Malesani, D. [International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA), Trieste (Italy); Mirabel, F. [ESO (Italy); Moretti, A.; Romano, P. [INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera (Italy); Italian Space Agency (ASI) (Italy)

    2006-03-15

    Swift, a satellite devoted to the study of cosmic gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), is now fully operational and detects about 100 GRBs per year, as the first year of operation demonstrated. Since its launch (20 November 2004), Swift has monitored with the narrow-field X-ray telescope (XRT) 75 afterglows (out of 97 GRBs), starting just a few minutes after the GRB onset. Together with the events detected by HETE-II and INTEGRAL, Swift gives us a unique position to unveil the details of these enigmatic events, which likely identify the birth of black holes. GRBs are also useful cosmological tools, and can be used as powerful, distant beacons to trace the history and evolution of the early Universe. All of this can be accomplished by the use of Swift, coupled to large ground-based telescopes. In this article we describe some of the fresh, exciting results obtained in the field. (orig.)

  18. Generating multiple-pulse bursts for enhanced fluorescence detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -nanosecond/nanosecond background. Such an approach can be applied for any sensing format, allowing much higher sensitivity for detection. Since the energy of a single pulse is spread over a few pulses in the burst, the fluorophore’s photostability also improves. (paper)

  19. Millisecond Oscillations During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Muno, M P

    2004-01-01

    I review the basic phenomenology and theory of the millisecond brightness oscillations observed during thermonuclear X-ray bursts from 13 of approximately 70 accreting neutron stars in low-mass X-ray binaries. Compelling observations indicate that the oscillations are produced by surface brightness patterns on the rapidly rotating neutron stars. However, it remains to be understood (1) why the brightness patterns producing them persist for up to 15 s during an X-ray burst, whereas the burning should cover the entire surface in less than 1 s, and (2) why the frequencies drift upward by about 5 Hz during the course of the burst. These peculiarities can probably be explained by taking into account the expansion of the surface layers caused by the burning, zonal flows that form due to pressure gradients between the equator and poles, and Rossby-Alfven modes that are excited in the surface ocean. Further progress toward understanding how burning progresses on the surface of the neutron star can be made with a next...

  20. TRIO: Burst Buffer Based I/O Orchestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Teng [Auburn University; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Pritchard, Michael [Auburn University; Wang, Bin [Auburn University; Yu, Weikuan [Auburn University

    2015-01-01

    The growing computing power on leadership HPC systems is often accompanied by ever-escalating failure rates. Checkpointing is a common defensive mechanism used by scientific applications for failure recovery. However, directly writing the large and bursty checkpointing dataset to parallel filesystem can incur significant I/O contention on storage servers. Such contention in turn degrades the raw bandwidth utilization of storage servers and prolongs the average job I/O time of concurrent applications. Recently burst buffer has been proposed as an intermediate layer to absorb the bursty I/O traffic from compute nodes to storage backend. But an I/O orchestration mechanism is still desired to efficiently move checkpointing data from bursty buffers to storage backend. In this paper, we propose a burst buffer based I/O orchestration framework, named TRIO, to intercept and reshape the bursty writes for better sequential write traffic to storage severs. Meanwhile, TRIO coordinates the flushing orders among concurrent burst buffers to alleviate the contention on storage server bandwidth. Our experimental results reveal that TRIO can deliver 30.5% higher bandwidth and reduce the average job I/O time by 37% on average for data-intensive applications in various checkpointing scenarios.

  1. A MAD Model for Gamma-Ray Burst Variability

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    We present a model for the temporal variability of long gamma-ray bursts during the prompt phase (the highly variable first 100 seconds or so), in the context of a magnetically arrested disk (MAD) around a black hole. In this state, sufficient magnetic flux is held on to the black hole such that it stalls the accretion near the inner region of the disk. The system transitions in and out of the MAD state, which we relate to the variable luminosity of the GRB during the prompt phase, with a characteristic timescale defined by the free fall time in the region over which the accretion is arrested. We present simple analytic estimates of the relevant energetics and timescales, and compare them to gamma-ray burst observations. In particular, we show how this model can reproduce the characteristic one second time scale that emerges from various analyses of the prompt emission light curve. We also discuss how our model can accommodate the potentially physically important correlation between a burst quiescent time and...

  2. Detection of burning ashes from thermonuclear X-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kajava, J J E; Poutanen, J; Cumming, A; Suleimanov, V; Kuulkers, E

    2016-01-01

    When neutron stars (NS) accrete gas from low-mass binary companions, explosive nuclear burning reactions in the NS envelope fuse hydrogen and helium into heavier elements. The resulting thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts produce energy spectra that are fit well with black bodies, but a significant number of burst observations show deviations from Planck spectra. Here we present our analysis of RXTE/PCA observations of X-ray bursts from the NS low-mass X-ray binary HETE J1900.1-2455. We have discovered that the non-Planckian spectra are caused by photo-ionization edges. The anti-correlation between the strength of the edges and the colour temperature suggests that the edges are produced by the nuclear burning ashes that have been transported upwards by convection and become exposed at the photosphere. The atmosphere model fits show that occasionally the photosphere can consist entirely of metals, and that the peculiar changes in black body temperature and radius can be attributed to the emergence and disappea...

  3. Photon mass limits from fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetti, Luca; Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E.; Sakharov, Alexander S.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward K.; Spallicci, Alessandro D. A. M.

    2016-06-01

    The frequency-dependent time delays in fast radio bursts (FRBs) can be used to constrain the photon mass, if the FRB redshifts are known, but the similarity between the frequency dependences of dispersion due to plasma effects and a photon mass complicates the derivation of a limit on mγ. The dispersion measure (DM) of FRB 150418 is known to ∼ 0.1%, and there is a claim to have measured its redshift with an accuracy of ∼ 2%, but the strength of the constraint on mγ is limited by uncertainties in the modelling of the host galaxy and the Milky Way, as well as possible inhomogeneities in the intergalactic medium (IGM). Allowing for these uncertainties, the recent data on FRB 150418 indicate that mγ ≲ 1.8 ×10-14 eVc-2 (3.2 ×10-50 kg), if FRB 150418 indeed has a redshift z = 0.492 as initially reported. In the future, the different redshift dependences of the plasma and photon mass contributions to DM can be used to improve the sensitivity to mγ if more FRB redshifts are measured. For a fixed fractional uncertainty in the extra-galactic contribution to the DM of an FRB, one with a lower redshift would provide greater sensitivity to mγ.

  4. Photon Mass Limits from Fast Radio Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Bonetti, Luca; Mavromatos, Nikolaos E; Sakharov, Alexander S; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, Edward K G; Spallicci, Alessandro D A M

    2016-01-01

    The frequency-dependent time delays in fast radio bursts (FRBs) can be used to constrain the photon mass, if the FRB redshifts are known, but the similarity between the frequency dependences of dispersion due to plasma effects and a photon mass complicates the derivation of a limit on $m_\\gamma$. The redshift of FRB 150418 has been measured to $\\sim 2$% and its dispersion measure (DM) is known to $\\sim 0.1$%, but the strength of the constraint on $m_\\gamma$ is limited by uncertainties in the modelling of the host galaxy and the Milky Way, as well as possible inhomogeneities in the intergalactic medium (IGM). Allowing for these uncertainties, the recent data on FRB 150418 indicate that $m_\\gamma \\lesssim 1.7 \\times 10^{-14}$ eV c$^{-2}$ ($4.6 \\times 10^{-50}$ kg). In the future, the different redshift dependences of the plasma and photon mass contributions to DM can be used to improve the sensitivity to $m_\\gamma$ if more FRB redshifts are measured. For a fixed fractional uncertainty in the extra-galactic cont...

  5. Neural Network Aided Glitch-Burst Discrimination and Glitch Classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampone, Salvatore; Pierro, Vincenzo; Troiano, Luigi; Pinto, Innocenzo M.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the potential of neural-network based classifiers for discriminating gravitational wave bursts (GWBs) of a given canonical family (e.g. core-collapse supernova waveforms) from typical transient instrumental artifacts (glitches), in the data of a single detector. The further classification of glitches into typical sets is explored. In order to provide a proof of concept, we use the core-collapse supernova waveform catalog produced by H. Dimmelmeier and co-Workers, and the data base of glitches observed in laser interferometer gravitational wave observatory (LIGO) data maintained by P. Saulson and co-Workers to construct datasets of (windowed) transient waveforms (glitches and bursts) in additive (Gaussian and compound-Gaussian) noise with different signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Principal component analysis (PCA) is next implemented for reducing data dimensionality, yielding results consistent with, and extending those in the literature. Then, a multilayer perceptron is trained by a backpropagation algorithm (MLP-BP) on a data subset, and used to classify the transients as glitch or burst. A Self-Organizing Map (SOM) architecture is finally used to classify the glitches. The glitch/burst discrimination and glitch classification abilities are gauged in terms of the related truth tables. Preliminary results suggest that the approach is effective and robust throughout the SNR range of practical interest. Perspective applications pertain both to distributed (network, multisensor) detection of GWBs, where some intelligence at the single node level can be introduced, and instrument diagnostics/optimization, where spurious transients can be identified, classified and hopefully traced back to their entry points.

  6. Indication to distinguish the burst region of coal gas from seismic data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Jian-yuan; TANG Hong-wei; XU Lin; LI Yan-fang

    2009-01-01

    The velocity of an over-burst coal seam is about 1/3 compared to a normal coal seam based on laboratory test results. This can be considered as a basis to confirm the area of coal and gas burst by seismic exploration technique. Similarly, the simulation result of the theoretical seismic model shows that there is obvious distinction between over-burst coal and normal coal based on the coal reflection's travel-time, energy and frequency. The results from the actual seismic data acquired in the coal and gas over-burst cases is con-sistent with that of the laboratory and seismic modeling; that is, in the coal and gas burst region, seismic reflection travel time is delayed, seismic amplitude is weakened and seis-mic frequency is reduced. Therefore, it can be concluded that seismic exploration tech-nique is promising for use in distinguishing coal and gas over-burst regions based on the variation of seismic reflection travel time, amplitude and frequency.

  7. The Interplanetary Network Supplement to the Fermi GBM Catalog of Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Hurley, K; Aptekar, R L; Golenetskii, S V; Frederiks, D D; Mazets, E P; Svinkin, D S; Briggs, M S; Connaughton, V; Meegan, C; Goldsten, J; Boynton, W; Fellows, C; Harshman, K; Mitrofanov, I G; Golovin, D V; Kozyrev, A S; Litvak, M L; Sanin, A B; Rau, A; von Kienlin, A; Zhang, X; Yamaoka, K; Fukazawa, Y; Hanabata, Y; Ohno, M; Takahashi, T; Tashiro, M; Terada, Y; Murakami, T; Makishima, K; Barthelmy, S; Cline, T; Gehrels, N; Cummings, J; Krimm, H A; Smith, D M; Del Monte, E; Feroci, M; Marisaldi, M

    2013-01-01

    We present Interplanetary Network (IPN) data for the gamma-ray bursts in the first Fermi Gamma-Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) catalog. Of the 491 bursts in that catalog, covering 2008 July 12 to 2010 July 11, 393 were observed by at least one other instrument in the 9-spacecraft IPN. Of the 393, the localizations of 146 could be improved by arrival time analysis (or "triangulation"). For any given burst observed by the GBM and one other distant spacecraft, triangulation gives an annulus of possible arrival directions whose half-width varies between about 0.4 arcminutes and 32 degrees, depending on the intensity, time history, and arrival direction of the burst, as well as the distance between the spacecraft. We find that the IPN localizations intersect the 1 sigma GBM error circles in only 52% of the cases, if no systematic uncertainty is assumed for the latter. If a 6 degree systematic uncertainty is assumed and added in quadrature, the two localization samples agree about 87% of the time, as would be expected. If ...

  8. A biomechanical study on burst mechanisms of plant fruit: stress analysis of pericarps before bursting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Yasuhiro; Sakamoto, Jiro; Kashiwano, Yuki; Yokota, Hideo; Nakamura, Sakiko; Kinoshita, Eichiro

    2010-10-01

    Bursting of fruit is a very interesting biomechanical phenomenon because its mechanism is directly related to the plant's reproduction. A plant that produces fruit that bursts powerfully and spreads the seeds widely has the advantage of reproduction without relying on other mechanisms such as transportation of fruit by insects. The structures of many types of fruit have likely been optimized by evolution, although the structure itself appears rather simplistic. Strain energy is stored in each pericarp because of growth deformation, swelling or desiccation just before bursting. Throughout these changes, the mechanical stress of the pericarps is at equilibrium. At the instant of bursting, the stored strain energy is released very rapidly. Quick and wide motion of the pericarps in a certain direction is advantageous for throwing the seed a long distance. The motion and deformation of bursting pericarps depend on their tissue structure and mechanical stress condition just before the burst. We tracked the bursting motion by using a high-speed camera. Then we calculated the pre-burst stress generated in a pericarp of Impatiens by using the finite-element method. The boundary condition obtained by experiments using a high-speed video camera is given, and the stress was calculated using reverse deformation analysis. The stress distribution of the pericarp is effective in causing the pericarp motion to throw the seeds far away. PMID:20696416

  9. The Cosmic Gamma-Ray Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djorgovski, S. G.; Frail, D. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Sari, R.; Bloom, J. S.; Galama, T. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Price, P. A.; Fox, D.; Reichart, D. E.; Yost, S.; Berger, E.; Diercks, A.; Goodrich, R.; Chaffee, F.

    2002-12-01

    Cosmic γ-ray bursts are one of the great frontiers of astrophysics today. They are a playground of relativists and observers alike. They may teach us about the death of stars and the birth of black holes, the physics in extreme conditions, and help us probe star formation in the distant and obscured universe. In this review we summarise some of the remarkable progress in this field over the past few years. While the nature of the GRB progenitors is still unsettled, it now appears likely that at least some bursts originate in explosions of very massive stars, or at least occur in or near the regions of massive star formation. The physics of the burst afterglows is reasonably well understood, and has been tested and confirmed very well by the observations. Bursts are found to be beamed, but with a broad range of jet opening angles; the mean γ-ray energies after the beaming corrections are ~ 1051 erg. Bursts are associated with faint ( ~ 25 mag) galaxies at cosmological redshifts, with ~ 1. The host galaxies span a range of luminosities and morphologies, but appear to be broadly typical for the normal, actively star-forming galaxy populations at comparable redshifts and magnitudes. Some of the challenges for the future include: the nature of the short bursts and possibly other types of bursts and transients; use of GRBs to probe the obscured star formation in the universe, and possibly as probes of the very early universe; and their detection as sources of high-energy particles and gravitational waves.

  10. Constraints on Compact Star Parameters from Burst Oscillation Light Curves of the Accreting Millisecond Pulsar XTE J1814-338

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, S; Miller, M C; Markwardt, C B; Bhattacharyya, Sudip; Strohmayer, Tod E.; Markwardt, Craig B.

    2004-01-01

    Detailed modeling of the millisecond brightness oscillations from low mass X-ray binaries during thermonuclear bursts can provide us with important information about compact star parameters. Until now the implementation of this idea has not been entirely successful, largely because of the negligible amount of harmonic content in burst oscillation lightcurves. However, the recent discovery of unique, non-sinusoidal burst oscillation lightcurves from the accreting millisecond pulsar XTE J1814-338 has changed this situation. We, therefore, for the first time, make use of this opportunity to constrain compact star structure parameters effectively. In our detailed study of the lightcurves of 22 bursts we fit the burst oscillation lightcurves with fully general relativistic models that include light-bending and frame-dragging for lightcurve calculation, and compute numerically the structure of compact stars using realistic equations of state. We find that the 90% confidence interval of the dimensionless radius to m...

  11. The nature of the outflow in gamma-ray bursts

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, P; Panaitescu, A; Willingale, R; O'Brien, P; Burrows, D; Cummings, J; Gehrels, N; Holland, S; Pandey, S B; Vanden Berk, D E; Zane, S

    2007-01-01

    The Swift satellite has enabled us to follow the evolution of gamma-ray burst (GRB) fireballs from the prompt gamma-ray emission to the afterglow phase. The early x-ray and optical data obtained by telescopes aboard the Swift satellite show that the source for prompt gamma-ray emission, the emission that heralds these bursts, is short lived and that its source is distinct from that of the ensuing, long-lived afterglow. Using these data, we determine the distance of the gamma-ray source from the center of the explosion. We find this distance to be 1e15-1e16 cm for most bursts and we show that this is within a factor of ten of the radius of the shock-heated circumstellar medium (CSM) producing the x-ray photons. Furthermore, using the early gamma-ray, x-ray and optical data, we show that the prompt gamma-ray emission cannot be produced in internal shocks, nor can it be produced in the external shock; in a more general sense gamma-ray generation mechanisms based on shock physics have problems explaining the GRB ...

  12. GRB 060313: A New Paradigm for Short-Hard Bursts?

    CERN Document Server

    Roming, P W A; Palshin, V D; Pagani, C; Norris, J; Kumar, P; Krimm, H; Holland, S T; Gronwall, C; Blustin, A J; Zhang, B; Schady, P; Sakamoto, T; Osborne, J P; Nousek, J A; Marshall, F E; Mészáros, P; Golenetskii, S V; Gehrels, N; Frederiks, D D; Campana, S; Burrows, D N; Boyd, P T; Barthelmy, S; Aptekar, R L; Roming, Peter W. A.; Berk, Daniel Vanden; Palshin, Valentin; Pagani, Claudio; Norris, Jay; Kumar, Pawan; Krimm, Hans; Holland, Stephen T.; Gronwall, Caryl; Zhang, Bing; Schady, Patricia; Sakamoto, Takanori; Osborne, Julian P.; Nousek, John A.; Marshall, Frank E.; Meszaros, Peter; Golenetskii, Sergey V.; Gehrels, Neil; Frederiks, Dmitry D.; Campana, Sergio; Burrows, David N.; Boyd, Patricia T.; Barthelmy, Scott

    2006-01-01

    We report the simultaneous observations of the prompt emission in the gamma-ray and hard X-ray bands by the Swift-BAT and the KONUS-Wind instruments of the short-hard burst, GRB 060313. The observations reveal multiple peaks in both the gamma-ray and hard X-ray suggesting a highly variable outflow from the central explosion. We also describe the early-time observations of the X-ray and UV/Optical afterglows by the Swift XRT and UVOT instruments. The combination of the X-ray and UV/Optical observations provide the most comprehensive lightcurves to date of a short-hard burst at such an early epoch. The afterglows exhibit complex structure with different decay indices and flaring. This behavior can be explained by the combination of a structured jet, radiative loss of energy, and decreasing microphysics parameters occurring in a circum-burst medium with densities varying by a factor of approximately two on a length scale of 10^17 cm. These density variations are normally associated with the environment of a mass...

  13. Gamma-Ray Burst Groups Observed by Different Satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, István; Veres, Péter

    2009-01-01

    Two classes of gamma-ray bursts have been identified in the BATSE catalogs characterized by durations shorter and longer than about 2 seconds. There are, however, some indications for the existence of a third one. Swift satellite detectors have different spectral sensitivity than pre-Swift ones for gamma-ray bursts. Therefore it is worth to reanalyze the durations and their distribution and also the classification of GRBs. In this paper we are going to analyze the bursts' duration distribution and also the duration-hardness bivariate distribution, published in The First BAT Catalog, whether it contains two, three or maybe more groups. Similarly to the BATSE data, to explain the BAT GRBs duration distribution three components are needed. Although, the relative frequencies of the groups are different than they were in the BATSE GRB sample, the difference in the instrument spectral sensitivities can explain this bias in a natural way. This means theoretical models may have to explain three different type of gamm...

  14. Fast Radio Bursts and Radio Transients from Black Hole Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mingarelli, Chiara; Levin, Janna; Lazio, Joseph

    2016-03-01

    Most black holes (BHs) will absorb a neutron star (NS) companion fully intact, without tidal disruption, suggesting the pair will remain dark to telescopes. Even without tidal disruption, electromagnetic (EM) luminosity is generated from the battery phase of the binary when the BH interacts with the NS magnetic field. Originally the luminosity was expected in high-energy X-rays or gamma-rays, however we conjecture that some of the battery power is emitted in the radio bandwidth. While the luminosity and timescale are suggestive of fast radio bursts (FRBs), NS-BH coalescence rates are too low to make these a primary FRB source. Instead, we propose the transients form a FRB sub-population, distinguishable by a double peak. The main burst is from the peak luminosity before merger, while the post-merger burst follows from the NS magnetic field migration to the BH, causing a shock. NS-BH pairs are desirable for ground-based gravitational wave (GW) observatories since the pair might not be detected any other way, with EM counterparts augmenting the scientific leverage beyond the GW signal. Valuably, EM signal can break degeneracies in the parameters encoded in the GW as well as probe the NS magnetic field strength, yielding insights into open problems in NS magnetic field decay.

  15. NuSTAR observations of X-ray bursts from the magnetar 1E 1048.1–5937

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the detection of eight bright X-ray bursts from the 6.5 s magnetar 1E 1048.1–5937, during a 2013 July observation campaign with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array. We study the morphological and spectral properties of these bursts and their evolution with time. The bursts resulted in count rate increases by orders of magnitude, sometimes limited by the detector dead time, and showed blackbody spectra with kT ∼ 6-8 keV in the T90 duration of 1-4 s, similar to earlier bursts detected from the source. We find that the spectra during the tail of the bursts can be modeled with an absorbed blackbody with temperature decreasing with flux. The burst flux decays followed a power law of index 0.8-0.9. In the burst tail spectra, we detect a ∼13 keV emission feature, similar to those reported in previous bursts from this source as well as from other magnetars observed with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We explore possible origins of the spectral feature such as proton cyclotron emission, which implies a magnetic field strength of B ∼ 2 × 1015 G in the emission region. However, the consistency of the energy of the feature in different objects requires further explanation.

  16. Structured jets in gamma ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are some of the most powerful explosions in the Universe. Observationally, they are short and very intense pulses of photons in the keV-MeV range. The paradigm is that the gamma rays are emitted at cosmological distances when an ultra-relativistic energy flow is converted to radiation in an optically thin region. Evidence suggests that many of the GRBs originate from the relativistically moving matter beamed in the form of a conical jet. Probably, these jets are not uniform, but rather structured, the energy being distributed with internal angle as some function dependent on the angle between the jet symmetry axis and an arbitrary direction within the jet. Here we investigate the case in which the bulk Lorentz factor of the ejecta varies as a power-law with respect to the axis of the jet. Using a simple kinematical model, under certain assumptions, we can constraint the values of the power-law index. Also, we briefly discuss some important consequences of the jetted GRBs concept in the context of the general understanding of the phenomenon. (authors)

  17. An updated Gamma Ray Bursts Hubble diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Cardone, V F; Dainotti, M G

    2009-01-01

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) have recently attracted much attention as a possible way to extend the Hubble diagram to very high redshift. To this aim, the luminosity (or isotropic emitted energy) of a GRB at redshift z must be evaluated from a correlation with a distance independent quantity so that one can then solve for the luminosity distance D_L(z) and hence the distance modulus mu(z). Averaging over five different two parameters correlations and using a fiducial cosmological model to calibrate them, Schaefer (2007) has compiled a sample of 69 GRBs with measured mu(z) which has since then been widely used to constrain cosmological parameters. We update here that sample by many aspects. First, we add a recently found correlation for the X - ray afterglow and use a Bayesian inspired fitting method to calibrate the different GRBs correlations known insofar assuming a fiducial LCDM model in agreement with the recent WMAP5 data. Averaging over six correlations, we end with a new GRBs Hubble diagram comprising 83 ob...

  18. Quark nova model for fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shand, Zachary; Ouyed, Amir; Koning, Nico; Ouyed, Rachid

    2016-05-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are puzzling, millisecond, energetic radio transients with no discernible source; observations show no counterparts in other frequency bands. The birth of a quark star from a parent neutron star experiencing a quark nova - previously thought undetectable when born in isolation - provides a natural explanation for the emission characteristics of FRBs. The generation of unstable r-process elements in the quark nova ejecta provides millisecond exponential injection of electrons into the surrounding strong magnetic field at the parent neutron star's light cylinder via β-decay. This radio synchrotron emission has a total duration of hundreds of milliseconds and matches the observed spectrum while reducing the inferred dispersion measure by approximately 200 cm‑3 pc. The model allows indirect measurement of neutron star magnetic fields and periods in addition to providing astronomical measurements of β-decay chains of unstable neutron rich nuclei. Using this model, we can calculate expected FRB average energies (∼ 1041 erg) and spectral shapes, and provide a theoretical framework for determining distances.

  19. Unveiling the population of orphan γ-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirlanda, G.; Salvaterra, R.; Campana, S.; Vergani, S. D.; Japelj, J.; Bernardini, M. G.; Burlon, D.; D'Avanzo, P.; Melandri, A.; Gomboc, A.; Nappo, F.; Paladini, R.; Pescalli, A.; Salafia, O. S.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2015-06-01

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are detectable in the γ-ray band if their jets are oriented toward the observer. However, for each GRB with a typical θjet, there should be ~2/θ2jet bursts whose emission cone is oriented elsewhere in space. These off-axis bursts can eventually be detected when, due to the deceleration of their relativistic jets, the beaming angle becomes comparable to the viewing angle. Orphan afterglows (OAs) should outnumber the current population of bursts detected in the γ-ray band even if they have not been conclusively observed so far at any frequency. We compute the expected flux of the population of orphan afterglows in the mm, optical, and X-ray bands through a population synthesis code of GRBs and the standard afterglow emission model. We estimate the detection rate of OAs with ongoing and forthcoming surveys. The average duration of OAs as transients above a given limiting flux is derived and described with analytical expressions: in general OAs should appear as daily transients in optical surveys and as monthly/yearly transients in the mm/radio band. We find that ~2 OA yr-1 could already be detected by Gaia and up to 20 OA yr-1 could be observed by the ZTF survey. A larger number of 50 OA yr-1 should be detected by LSST in the optical band. For the X-ray band, ~26 OA yr-1 could be detected by the eROSITA. For the large population of OA detectable by LSST, the X-ray and optical follow up of the light curve (for the brightest cases) and/or the extensive follow up of their emission in the mm and radio band could be the key to disentangling their GRB nature from other extragalactic transients of comparable flux density.

  20. Decameter Stationary Type IV Burst in Imaging Observations on the 6th of September 2014

    CERN Document Server

    Koval, Artem; Chen, Yao; Feng, Shiwei; Konovalenko, Aleksander; Volvach, Yaroslav

    2016-01-01

    First-of-its-kind radio imaging of decameter solar stationary type IV radio burst has been presented in this paper. On 6 September 2014 the observations of type IV burst radio emission have been carried out with the two-dimensional heliograph based on the Ukrainian T-shaped radio telescope (UTR-2) together with other telescope arrays. Starting at 09:55 UT and throughout 3 hours, the radio emission was kept within the observational session of UTR-2. The interesting observation covered the full evolution of this burst, "from birth to death". During the event lifetime, two C-class solar X-ray flares with peak times 11:29 UT and 12:24 UT took place. The time profile of this burst in radio has a double-humped shape that can be explained by injection of energetic electrons, accelerated by the two flares, into the burst source. According to the heliographic observations we suggest the burst source was confined within a high coronal loop, which was a part of a relatively slow coronal mass ejection. The latter has bee...