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Sample records for burnup pwr fuel

  1. A burnup credit calculation methodology for PWR spent fuel transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A burnup credit calculation methodology for PWR spent fuel transportation has been developed and validated in CEA/Saclay. To perform the calculation, the spent fuel composition are first determined by the PEPIN-2 depletion analysis. Secondly the most important actinides and fission product poisons are automatically selected in PEPIN-2 according to the reactivity worth and the burnup for critically consideration. Then the 3D Monte Carlo critically code TRIMARAN-2 is used to examine the subcriticality. All the resonance self-shielded cross sections used in this calculation system are prepared with the APOLLO-2 lattice cell code. The burnup credit calculation methodology and related PWR spent fuel transportation benchmark results are reported and discussed. (authors)

  2. Activity ratio measurement and burnup analysis for high burnup PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applying burnup credit to spent fuel transportation and storage system is beneficial. To take burnup credit to criticality safety design for a spent fuel transportation cask and storage rack, the burnup of target fuel assembly based on core management data must be confirmed by experimental methods. Activity ratio method, in which measured the ratio of the activity of a nuclide to that of another, is one of the ways to confirm burnup history. However, there is no public data of gamma-ray spectrum from high burnup fuels and validation of depletion calculation codes is not sufficient in the evaluation of the burnup or nuclide inventories. In this study, applicability evaluation of activity ratio method was carried out for high burnup fuel samples taken from PWR lead use assembly. In the gamma-ray measurement experiments, energy spectrum was taken in the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), and 134Cs/137Cs and 154Eu/137Cs activity ratio were obtained. With the MVP-BURN code, the activity ratios were calculated by depletion calculation tracing the operation history. As a result, 134Cs/137Cs and 154Eu/137Cs activity ratios for UO2 fuel samples show good agreements and the activity ratio method has good applicability to high burnup fuels. 154Eu/134Cs activity ratio for Gd2O3+UO2 fuels also shows good agreements between calculation results and experimental results as well as the activity ratio for UO2 fuels. It also becomes clear that it is necessary to pay attention to not only burnup but also axial burnup distribution history when confirming the burnup of UO2+Gd2O3 fuel with 134Cs/137Cs activity ratios. (author)

  3. Application of a burnup verification meter to actinide-only burnup credit for spent PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A measurement system to verify reactor records for burnup of spent fuel at pressurized water reactors (PWR) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories and tested at US nuclear utility sites. The system makes use of the Fork detector designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the safeguards program of the International Atomic Energy Agency. A single-point measurement of the neutrons and gamma- rays emitted from a PWR assembly is made at the center plane of the assembly while it is partially raised from its rack in the spent fuel pool. The objective of the measurements is to determine the variation in burnup assignments among a group of assemblies, and to identify anomalous assemblies that might adversely affect nuclear criticality safety. The measurements also provide an internal consistency check for reactor records of cooling time and initial enrichment. The burnup verification system has been proposed for qualifying spent fuel assemblies for loading into containers designed using burnup credit techniques. The system is incorporated in the US Department of Energy's.''Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages'' [DOE/RW 19951

  4. Application of burnup credit with partial boron credit to PWR spent fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outcome of performing a burnup credit criticality safety analysis of a PWR spent fuel storage pool is the determination of burnup credit loading curves BLC=BLC(e) for the spent fuel storage racks designed for burnup credit, cp. Reference. A burnup credit loading curve BLC=BLC(e) specifies the loading criterion by indicating the minimum burnup BLC(e) necessary for the fuel assembly with a specific initial enrichment e to be placed in storage racks designed for burnup credit. (orig.)

  5. Implementation of burnup credit in PWR spent fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel storage of LWR fuel at nuclear power plants is approved in Germany since the beginning of 2000. The burnup credit methods applied have to comply with the newly developed German criticality safety standard DIN 25471 passed in November 1999 and published in September 2000, cp. (orig.)

  6. Depletion of gadolinium burnable poison in a PWR assembly with high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tendency to increase the discharge burnup of nuclear fuel for Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been a characteristic of its operation for many years. It will be able to burn at very high burnup of about 70 GWd/t with UO2 fuels. The U-235 enrichment must be higher than 5 %, which leads to the necessity of using an extremely efficient burnable poison like Gadolinium oxide. Using gadolinium isotope is significant due to its particular depletion behavior (''Onion-Skin'' effect). In this paper, the MCNPX2.7 code is used to calculate the important neutronic parameters of the next generation fuels of PWR. K-infinity, local peaking factor and fission rate distributions are calculated for a PWR assembly which burn at very high burnup reaching 70 GWd/t. The calculations are performed using the recently released evaluated Gadolinium cross section data. The results obtained are close to those of a LWR next generation fuel benchmark problem. This demonstrates that the calculation scheme used is able to accurately model a PWR assembly that operates at high burnup values.

  7. Depletion of gadolinium burnable poison in a PWR assembly with high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refeat, Riham Mahmoud [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA), Cairo (Egypt). Safety Engineering Dept.

    2015-12-15

    A tendency to increase the discharge burnup of nuclear fuel for Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been a characteristic of its operation for many years. It will be able to burn at very high burnup of about 70 GWd/t with UO{sub 2} fuels. The U-235 enrichment must be higher than 5 %, which leads to the necessity of using an extremely efficient burnable poison like Gadolinium oxide. Using gadolinium isotope is significant due to its particular depletion behavior (''Onion-Skin'' effect). In this paper, the MCNPX2.7 code is used to calculate the important neutronic parameters of the next generation fuels of PWR. K-infinity, local peaking factor and fission rate distributions are calculated for a PWR assembly which burn at very high burnup reaching 70 GWd/t. The calculations are performed using the recently released evaluated Gadolinium cross section data. The results obtained are close to those of a LWR next generation fuel benchmark problem. This demonstrates that the calculation scheme used is able to accurately model a PWR assembly that operates at high burnup values.

  8. Shielding and Criticality Safety Analysis of KSC-1 Cask for the High Burnup PWR Spent Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KSC-1 (KAERI Shipping Cask-1) was designed and manufactured with a pure domestic technology in 1985 in order to transport a PWR spent fuel assembly from nuclear power plant to PIEF (Post-Irradiation Examination Facility) of KAERI. Since the first transportation of the fuel assembly from Kori-1 NPP was carried out by the cask in 1987, 19 shipments for the PWR spent fuels have been done successfully by now. Maximum discharge burnup of PWR in Korea has been extended from the late 1990s in order to reduce the cost of power generation. From this cause, allowable design values of the initial enrichment and the cooling time for the cask have been changed three times: year 2003, 2007 and 2010. Radiation shielding and criticality of KSC-1 were analyzed for all the PWR fuel type irradiated in Korea NPP to renew the design approval

  9. Shielding and Criticality Safety Analysis of KSC-1 Cask for the High Burnup PWR Spent Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hyoung Mun; Jang, Jung Nam; Hwang, Yong Hwa; Kwon, In Chan; Min, Duck Kee; Chun, Yong Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    KSC-1 (KAERI Shipping Cask-1) was designed and manufactured with a pure domestic technology in 1985 in order to transport a PWR spent fuel assembly from nuclear power plant to PIEF (Post-Irradiation Examination Facility) of KAERI. Since the first transportation of the fuel assembly from Kori-1 NPP was carried out by the cask in 1987, 19 shipments for the PWR spent fuels have been done successfully by now. Maximum discharge burnup of PWR in Korea has been extended from the late 1990s in order to reduce the cost of power generation. From this cause, allowable design values of the initial enrichment and the cooling time for the cask have been changed three times: year 2003, 2007 and 2010. Radiation shielding and criticality of KSC-1 were analyzed for all the PWR fuel type irradiated in Korea NPP to renew the design approval

  10. Burnup effects of MOX fuel pincells in PWR - OECD/NEA burnup credit benchmark analysis -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burnup effects were analyzed for various cases of MOX fuel pincells of fresh and irradiated fuels by using the HELIOS, MCNP-4/B, CRX and CDP computer codes. The investigated parameters were burnup, cooling time and combinations of nuclides in the fuel region. The fuel compositions for each case were provided by BNFL (British Nuclear Fuel Limited) as a part of the problem specification so that the results could be focused on the calculation of the neutron multiplication factor. The results of the analysis show that the largest saving effect of the neutron multiplication factor due to burnup credit is 30 %. This is mainly due to the consideration of actinides and fission products in the criticality analysis

  11. Analysis of bubble pressure in the rim region of high burnup PWR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Yang Hyun; Lee, Byung Ho; Sohn, Dong Seong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    Bubble pressure in the rim region of high burnup PWR UO{sub 2} fuel has been modeled based on measured rim width, porosity and bubble density. Using the assumption that excessive bubble pressure in the rim is inversely proportional to its radius, proportionality constant is derived as a function of average pellet burnup and bubble radius. This approach is possible because the integration of the number of Xe atoms retained in the rim bubbles, which can be calculated as a function of bubble radius, over the bubble radius gives the total number of Xe atoms in the rim bubbles. Here the total number of Xe atoms in the rim bubbles can be derived from the measured Xe depletion fraction in the matrix and the calculated rim thickness. Then the rim bubble pressure is obtained as a function of fuel burnup and bubble size from the proportionality constant. Therefore, the present model can provide some useful information that would be required to analyze the behavior of high burnup PWR UO{sub 2} fuel under both normal and transient operating conditions. 28 refs., 9 figs. (Author)

  12. Application of SCALE4.4 system for burnup credit criticality analysis of PWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation on the application of burnup credit for a PWR spent fuel storage pool has been carried out with the use of the SCALE 4.4 computer code system consisting of SAS2H and CSAS6 modules in association with 44-group SCALE cross-section library. Prior to the application of the computer code system, a series of bench markings have been performed in comparison with available data. A benchmarking of the SAS2h module has been done for experimental concentration data of 54 PWR spent fuel and then correction factors with a 95% probability at a 95% confidence level have been determined on the basis of the calculated and measured concentrations of 38 nuclides. After that, the bias which might have resulted from the use of the CSAS6 module has been calculated for 46 criticality experimental data of UO2 fuel and MOX fuel assemblies. The calculation bias with one-sided tolerance limit factor (2.086) corresponding to a 95% probability at a 95% confidence level has consequently been obtained to be 0.00834. Burnup credit criticality analysis has been done for the PWR spent fuel storage pool by means of the benchmarked or validated code system. It is revealed that the minimum burnup for safe storage is 7560 MWd/tU in 5 wt% enriched fuel if both actinides and fission products in spent fuel are taken into account. However, the minimum value required seems to be 9,565 MWd/tU in the same enriched fuel provided that only the actinides are taken into consideration. (author)

  13. Validation of SWAT for burnup credit problems by analysis of post irradiation examination of 17*17 PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For adopting burnup credit in transport or storage of spent fuel (SF), development of a reliable burnup calculation code is crucial. For this purpose, data of Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) have been extensively analyzed to evaluate accuracy of burnup calculation codes for a 14*14 or 15*15 PWR fuel assembly. This study shows results of analysis of this latest PIE with SWAT and ORIGEN2.1. SWAT is an integrated burnup code system for a 17*17 PWR fuel assembly that has been developed by Tohoku University and JAERI. The results show that SWAT can more precisely predict nuclide composition of latest PWR assembly than ORIGEN2.1. (O.M.)

  14. Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this topical report is to present to the NRC for review and acceptance a methodology for using burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems for PWR spent fuel transportation packages, while maintaining the criticality safety margins and related requirements of 10 CFR Part 71 and 72. The proposed methodology consists of five major steps as summarized below: (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations in SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, keff, of a spent nuclear fuel package. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). and (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper fuel assembly selection prior to loading. (This step is required but the details are outside the scope of this topical report.) When reviewed and accepted by the NRC, this topical report will serve as a criterion document for criticality control analysts and will provide steps for the use of actinide-only burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems. The NRC-accepted burnup credit methodology will be used by commercial SNF storage and transportation package designers. Design-specific burnup credit criticality analyses will be defined, developed, and documented in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for each specific storage or transportation package that uses burnup credit. These SARs will then be submitted to the NRC for review and approval. This topical report is expected to be referenced in a number of storage and transportation cask applications to be submitted by commercial cask and canister designers to the NRC. Therefore, NRC acceptance of this topical report will result in increased efficiency of the

  15. Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this topical report is to present to the NRC for review and acceptance a methodology for using burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems for PWR spent fuel transportation packages, while maintaining the criticality safety margins and related requirements of 10 CFR Part 71 and 72. The proposed methodology consists of five major steps as summarized below: (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations in SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, keff, of a spent nuclear fuel package. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). and (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper fuel assembly selection prior to loading. (This step is required but the details are outside the scope of this topical report.) When reviewed and accepted by the NRC, this topical report will serve as a criterion document for criticality control analysts and will provide steps for the use of actinide-only burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems. The NRC-accepted burnup credit methodology will be used by commercial SNF storage and transportation package designers. Design-specific burnup credit criticality analyses will be defined, developed, and documented in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for each specific storage or transportation package that uses burnup credit. These SARs will then be submitted to the NRC for review and approval. This topical report is expected to be referenced in a number of storage and transportation cask applications to be submitted by commercial cask and canister designers to the NRC. Therefore, NRC acceptance of this topical report will result in increased efficiency of the

  16. Burn-up credit in criticality safety of PWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Designing spent fuel wet storage using WIMS-5D and MCNP-5 code. • Studying fresh and burned fuel with/out absorber like “B4C and Ag–In–Cd” in racks. • Sub-criticality was confirmed for fresh and burned fuel under specific cases. • Studies for BU credit recommend increasing fuel burn-up to 60.0 GWD/MTU. • Those studies require new core structure materials, fuel composition and cladding. - Abstract: The criticality safety calculations were performed for a proposed design of a wet spent fuel storage pool. This pool will be used for the storage of spent fuel discharged from a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR). The mathematical model based on the international validated codes, WIMS-5 and MCNP-5 were used for calculating the effective multiplication factor, keff, for the spent fuel stored in the pool. The data library for the multi-group neutron microscopic cross-sections was used for the cell calculations. The keff was calculated for several changes in water density, water level, assembly pitch and burn-up with different initial fuel enrichment and new types and amounts of fixed absorbers. Also, keff was calculated for the conservative fresh fuel case. The results of the calculations confirmed that the effective multiplication factor for the spent fuel storage is sub-critical for all normal and abnormal states. The future strategy for the burn-up credit recommends increasing the fuel burn-up to a value >60.0 GWD/MTU, which requires new fuel composition and new fuel cladding material with the assessment of the effects of negative reactivity build up

  17. Burn-up credit in criticality safety of PWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Rowayda F., E-mail: Rowayda_mahmoud@yahoo.com [Metallurgy Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt); Shaat, Mohamed K. [Nuclear Engineering, Reactors Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt); Nagy, M.E.; Agamy, S.A. [Professor of Nuclear Engineering, Nuclear and Radiation Department, Alexandria University (Egypt); Abdelrahman, Adel A. [Metallurgy Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Designing spent fuel wet storage using WIMS-5D and MCNP-5 code. • Studying fresh and burned fuel with/out absorber like “B{sub 4}C and Ag–In–Cd” in racks. • Sub-criticality was confirmed for fresh and burned fuel under specific cases. • Studies for BU credit recommend increasing fuel burn-up to 60.0 GWD/MTU. • Those studies require new core structure materials, fuel composition and cladding. - Abstract: The criticality safety calculations were performed for a proposed design of a wet spent fuel storage pool. This pool will be used for the storage of spent fuel discharged from a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR). The mathematical model based on the international validated codes, WIMS-5 and MCNP-5 were used for calculating the effective multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, for the spent fuel stored in the pool. The data library for the multi-group neutron microscopic cross-sections was used for the cell calculations. The k{sub eff} was calculated for several changes in water density, water level, assembly pitch and burn-up with different initial fuel enrichment and new types and amounts of fixed absorbers. Also, k{sub eff} was calculated for the conservative fresh fuel case. The results of the calculations confirmed that the effective multiplication factor for the spent fuel storage is sub-critical for all normal and abnormal states. The future strategy for the burn-up credit recommends increasing the fuel burn-up to a value >60.0 GWD/MTU, which requires new fuel composition and new fuel cladding material with the assessment of the effects of negative reactivity build up.

  18. Topical report on actinide-only burnup credit for PWR spent nuclear fuel packages. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1997-04-01

    A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k{sub eff} (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k{sub eff}, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package

  19. TOPICAL REPORT ON ACTINIDE-ONLY BURNUP CREDIT FOR PWR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL PACKAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, keff, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO2, UO2/Gd2O3, and UO2/PuO2 critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on keff (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased keff, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper assembly selection prior to loading

  20. LOLA-SYSTEM, JEN-UPM PWR Fuel Management System Burnup Code System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: The LOLA-SYSTEM is a part of the JEN-UPM code package for PWR fuel management, scope or design calculations. It is a code package for core burnup calculations using nodal theory based on a FLARE type code. The LOLA-SYSTEM includes four modules: the first one (MELON-3) generates the constants of the K-inf and M2 correlations to be input into SIMULA-3. It needs the K-inf and M2 fuel assembly values at different conditions of moderator temperature, Boron concentration, burnup, etc., which are provided by MARIA fuel assembly calculations. The main module (SIMULA-3) is the core burnup calculation code in three dimensions and one group of energy. It normally uses a geometrical representation of one node per fuel assembly or per quarter of fuel assembly. It has included a thermal hydraulic feedback on flow and voids and criticality searches on boron concentration and control rods insertion. The CONCON code makes the calculation of the albedo, transport factors, K-inf and M2 correction factors to be input into SIMULA-3. The calculation is made in the XY transversal plane. The CONAXI code is similar to CONCON, but in the axial direction. 2 - Method of solution: MELON-3 makes a mean squares fit of K-inf and M2 values at different conditions in order to determine the constants of the feedback correlations. SIMULA-3 uses a modified one-group nodal theory, with a new transport kernel that provides the same node interface leakages as a fine mesh diffusion calculation. CONCON and CONAXI determine the transport and correction factors, as well as the albedo, to be input into SIMULA-3. They are determined by a method of leakages equivalent to the detailed diffusion calculation of CARMEN or VENTURE; these factors also include the heterogeneity effects inside the node. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Number of axial nodes less than or equal 34. Number of material types less than or equal 30. Number of fuel assembly types less

  1. High fuel burn-up and nonproliferation in PWR-type reactor on the basis of modified Th-fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutronics-physical characteristics of the fuel lattice of a PWR-type reactor cooled by light water and by a mixture of light and heavy water have been analyzed. Th-fuel containing an essential amount of 231Pa and 232U is used, which allows an increase in fuel burn-up by a factor of 2-5 compared with that of traditional oxide uranium fuel with light water. It is important to underline that this is attained under the negative coolant density reactivity effect using cross sections of 231Pa and 232U from the updated JENDL-3.2 nuclear library. This radical increase of fuel burn-up is accompanied by a small change of reactivity during fuel irradiation (K∞=1.1 / 1.0), that favorably affects safety parameters of the reactor operation. A considerable percentage of 232U in fuel, and consequently in U, is a strong barrier against the proliferation of such weapon nuclide as 233U. (authors)

  2. Development of base technology for high burnup PWR fuel improvement Volume 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yang Eun; Lee, Sang Hee; Bae, Seong Man [Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Research Center; Chung, Jin Gon; Chung, Sun Kyo; Kim, Sun Du [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., Daeduk (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Won; Chung, Sun Kyo; Kim, Sun Du [Korea Nuclear Fuel Development Inst., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-12-31

    Development of base technology for high burnup nuclear fuel -Development of UO{sub 2} pellet manufacturing technology -Improvement of fuel rod performance code -Improvement of plenum spring design -Study on the mechanical characteristics of fuel cladding -Organization of fuel failure mechanism Establishment of next stage R and D program (author). 226 refs., 100 figs.

  3. Sensitivity and parametric evaluations of significant aspects of burnup credit for PWR spent fuel packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel transportation and storage cask designs based on a burnup credit approach must consider issues that are not relevant in casks designed under a fresh-fuel loading assumption. For example, the spent fuel composition must be adequately characterized and the criticality analysis model can be complicated by the need to consider axial burnup variations. Parametric analyses are needed to characterize the importance of fuel assembly and fuel cycle parameters on spent fuel composition and reactivity. Numerical models must be evaluated to determine the sensitivity of criticality safety calculations to modeling assumptions. The purpose of this report is to describe analyses and evaluations performed in order to demonstrate the effect physical parameters and modeling assumptions have on the criticality analysis of spent fuel. The analyses in this report include determination and ranking of the most important actinides and fission products; study of the effect of various depletion scenarios on subsequent criticality calculations; establishment of trends in neutron multiplication as a function of fuel enrichment, burnup, cooling time- and a parametric and modeling evaluation of three-dimensional effects (e.g., axially varying burnup and temperature/density effects) in a conceptual cask design. The sensitivity and parametric evaluations were performed with the consideration of two different burnup credit approaches: (1) only actinides in the fuel are considered in the criticality analysis, and (2) both actinides and fission products are considered. Calculations described in this report were performed using the criticality and depletion sequences available in the SCALE code system and the SCALE 27-group burnup library. Although the results described herein do not constitute a validation of SCALE for use in spent fuel analysis, independent validation efforts have been completed and are described in other reports

  4. Sensitivity and parametric evaluations of significant aspects of burnup credit for PWR spent fuel packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1996-05-01

    Spent fuel transportation and storage cask designs based on a burnup credit approach must consider issues that are not relevant in casks designed under a fresh-fuel loading assumption. For example, the spent fuel composition must be adequately characterized and the criticality analysis model can be complicated by the need to consider axial burnup variations. Parametric analyses are needed to characterize the importance of fuel assembly and fuel cycle parameters on spent fuel composition and reactivity. Numerical models must be evaluated to determine the sensitivity of criticality safety calculations to modeling assumptions. The purpose of this report is to describe analyses and evaluations performed in order to demonstrate the effect physical parameters and modeling assumptions have on the criticality analysis of spent fuel. The analyses in this report include determination and ranking of the most important actinides and fission products; study of the effect of various depletion scenarios on subsequent criticality calculations; establishment of trends in neutron multiplication as a function of fuel enrichment, burnup, cooling time- and a parametric and modeling evaluation of three-dimensional effects (e.g., axially varying burnup and temperature/density effects) in a conceptual cask design. The sensitivity and parametric evaluations were performed with the consideration of two different burnup credit approaches: (1) only actinides in the fuel are considered in the criticality analysis, and (2) both actinides and fission products are considered. Calculations described in this report were performed using the criticality and depletion sequences available in the SCALE code system and the SCALE 27-group burnup library. Although the results described herein do not constitute a validation of SCALE for use in spent fuel analysis, independent validation efforts have been completed and are described in other reports.

  5. Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

  6. A PWR Thorium Pin Cell Burnup Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Zhao, X.; Pilat, E. E; Hejzlar, P.

    2000-05-01

    As part of work to evaluate the potential benefits of using thorium in LWR fuel, a thorium fueled benchmark comparison was made in this study between state-of-the-art codes, MOCUP (MCNP4B + ORIGEN2), and CASMO-4 for burnup calculations. The MOCUP runs were done individually at MIT and INEEL, using the same model but with some differences in techniques and cross section libraries. Eigenvalue and isotope concentrations were compared on a PWR pin cell model up to high burnup. The eigenvalue comparison as a function of burnup is good: the maximum difference is within 2% and the average absolute difference less than 1%. The isotope concentration comparisons are better than a set of MOX fuel benchmarks and comparable to a set of uranium fuel benchmarks reported in the literature. The actinide and fission product data sources used in the MOCUP burnup calculations for a typical thorium fuel are documented. Reasons for code vs code differences are analyzed and discussed.

  7. Evaluation of fission product worth margins in PWR spent nuclear fuel burnup credit calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current criticality safety calculations for the transportation of irradiated LWR fuel make the very conservative assumption that the fuel is fresh. This results in a very substantial overprediction of the actual keff of the transportation casks; in certain cases, this decreases the amount of spent fuel which can be loaded in a cask, and increases the cost of transporting the spent fuel to the repository. Accounting for the change of reactivity due to fuel depletion is usually referred to as ''burnup credit.'' The US DOE is currently funding a program aimed at establishing an actinide only burnup credit methodology (in this case, the calculated reactivity takes into account the buildup or depletion of a limited number of actinides). This work is undergoing NRC review. While this methodology is being validated on a significant experimental basis, it implicitly relies on additional margins: in particular, the absorption of neutrons by certain actinides and by all fission products is not taken into account. This provides an important additional margin and helps guarantee that the methodology is conservative provided these neglected absorption are known with reasonable accuracy. This report establishes the accuracy of fission product absorption rate calculations: (1) the analysis of European fission product worth experiments demonstrates that fission product cross-sections available in the US provide very good predictions of fission product worth; (2) this is confirmed by a direct comparison of European and US cross section evaluations; (3) accuracy of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) fission product content predictions is established in a recent ORNL report where several SNF isotopic assays are analyzed; and (4) these data are then combined to establish in a conservative manner the fraction of the predicted total fission product absorption which can be guaranteed based on available experimental data

  8. Evaluation of fission product worth margins in PWR spent nuclear fuel burnup credit calculations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomquist, R.N.; Finck, P.J.; Jammes, C.; Stenberg, C.G.

    1999-02-17

    Current criticality safety calculations for the transportation of irradiated LWR fuel make the very conservative assumption that the fuel is fresh. This results in a very substantial overprediction of the actual k{sub eff} of the transportation casks; in certain cases, this decreases the amount of spent fuel which can be loaded in a cask, and increases the cost of transporting the spent fuel to the repository. Accounting for the change of reactivity due to fuel depletion is usually referred to as ''burnup credit.'' The US DOE is currently funding a program aimed at establishing an actinide only burnup credit methodology (in this case, the calculated reactivity takes into account the buildup or depletion of a limited number of actinides). This work is undergoing NRC review. While this methodology is being validated on a significant experimental basis, it implicitly relies on additional margins: in particular, the absorption of neutrons by certain actinides and by all fission products is not taken into account. This provides an important additional margin and helps guarantee that the methodology is conservative provided these neglected absorption are known with reasonable accuracy. This report establishes the accuracy of fission product absorption rate calculations: (1) the analysis of European fission product worth experiments demonstrates that fission product cross-sections available in the US provide very good predictions of fission product worth; (2) this is confirmed by a direct comparison of European and US cross section evaluations; (3) accuracy of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) fission product content predictions is established in a recent ORNL report where several SNF isotopic assays are analyzed; and (4) these data are then combined to establish in a conservative manner the fraction of the predicted total fission product absorption which can be guaranteed based on available experimental data.

  9. Burn-up credit criticality benchmark. Phase 4-A: reactivity prediction calculations for infinite arrays of PWR MOX fuel pin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD/NEA Expert Group on Burn-up Credit was established in 1991 to address scientific and technical issues connected with the use of burn-up credit in nuclear fuel cycle operations. Following the completion of six benchmark exercises with uranium oxide fuels irradiated in pressurised water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs), the present report concerns mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) fuels irradiated in PWRs. The report summarises and analyses the solutions to the specified exercises provided by 37 contributors from 10 countries. The exercises were based upon the calculation of infinite PWR fuel pin cell reactivity for fresh and irradiated MOX fuels with various MOX compositions, burn-ups and cooling times. In addition, several representations of the MOX fuel assembly were tested in order to check various levels of approximations commonly used in reactor physics calculations. (authors)

  10. Burnup Credit of French PWR-MOx fuels: methodology and associated conservatisms with the JEFF-3.1.1 evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering spent fuel management (storage, transport and reprocessing), the approach using 'fresh fuel assumption' in criticality-safety studies results in a significant conservatism in the calculated value of the system reactivity. The concept of Burnup Credit (BUC) consists in considering the reduction of the spent fuel reactivity due to its burnup. A careful BUC methodology, developed by CEA in association with AREVA-NC was recently validated and written up for PWR-UOx fuels. However, 22 of 58 French reactors use MOx fuel, so more and more irradiated MOx fuels have to be stored and transported. As a result, why industrial partners are interested in this concept is because taking into account this BUC concept would enable for example a load increase in several fuel cycle devices. Recent publications and discussions within the French BUC Working Group highlight the current interest of the BUC concept in PWR-MOx spent fuel industrial applications. In this case of PWR-MOx fuel, studies show in particular that the 15 FPs selected thanks to their properties (absorbing, stable, non-gaseous) are responsible for more than a half of the total reactivity credit and 80% of the FPs credit. That is why, in order to get a conservative and physically realistic value of the application keff and meet the Upper Safety Limit constraint, calculation biases on these 15 FPs inventory and individual reactivity worth should be considered in a criticality-safety approach. In this context, thanks to an exhaustive literature study, PWR-MOx fuels particularities have been identified and by following a rigorous approach, a validated and physically representative BUC methodology, adapted to this type of fuel has been proposed, allowing to take fission products into account and to determine the biases related to considered isotopes inventory and to reactivity worth. This approach consists of the following studies: - isotopic correction factors determination to guarantee the criticality

  11. Reactivity and isotopic composition of spent PWR [pressurized-water-reactor] fuel as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents the reactivity loss of spent PWR fuel due to burnup in terms of the infinite lattice multiplications factor, k/sub ∞/. Calculations were performed using the SAS2 and CSAS1 control modules of the SCALE system. The k/sub ∞/ values calculated for all combinations of six enrichments, seven burnups, and five cooling times. The results are presented as a primary function of enrichment in both tabular and graphic form. An equation has been developed to estimate the tabulated values of k/sub ∞/'s by specifying enrichment, cooling time, and burnup. Atom densities for fresh fuel, and spent fuel at cooling times of 2, 10, and 20 years are included. 13 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs

  12. Recommendations for Addressing Axial Burnup in the PWR Burnup Credit Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2002-10-23

    This report presents studies performed to support the development of a technically justifiable approach for addressing the axial-burnup distribution in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety analyses. The effect of the axial-burnup distribution on reactivity and proposed approaches for addressing the axial-burnup distribution are briefly reviewed. A publicly available database of profiles is examined in detail to identify profiles that maximize the neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, assess its adequacy for PWR burnup credit analyses, and investigate the existence of trends with fuel type and/or reactor operations. A statistical evaluation of the k{sub eff} values associated with the profiles in the axial-burnup-profile database was performed, and the most reactive (bounding) profiles were identified as statistical outliers. The impact of these bounding profiles on k{sub eff} is quantified for a high-density burnup credit cask. Analyses are also presented to quantify the potential reactivity consequence of loading assemblies with axial-burnup profiles that are not bounded by the database. The report concludes with a discussion on the issues for consideration and recommendations for addressing axial burnup in criticality safety analyses using burnup credit for dry cask storage and transportation.

  13. Addressing the Axial Burnup Distribution in PWR Burnup Credit Criticality Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes efforts related to developing a technically justifiable approach for addressing the axial burnup distribution in PWR burnup-credit criticality safety analyses. The paper reviews available data on the axial variation in burnup and the effect of axial burnup profiles on reactivity in a SNF cask. A publicly available database of profiles is examined to identify profiles that maximize the neutron multiplication factor, keff, assess its adequacy for general PWR burnup credit analyses, and investigate the existence of trends with fuel type and/or reactor operations. For this assessment, a statistical evaluation of the keff values associated with the profiles in the axial burnup profile database was performed that identifies the most reactive profiles as statistical outliers that are not representative of typical discharged SNF assemblies. The impact of these bounding profiles on the neutron multiplication factor for a high-density burnup credit cask is quantified. Finally, analyses are presented to quantify the potential reactivity consequence of assemblies with axial profiles that are not bounded by the existing database. The paper concludes with findings for addressing the axial burnup distribution in burnup credit analyses

  14. Extended calculations of OECD/NEA phase II-C burnup credit criticality benchmark problem for PWR spent fuel transport cask by using MCNP-4B2 code and JENDL-3.2 library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroishi, Takeshi; Hoang, Anh Tuan; Nomura, Yasushi; Okuno, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The reactivity effect of the asymmetry of axial burnup profile in burnup credit criticality safety is studied for a realistic PWR spent fuel transport cask proposed in the current OECD/NEA Phase II-C benchmark problem. The axial burnup profiles are simulated in 21 material zones based on in-core flux measurements varying from strong asymmetry to more or less no asymmetry. Criticality calculations in a 3-D model have been performed using the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B2 and the nuclear data library JENDL-3.2. Calculation conditions are determined with consideration of the axial fission source convergence. Calculations are carried out not only for cases proposed in the benchmark but also for additional cases assuming symmetric burnup profile. The actinide-only approach supposed for first domestic introduction of burnup credit into criticality evaluation is also considered in addition to the actinide plus fission product approach adopted in the benchmark. The calculated results show that k{sub eff} and the end effect increase almost linearly with increasing burnup axial offset that is defined as one of typical parameters showing the intensity of axial burnup asymmetry. The end effect is more sensitive to the asymmetry of burnup profile for the higher burnup. For an axially distributed burnup, the axial fission source distribution becomes strongly asymmetric as its peak shifts toward the top end of the fuel's active zone where the local burnup is less than that of the bottom end. The peak of fission source distribution becomes higher with the increase of either the asymmetry of burnup profile or the assembly-averaged burnup. The conservatism of the assumption of uniform axial burnup based on the actinide-only approach is estimated quantitatively in comparison with the k{sub eff} result calculated with experiment-based strongest asymmetric axial burnup profile with the actinide plus fission product approach. (author)

  15. High burnup fuel development program in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A step wise burnup extension program has been progressing in Japan to reduce the LWR fuel cycle cost. At present, the maximum assembly burnup limit of BWR 8 Χ 8 type fuel (B. Step II fuel) is 50GWd/t and a limited numbers of 9 Χ 9 type fuel (B. Step III fuel) with 55GWd/t maximum assembly burnup has been licensed by regulatory agencies recently. Though present maximum assembly burnup limit for PWR fuel is 48GWd/t (P. Step I fuel), the licensing work has been progressing for irradiation testing on a limited number of fuel assemblies with extended burnup of up to 55GWd/t (p. Step II fuel) Design of high burnup fuel and fabrication test are carried out by vendors, and subsequent irradiation test of fuel rods is conducted jointly by utilities and vendors to prepare for licensing. It is usual to make an irradiation test for vectarion, using lead use assemblies by government to confirm fuel integrity and reliability and win the public confidence. Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPE C) is responsible for verification test. The fuel are subjected to post irradiation examination (PIE) and no unfavorable indications of fuel behavior have found both in NUPE C verification test and joint irradiation test by utilities and vendors. Burnup extension is an urgent task for LWR fuel in Japan in order to establish the domestic fuel cycle. It is conducted in joint efforts of industries, government and institutes. However, watching a situation of burnup extension in the world, we are not going ahead of other countries in the achievement of burnup extension. It is due to a conservative policy in the nuclear safety of the country. This is the reason why the burnup extension program in Japan is progressing 'slow and steady' As for the data obtained, no unfavorable indications of fuel behavior have found both in NUPE C verification test and joint irradiation test by utilities and vendors until now

  16. Analysis of high burnup fuel safety issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Kim, D. H.; Bang, J. G.; Kim, Y. M.; Yang, Y. S.; Jung, Y. H.; Jeong, Y. H.; Nam, C.; Baik, J. H.; Song, K. W.; Kim, K. S

    2000-12-01

    Safety issues in steady state and transient behavior of high burnup LWR fuel above 50 - 60 MWD/kgU were analyzed. Effects of burnup extension upon fuel performance parameters was reviewed, and validity of both the fuel safety criteria and the performance analysis models which were based upon the lower burnup fuel test results was analyzed. It was found that further tests would be necessary in such areas as fuel failure and dispersion for RIA, and high temperature cladding corrosion and mechanical deformation for LOCA. Since domestic fuels have been irradiated in PWR up to burnup higher than 55 MWD/kgU-rod. avg., it can be said that Korea is in the same situation as the other countries in the high burnup fuel safety issues. Therefore, necessary research areas to be performed in Korea were derived. Considering that post-irradiation examination(PIE) for the domestic fuel of burnup higher than 30 MWD/kgU has not been done so far at all, it is primarily necessary to perform PIE for high burnup fuel, and then simulation tests for RIA and LOCA could be performed by using high burnup fuel specimens. For the areas which can not be performed in Korea, international cooperation will be helpful to obtain the test results. With those data base, safety of high burnup domestic fuels will be confirmed, current fuel safety criteria will be re-evaluated, and finally transient high burnup fuel behavior analysis technology will be developed through the fuel performance analysis code development.

  17. Long-Term Dry Storage of High Burn-Up Spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Fuel in TAD (Transportation, Aging, and Disposal) Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A TAD canister, in conjunction with specially-designed over-packs can accomplish the functions of transportation, aging, and disposal (TAD) in the management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Industrial dry cask systems currently available for SNF are licensed for storage-only or for dual-purpose (i.e., storage and transportation). By extending the function to include the indefinite storage and perhaps, eventual geologic disposal, the TAD canister would have to be designed to enhance, among others, corrosion resistance, thermal stability, and criticality-safety control. This investigative paper introduces the use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials for SNF transportation, aging, and disposal.The objective of this investigative project is to explore the interest that KAERI would research and develop its specific SAM coating materials for the TAD canisters to satisfy the requirements of corrosion-resistance, thermal stability, and criticality-controls for long-term dry storage of high burn-up spent PWR fuel

  18. Burnup credit implementation in spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criticality safety analysis of spent fuel management systems has traditionally assumed that the fuel is fresh. This results in significant conservatism in the calculated value of the system's reactivity. The concept of allowing reactivity credit for spent fuel offers economic incentives. Burnup Credit (BUC) could reduce mass limitation during dissolution of highly enriched PWR assemblies at the La Hague reprocessing plant. Furthermore, accounting for burnup credit enables the operator to avoid the use of Gd soluble poison in the dissolver for MOX assemblies. Analyses performed by DOE and its contractors have indicated that using BUC to maximize spent fuel transportation cask capacities is a justifiable concept that would result in public risk benefits and cost savings while fully maintaining criticality safety margins. In order to allow for Fission Products and Actinides in Criticality-Safety analyses, an extensive BUC experimental programme has been developed in France in the framework of the CEA-COGEMA collaboration. The use of burnup credit implies a verification of the fuel burnup before loading for transport, storage, disposal, or reprocessing each assembly, to make sure that the burnup level achieved complies with the criteria established. Independent measurement systems, e.g. gamma spectrum detection systems, are needed to perform a true independent measurement of assembly burnup, without reliance on reactor records, using the gamma emission signatures fission products (mainly Cesium isotopes). (author)

  19. In-pile test of Qinshan PWR fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-pile test of Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant PWR fuel bundle has been conducted in HWRR HTHP Test loop at CIAE. The test fuel bundle was irradiated to an average burnup of 25000 Mwd/tU. The authors describe the structure of (3 x 3-2) test fuel bundle, structure of irradiation rig, fuel fabrication, irradiation conditions, power and fuel burnup. Some comments on the in-pile performance for fuel bundle, fuel rod and irradiation rig were made

  20. Increased burnup of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specialists' group for fuel elements of the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft e.V. held a meeting on ''Increased Burnup of Fuel Elements'' on 9th and 10th of November 1982 at the GKSS Research Center Geesthacht. Most papers dealt with the problems of burnup increase of fuel elements for light water reactors with respect to fuel manufacturing, power plant operation and reprocessing. Review papers were given on the burnup limits for high temperature gas cooled reactors and sodium fast breeder reactors. The meeting ended with a presentation of the technical equipment of the hot laboratory of the GKSS and the programs which are in progress there. (orig.)

  1. Research on Integrity of High Burnup Spent Fuel Under the Long Term Dry Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives were to acquire the following behaviour data by dynamic load impact tests on high burnup spent fuel rods of BWR and PWR and to improve the guidance of regulation of spent fuel storage and transportation. (1) The limit of load and strain for high burnup fuel in the cask drop accident. (2) The amount of deformation of high burnup fuel rods under dynamic load impact. (3) The amount of fuel pellet material released from fuel rods under dynamic load impact

  2. New results from the NSRR experiments with high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuketa, Toyoshi; Ishijima, Kiyomi; Mori, Yukihide [Japan Atomic Research Institute, Toaki, Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Results obtained in the NSRR power burst experiments with irradiated PWR fuel rods with fuel burnup up to 50 MWd/kgU are described and discussed in this paper. Data concerning test method, test fuel rod, pulse irradiation, transient records during the pulse and post irradiation examination are described, and interpretations and discussions on fission gas release and fuel pellet fragmentation are presented. During the pulse-irradiation experiment with 50 MWd/kgU PWR fuel rod, the fuel rod failed at considerably low energy deposition level, and large amount of fission gas release and fragmentation of fuel pellets were observed.

  3. Effects of high burnup on spent-fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utility fuel managers have become very interested in higher burnup fuels as a means to reduce the impact of refueling outages. High-burnup fuels have significant effects on spent-fuel storage or transportation casks because additional heat rejection and shielding capabilities are required. Some existing transportation casks have useful margins that allow shipment of high-burnup fuel, especially the NLI-1/2 truck cask, which has been relicensed to carry pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel with 56,000 MWd/ton U burnup at 450 days of cooling time. New cask designs should consider the effects of high burnup for future use, even though it is not commercially desirable to include currently unneeded capability. In conclusion, the increased heat and gamma radiation of high-burnup fuels can be accommodated by additional cooling time, but the increased neutron radiation source cannot be accommodated unless the balance of neutron and gamma contributions to the overall dose rate is properly chosen in the initial cask design. Criticality control of high-burnup fuels is possible with heavily poisoned baskets, but burnup credit in licensing is a much more direct means of demonstrating criticality safety

  4. Assessment of Reactivity Margins and Loading Curves for PWR Burnup Credit Cask Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2002-12-17

    This report presents studies to assess reactivity margins and loading curves for pressurized water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety evaluations. The studies are based on a generic high-density 32-assembly cask and systematically vary individual calculational (depletion and criticality) assumptions to demonstrate the impact on the predicted effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, and burnup-credit loading curves. The purpose of this report is to provide a greater understanding of the importance of input parameter variations and quantify the impact of calculational assumptions on the outcome of a burnup-credit evaluation. This study should provide guidance to regulators and industry on the technical areas where improved information will most enhance the estimation of accurate subcritical margins. Based on these studies, areas where future work may provide the most benefit are identified. The report also includes an evaluation of the degree of burnup credit needed for high-density casks to transport the current spent nuclear fuel inventory. By comparing PWR discharge data to actinide-only based loading curves and determining the number of assemblies that meet the loading criteria, this evaluation finds that additional negative reactivity (through either increased credit for fuel burnup or cask design/utilization modifications) is necessary to accommodate the majority of current spent fuel assemblies in high-capacity casks. Assemblies that are not acceptable for loading in the prototypic high-capacity cask may be stored or transported by other means (e.g., lower capacity casks that utilize flux traps and/or increased fixed poison concentrations or high-capacity casks with design/utilization modifications).

  5. Parametric Study of Control Rod Exposure for PWR Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office, recommends the use of analyses that provide an ''adequate representation of the physics'' and notes particular concern with the ''need to consider the more reactive actinide compositions of fuels burned with fixed absorbers or with control rods fully or partly inserted.'' In the absence of readily available information on the extent of control rod (CR) usage in U.S. PWRs and the subsequent reactivity effect of CR exposure on discharged SNF, NRC staff have indicated a need for greater understanding in these areas. In response, this paper presents results of a parametric study of the effect of CR exposure on the reactivity of discharged SNF for various CR designs (including Axial Power Shaping Rods), fuel enrichments, and exposure conditions (i.e., burnup and axial insertion). The study is performed in two parts. In the first part, two-dimensional calculations are performed, effectively assuming full axial CR insertion. These calculations are intended to bound the effect of CR exposure and facilitate comparisons of the various CR designs. In the second part, three-dimensional calculations are performed to determine the effect of various axial insertion conditions and gain a better understanding of reality. The results from the study demonstrate that the reactivity effect increases with increasing CR exposure (e.g., burnup) and decreasing initial fuel enrichment (for a fixed burnup). Additionally, the results show that even for significant burnup exposures, minor axial CR insertions (e.g., eff of a spent fuel cask

  6. Effects of Lower Drying-Storage Temperature on the Ductility of High-Burnup PWR Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Burtseva, T. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-08-30

    The purpose of this research effort is to determine the effects of canister and/or cask drying and storage on radial hydride precipitation in, and potential embrittlement of, high-burnup (HBU) pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding alloys during cooling for a range of peak drying-storage temperatures (PCT) and hoop stresses. Extensive precipitation of radial hydrides could lower the failure hoop stresses and strains, relative to limits established for as-irradiated cladding from discharged fuel rods stored in pools, at temperatures below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  7. Analysis of burnup credit on spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical analyses were carried out on high burnup UO2 (65 GWd/t) and MOX (45 GWd/t) spent fuel pins. Measured data of the composition of nuclides from 234U to 242Pu were used for evaluation of ORIGEN-2/82 code. Criticality calculations were executed for the casks which were being designed to store 52 BWR or 21 PWR spent fuel assemblies. The reactivity biases were evaluated for (1) axial and horizontal profiles of burnup, and void history (BWR), (2) operational histories such as control rod insertion history, BPR insertion history and others, and (3) calculational accuracy of ORIGEN-2/82 code on the composition of nuclides. Present evaluation shows that introduction of burnup credit has a substantial merit in criticality safety analysis of the cask, even if these reactivity biases are considered. The concept of equivalent uniform burnup was adapted for present reactivity bias evaluation and showed a possibility of simplifying the reactivity bias evaluation in burnup credit. Finally, adapting procedures of burnup credit such as the burnup meter were evaluated. (author)

  8. Evolutionary developments of advanced PWR nuclear fuels and cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are provided. • Evolution of PWR advanced fuel in U.S.A. and in Korea is described. • Cutting-edge design features against grid-to-rod fretting and debris are explained. • High performance data of advanced grids, debris filters and claddings are given. -- Abstract: The evolutionary developments of advanced PWR fuels and cladding materials are explained with outstanding design features of nuclear fuel assembly components and zirconium-base cladding materials. The advanced PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are also provided along with verification tests, which can be used as guidelines for newcomers planning to develop an advanced fuel for the first time. The up-to-date advanced fuels with the advanced cladding materials may provide a high level of economic utilization and reliable performance even under current and upcoming aggressive operating conditions. To be specific, nuclear fuel vendors may achieve high fuel burnup capability of between 45,000 and 65,000 MWD/MTU batch average, overpower thermal margin of as much as 15% and longer cycle length up to 24 months on the one hand and fuel failure rates of around 10−6 on the other hand. However, there is still a need for better understanding of grid-to-rod fretting wear mechanisms leading to major PWR fuel defects in the world and subsequently a driving force for developing innovative spacer grid designs with zero fretting wear-induced fuel failure

  9. Evolutionary developments of advanced PWR nuclear fuels and cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyu-Tae, E-mail: ktkim@dongguk.ac.kr

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are provided. • Evolution of PWR advanced fuel in U.S.A. and in Korea is described. • Cutting-edge design features against grid-to-rod fretting and debris are explained. • High performance data of advanced grids, debris filters and claddings are given. -- Abstract: The evolutionary developments of advanced PWR fuels and cladding materials are explained with outstanding design features of nuclear fuel assembly components and zirconium-base cladding materials. The advanced PWR fuel and cladding materials development processes are also provided along with verification tests, which can be used as guidelines for newcomers planning to develop an advanced fuel for the first time. The up-to-date advanced fuels with the advanced cladding materials may provide a high level of economic utilization and reliable performance even under current and upcoming aggressive operating conditions. To be specific, nuclear fuel vendors may achieve high fuel burnup capability of between 45,000 and 65,000 MWD/MTU batch average, overpower thermal margin of as much as 15% and longer cycle length up to 24 months on the one hand and fuel failure rates of around 10{sup −6} on the other hand. However, there is still a need for better understanding of grid-to-rod fretting wear mechanisms leading to major PWR fuel defects in the world and subsequently a driving force for developing innovative spacer grid designs with zero fretting wear-induced fuel failure.

  10. Progress of the RIA experiments with high burnup fuels and their evaluation in JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishijima, Kiyomi; Fuketa, Toyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-01-01

    Recent results obtained in the NSRR power burst experiments with high burnup PWR fuel rods are described and discussed in this paper. Data concerning test condition, transient records during pulse irradiation and post irradiation examination are described. Another high burnup PWR fuel rod failed in the test HBO-5 at the slightly higher energy deposition than that in the test HBO-1. The failure mechanism of the test HBO-5 is the same as that of the test HBO-1, that is, hydride-assisted PCMI. Some influence of the thermocouples welding on the failure behavior of the HBO-5 rod was observed.

  11. Criticality analysis of PWR spent fuel storage facilities inside nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes some of the main features of the actinide plus fission product burnup credit methodology used by Siemens for criticality safety design analysis of wet PWR storage pools with soluble boron in the pool water. Application of burnup credit requires knowledge of the isotopic inventory of the irradiated fuel for which burnup credit is taken. This knowledge is gained by using depletion codes. The results of the depletion analysis are a necessary input to the criticality analysis. Siemens performs depletion calculations for PWR fuel burnup credit applications with the aid of the Siemens standard design procedure SAV90. The quality of this procedure relies on statistics on the differences between calculation and measurement extracted from in-core measurement data and chemical assay data. Siemens performs criticality safety calculations with the aid of the criticality calculation modules of the SCALE code package. These modules are verified many times with the aid of various kinds of critical experiments and configurations: Application of these modules to spent LWR fuel assembly storage pools was verified by analyzing critical experiments simulating such storage pools. Actinide plus fission product burnup credit applications of these modules were verified by analyzing PWR reactor critical configurations. The result of performing a burnup credit analysis is the determination of a burnup, credit loading curve for the spent fuel storage racks designed for burnup credit. This curve specifies the loading criterion by indicating the minimum burnup necessary for the fuel assembly with a specific initial enrichment to be placed in the storage racks designed for burnup credit. The loading of the spent fuel storage racks designed for burnup credit requires the implementation of controls to ensure that the loading curve is met. The controls include the determination of fuel assembly burnup based on reactor records. (author)

  12. Analysis of burnup credit on spent fuel transport / storage casks - estimation of reactivity bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical analyses of high burnup UO2 (65 GWd/t) and MOX (45 GWd/t) spent fuel pins were carried out. Measured data of nuclides' composition from U234 to P 242 were used for evaluation of ORIGEN-2/82 code and a nuclear fuel design code (NULIF). Critically calculations were executed for transport and storage casks for 52 BWR or 21 PWR spent fuel assemblies. The reactivity biases were evaluated for axial and horizontal profiles of burnup, and historical void fraction (BWR), operational histories such as control rod insertion history, BPR insertion history and others, and calculational accuracy of ORIGEN-2/82 on nuclides' composition. This study shows that introduction of burnup credit has a large merit in criticality safety analysis of casks, even if these reactivity biases are considered. The concept of equivalent uniform burnup was adapted for the present reactivity bias evaluation and showed the possibility of simplifying the reactivity bias evaluation in burnup credit. (authors)

  13. Physics of hydride fueled PWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganda, Francesco

    The first part of the work presents the neutronic results of a detailed and comprehensive study of the feasibility of using hydride fuel in pressurized water reactors (PWR). The primary hydride fuel examined is U-ZrH1.6 having 45w/o uranium: two acceptable design approaches were identified: (1) use of erbium as a burnable poison; (2) replacement of a fraction of the ZrH1.6 by thorium hydride along with addition of some IFBA. The replacement of 25 v/o of ZrH 1.6 by ThH2 along with use of IFBA was identified as the preferred design approach as it gives a slight cycle length gain whereas use of erbium burnable poison results in a cycle length penalty. The feasibility of a single recycling plutonium in PWR in the form of U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 has also been assessed. This fuel was found superior to MOX in terms of the TRU fractional transmutation---53% for U-PuH2-ZrH1.6 versus 29% for MOX---and proliferation resistance. A thorough investigation of physics characteristics of hydride fuels has been performed to understand the reasons of the trends in the reactivity coefficients. The second part of this work assessed the feasibility of multi-recycling plutonium in PWR using hydride fuel. It was found that the fertile-free hydride fuel PuH2-ZrH1.6, enables multi-recycling of Pu in PWR an unlimited number of times. This unique feature of hydride fuels is due to the incorporation of a significant fraction of the hydrogen moderator in the fuel, thereby mitigating the effect of spectrum hardening due to coolant voiding accidents. An equivalent oxide fuel PuO2-ZrO2 was investigated as well and found to enable up to 10 recycles. The feasibility of recycling Pu and all the TRU using hydride fuels were investigated as well. It was found that hydride fuels allow recycling of Pu+Np at least 6 times. If it was desired to recycle all the TRU in PWR using hydrides, the number of possible recycles is limited to 3; the limit is imposed by positive large void reactivity feedback.

  14. Features of fuel performance at high fuel burnups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some features of fuel behavior at high fuel burnups, in particular, initiation and development of rim-layer, increase in the rate of fission gas release from the fuel and increase in the inner gas pressure in the fuel rod are briefly described. Basing on the analysis of the data of post-irradiation examinations of fuel rods of WWER-440 working FA and CR fuel followers, that have been operated for five fuel cycles and got the average fuel burnup or varies as 50MW-day/kgU, a conclusion is made that the WWER-440 fuel burnup can be increased at least to average burnups of 55-58 MW-day/kgU per fuel assembly (Authors)

  15. Advanced PWR fuel design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nearly 15 years, Combustion Engineering has provided pressurized water reactor fuel with the features most suppliers are now introducing in their advanced fuel designs. Zircaloy grids, removable upper end fittings, large fission gas plenum, high burnup, integral burnable poisons and sophisticated analytical methods are all features of C-E standard fuel which have been well proven by reactor performance. C-E's next generation fuel for pressurized water reactors features 24-month operating cycles, optimal lattice burnable poisons, increased resistance to common industry fuel rod failure mechanisms, and hardware and methodology for operating margin improvements. Application of these various improvements offer continued improvement in fuel cycle economics, plant operation and maintenance. (author)

  16. High burnup effects in WWER fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, V.; Smirnov, A. [RRC Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovqrad (Russian Federation)

    1996-03-01

    Since 1987 at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, the examinations of the WWER spent fuel assemblies has been carried out. These investigations are aimed to gain information on WWER spent fuel conditions in order to validate the fuel assemblies use during the 3 and 4 year fuel cycle in the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 units. At present time, the aim is to reach an average fuel burnup of 55 MWd/kgU. According to this aim, a new investigation program on the WWER spent fuel elements is started. The main objectives of this program are to study the high burnup effects and their influence on the WWER fuel properties. This paper presented the main statistical values of the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors` fuel assemblies and their fragment parameters. Average burnup of fuel in the investigated fuel assemblies was in the range of 13 to 49.7 MWd/kgU. In this case, the numer of fuel cycles was from 1 to 4 during operation of the fuel assemblies.

  17. Models for fuel rod behaviour at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernkvist, Lars O.; Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    This report deals with release of fission product gases and irradiation-induced restructuring in uranium dioxide nuclear fuel. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloy clad tubes to light water reactor fuel rods is also discussed. Computational models, suitable for implementation in the FRAPCON-3.2 computer code, are proposed for these potentially life-limiting phenomena. Hence, an integrated model for the calculation or thermal fission gas release by intragranular diffusion, gas trapping in grain boundaries, irradiation-induced re-solution, grain boundary saturation, and grain boundary sweeping in UO{sub 2} fuel, under time varying temperature loads, is formulated. After a brief review of the status of thermal fission gas release modelling, we delineate the governing equations for the aforementioned processes. Grain growth kinetic modelling is briefly reviewed and pertinent data on grain growth of high burnup fuel obtained during power ramps in the Third Risoe Fission Gas Release Project are evaluated. Sample computations are performed, which clearly show the connection between fission gas release and gram growth as a function of time at different isotherms. Models are also proposed for the restructuring of uranium dioxide fuel at high burnup, the so-called rim formation, and its effect on fuel porosity build-up, fuel thermal conductivity and fission gas release. These models are assessed by use of recent experimental data from the High Burnup Rim Project, as well as from post irradiation examinations of high-burnup fuel, irradiated in power reactors. Moreover, models for clad oxide growth and hydrogen pickup in PWRs, applicable to Zircaloy-4, ZIRLO or M5 cladding, are formulated, based on recent in-reactor corrosion data for high-burnup fuel rods. Our evaluation of these data indicates that the oxidation rate of ZIRLO-type materials is about 20% lower than for standard Zircaloy-4 cladding under typical PWR conditions. Likewise, the oxidation rate of M5 seems to be

  18. Effect of burn-up and high burn-up structure on spent nuclear fuel alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarens, F.; Gonzalez-Robles, E.; Gimenez, F. J.; Casas, I.; Pablo, J. de; Serrano, D.; Wegen, D.; Glatz, J. P.; Martinez-Esparza, A.

    2009-07-01

    In this report the results of the experimental work carried out within the collaboration project between ITU-ENRESA-UPC/CTM on spent fuel (SF) covering the period 2005-2007 were presented. Studies on both RN release (Fast Release Fraction and matrix dissolution rate) and secondary phase formation were carried out by static and flow through experiments. Experiments were focussed on the study of the effect of BU with two PWR SF irradiated in commercial reactors with mean burn-ups of 48 and 60 MWd/KgU and; the effect of High Burn-up Structure (HBS) using powdered samples prepared from different radial positions. Additionally, two synthetic leaching solutions, bicarbonate and granitic bentonite ground wa ter were used. Higher releases were determined for RN from SF samples prepared from the center in comparison with the fuel from the periphery. However, within the studied range, no BU effect was observed. After one year of contact time, secondary phases were observed in batch experiments, covering the SF surface. Part of the work was performed for the Project NF-PRO of the European Commission 6th Framework Programme under contract no 2389. (Author)

  19. Computational Benchmark for Estimation of Reactivity Margin from Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2001-08-02

    This report proposes and documents a computational benchmark problem for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from fission products and minor actinides in a burnup-credit storage/transport environment, relative to SNF compositions containing only the major actinides. The benchmark problem/configuration is a generic burnup credit cask designed to hold 32 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies. The purpose of this computational benchmark is to provide a reference configuration for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin, which is encouraged in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidance for partial burnup credit (ISG8), and document reference estimations of the additional reactivity margin as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Consequently, the geometry and material specifications are provided in sufficient detail to enable independent evaluations. Estimates of additional reactivity margin for this reference configuration may be compared to those of similar burnup-credit casks to provide an indication of the validity of design-specific estimates of fission-product margin. The reference solutions were generated with the SAS2H-depletion and CSAS25-criticality sequences of the SCALE 4.4a package. Although the SAS2H and CSAS25 sequences have been extensively validated elsewhere, the reference solutions are not directly or indirectly based on experimental results. Consequently, this computational benchmark cannot be used to satisfy the ANS 8.1 requirements for validation of calculational methods and is not intended to be used to establish biases for burnup credit analyses.

  20. Computational Benchmark for Estimation of Reactivity Margin from Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes and documents a computational benchmark problem for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from fission products and minor actinides in a burnup-credit storage/transport environment, relative to SNF compositions containing only the major actinides. The benchmark problem/configuration is a generic burnup credit cask designed to hold 32 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies. The purpose of this computational benchmark is to provide a reference configuration for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin, which is encouraged in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidance for partial burnup credit (ISG8), and document reference estimations of the additional reactivity margin as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Consequently, the geometry and material specifications are provided in sufficient detail to enable independent evaluations. Estimates of additional reactivity margin for this reference configuration may be compared to those of similar burnup-credit casks to provide an indication of the validity of design-specific estimates of fission-product margin. The reference solutions were generated with the SAS2H-depletion and CSAS25-criticality sequences of the SCALE 4.4a package. Although the SAS2H and CSAS25 sequences have been extensively validated elsewhere, the reference solutions are not directly or indirectly based on experimental results. Consequently, this computational benchmark cannot be used to satisfy the ANS 8.1 requirements for validation of calculational methods and is not intended to be used to establish biases for burnup credit analyses

  1. Impact of Integral Burnable Absorbers on PWR Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of taking credit for the reduction in reactivity of burned or spent nuclear fuel (SNF) due to fuel burnup is commonly referred to as burnup credit. The reduction in reactivity that occurs with fuel burnup is due to the net reduction of fissile nuclide concentrations and the production of actinide and fission-product neutron absorbers. The change in the inventory of these nuclides with fuel burnup, and the consequent reduction in reactivity, is dependent upon the depletion environment. Therefore, the use of burnup credit necessitates consideration of all possible fuel operating conditions, including the use of integral burnable absorbers (IBAs). The Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit [1] issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office recommends licensees restrict the use of burnup credit to assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers (e.g., IBAs or burnable poison rods, BPRs). This restriction eliminates a large portion of the currently discharged spent fuel assemblies from cask loading, and thus severely limits the practical usefulness of burnup credit. The reason for this restriction is that the presence of burnable absorbers during depletion hardens the neutron spectrum, resulting in lower 235U depletion and higher production of fissile plutonium isotopes. Enhanced plutonium production has the effect of increasing the reactivity of the fuel at discharge and beyond. Consequently, an assembly exposed to burnable absorbers may have a slightly higher reactivity for a given burnup than an assembly that has not been exposed to burnable absorbers. This paper examines the effect of IBAs on reactivity for various designs and enrichment/poison loading combinations as a function of burnup. The effect of BPRs, which are typically removed during operation, is addressed elsewhere [2

  2. High Burnup Fuel Performance and Safety Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Je Keun; Lee, Chan Bok; Kim, Dae Ho (and others)

    2007-03-15

    The worldwide trend of nuclear fuel development is to develop a high burnup and high performance nuclear fuel with high economies and safety. Because the fuel performance evaluation code, INFRA, has a patent, and the superiority for prediction of fuel performance was proven through the IAEA CRP FUMEX-II program, the INFRA code can be utilized with commercial purpose in the industry. The INFRA code was provided and utilized usefully in the universities and relevant institutes domesticallly and it has been used as a reference code in the industry for the development of the intrinsic fuel rod design code.

  3. Fuel burnup monitor for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in-service detector is designed using the principle of comparing temperatures in the fuel element and in the detector material. The detector consists of 3 metallic heat conductors insulated with ceramic insulators, two of them with uranium fuel spheres at the end. One sphere is coated with zirconium, the other with zirconium and gold. The precision of measurement of the degree of fuel burnup depends on the precision of the measurement of temperature and is determined from the difference in temperature gradients of the two uranium fuel spheres in the detector. (M.D.)

  4. Behaviour of fission gas in the rim region of high burn-up UO 2 fuel pellets with particular reference to results from an XRF investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, M.; Pearce, J. H.; Walker, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    XRF and EPMA results for retained xenon from Battelle's high burn-up effects program are re-evaluated. The data reviewed are from commercial low enriched BWR fuel with burn-ups of 44.8-54.9 GWd/tU and high enriched PWR fuel with burn-ups from 62.5 to 83.1 GWd/tU. It is found that the high burn-up structure penetrated much deeper than initially reported. The local burn-up threshold for the formation of the high burn-up structure in those fuels with grain sizes in the normal range lay between 60 and 75 GWd/tU. The high burn-up structure was not detected by EPMA in a fuel that had a grain size of 78 μm although the local burn-up at the pellet rim had exceeded 80 GWd/tU. It is concluded that fission gas had been released from the high burn-up structure in three PWR fuel sections with burn-ups of 70.4, 72.2 and 83.1 GWd/tU. In the rim region of the last two sections at the locations where XRF indicated gas release the local burn-up was higher than 75 GWd/tU.

  5. MOX and UOX PWR fuel performances EDF operating experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on a large program of experimentations implemented during the 90s, the industrial achievement of new FAs designs with increased performances opens up new prospects. The currently UOX fuels used on the 58 EDF PWR units are now authorized up to a maximum FA burn-up of 52 GWd/t with a large experience from 45 to 50 GWd/t. Today, the new products, along with the progress made in the field of calculation methods, still enable to increase further the fuel performances with respect to the safety margins. Thus, the conditions are met to implement in the next years new fuel managements on each NPPs series of the EDF fleet with increased enrichment (up to 4.5%) and irradiation limits (up to 62 GWd/t). The recycling of plutonium is part of EDF's reprocessing/recycling strategy. Up to now, 20 PWR 900 MW reactors are managed in MOX hybrid management. The feedback experience of 18 years of PWR operation with MOX is satisfactory, without any specific problem regarding manoeuvrability or plant availability. EDF is now looking to introduce MOX fuels with a higher plutonium content (up to 8.6%) equivalent to natural uranium enriched to 3.7%. It is the goal of the MOX Parity core management which achieve balance of MOX and UOX fuel performance with a significant increase of the MOX average discharge burn-up (BU max: 52 GWd/t for MOX and UOX). The industrial maturity of new FAs designs, with increased performances, allows the implementation in the next years of new fuel managements on each NPPs series of the EDF fleet. The scheduling of the implementation of the new fuel managements on the PWRs fleet is a great challenge for EDF, with important stakes: the nuclear KWh cost decrease with the improvement of the plant operation performance. (author)

  6. Burnup measurements of leader fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some time ago the CCHEN authorities decided to produce a set of 50 low enrichment fuel elements. These elements were produced in the PEC (Fuel Elements Plant), located at CCHEN offices in Lo Aguirre. These new fuel elements have basically the same geometrical characteristics of previous ones, which were British and made with raw material from the U.S. The principal differences between our fuel elements and the British ones is the density of fissile material, U-235, which was increased to compensate the reduction in enrichment. Last year, the Fuel Elements Plant (PEC) delivered the shipment's first four (4) fuel elements, called leaders, to the RECH1. A test element was delivered too, and the complete set was introduced into the reactor's nucleus, following the normal routine, but performing a special follow-up on their behavior inside the nucleus. This experimental element has only one outside fuel plate, and the remaining (15) structural plates are aluminum. In order to study the burnup, the test element was taken out of the nucleus, in mid- November 1999, and left to decay until June 2000, when it was moved to the laboratory (High Activity Cell), to start the burnup measurements, with a gamma spectroscopy system. This work aims to show the results of these measurements and in addition to meet the following objectives: (a) Visual test of the plate's general condition; (b) Sipping test of fission products; (c) Study of burn-up distribution in the plate; (d) Check and improve the calculus algorithm; (e) Comparison of the results obtained from the spectroscopy with the ones from neutron calculus

  7. Burnup determination of water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present meeting was scheduled by the International Atomic Energy Agency in consultation with the Members of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. The meeting was hosted by the Commission of the European Communities, at the Transuranium Research Laboratory, Joint Research Centre Karlsruhe, in the Federal Republic of Germany. This subject was dealt with for the first time by the IAEA. It was found to correspond adequately to this type of Specialist Meeting and to be suitable at a moment when the extension of burnup constitutes a major technical and economical issue in fuel technology. It was stressed that analysis of highly burnt fuels, mixed oxides and burnable absorber bearing fuels required extension of the experimental data base, to comply with the increasing demand for an improved fuel management, including better qualification of reactor physics codes. Twenty-seven participants from eleven countries plus two international organizations attended the Meeting. Twelve papers were given during three technical sessions, followed by a panel discussion which allowed to formulate the conclusions of the meeting and recommendations to the Agency. In addition, participants were invited to give an outline of their national programmes, related to Burnup Determination of Water Reactor Fuel. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 12 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Extension and validation of the TRANSURANUS burn-up model for helium production in high burn-up LWR fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botazzoli, Pietro; Luzzi, Lelio; Brémier, Stephane; Schubert, Arndt; Van Uffelen, Paul; Walker, Clive T.; Haeck, Wim; Goll, Wolfgang

    2011-12-01

    The TRANSURANUS burn-up model (TUBRNP) calculates the local concentration of the actinides, the main fission products, and 4He as a function of the radial position across a fuel rod. In this paper, the improvements in the helium production model as well as the extensions in the simulation of 238-242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 242-245Cm isotopes are described. Experimental data used for the extended validation include new EPMA measurements of the local concentrations of Nd and Pu and recent SIMS measurements of the radial distributions of Pu, Am and Cm isotopes, both in a 3.5% enriched commercial PWR UO 2 fuel with a burn-up of 80 and 65 MWd/kgHM, respectively. Good agreement has been found between TUBRNP and the experimental data. The analysis has been complemented by detailed neutron transport calculations (VESTA code), and also revealed the need to update the branching ratio for the 241Am(n,γ) 242mAm reaction in typical PWR conditions.

  9. Safety Analysis Report for the PWR Spent Fuel Canister

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Heui Joo; Choi, Jong Won; Cho, Dong Keun; Chun, Kwan Sik; Lee, Jong Youl; Kim, Seong Ki; Kim, Seong Soo; Lee, Yang

    2005-11-15

    This report outlined the results of the safety assessment of the canisters for the PWR spent fuels which will be used in the KRS. All safety analyses including criticality and radiation shielding analyses, mechanical analyses, thermal analyses, and containment analyses were performed. The reference PWR spent fuels were in the 17x17 and determined to have 45,000 MWD/MTU burnup. The canister consists of copper outer shell and nodular cast iron inner structure with diameter of 102 cm and height of 483 cm. Criticality safety was checked for normal and abnormal conditions. It was assumed that the integrity of engineered barriers is preserved and saturated with water of 1.0g/cc for normal condition. For the abnormal condition container and bentonite was assumed to disappear, which allows the spent fuel to be surrounded by water with the most reactive condition. In radiation shielding analysis it was investigated that the absorbed dose at the surface of the canister met the safety limit. The structural analysis was conducted considering three load conditions, normal, extreme, and rock movement condition. Thermal analysis was carried out for the case that the canister with four PWR assemblies was deposited in the repository 500 meter below the surface with 40 m tunnel spacing and 6 m deposition hole spacing. The results of the safety assessment showed that the proposed KDC-1 canister met all the safety limits.

  10. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIB. Burnup calculations of BWR fuel assemblies for storage and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-02-01

    The report describes the final results of the Phase IIIB Benchmark conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The Benchmark was intended to compare the predictability of current computer code and data library combinations for the atomic number densities of an irradiated PWR fuel assembly model. The fuel assembly was irradiated under specific power of 25.6 MW/tHM up to 40 GWd/tHM and cooled for five years. The void fraction was assumed to be uniform throughout the channel box and constant, at 0, 40 and 70%, during burnup. In total, 16 results were submitted from 13 institutes of 7 countries. The calculated atomic number densities of 12 actinides and 20 fission product nuclides were found to be for the most part within a range of {+-}10% relative to the average, although some results, esp. {sup 155}Eu and gadolinium isotopes, exceeded the band, which will require further investigation. Pin-wise burnup results agreed well among the participants. The results in the infinite neutron multiplication factor k{sub {infinity}} also accorded well with each other for void fractions of 0 and 40%; however some results deviated from the averaged value noticeably for the void fraction of 70%. (author)

  11. A Criticality Evaluation of the GBC-32 Dry Storage Cask in PWR Burnup Credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current criticality safety evaluation assumes the only unirradiated fresh fuels with the maximum enrichment in a dry storage cask (DSC) for conservatism without consideration of the depletion of fissile nuclides and the generation of neutron-absorbing fission products. However, the large conservatism leads to the significant increase of the storage casks required. Thus, the application of burnup credit which takes credit for the reduction of reactivity resulted from fuel depletion can increase the capacity in storage casks. On the other hand, the burnup credit application introduces lots of complexity into a criticality safety analysis such as the accurate estimation of the isotopic inventories and the burnup of UNFs and the validation of the criticality calculation. The criticality evaluation with an effect of burnup credit was performed for the DSC of GBC-32 by using SCALE 6.1/STARBUCS. keff values were calculated as a function of burnup and cooling time for four initial enrichments of 2, 3, 4, and 5 wt. % 235U. The values were calculated for the burnup range of 0 to 60,000 MWD/MTU, in increments of 10,000 MWD/MTU, and for five cooling times of 0, 5, 10, 20, and 40 years

  12. Experimental programmes related to high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental programmes undertaken at IGCAR with regard to high burn-up fuels fall under the following categories: a) studies on fuel behaviour, b) development of extractants for aqueous reprocessing and c) development of non-aqueous reprocessing techniques. An experimental programme to measure the carbon potential in U/Pu-FP-C systems by methane-hydrogen gas equilibration technique has been initiated at IGCAR in order to understand the evolution of fuel and fission product phases in carbide fuel at high burn-up. The carbon potentials in U-Mo-C system have been measured by this technique. The free energies and enthalpies of formation of LaC2, NdC2 and SmC2 have been measured by measuring the vapor pressures of CO over the region Ln2O3-LnC2-C during the carbothermic reduction of Ln2O3 by C. The decontamination from fission products achieved in fuel reprocessing depends strongly on the actinide loading of the extractant phase. Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), presently used as the extractant, does not allow high loadings due to its propensity for third phase formation in the extraction of Pu(IV). A detailed study of the allowable Pu loadings in TBP and other extractants has been undertaken in IGCAR, the results of which are presented in this paper. The paper also describes the status of our programme to develop a non-aqueous route for the reprocessing of fast reactor fuels. (author)

  13. Calculation study of TNPS spent fuel pool using burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exampled by the spent fuel pool of TNPS which is consist of 2 × 5 fuel storage racks, the spent fuel high-density storage based on burnup credit (BUC) and related criticality safety issues were studied. The MONK9A code was used to analyze keff, of different enrichment fuels at different burnups. A reference loading curve was proposed in accordance with the system keff's changing with the burnup of different initially enriched nuclear fuels. The capacity of the spent fuel pool increases by 31% compared with the one that does not consider BUC. (authors)

  14. PWR and BWR spent fuel assembly gamma spectra measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccaro, S.; Tobin, S. J.; Favalli, A.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Hu, J.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Trellue, H.; Vo, D.

    2016-10-01

    A project to research the application of nondestructive assay (NDA) to spent fuel assemblies is underway. The research team comprises the European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM), embodied by the European Commission, DG Energy, Directorate EURATOM Safeguards; the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB); two universities; and several United States national laboratories. The Next Generation of Safeguards Initiative-Spent Fuel project team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins, (3) estimate the plutonium mass, (4) estimate the decay heat, and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. This study focuses on spectrally resolved gamma-ray measurements performed on a diverse set of 50 assemblies [25 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies and 25 boiling water reactor (BWR) assemblies]; these same 50 assemblies will be measured with neutron-based NDA instruments and a full-length calorimeter. Given that encapsulation/repository and dry storage safeguards are the primarily intended applications, the analysis focused on the dominant gamma-ray lines of 137Cs, 154Eu, and 134Cs because these isotopes will be the primary gamma-ray emitters during the time frames of interest to these applications. This study addresses the impact on the measured passive gamma-ray signals due to the following factors: burnup, initial enrichment, cooling time, assembly type (eight different PWR and six different BWR fuel designs), presence of gadolinium rods, and anomalies in operating history. To compare the measured results with theory, a limited number of ORIGEN-ARP simulations were performed.

  15. Reevaluation of fuel enthalpy in NSRR test for high burnup fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the recent procedure of evaluation of the fuel enthalpy in the reactivity initiated accident (RIA) simulating tests performed at the nuclear safety research reactor (NSRR), and reports some important updates of the fuel enthalpies in the tests with high burnup PWR fuels. Previously, the fuel enthalpy had been evaluated by the procedure based on the short-life fission product measurement, i.e. a pellet slice was sampled from the test fuel rod after the NSRR test, a chemical separation process was applied to the solution of the pellet slice to separate barium, and the amount of Ba-140 was measured by gamma spectrometry on the separated barium. But a part of the results showed significant scattering even within the similar tests with similar fuels, which should have showed similar fuel enthalpies. The scattering appears to indicate the difficulty in treatment of the short-life nuclides after the completion of the NSRR test and unsuccessful measurement of the amount of fuel dissolved in the specimen preparation. Another difficulty of the procedure is that it is not repeatable for a specimen and so double check of an evaluation is not possible. Hence, an alternative procedure, which is based on the total amount of fissile materials evaluated by mass analysis, was developed and has been applied for the tests after 2003; the amount of fissile materials is input to a well-verified neutron transport calculation model for the NSRR reactor core to calculate a coupling factor of power densities between the test fuel rod and the NSRR driver fuel rods. This procedure does not require quickness and is repeatable, so it is applicable even many years later if the fuel sample is available. The recent procedure was thus applied to the tests before 2003, whose burnups are below 60 GWd/tU. It was shown that the fuel enthalpy had been significantly underestimated in the tests with high burnup PWR fuels: the test series HBO and TK. In this paper, the procedure

  16. Investigation of burnup credit implementation for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnup Credit allows considering the reactivity decrease due to fuel irradiation in criticality studies for the nuclear fuel cycle. Its implementation requires to carefully analyze the validity of the assumptions made to define the axial profile of the burnup and void fraction (for BWR), to determine the composition of the irradiated fuel and to compute the criticality simulation. In the framework of Burnup Credit implementation for BWR fuel, this paper proposes to investigate part of these items. The studies presented in this paper concern: the influence of the burnup and of the void fraction on BWR spent fuel content and on the effective multiplication factor of an infinite array of BWR assemblies. A code-to-code comparison for BWR fuel depletion calculations relevant to Burnup Credit is also performed. (authors)

  17. Burnup determination and age dating of spent nuclear fuel using noble gas isotopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the chopping and dissolving phases of reprocessing, gases (such as tritium, krypton, xenon, iodine, carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxide, and steam) are released. These gases are traditionally transferred to a gas-treatment system for treatment, release, and/or recycle. Because of their chemically inert nature, the xenon and krypton noble gases are generally released directly into the loser atmosphere through the facility's stack. These gases (being fission products) contain information about the fuel being reprocessed and may prove a valuable monitor of reprocessing activities. Two properties of the fuel that may prove valuable from a safeguards standpoint are the fuel burnup and the fuel age (or time since discharge from the reactor). Both can be used to aid in confirming declared activities, and the burnup is generally indicative of the usability of the fuel for fabricating nuclear explosives. A study has been ongoing at Los Alamos National Laboratory to develop a methodology to determine spent-fuel parameters from measured xenon and/or krypton isotopic ratios on-stack at reprocessing facilities. This study has resulted in the generation of the NOVA data analysis code, which links to a comprehensive database of reactor physics parameters (calculated using the Monteburns 3.01 code system). NOVA has been satisfactorily tested for burnup determination of weapons-grade fuel from a US production reactor. Less effort has been spent quantifying NOVA's ability to predict burnup and fuel age for power reactor fuel. The authors describe the results predicted by NOVA for xenon and krypton isotopic ratios measured after the dissolution of spent-fuel samples from the Borssele reactor. The Borssele reactor is a 450-MW(electric) pressurized water reactor (PWR) consisting of 15 x 15 KWU assemblies. The spent-fuel samples analyzed were single fuel rods removed from one assembly and dissolved at the La Hague reprocessing facility. The assembly average burnup was estimated at 32

  18. The effects of fission gas release on PWR fuel rod design and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of fission gas release on PWR fuel rod design and performance. Empirical models were developed from fission gas release data. Fission gas release during normal operation is a function of burnup. There is little additional fission gas release during anticipated transients. The empirical models were used to evaluate Westinghouse fuel rod designs. It was determined that fission gas release is not a limiting parameter for obtaining rod average burnups in the range of 50 000 to 60 000 MWD/MTU. Fission gas release during anticipated transients has a negligible effect on the margins to rod design limits. (author)

  19. The effects of fission gas release on PWR fuel rod design and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of fission gas release on PWR fuel rod design and performance. Empirical models were developed from fission gas release data. Fission gas release during normal operation is a function of burnup. There is little additional fission gas release during anticipated transients. The empirical models were used to evaluate Westinghouse fuel rod designs. It was determined that fission gas release is not a limiting parameter for obtaining rod average burnups in the range of 50,000 to 60,000 MWD/MTU. Fission gas release during anticipated transients has a negligible effect on the margins to rod design limits. (author)

  20. Thorium fuel cycle study for PWR applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Jae Yong; Kim, Myung Hyun [Kyung Hee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A nuclear design feasibility of thorium fueled high converting PWR was investigated. Two kinds of fuel design option were tested for the comparison with conventional UO{sub 2} fuel. The first one was an application of MHTGR pyro-carbon coated particle fuels. The other design was an application of MOX fuels as a ThO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2} ceramic pellet. In the case of carbon-coated particle fuels, there was no benefit in nuclear design aspect because enrichment of U-235 was required over 5 w/o in order to match with the K-infinite of Ulchin-3/4 fuels. However, the use of thorium based plutonium fuels in PWR gave favorable aspects in nuclear design such as flatter K-infinite curve, lower M. T. C. and lower F. T. C. than that of UO{sub 2} fuel. (author). 6 refs., 3 tabs., 6 figs.

  1. Program of monitoring PWR fuel in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the year 2000 the PWR utilities: Centrales Nucleares Almaraz-Trillo (CNAT) and Asociacion Nuclear Asco-Vandellos (ANAV), and ENUSA Industrias Avanzadas developed and executed a coordinated strategy named PIC (standing for Coordinated Research Program), for achieving the highest level of fuel reliability. The paper will present the scope and results of this program along the years and will summarize the way the changes are managed to ensure fuel integrity. The excellent performance of the ENUSA manufactured fuel in the PWR Spanish NPPs is the best indicator that the expectations on this program are being met. (Author)

  2. BNFL assessment of methods of attaining high burnup MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is clear that in order to maintain competitiveness with UO2 fuel, the burnups achievable in MOX fuel must be enhanced beyond the levels attainable today. There are two aspects which require attention when studying methods of increased burnups - cladding integrity and fuel performance. Current irradiation experience indicates that one of the main performance issues for MOX fuel is fission gas retention. MOX, with its lower thermal conductivity, runs at higher temperatures than UO2 fuel; this can result in enhanced fission gas release. This paper explores methods of effectively reducing gas release and thereby improving MOX burnup potential. (author)

  3. Manufacture of nuclear fuel elements for commercial PWR in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yibin Nuclear Fuel Element Plant (YFP) under the leadership of China National Nuclear Corporation is sole manufacturer in China to specialize in the production of fuel assemblies and associated core components for commercial PWR nuclear power plant. At the early of 1980's, it began to manufacture fuel assemblies and associated core components for the first core of QINSHAN 300 MW nuclear power plant designed and built by China itself. With the development of nuclear power industry in China and the demand for localization of nuclear fuel elements in the early 1990's, YFP cooperated with FRAMATOME France in technology transfer for design and manufacturing of AFA 2G fuel assembly and successfully supplied the qualified fuel assemblies for the reloads of two units of GUANGDONG Da Ya Bay 900 MW nuclear power plant (Da Ya Bay NPP), and has achieved the localization of fuel assemblies and nuclear power plants. Meanwhile, it supplied fuel assemblies and associated core components for the first core and further reloads of Pakistan CHASHMA 300 MW nuclear power plant which was designed and built by China, and now it is manufacturing AFA 2G fuel assemblies and associated core components for the first core of two units of NPQJVC 600 MW nuclear power plant. From 2001 on, YFP will be able to supply Da Ya Bay NPP with the third generation of fuel assembly-AFA 3G which is to realize a strategy to develop the fuel assembly being of long cycle reload and high burn-up

  4. PWR fuel behavior: lessons learned from LOFT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the experience with the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) fuel during loss-of-coolant experiments (LOCEs), operational and overpower transient tests and steady-state operation is presented. LOFT provides unique capabilities for obtaining pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel behavior information because it features the representative thermal-hydraulic conditions which control fuel behavior during transient conditions and an elaborate measurement system to record the history of the fuel behavior

  5. Radionuclide Release from High Burnup Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we investigate the production, evolution and release of radioactive fission products in a light water reactor. The production of the nuclides is determined by the neutronics, their evolution in the fuel by local temperature and by the fuel microstructure and the rate of release is governed by the scenario and the properties of the microstructure where the nuclides reside. The problem combines fields of reactor physics, fuel behaviour analysis and accident analysis. Radionuclide evolution during fuel reactor life is also important for determination of instant release fraction of final repository analysis. The source term problem is investigated by literature study and simulations with reactor physics code Serpent as well as fuel performance code ENIGMA. The capabilities of severe accident management codes MELCOR and ASTEC for describing high burnup structure effects are reviewed. As the problem is multidisciplinary in nature the transfer of information between the codes is studied. While the combining of the different fields as they currently are is challenging, there are some possibilities to synergy. Using reactor physics tools capable of spatial discretization is necessary for determining the HBS inventory. Fuel performance studies can provide insight how the HBS should be modelled in severe accident codes, however the end effect is probably very small considering the energetic nature of the postulated accidents in these scenarios. Nuclide release in severe accidents is affected by fuel oxidation, which is not taken into account by ANSI/ANS-5.4 but could be important in some cases, and as such, following the example of severe accident models would benefit the development of fuel performance code models. (author)

  6. High burnup (41 - 61 GWd/tU) BWR fuel behavior under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Takehiko; Kusagaya, Kazuyuki; Yoshinaga, Makio; Uetsuka, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-12-01

    High burnup boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel was pulse irradiated in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) to investigate fuel behavior under cold startup reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. Temperature, deformation, failure, and fission gas release behavior under the simulated RIA condition was studied in the tests. Fuel failure due to pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) did not occur in the tests with typical domestic BWR fuel at burnups up to 56 GWd/tU, because they had limited cladding embrittlement due to hydrogen absorption of about 100 ppm or less. However, the cladding failure occurred in tests with fuel at a burnup of 61 GWd/tU, in which the peak hydrogen content in the cladding was above 150 ppm. This type of failure was observed for the first time in BWR fuels. The cladding failure occurred at fuel enthalpies of 260 to 360 J/g (62 to 86 cal/g), which were higher than the PCMI failure thresholds decided by the Japanese Nuclear Safety Commission. From post-test examinations of the failed fuel, it was found that the crack in the BWR cladding progressed in a manner different from the one in PWR cladding failed in earlier tests, owing to its more randomly oriented hydride distribution. Because of these differences, the BWR fuel was judged to have failed at hydrogen contents lower than those of the PWR fuel. Comparison of the test results with code calculations revealed that the PCMI failure was caused by thermal expansion of pellets, rather than by the fission gas expansion in the pellets. The gas expansion, however, was found to cause large cladding hoop deformation later after the cladding temperature escalated. (author)

  7. Comparison of Computational Estimations of Reactivity Margin From Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper has presented the results of a computational benchmark and independent calculations to verify the benchmark calculations for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available from fission products and minor actinides in a PWR burnup credit storage/transport environment. The calculations were based on a generic 32 PWR-assembly cask. The differences between the independent calculations and the benchmark lie within 1% for the uniform axial burnup distribution, which is acceptable. The Δk for KENO - MCNP results are generally lower than the other Δk values, due to the fact that HELIOS performed the depletion part of the calculation for both the KENO and MCNP results. The differences between the independent calculations and the benchmark for the non-uniform axial burnup distribution were within 1.1%

  8. HEXBU-3D, a three-dimensional PWR-simulator program for hexagonal fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEXBU-3D is a three-dimensional nodal simulator program for PWR reactors. It is designed for a reactor core that consists of hexagonal fuel assemblies and of big follower-type control assemblies. The program solves two-group diffusion equations in homogenized fuel assembly geometry by a sophisticated nodal method. The treatment of feedback effects from xenon-poisoning, fuel temperature, moderator temperature and density and soluble boron concentration are included in the program. The nodal equations are solved by a fast two-level iteration technique and the eigenvalue can be either the effective multiplication factor or the boron concentration of the moderator. Burnup calculations are performed by tabulated sets of burnup-dependent cross sections evaluated by a cell burnup program. HEXBY-3D has been originally programmed in FORTRAN V for the UNIVAC 1108 computer, but there is also another version which is operable on the CDC CYBER 170 computer. (author)

  9. Parametric Study of the Effect of Burnable Poison Rods for PWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2001-09-28

    The Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) issued by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (U.S. NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office recommends restricting the use of burnup credit to assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers. This recommended restriction eliminates a large portion of the currently discharged spent fuel assemblies from cask loading, and thus severely limits the practical usefulness of burnup credit. In the absence of readily available information on burnable poison rod (BPR) design specifications and usage in U.S. pressurized-water-reactors (PWRs), and the subsequent reactivity effect of BPR exposure on discharged spent nuclear fuel (SNF), NRC staff has indicated a need for additional information in these areas. In response, this report presents a parametric study of the effect of BPR exposure on the reactivity of SNF for various BPR designs, fuel enrichments, and exposure conditions, and documents BPR design specifications. Trends in the reactivity effects of BPRs are established with infinite pin-cell and assembly array calculations with the SCALE and HELIOS code packages, respectively. Subsequently, the reactivity effects of BPRs for typical initial enrichment and burnup combinations are quantified based on three-dimensional (3-D) KENO V.a Monte Carlo calculations with a realistic rail-type cask designed for burnup credit. The calculations demonstrate that the positive reactivity effect due to BPR exposure increases nearly linearly with burnup and is dependent on the number, poison loading, and design of the BPRs and the initial fuel enrichment. Expected typical reactivity increases, based on one-cycle BPR exposure, were found to be less than 1% {Delta}k. Based on the presented analysis, guidance is offered on an appropriate approach for calculating bounding SNF isotopic data for assemblies exposed to BPRs. Although the analyses do not address the issue of validation of depletion methods for assembly designs with BPRs

  10. Parametric Study of the Effect of Burnable Poison Rods for PWR Burnup Credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) issued by the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office recommends restricting the use of burnup credit to assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers. This recommended restriction eliminates a large portion of the currently discharged spent fuel assemblies from cask loading, and thus severely limits the practical usefulness of burnup credit. In the absence of readily available information on burnable poison rod (BPR) design specifications and usage in U.S. pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and the subsequent reactivity effect of BPR exposure on discharged spent nuclear fuel (SNF), NRC staff has indicated a need for additional information in these areas. In response, this report presents a parametric study of the effect of BPR exposure on the reactivity of SNF for various BPR designs, fuel enrichments, and exposure conditions, and documents BPR design specifications. Trends in the reactivity effects of BPRs are established with infinite pin-cell and assembly array calculations with the SCALE and HELIOS code packages, respectively. Subsequently, the reactivity effects of BPRs for typical initial enrichment and burnup combinations are quantified based on three-dimensional (3-D) KENO V.a Monte Carlo calculations with a realistic rail-type cask designed for burnup credit. The calculations demonstrate that the positive reactivity effect due to BPR exposure increases nearly linearly with burnup and is dependent on the number, poison loading, and design of the BPRs and the initial fuel enrichment. Expected typical reactivity increases, based on one-cycle BPR exposure, were found to be less than 1% Δk. Based on the presented analysis, guidance is offered on an appropriate approach for calculating bounding SNF isotopic data for assemblies exposed to BPRs. Although the analyses do not address the issue of validation of depletion methods for assembly designs with BPRs, they

  11. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    The purpose of this research was to develop a burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model within Pennsylvania State University, Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Management Group (RDFMG) version of the subchannel thermal-hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF). The model takes into account first, the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity with high burnup; and second, the fuel thermal conductivity dependence on the Gadolinium content for both UO2 and MOX fuel rods. The modified Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) model for UO2 fuel rods and Duriez/Modified NFI Model for MOX fuel rods were incorporated into CTF and fuel centerline predictions were compared against Halden experimental test data and FRAPCON-3.4 predictions to validate the burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF. Experimental test cases from Halden reactor fuel rods for UO2 fuel rods at Beginning of Life (BOL), through lifetime without Gd2O3 and through lifetime with Gd 2O3 and a MOX fuel rod were simulated with CTF. Since test fuel rod and FRAPCON-3.4 results were based on single rod measurements, CTF was run for a single fuel rod surrounded with a single channel configuration. Input decks for CTF were developed for one fuel rod located at the center of a subchannel (rod-centered subchannel approach). Fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF were compared against the measurements from Halden experimental test data and the predictions from FRAPCON-3.4. After implementing the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF and validating the model with experimental data, CTF model was applied to steady state and transient calculations. 4x4 PWR fuel bundle configuration from Purdue MOX benchmark was used to apply the new model for steady state and transient calculations. First, one of each high burnup UO2 and MOX fuel rods from 4x4 matrix were selected to carry out single fuel rod calculations and fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD were compared against CTF /TORT-TD /FRAPTRAN

  12. Calculation of source term in spent PWR fuel assemblies for dry storage and shipping cask design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the ORIGEN-2 Coda, the decay heat and neutron and photon sources for an irradiated PWR fuel element have been calculated. Also, parametric studies on the behaviour of the magnitudes with the burn-up, linear heat power and irradiation and cooling times were performed. Finally, a comparison between our results and other design calculations shows a good agreement and confirms the validity of the used method. (Author) 6 refs

  13. Utilization of spent PWR fuel-advanced nuclear fuel cycle of PWR/CANDU synergism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUO Xiao-Dong; XIE Zhong-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    High neutron economy, on line refueling and channel design result in the unsurpassed fuel cycle flexibility and variety for CANDU reactors. According to the Chinese national conditions that China has both PWR and CANDU reactors and the closed cycle policy of reprocessing the spent PWR fuel is adopted, one of the advanced nuclear fuel cycles of PWR/CANDU synergism using the reprocessed uranium of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactor is proposed, which will save the uranium resource (~22.5%), increase the energy output (~41%), decrease the quantity of spent fuels to be disposed (~2/3) and lower the cost of nuclear power. Because of the inherent flexibility of nuclear fuel cycle in CANDU reactor, and the low radiation level of recycled uranium(RU), which is acceptable for CANDU reactor fuel fabrication, the transition from the natural uranium to the RU can be completed without major modification of the reactor core structure and operation mode. It can be implemented in Qinshan Phase Ⅲ CANDU reactors with little or no requirement of big investment in new design. It can be expected that the reuse of recycled uranium of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactor is a feasible and desirable strategy in China.

  14. An Empirical Approach to Bounding the Axial Reactivity Effects of PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. M. O' Leary; J. M. Scaglione

    2001-04-04

    One of the significant issues yet to be resolved for using burnup credit (BUC) for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is establishing a set of depletion parameters that produce an adequately conservative representation of the fuel's isotopic inventory. Depletion parameters (such as local power, fuel temperature, moderator temperature, burnable poison rod history, and soluble boron concentration) affect the isotopic inventory of fuel that is depleted in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). However, obtaining the detailed operating histories needed to model all PWR fuel assemblies to which BUC would be applied is an onerous and costly task. Simplifications therefore have been suggested that could lead to using ''bounding'' depletion parameters that could be broadly applied to different fuel assemblies. This paper presents a method for determining a set of bounding depletion parameters for use in criticality analyses for SNF.

  15. Research on irradiation behavior of superhigh burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the special team for LWR future technology development project was organized in Tokai Research Establishment from October, 1991 to the end of fiscal year 1993. Due to the delay of the introduction of fast reactors, LWRs are expected to be used for considerably long period also in 21st century, therefore, it aimed at the further advancement of LWRs, and as one of its embodiments, the concept of superhigh burnup fuel was investigated. The superhigh burnup fuel aims at the attainment of 100 GWd/t burnup, and it succeeded the achievement of the conceptual design study on 'superlong life LWRs'. It is generally recognized that the development of the new material that substitutes for zircaloy is indispensable for superhigh burnup fuel. The concept of superhigh burnup core and the specification of fuel, the research and development of superhigh burnup fuel, the research on the irradiation behavior and irradiation damage of fuel and the damage by ion irradiation, and the method and the results of the irradiation experiment using a tandem accelerator are reported. (K.I.)

  16. Research on irradiation behavior of superhigh burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Kimio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-03-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the special team for LWR future technology development project was organized in Tokai Research Establishment from October, 1991 to the end of fiscal year 1993. Due to the delay of the introduction of fast reactors, LWRs are expected to be used for considerably long period also in 21st century, therefore, it aimed at the further advancement of LWRs, and as one of its embodiments, the concept of superhigh burnup fuel was investigated. The superhigh burnup fuel aims at the attainment of 100 GWd/t burnup, and it succeeded the achievement of the conceptual design study on `superlong life LWRs`. It is generally recognized that the development of the new material that substitutes for zircaloy is indispensable for superhigh burnup fuel. The concept of superhigh burnup core and the specification of fuel, the research and development of superhigh burnup fuel, the research on the irradiation behavior and irradiation damage of fuel and the damage by ion irradiation, and the method and the results of the irradiation experiment using a tandem accelerator are reported. (K.I.).

  17. High burnup experience in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the high burnup experience of Westinghouse PWR fuel. The emphasis is on two regions of commercial PWR fuel that attained region average burnups greater than 36,000 MWD/MTU. One region operated under load follow conditions. The other region operated at base load conditions with a high average linear heat rating. Coolant activity data and post irradiation data were obtained. The post-irradiation data consisted of visual examinations, crud sampling, rod-to-rod dimensional changes, fuel column length changes, rod and assembly growth, assembly bow, fuel rod profilometry, grid spring relaxation, and fuel assembly sipping tests. The data showed that the fuel operated reliably to this burnup. Plans for irradiation to higher burnups are also discussed

  18. Criticality Analysis of Assembly Misload in a PWR Burnup Credit Cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J. C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-01-31

    The Interim Staff Guidance on bumup credit (ISG-8) for spent fuel in storage and transportation casks, issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Spent Fuel Project Office, recommends a bumup measurement for each assembly to confirm the reactor record and compliance with the assembly bumup value used for loading acceptance. This recommendation is intended to prevent unauthorized loading (misloading) of assemblies due to inaccuracies in reactor burnup records and/or improper assembly identification, thereby ensuring that the appropriate subcritical margin is maintained. This report presents a computational criticality safety analysis of the consequences of misloading fuel assemblies in a highcapacity cask that relies on burnup credit for criticality safety. The purpose of this report is to provide a quantitative understanding of the effects of fuel misloading events on safety margins. A wide variety of fuel-misloading configurations are investigated and results are provided for informational purposes. This report does not address the likelihood of occurrence for any of the misload configurations considered. For representative, qualified bumup-enrichment combinations, with and without fission products included, misloading two assemblies that are underburned by 75% results in an increase in keff of 0.025-0.045, while misloading four assemblies that are underburned by 50% also results in an increase in keff of 0.025-0.045. For the cask and conditions considered, a reduction in bumup of 20% in all assemblies results in an increase in kff of less than 0.035. Misloading a single fresh assembly with 3, 4, or 5 wt% 235U enrichment results in an increase in keffof--0.02, 0.04, or 0.06, respectively. The report concludes with a summary of these and other important findings, as well as a discussion of relevant issues that should be considered when assessing the appropriate role of burnup measurements.

  19. Fuel burnup analysis for the Moroccan TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A fuel burnup analysis of the 2 MW TRIGA MARK II Moroccan research reactor was established. ► Burnup calculations were done by means of the in-house developed burnup code BUCAL1. ► BUCAL1 uses the MCNP tallies directly in the calculation of the isotopic inventories. ► The reactor life time was found to be 3360 MW h considering full power operating conditions. ► Power factors and fluxes of the in-core irradiation positions are strongly affected by burnup. -- Abstract: The fundamental advantage and main reason to use Monte Carlo methods for burnup calculations is the possibility to generate extremely accurate burnup dependent one group cross-sections and neutron fluxes for arbitrary core and fuel geometries. Yet, a set of values determined for a material at a given position and time remains accurate only in a local region, in which neutron spectrum and flux vary weakly — and only for a limited period of time, during which changes of the local isotopic composition are minor. This paper presents the approach of fuel burnup evaluation used at the Moroccan TRIGA MARK II research reactor. The approach is essentially based upon the utilization of BUCAL1, an in-house developed burnup code. BUCAL1 is a FORTRAN computer code designed to aid in analysis, prediction, and optimization of fuel burnup performance in nuclear reactors. The code was developed to incorporate the neutron absorption reaction tally information generated directly by MCNP5 code in the calculation of fissioned or neutron-transmuted isotopes for multi-fueled regions. The fuel cycle length and changes in several core parameters such as: core excess reactivity, control rods position, fluxes at the irradiation positions, axial and radial power factors and other parameters are estimated. Besides, this study gives valuable insight into the behavior of the reactor and will ensure better utilization and operation of the reactor during its life-time and it will allow the establishment of

  20. Criticality safety evaluation for the direct disposal of used nuclear fuel. Preparation of data for burnup credit evaluation (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the direct disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF), criticality safety evaluation is one of the important issues since UNF contains some amount of fissile material. In the conventional criticality safety evaluation of UNF where the fresh fuel composition is conservatively assumed, neutron multiplication factor is becoming overestimated as the fuel enrichment increases. The recent development of higher-enrichment fuel has therefore enhanced the benefit of the application of burnup credit. When applying the burnup credit to the criticality safety analysis of the disposed fuel system, the safe-side estimation of the reactivity is required taking into account the factors which affect the neutron multiplication factor of the burnt fuel system such as the nuclide composition uncertainties. In this report, the effects of the several parameters on the reactivity of disposal canister model were evaluated for used PWR fuel. The parameters are relevant to the uncertainties of depletion calculation code, irradiation history, and axial and horizontal burnup distribution, which are known to be important effect in the criticality safety evaluation adopting burnup credit. The latest data or methodology was adopted in this evaluation, based on the various latest studies. The appropriate margin of neutron multiplication factor in the criticality safety evaluation for UNF can be determined by adopting the methodology described in the present study. (author)

  1. The Design Method for the ATR High Burnup MOX Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) has developed the advanced thermal reactor (ATR). PNC is demonstrating MOX fuel utilization in a prototype of ATR, Fugen (165 MWe), in which 638 MOX fuel assemblies have been loaded without a failure since 1979. PNC is developing the high burn-up MOX fuel for the ATR to contribute to MOX fuels for thermal reactors. The statistical design evaluation method that included the MOX fuel rod performance evaluation code 'FEMAXI-ATR' was developed for the ATR high bum-up MOX fuel rod; it was verified that the integrity of the fuel could be maintained over the whole irradiation period

  2. Mechanical Property Evaluation of High Burnup PHWR Fuel Clads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assurance of clad integrity is of vital importance for the safe and reliable extension of fuel burnup. In order to study the effect of extended burnup of 15,000 MW∙d/tU on the performance of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) fuel bundles of 19-element design, a couple of bundles were irradiated in Indian PHWR. The tensile property of irradiated cladding from one such bundle was evaluated using the ring tension test method. Using a similar method, claddings of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel elements irradiated in the pressurized water loop (PWL) of CIRUS to a burnup of 10,000 MW∙d/THM were tested. The tests were carried out both at ambient temperature and at 300°C. The paper will describe the test procedure, results generated and discuss the findings. (author)

  3. Burn-up measurement of irradiated rock-like fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain burn-up data of plutonium rock-like (ROX) fuels irradiated at JRR-3M in JAERI, destructive chemical analysis of zirconia or thoria system ROX fuels was performed after development of a new dissolution method. The dissolution method and procedure have been established using simulated ROX fuel, which is applicable to the hot-cell handling. Specimens for destructive chemical analysis were obtained by applying the present method to irradiated ROX fuels in a hot-cell. Isotopic ratios of neodymium and plutonium were determined by mass-spectrometry using the isotope dilution procedure. Burn-up of the irradiated ROX fuels was calculated by the 148Nd procedure using measured data. The burn-ups of thoria and zirconia system fuels that irradiated same location in the capsule showed almost same values. For the ROX fuel containing thorium, 233U was also determined by the same techniques in order to evaluate the effect of burn-up of thorium. As the result, it was found that the fission of 233U was below 1% of total fission number and could be negligible. In addition, americium and curium were determined by alpha-spectrometry. These data, together with isotopic ratio of plutonium, are important data to analyze the irradiation behavior of plutonium. (author)

  4. Effect of transplutonium doping on approach to long-life core in uranium-fueled PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peryoga, Yoga; Saito, Masaki; Artisyuk, Vladimir [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan). Research Lab. for Nuclear Reactors; Shmelev, Anatolii [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2002-08-01

    The present paper advertises doping of transplutonium isotopes as an essential measure to improve proliferation-resistance properties and burnup characteristics of UOX fuel for PWR. Among them {sup 241}Am might play the decisive role of burnable absorber to reduce the initial reactivity excess while the short-lived nuclides {sup 242}Cm and {sup 244}Cm decay into even plutonium isotopes, thus increasing the extent of denaturation for primary fissile {sup 239}Pu in the course of reactor operation. The doping composition corresponds to one discharged from a current PWR. For definiteness, the case identity is ascribed to atomic percentage of {sup 241}Am, and then the other transplutonium nuclide contents follow their ratio as in the PWR discharged fuel. The case of 1 at% doping to 20% enriched uranium oxide fuel shows the potential of achieving the burnup value of 100 GWd/tHM with about 20% {sup 238}Pu fraction at the end of irradiation. Since so far, americium and curium do not require special proliferation resistance measures, their doping to UOX would assist in introducing nuclear technology in developing countries with simultaneous reduction of accumulated minor actinides stockpiles. (author)

  5. Feasibility assessment of burnup credit in the criticality analysis of shipping casks with boiling water reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable interest in the allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history of power reactor fuel currently exists. This ''burnup credit'' issue has the potential to greatly reduce risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Recently, analyses have demonstrated the technical feasibility and estimated the risk and economic incentives for allowing burnup credit in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel shipping cask applications. This report summarizes the extension of the previous PWR technical feasibility assessment to boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel. This feasibility analysis aims to apply simple methods that adequately characterize the time-dependent isotopic compositions of typical BWR fuel. An initial analysis objective was to identify a simple and reliable method for characterizing BWR spent fuel. Two different aspects of fuel characterization were considered:l first, the generation of burn- up dependent material interaction probabilities; second, the prediction of material inventories over time (depletion). After characterizing the spent fuel at various stages of exposure and decay, three dimensional (3-D) models for an infinite array of assemblies and, in several cases, infinite arrays of assemblies in a typical shipping cask basket were analyzed. Results for assemblies without a basket provide reactivity control requirements as a function of burnup and decay, while results including the basket allow assessment of typical basket configurations to provide sufficient reactivity control for spent BWR fuel. Resulting basket worths and reactivity trends over time are then evaluated to determine whether burnup credit is needed and feasible in BWR applications

  6. TRIGA fuel burn-up calculations and its confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cesium (Cs-137) isotopic concentration due to irradiation of TRIGA Fuel Elements FE(s) is calculated and measured at the Atominstitute (ATI) of Vienna University of Technology (VUT). The Cs-137 isotope, as proved burn-up indicator, was applied to determine the burn-up of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor FE. This article presents the calculations and measurements of the Cs-137 isotope and its relevant burn-up of six selected Spent Fuel Elements SPE(s). High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy based non-destructive method is employed to measure spent fuel parameters. By the employment of this method, the axial distribution of Cesium-137 for six SPE(s) is measured, resulting in the axial burn-up profiles. Knowing the exact irradiation history and material isotopic inventory of an irradiated FE, six SPE(s) are selected for on-site gamma scanning using a special shielded scanning device developed at the ATI. This unique fuel inspection unit allows to scan each millimeter of the FE. For this purpose, each selected FE was transferred to the fuel inspection unit using the standard fuel transfer cask. Each FE was scanned at a scale of 1 cm of its active length and the Cs-137 activity was determined as proved burn-up indicator. The measuring system consists of a high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) together with suitable fast electronics and on-line PC data acquisition module. The absolute activity of each centimeter of the FE was measured and compared with reactor physics calculations. The ORIGEN2, a one-group depletion and radioactive decay computer code, was applied to calculate the activity of the Cs-137 and the burn-up of selected SPE. The deviation between calculations and measurements was in range from 0.82% to 12.64%.

  7. Use of burnup credit in criticality safety design analysis of spent fuel storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    temperature and density, presence of soluble boron in the core (PWR), use of fixed neutron absorbers (control rods, burnable poison rods, axial power shaping rods), use of integral burnable absorbers (gadolinium or erbium bearing fuel rods, IFBA rods). It will be shown how a bounding approach can be obtained for the impact of these parameters on the reactivity of the storage system. The criticality calculation procedure consists in the following main steps: Isotopic selection and validation; Validation of the criticality calculation code applied; Sensitivity studies on the reactivity effects of axial and horizontal burnup profiles of fuel assemblies; Determination of the criticality acceptance criterion (maximum allowable neutron multiplication factor including the impacts of all the mechanical and calculational uncertainties) and determination of the loading curve. The fundamentals of isotopic selection will be defined, and a survey of the benchmark experiments available for isotopic validation and validation of the criticality calculation code applied will be given. Since the parameters and conditions characterizing the benchmark experiments are usually different from the parameters and conditions describing the spent fuel storage system of interest, a method of checking the applicability of such experiments to the storage system will be briefly described. This method bases the applicability on the similarity of sensitivity coefficients which are defined for the underlying nuclear data characterizing the isotopic compositions and their effect on the spent fuel reactivity. The fact that the axial burnup distribution in a fuel assembly is non-uniform must be considered in the analysis of the storage system. The difference between the system's neutron multiplication factor obtained by using an axially varying burnup profile and the system's neutron multiplication factor obtained by assuming a uniform distribution of the averaged burnup of this profile is known as the 'end

  8. Size Design of CdZnTe Detector Shield for Measuring Burnup of Spent Fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>It is important to measure the burnup of spent fuel for nuclear safeguards, burnup credit and critical safety in spent-fuel reprocessing process. The purpose of this work is designing a portable device to

  9. Investigation of Burnup Credit Issues in BWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations for long-term-disposal criticality safety of spent nuclear fuel requires the application of burnup credit because of the large mass of fissile material that will be present in the repository. Burnup credit calculations are based on depletion calculations that provide a conservative estimate of spent fuel contents, followed by criticality calculations to assess the value of keff for a spent fuel cask or a fuel configuration under a variety of probabilistically derived events. In order to ensure that the depletion calculation is conservative, it is necessary to both qualify and quantify assumptions that can be made in depletion models used to characterize spent fuel. Most effort in the United States this decade has focused on burnup issues related to pressurized-water reactors. However, requirements for the permanent disposal of fuel from boiling-water reactors has necessitated development of methods for prediction of spent fuel contents for such fuels. Concomitant with such analyses, validation is also necessary. This paper provides a summary of initial efforts at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to better understand and validate spent fuel analyses for boiling-water-reactor fuel

  10. Nuclear fuel burn-up credit for criticality safety justification of spent nuclear fuel storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn-up credit analysis of RBMK-1000 an WWER-1000 spent nuclear fuel accounting only for actinides is carried out and a method is proposed for actinide burn-up credit. Two burn-up credit approaches are analyzed, which consider a system without and with the distribution of isotopes along the height of the fuel assembly. Calculations are performed using SCALE and MCNP computer codes

  11. Need for higher fuel burnup at the Hatch Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckhman, J.T. [Georgia Power Co., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Hatch is a BWR 4 and has been in operation for some time. The first unit became commercial about 1975. Obtaining higher burnups, or higher average discharge exposures, is nothing new at Hatch. Since we have started, the discharge exposure of the plant has increased. Now, of course, we are not approaching the numbers currently being discussed but, the average discharge exposure has increased from around 20,000 MWD/MTU in the early to mid-1980s to 34,000 MWD/MTU in 1994, I am talking about batch average values. There are also peak bundle and peak rod values. You will have to make the conversions if you think in one way or the other because I am talking in batch averages. During Hatch`s operating history we have had some problems with fuel failure. Higher burnup fuel raises a concern about how much fuel failure you are going to have. Fuel failure is, of course, an economic issue with us. Back in the early 1980s, we had a problem with crud-induced localized corrosion, known as CILC. We have gotten over that, but we had some times when it was up around 27 fuel failures a year. That is not a pleasant time to live through because it is not what you want from an economic viewpoint or any other. We have gotten that down. We have had some fuel failures recently, but they have not been related to fuel burnup or to corrosion. In fact, the number of failures has decreased from the early 1980s to the 90s even though burnup increased during that time. The fuel failures are more debris-related-type failures. In addition to increasing burnups, utilities are actively evaluating or have already incorporated power uprate and longer fuel cycles (e.g., 2-year cycles). The goal is to balance out the higher power density, longer cycles, higher burnup, and to have no leakers. Why do we as an industry want to have higher burnup fuel? That is what I want to tell you a little bit about.

  12. Neutronic Analysis of Advanced SFR Burner Cores using Deep-Burn PWR Spent Fuel TRU Feed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, an advanced sodium-cooled fast TRU (Transuranics) burner core using deep-burn TRU feed composition discharged from small LWR cores was neutronically analyzed to show the effects of deeply burned TRU feed composition on the performances of sodium-cooled fast burner core. We consider a nuclear park that is comprised of the commercial PWRs, small PWRs of 100MWe for TRU deep burning using FCM (Fully Ceramic Micro-encapsulated) fuels and advanced sodium-cooled fast burners for their synergistic combination for effective TRU burning. In the small PWR core having long cycle length of 4.0 EFPYs, deep burning of TRU up to 35% is achieved with FCM fuel pins whose TRISO particle fuels contain TRUs in their central kernel. In this paper, we analyzed the performances of the advanced SFR burner cores using TRU feeds discharged from the small long cycle PWR deep-burn cores. Also, we analyzed the effect of cooling time for the TRU feeds on the SFR burner core. The results showed that the TRU feed composition from FCM fuel pins of the small long cycle PWR core can be effectively used into the advanced SFR burner core by significantly reducing the burnup reactivity swing which reduces smaller number of control rod assemblies to satisfy all the conditions for the self controllability than the TRU feed composition discharged from the typical PWR cores

  13. Revaluation on measured burnup values of fuel assemblies by post-irradiation experiments at BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel composition data for 8x8 UO2, Tsuruga MOX and 9x9-A type UO2 fuel assemblies irradiated in BWR plants were measured. Burnup values for measured fuels based on Nd-148 method were revaluated. In this report, Nd-148 fission yield and energy per fission obtained by burnup analyses for measured fuels were applied and fuel composition data for the measured fuel assemblies were revised. Furthermore, the adequacies of revaluated burnup values were verified through the comparison with burnup values calculated by the burnup analyses for the measured fuel assemblies. (author)

  14. Fuel performance annual report for 1981. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, W.J.; Tokar, M.

    1982-12-01

    This annual report, the fourth in a series, provides a brief description of fuel performance during 1981 in commercial nuclear power plants. Brief summaries of fuel operating experience, fuel problems, fuel design changes and fuel surveillance programs, and high-burnup fuel experience are provided. References to additional, more detailed information and related NRC evaluations are included.

  15. PWR rod ejection accident: uncertainty analysis on a high burn-up core configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pallec, J.C.; Studer, E.; Royer, E. [CEA Saclay, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, Service d' Etudes de Reacteurs et de Modelisation Avancee (DEN/SERMA), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-07-01

    With the increasing of the discharge burn-up assembly, the rod ejection accident (REA) methodology based on the analyse of the hot spot from a decoupling methods of calculation does not allow to ensure the respect of safety criteria. The main reason is that the irradiated fuel certainly less solicited thermally is in the other hand more sensitive to a transient due to a rod ejection. Thus, the hot spot is not necessarily the sensitive point of the core. In the framework of high burn-up configurations, a new methodology tends to replace the former. It characterizes by the use of a best-estimate 3-dimensional modelling: coupling of the thermal hydraulics and neutronics, taking in account fuel properties depending on irradiation. To ensure the conservatism of the modelling response, this new approach has to be followed by an uncertainties analysis. Inputs from the benchmark RIA TMI-1 conducted by IRSN (France), NRC (United State of America) and KI (Russian) are used to perform a first analysis. The response of the modelling is the enthalpy deposited in an assembly. The analysis is based on the Design of Experiments (DoE) that permits to measure the weight of the main parameters and their interactions on the response. These last cannot be disregarded because they represent up to 20% of the penalizing uncertainty. This study shows that the main fuel modifications due to irradiation (radial power distribution, thermal properties degradation) have to be taken into account in a realistic thermal modelling during a strong transient.

  16. Development of mechanical test techniques for structural components of irradiated PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increase of fuel burnup and duration of fuel life remains one of the main methods for a nuclear power engineering enhancement. Properties of structural materials providing corrosion resistance, mechanical strength, and dimensional instability of the components of a fuel assembly (FA) are of great importance for fuel operational reliability in such fuel life cycles. Generally, PWR fuel assemblies consist of a top nozzle, spacer grid, bottom nozzle, and guide/instrumentation tubes. The top and bottom nozzle are fixed to the guide tubes using a screw or bulge method. The spacer grid fixed to the guide/instrumentation tubes using a spot weld or bulge method. To understand the in-reactor performance of PWR FA, several devices and test techniques have been developed for mechanical property tests. Among the structural components of PWR FA, a spacer grid, a hold down spring of a top nozzle and a connecting part of FA were considered. Experimental works were carried out for the unirradiated and irradiated components of advanced nuclear fuel assemblies for KSNPs and Westinghouse type PWRs at IMEF (Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) at KAERI. The developed techniques were verified through a hot cell tests. (author)

  17. Hot Operation of FTL for PWR Fuels Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sung Ho; Joung, Chang Yong; Lee, Jong Min; Park, Su Ki; Sim, Bong Sik; Ahn, Guk Hoon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Fuel Test Loop (FTL) in HANARO is the test facility which can conduct a fuel irradiation test with commercial NPPs' operating conditions such as their pressure, temperature, flow and water chemistry. The FTL is used for the irradiation test of PWR type or CNNDU type fuels. In this paper, the hot operation of FTL for irradiation test of PWR fuels is introduced. The experimental results show the excellence of operation performance

  18. Development of a reference spent fuel library of 17x17 PWR fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most common ways to investigate new Non-Destructive Assays (NDA) for the spent fuel assemblies are Monte Carlo simulations. In order to build realistic models the user must define in an accurate way the material compositions and the source terms in the system. This information can be obtained using burnup codes such as ORIGEN-ARP and ALEPH2.2, developed at SCK-CEN. These software applications allow the user to select the irradiation history of the fuel assembly and to calculate the corresponding isotopic composition and neutron/gamma emissions as a function of time. In the framework of the development of an innovative NDA for spent fuel verifications, SCK•CEN built an extensive fuel library for 17x17 PWR assemblies, using both ORIGEN-ARP and ALEPH2.2. The parameters considered in the calculations were initial enrichment, discharge burnup, and cooling time. The combination of these variables allows to obtain more than 1500 test cases. Considering the broad range of the parameters, the fuel library can be used for other purposes apart from spent fuel verifications, for instance for the direct disposal in geological repositories. In addition to the isotopic composition of the spent fuel, the neutron and photon emissions were also calculated and compared between the two codes. The comparison of the isotopic composition showed a good agreement between the codes for most of the relevant isotopes in the spent fuel. However, specific isotopes as well as neutron and gamma spectra still need to be investigated in detail.

  19. Dependence of control rod worth on fuel burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savva, P., E-mail: savvapan@ipta.demokritos.g [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Varvayanni, M., E-mail: melina@ipta.demokritos.g [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Catsaros, N., E-mail: nicos@ipta.demokritos.g [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece)

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: Diffusion and MC calculations for rod worth dependence on burnup and Xe in reactors. One-step rod withdrawal/insertion are used for rod worth estimation. The study showed that when Xe is present the rods worth is significantly reduced. Rod worth variation with burnup depends on rod position in core. Rod worth obtained with MC code is higher than that obtained from deterministic. - Abstract: One important parameter in the design and the analysis of a nuclear reactor core is the reactivity worth of the control rods, i.e. their efficiency to absorb excess reactivity. The control rod worth is affected by parameters such as the fuel burnup in the rod vicinity, the Xe concentration in the core, the operational time of the rod and its position in the core. In the present work, two different computational approaches, a deterministic and a stochastic one, were used for the determination of the rods worth dependence on the fuel burnup level and the Xe concentration level in a conceptual, symmetric reactor core, based on the MTR fuel assemblies used in the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1). For the deterministic approach the neutronics code system composed by the SCALE modules NITAWL and XSDRN and the diffusion code CITATION was used, while for the stochastic one the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI was applied. The study showed that when Xe is present in the core, the rods worth is significantly reduced, while the rod worth variation with increasing burnup depends on the rods position in the core grid. The rod worth obtained with the use of the Monte Carlo code is higher than the one obtained from the deterministic code.

  20. Optimization of small long-life PWR based on thorium fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subkhi, Moh Nurul, E-mail: nsubkhi@students.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology. Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung (Indonesia); Physics Dept., Faculty of Science and Technology, State Islamic University of Sunan Gunung Djati Bandung Jalan A.H Nasution 105 Bandung (Indonesia); Suud, Zaki, E-mail: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology. Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    A conceptual design of small long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium fuel has been investigated in neutronic aspect. The cell-burn up calculations were performed by PIJ SRAC code using nuclear data library based on JENDL 3.2, while the multi-energy-group diffusion calculations were optimized in three-dimension X-Y-Z geometry of core by COREBN. The excess reactivity of thorium nitride with ZIRLO cladding is considered during 5 years of burnup without refueling. Optimization of 350 MWe long life PWR based on 5% {sup 233}U & 2.8% {sup 231}Pa, 6% {sup 233}U & 2.8% {sup 231}Pa and 7% {sup 233}U & 6% {sup 231}Pa give low excess reactivity.

  1. Phenomena and Parameters Important to Burnup Credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the mid-1980s, a significant number of studies have been directed at understanding the phenomena and parameters important to implementation of burnup credit in out-of-reactor applications involving pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel. The efforts directed at burnup credit involving boiling-water-reactor (BWR) spent fuel have been more limited. This paper reviews the knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the US and other countries in the study of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation for transport and dry cask storage is given

  2. Fuel burnup calculation of a research reactor plate element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nadia Rodrigues dos; Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: nadiasam@gmail.com, E-mail: zrlima@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This work consists in simulating the burnup of two different plate type fuel elements, where one is the benchmark MTR of the IAEA, which is made of an alloy of uranium and aluminum, while the other belonging to a typical multipurpose reactor is composed of an alloy of uranium and silicon. The simulation is performed using the WIMSD-5B computer code, which makes use of deterministic methods for solving neutron transport. In developing this task, fuel element equivalent cells were calculated representing each of the reactors to obtain the initial concentrations of each isotope constituent element of the fuel cell and the thicknesses corresponding to each region of the cell, since this information is part of the input data. The compared values of the k∞ showed a similar behavior for the case of the MTR calculated with the WIMSD-5B and EPRI-CELL codes. Relating the graphs of the concentrations in the burnup of both reactors, there are aspects very similar to each isotope selected. The application WIMSD-5B code to calculate isotopic concentrations and burnup of the fuel element, proved to be satisfactory for the fulfillment of the objective of this work. (author)

  3. Destructive radiochemical analysis of uraniumsilicide fuel for burnup determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gysemans, M.; Bocxstaele, M. van; Bree, P. van; Vandevelde, L.; Koonen, E.; Sannen, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium); Guigon, B. [CEA, Centre de Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    During the design phase of the French research reactor Jules Horowitz (RJH) several types of low enriched uranium fuels (LEU), i.e. <20% {sup 235}U enrichment, are studied as possible candidate fuel elements for the reactor core. One of the LEU fuels that is taken into consideration is an uraniumsilicide based fuel with U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed in an aluminium matrix. The development and evaluation of such a new fuel for a research reactor requires an extensive testing and qualification program, which includes destructive radiochemical analysis to determine the burnup of irradiated fuel with a high accuracy. In radiochemistry burnup is expressed as atom percent burnup and is a measure for the number of fissions that have occurred per initial 100 heavy element atoms (%FIMA). It is determined by measuring the number of heavy element atoms in the fuel and the number of atoms of selected key fission products that are proportional to the number of fissions that occurred during irradiation. From the few fission products that are suitable as fission product monitor, the stable Nd-isotopes {sup 143}Nd, {sup 144}Nd, {sup 145}Nd, {sup 146}Nd, {sup 148Nd}, {sup 150}Nd and the gamma-emitters {sup 137}Cs and {sup 144}Ce are selected for analysis. Samples form two curved U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} plates, with a fuel core density of 5.1 and 6.1 g U/cm{sup 3} (35% {sup 235}U) and being irradiated in the BR2 reactor of SCK x CEN{sup [1]}, were analyzed. (orig.)

  4. An extension of the validation of SCALE (SAS2H) isotopic predictions for PWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.; Hermann, O.W.

    1996-09-01

    Isotopic characterization of spent fuel via depletion and decay calculations is necessary for determination of source terms. Unlike fresh fuel assumptions typically used in criticality safety analysis of spent fuel configurations, burnup credit applications also rely on depletion and decay calculations to predict spent fuel composition; these isotopics are used in subsequent criticality calculations to assess the reduced worth of spent fuel. To validate the depletion codes and data, experiment is compared with predictions; such comparisons have been done in earlier ORNL work. This report describes additional independent measurements and corresponding calculations as a supplement. The current work includes measured isotopic data from 19 spent fuel samples from the Italian Trino Vercelles PWR and the US Turkey Point-3 PWR. In addition, an approach to determine biases and uncertainties between calculated and measured isotopic concentrations is discussed, together with a method to statistically combine these terms to obtain a conservative estimate of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results on combination of measured-to-calculated ratios are presented. The results described herein represent an extension to a new reactor design and spent fuel samples with enrichment as high as 3.9 wt% {sup 235}U. Consistency with the earlier work for each of two different cross-section libraries suggests that the estimated biases for each of the isotopes in the earlier work are reasonably good estimates.

  5. The implementation of burnup credit in VVER-440 spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The countries using Russian reactors VVER-440 cooperate in reactor physics in Atomic Energy Research (AER). One of topic areas is 'Physical Problems of Spent Fuel, Radwaste and Decommissioning' (Working Group E). In this article, in the first part is an overview about our activity for numerical and experimental verification of codes which participants use for calculation of criticality, isotopic concentration, activity, neutron and gamma sources and shielding is shown. The set of numerical benchmarks (CB1, CB2, CB3 and CB4) is very similar (the same idea, the VVER-440) to the OECD/NEA/NSC Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmarks, Phases 1 and 2. In the second part, verification of the SCALE 4.4 system (only criticality and nuclide concentrations) for VVER-440 fuel is shown. In the third part, dependence of criticality on burnup (only actinides and actinides + fission products) for transport cask C30 with VVER-440 fuel by optimal moderation is shown. In the last part, current status in implementation burnup credit in Slovakia is shown. (author)

  6. Nuclide Importance to Criticality Safety, Decay Heating, and Source Terms Related to Transport and Interim Storage of High-Burnup LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I. C.; Ryman, J. C.

    2000-12-11

    This report investigates trends in the radiological decay properties and changes in relative nuclide importance associated with increasing enrichments and burnup for spent LWR fuel as they affect the areas of criticality safety, thermal analysis (decay heat), and shielding analysis of spent fuel transport and storage casks. To facilitate identifying the changes in the spent fuel compositions that most directly impact these application areas, the dominant nuclides in each area have been identified and ranked by importance. The importance is investigated as a function of increasing burnup to assist in identifying the key changes in spent fuel characteristics between conventional- and extended-burnup regimes. Studies involving both pressurized water-reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies and boiling-water-reactor (BWR) assemblies are included. This study is seen to be a necessary first step in identifying the high-burnup spent fuel characteristics that may adversely affect the accuracy of current computational methods and data, assess the potential impact on previous guidance on isotopic source terms and decay-heat values, and thus help identify areas for methods and data improvement. Finally, several recommendations on the direction of possible future code validation efforts for high-burnup spent fuel predictions are presented.

  7. Modeling of the thermo-mechanical behaviour of the PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reviews the various physical phenomena that take place in an irradiated fuel rod and presents the development of the thermo-mechanical codes able to simulate them. Though technically simple the fuel rod is the place where appear 4 types of process: thermal, gas behaviour, mechanical and corrosion that combine involving 5 elements: the fuel pellet, the fuel clad, the fuel-clad gap, the inside volume and the coolant. For instance the pellet is the place where the following mechanical processes took place: thermal dilatation, elastic deformation, creep deformation, densification, solid swelling, gaseous swelling and cracking. The first industrial code simulating the behaviour of the fuel rod was COCCINEL, it was developed by AREVA teams from the American PAD code that was included in the Westinghouse license. Today the GALILEO code has replaced the COPERNIC code that was developed in the beginning of the 2000 years. GALILEO is a synthesis of the state of the art of the different models used in the codes validated for PWR and BWR. GALILEO has been validated on more than 1500 fuel rods concerning PWR, BWR and specific reactors like Siloe, Osiris, HFR, Halden, Studsvik, BR2/3,...) and also for extended burn-ups. (A.C.)

  8. Bias estimates used in lieu of validation of fission products and minor actinides in MCNP Keff calculations for PWR burnup credit casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Don E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Marshall, William J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wagner, John C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowen, Douglas G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation recently issued Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) 8, Revision 3. This ISG provides guidance for burnup credit (BUC) analyses supporting transport and storage of PWR pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in casks. Revision 3 includes guidance for addressing validation of criticality (keff) calculations crediting the presence of a limited set of fission products and minor actinides (FP&MA). Based on previous work documented in NUREG/CR-7109, recommendation 4 of ISG-8, Rev. 3, includes a recommendation to use 1.5 or 3% of the FP&MA worth to conservatively cover the bias due to the specified FP&MAs. This bias is supplementary to the bias and bias uncertainty resulting from validation of keff calculations for the major actinides in SNF and does not address extension to actinides and fission products beyond those identified herein. The work described in this report involves comparison of FP&MA worths calculated using SCALE and MCNP with ENDF/B-V, -VI, and -VII based nuclear data and supports use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias when either SCALE or MCNP codes are used for criticality calculations, provided the other conditions of the recommendation 4 are met. The method used in this report may also be applied to demonstrate the applicability of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias to other codes using ENDF/B V, VI or VII based nuclear data. The method involves use of the applicant s computational method to generate FP&MA worths for a reference SNF cask model using specified spent fuel compositions. The applicant s FP&MA worths are then compared to reference values provided in this report. The applicants FP&MA worths should not exceed the reference results by more than 1.5% of the reference FP&MA worths.

  9. Assessment of reactivity transient experiments with high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozer, O.; Yang, R.L.; Rashid, Y.R.; Montgomery, R.O.

    1996-03-01

    A few recent experiments aimed at determining the response of high-burnup LWR fuel during a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) have raised concerns that existing failure criteria may be inappropriate for such fuel. In particular, three experiments (SPERT CDC-859, NSRR HBO-1 and CABRI REP Na-1) appear to have resulted in fuel failures at only a fraction of the anticipated enthalpy levels. In evaluating the results of such RIA simulation experiments, however, it is necessary that the following two key considerations be taken into account: (1) Are the experiments representative of conditions that LWR fuel would experience during an in-reactor RIA event? (2) Is the fuel that is being utilized in the tests representative of the present (or anticipated) population of LWR fuel? Conducting experiments under conditions that can not occur in-reactor can trigger response modes that could not take place during in-reactor operation. Similarly, using unrepresentative fuel samples for the tests will produce failure information that is of limited relevance to commercial LWR fuel. This is particularly important for high-burnup fuel since the manner under which the test samples are base-irradiated prior to the test will impact the mechanical properties of the cladding and will therefore affect the RIA response. A good example of this effect can be seen in the results of the SPERT CDC-859 test and in the NSRR JM-4 and JM-5 tests. The conditions under which the fuel used for these tests was fabricated and/or base-irradiated prior to the RIA pulse resulted in the formation of multiple cladding defects in the form of hydride blisters. When this fuel was subjected to the RIA power pulse, it failed by developing multiple cracks that were closely correlated with the locations of the pre-existing hydride blisters. In the case of the JM tests, many of the cracks formed within the blisters themselves and did not propagate beyond the heavily hydrided regions.

  10. Actinide-only burnup credit for spent fuel transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conservative methodology is described that would allow taking credit for burn up in the criticality safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel packages. Requirements for its implementation include isotopic and criticality validation, generation of package loading criteria using limiting parameters, and assembly burn up verification by measurement. The method allows credit for the changes in the 234U, 235U, 236U, 238U, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, and 241Am concentrations with burnup. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. Analyses are included regarding the methodology's financial benefits and conservative margin. It is estimated that the proposed actinide-only burnup credit methodology would save 20% of the transport costs. Nevertheless, the methodology includes a substantial margin. Conservatism due to the isotopic correction factors, limiting modelling parameters, limiting axial profiles and exclusion of the fission products ranges from 10 to 25% k. (author)

  11. In-core fuel management amd attainable fuel burn-up in TRIGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of in-core fuel management in research reactors, and especially in TRIGA, are discussed. Calculations made to determine the attainable fuel burn-up values of various fuel element types in the Otaniemi TRIGA Mark II reactor are described and the results obtained are given. Recommendations are given of how to perform the in-core fuel management to achieve good fuel utilization. The results obtained indicate that burn-up values of up to 5 and 2.5 MWd/element can be achieved for the 8 wt-% U Al clad and the 8.5 wt-% U SS clad elements, respectively. (author)

  12. Advanced fuel developments to improve fuel cycle cost in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasingly lower fuel cycle costs and higher plant availability factors have been two crucial components in keeping the overall cost of electricity produced by nuclear low and competitive with respect to other energy sources. The continuous quest to reduce fuel cycle cost has resulted in some consolidated trends in LWR fuel management schemes: smaller number of feed fuel assemblies with longer residence time; longer cycles, with 18-month cycle as the predominant option, and some plants already operating on, or considering, 24-month refueling intervals; higher power ratings with many plants undergoing power uprates. In order to maintain or improve fuel utilization for the longer cycles and/or higher power ratings, the licensed limits in fuel fissile content (5.0 w/o U235 enrichment) and discharge burnup (62 GWd/tHM for the peak pin) have been approached. In addition, Zr-based fuel cladding materials are also being challenged by the resulting increased duty. For the above reasons further improvements in fuel cycle cost have to overcome one or more of the current limits. This paper discusses an option to break through this 'stalemate', i.e. uranium nitride (UN) fuel with SiC clad. In UN the higher density of the nitride with respect to the oxide fuel leads to higher fissile content and reduction in the number of feed assemblies, improved fuel utilization and potentially higher specific powers. The SiC clad, among other benefits, enables higher clad irradiation, thereby exploiting the full potential of UN fuel. An alternative to employing UN fuel is to maintain UO2 fuel but boost the fissile content increasing the U235 enrichment beyond the 5 w/o limit. The paper describes and compares the potential benefits on fuel cycle cost of either option using realistic full-core calculations and ensuing economic analysis performed using Westinghouse in-house reactor physics tools and methodologies. (author)

  13. Sensitivity analysis of a PWR fuel element using zircaloy and silicon carbide claddings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Rochkhudson B. de; Cardoso, Fabiano; Salome, Jean A.D.; Pereira, Claubia; Fortini, Angela, E-mail: rochkhudson@ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The alloy composed of zirconium has been used effectively for over 50 years in claddings of nuclear fuel, especially for PWR type reactors. However, to increase fuel enrichment with the aim of raising the burning and maintaining the safety of nuclear plants is of great relevance the study of new materials that can replace safely and efficiently zircaloy cladding. Among several proposed material, silicon carbide (SiC) has a potential to replace zircaloy as fuel cladding material due to its high-temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity. In this paper, the goal is to expand the study with silicon carbide cladding, checking its behavior when submitted to an environment with boron, burnable poison rods, and temperature variations. Sensitivity calculation and the impact in multiplication factor to both claddings, zircaloy and silicon carbide, were performed during the burnup. The neutronic analysis was made using the SCALE 6.0 (Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation) code. (author)

  14. Composition and Distribution of Tramp Uranium Contamination on BWR and PWR Fuel Rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a joint research project of VGB and AREVA NP GmbH the behaviour of alpha nuclides in nuclear power plants with light water reactors has been investigated. Understanding the source and the behaviour of alpha nuclides is of big importance for planning radiation protection measures for outages and upcoming dismantling projects. Previous publications have shown the correlation between plant specific alpha contamination of the core and the so called 'tramp fuel' or 'tramp uranium' level which is linked to the defect history of fuel assemblies and accordingly the amount of previously washed out fuel from defective fuel rods. The methodology of tramp fuel estimation is based on fission product concentrations in reactor coolant but also needs a good knowledge of tramp fuel composition and in-core distribution on the outer surface of fuel rods itself. Sampling campaigns of CRUD deposits of irradiated fuel assemblies in different NPPs were performed. CRUD analyses including nuclide specific alpha analysis have shown systematic differences between BWR and PWR plants. Those data combined with literature results of fuel pellet investigations led to model improvements showing that a main part of fission products is caused by fission of Pu-239 an activation product of U-238. CRUD investigations also gave a better picture of the in-core composition and distribution of the tramp uranium contamination. It was shown that the tramp uranium distribution in PWR plants is time dependent. Even new fuel assemblies will be notably contaminated after only one cycle of operation. For PWR applies the following logic: the higher the local power the higher the contamination. With increasing burnup the local rod power usually decreases leading to decreasing tramp uranium contamination on the fuel rod surface. This is not applicable for tramp uranium contamination in BWR. CRUD contamination (including the tramp fuel deposits) is much more fixed and is constantly increasing

  15. Nuclear fuel behaviour modelling at high burnup and its experimental support. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    of MOX behaviour up to that for UO2 fuel. There appears to be a good consensus on how MOX fuel performance differs from UO2, and on the issues that need to be addressed to achieve higher burnups. The final sessions of the TCM considered the current status of integrated fuel behaviour codes and the challenges for higher burnup modelling. The meeting provided a valuable forum for a review of the state-of-the-art. Presentations were given on a number of existing codes and others under development, covering PWR, WWER, BWR and CANDU fuel performance. Some specialised methods for specific advanced fuel types were also discussed. Recommendations on future work in the area of fission gas release; clad modelling; and MOX fuel modelling are included

  16. Criticality calculations of a generic fuel container for fuel assemblies PWR, by means of the code MCNP; Calculos de criticidad de un contenedor de combustible generico para ensambles combustibles PWR, mediante el codigo MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas E, S.; Esquivel E, J.; Ramirez S, J. R., E-mail: samuel.vargas@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The purpose of the concept of burned consideration (Burn-up credit) is determining the capacity of the calculation codes, as well as of the nuclear data associates to predict the isotopic composition and the corresponding neutrons effective multiplication factor in a generic container of spent fuel during some time of relevant storage. The present work has as objective determining this capacity of the calculation code MCNP in the prediction of the neutrons effective multiplication factor for a fuel assemblies arrangement type PWR inside a container of generic storage. The calculations are divided in two parts, the first, in the decay calculations with specified nuclide concentrations by the reference for a pressure water reactor (PWR) with enriched fuel to 4.5% and a discharge burned of 50 GW d/Mtu. The second, in criticality calculations with isotopic compositions dependent of the time for actinides and important fission products, taking 30 time steps, for two actinide groups and fission products. (Author)

  17. Experience and reliability of Framatome ANP's PWR and BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on three decades of fuel supply to 169 PWR and BWR plants on four continents, Framatome ANP has a very large database from operating experience feedback. The performance of Framatome PWR and BWR fuel is discussed for the period 1992-2001 with special emphasis on fuel failures, countermeasures and their effectiveness. While PWR fuel performance in most reactors has been good, the performance in some years did suffer from special circumstances that caused grid-to-rod fretting failures in few PWRs. After solving this problem, fuel of all types showed high reliability again. Especially the current PWR fuel products AFA 3G, HTP, Mark B and Mark BW showed a very good operating performance. Fuel reliability of Framatome ANP BWR fuel has been excellent over the last decade with average annual fuel rod failure rates under 1x10-5 since 1991. More than 40% of all BWR fuel failures in the 1992-2001 decade were caused by debris fretting. The debris problem has been remedied with the FUELGUARDTM lower tie plate, and by reactor operators' efforts to control the sources of debris. PCI, the main failure mechanism in former periods, affected only 10 rods. All of these rods had non-liner cladding. (author)

  18. Nondestructive analysis of RA reactor fuel burnup, Program for burnup calculation base on relative yield of 106Ru, 134Cs and 137Cs in the irradiated fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnup of low enriched metal uranium fuel of the RA reactor is described by two chain reactions. Energy balance and material changes in the fuel are described by systems of differential equations. Numerical integration of these equations is base on the the reactor operation data. Neutron flux and percent of Uranium-235 or more frequently yield of epithermal neutrons in the neutron flux, is determined by iteration from the measured contents of 106Ru, 134Cs and 137Cs in the irradiated fuel. The computer program was written in FORTRAN-IV. Burnup is calculated by using the measured activities of fission products. Burnup results are absolute values

  19. The traveller: a new look for PWR fresh fuel packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayley, B.; Stilwell, W.E.; Kent, N.A. [Westinghouse Electric Co., Columbia, SC (United States)

    2004-07-01

    The Traveller PWR fresh fuel shipping package represents a radical departure from conventional PWR fuel package designs. This paper follows the development effort from the establishment of goals and objectives, to intermediate testing and analysis, to final testing and licensing. The discussion starts with concept origination and covers the myriad iterations that followed until arriving at a design that would meet the demanding licensing requirements, last for 30 years, and would be easy to load and unload fuel, easy to handle, inexpensive to manufacture and transport, and simple and inexpensive to maintain.

  20. The traveller: a new look for PWR fresh fuel packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Traveller PWR fresh fuel shipping package represents a radical departure from conventional PWR fuel package designs. This paper follows the development effort from the establishment of goals and objectives, to intermediate testing and analysis, to final testing and licensing. The discussion starts with concept origination and covers the myriad iterations that followed until arriving at a design that would meet the demanding licensing requirements, last for 30 years, and would be easy to load and unload fuel, easy to handle, inexpensive to manufacture and transport, and simple and inexpensive to maintain

  1. Make use of EDF orientations in PWR fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EDF experience acquired permits to allow the PWR fuel performances and to make use of better management. In this domain low progress can be given considerable financial profits. The industrial and commercial structures, the time constant of the fuel cycle, has for consequence that the electric utilities can take advantage only progressively of the expected profits

  2. A comparative study of fuel management in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study about fuel management in PWR reactors, where not only the conventional uranium cycle is considered, but also the thorium cycle as an alternative is presented. The final results are presented in terms of U3O8 demand and SWU and the approximate costs of the principal stages of the fuel cycle, comparing with the stardand cycle without recycling. (E.G.)

  3. Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes testing designed to determine the ability of high burnup (HBU) (>45 GWd/MTU) spent fuel to maintain its integrity under normal conditions of transportation. An innovative system, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT), has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test and evaluate the mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under conditions relevant to storage and transportation. The CIRFT system is composed of a U-frame equipped with load cells for imposing the pure bending loads on the SNF rod test specimen and measuring the in-situ curvature of the fuel rod during bending using a set up with three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs).

  4. Development of the Combination Method of PWR Spent Fuel for DUPIC Fuel Preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ju Ho; Kim, S. K.; Jung, T. C.; June, T. H.; Lee, J. M.; Kim, I. S.; Park, C. S.; Kim, M. J.; An, J. I.; Park, S. H. [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-15

    Optimum finding method of PWR spent fuel was developed in application of DUPIC fuel composition to nuclear fuel production. In order to make the database of the PWR spent fuel for the optimum composition, composition data of the PWR spent fuels from Youngkwang unit 1 and 2, Kori unit 3 and 4 and Uljin unit 1 and 2 were collected, analyzed and stored. Artificial intelligent access was attempted in optimizing the composition, and the combination algorithm for PWR spent fuel was developed. In this work database of the composition data of the PWR spent fuels from Youngkwang unit 1 and 2, Kori unit 3 and 4 and Uljin unit 1 and 2 as well as their combination algorithm for PWR spent fuel were developed. The combination algorithm is to find the combination of the spent fuel assembly which is quite close to the requirement per unit mass of DUPIC fuel. The required data are total weight of the fuel, tolerance of the errors, importance of the elements and the discharge data. This combination algorithm enables to find the optimum PWR spent fuel assembly for DUPIC fuel with the database of the spent fuels according to the DUPIC fuel standards. The combination algorithm developed in this work can afford the technical support to fuel supply in preparing the DUPIC fuel, and make contribution in DUPIC fuel cycle technology. It can be directly used in DUPIC fuel cycle technology, and can be also used in the management of the spent fuels with respect to their compositions and ingredients as well as the nuclear safeguards. Composition of the PWR spent fuel in each assembly depends on the initial concentration, degree of combustion, specific power, and its location in the reactor core. They may be affected by the kind of fuel rod and its axial length. Therefore, analysis procedures in these regards should be established for the effective application of the results of this work. 6 refs., 12 tabs., 46 figs. (author)

  5. Long term Integrity of PWR Spent Fuel in Dry Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The newly established organization KRMC (Korea radioactive waste management corporation) which is responsible for all kinds of radioactive waste generated in the Republic of Korea launched the PWR spent fuel dry storage research project in June 2009. This project has objectives to develop a storage system and evaluate the integrity of PWR fuel in dry storage. The project consists of three steps. At first step, it would develop own degradation models by referring to pre-exist good models and develop the hot test scenarios. Second step, test facilities would be constructed and used for testing the degradation behaviour in each mechanisms and in total. As a final step, total evaluation code would be developed by integrating each degradation model produced in the first step and the test data produced in the second step. All the activities would be summarized into a report and applied to licensing work. The Republic of Korea PWR spent fuels have unique characteristics of various fuel types (array type, clad material) and high capacity factor (maximum usage of fuel which is bad for integrity). These facts could impact on the research ranges of experimental data needed for degradation evaluation. In this research, spent fuel performance data concerning long term dry storage will be analysed and the major degradation mechanisms like creep and hydride behaviour will be studied and proposed for Korean PWR spent fuels

  6. Investigation of research and development subjects for very high burnup fuel. Development of fuel cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagase, Fumihisa; Suzuki, Masahide; Furuta, Teruo; Suzuki, Yasufumi; Hayashi, Kimio; Amano, Hidetoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1993-05-01

    Plutonium use as well as burnup extension of UO{sub 2} fuel is an important subject for the strategy of utilization of the nuclear energy in LWRs. A higher burnup is favorable to MOX fuel in economic respect and for effective use of plutonium. Therefore, the concept of a `very high burnup` aiming at the maximum bundle burnup of 100GWd/t has been proposed assuming use of MOX fuel. The authors have investigated research and development subjects for the fuel pellet and the cladding material to be developed. The present report shows the results on the cladding material. In order to achieve a very high burnup, development of the cladding material with higher corrosion and radiation resistance compared with Zircaloy is necessary. In this report, zirconium based alloy, stainless steel, nickel and titanium based alloys, ceramics, etc. were reviewed considering water corrosion resistance, thermal and mechanical properties, radiation effects, etc. Furthermore, capability of these materials as the fuel cladding was discussed focusing on water side corrosion and radiation effect on mechanical properties. As a result, candidate materials at present and the required research tasks were shown with issues for the development. (author) 66 refs.

  7. Burn-up measurements at TRIGA fuel elements containing strong burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactivity method of determining the burn-up of research reactor fuel elements is applied to the highly enriched FLIP elements of TRIGA reactors. In contrast to other TRIGA fuel element types, the reactivity of FLIP elements increases with burn-up due to consumption of burnable poison. 33 fuel elements with burn-up values between 3% and 14% were investigated. The experiments showed that variations in the initial fuel composition significantly influence the reactivity and, consequently, increase the inaccuracy of the burn-up measurements. Particularly important are variations in the initial concentration of erbium, which is used as burnable poison in FLIP fuel. A method for reducing the effects of the material composition variations on the measured reactivity is presented. If it is applied, the accuracy of the reactivity method for highly poisoned fuel elements becomes comparable to the accuracy of other methods for burn-up determination. (orig.)

  8. An overview of burnup credit application in spent nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status of burnup credit application has been overviewed for spent nuclear fuel management. It was revealed that the use of burnup credit is practically limited to spent nuclear fuel storage, for which selected actinides-only are taken into account

  9. Investigation of research and development subjects for the Very High Burnup Fuel. Development of fuel pellet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Kimio; Amano, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Yasufumi; Furuta, Teruo; Nagase, Fumihisa; Suzuki, Masahide [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1993-06-01

    A concept of the Very High Burnup Fuel aiming at a maximum fuel assembly burnup of 100 GWd/t has been proposed in terms of burnup extension, utilization of Pu and transmutation of transuranium elements (TRU: Np, Am and Cm). The authors have investigated research and development (R and D) subjects of the fuel pellet and the cladding material of the Fuel. The present report describes the results on the fuel pellet. First, the chemical state of the Fuel and fission products (FP) was inferred through an FP-inventory and an equilibrium-thermodynamics calculations. Besides, knowledge obtained from post-irradiation examinations was surveyed. Next, an investigation was made on irradiation behavior of U/Pu mixed oxide (MOX) fuel with high enrichment of Pu, as well as on fission-gas release and swelling behavior of high burnup fuels. Reprocessibility of the Fuel, particularly solubility of the spent fuel, was also examined. As for the TRU-added fuel, material property data on TRU oxides were surveyed and summarized as a database. And the subjects on the production and the irradiation behavior were examined on the basis of experiences of MOX fuel production and TRU-added fuel irradiation. As a whole, the present study revealed the necessity of accumulating fundamental data and knowledge required for design and assessment of the fuel pellet, including the information on properties and irradiation performance of the TRU-added fuel. Finally, the R and D subjects were summarized, and a proposal was made on the way of development of the fuel pellet and cladding materials. (author).

  10. Fuel performance at high burnup for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present meeting was scheduled by the International Atomic Energy Agency, upon proposal of the Members of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. The purpose of this meeting was to review the ''state-of-the-art'' in the area of Fuel Performance at High Burnup for Water Reactors. Previous IAEA meetings on this topic were held in Mol in 1981 and 1984 and on related topics in Stockholm and Lyon in 1987. Fifty-five participants from 16 countries and two international organizations attended the meeting and 28 papers were presented and discussed. The papers were presented in five sub-sessions and during the meeting, working groups composed of the session chairmen and paper authors prepared the summary of each session with conclusions and recommendations for future work. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Simulation of Spent PWR Fuel Assembly Behavior Under Normal Conditions of Transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of a PWR high-burnup spent fuel assembly under normal conditions of transport is simulated in a dynamic analysis of a 0.3-m free drop of a transportation cask unprotected by impact limiters striking a flat rigid surface in the horizontal orientation. The structural analysis employs a finite element numerical model consisting of the cask, the fuel assemblies, the fuel rods, the guide tubes and the cask’s internal structures that hold the fuel assemblies in position. Appropriate mechanical properties for the cask’s structural components, as well as the elastic-plastic properties typical of high-burnup Zircaloy-4 cladding, are utilized. Emphasis is placed on fuel rods responses at locations where maximum forces would be expected, which include end-plate positions and spacer-grid positions at assembly mid-span. Temporal and spatial variations of the forces acting on the fuel rods are calculated and post-processed to obtain frequency distributions, which statistically represent the total fuel rod population in the cask. The results show that the largest pinch force, (ror-to-rod contact force), is 1700 lb, the maximum axial force is 600 lb, and the largest bending moment is 175 in-lb. Failure analysis of fuel rods using these force quantities, and considering the effects of potential hydrides reorientation on cladding failure resistance, indicates, under conservative assumptions, a factor of safety of least 2 against longitudinal tearing, and no failure is predicted for transverse tearing or rod breakage. Fuel reconfiguration is predicted not to occur, and although partial tearing of guide tubes is possible, it is not enough to impair post-accident assembly retrieval. (author)

  12. Optimal burnable poison-loading in a PWR with carbon coated particle fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An innovative PWR concept that uses carbon-coated particle fuels moderated by graphite as that of HTGR but cooled by pressurized light water has been studied. The aim of this concept is to take both the best advantages of fuel integrity against fission products release and the reliability PWR technology based on the long operational experience. The purpose of the study is to optimize loading pattern of burnable poison in the proposed core in order to suppress excess reactivity during a cycle. Although there are many parameters to be determined for optimization of the usage of burnable poison, the emphasis is put here on loading patterns of Gadolinia in an assembly and in the core. We investigated the burnup characteristics of the core varying the concentration of burnable poison in a fuel rod, the number of burnable poison-rods in an assembly, and the number of burnable poison-assemblies in the core. The result suggested that Gadolinia was more suitable for this reactor than boron as burnable poison, and it was possible to make the reactivity swing negligible by combining at least three kinds of burnable poison-assemblies in which the amount of Gadolinia was different. Therefore the requirement for the number of control rods was reduced and it meant that Control Rod Programming would become easier. (author)

  13. Dissolution of low burnup Fast Flux Test reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Fast-Flux Test Facility reactor fuel [mixed (U,Pu)O2 composition] has been used in dissolution tests for fuel reprocessing. The fuel tested here had a peak burnup of 0.22 at. %, with peak centerline temperatures of 19970C. Linear dissolution rates of 0.99 to 1.57 mm/h were determined for dissolver solution and fresh acid, respectively. Insoluble residues from dissolution at 950C ranged from 0.18 to 0.28% of the original fuel. From 2 to 37 wt % of the residue was recoverable plutonium. Dissolution at 290C yielded residues of 0.56 to 0.64% of the original fuel. The major elements present in the HF leached residue included Ru, Mo, and Rh. The recovered cladding from the 950C dissolution contained the equivalent of 198 mg of 239Pu per 100 g of hulls, while the cladding from the 290c experiments contained only 0.21 mg of 239Pu per 100 g of hulls. 9 references, 5 figures

  14. Radiochemical Assays of Irradiated VVER-440 Fuel for Use in Spent Fuel Burnup Credit Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L J

    2005-04-25

    The objective of this spent fuel burnup credit work was to study and describe a VVER-440 reactor spent fuel assembly (FA) initial state before irradiation, its operational irradiation history and the resulting radionuclide distribution in the fuel assembly after irradiation. This work includes the following stages: (1) to pick out and select a specific spent (irradiated) FA for examination; (2) to describe the FA initial state before irradiation; (3) to describe the irradiation history, including thermal calculations; (4) to examine the burnup distribution of select radionuclides along the FA height and cross-section; (5) to examine the radionuclide distributions; (6) to determine the Kr-85 release into the plenum; (7) to select and prepare FA rod specimens for destructive examinations; (8) to determine the radionuclide compositions, isotope masses and burnup in the rod specimens; and (9) to analyze, document and process the results. The specific workscope included the destructive assay (DA) of spent fuel assembly rod segments with an {approx}38.5 MWd/KgU burnup from a single VVER-440 fuel assembly from the Novovorenezh reactor in Russia. Based on irradiation history criteria, four rods from the fuel assembly were selected and removed from the assembly for examination. Next, 8 sections were cut from the four rods and sent for destructive analysis of radionuclides by radiochemical analyses. The results were documented in a series of seven reports over a period of {approx}1 1/2 years.

  15. Fission product release and microstructure changes during laboratory annealing of a very high burn-up fuel specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiernaut, J.-P.; Wiss, T.; Colle, J.-Y.; Thiele, H.; Walker, C. T.; Goll, W.; Konings, R. J. M.

    2008-07-01

    A commercial PWR fuel sample with a local burn-up of about 240 MWd/kgHM was annealed in a Knudsen cell mass spectrometer system with a heating rate of 10 K/min up to 2750 K at which temperature the sample was completely vaporized. The release of fission gases and fission products was studied as a function of temperature. In one of the runs the heating was interrupted successively at 900, 1500 and 1860 K and at each step a small fragment of the sample was examined by SEM and analysed by energy dispersive electron probe microanalysis. The release behaviour of volatile, gaseous and other less volatile fission products is presented and analysed with the EFFUS program and related to the structural changes of the fuel.

  16. A MATLAB-Linked Solver to Find Fuel Depletion in a PWR, a Suggested VVER-1000 Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Faghihi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Coupled first-order IVPs are frequently used in many parts of engineering and sciences. We present a “solver” including three computer programs which were joint with the MATLAB software to solve and plot solutions of the first-order coupled stiff or nonstiff IVPs. Some applications related to IVPs are given here using our MATLAB-linked solver. Muon catalyzed fusion in a D-T mixture is considered as a first dynamical example of the coupled IVPs. Then, we have focused on the fuel depletion in a suggested PWR including poisons burnups (xenon-135 and samarium-149, plutonium isotopes production, and uranium depletion.

  17. Assessment of the use of extended burnup fuel in light water power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.; Bailey, W.J.; Beyer, C.E.; Bold, F.C.; Tawil, J.J.

    1988-02-01

    This study has been conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the environmental and economic impacts associated with the use of extended burnup nuclear fuel in light water power reactors. It has been proposed that current batch average burnup levels of 33 GWd/t uranium be increased to above 50 GWd/t. The environmental effects of extending fuel burnup during normal operations and during accident events and the economic effects of cost changes on the fuel cycle are discussed in this report. The physical effects of extended burnup on the fuel and the fuel assembly are also presented as a basis for the environmental and economic assessments. Environmentally, this burnup increase would have no significant impact over that of normal burnup. Economically, the increased burnup would have favorable effects, consisting primarily of a reduction: (1) total fuel requirements; (2) reactor downtime for fuel replacement; (3) the number of fuel shipments to and from reactor sites; and (4) repository storage requirements. 61 refs., 4 figs., 27 tabs.

  18. Criticality evaluation of control component credited mixed zone spent and fresh fuel storage in high density PWR racks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To expand the set of assemblies that qualify for storage in high-density racks, a mixed zone analysis may be performed where repeating pattern configurations within the rack are prescribed. In a mixed zone analysis, assemblies that are more reactive (low burnup) are stored adjacent to less reactive (highly burned) assemblies, thereby meeting the same overall criticality requirements as with the uniform burnup/enrichment analysis. The Arkansas Nuclear One (ANO) Plant has faced several challenges with respect to their spent fuel storage that reach beyond simply the number of spent fuel assemblies and available storage cells. These issues have resulted in the need for ANO to use an advanced storage strategy. In addition to using the mixed zone burnup approach in the high-density racks, ANO also proposed a new solution involving credit for control components in the spent fuel pool. ANO submitted an amendment of their spent fuel pool technical specifications to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) based on the evaluation performed by Holtec International that was subsequently approved. This paper presents a description of the overall methodology used for supporting the submittal, and provides further discussion regarding the reactivity effect of control rods in a PWR spent fuel pool. (authors)

  19. Evaluation of a high burnup spent fuel regarding the regulations for a spent fuel dry storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Ik Sung; Yang, Young Sik; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Sun Ki; Song, Keun Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    All nuclear plants have storage pools for spent fuel. These pools are typically 40 or more feet deep. In many countries, the spent fuels are stored under water. The water serves 2 purposes: 1) It serves as a shield to reduce the radiation levels. 2) It cools the fuel assemblies that continue to produce heat (called decay heat). But Korean nuclear plant expects the storage capacity to reach its limit by the year 2016. So, the research for the spent fuel dry storage facilities is necessary. The purpose of this study was to overview the regulatory basis for spent fuel dry storage and to evaluate its applicability for high burnup spent fuel.

  20. The development of flow test technology for PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI has an extensive program to develope PWR fuel assembly. In relation to the program, development of flow test technology is needed to evaluate the thermal hydraulic compactibility and mechanical integrity of domestically fabricated nuclear fuels. A high-pressure and high-temperature flow test facility was designed to test domestically fabricated fuel assembly. The test section of the facility has capacity of a 6x6 full length PWR fuel assembly. A flow test rig was designed and installed at Cold Test Loop to carry out model experiments with 5x5 rod assembly under atmosphere pressure to get information about the characteristics of pressure loss of spacer grids and velocity distribution in the subchannels. LDV measuring technology was established using TSI's Laser Dopper Velocimeter 9100-3 System

  1. Fuel rod behavior of a PWR during load following

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of a PWR fuel rod when operating in normal power cycles, excluding in case of accidents, is analysed. A computer code, that makes the mechanical analysis of the cladding using the finite element method was developed. The ramps and power cycles were simulated suposing the existence of cracks in pellets when the cladding-pellet interaction are done. As a result, an operation procedure of the fuel rod in power cycle is recommended. (E.G.)

  2. High burn-up structure of U(Mo) dispersion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaers, A.; Van Renterghem, W.; Van den Berghe, S.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the high burn-up structure (HBS) in U(Mo) fuel irradiated up to a burn-up of ∼70% 235U or ∼5 × 1021 f/cm3 or ∼120 GWd/tHM is described and compared to the observation made on LWR fuel. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy was performed on several samples having different burn-ups in order to get a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to the high burn-up structure formation. Even though there are some substantial differences between the irradiation of ceramic and U(Mo) alloy fuels (crystal structure, enrichment, irradiation temperature …), it was found that in both fuels recrystallization initiates at the same threshold and progresses in a similar way with increasing fission density. In case of U(Mo), recrystallization leads to accelerated swelling of the fuel which could result in instability of the fuel plate.

  3. Technical Development on Burn-up Credit for Spent LWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled ''Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels.'' Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burnup and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report

  4. Technical Development on Burn-up Credit for Spent LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2001-12-26

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled ''Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels.'' Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burnup and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report.

  5. Comparison of nuclear data uncertainty propagation methodologies for PWR burn-up simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Diez, Carlos Javier; Hoefer, Axel; Porsch, Dieter; Cabellos, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Several methodologies using different levels of approximations have been developed for propagating nuclear data uncertainties in nuclear burn-up simulations. Most methods fall into the two broad classes of Monte Carlo approaches, which are exact apart from statistical uncertainties but require additional computation time, and first order perturbation theory approaches, which are efficient for not too large numbers of considered response functions but only applicable for sufficiently small nuclear data uncertainties. Some methods neglect isotopic composition uncertainties induced by the depletion steps of the simulations, others neglect neutron flux uncertainties, and the accuracy of a given approximation is often very hard to quantify. In order to get a better sense of the impact of different approximations, this work aims to compare results obtained based on different approximate methodologies with an exact method, namely the NUDUNA Monte Carlo based approach developed by AREVA GmbH. In addition, the impact ...

  6. Dry Storage Demonstration for High-Burnup Spent Nuclear Fuel-Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initially, casks for dry storage of spent fuel were licensed for assembly-average burnup of about 35 GWd/MTU. Over the last two decades, the discharge burnup of fuel has increased steadily and now exceeds 45 GWd/MTU. With spent fuel burnups approaching the licensing limits (peak rod burnup of 62 GWd/MTU for pressurized water reactor fuel) and some lead test assemblies being burned beyond this limit, a need for a confirmatory dry storage demonstration program was first identified after the publication in May 1999 of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions (NRC) Interim Staff Guidance 11 (ISG-11). With the publication in July 2002 of the second revision of ISG-11, the desirability for such a program further increased to obtain confirmatory data about the potential changes in cladding mechanical properties induced by dry storage, which would have implications to the transportation, handling, and disposal of high-burnup spent fuel. While dry storage licenses have kept pace with reactor discharge burnups, transportation licenses have not and are considered on a case by case basis. Therefore, this feasibility study was performed to examine the options available for conducting a confirmatory experimental program supporting the dry storage, transportation, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel with burnups well in excess of 45 GWd/MTU

  7. Re-evaluation of Assay Data of Spent Nuclear Fuel obtained at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute for validation of burnup calculation code systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The specifications required for the analyses of the destructive assay data taken from irradiated fuel in Ohi-1 and Ohi-2 PWRs were documented in this paper. → These data were analyzed using the SWAT2.1 code, and the calculation results showed good agreement with experimental results. → These destructive assay data are suitable for the benchmarking of the burnup calculation code systems. - Abstract: The isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuels is vital data for studies on the nuclear fuel cycle and reactor physics. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has been active in obtaining such data for pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuels, and some data has already been published. These data have been registered with the international Spent Fuel Isotopic Composition Database (SFCOMPO) and widely used as international benchmarks for burnup calculation codes and libraries. In this paper, Assay Data of Spent Nuclear Fuel from two fuel assemblies irradiated in the Ohi-1 and Ohi-2 PWRs in Japan are shown. The destructive assay data from Ohi-2 have already been published. However, these data were not suitable for the benchmarking of calculation codes and libraries because several important specifications and data were not included. This paper summarizes the details of destructive assay data and specifications required for analyses of isotopic composition from Ohi-1 and Ohi-2. For precise burnup analyses, the burnup values of destructive assay samples were re-evaluated in this study. These destructive assay data were analyzed using the SWAT2.1 code, and the calculation results showed good agreement with experimental results. This indicates that the quality of destructive assay data from Ohi-1 and Ohi-2 PWRs is high, and that these destructive assay data are suitable for the benchmarking of burnup calculation code systems.

  8. Basic evaluation on nuclear characteristics of BWR high burnup MOX fuel and core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MOX fuel will be used in existing commercial BWR cores as a part of reload fuels with equivalent operability, safety and economy to UO2 fuel in Japan. The design concept should be compatible with UO2 fuel design. High burnup UO2 fuels are being developed and commercialized step by step. The MOX fuel planned to be introduced in around year 2000 will use the same hardware as UO2 8 x 8 array fuel developed for a second step of UO2 high burnup fuel. The target discharge exposure of this MOX fuel is about 33 GWd/t. And the loading fraction of MOX fuel is approximately one-third in an equilibrium core. On the other hand, it becomes necessary to minimize a number of MOX fuels and plants utilizing MOX fuel, mainly due to the fuel economy, handling cost and inspection cost in site. For the above reasons, it needed to developed a high burnup MOX fuel containing much Pu and a core with a large amount of MOX fuels. The purpose of this study is to evaluate basic nuclear fuel and core characteristics of BWR high burnup MOX fuel with batch average exposure of about 39.5 GWd/t using 9 x 9 array fuel. The loading fraction of MOX fuel in the core is within a range of about 50% to 100%. Also the influence of Pu isotopic composition fluctuations and Pu-241 decay upon nuclear characteristics are studied. (author). 3 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs

  9. Taking burnup credit for interim storage and transportation system for BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to establish a realistic burnup credit design system, a calculation system has been developed for determining isotope compositions, burnup, and criticality. The calculation system consists of several modules such as TGBLA, ORIGEN, CITATION, MCNP, and KENO. The TGBLA code is a fuel design code for LWR fuels developed in TOSHIBA Corporation. A compact measurement system for a fuel assembly has been being developed to meet requirements for the burnup determination, the neutron emission-rate evaluation, and the nuclear materials management. For a spent MOX fuel, a neutron emission rate measurement method has been being developed. The system consists of Cd-Te detectors and / or fission chambers. Some model calculations were carried out for the latest design BWR fuels. The effect of taking burnup credit for a transportation cask is shown. (authors)

  10. Fission gas release and fuel rod chemistry related to extended burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the meeting was to review the state of the art in fission gas release and fuel rod chemistry related to extended burnup. The meeting was held in a time when national and international programmes on water reactor fuel irradiated in experimental reactors were still ongoing or had reached their conclusion, and when lead test assemblies had reached high burnup in power reactors and been examined. At the same time, several out-of-pile experiments on high burnup fuel or with simulated fuel were being carried out. As a result, significant progress has been registered since the last meeting, particularly in the evaluation of fuel temperature, the degradation of the global thermal conductivity with burnup and in the understanding of the impact on fission gas release. Fifty five participants from 16 countries and one international organization attended the meeting. 28 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the papers. Refs, figs, tabs and photos

  11. Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Technical Committee Meeting was to explore the status of international activities related to the use of burnup credit for spent fuel applications. This was the second major meeting on the issues of burnup credit for spent fuel management systems held since the IAEA began to monitor the uses of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems in 1997. Burnup credit for wet and dry storage systems is needed in many Member States to allow for increased initial fuel enrichment, and to increase the storage capacity and thus to avoid the need for extensive modifications of the spent fuel management systems involved. This document contains 31 individual papers presented at the Meeting; each of the papers was indexed separately

  12. The Study of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options Based On PWR and CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of nuclear fuel cycle options based on PWR and CANDU type reactors have been carried out. There are 5 cycle options based on PWR and CANDU reactors, i.e.: PWR-OT, PWR-OT, PWR-MOX, CANDU-OT, DUPIC, and PWR-CANDU-OT options. While parameters which assessed in this study are fuel requirement, generating waste and plutonium from each cycle options. From the study found that the amount of fuel in the DUPIC option needs relatively small compared the other options. From the view of total radioactive waste generated from the cycles, PWR-MOX generate the smallest amount of waste, but produce twice of high level waste than DUPIC option. For total plutonium generated from the cycle, PWR-MOX option generates smallest quantity, but for fissile plutonium, DUPIC options produce the smallest one. It means that the DUPIC option has some benefits in plutonium consumption aspects. (author)

  13. End effect analysis with various axial burnup distributions in high density spent fuel storage racks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Criticality tests are carried out with various axial burnup distributions of fuel assemblies for spent fuel storage racks. • KENO-Va code system was used to obtain criticalities with 10 axial segments. • ORIGEN-S code system was used to obtain burnup dependent axial compositions. • The criticality and burnup dependent reactivity difference are obtained from the results. • End effect quantifications are satisfactory confirming the previous suggestions. - Abstract: End effect of spent fuel comes from the difference between uniform and actual axial burnup distributions of fuel assemblies. It is significant to control the criticality safety in spent fuel storage and transportation. This work is focused on estimation of end effect in the spent fuel of light water reactor for the spent fuel storage rack region-II. High and low burnups of corresponding different uranium enrichments are taken into consideration to analyze the end effect with different axial burnup distributions such as uniform, MOC and EOC profiles. Two types of fuel assemblies such as CE type and Westinghouse type are considered. The whole calculations have been carried out by using the SCALE6 code including ORIGEN-S and KENO-Va

  14. Calibration of burnup monitor of spent nuclear fuel installed at Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeda, Kaoru; Matoba, Masaru; Wakabayashi, Genichiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Naito, Hirofumi; Hirota, Masanari [Nuclear Fuel Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Morizaki, Hidetoshi; Kumanomido, Hironori; Natsume, Koichiro [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    The spent nuclear fuel storage pool of Rokkasho reprocessing plant adopts the burnup credit' conception. Spent fuel assemblies are measured every one by one, by burnup monitors, and stored to a storage rack which is designed with specified residual enrichment. For nuclear criticality control, it is necessary for the burnup monitor that the measured value includes a kind of margin, which consists of errors of the monitor. In this paper, we describe the error of the burnup monitors, and the way of taking of the margin. From the result of calibration of the burnup monitor carried out from July through November, 1999, we describe that the way of taking of the margin is validated. And comments about possibility of error reduction are remarked. (author)

  15. Detailed description and user`s manual of high burnup fuel analysis code EXBURN-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Saitou, Hiroaki

    1997-11-01

    EXBURN-I has been developed for the analysis of LWR high burnup fuel behavior in normal operation and power transient conditions. In the high burnup region, phenomena occur which are different in quality from those expected for the extension of behaviors in the mid-burnup region. To analyze these phenomena, EXBURN-I has been formed by the incorporation of such new models as pellet thermal conductivity change, burnup-dependent FP gas release rate, and cladding oxide layer growth to the basic structure of low- and mid-burnup fuel analysis code FEMAXI-IV. The present report describes in detail the whole structure of the code, models, and materials properties. Also, it includes a detailed input manual and sample output, etc. (author). 55 refs.

  16. High Burn-Up Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Rob L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) approach to successfully demonstrate the controllable fatigue fracture on high burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a normal vibration mode. CIRFT enables examination of the underlying mechanisms of SNF system dynamic performance. Due to the inhomogeneous composite structure of the SNF system, the detailed mechanisms of the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interactions and the stress concentration effects at the pellet-pellet interface cannot be readily obtained from a CIRFT system measurement. Therefore, finite element analyses (FEAs) are used to translate the global moment-curvature measurement into local stress-strain profiles for further investigation. The major findings of CIRFT on the HBU SNF are as follows: SNF system interface bonding plays an important role in SNF vibration performance. Fuel structure contributes to SNF system stiffness. There are significant variations in stress and curvature of SNF systems during vibration cycles resulting from segment pellets and clad interactions. SNF failure initiates at the pellet-pellet interface region and appears to be spontaneous.

  17. Economic incentives and recommended development for commercial use of high burnup fuels in the once-through LWR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study calculates the reduced uranium requirements and the economic incentives for increasing the burnup of current design LWR fuels from the current range of 25 to 35 MWD/Kg to a range of 45 to 55 MWD/Kg. The changes in fuel management strategies which may be required to accommodate these high burnup fuels and longer fuel cycles are discussed. The material behavior problems which may present obstacles to achieving high burnup or to license fuel are identified and discussed. These problems are presented in terms of integral fuel response and the informational needs for commercial and licensing acceptance. Research and development programs are outlined which are aimed at achieving a licensing position and commercial acceptance of high burnup fuels

  18. New high burnup fuel models for NRC`s licensing audit code, FRAPCON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L. [Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Fuel behavior models have recently been updated within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission steady-state FRAPCON code used for auditing of fuel vendor/utility-codes and analyses. These modeling updates have concentrated on providing a best estimate prediction of steady-state fuel behavior up to the maximum burnup level s of current data (60 to 65 GWd/MTU rod-average). A decade has passed since these models were last updated. Currently, some U.S. utilities and fuel vendors are requesting approval for rod-average burnups greater than 60 GWd/MTU; however, until these recent updates the NRC did not have valid fuel performance models at these higher burnup levels. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has reviewed 15 separate effects models within the FRAPCON fuel performance code (References 1 and 2) and identified nine models that needed updating for improved prediction of fuel behavior at high burnup levels. The six separate effects models not updated were the cladding thermal properties, cladding thermal expansion, cladding creepdown, fuel specific heat, fuel thermal expansion and open gap conductance. Comparison of these models to the currently available data indicates that these models still adequately predict the data within data uncertainties. The nine models identified as needing improvement for predicting high-burnup behavior are fission gas release (FGR), fuel thermal conductivity (accounting for both high burnup effects and burnable poison additions), fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, fuel-cladding contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion, cladding mechanical properties and cladding axial growth. Each of the updated models will be described in the following sections and the model predictions will be compared to currently available high burnup data.

  19. ThO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} annular pins for high burnup fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caner, Marc; Dugan, Edward T

    2000-06-01

    The main purpose of this work is to investigate the use of annular fuel pins (particularly pins containing thorium dioxide) for high burnup fuel. The following parameters were evaluated and compared between postulated mixed thorium-uranium dioxide standard and annular (9% void fraction) type fuel assemblies, as a function of burnup: the infinite multiplication factor, the uranium and plutonium isotopic compositions, the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity and the conversion ratio. We used the SCALE-4.3 code system. The calculation method consisted in obtaining actinide and fission product number densities as functions of assembly burnup, by means of a 1-D transport calculation combined with a 0-D burnup calculation. These number densities were then used in a 3-D Monte Carlo code for obtaining k{sub {infinity}} from two-dimensional-symmetry 'snapshots'.

  20. Separation of Molybdenum From Spent Fuel Solution in Burnup Measurements Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In order to establish a kind of automatic radiochemistry separation procedure of nuclide 100Mo from spent fuel solution in burnup measurements process, a method of separating Mo quickly and effectively from the feed solution is needed. In the studies,

  1. Extended burnup demonstration: reactor fuel program. Pre-irradiation characterization and summary of pre-program poolside examinations. Big Rock Point extended burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a resource document characterizing the 64 fuel rods being irradiated at the Big Rock Point reactor as part of the Extended Burnup Demonstration being sponsored jointly by the US Department of Energy, Consumers Power Company, Exxon Nuclear Company, and General Public Utilities. The program entails extending the exposure of standard BWR fuel to a discharge average of 38,000 MWD/MTU to demonstrate the feasibility of operating fuel of standard design to levels significantly above current limits. The fabrication characteristics of the Big Rock Point EBD fuel are presented along with measurement of rod length, rod diameter, pellet stack height, and fuel rod withdrawal force taken at poolside at burnups up to 26,200 MWD/MTU. A review of the fuel examination data indicates no performance characteristics which might restrict the continued irradiation of the fuel

  2. Development of modified MDA (M-MDA), PWR fuel cladding tube for high duty operation in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new cladding material of M-MDA has been developed in order to prepare for a strong growing demand for advanced fuel which can maintain its integrity even under high duties due to more efficient operation such as higher burnup, higher LHR, and longer operation cycle which will contribute the suppression of environmental burdens like CO2 emission. The main aim of M-MDA is to have excellent corrosion resistance while the other properties are inherited from MDA, which has been adopted to the step 2 fuel, instead of Zry-4, of Japanese PWR plant whose upper limit of assembly discharged burnup is 55 MWd/kgU. And we could confirm that the main aim of M-MDA was achieved by means of out-of-pile tests. In order to confirm improvement of corrosion resistance of M-MDA in the actual operation, irradiation test of M-MDA in the commercial reactor of Vandellos II is ongoing. The latest results of on-site examination after every end of cycle showed that oxide thickness of M-MDA-SR was much smaller than that of MDA at rod discharged burnup of approximately 60 MWd/kgU. The final irradiation cycle was completed on April 2007 and then we will obtain corrosion data of M-MDA over 70 MWd/kgU. M-MDA is a candidate alloy for advanced fuel under higher duty usage. (authors)

  3. The Effect of Pitch, Burnup, and Absorbers on a TRIGA Spent-Fuel Pool Criticality Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that supercriticality might occur for some postulated accident conditions at the TRIGA spent-fuel pool. However, the effect of burnup was not accounted for in previous studies. In this work, the combined effect of fuel burnup, pitch among fuel elements, and number of uniformly mixed absorber rods for a square arrangement on the spent-fuel pool keff is investigated.The Monte Carlo computer code MCNP4B with the ENDF-B/VI library and detailed three dimensional geometry was used. The WIMS-D code was used to model the isotopic composition of the standard TRIGA and FLIP fuel for 5, 10, 20 and 30% burnup level and 2- and 4-yr cooling time.The results show that out of the three studied effects, pitch from contact (3.75 cm) up to rack design pitch (8 cm), number of absorbers from zero to eight, and burnup up to 30%, the pitch has the greatest influence on the multiplication factor keff. In the interval in which the pitch was changed, keff decreased for up to ∼0.4 for standard and ∼0.3 for FLIP fuel. The number of absorber rods affects the multiplication factor much less. This effect is bigger for more compact arrangements, e.g., for contact of standard fuel elements with eight absorber rods among them, keff values are smaller for ∼0.2 (∼0.1 for FLIP) than for arrangements without absorber rods almost regardless of the burnup. The effect of burnup is the smallest. For standard fuel elements, it is ∼0.1 for almost all pitches and numbers of absorbers. For FLIP fuel, it is smaller for a factor of 3, but increases with the burnup for compact arrangements. Cooling time of fuel has just a minor effect on the keff of spent-fuel pool and can be neglected in spent-fuel pool design

  4. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors -Fuel management and safety analysis-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Boh Wook; Choi, Hang Bok; Lee, Yung Wook; Cho, Jae Sun; Huh, Chang Wook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    The reference DUPIC fuel composition was determined based on the reactor safety, thermal-hydraulics, economics, and refabrication aspects. The center pin of the reference DUPIC fuel bundle is poisoned with natural dysprosium. The worst LOCA analysis has shown that the transient power and heat deposition of the reference DUPIC core are the same as those of natural uranium CANDU core. The intra-code comparison has shown that the accuracy of DUPIC physics code system is comparable to the current CANDU core design code system. The sensitivity studies were performed for the refuelling schemes of DUPIC core and the 2-bundle shift refuelling scheme was selected as the standard refuelling scheme of the DUPIC core. The application of 4-bundle shift refuelling scheme will be studied in parallel as the auto-refuelling method is improved and the reference core parameters of the heterogeneous DUPIC core are defined. The heterogeneity effect was analyzed in a preliminary fashion using 33 fuel types and the random loading strategy. The refuelling simulation has shown that the DUPIC core satisfies the current CANDU 6 operating limits of channel and bundle power regardless of the fuel composition heterogeneity. The 33 fuel types used in the heterogeneity analysis was determined based on the initial enrichment and discharge burnup of the PWR fuel. 90 figs, 62 tabs, 63 refs. (Author).

  5. Burnup measurements on spent fuel elements of the RP-10 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela Mora, Mariano; Gallardo Padilla, Alberto; Palomino, Jose Luis Castro, E-mail: mvela@ipen.gob.p [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN/Peru), Lima (Peru). Grupo de Calculo, Analisis y Seguridad de Reactores; Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac, E-mail: laaterre@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the measurement, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, of the average burnup attained by Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the RP-10 research reactor. Measurements were performed at the reactor storage pool area using {sup 137}Cs as the only burnup monitor, even for spent fuel elements with cooling times much shorter than two years. The experimental apparatus was previously calibrated in efficiency to obtain absolute average burnup values, which were compared against corresponding ones furnished by reactor physics calculations. The mean deviation between both values amounts to 6%. (author)

  6. Determination of the burn-up of TRIGA fuel elements by calculation and reactivity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burnup of 17 fuel elements of the TRIGA Mark-II reactor in Vienna was measured. Different types of fuel elements had been simultaneously used for several years. The measured burnup values are compared with those calculated on the basis of core configuration and reactor operation history records since the beginning of operation. A one-dimensional, two-group diffusion computer code TRIGAP was used for the calculations. Comparison with burnup values determined by γ-scanning is also made. (orig./HP)

  7. Design and manufacturing of non-instrumented capsule for advanced PWR fuel pellet irradiation test in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Lee, C. B.; Song, K. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-04-01

    This project is preparing to irradiation test of the developed large grain UO{sub 2} fuel pellet in HANARO for pursuit fuel safety and high burn-up in 'Advanced LWR Fuel Technology Development Project' as a part Nuclear Mid and Long-term R and D Program. On the basis test rod is performed the nuclei property and preliminary fuel performance analysis, test rod and non-instrumented capsule are designed and manufactured for irradiation test in HANARO. This non-instrumented irradiation capsule of Advanced PWR Fuel pellet was referred the non-instrumented capsule for an irradiation test of simulated DUPIC fuel in HANARO(DUPIC Rig-001) and 18-element HANARO fuel, was designed to ensure the integrity and the endurance of non-instrumented capsule during the long term(2.5 years) irradiation. To irradiate the UO{sub 2} pellets up to the burn-up 70 MWD/kgU, need the time about 60 months and ensure the integrity of non-instrumented capsule for 30 months until replace the new capsule. This non-instrumented irradiation capsule will be based to develope the non-instrumented capsule for the more long term irradiation in HANARO. 22 refs., 13 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  8. Burnup Estimation for Plate Type Fuel Assembly Using SCALE6 Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alawneh, Luay M.; Park, Chang Je; Lee, Byungchul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    Accurate burnup estimation is not an easy job due to several reasons such as the effect of fission products and the power change caused by fuel refueling and depletion. The presence of fission products may distort the linear relationship between burnup and input parameters including power density and enrichment. The feasibility test of this approach has been done by comparing the results with a Monte Carlo code results. In this paper, it has been tried to get a crude formula to estimate burnup for an open pool type research reactor. In addition, we want to investigate the perturbation of each factor on burnup, and then combine the effects in one fitted formula for each cycle. This work is focused on calculating burnup for plate type fuel assembly of research reactors through a couple of code systems such as TRITON/NEWT and ORIGEN-ARP. Several sensitivity calculations have been done and the least square fitting is carried out to express a unified formula for burnup. The estimated burnup is compared with that of McCARD calculation. It is founded that the fitted burnup agrees well with the McCARD results.

  9. RAPID program to predict radial power and burnup distribution of UO{sub 2} fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Song, Jae Sung; Bang, Je Gun; Kim, Dae Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-02-01

    Due to the radial variation of the neutron flux and its energy spectrum inside UO{sub 2} fuel, the fission density and fissile isotope production rates are varied radially in the pellet, and it becomes necessary to know the accurate radial power and burnup variation to predict the high burnup fuel behavior such as rim effects. Therefore, to predict the radial distribution of power, burnup and fissionable nuclide densities in the pellet with the burnup and U-235 enrichment, RAPID(RAdial power and burnup Prediction by following fissile Isotope Distribution in the pellet) program was developed. It considers the specific radial variation of the neutron reaction of the nuclides while the constant radial variation of neutron reaction except neutron absorption of U-238 regardless of the nuclides, the burnup and U-235 enrichment is assumed in TUBRNP model which is recognized as the one of the most reliable models. Therefore, it is expected that RAPID may be more accurate than TUBRNP, specially at high burnup region. RAPID is based upon and validated by the detailed reactor physics code, HELIOS which is one of few codes that can calculates the radial variations of the nuclides inside the pellet. Comparison of RAPID prediction with the measured data of the irradiated fuels showed very good agreement. RAPID can be used to calculate the local variations of the fissionable nuclide concentrations as well as the local power and burnup inside that pellet as a function of the burnup up to 10 w/o U-235 enrichment and 150 MWD/kgU burnup under the LWR environment. (author). 8 refs., 50 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Development of a fuel rod thermal-mechanical analysis code for high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal-mechanical analysis code for high burnup BWR fuel rod has been developed by NFI. The irradiation data accumulated up to the assembly burnup of 55 GWd/t in commercial BWRs were adopted for the modeling. In the code, pellet thermal conductivity degradation with burnup progress was considered. Effects of the soluble FPs, irradiation defects and porosity increase due to RIM effect were taken into the model. In addition to the pellet thermal conductivity degradation, the pellet swelling due to the RIM porosity was studied. The modeling for the high burnup effects was also carried out for (U, Gd)O2 and MOX fuel. The thermal conductivities of all pellet types, UO2, (U, Gd)O2 and (U, Pu)O2 pellets, are expressed by the same form of equation with individual coefficient γ in the code. The pellet center temperature was calculated using this modeling code, and compared with measured values for the code verification. The pellet center temperature calculated using the thermal conductivity degradation model agreed well with the measured values within ±150 deg. C. The influence of rim porosity on pellet center temperature is small, and the temperature increase in only 30 deg. C at 75 GWd/t and 200 W/cm. The pellet center temperature of MOX fuel was also calculated, and it was found that the pellet center temperature of MOX fuel with 10wt% PuO2 is about 60 deg. C higher than UO2 fuel at 75 GWd/t and 200 W/cm. (author)

  11. Fuel Thermal Expansion (FTHEXP). [BWR; PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reymann, G. A.

    1978-07-01

    A model is presented which deals with dimensional changes in LWR fuel pellets caused by changes in temperature. It is capable of dealing with any combination of UO/sub 2/ and PuO/sub 2/ in solid, liquid or mixed phase states, and includes expansion due to the solid-liquid phase change. The function FTHEXP models fuel thermal expansion as a function of temperature, fraction of PuO/sub 2/, and the fraction of fuel which is molten.

  12. Non destructive assay of nuclear LEU spent fuels for burnup credit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criticality safety analysis devoted to spent fuel storage and transportation has to be conservative in order to be sure no accident will ever happen. In the spent fuel storage field, the assumption of freshness has been used to achieve the conservative aspect of criticality safety procedures. Nevertheless, after being irradiated in a reactor core, the fuel elements have obviously lost part of their original reactivity. The concept of taking into account this reactivity loss in criticality safety analysis is known as Burnup credit. To be used, Burnup credit involves obtaining evidence of the reactivity loss with a Burnup measurement. Many non destructive assays (NDA) based on neutron as well as on gamma ray emissions are devoted to spent fuel characterization. Heavy nuclei that compose the fuels are modified during irradiation and cooling. Some of them emit neutrons spontaneously and the link to Burnup is a power link. As a result, burn-up determination with passive neutron measurement is extremely accurate. Some gamma emitters also have interesting properties in order to characterize spent fuels but the convenience of the gamma spectrometric methods is very dependent on characteristics of spent fuel. In addition, contrary to the neutron emission, the gamma signal is mostly representative of the peripheral rods of the fuels. Two devices based on neutron methods but combining different NDA methods which have been studied in the past are described in detail: 1. The PYTHON device is a combination of a passive neutron measurement, a collimated total gamma measurement, and an online depletion code. This device, which has been used in several Nuclear Power Plants in western Europe, gives the average Burnup within a 5% uncertainty and also the extremity Burnup, 2. The NAJA device is an automatic device that involves three nuclear methods and an online depletion code. It is designed to cover the whole fuel assembly panel (Active Neutron Interrogation, Passive Neutron

  13. Advanced PWR fuel assembly development programs in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both KNFC and Westinghouse have continued to focus on developing products that will meet the challenge of increasing fuel duty requirements in Korea. These higher duty conditions include higher energy core designs through improved plant capacity factors, power uprate, extended fuel burnup, peaking factor increases, and more severe coolant chemistry (including high lithium concentration). Recent advanced fuel development activities in Korea include implementation of the 17x17 Robust Fuel Assembly (RFA), which is currently in operation with excellent performance in the United States and Europe, as well as the 16x16 PLUS7TM fuel assembly for use in KSNP plants. KNFC and Westinghouse are jointly developing advanced fuel that will meet future fuel duty challenges of 17x17 and 16x16 Westinghouse type plants. This paper focuses on advanced fuel assembly development programs that are underway and how these designs demonstrate improved margins under high duty plant operating conditions. In designing for these high duty conditions key design considerations for the various operational modes (i.e. power uprating, high burnup, long cycles, etc.) must be identified. These design considerations will include the traditional factors such as safety margin (DNB and LOCA), fuel rod design margin (e.g. corrosion, internal pressure, etc.) and mechanical design margins, among others. In addressing these design considerations, the fundamental approach is to provide additional design margin through materials, mechanical, and thermal performance enhancements, to assure flawless fuel performance. The foundation of all fuel designs is the product development process used to meet the demands of modern high duty operation including power uprating, high burnup, longer cycles, and high-lithium coolant chemistries. These advanced fuel assembly designs incorporate features that provide improved mechanical design margin, as well as thermal performance margin (DNB). Enhanced grid designs result in a

  14. Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup (Fumex-II). Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2002-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    to fuel licensing. This report describes the results of the coordinated research project on fuel modelling at extended burnup (FUMEX-II). This programme was initiated in 2000 and completed in 2006. It followed previous programmes on fuel modelling, D-COM which was conducted between 1982 and 1984, and the FUMEX programme which was conducted between 1993 and 1996. The participants used a mixture of data, derived from actual irradiation histories, in particular those with PIE measurements from high burnup commercial and experimental fuels, combined with idealized power histories intended to represent possible future extended dwell, commercial irradiations, to test code capabilities at high burnup. All participants have carried out calculations on the six priority cases selected from the 27 cases identified to them at the first research coordination meeting (RCM). At the second RCM, three further priority cases were identified and have been modelled. These priority cases have been chosen as the best available to help determine which of the many high burnup models used in the codes best reflect reality. The participants are using the remaining cases for verification and validation purposes as well as inter-code comparisons. The codes participating in the exercise have been developed for a wide variety of purposes, including predictions for fuel operation in PWR, BWR, WWER, the pressurized HWR type, CANDU and other reactor types. They are used as development tools as well as for routine licensing calculations, where code configuration is strictly controlled.

  15. Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.R.; Wade, N.L.; Katsma, K.R.; Siefken, L.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Straka, M. (Halliburton NUS, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1992-09-01

    Research has been conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin bumup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PFL/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design bumup. Using peaking factors commensurate widi actual bumups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document also contains appendices A through J of this report.

  16. Timing analysis of PWR fuel pin failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research has been conducted to develop and demonstrate a methodology for calculation of the time interval between receipt of the containment isolation signals and the first fuel pin failure for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). Demonstration calculations were performed for a Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) design (Oconee) and a Westinghouse (W) four-loop design (Seabrook). Sensitivity studies were performed to assess the impacts of fuel pin bumup, axial peaking factor, break size, emergency core cooling system availability, and main coolant pump trip on these times. The analysis was performed using the following codes: FRAPCON-2, for the calculation of steady-state fuel behavior; SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRACPF1/MOD1, for the calculation of the transient thermal-hydraulic conditions in the reactor system; and FRAP-T6, for the calculation of transient fuel behavior. In addition to the calculation of fuel pin failure timing, this analysis provides a comparison of the predicted results of SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 and TRAC-PFL/MOD1 for large-break LOCA analysis. Using SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 thermal-hydraulic data, the shortest time intervals calculated between initiation of containment isolation and fuel pin failure are 10.4 seconds and 19.1 seconds for the B ampersand W and W plants, respectively. Using data generated by TRAC-PF1/MOD1, the shortest intervals are 10.3 seconds and 29.1 seconds for the B ampersand W and W plants, respectively. These intervals are for a double-ended, offset-shear, cold leg break, using the technical specification maximum peaking factor and applied to fuel with maximum design bumup. Using peaking factors commensurate widi actual bumups would result in longer intervals for both reactor designs. This document also contains appendices A through J of this report

  17. Criticality evaluation of high density spent fuel storge rack under normal condition using burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high density spent fuel storage rack Boraflex was known to experience changes of its physical property and to dissolve under exposure to radiation in an aqueous environment for long period of time. In this study, the criticality evaluation for spent fuel storage rack of Ulchin Unit 2 under normal condition was performed assuming complete loss of 10B from the Boraflex and applying burnup credit. Criticality evaluation code KENO-V.a. from SCALE4.4 system was benchmarked against critical experiments to obtain the calculation bias and bias uncertainties. The manufacturing tolerances of nuclear fuel and storage rack and their reactivity uncertainties were derived, as well. Considering those bias and uncertainties of calculation, the criticality of spent fuel storage under normal condition was conservatively evaluated. The criticality evaluation result using burnup credit can be presented as a spent fuel loading curve that indicates the acceptable burnup domain in spent fuel storage pool. The spent fuels with various initial enrichments and discharge fuel burnup can be safely accommodated in the storage without taking any boron credit from Boraflex, provided the combination falls within the acceptable domain in the loading curve. The spent fuel with initial enrichment of 5.0w/o was evaluated to meet the subcritical safety if its burnup is over 43.0GWD/MTU. The criticality evaluation result also showed that spent fuels with the initial enrichment less than 1.6w/o were able to be stored in the storage pool regardless of their burnup. Conclusively, in the Region 2 of the spent fuel storage pool, the maximum keff , considering all uncertainties, was calculated as 0.94818

  18. Development of the ACP safeguards neutron counter for PWR spent fuel rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae-Hoon; Menlove, Howard O.; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Kim, Ho-Dong

    2008-04-01

    An advanced neutron multiplicity counter has been developed for measuring spent fuel in the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process (ACP) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The counter uses passive neutron multiplicity counting to measure the 244Cm content in spent fuel. The input to the ACP process is spent fuel from pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and the high intensity of the gamma-ray exposure from spent fuel requires a careful design of the counter to measure the neutrons without gamma-ray interference. The nuclear safeguards for the ACP facility requires the measurement of the spent fuel input to the process and the Cm/Pu ratio for the plutonium mass accounting. This paper describes the first neutron counter that has been used to measure the neutron multiplicity distribution from spent fuel rods. Using multiple samples of PWR spent fuel rod-cuts, the singles (S), doubles (D), and triples (T) rates of the neutron distribution for the 244Cm nuclide were measured and calibration curves were produced. MCNPX code simulations were also performed to obtain the three counting rates and to compare them with the measurement results. The neutron source term was evaluated by using the ORIGEN-ARP code. The results showed systematic difference of 21-24% in the calibration graphs between the measured and simulation results. A possible source of the difference is that the burnup codes have a 244Cm uncertainty greater than ±15% and it would be systematic for all of the calibration samples. The S/D and D/T ratios are almost constant with an increment of the 244Cm mass, and this indicates that the bias is in the 244Cm neutron source calculation using the ORIGEN-ARP source code. The graphs of S/D and D/T ratios show excellent agreement between measurement and MCNPX simulation results.

  19. Estimating Burnup for UMo Plate Type Fuel with Least Square Fitting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alawneh, Luay M.; Jaradat, Mustafa K. [Univ. of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chang Je; Lee, Byungchul [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The feasibility test of this approach has been done by comparing the results with a Monte Carlo code results. UMo fuel is a promising candidate for a high performance research reactor and provides better fuel performance including an extended burnup and swelling resistance. Additionally, its relatively high uranium content provides high power density. However, when irradiating UMo fuel in the core, lots of pores are produced due to an extensive interaction between the UMo and Al matrix. The pore leads to an expansion of fuel meat and may result in a fuel failure after all. This problem has almost been solved by using an optimal Si additive to depress the interaction layer. An international program has been performed to manufacture a robust UMo fuel. However, in terms of neutronics, the absorption cross section of Mo is much higher than that of Si, and thus a slightly high uranium density of UMo fuel is required to provide equivalent characteristics to U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel. Recently, Korea considers U-Mo fuel for the KJRR design, which is under design stage. This work is focused on calculating burnup for plate type UMo fuel through a couple of code systems such as TRITON/NEWT and ORIGEN-ARP. The estimated burnup is compared with that of MCNPX calculation. It is founded that the fitted burnup agrees well with the MCNPX results. This approach will be applicable to easily estimate discharge burnup in research reactor without additional burden. However, some sensitivity tests required for another parameters in order to obtain burnup exactly.

  20. Technical and economic limits to fuel burnup extension. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, the increase of efficiency in the production of nuclear electricity has been an economic challenge in many countries which have developed this kind of energy. The increase of fuel burnup leads to a reduction in the volume of spent fuel discharged to longer fuel cycles in the reactor, which means bigger availability and capacity factors. After having increased the authorized burnup in plants, developing new alloys capable of resisting high burnup, and having accumulated data on fuel evolution with burnup, it has become necessary to establish the limitations which could be imposed by the physical evolution of the fuel, influencing fuel management, neutron properties, reprocessing or, more generally, the management of waste and irradiated fuels. It is also necessary to verify whether the benefits of lower electricity costs would not be offset by an increase in fuel management costs. The main questions are: Are technical and economic limits to the increasing of fuel burnup in parallel? Can we envisage nowadays the hardest limitation in some of these areas? Which are the main points to be solved from the technical point of view? Is this effort worthwhile considering the economy of the cycle? To which extent? For these reasons, the IAEA, following a recommendation by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology, held a Technical Committee Meeting on Technical and Economic Limits to Fuel Burnup Extension. The purpose of this meeting was to provide an international forum to review the evolution of fuel properties at increased burnup in order to estimate the limitations both from a physical and an economic point of view. The meeting was therefore divided into two parts. The first part, focusing on technical limits, was devoted to the improvement of the fuel element, such as fission gas release (FGR), RIM effect, cladding, etc. and the fabrication, core management, spent fuel and reprocessing. Eighteen related papers were presented which

  1. Fuel rod and core materials investigations related to LWR extended burnup operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolstad, Erik; Vitanza, Carlo

    1992-06-01

    The paper deals with tests and recent measurements related to extended burnup fuel performance and describes test facilities and results in the areas of waterside cladding corrosion and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). Fuel temperature data suggest a gradual degradation of UO 2 thermal conductivity with exposure in the range 6-8% per 10 MWd/kgUO 2 at temperatures below 700°C. The effect on the fuel microstructure of interlinkage and resintering phenomena is shown by measuring the surface-to-volume ( S/ V) ratio of the fuel. Changes in S/V with burnup are correlated to power rating and fuel operating temperature. No evidence was found of enhanced fission gas release during load-follow operation in the burnup range 25-45 MWd/kgUO 2. The effect of high lithium concentration (high pH) on the corrosion behaviour of pre-irradiated high burnup Zircaloy-4 fuel rods subjected either to nucleate boiling or to one-phase cooling conditions was studied. The oxide thickness growth rates measured at an average burnup up to 40 MWd/kgUO 2 are consistent with literature data and show no evidence of corrosion enhancement due to the high lithium content and little effect of cooling regime. A test facility for exploring the effects of environmental variables on IASCC behaviour of in-core structural materials is described.

  2. Instant release fraction and matrix release of high burn-up UO2 spent nuclear fuel: Effect of high burn-up structure and leaching solution composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two weak points in Performance Assessment (PA) exercises regarding the alteration of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are the contribution of the so-called Instant Release Fraction (IRF) and the effect of High Burn-Up Structure (HBS). This manuscript focuses on the effect of HBS in matrix (long term) and instant release of a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) SNF irradiated in a commercial reactor with a mean Burn-Up (BU) of 60 GWd/tU. In order to study the HBS contribution, two samples from different radial positions have been prepared. One from the centre of the SNF, labelled CORE, and one from the periphery, enriched with HBS and labelled OUT. Static leaching experiments have been carried out with two synthetic leaching solutions: bicarbonate (BIC) and Bentonitic Granitic Groundwater (BGW), and in all cases under oxidising conditions. IRF values have been calculated from the determined Fraction of Inventory in Aqueous Phase (FIAP). In all studied cases, some radionuclides (RN): Rb, Sr and Cs, have shown higher release rates than uranium, especially at the beginning of the experiment, and have been considered as IRF. Redox sensitive RN like Mo and Tc have been found to dissolve slightly faster than uranium and further studies might be needed to confirm if they can also be considered part of the IRF. Most of the remaining studied RN, mainly actinides and lanthanides, have been found to dissolve congruently with the uranium matrix. Finally, Zr, Ru and Rh presented lower release rates than the matrix. Higher matrix release has been determined for CORE than for OUT samples showing that the formation of HBS might have a protective effect against the oxidative corrosion of the SNF. On the contrary, no significant differences have been observed between the two studied leaching solutions (BIC and BGW). Two different IRF contributions have been determined. One corresponding to the fraction of inventory segregated in the external open grain boundaries, directly available to water and

  3. An economic evaluation of a storage system for casks with burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is generally recognized that casks designed with burnup credit are more economical than those without burnup credit. To estimate how much more economical they are, we made conceptual designs of transport/storage casks with and without burnup credit for PWR and BWR fuels of various uranium enrichment. The casks were designed to contain the maximum number of fuel assemblies under the necessary weight and dimensional limitations as well as the criticality and shielding criteria. The results showed that approximately 8 % to 44 % more fuel assemblies could be contained in casks with burnup credit. We then evaluated the economy of cask storage system incorporating the cask designs obtained above both with and without burnup credit. The results showed that the cost of storing casks with burnup credit is approximately 7 % to 30 % less expensive than storing casks without burnup credit. (J.P.N.)

  4. Gross Gamma Dose Rate Measurements for TRIGA Spent Nuclear Fuel Burnup Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross gamma-ray dose rates from six spent TRIGA fuel elements were measured and compared to calculated values as a means to validate the reported element burnups. A newly installed and functional gamma-ray detection subsystem of the In-Cell Examination System was used to perform the measurements and is described in some detail. The analytical methodology used to calculate the corresponding dose rates is presented along with the calculated values. Comparison of the measured and calculated dose rates for the TRIGA fuel elements indicates good agreement (less than a factor of 2 difference). The intent of the subsystem is to measure the gross gamma dose rate and correlate the measurement to a calculated dose rate based on the element s known burnup and other pertinent spent fuel information. Although validation of the TRIGA elements' burnup is of primary concern in this paper, the measurement and calculational techniques can be used to either validate an element's reported burnup or provide a burnup estimate for an element with an unknown burnup. (authors)

  5. Evaluation of fuel performance in reactor (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ratios of primary coolant concentration of 131I to 133I and 135I to 133I are expressible as one point in the area surrounded by two straight lines and two rectangular hyperbolas having a fixed common point in the rectangular coordinate system of the above two ratios. And fuel defect level, exposed tramp uranium level and primary purification rate are obtained conveniently in the above figure. Some remarks to these procedures are also presented. (auth.)

  6. Dynamic modelling of PWR fuel assembly for seismic behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vibration and snap back tests have shown that the behaviour of PWR fuel assemblies was non linear : the fuel assembly eigenfrequencies decrease with the excitation level or with the motion amplitude, which was supposed to be due to the slippage of the fuel rods through the grids. Up to now the fuel assembly models were linear and composed by one beam alone representing both the guide thimbles and the fuel rods or by two beams (one for the guide thimbles and one for the fuel rods). The stiffness of such models' were adjusted to fit with the measured eigenfrequency corresponding to a given amplitude. The aim of this paper is to identify the influence of the slippage between grids and fuel rods on the dynamic behaviour of the fuel assembly. For that purpose a non linear fuel assembly model is proposed representing explicitly the slippage phenomenon and is applied to the reduced scale fuel assemblies which have been tested in the framework of a collaboration between FRAMATOME and CEA-DMT. Comparisons between calculations and experiments will be presented and the limitation of this model will be also discussed

  7. Impact investigation of reactor fuel operating parameters on reactivity for use in burnup credit applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloma, Tanya Noel

    When representing the behavior of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF), credit is sought for the reduced reactivity associated with the net depletion of fissile isotopes and the creation of neutron-absorbing isotopes, a process that begins when a commercial nuclear reactor is first operated at power. Burnup credit accounts for the reduced reactivity potential of a fuel assembly and varies with the fuel burnup, cooling time, and the initial enrichment of fissile material in the fuel. With regard to long-term SNF disposal and transportation, tremendous benefits, such as increased capacity, flexibility of design and system operations, and reduced overall costs, provide an incentive to seek burnup credit for criticality safety evaluations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Interim Staff Guidance 8, Revision 2 in 2002, endorsing burnup credit of actinide composition changes only; credit due to actinides encompasses approximately 30% of exiting pressurized water reactor SNF inventory and could potentially be increased to 90% if fission product credit were accepted. However, one significant issue for utilizing full burnup credit, compensating for actinide and fission product composition changes, is establishing a set of depletion parameters that produce an adequately conservative representation of the fuel's isotopic inventory. Depletion parameters can have a significant effect on the isotopic inventory of the fuel, and thus the residual reactivity. This research seeks to quantify the reactivity impact on a system from dominant depletion parameters (i.e., fuel temperature, moderator density, burnable poison rod, burnable poison rod history, and soluble boron concentration). Bounding depletion parameters were developed by statistical evaluation of a database containing reactor operating histories. The database was generated from summary reports of commercial reactor criticality data. Through depletion calculations, utilizing the SCALE 6 code package, several light

  8. Irradiation behavior of FBTR mixed carbide fuel at various burn-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast breeder test reactor at Kalpakkam has completed nearly 25 years of operation and is now operating at 18 MWt capacity with 46 fuel subassemblies (FSA) in the core consisting of 27 Mark-I (70% PuC + 30% UC), 13 Mark-II (55% PuC + 45% UC) and 6 MOX (44% PuO2 + 56% UO2) and one test PFBR FSA. Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) campaigns on FSAs at different burnup levels has provided valuable information about the irradiation behavior of the carbide fuel. This paper gives a summary of the irradiation performance of the carbide fuel evaluated through some of the investigations such as neutron radiography, x-radiography, gamma scanning, fission gas analysis and ceramography. Burnup of the carbide fuel could be enhanced from the initial design burnup limit of 50 GWd/t to 165 GWd/through systematic PIE. (author)

  9. Development of the new basic correlation “MG-S” for CHF prediction of the PWR fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yodo, T.; Sato, Y.; Yumura, T.; Makino, Y.; Suemura, T. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD., Kobe, Hyogo (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    It is important for core thermal-hydraulic design and plant safety analysis of PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) to predict CHF (Critical Heat Flux) accurately. The accurate CHF prediction can enhance the reliability of the safety analysis and bring more efficient plant operations such as up-rating and higher burn-up fuel management. The new CHF correlation, MG-S (Mitsubishi Generalized correlation - for Standard grid), has been developed as a basic correlation of the new correlation series, which are for conventional and new-generation Mitsubishi fuel assemblies. Through comparisons with existing CHF data and a conventional CHF correlation, it was confirmed that MG-S can predict CHF with sufficient accuracy and extend its applicability to wider fluid parameters of interest. (author)

  10. Development of the new basic correlation “MG-S” for CHF prediction of the PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important for core thermal-hydraulic design and plant safety analysis of PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) to predict CHF (Critical Heat Flux) accurately. The accurate CHF prediction can enhance the reliability of the safety analysis and bring more efficient plant operations such as up-rating and higher burn-up fuel management. The new CHF correlation, MG-S (Mitsubishi Generalized correlation - for Standard grid), has been developed as a basic correlation of the new correlation series, which are for conventional and new-generation Mitsubishi fuel assemblies. Through comparisons with existing CHF data and a conventional CHF correlation, it was confirmed that MG-S can predict CHF with sufficient accuracy and extend its applicability to wider fluid parameters of interest. (author)

  11. Investigation of research and development subjects for very high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium use as well as burnup extension of UO2 fuel is an important subject for the strategy of utilization of the nuclear energy in LWRs. A higher burnup is favorable to MOX fuel in economic respect and for effective use of plutonium. Therefore, the concept of a 'very high burnup' aiming at the maximum bundle burnup of 100GWd/t has been proposed assuming use of MOX fuel. The authors have investigated research and development subjects for the fuel pellet and the cladding material to be developed. The present report shows the results on the cladding material. In order to achieve a very high burnup, development of the cladding material with higher corrosion and radiation resistance compared with Zircaloy is necessary. In this report, zirconium based alloy, stainless steel, nickel and titanium based alloys, ceramics, etc. were reviewed considering water corrosion resistance, thermal and mechanical properties, radiation effects, etc. Furthermore, capability of these materials as the fuel cladding was discussed focusing on water side corrosion and radiation effect on mechanical properties. As a result, candidate materials at present and the required research tasks were shown with issues for the development. (author) 66 refs

  12. Estimating PWR fuel rod failures throughout a cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel performance engineer requires good prediction models for fuel conditions to help assure that any fuel repair operation he may recommend for the next refueling outage will have a minimal impact on nuclear plant operation. For nearly two decades, simple equilibrium equations have been used to provide estimates of the number of failed fuel rods in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core. The unknown parameter is the isotopic escape rate (upsilon), which is often assumed to be --1 X 10/sup -8//s for the release of /sup 131/I from a 3- to 4-m-long PWR rod. The use of this escape rate value will generally produce end-of-cycle (EOC) predictions that are accurate within a factor of --3. When applied at the time when fuel rods initially fail, such as early in a reactor cycle, however, the prediction obtained may overestimate the number of failed rods present by a factor of 10 or more. While a goal of Combustion Engineering's (C-E's) efforts on failed fuel prediction (FFP) models over the past decade has been to increase the accuracy of the EOC estimate, recent efforts have emphasized improving prediction capability for failed rods present early in a reactor cycle. The C-E approach to modeling iodine release from failed fuel rods is based on dynamic escape rate theory that is incorporated in the C-E IODYNE (for iodine dynamic evaluation) code. This theory has been empirically modified to account for specific observed time dependencies of the release rates for /sup 131/I and /sup 133/I from a failed rod. In a current version of IODYNE, four such factors have been included in the FFP model, as described in this paper

  13. Summary of high burnup fuel issues and NRC`s plan of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, R.O.

    1997-01-01

    For the past two years the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research has concentrated mostly on the so-called reactivity-initiated accidents -- the RIAs -- in this session of the Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting, but this year there is a more varied agenda. RIAs are, of course, not the only events of interest for reactor safety that are affected by extended burnup operation. Their has now been enough time to consider a range of technical issues that arise at high burnup, and a list of such issues being addressed in their research program is given here. (1) High burnup capability of the steady-state code (FRAPCON) used for licensing audit calculations. (2) General capability (including high burnup) of the transient code (FRAPTRAN) used for special studies. (3) Adequacy at high burnup of fuel damage criteria used in regulation for reactivity accidents. (4) Adequacy at high burnup of models and fuel related criteria used in regulation for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). (5) Effect of high burnup on fuel system damage during normal operation, including control rod insertion problems. A distinction is made between technical issues, which may or may not have direct licensing impacts, and licensing issues. The RIAs became a licensing issue when the French test in CABRI showed that cladding failures could occur at fuel enthalpies much lower than a value currently used in licensing. Fuel assembly distortion became a licensing issue when control rod insertion was affected in some operating plants. In this presentation, these technical issues will be described and the NRC`s plan of action to address them will be discussed.

  14. Determination of fissile fraction in MOX (mixed U + Pu oxides) fuels for different burnup values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozdemir, Levent, E-mail: levent.ozdemir@taek.gov.tr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hacettepe University, 06800 Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey); Acar, Banu Bulut; Zabunoglu, Okan H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Hacettepe University, 06800 Beytepe, Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-02-15

    When spent Light Water Reactor fuels are processed by the standard Purex method of reprocessing, plutonium (Pu) and uranium (U) in spent fuel are obtained as pure and separate streams. The recovered Pu has a fissile content (consisting of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu) greater than 60% typically (although it mainly depends on discharge burnup of spent fuel). The recovered Pu can be recycled as mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel after being blended with a fertile U makeup in a MOX fabrication plant. The burnup that can be obtained from MOX fuel depends on: (1) isotopic composition of Pu, which is closely related to the discharge burnup of spent fuel from which Pu is recovered; (2) the type of fertile U makeup material used (depleted U, natural U, or recovered U); and (3) fraction of makeup material in the mix (blending ratio), which in turn determines the total fissile fraction of MOX. Using the Non-linear Reactivity Model and the code MONTEBURNS, a step-by-step procedure for computing the total fissile content of MOX is introduced. As was intended, the resulting expression is simple enough for quick/hand calculations of total fissile content of MOX required to reach a desired burnup for a given discharge burnup of spent fuel and for a specified fertile U makeup. In any case, due to non-fissile (parasitic) content of recovered Pu, a greater fissile fraction in MOX than that in fresh U is required to obtain the same burnup as can be obtained by the fresh U fuel.

  15. Review of Halden Reactor Project high burnup fuel data that can be used in safety analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesenack, W. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    1996-03-01

    The fuels and materials testing programmes carried out at the OECD Halden Reactor Project are aimed at providing data in support of a mechanistic understanding of phenomena, especially as related to high burnup fuel. The investigations are focused on identifying long term property changes, and irradiation techniques and instrumentation have been developed over the years which enable to assess fuel behaviour and properties in-pile. The fuel-cladding gap has an influence on both thermal and mechanical behaviour. Improved gap conductance due to gap closure at high exposure is observed even in the case of a strong contamination with released fission gas. On the other hand, pellet-cladding mechanical interaction, which is measured with cladding elongation detectors and diameter gauges, is re-established after a phase with less interaction and is increasing. These developments are exemplified with data showing changes of fuel temperature, hydraulic diameter and cladding elongation with burnup. Fuel swelling and cladding primary and secondary creep have been successfully measured in-pile. They provide data for, e.g., the possible cladding lift-off to be accounted for at high burnup. Fuel conductivity degradation is observed as a gradual temperature increase with burnup. This affects stored heat, fission gas release and temperature dependent fuel behaviour in general. The Halden Project`s data base on fission gas release shows that the phenomenon is associated with an accumulation of gas atoms at the grain boundaries to a critical concentration before appreciable release occurs. This is accompanied by an increase of the surface-to-volume ratio measured in-pile in gas flow experiments. A typical observation at high burnup is also that a burst release of fission gas may occur during a power decrease. Gas flow and pressure equilibration experiments have shown that axial communication is severely restricted at high burnup.

  16. About a fuel for burnup reactor of periodical pulsed nuclear pumped laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, A.I.; Lukin, A.V.; Magda, L.E.; Magda, E.P.; Pogrebov, I.S.; Putnikov, I.S.; Khmelnitsky, D.V.; Scherbakov, A.P. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center, Snezhinsk (Russian Federation)

    1998-07-01

    A physical scheme of burnup reactor for a Periodic Pulsed Nuclear Pumped Laser was supposed. Calculations of its neutron physical parameters were made. The general layout and construction of basic elements of the reactor are discussed. The requirements for the fuel and fuel elements are established. (author)

  17. Burnup analysis of the VVER-1000 reactor using thorium-based fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkmaz, Mehmet E.; Agar, Osman; Bueyueker, Eylem [Karamanoglu Mehmetbey Univ., Karaman (Turkey). Faculty of Kamil Ozdag Science

    2014-12-15

    This paper aims to investigate {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U fuel cycles in a VVER-1000 reactor through calculation by computer. The 3D core geometry of VVER-1000 system was designed using the Serpent Monte Carlo 1.1.19 Code. The Serpent Code using parallel programming interface (Message Passing Interface-MPI), was run on a workstation with 12-core and 48 GB RAM. {sup 232}Th/{sup 235}U/{sup 238}U oxide mixture was considered as fuel in the core, when the mass fraction of {sup 232}Th was increased as 0.05-0.1-0.2-0.3-0.4 respectively, the mass fraction of {sup 238}U equally was decreased. In the system, the calculations were made for 3 000 MW thermal power. For the burnup analyses, the core is assumed to deplete from initial fresh core up to a burnup of 16 MWd/kgU without refuelling considerations. In the burnup calculations, a burnup interval of 360 effective full power days (EFPDs) was defined. According to burnup, the mass changes of the {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am and {sup 244}Cm were evaluated, and also flux and criticality of the system were calculated in dependence of the burnup rate.

  18. Burnup analysis of the VVER-1000 reactor using thorium-based fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to investigate 232Th/233U fuel cycles in a VVER-1000 reactor through calculation by computer. The 3D core geometry of VVER-1000 system was designed using the Serpent Monte Carlo 1.1.19 Code. The Serpent Code using parallel programming interface (Message Passing Interface-MPI), was run on a workstation with 12-core and 48 GB RAM. 232Th/235U/238U oxide mixture was considered as fuel in the core, when the mass fraction of 232Th was increased as 0.05-0.1-0.2-0.3-0.4 respectively, the mass fraction of 238U equally was decreased. In the system, the calculations were made for 3 000 MW thermal power. For the burnup analyses, the core is assumed to deplete from initial fresh core up to a burnup of 16 MWd/kgU without refuelling considerations. In the burnup calculations, a burnup interval of 360 effective full power days (EFPDs) was defined. According to burnup, the mass changes of the 232Th, 233U, 238U, 237Np, 239Pu, 241Am and 244Cm were evaluated, and also flux and criticality of the system were calculated in dependence of the burnup rate.

  19. Development of the CANDU high-burnup fuel design/analysis technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains all the information related to the development of the CANDU advanced fuel, so-called CANFLEX-NU, which is composed of 43 elements with natural uranium fuel. Also, it contains the compatibility study of CANFLEX-RU which is considered as a CANDU high burnup fuel. This report describes the mechanical design, thermalhydraulic and safety evaluations of CANFLEX fuel bundle. (author). 38 refs., 24 tabs., 74 figs

  20. Investigation of research and development subjects for the Very High Burnup Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept of the Very High Burnup Fuel aiming at a maximum fuel assembly burnup of 100 GWd/t has been proposed in terms of burnup extension, utilization of Pu and transmutation of transuranium elements (TRU: Np, Am and Cm). The authors have investigated research and development (R and D) subjects of the fuel pellet and the cladding material of the Fuel. The present report describes the results on the fuel pellet. First, the chemical state of the Fuel and fission products (FP) was inferred through an FP-inventory and an equilibrium-thermodynamics calculations. Besides, knowledge obtained from post-irradiation examinations was surveyed. Next, an investigation was made on irradiation behavior of U/Pu mixed oxide (MOX) fuel with high enrichment of Pu, as well as on fission-gas release and swelling behavior of high burnup fuels. Reprocessibility of the Fuel, particularly solubility of the spent fuel, was also examined. As for the TRU-added fuel, material property data on TRU oxides were surveyed and summarized as a database. And the subjects on the production and the irradiation behavior were examined on the basis of experiences of MOX fuel production and TRU-added fuel irradiation. As a whole, the present study revealed the necessity of accumulating fundamental data and knowledge required for design and assessment of the fuel pellet, including the information on properties and irradiation performance of the TRU-added fuel. Finally, the R and D subjects were summarized, and a proposal was made on the way of development of the fuel pellet and cladding materials. (author)

  1. Model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongxing; Long, Chongsheng; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-04-01

    The restructuring process of the high burnup structure (HBS) formation in UO2 fuel results in sub-micron size grains that accelerate the fission gas swelling, which will raise some concern over the safety of extended the nuclear fuel operation life in the reactor. A mechanistic and engineering model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel based on the experimental observations of the HBS in the literature is presented. The model takes into account dislocations evolution under irradiation and the grain subdivision occur successively at increasing local burnup. It is assumed that the original driving force for subdivision of grain in the HBS of UO2 fuel is the production and accumulation of dislocation loops during irradiation. The dislocation loops can also be annealed through thermal diffusion when the temperature is high enough. The capability of this model is validated by the comparison with the experimental data of temperature threshold of subdivision, dislocation density and sub-grain size as a function of local burnup. It is shown that the calculated results of the dislocation density and subdivided grain size as a function of local burnup are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. An iterative approach for TRIGA fuel burn-up determination using nondestructive gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Tienko E-mail: tkw@faculty.nthu.edu.tw; Peir Jinnjer

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a method for evaluating the burn-up values of the rod-type TRIGA spent fuel by using gamma-ray spectrometry of the short-lived fission products {sup 97}Zr/{sup 97}Nb, {sup 132}I, and {sup 140}La. Fuel irradiation history is not needed in this method. Short-lived fission-product activities were established by re irradiating the spent fuels in a nuclear reactor. Based on the measured activities, {sup 235}U burn-up values can be deduced by iterative calculations. The complication caused by {sup 239}Pu production and fission is also discussed in detail. The burn-up values obtained by this method are in good agreement with those deduced from the conventional method based on long-lived fission products {sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio and {sup 106}Ru/{sup 137}Cs ratio.

  3. An iterative approach for TRIGA fuel burn-up determination using nondestructive gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to establish a method for evaluating the burn-up values of the rod-type TRIGA spent fuel by using gamma-ray spectrometry of the short-lived fission products 97Zr/97Nb, 132I, and 140La. Fuel irradiation history is not needed in this method. Short-lived fission-product activities were established by re irradiating the spent fuels in a nuclear reactor. Based on the measured activities, 235U burn-up values can be deduced by iterative calculations. The complication caused by 239Pu production and fission is also discussed in detail. The burn-up values obtained by this method are in good agreement with those deduced from the conventional method based on long-lived fission products 137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs ratio and 106Ru/137Cs ratio

  4. An iterative approach for TRIGA fuel burn-up determination using nondestructive gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T K; Peir, J J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a method for evaluating the burn-up values of the rod-type TRIGA spent fuel by using gamma-ray spectrometry of the short-lived fission products 97Zr/97Nb, 132I, and 140La. Fuel irradiation history is not needed in this method. Short-lived fission-product activities were established by reirradiating the spent fuels in a nuclear reactor. Based on the measured activities, 235U burn-up values can be deduced by iterative calculations. The complication caused by 239Pu production and fission is also discussed in detail. The burn-up values obtained by this method are in good agreement with those deduced from the conventional method based on long-lived fission products 137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs ratio and 106Ru/137Cs ratio. PMID:10670930

  5. Use of axial burnup distribution profile in the nuclear safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel storage for WWER reactors in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear safety analysis of spent fuel storages taking into account fuel burnup should allow for burnup distribution along the height of the assembly. We propose a method based on an analysis of the axial burnup profiles of spent fuel assemblies. This method can be used in nuclear safety justification of spent fuel management and storage systems

  6. A simple gamma spectrometry method for evaluating the burnup of MTR-type HEU fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makmal, T.; Aviv, O.; Gilad, E.

    2016-10-01

    A simple method for the evaluation of the burnup of a materials testing reactor (MTR) fuel element by gamma spectrometry is presented. The method was applied to a highly enriched uranium MTR nuclear fuel element that was irradiated in a 5 MW pool-type research reactor for a total period of 34 years. The experimental approach is based on in-situ measurements of the MTR fuel element in the reactor pool by a portable high-purity germanium detector located in a gamma cell. To corroborate the method, analytical calculations (based on the irradiation history of the fuel element) and computer simulations using a dedicated fuel cycle burnup code ORIGEN2 were performed. The burnup of the MTR fuel element was found to be 52.4±8.8%, which is in good agreement with the analytical calculations and the computer simulations. The method presented here is suitable for research reactors with either a regular or an irregular irradiation regime and for reactors with limited infrastructure and/or resources. In addition, its simplicity and the enhanced safety it confers may render this method suitable for IAEA inspectors in fuel element burnup assessments during on-site inspections.

  7. The REBUS experimental programme for burn-up credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international programme called REBUS for the investigation of the burn-up credit has been initiated by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK·CEN and Belgonucleaire with the support of EdF and IRSN from France and VGB, representing German nuclear utilities and NUPEC, representing the Japanese industry. Recently also ORNL from the U.S. jointed the programme. The programme aims to establish a neutronic benchmark for reactor physics codes in order to qualify the codes for calculations of the burn-up credit. The benchmark exercise investigate the following fuel types with associated burn-up: reference fresh 3.3% enriched UO2 fuel, fresh commercial PWR UO2 fuel and irradiated commercial PWR UO2 fuel (54 GWd/tM), fresh PWR MOX fuel and irradiated PWR MOX fuel (20 GWd/tM). The experiments on the three configurations with fresh fuel have been completed. The experiments show a good agreement between calculation and experiments for the different measured parameters: critical water level, reactivity effect of the water level and fission-rate and flux distributions. In 2003 the irradiated BR3 MOX fuel bundle was loaded into the VENUS reactor and the associated experimental programme was carried out. The reactivity measurements in this configuration with irradiated fuel show a good agreement between experimental and preliminary calculated values. (author)

  8. Corrosion studies with high burnup light water reactor fuel. Release of nuclides into simulated groundwater during accumulated contact time of up to two years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicky, Hans-Urs (Zwicky Consulting GmbH, Remigen (Switzerland)); Low, Jeanett; Ekeroth, Ella (Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden))

    2011-03-15

    pellet surface than the bulk of the pellet in leaching experiments. Thus, formation of oxidising species and radicals by radiolysis is expected to be disproportionately high as well. Therefore, when discussing high burnup fuel dissolution, the effect of the increased radiation field with burnup, as well as of the influence of the smaller grain size and increased porosity at the rim are mentioned as factors which contribute to increased dissolution rates. A third factor, increased fission product and actinide doping with burnup, has been discussed extensively in connection with increased resistance to air oxidation of the fuel. Samples from four different fuel rods, all operated in Pressurised Water Reactors (PWR), are used in the new series of corrosion experiments. They cover a burnup range from 58 to 75 MWd/kgU. The nuclide inventory of all four samples was determined by means of a combination of experimental nuclide analysis and sample specific modelling calculations. More than 40 different nuclides were analysed by isotope dilution analysis using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS), as well as other ICP-MS and gamma spectrometric methods. The content of roughly all fission products and actinides was also calculated separately for each sample. The experiments are performed under oxidising conditions in synthetic groundwater at ambient temperature. In order to make results as comparable as possible to those of the Series 11 experiments, the same procedure and the same leachant is used. At least nine consecutive contact periods of one and three weeks and two, three, six and twelve months are planned. The present report covers the first five contact periods up to a cumulative contact time of one year for all four samples and in addition the sixth period up to a cumulative contact time of two years for two of the samples. The samples, kept in position by a platinum wire spiral, are exposed to synthetic groundwater in a Pyrex flask. After the contact

  9. Determination of the fuel element burn-up for mixed TRIGA core by measurement and calculation with new TRIGLAV code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Persic, A. (J.Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia))

    1999-12-15

    Results of fuel element burn-up determination by measurement and calculation are given. Fuel element burn-up was calculated with two different programs TRIGLAV and TRIGAC using different models. New TRIGLAV code is based on cylindrical, two-dimensional geometry with four group diffusion approximation. TRIGAC program uses one-dimensional cylindrical geometry with twogroup diffusion approximation. Fuel element burn-up was measured with reactivity method. In this paper comparison and analysis of these three methods is presented. Results calculated with TRIGLAV show considerably better alignment with measured values than results calculated with TRIGAC. Some two-dimensional effects in fuel element burn-up can be observed, for instance smaller standard fuel element burn-up in mixed core rings and control rod influence on nearby fuel elements. (orig.)

  10. Automatic defect identification on PWR nuclear power station fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents a new automatic identification technique of structural failures in nuclear green fuel pellet. This technique was developed to identify failures occurred during the fabrication process. It is based on a smart image analysis technique for automatic identification of the failures on uranium oxide pellets used as fuel in PWR nuclear power stations. In order to achieve this goal, an artificial neural network (ANN) has been trained and validated from image histograms of pellets containing examples not only from normal pellets (flawless), but from defective pellets as well (with the main flaws normally found during the manufacturing process). Based on this technique, a new automatic identification system of flaws on nuclear fuel element pellets, composed by the association of image pre-processing and intelligent, will be developed and implemented on the Brazilian nuclear fuel production industry. Based on the theoretical performance of the technology proposed and presented in this article, it is believed that this new system, NuFAS (Nuclear Fuel Pellets Failures Automatic Identification Neural System) will be able to identify structural failures in nuclear fuel pellets with virtually zero error margins. After implemented, the NuFAS will add value to control quality process of the national production of the nuclear fuel.

  11. Fuel cycle and waste management. 3. Analysis of PWR Equilibrium Fuel Cycles Using Nuclide Importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy generation by nuclear reactors entails production of plutonium and radioactive waste. To utilize the plutonium and to minimize the long-term radio-toxic waste, an option is a closed fuel cycle strategy employing reprocessing and recycling of actinides. Since commercial operation of fast reactors is not considered to be realized in the near future, plutonium and minor actinide recycling in light water reactors (LWRs) is considered, although LWR neutron economy is not good. In this study, uranium enrichment, natural uranium requirements, and toxicity of discharged heavy metals (HMs) are evaluated for a pressurized water reactor (PWR), whose design parameters are given in Table I. The following fuel cycles are investigated, where all fission products (FPs) and final products of HMs (Tl-Fr) are discharged from the reactor at a standard rate (25%/yr): Case 1: All HMs are discharged with the standard rate. Case 2: All HMs except Pu are discharged with the standard rate; Pu is discharged at the rate of one-half of the standard rate. Case 3: All HMs except Pu are discharged with the standard rate; Pu is confined. Case 4: All HMs except U are confined; U is discharged with the standard rate. Case 5: All HMs are confined. The infinite multiplication factor k can be expressed by using the nuclide importance (fission neutron importance fj and absorbed neutron importance aj ) as k = (Σj fj sj)/(αΣj aj sj), where sj = atomic percent of uranium isotopes (234U, 235U, and 238U ) in the supplied fuel α = correction factor for estimating neutron absorption by non-fuel-originating nuclides, such as coolant and construction materials. A detailed description of nuclide importance and calculation method is given in Ref. 1. The value k is set to be 1.02, and sj are evaluated from this equation and the following ones: s24 + s25 + s28 = 100 and 100s24 - 0.9937s25=-0.1925. The second equation is given by enrichment conditions. The group cross-section set is generated with the SRAC

  12. Fission gas release behavior in high burnup UO2 fuels with developed rim-structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of rim structure formation and external restraint pressure on fission gas release at transient conditions has been examined by using an out-of-pile high pressure heating technique for high burnup UO2 fuels (60, 74 and 90 GWd/t), which had been irradiated in test reactors. The latter two fuels bore a developed rim structure. The maximum heating temperature was 1500 degC, and the external pressures were independently controlled in the range of 10-150 MPa. The present high burnup fuel data were compared with those of previously studied BWR fuels of 37 and 54 GWd/t with almost no rim structure. The fission gas release and bubble swelling due to the growth of grain boundary bubbles and coarsened rim bubbles were effectively suppressed by the strong restraint pressure of 150 MPa for all the fuels; however the fission gas release remarkably increased for the two high burnup fuels with the developed rim structure, even at the strong restraint conditions. From the stepwise de-pressurization tests at an isothermal condition of 1500degC, the critical external pressure, below which a large burst release due to the rapid growth and interlinkage of the bubbles abruptly begins, was increased from a 40-60 MPa level for the middle burnup fuels to a high level of 120-140 MPa for the rim-structured high burnup fuels. The high potential for transient fission gas release and bubble swelling in the rim-structured fuels was attributed to highly over-pressurized fission gases in the rim bubbles. (author)

  13. The use of burnup credit in criticality control for the Korean spent fuel management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 25% k-eff saving effect is observed in this burnup credit analysis. This mainly comes from the adoption of actinide nuclides and fission products in the criticality analysis. By taking burnup credit, the high capacity of the storage and transportation can be more fully utilized, reducing the space of storage and the number of shipments. Larger storage and fewer shipments for a given inventory of spent fuel result should in remarkable cost savings and more importantly reduce the risks to the public and occupational workers for the Korean Spent Fuel Management Program

  14. Computational simulation of fuel burnup estimation for research reactors plate type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nadia Rodrigues dos, E-mail: nadiasam@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ), Paracambi, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: zrlima@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the spatial fuel burnup, through computational simulation, in two research reactors plate type, loaded with dispersion fuel: the benchmark Material Test Research - International Atomic Energy Agency (MTR-IAEA) and a typical multipurpose reactor (MR). The first composed of plates with uranium oxide dispersed in aluminum (UAlx-Al) and a second composed with uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) dispersed in aluminum. To develop this work we used the deterministic code, WIMSD-5B, which performs the cell calculation solving the neutron transport equation, and the DF3DQ code, written in FORTRAN, which solves the three-dimensional neutron diffusion equation using the finite difference method. The methodology used was adequate to estimate the spatial fuel burnup , as the results was in accordance with chosen benchmark, given satisfactorily to the proposal presented in this work, even showing the possibility to be applied to other research reactors. For future work are suggested simulations with other WIMS libraries, other settings core and fuel types. Comparisons the WIMSD-5B results with programs often employed in fuel burnup calculations and also others commercial programs, are suggested too. Another proposal is to estimate the fuel burnup, taking into account the thermohydraulics parameters and the Xenon production. (author)

  15. Angra 1 high burnup fuel behaviour under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.b, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The 16x16 NGF (Next Generation Fuel) fuel assembly, comprising of highly corrosive-resistant ZIRLO clad fuel rods, been replacing the current 16x16 Standard (16STD) fuel assembly in the Angra 1, a pressurized water reactor, with a net output of 626 MWe. The 16x16 NGF fuel assemblies are designed for a peak rod average burnup of up to 75 GWd/MTU, thus improving fuel utilization and reducing spent fuel storage issues. A design basis accident, the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA), became a concern for a further increase in burnup as the simulated RIA tests revealed a lower enthalpy threshold for fuel failure. Two fuel performance codes, FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN, were used to predict high burnup behavior of Angra 1, during an RIA. The maximum average linear fuel rating used was 17.62 KW/m. The FRAPCON 3.4 code was applied to simulate the steady-state performance of the 16 NGF fuel rods up to a burnup of 55 GWd/MTU. With FRAPTRAN-1.4 the fuel behavior was simulated for an RIA power pulse of 4.5 ms (FHWH), and enthalpy peak of 130 Cal/g. With FRAPCON-3.4, the corrosion and hydrogen pickup characteristics of the advanced ZIRLO clad fuel rods were added to the code by modifying the actual corrosion model for Zircaloy-4 through the multiplication of empirical factors, which were appropriate to each alloy, and by means of reducing the current hydrogen pickup fraction. (author)

  16. Preliminary study of the economics of enriching PWR fuel with a fusion hybrid reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is a comparison of the economics of enriching uranium oxide for pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant fuel using a fusion hybrid reactor versus the present isotopic enrichment process. The conclusion is that privately owned hybrid fusion reactors, which simultaneously produce electrical power and enrich fuel, are competitive with the gaseous diffusion enrichment process if spent PWR fuel rods are reenriched without refabrication. Analysis of irradiation damage effects should be performed to determine if the fuel rod cladding can withstand the additional irradiation in the hybrid and second PWR power cycle. The cost competitiveness shown by this initial study clearly justifies further investigations

  17. Microstructural Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of High Burn-up Mixed Oxide Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predicting the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels as a function of burn-up and temperature is fundamental to the efficient and safe operation of nuclear reactors. However, modeling the thermal conductivity of fuel is greatly complicated by the radially inhomogeneous nature of irradiated fuel in both composition and microstructure. In this work, radially and temperature-dependent models for effective thermal conductivity were developed utilizing optical micrographs of high burn-up mixed oxide fuel. The micrographs were employed to create finite element meshes with the OOF2 software. The meshes were then used to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the microstructures using the BISON fuel performance code. The new thermal conductivity models were used to calculate thermal profiles at end of life for the fuel pellets. These results were compared to thermal conductivity models from the literature, and comparison between the new finite element-based thermal conductivity model and the Duriez-Lucuta model was favorable

  18. Microhardness and Young's modulus of high burn-up UO2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappia, F.; Pizzocri, D.; Marchetti, M.; Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P.; Luzzi, L.; Papaioannou, D.; Macián-Juan, R.; Rondinella, V. V.

    2016-10-01

    Vickers microhardness (HV0.1) and Young's modulus (E) measurements of LWR UO2 fuel at burn-up ≥60 GWd/tHM are presented. Their ratio HV0.1/E was found constant in the range 60-110 GWd/tHM. From the ratio and the microhardness values vs porosity, the Young's modulus dependence on porosity was derived and extended to the full radial profile, including the high burn-up structure (HBS). The dependence is well represented by a linear correlation. The data were compared to fuel performance codes correlations. A burn-up dependent factor was introduced in the Young's modulus expression. The modifications extend the experimental validation range of the TRANSURANUS correlation from un-irradiated to irradiated UO2 and up to 20% porosity. First simulations of LWR fuel rod irradiations were performed in order to illustrate the impact on fuel performance. In the specific cases selected, the simulations suggest a limited effect of the Young's modulus decrease due to burn-up on integral fuel performance.

  19. Practice and prospect of advanced fuel management and fuel technology application in PWR in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since Daya Bay nuclear power plant implemented 18-month refueling strategy in 2001, China has completed a series of innovative fuel management and fuel technology projects, including the Ling Ao Advanced Fuel Management (AFM) project (high-burnup quarter core refueling) and the Ningde 18-month refueling project with gadolinium-bearing fuel in initial core. First, this paper gives brief introduction to China's advanced fuel management and fuel technology experience. Second, it introduces practices of the advanced fuel management in China in detail, which mainly focuses on the implementation and progress of the Ningde 18-month refueling project with gadolinium-bearing fuel in initial core. Finally, the paper introduces the practices of advanced fuel technology in China and gives the outlook of the future advanced fuel management and fuel technology in this field. (author)

  20. ISOTOPIC MODEL FOR COMMERCIAL SNF BURNUP CREDIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.H. Wells

    2004-11-17

    The purpose of this report is to demonstrate a process for selecting bounding depletion parameters, show that they are conservative for pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and establish the range of burnup for which the parameters are conservative. The general range of applicability is for commercial light water reactor (LWR) SNF with initial enrichments between 2.0 and 5.0 weight percent {sup 235}U and burnups between 10 and 50 gigawatt-day per metric ton of uranium (GWd/MTU).

  1. Burnup simulations of different fuel grades using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asah-Opoku Fiifi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global energy problems range from the increasing cost of fuel to the unequal distribution of energy resources and the potential climate change resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. A sustainable nuclear energy would augment the current world energy supply and serve as a reliable future energy source. This research focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of pressurized water reactor systems. Three different fuel grades - mixed oxide fuel (MOX, uranium oxide fuel (UOX, and commercially enriched uranium or uranium metal (CEU - are used in this simulation and their impact on the effective multiplication factor (Keff and, hence, criticality and total radioactivity of the reactor core after fuel burnup analyzed. The effect of different clad materials on Keff is also studied. Burnup calculation results indicate a buildup of plutonium isotopes in UOX and CEU, as opposed to a decline in plutonium radioisotopes for MOX fuel burnup time. For MOX fuel, a decrease of 31.9% of the fissile plutonium isotope is observed, while for UOX and CEU, fissile plutonium isotopes increased by 82.3% and 83.8%, respectively. Keff results show zircaloy as a much more effective clad material in comparison to zirconium and stainless steel.

  2. Burn-Up Dependence of Bubble Morphology of Uranium Silicide Dispersion Fuels Used in Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn-up dependence of fission gas bubble morphology of U3Si2-Al and U3Si-Al dispersion fuels are reviewed with the data of ANL(Argonne Nation Laboratory) and KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

  3. Enhancing heat transfer and crud mitigation in PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses three methods for increasing single phase heat transfer in PWR fuel. The primary effect of increasing heat transfer is a reduction in the steaming rate from the fuel rods, which in turn reduces the likelihood of crud formation on the fuel rods and the potential for adsorption of boron into the crud. The advantage of lowering boron mass on the fuel is reduced risk of Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA). Another benefit of reduced crud formation is a lower risk of localized corrosion, a known contributor to rod cladding failures. Thinner crud leads to locally lower rod operating temperatures (lower corrosion rate) since crud acts as a thermal insulator between the rod and the coolant. The first method of increasing heat transfer involves addition of more than one Intermediate Flow Mixing vane grid (IFM) in the span between two neighboring structural spacing grids. The second method includes optimization of the mixing vane according to axial position. The third method involves variation of the IFMs axial position to optimize axial distribution of rod heat transfer. (authors)

  4. Development of a dry storage cask for PWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd.(KHNP), which operates all the nuclear power plants in Korea, is developing a new dry storage cask to store twenty four spent fuel assemblies generated from pressurized water reactors for at-reactor or away-from-reactor interim storage facility in Korea. The dry storage cask is designed and evaluated according to the requirements of the IAEA, the US NRC and the Korean regulations for the dry spent fuel storage system. It provides confinement, radiation shielding, structural integrity, subcritical control and passive heat removal for normal and accident conditions. The dry storage cask consists of a dual purpose canister providing a confinement boundary for the PWR spent fuel, and a storage overpack providing a structural and radiological boundary for long-term storage of the canister placed inside it. The overpack is constructed by a combination of steel and concrete, and is equipped with penetrating ducts near its lower and upper extremities to permit natural circulation of air to provide for the passive cooling of the canister and the contained spent fuel assemblies. This paper describes development status, description, design criteria, evaluation and demonstration tests of the dry storage cask. (authors)

  5. Validation of the burn-up code EVOLCODE 2.0 with PWR experimental data and with a Sensitivity/Uncertainty analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A successful validation of the burn-up simulation system EVOLCODE is presented here. • A Sensitivity/Uncertainty model was applied for uncertainty propagation/assessment. • Cross sections are for most cases the main contributors to inventory uncertainties. • The improved model helps to explain some simulation-experiment discrepancies. • Some hints for the improvement of basic data libraries are provided. - Abstract: A validation of the burn-up simulation system EVOLCODE 2.0 is presented here, involving the experimental measurement of U and Pu isotopes and some fission fragments production ratios after a burn-up of around 30 GWd/tU in a Pressurized Light Water Reactor (PWR). This work provides an in-depth analysis of the validation results, including the possible sources of the uncertainties. An uncertainty analysis based on the sensitivity methodology has been also performed, providing the uncertainties in the isotopic content propagated from the cross sections uncertainties. An improvement of the classical Sensitivity/Uncertainty (S/U) model has been developed to take into account the implicit dependence of the neutron flux normalization, that is, the effect of the constant power of the reactor. The improved S/U methodology, neglected in this kind of studies, has proven to be an important contribution to the explanation of some simulation-experiment discrepancies for which, in general, the cross section uncertainties are, for the most relevant actinides, an important contributor to the simulation uncertainties, of the same order of magnitude and sometimes even larger than the experimental uncertainties and the experiment-simulation differences. Additionally, some hints for the improvement of the JEFF3.1.1 fission yield library and for the correction of some errata in the experimental data are presented

  6. Calibration of burnup monitor in the Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oheda, K.; Naito, H.; Hirota, M. [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., Aomori (Japan); Natsume, K. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Kumanomido, H. [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    The Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant has adopted a credit for burnup in criticality control in the Spent Fuel Storage Facility (SFSF) and the Dissolution Facility. The burnup monitor system, prepared for BWR and PWR type fuel assemblies, nondestructively measures the burnup value and determines the residual U-235 enrichment in a spent fuel assembly, and criticality is controlled by the value of residual U-235 enrichment in SFSF and by the value of top 50 cm average burnup in the Dissolution Facility. The burnup monitor consists of three measurement systems; a Boss gamma-ray profile measurement system, a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry system, and a passive neutron measurement system. The monitor sensitivity is calibrated against operator-declared burnup values through repetitive measurements of 100 spent fuel assemblies: BWR 8 X 8, PWR 14 X 14. and 17 X 17. The outline of the measurement methods, objectives of the calibration, actual calibration method, and an example of calibration performed in a demonstration experiment are presented. (author)

  7. Fuel Burnup and Fuel Pool Shielding Analysis for Bushehr Nuclear Reactor VVER-1000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Kamal; Ayobian, Navid

    Bushehr Nuclear power plant (BNPP) is currently under construction. The VVER-1000 reactor will be loaded with 126 tons of about 4% enriched fuel having 3-years life cycle. The spent fuel (SF) will be transferred into the spent fuel pool (SPF), where it stays for 8 years before being transferred to Russia. The SPF plays a crucial role during 8 years when the SP resides in there. This paper investigates the shielding of this structure as it is designed to shield the SF radiation. In this study, the SF isotope inventory, for different cycles and with different burnups, was calculated using WIMS/4D transport code. Using MCNP4C nuclear code, the intensity of γ rays was obtained in different layers of SFP shields. These layers include the water above fuel assemblies (FA) in pool, concrete wall of the pool and water laid above transferring fuels. Results show that γ rays leakage from the shield in the mentioned layers are in agreement with the plant's PSAR data. Finally we analyzed an accident were the water height above the FA in the pool drops to 47 cm. In this case it was observed that exposure dose above pool, 10 and 30 days from the accident, are still high and in the levels of 1000 and 758 R/hr.

  8. Spent fuel pool storage calculations using the ISOCRIT burnup credit tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Depletion isotopics are needed for burnup credit in spent fuel pool analyses. ► We developed ISOCRIT to generate the isotopics using conservative depletion assumptions. ► ISOCRIT works in an automated fashion passing data between lattice physics and 3D Monte Carlo codes. ► Analyses to assess the impact of different depletion parameters on the reactivity of the spent fuel in pool conditions. - Abstract: In order to conservatively apply burnup credit in spent fuel pool criticality safety analyses, Westinghouse has developed a software tool, ISOCRIT, for generating depletion isotopics. This tool is used to create isotopics data based on specific reactor input parameters, such as design basis assembly type; bounding power/burnup profiles; reactor specific moderator temperature profiles; pellet percent theoretical density; burnable absorbers, axial blanket regions, and bounding ppm boron concentration. ISOCRIT generates burnup dependent isotopics using PARAGON; Westinghouse’s state-of-the-art and licensed lattice physics code. Generation of isotopics and passing the data to the subsequent 3D KENO calculations are performed in an automated fashion, thus reducing the chance for human error. Furthermore, ISOCRIT provides the means for responding to any customer request regarding re-analysis due to changed parameters (e.g., power uprate, exit temperature changes, etc.) with a quick turnaround.

  9. TRIGA fuel burn-up calculations supported by gamma scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy based non-destructive methods is employed to measure spent fuel parameters. By this method, the axial distribution of Cesium-137 has been measured which results in an axial burn up profiles. Knowing the exact irradiation history of the fuel, four spent TRIGA fuel elements have been selected for on-site gamma scanning using a special shielded scanning device developed at the Atominstitute. Each selected fuel element was transferred into the fuel inspection unit using the standard fuel transfer cask. Each fuel element was scanned in one centimetre steps of its active fuel length and the Cesium-137 activity was determined as a proved burn up indicator. The absolute activity of each centimetre was measured and compared with the reactor physics code ORIGEN2.2 results. This code was used to calculate average burn up and isotopic composition of fuel element. The comparison between measured and calculated results shows good agreement. (author)

  10. Determination of Fission Gas Inclusion Pressures in High Burnup Nuclear Fuel using Laser Ablation ICP-MS combined with SEM/EPMA and Optical Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In approximately 20% of all fissions at least one of the fission products is gaseous. These are mainly xenon and krypton isotopes contributing up to 90% by the xenon isotopes. Upon reaching a burn-up of 60 - 75 GWd/tHM a so called High Burnup Structure (HBS) is formed in the cooler rim of the fuel. In this region a depletion of the noble fission gases (FG) in the matrix and an enrichment of FG in μm-sized pores can be observed. Recent calculations show that in these pores the pressure at room temperature can be as large as 30 MPa. The knowledge of the FG pressure in pores is important to understand the high burn-up fuel behavior under accident conditions (i.e. RIA or LOCA). With analytical methods routinely used for the characterization of solid samples, i.e. Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS), the quantification of gaseous inclusions is very difficult to almost impossible. The combination of a laser ablation system (LA) with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) offers a powerful tool for quantification of the gaseous pore inventory. This method offers the advantages of high spatial resolution with laser spot sizes down to 10 μm and low detection limits. By coupling with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the pore size distribution, EPMA for the FG inventory in the fuel matrix and optical microscopy for the LA-crater sizes, the pressures in the pores and porosity was calculated. As a first application of this calibration technique for gases, measurements were performed on pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel with a rod average of 105 GWd/tHM to determine the local FG pressure distribution. (authors)

  11. Standard- and extended-burnup PWR [pressurized-water reactor] and BWR [boiling-water reactor] reactor models for the ORIGEN2 computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to describe an updated set of reactor models for pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs) operating on uranium fuel cycles and the methods used to generate the information for these models. Since new fuel cycle schemes and reactor core designs are introduced from time to time by reactor manufacturers and fuel vendors, an effort has been made to update these reactor models periodically and to expand the data bases used by the ORIGEN2 computer code. In addition, more sophisticated computational techniques than previously available were used to calculate the resulting reactor model cross-section libraries. The PWR models were based on a Westinghouse design, while the BWR models were based on a General Electric BWR/6 design. The specific reactor types considered in this report are as follows (see Glossary for the definition of these and other terms): (1) PWR-US, (2) PWR-UE, (3) BWR-US, (4) BWR-USO, and (5) BWR-UE. Each reactor model includes a unique data library that may be used to simulate the buildup and deletion of isotopes in nuclear materials using the ORIGEN2 computer code. 33 refs., 44 tabs

  12. Advances in applications of burnup credit to enhance spent fuel transportation, storage, reprocessing and disposition. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given a trend towards higher burnup power reactor fuel, the IAEA began an active programme in burnup credit (BUC) with major meetings in 1997 (IAEA-TECDOC-1013), 2000 (IAEA-TECDOC-1241) and 2002 (IAEA-TECDOC-1378) exploring worldwide interest in using BUC in spent fuel management systems. This publication contains the proceedings of the IAEA's 4th major BUC meeting, held in London. Sixty participants from 18 countries addressed calculation methodology, validation and criticality, safety criteria, procedural compliance with safety criteria, benefits of BUC applications, and regulatory aspects in BUC. This meeting encouraged the IAEA to continue its activities on burnup credit including dissemination of related information, given the number of Member States having to deal with increased spent fuel quantities and extended durations. A 5th major meeting on burnup credit is planned 2008. Burnup credit is a concept that takes credit for the reduced reactivity of fuel discharged from the reactor to improve loading density of irradiated fuel assemblies in storage, transportation, and disposal applications, relative to the assumption of fresh fuel nuclide inventories in loading calculations. This report has described a general four phase approach to be considered in burnup credit implementation. Much if not all of the background research and data acquisition necessary for successful burnup credit development in preparation for licensing has been completed. Many fuel types, facilities, and analysis methods are encompassed in the public knowledge base, such that in many cases this guidance will provide a means for rapid development of a burnup credit program. For newer assembly designs, higher enrichment fuels, and more extensive nuclide credit, additional research and development may be necessary, but even this work can build on the foundation that has been established to date. Those, it is hoped that this report will serve as a starting point with sufficient reference to

  13. Irradiation performance of PFBR MOX fuel after 112 GWd/t burn-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkiteswaran, C.N., E-mail: cnv@igcar.gov.in; Jayaraj, V.V.; Ojha, B.K.; Anandaraj, V.; Padalakshmi, M.; Vinodkumar, S.; Karthik, V.; Vijaykumar, Ran; Vijayaraghavan, A.; Divakar, R.; Johny, T.; Joseph, Jojo; Thirunavakkarasu, S.; Saravanan, T.; Philip, John; Rao, B.P.C.; Kasiviswanathan, K.V.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-06-01

    The 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) which is in advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam, India, will use mixed oxide (MOX) fuel with a target burnup of 100 GWd/t. The fuel pellet is of annular design to enable operation at a peak linear power of 450 W/cm with the requirement of minimum duration of pre-conditioning. The performance of the MOX fuel and the D9 clad and wrapper material was assessed through Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE) after test irradiation of 37 fuel pin subassembly in Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) to a burn-up of 112 GWd/t. Fission product distribution, swelling and fuel–clad gap evolution, central hole diameter variation, restructuring, fission gas release and clad wastage due to fuel–clad chemical interaction were evaluated through non-destructive and destructive examinations. The examinations have indicated that the MOX fuel can safely attain the desired target burn-up in PFBR.

  14. Evaluation of the characteristics of high burnup and high plutonium content mixed oxide (MOX) fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two kinds of MOX fuel irradiation tests, i.e., MOX irradiation test up to high burnup and MOX having high plutonium content irradiation test, have been performed from JFY 2007 for five years in order to establish technical data concerning MOX fuel behavior during irradiation, which shall be needed in safety regulation of MOX fuel with high reliability. The high burnup MOX irradiation test consists of irradiation extension and post irradiation examination (PIE). The activities done in JFY 2011 are destructive post irradiation examination (D-PIE) such as EPMA and SIMS at CEA (Commissariat a l'Enegie Atomique) facility. Cadarache and PIE data analysis. In the frame of irradiation test of high plutonium content MOX fuel programme, MOX fuel rods with about 14wt % Pu content are being irradiated at BR-2 reactor and corresponding PIE is also being done at PIE facility (SCK/CEN: Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie/Centre d'Etude l'Energie Nucleaire) in Belgium. The activities done in JFY 2011 are non-destructive post irradiation examination (ND-PIE) and D-PIE and PIE data analysis. In this report the results of EPMA and SIMS with high burnup irradiation test and the result of gamma spectrometry measurement which can give FP gas release rate are reported. (author)

  15. Fuel utilization improvements in a once-through PWR fuel cycle. Final report on Task 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dabby, D.

    1979-06-01

    In studying the position of the United States Department of Energy, Non-proliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program, this report determines the uranium saving associated with various improvement concepts applicable to a once-through fuel cycle of a standard four-loop Westinghouse Pressurized Water Reactor. Increased discharged fuel burnup from 33,000 to 45,000 MWD/MTM could achieve a 12% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ saving by 1990. Improved fuel management schemes combined with coastdown to 60% power, could result in U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ savings of 6%.

  16. Correlation of waterside corrosion and cladding microstructure in high-burnup fuel and gadolinia rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1989-09-01

    Waterside corrosion of the Zircaloy cladding has been examined in high-burnup fuel rods from several BWRs and PWRs, as well as in 3 wt % gadolinia burnable poison rods obtained from a BWR. The corrosion behavior of the high-burnup rods was then correlated with results from a microstructural characterization of the cladding by optical, scanning-electron, and transmission-electron microscopy (OM, SEM, and TEM). OM and SEM examination of the BWR fuel cladding showed both uniform and nodular oxide layers 2 to 45 {mu}m in thickness after burnups of 11 to 30 MWd/kgU. For one of the BWRs, which was operated at 307{degree}C rather than the normal 288{degree}C, a relatively thick (50 to 70 {mu}m) uniform oxide, rather than nodular oxides, was observed after a burnup of 27 to 30 MWd/kgU. TEM characterization revealed a number of microstructural features that occurred in association with the intermetallic precipitates in the cladding metal, apparently as a result of irradiation-induced or -enhanced processes. The BWR rods that exhibited white nodular oxides contained large precipitates (300 to 700 nm in size) that were partially amorphized during service, indicating that a distribution of the large intermetallic precipitates is conductive to nodular oxidation. 23 refs., 9 figs.

  17. ELESTRES 2.1 computer code for high burnup CANDU fuel performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ELESTRES (ELEment Simulation and sTRESses) computer code models the thermal, mechanical and micro structural behaviours of CANDU® fuel element under normal operating conditions. The main purpose of the code is to calculate fuel temperatures, fission gas release, internal gas pressure, fuel pellet deformation, and fuel sheath strains in fuel element design analysis and assessments. It is also used to provide initial conditions for evaluating fuel behaviour during high temperature transients. ELESTRES 2.1 was developed for high burnup fuel application, based on an industry standard tool version of the code, through the implementation or modification to code models such as fission gas release, fuel pellet densification, flux depression (radial power distribution in the fuel pellet), fuel pellet thermal conductivity, fuel sheath creep, fuel sheath yield strength, fuel sheath oxidation, two dimensional heat transfer between the fuel pellet and the fuel sheath; and an automatic finite element meshing capability to handle various fuel pellet shapes. The ELESTRES 2.1 code design and development was planned, implemented, verified, validated, and documented in accordance with the AECL software quality assurance program, which meets the requirements of the Canadian Standards Association standard for software quality assurance CSA N286.7-99. This paper presents an overview of the ELESTRES 2.1 code with descriptions of the code's theoretical background, solution methodologies, application range, input data, and interface with other analytical tools. Code verification and validation results, which are also discussed in the paper, have confirmed that ELESTRES 2.1 is capable of modelling important fuel phenomena and the code can be used in the design assessment and the verification of high burnup fuels. (author)

  18. Application of Genetic Algorithm methodologies in fuel bundle burnup optimization of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We study and compare Genetic Algorithms (GA) in the fuel bundle burnup optimization of an Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) of 220 MWe. • Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are considered. • For the selected problem, Multi Objective GA performs better than Penalty Functions based GA. • In the present study, Multi Objective GA outperforms Penalty Functions based GA in convergence speed and better diversity in solutions. - Abstract: The work carried out as a part of application and comparison of GA techniques in nuclear reactor environment is presented in the study. The nuclear fuel management optimization problem selected for the study aims at arriving appropriate reference discharge burnup values for the two burnup zones of 220 MWe Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) core. Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are applied in this study. The study reveals, for the selected problem of PHWR fuel bundle burnup optimization, Multi Objective GA is more suitable than Penalty Functions based GA in the two aspects considered: by way of producing diverse feasible solutions and the convergence speed being better, i.e. it is capable of generating more number of feasible solutions, from earlier generations. It is observed that for the selected problem, the Multi Objective GA is 25.0% faster than Penalty Functions based GA with respect to CPU time, for generating 80% of the population with feasible solutions. When average computational time of fixed generations are considered, Penalty Functions based GA is 44.5% faster than Multi Objective GA. In the overall performance, the convergence speed of Multi Objective GA surpasses the computational time advantage of Penalty Functions based GA. The ability of Multi Objective GA in producing more diverse feasible solutions is a desired feature of the problem selected, that helps the

  19. Investigation of Irradiation Behavior of SiC-Coated Fuel Particle at Extended Burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In current high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), Tri-isotropic (TRISO)-coated fuel particles are employed as fuel. In safety design of the HTGR fuels, it is important to retain fission products within particles so that their release to primary coolant does not exceed an acceptable level. From this point of view, the basic design criteria for the fuel are to minimize the failure fraction of as-fabricated fuel coating layers and to prevent significant additional fuel failures during operation. The maximum burnup of the first-loading fuel of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) is limited to 3.6%FIMA (% fission per initial metallic atom) to certify its integrity during the operation. In order to investigate fuel behavior under extended burnup condition, irradiation tests were performed. The irradiation was carried out as HRB-22 and 91F-1A capsule irradiation tests. The fuel for the irradiation tests was called extended burnup fuel, whose target burnup and fast neutron fluence were higher than those of the first-loading fuel of the HTTR. In order to keep fuel integrity up to over 5%FIMA, the thickness of buffer and SiC layers of fuel particle were increased. The fuel compacts were irradiated in the HRB-22 and the 91F-1A capsules at the High Flux Isotope Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory and at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, respectively. The comparison of measured and calculated release rate-to-birth rate ratios showed that there were additional failures in both irradiation tests. A pressure vessel failure model analysis showed that no tensile stresses acted on the SiC layers even at the end of irradiation and no pressure vessel failure occurred in the intact particles even in a particle with thin buffer layer with failed OPyC layer. The presumed failure mechanisms are additional through-coatings failure of as-fabricated SiC-failed particles or an excessive increase of internal pressure

  20. Characterisation of high-burnup LWR fuel rods through gamma tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current fuel management strategies for light water reactors (LWRs), in countries with high back-end costs, progressively extend the discharge burnup at the expense of increasing the 235U enrichment of the fresh UO2 fuel loaded. In this perspective, standard non-destructive assay techniques, which are very attractive because they are fast, cheap, and preserve the fuel integrity, in contrast to destructive approaches, require further validation when burnup values become higher than 50 GWd/t. This doctoral work has been devoted to the development and optimisation of non-destructive assay techniques based on gamma-ray emissions from irradiated fuel. It represents an important extension of the unique, high-burnup related database, generated in the framework of the LWR PROTEUS Phase II experiments. A novel tomographic measurement station has been designed and developed for the investigation of irradiated fuel rod segments. A unique feature of the station is that it allows both gamma-ray transmission and emission computerised tomography to be performed on single fuel rods. Four burnt UO2 fuel rod segments of 400 mm length have been investigated, two with very high (52 GWd/t and 71 GWd/t) and two with ultra-high (91 GWd/t and 126 GWd/t) burnup. Several research areas have been addressed, as described below. The application of transmission tomography to spent fuel rods has been a major task, because of difficulties of implementation and the uniqueness of the experiments. The main achievements, in this context, have been the determination of fuel rod average material density (a linear relationship between density and burnup was established), fuel rod linear attenuation coefficient distribution (for use in emission tomography), and fuel rod material density distribution. The non-destructive technique of emission computerised tomography (CT) has been applied to the very high and ultra-high burnup fuel rod samples for determining their within-rod distributions of caesium and

  1. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Mertyurek, Ugur [ORNL; Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  2. Use of burnup credit in criticality evaluation for spent fuel storage pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chon, Je Keun; Kim, Jae Chun; Koh, Duck Joon; Kim Byung Tae [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute, Korea Electric Power Corporation, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    Boraflex is a polymer based material which is used as matrix to contain a neutron absorber material, boron carbide. In a typical spent fuel pool the irradiated Boraflex has been known as a significant source of silica. Since 1996, it was reported that elevated silica levels were measured in the Ulchin Unit 2 spent fuel pool water. Therefore, the Ulchin Unit 2 spent fuel storage racks were needed to be reanalyzed to allow storage of fuel assemblies with normal enrichments up to 5.0w/o U-235 in all storage cell locations using credit for burnup. The analysis does not take any credit for the presence of the spent fuel rack Boraflex neutron absorber panels. In region 2, the calculations were performed by assuming in an infinite radial array of storage cells. No credit is taken for axial or radial neutron leakage. The water in the spent fuel storage pool was assumed to be pure. In the evaluation of the Ulchin Unit 2 spent fuel storage pool, criticality analyses were performed with the CASMO-3 code. A reactivity uncertainty in the fuel depletion calculations was combined with other calculational uncertainty. The manufacturing tolerances were considered, as well. From the calculation, the acceptable burnup domain in region 2 of the spent fuel storage pool. where the curve identifies conditions of equal reactivity for various initial enrichments between 1.6w/o and 5.0w/o, was evaluated. In region 2, the maximum k{sub e}ff including all uncertainties, is 0.94648 for the enrichment-burnup combination from loading curve. (author)

  3. Use of burnup credit in criticality evaluation for spent fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boraflex is a polymer based material which is used as matrix to contain a neutron absorber material, boron carbide. In a typical spent fuel pool the irradiated Boraflex has been known as a significant source of silica. Since 1996, it was reported that elevated silica levels were measured in the Ulchin Unit 2 spent fuel pool water. Therefore, the Ulchin Unit 2 spent fuel storage racks were needed to be reanalyzed to allow storage of fuel assemblies with normal enrichments up to 5.0w/o U-235 in all storage cell locations using credit for burnup. The analysis does not take any credit for the presence of the spent fuel rack Boraflex neutron absorber panels. In region 2, the calculations were performed by assuming in an infinite radial array of storage cells. No credit is taken for axial or radial neutron leakage. The water in the spent fuel storage pool was assumed to be pure. In the evaluation of the Ulchin Unit 2 spent fuel storage pool, criticality analyses were performed with the CASMO-3 code. A reactivity uncertainty in the fuel depletion calculations was combined with other calculational uncertainty. The manufacturing tolerances were considered, as well. From the calculation, the acceptable burnup domain in region 2 of the spent fuel storage pool. where the curve identifies conditions of equal reactivity for various initial enrichments between 1.6w/o and 5.0w/o, was evaluated. In region 2, the maximum keff including all uncertainties, is 0.94648 for the enrichment-burnup combination from loading curve. (author)

  4. DUPIC fuel fabrication using spent PWR fuels at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains DUPIC fuel cycle R and D activities to be carried out for 5 years beyond the scope described in the report KAERI/AR-510/98, which was attached to Joint Determination for Post-Irradiation Examination of irradiated nuclear fuel, by MOST and US Embassy in Korea, signed on April 8, 1999. This document is purposely prepared as early as possible to have ample time to review that the over-all DUPIC activities are within the scope and contents in compliance to Article 8(C) of ROK-U.S. cooperation agreement, and also maintain the current normal DUPIC project without interruption. Manufacturing Program of DUPIC Fuel in DFDF and Post Irradiation Examination of DUPIC Fuel are described in Chapter I and Chapter II, respectively. In Chapter III, safeguarding procedures in DFDF and on-going R and D on DUPIC safeguards such as development of nuclear material accounting system and development of containment/surveillance system are described in details

  5. DUPIC fuel fabrication using spent PWR fuels at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ho Dong; Yang, Myung Seung; Ko, Won Il and others

    2000-12-01

    This document contains DUPIC fuel cycle R and D activities to be carried out for 5 years beyond the scope described in the report KAERI/AR-510/98, which was attached to Joint Determination for Post-Irradiation Examination of irradiated nuclear fuel, by MOST and US Embassy in Korea, signed on April 8, 1999. This document is purposely prepared as early as possible to have ample time to review that the over-all DUPIC activities are within the scope and contents in compliance to Article 8(C) of ROK-U.S. cooperation agreement, and also maintain the current normal DUPIC project without interruption. Manufacturing Program of DUPIC Fuel in DFDF and Post Irradiation Examination of DUPIC Fuel are described in Chapter I and Chapter II, respectively. In Chapter III, safeguarding procedures in DFDF and on-going R and D on DUPIC safeguards such as development of nuclear material accounting system and development of containment/surveillance system are described in details.

  6. Analytical and numerical study of radiation effect up to high burnup in power reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the behavior of fuel pellets for power reactors in the high burnup range (average burnup higher than 50 MWd/kgHM) is analyzed. For extended irradiation periods, a considerable Pu concentration is reached in the pellet periphery (rim zone), that contributes to local burnup, as long as a new microstructure develops, characterized by small grains and large pores as compared with those of the original material. In this region Xe is absent from the solid lattice (although it continues to be dissolved in the rest of the pellet). The porous microstructure in the pellet edge causes local changes in the mechanical and thermal properties, thus affecting the overall fuel behaviour. The evolution of porosity in the high burnup structure (HBS) is assumed to be determinant of the retention capacity of the fission gases released by the matrix. This is the reason why, during the latest years a considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the parameters that influence porosity. Starting from several works published in the open literature, a model was developed to describe the behaviour and evolution of porosity at local burnup values ranging from 60 to 300 MWd/KgHM. The model is mathematically expressed by a system of non-linear differential equations that take into account the open and closed porosity, the interactions between pores and the free surface and phenomena like pore's coalescence and migration and gas venting. Interactions of different orders between open and closed pores, growth of pores radius by vacancies trapping, the evolution of the pores number density, the internal pressure and over pressure within the pores, the fission gas retained in the matrix and released to the free volume are analyzed. The results of the simulations performed in the present work are in excellent agreement with experimental data available in the open literature and with results calculated by other authors (author)

  7. Experience with incomplete control rod insertion in fuel with burnup exceeding approximately 40 GWD/MTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kee, E. [Houston Lighting & Power Co., Wadworth, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Analysis and measurement experience with fuel assemblies having incomplete control rod insertion at burnups of approximately 40 GWD/MTU is presented. Control rod motion dynamics and simplified structural analyses are presented and compared to measurement data. Fuel assembly growth measurements taken with the plant Refueling Machine Z-Tape are described and presented. Bow measurements (including plug gauging) are described and potential improvements are suggested. The measurements described and analysis performed show that sufficient guide tube bow (either from creep or yield buckling) is present in some high burnup assemblies to stop the control rods before they reach their full limit of travel. Recommendations are made that, if implemented, could improve cost performance related to testing and analysis activities.

  8. Effect of burnup dependence of fuel cladding gap properties on WWER core characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dependence of gas gap properties on burnup has been obtained with use of TRANSURANUS code. Implemented dependency on burnup is based on TRANSURANUS calculations of different fuel pins upon different linear power Ql. Obtained dependence was implemented into DYN3D code and results of new dependence effect on characteristics of WWER fuel loadings are presented. The work was performed in framework of orders BMU SR 2511 and BMU R0801504 (SR2611). The report describes the opinion and view of the contractor-State Scientific and Technical Centre on Nuclear and Radiation Safety-and does not necessarily represent the opinion of the ordering party-BMU-BfS/GRS and TUEV SUED. (Authors)

  9. Fuel chemistry and pellet-clad interaction related to high burnup fuel. Proceedings of the technical committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the meeting was to review new developments in clad failures. Major findings regarding the causes of clad failures are presented in this publication, with the main topics being fuel chemistry and fission product behaviour, swelling and pellet-cladding mechanical interaction, cladding failure mechanism at high burnup, thermal properties and fuel behaviour in off-normal conditions. This publication contains 17 individual presentations delivered at the meeting; each of them was indexed separately

  10. The high burn-up structure in nuclear fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo V. Rondinella

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available During its operating life in the core of a nuclear reactor nuclear fuel is subjected to significant restructuring processes determined by neutron irradiation directly through nuclear reactions and indirectly through the thermo-mechanical conditions established as a consequence of such reactions. In today's light water reactors, starting after ∼4 years of operation the cylindrical UO2 fuel pellet undergoes a transformation that affects its outermost radial region. The discovery of a newly forming structure necessitated the answering of important questions concerning the safety of extended fuel operation and still today poses the fascinating scientific challenge of fully understanding the microstructural mechanisms responsible for its formation.

  11. Evaluation of safety criteria on LOCA and RIA for high burnup nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Dae Ho; Yang, Yong Sik; Song, Keun Woo

    2007-12-15

    Comprehensive researches in many countries and some international research programs to investigate the applicability to high burnup nuclear fuels have been performing as the existing safety criteria of DBA such as LOCA and RIA was established several decades ago. In this report, main research programs for the safety criteria of DBA such as LOCA and RIA are introduced, and also the current status on the modification of the safety criteria are also introduced.

  12. PLD-IDMS studies towards direct measurement of burn-up of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method based on Pulsed laser deposition followed by Isotope dilution mass spectrometric method is evaluated towards the possibility of direct measurement of burn up of nuclear fuel and also to find out spatial distribution of burn-up along the pellet. The wave length dependent results show larger error with 1064 nm, compared to 532 nm laser beam. Much less error is expected with shorter wave length and shorter pulse width laser beam. Further work is being carried out in this direction

  13. Evaluation of safety criteria on LOCA and RIA for high burnup nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive researches in many countries and some international research programs to investigate the applicability to high burnup nuclear fuels have been performing as the existing safety criteria of DBA such as LOCA and RIA was established several decades ago. In this report, main research programs for the safety criteria of DBA such as LOCA and RIA are introduced, and also the current status on the modification of the safety criteria are also introduced

  14. Investigation of burnup credit allowance in the criticality safety evaluation of spent fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation discusses work in progress on criticality analysis verification for designs which take account of the burnup and age of transported fuel. The work includes verification of cross section data, correlation with experiments, proper extension of the methods into regimes not covered by experiments, establishing adequate reactivity margins, and complete documentation of the project. Recommendations for safe operational procedures are included, as well as a discussion of the economic and safety benefits of such designs

  15. Probabilistic safety criteria on high burnup HWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BACO is a code for the simulation of the thermo-mechanical and fission gas behaviour of a cylindrical fuel rod under operation conditions. Their input parameters and, therefore, output ones may include statistical dispersion. In this paper, experimental CANDU fuel rods irradiated at the NRX reactor together with experimental MOX fuel rods and the IAEA-CRP FUMEX cases are used in order to determine the sensitivity of BACO code predictions. The techniques for sensitivity analysis defined in BACO are: the 'extreme case analysis', the 'parametric analysis' and the 'probabilistic (or statistics) analysis'. We analyse the CARA and CAREM fuel rods relation between predicted performance and statistical dispersion in order of enhanced their original designs taking account probabilistic safety criteria and using the BACO's sensitivity analysis. (author)

  16. Determination of dependence of fissile fraction in MOX fuels on spent fuel storage period for different burnup values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► In a previous study, an expression to calculate fissile fraction of MOX for various burnups was obtained for 5-year cooled SF. ► In this follow-up study, a correction factor for spent fuel storage periods other than 5 years is derived. ► Thus, one major restriction on use of the expression derived in the initial study is eliminated. - Abstract: The purpose of this technical note is to remove one of the limitations of a derived expression in a previously published article (Özdemir et al., 2011). The original article focused on deriving (computationally) an expression for calculating total fissile fraction of mixed oxid (MOX) fuels depending on discharge burnup of spent fuel and desired burnup of MOX fuel; consequently, such an expression was obtained and put forward, together with its limitations. One of the limitations has been that all the computations and therefore the resulting expression are based on the assumption of a spent fuel storage period of 5 years. This follow-up study simply aims to obtain a correction factor for spent fuel storage periods other than 5 years; thus to remove one major restriction on use of the expression derived in the original article

  17. Chemical separation for the burnup determination of the U3Si/Al spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The separation of U, Pu, and Nd for the burnup determination of the U3Si/Al spent fuel samples has been studied. The preliminary experiments were carried out with the simulated spent fuel solution. The solutions were prepared by adding of fission product elements to unirradiated U3Si/Al fuel samples. The fuel samples were dissolved in 6 M HNO3, 6 M HNO3 using mercury catalyst, or applying a mixture of HCl and HNO3 without any catalyst. All dissolved fuel solutions contained a small amount of a residue(silica). The trace silica reprecipitated from the fuel solutions taken for the separation was dissolved in HF and removed by subsequent evaporating to dryness. The separation of U and fission product elements from the various sample solutions was achieved by two sequential anion exchange resin separation procedures. The U, Pu and Nd can be purely isolated from the sample solutions with a large excess of Al by this chromatographic procedures. The dissolution and separation procedure used in this experiment were applied for burnup determination of real U3Si/Al spent fuels from HANARO reactor

  18. Optimisation of water chemistry to ensure reliable water reactor fuel performance at high burnup and in ageing plant (FUWAC): an International Atomic Energy Agency coordinated research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA project 'Optimisation of Water Chemistry to ensure Reliable Water Reactor Fuel Performance at High Burnup and in Aging Plant' (FUWAC) was initiated with the objectives of monitoring, maintaining and optimising water chemistry regimes in primary circuits of water cooled power reactors, taking into account high burnup operation, mixed cores and plant aging, including following issues and remedies. This report provides some highlights of the work undertaken by the project participants. Clad oxidation studies have been undertaken and include operational data from the South Ukraine WWER where no corrosion problems have been seen on either Westinghouse ZIRLO™ or Russian alloy E110 fuel cladding. Work on the Russian alloy E110 showed that potassium in the coolant is preferable to lithium for mitigating fuel cladding oxidation. Studies on crud behaviour in PWR have shown a dependence on crud thickness and pHT. The nature and mechanisms for boron deposition in fuel cladding cruds have been investigated which is the root cause of crud induced power shifts (CIPS). Operational experience at French PWRs shows no difference in the CIPS behaviour between units with Alloy 600 or 690 steam generators, whilst Korean experience provides information on the Ni/Fe ratio on fuel cladding crud and the occurrence of CIPS. Coolant additions have been studied, for example in BWR units using zinc addition, crud is more tenacious. Zinc is also added to PWR units, mainly for dose rate control and in some cases for PWSCC mitigation of Alloy 600. At low levels there has been no clear evidence of any effect of zinc on CIPS, but there is a benefit on fuel oxidation. It is suggested that zinc addition should be considered where there is SG replacement or fuel core management modification. One possibility for the elimination of fuel crud is decontamination. Such an operation is time consuming, expensive, includes several risks of corrosion and induces a large quantity of

  19. Development of a Mobile CZT Detector System for Burnup Measurement of Spent Fuel Assembly and On-Site Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of mobile CdZnTe (CZT) detector for nuclear safeguard applications of spent fuel burnup inspection in assembly storage pond are compactness, low cost and ease of operations. In this work, a mobile detection system shield with tungsten alloy was designed and then performed on-site. Net count rate of the 662 keV line of 137Cs was produced linearly with burnup as experimental data simulations shows, in which the deviation from linearity is smaller than 9%. As a result, the feasibility of the method using CZT detector to monitor spent nuclear fuel assembly burnup in a fuel pond was validated. The results calculated with Monte Carlo procedure Geant4 can provide a theoretical guide for the further burnup measurement. (author)

  20. Calculation of activity content and related properties in PWR and BWR fuel using ORIGEN 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report lists the conditions for calculations of the core inventory for a PWR and BWR. The calculations have been performed using the computer code ORIGEN 2. The amount (grams), the total radioactivity (bequerels), the thermal power (watts), the radioactivity from theα-decay (bequerels), and the neutron emission (neutrons/sec) from the core after the last burnup have been determined. All the parameters have been calculated as a function of the burnup and the natural decay, the latter over a time period of 0-1.0E07 years. The calculations have been performed for 68 heavy nuclides, 60 daughter nuclides, to the heavy nuclides with atomic numbers under 92, 852 fission products and 7 light nucli ides. The most important results are listed. (author)

  1. The formation process of the pellet-cladding bonding layer in high burnup BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bonding formation process was studied by EPMA analysis, XRD measurements, and SEM/TEM observations for the oxide layer on a cladding inner surface and the pellet-cladding bonding layer in irradiated fuel rods. Specimens were prepared from fuels which had been irradiated to the pellet average burnups of 15, 27, 42 and 49 GWd/t in BWRs. In the lower burnup specimens of 15 and 27 GWd/t, no bonding layer was found, while the higher burnup specimens of 42 and 49 GWd/t had a typical bonding layer about 10 to 20 μm thick. A bonding layer which consisted of two regions was found in the latter fuels. One region of the inner surface of the Zr liner cladding was made up mainly of ZrO2 with a small amount of dissolved UO2. The structure of this ZrO2 consisted of cubic polycrystals a few nanometers in size, while no monoclinic crystals were found. The other region, near the pellet surface, had both a cubic solid solution of (U,Zr)O2 and amorphous phase in which the concentrations of UO2 and ZrO2 changed continuously. Even in the lower burnup specimens having no bonding layer, cubic ZrO2 phase was identified in the cladding inner oxide layer. The XRD measurements were consistent with the TEM results of the absence of the monoclinic ZrO2 phase. Phase transformation and amorphization were attributed to fission damage, since such phenomena have never been observed in the cladding outer surface. Phase transformation from monoclinic to cubic ZrO2 and amorphization by irradiation damage of fission products were discussed in connection with the formation mechanism and conditions of the bonding layer. (author)

  2. High burnup fast reactor fuel: processing and waste management experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The routine processing of mixed Plutonium/Uranium oxide fuels from the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) at Dounreay began in September 1980 and the design features of the modified Dounreay Fast Reactor (DFR) reprocessing plant and experience of the first active campaign were described in a paper to the British Nuclear Engineering Society in November 1981 (1). Since then progress in processing the fuel discharged from PFR has been covered briefly in a number of papers to international conferences and the Public Inquiry held in 1986 into the outline planning application for the proposed European Demonstration Reprocessing Plant. During this decade considerable experience in the operation of fast reactors and associated fuel plants has been accumulated providing confidence in the system before entering the next development phase - that of its commercial demonstration. Confidence in the UK draws on the successful operation of the PFR and the associated Dounreay fuel reprocessing and BNF Sellafield fabrication plants. Of equal importance is public confidence in safe operation and in the management of wastes generated by a fast reactor system. The present paper is a review of fast reactor reprocessing and waste management at the Dounreay Nuclear Establishment (DNE) as a contribution to the present status of the fast reactor system

  3. Design and fuel management of PWR cores to optimize the once-through fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The once-through fuel cycle has been analyzed to see if there are substantial prospects for improved uranium ore utilization in current light water reactors, with a specific focus on pressurized water reactors. The types of changes which have been examined are: (1) re-optimization of fuel pin diameter and lattice pitch, (2) axial power shaping by enrichment gradation in fresh fuel, (3) use of 6-batch cores with semi-annual refueling, (4) use of 6-batch cores with annual refueling, hence greater extended (approximately doubled) burnup, (5) use of radial reflector assemblies, (6) use of internally heterogeneous cores (simple seed/blanket configurations), (7) use of power/temperature coastdown at the end of life to extend burnup, (8) use of metal or diluted oxide fuel, (9) use of thorium, and (10) use of isotopically separated low sigma/sub a/ cladding material. State-of-the-art LWR computational methods, LEOPARD/PDQ-7/FLARE-G, were used to investigate these modifications

  4. Evaluation and Selection of Boundary Isotopic Composition for Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analysis of RBMK Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The on-site wet-type spent fuel storage facility ISF-1 is currently used for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel removed from Chernobyl NPP power units. The results of ISF-1 preliminary criticality analyses demonstrated the need for using the burnup credit principle in nuclear safety analysis. This paper provides results from the selection and testing of computer codes for determining the isotopic composition of RBMK spent fuel. Assessment is carried out and conclusions are made on conservative approaches to fuel burnup credit in subsequent ISF-1 safety assessment. (author)

  5. Assessing the Effect of Fuel Burnup on Control Rod Worth for HEU and LEU Cores of Gharr-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.K. Boafo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An important parameter in the design and analysis of a nuclear reactor is the reactivity worth of the control rod which is a measure of the efficiency of the control rod to absorb excess reactivity. During reactor operation, the control rod worth is affected by factors such as the fuel burnup, Xenon concentration, Samarium concentration and the position of the control rod in the core. This study investigates the effect of fuel burnup on the control rod worth by comparing results of a fresh and an irradiated core of Ghana's Miniature Neutron Source Reactor for both HEU and LEU cores. In this study, two codes have been utilized namely BURNPRO for fuel burnup calculation and MCNP5 which uses densities of actinides of the irradiated fuel obtained from BURNPRO. Results showed a decrease of the control rod worth with burnup for the LEU while rod worth increased with burnup for the HEU core. The average thermal flux in both inner and outer irradiation sites also decreased significantly with burnup for both cores.

  6. A neutronic study of the cycle PWR-CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Alberto da; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora Fortini; Fortini, Angela; Pinheiro, Ricardo Brant [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: albertomoc@terra.com.br; claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br; dora@nuclear.ufmg.br; fortini@nuclear.ufmg.br; rbp@nuclear.ufmg.br

    2007-07-01

    The cycle PWR-CANDU was simulated using the WIMSD-5B and ORIGEN2.1 codes. It was simulated a fuel burnup of 33,000 MWd/t for UO{sub 2} with enrichment of 3.2% and a fuel extended burnup of 45,000 MWd/t for UO{sub 2} with enrichments of 3.5%, 4.0% and 5.0% in a PWR reactor. The PWR discharged fuel was submitted to the simulation of deposition for five years. After that, it was submitted to AYROX reprocessing and used to produce a fuel to CANDU reactor. Then, it was simulated the burnup in the CANDU. Parameters such as infinite medium multiplication factor, k{sub inf}, fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity, {alpha}{sub TF}, moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity, {alpha}{sub TM}, the ratio rapid flux/total flux and the isotopic composition in the begin and the end of life were evaluated. The results showed that the fuels analyzed could be used on PWR and CANDU reactors without the need of change on the design of these reactors. (author)

  7. 77 FR 60479 - Burnup Credit in the Criticality Safety Analyses of Pressurized Water Reactor Spent Fuel in...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    .... SUMMARY: The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is issuing a Spent Fuel Storage... Criticality Safety Analyses of PWR Spent Fuel in Transportation and Storage Casks.'' This SFST-ISG provides... ``Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation'' heading at...

  8. Study of irradiation induced restructuring of high burnup fuel - Use of computer and accelerator for fuel science and engineering -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sataka, M.; Ishikawa, N.; Chimn, Y.; Nakamura, J.; Amaya, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka Gun (Japan); Iwasawa, M.; Ohnuma, T.; Sonoda, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Kinoshita, M.; Geng, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Kaneta, Y. [The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yasunaga, K.; Matsumura, S.; Yasuda, K. [Kyushu Univ., Motooka (Japan); Iwase [Osaka Prefecture Univ., Osaka (Japan); Ichinomiya, T.; Nishiuran, Y. [Hokkaido Univ., Kitaku (Japan); Matzke, HJ. [Academy of Ceramics, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    In order to develop advanced fuel for future LWR reactors, trials were made to simulate the high burnup restructuring of the ceramics fuel, using accelerator irradiation out of pile and with computer simulation. The target is to reproduce the principal complex process as a whole. The reproduction of the grain subdivision (sub grain formation) was successful at experiments with sequential combined irradiation. It was made by recovery process of the accumulated dislocations, making cells and sub-boundaries at grain boundaries and pore surfaces. Details of the grain sub division mechanism is now in front of us outside of the reactor. Extensive computer science studies, first principle and molecular dynamics gave behavior of fission gas atoms and interstitial oxygen, assisting the high burnup restructuring.

  9. Study of irradiation induced restructuring of high burnup fuel - Use of computer and accelerator for fuel science and engineering -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop advanced fuel for future LWR reactors, trials were made to simulate the high burnup restructuring of the ceramics fuel, using accelerator irradiation out of pile and with computer simulation. The target is to reproduce the principal complex process as a whole. The reproduction of the grain subdivision (sub grain formation) was successful at experiments with sequential combined irradiation. It was made by recovery process of the accumulated dislocations, making cells and sub-boundaries at grain boundaries and pore surfaces. Details of the grain sub division mechanism is now in front of us outside of the reactor. Extensive computer science studies, first principle and molecular dynamics gave behavior of fission gas atoms and interstitial oxygen, assisting the high burnup restructuring

  10. Le Crédit Burnup des combustibles REP-MOx français : méthodologie et conservatismes associés à l'évaluation JEFF-3.1.1.

    OpenAIRE

    Chambon, Amalia

    2013-01-01

    Considering spent fuel management (storage, transport and reprocessing), the approach using « fresh fuel assump-tion » in criticality-safety studies results in a significant conservatism in the calculated value of the system reactivity.The concept of Burnup Credit (BUC) consists in considering the reduction of the spent fuel reactivity due to its burnup.A careful BUC methodology, developed by CEA in association with AREVA-NC was recently validated and writtenup for PWR-UOx fuels. However, 22 ...

  11. Review of Technical Issues Related to Predicting Isotopic Compositions and Source Terms for High-Burnup LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I. C.; Parks, C. V.

    2000-12-11

    This report has been prepared to review the technical issues important to the prediction of isotopic compositions and source terms for high-burnup, light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel as utilized in the licensing of spent fuel transport and storage systems. The current trend towards higher initial 235U enrichments, more complex assembly designs, and more efficient fuel management schemes has resulted in higher spent fuel burnups than seen in the past. This trend has led to a situation where high-burnup assemblies from operating LWRs now extend beyond the area where available experimental data can be used to validate the computational methods employed to calculate spent fuel inventories and source terms. This report provides a brief review of currently available validation data, including isotopic assays, decay heat measurements, and shielded dose-rate measurements. Potential new sources of experimental data available in the near term are identified. A review of the background issues important to isotopic predictions and some of the perceived technical challenges that high-burnup fuel presents to the current computational methods are discussed. Based on the review, the phenomena that need to be investigated further and the technical issues that require resolution are presented. The methods and data development that may be required to address the possible shortcomings of physics and depletion methods in the high-burnup and high-enrichment regime are also discussed. Finally, a sensitivity analysis methodology is presented. This methodology is currently being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a computational tool to better understand the changing relative significance of the underlying nuclear data in the different enrichment and burnup regimes and to identify the processes that are dominant in the high-burnup regime. The potential application of the sensitivity analysis methodology to help establish a range of applicability for experimental

  12. Review and Prioritization of Technical Issues Related to Burnup Credit for LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C V; DeHart, M D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wagner, John C [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2000-03-13

    This report has been prepared to review relevant background information and provide technical discussion that will help initiate a PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables) process for use of burnup credit in light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel storage and transport cask applications. The PIRT process will be used by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to help prioritize and guide a coordinated program of research and as a means to obtain input/feedback from industry and other interested parties. The review and discussion in this report are based on knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the United States and other countries. Current regulatory practice and perceived industry needs are also reviewed as a background for prioritizing technical needs that will facilitate safe practice in the use of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation is given. Finally, phenomena that need to be better understood for effective licensing, together with technical issues that require resolution, are presented and discussed in the form of a prioritization ranking and initial draft program plan.

  13. Review and Prioritization of Technical Issues Related to Burnup Credit for LWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has been prepared to review relevant background information and provide technical discussion that will help initiate a PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables) process for use of burnup credit in light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel storage and transport cask applications. The PIRT process will be used by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to help prioritize and guide a coordinated program of research and as a means to obtain input/feedback from industry and other interested parties. The review and discussion in this report are based on knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the United States and other countries. Current regulatory practice and perceived industry needs are also reviewed as a background for prioritizing technical needs that will facilitate safe practice in the use of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation is given. Finally, phenomena that need to be better understood for effective licensing, together with technical issues that require resolution, are presented and discussed in the form of a prioritization ranking and initial draft program plan

  14. An improved projected predictor-corrector method for Gd-bearing fuel burnup calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of the conventional predictor-corrector (PC) fuel depletion method breaks down for the Gd-bearing fuel when coarse time step is adopted. To resolve this issue, the projected predictor-corrector (PPC) method which assumes the reaction rates are linear functions of the nuclide's atom density, was proposed by Yamamoto and significant accuracy gain was achieved for Gd-bearing fuel depletion calculation. This paper proposes an improved PPC method, which assumes a linear relation between the microscopic reaction rate and the natural logarithm of the nuclide's atom density for nuclides 155Gd and 157Gd. Verification calculations are performed against a 17 × 17 PWR Gd-bearing fuel assembly test problem, numerical results demonstrate that once the time step is coarser than 25 days the new PPC method is better than the original PPC method. (authors)

  15. Study on burnup credit evaluation method at JAERI towards securing criticality safety rationale for management of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A higher initial 235U enrichment is currently required in the nuclear fuel fabrication specification to realize higher fuel burnup. Traditionally, in the criticality safety design of spent fuel (SF) storage and transportation (S/T) casks or facilities, the fuel is usually assumed to be at its full initial enrichment (so called fresh fuel assumption) to provide a large safety allowance, which is sometimes excessively given, for example requiring unnecessarily large space between fuel assemblies. The burnup credit taken for criticality safety design is firstly implemented to the SF Storage Rack of Rokkasho Reprocessing Facility, which is completed and expected for operation soon. Except for that, no burnup credit has been taken in criticality safety design for SF S/T casks or intermediate storage facilities in Japan. Since in the near future it is considered inevitable to handle spent fuel massively, it is desired to implement the rational S/T design saving safety and economy by taking into account the fuel burnup in the criticality safety control. Computer codes and data which are vital to assess criticality safety in the design stage of nuclear fuel cycle facility have been developed and prepared to constitute a Japanese criticality safety handbook at JAERI

  16. Investigation of the CANLUB/sheath interface in CANDU fuel at extended burnup by XPS and SEM/WDX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocking, W.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Behnke, R.; Duclos, A.M.; Gerwing, A.F. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada); Chan, P.K. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    1997-07-01

    A systematic investigation of the fuel-sheath interface in CANDU fuel as a function of extended burnup has been undertaken by XPS and SEM/WDX analysis. Adherent deposits of UO{sub 2} and fission products, including Cs, Ba, Rb, I, Te, Cd and possibly Ru, have been routinely identified on CANLUB coated and bare Zircaloy surfaces. Some trends in the distribution and chemistry of key fission products have begun to emerge. Several potential mechanisms for degradation of the CANLUB graphite layer at high burnup have been practically excluded. New evidence of carbon relocation within the fuel element and limited reaction with excess oxygen has also been obtained. (author)

  17. Development of a Safeguards Verification Method and Instrument to Detect Pin Diversion from Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Spent Fuel Assemblies Phase I Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel methodology to detect diversion of spent fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been developed in order to address a long unsolved safeguards verification problem for international safeguards community such as International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) or European Atomic Energy Community (EURATOM). The concept involves inserting tiny neutron and gamma detectors into the guide tubes of a spent fuel assembly and measuring the signals. The guide tubes form a quadrant symmetric pattern in the various PWR fuel product lines and the neutron and gamma signals from these various locations are processed to obtain a unique signature for an undisturbed fuel assembly. Signatures based on the neutron and gamma signals individually or in a combination can be developed. Removal of fuel pins from the assembly will cause the signatures to be visibly perturbed thus enabling the detection of diversion. All of the required signal processing to obtain signatures can be performed on standard laptop computers. Monte Carlo simulation studies and a set of controlled experiments with actual commercial PWR spent fuel assemblies were performed and validated this novel methodology. Based on the simulation studies and benchmarking measurements, the methodology developed promises to be a powerful and practical way to detect partial defects that constitute 10% or more of the total active fuel pins. This far exceeds the detection threshold of 50% missing pins from a spent fuel assembly, a threshold defined by the IAEA Safeguards Criteria. The methodology does not rely on any operator provided data like burnup or cooling time and does not require movement of the fuel assembly from the storage rack in the spent fuel pool. A concept was developed to build a practical field device, Partial Defect Detector (PDET), which will be completely portable and will use standard radiation measuring devices already in use at the IAEA. The use of the device will not require any information provided

  18. Fuel burnup analysis of the TRIGA Mark II Reactor at the University of Pavia

    OpenAIRE

    Chiesa, Davide; Clemenza, Massimiliano; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Alloni, Daniele; Magrotti, Giovanni; Manera, Sergio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Cammi, Antonio; Zanetti, Matteo; Sartori, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A time evolution model was developed to study fuel burnup for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia. The results were used to predict the effects of a complete core reconfiguration and the accuracy of this prediction was tested experimentally. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 to reproduce system neutronics in different operating conditions and to analyse neutron fluxes in the reactor core. The software that took care of time evolution, completely designed in-house, used the n...

  19. Recent view to the results of pulse tests in the IGR reactor with high burn-up fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmolov, V.; Yegorova, L. [Russian Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-03-01

    Testing of 43 fuel elements (13 fuel elements with high burn-up fuel, 10 fuel elements with preirradiated cladding and fresh fuel, and 20 non-irradiated fuel elements) was carried out in the IGR pulse reactor with a half width of the reactor power pulse of about 0.7 sec. Tests were conducted in capsules with no coolant flow and with standard initial conditions in the capsule of 20{degrees}C and 0.2 MPa. Two types of coolant were used: water and air. One purpose of the test program was to determine the thresholds and mechanisms of fuel rod failure under RIA conditions for VVER fuel rods over their entire exposure range, from zero to high burn-up. These failure thresholds are often used in safety analyses. The tests and analyses were designed to reveal the influence on fuel rod failure of (1) the mechanical properties of the cladding, (2) the pellet-to-cladding gap, (3) fuel burn-up, (4) fuel-to-coolant heat transfer, and other parameters. The resulting data base can also be used for validation of computer codes used for analyzing fuel rod behavior. Three types of test specimens were used in the tests, and diagrams of these specimens are shown in Fig. 1. {open_quotes}Type-C{close_quotes} specimens were re-fabricated from commercial fuel rods of the VVER-1000 type that had been subjected to many power cycles of operation in the Novovoronezh Nuclear Power Plant (NV NPP). {open_quotes}Type-D{close_quotes} specimens were fabricated from the same commercial fuel rods used above, but the high burn-up oxide fuel was removed from the cladding and was replaced with fresh oxide fuel pellets. {open_quotes}Type-D{close_quotes} specimens thus provided a means of separating the effects of the cladding and the oxide fuel pellets and were used to examine cladding effects only.

  20. Determination of nuclear fuel burnup by non-destructive gamma spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of nuclear fuel burnup by the non-destructive gamma spectroscopy method is studied. A MTR (Materials Testing Reactor) -type fuel element is used in the measurement. The fuel element was removed from the reactor core in 1958 and, because of the long decay time, show only one peak in is gamma spectrum at 661.6 Kev. Corresponding to 137Cs. Measurements are made at 330 points of the element using a Nal detector and the final result revealed that the quantity of 235U consumed was 3.3 +- 0,8 milligram in the entire element. The effect of the migration of 137Cs in the element is neglected in view of the fact that it occurs only when the temperature is above 10000C, which is not the case in IEAR-1. (Author)

  1. Blind prediction exercise on modeling of PHWR fuel at extended burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A blind prediction exercise was organised on Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) fuel to investigate the predictive capability of existing codes for their application at extended burnup and to identify areas of improvement. The blind problem for this exercise was based on a PHWR fuel bundle irradiated in Kakrapar Atomic Power Station-I (KAPS-I) up to about 15 000 MWd/tU and subjected to detailed post-irradiation examination (PIE) in the hot cells facility at BARC. Eleven computer codes from seven countries participated in this exercise. The participants provided blind predictions of fuel temperature, fission gas release, internal gas pressure and other performance parameters for the fuel pins. The predictions were compared with the experimental PIE data which included fuel temperature derived from fuel restructuring, fission gas release measured by fuel pin puncturing, internal gas pressure in pin, cladding oxidation and fuel microstructural data. The details of the blind problem and an analysis of the results of blind predictions by the codes vis-a-vis measured data are provided in this paper

  2. COGEMA/TRANSNUCLEAIRE's experience with burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facing a continuous increase in the fuel enrichments, COGEMA and TRANSNUCLEAIRE have implemented step by step a burnup credit programme to improve the capacity of their equipment without major physical modification. Many authorizations have been granted by the French competent authority in wet storage, reprocessing and transport since 1981. As concerns transport, numerous authorizations have been validated by foreign competent authorities. Up to now, those authorizations are restricted to PWR Fuel type assemblies made of enriched uranium. The characterization of the irradiated fuel and the reactivity of the systems are evaluated by calculations performed with well qualified French codes developed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission): CESAR as a depletion code and APPOLO-MORET as a criticality code. The authorizations are based on the assurance that the burnup considered is met on the least irradiated part of the fuel assemblies. Besides, the most reactive configuration is calculated and the burnup credit is restricted to major actinides only. This conservative approach allows not to take credit for any axial profile. On the operational side, the procedures have been reevaluated to avoid misloadings and a burnup verification is made before transport, storage and reprocessing. Depending on the level of burnup credit, it consists of a qualitative (go/no-go) verification or of a quantitative measurement. Thus the use of burnup credit is now a common practice in France and Germany and new improvements are still in progress: extended qualifications of the codes are made to enable the use of six selected fission products in the criticality evaluations. (author)

  3. Determination of burnup balance for nuclear reactor fuel on the basis of γ-spectrometric determination of fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are given of experimental investigations in one of the versions of the method for determination of the balance of nuclear fuel burnup process by means of the γ-spectrometry of fission products. In the version being considered a balance of the burnup process was determined on the base of 106Ru, 134Cs.Activity was measured by means of a γ-spectrometer with Ge counter. Investigations were done on the natural uranium metal fuel from the heavy-water moderated reactor of the first Czechoslovakian nuclear power plant A1 in Yaslovske Bohunice. Possibility was checked of determination of the fuel burnup depth as well as of the isotope ratio and content of plutonium. Results were compared with the control data which had been obtained on the base of the mass-spectrometry of U, Pu and Nd. The reasors for deviations were estimated in the cases when they were greater tan error in the control data

  4. Temperature and Burnup Correlated FCCI in U-10Zr Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William J. Carmack

    2012-05-01

    Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors. The experience basis for metallic fuels is extensive and includes development and qualification of fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor I, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II, FERMI-I, and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactors. Metallic fuels provide a number of advantages over other fuel types in terms of fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Key to the performance of all nuclear fuel systems is the resistance to “breach” and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the primary coolant system of the nuclear power plant. In metallic fuel, the experience is that significant fuel-cladding chemical (FCCI) interaction occurs and becomes prevalent at high power-high temperature operation and ultimately leads to fuel pin breach and failure. Empirical relationships for metallic fuel pin failure have been developed from a large body of in-pile and out of pile research, development, and experimentation. It has been found that significant in-pile acceleration of the FCCI rate is experienced over similar condition out-of-pile experiments. The study of FCCI in metallic fuels has led to the quantification of in-pile failure rates to establish an empirical time and temperature dependent failure limit for fuel elements. Up until now the understanding of FCCI layer formation has been limited to data generated in EBR-II experiments. This dissertation provides new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of metallic fuel irradiations performed in the FFTF. These fuel assemblies contain valuable information on the formation of FCCI in metallic fuels at a variety of temperature and burnup conditions and in fuel with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. The longer fuel column in the FFTF and the fuel pins examined have significantly different flux, power, temperature, and FCCI profiles than that found in similar tests conducted in

  5. Evaluation of the fuel rod integrity in PWR reactors from the spectrometric analysis of the primary coolant; Avaliacao da integridade de varetas combustiveis em reatores PWR a partir da analise espectrometrica da agua do primario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Iara Arraes

    1999-02-15

    The main objective of this thesis is to provide a better comprehension of the phenomena involved in the transport of fission products, from the fuel rod to the coolant of a PWR reactor. To achieve this purpose, several steps were followed. Firstly, it was presented a description of the fuel elements and the main mechanisms of fuel rod failure, indicating the most important nuclides and their transport mechanisms. Secondly, taking both the kinetic and diffusion models for the transport of fission products as a basis, a simple analytical and semi-empirical model was developed. This model was also based on theoretical considerations and measurements of coolant's activity, according to internationally adopted methodologies. Several factors are considered in the modelling procedures: intrinsic factors to the reactor itself, factors which depend on the reactor's operational mode, isotope characteristic factors, and factors which depend on the type of rod failure. The model was applied for different reactor's operational parameters in the presence of failed rods. The main conclusions drawn from the analysis of the model's output are relative to the variation on the coolant's water activity with the fuel burnup, the linear operation power and the primary purification rate and to the different behaviour of iodine and noble gases. The model was saturated from a certain failure size and showed to be unable to distinguish between a single big fail and many small ones. (author)

  6. FUNDAMENTAL MECHANISMS OF CORROSION OF ADVANCED LIGHT WATER REACTOR FUEL CLADDING ALLOYS AT HIGH BURNUP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK (B204) The corrosion behavior of nuclear fuel cladding is a key factor limiting the performance of nuclear fuel elements, improved cladding alloys, which resist corrosion and radiation damage, will facilitate higher burnup core designs. The objective of this project is to understand the mechanisms by which alloy composition, heat treatment and microstructure affect corrosion rate. This knowledge can be used to predict the behavior of existing alloys outside the current experience base (for example, at high burn-up) and predict the effects of changes in operation conditions on zirconium alloy behavior. Zirconium alloys corrode by the formation f a highly adherent protective oxide layer. The working hypothesis of this project is that alloy composition, microstructure and heat treatment affect corrosion rates through their effect on the protective oxide structure and ion transport properties. The experimental task in this project is to identify these differences and understand how they affect corrosion behavior. To do this, several microstructural examination techniques including transmission electron microscope (TEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and a selection of fluorescence and diffraction techniques using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) were employed

  7. Analysis of neodymium 148 in order to determin of nuclear fuel burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the degree of the nuclear fuel burnup experiments were conducted to introduce improvements in the mass-spectrometric study of neodymium-148 by the method of isotopic dilution with Nd-150 taken as a diluent. The separation of neodymium out of the mixture of the fission products and uranium was carried out in two stages. In the first stage a group of rare earth elements was isolated on the Vofatit SBV anionite in the mixture of nitric acid and methanol. The second stage involved the separation of the rare earth group on the Vofatite KPS cationite with the aid of the complexing agent of α-hydroxy-isobutyric acid. To identify the neodymium fraction, the traces of americium-241 were added at elution. The possibilities of the above analytical method are examplified by the isolation of neodymium out of the burned-up fuel of type EK-10. The isotopic ratios were determined by the spectroscopic method to the accuracy of +-1.2%. A highly enriched compound of neodymium-150 was used as a diluent. The factors are discussed affecting the degree of the burnup obtained by this method

  8. Criticality safety and sensitivity analyses of PWR spent nuclear fuel repository facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M; Glumac, B

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo criticality safety and sensitivity calculations of pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel repository facilities for the Slovenian nuclear power plant Krsko are presented. The MCNP4C code was deployed to model and assess the neutron multiplication parameters of pool-based stor

  9. SIVAR - Computer code for simulation of fuel rod behavior in PWR during fast transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel rod behavior during a stationary and a transitory operation, is studied. A computer code aiming at simulating PWR type rods, was developed; however, it can be adapted for simulating other type of rods. A finite difference method was used. (E.G.)

  10. Fission gas release behavior in high burnup UO{sub 2} fuels with developed rim-structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Une, Katsumi [Global Nuclear Fuel-Japan Co. Led., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kashibe, Shinji [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co. Ltd., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan); Hayashi, Kimio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    The effect of rim structure formation and external restraint pressure on fission gas release at transient conditions has been examined by using an out-of-pile high pressure heating technique for high burnup UO{sub 2} fuels (60, 74 and 90 GWd/t), which had been irradiated in test reactors. The latter two fuels bore a developed rim structure. The maximum heating temperature was 1500 degC, and the external pressures were independently controlled in the range of 10-150 MPa. The present high burnup fuel data were compared with those of previously studied BWR fuels of 37 and 54 GWd/t with almost no rim structure. The fission gas release and bubble swelling due to the growth of grain boundary bubbles and coarsened rim bubbles were effectively suppressed by the strong restraint pressure of 150 MPa for all the fuels; however the fission gas release remarkably increased for the two high burnup fuels with the developed rim structure, even at the strong restraint conditions. From the stepwise de-pressurization tests at an isothermal condition of 1500degC, the critical external pressure, below which a large burst release due to the rapid growth and interlinkage of the bubbles abruptly begins, was increased from a 40-60 MPa level for the middle burnup fuels to a high level of 120-140 MPa for the rim-structured high burnup fuels. The high potential for transient fission gas release and bubble swelling in the rim-structured fuels was attributed to highly over-pressurized fission gases in the rim bubbles. (author)

  11. A study of fuel failure behavior in high burnup HTGR fuel. Analysis by STRESS3 and STAPLE codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, David G.; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Ueta, Shouhei; Sumita, Junya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2001-05-01

    In current high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), Tri-isotropic coated fuel particles are employed as fuel. In safety design of the HTGR fuels, it is important to retain fission products within particles so that their release to primary coolant does not exceed an acceptable level. From this point of view, the basic design criteria for the fuel are to minimize the failure fraction of as-fabricated fuel coating layers and to prevent significant additional fuel failures during operation. This report attempts to model fuel behavior in irradiation tests using the U.K. codes STRESS3 and STAPLE. Test results in 91F-1A and HRB-22 capsules irradiation tests, which were carried out at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor of JAERI and at the High Flux Isotope Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, respectively, were employed in the calculation. The maximum burnup and fast neutron fluence were about 10%FIMA and 3 x 10{sup 25} m{sup -2}, respectively. The fuel for the irradiation tests was called high burnup fuel, whose target burnup and fast neutron fluence were higher than those of the first-loading fuel of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. The calculation results demonstrated that if only mean fracture stress values of PyC and SiC are used in the calculation it is not possible to predict any particle failures, by which is meant when all three load bearing layers have failed. By contrast, when statistical variations in the fracture stresses and particle specifications are taken into account, as is done in the STAPLE code, failures can be predicted. In the HRB-22 irradiation test, it was concluded that the first two particles which had failed were defective in some way, but that the third and fourth failures can be accounted for by the pressure vessel model. In the 91F-1A irradiation test, the result showed that 1 or 2 particles had failed towards the end of irradiation in the upper capsule and no particles failed in the lower capsule. (author)

  12. PWR 核电厂乏燃料贮存临界计算重要核素的选取%Important Nuclide Selection Based on Spent Fuel Storage Criticality Calculation for PWR Nuclear Power Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈志宏; 沈季; 李亢; 黄才龙

    2015-01-01

    信用核素选取是基于燃耗信用制乏燃料贮存临界安全分析的关键一步。通过对不同富集度、燃耗深度及停堆冷却时间下典型PWR燃料组件分析,以核素中子吸收份额大小排序为依据,筛选出对总的中子吸收起主要贡献的核素。结果显示,47个核素即可包络停堆后0~20 a内影响乏燃料贮存系统反应性的所有核素中的99%。通过核素敏感性因子分析证明依据中子吸收份额排序选取重要核素的方法是合理的,与基准算例的结果对比证明所筛选出的核素能足够代表影响系统反应性的所有重要核素。%The credit nuclide selection is the key step in burnup credit for spent fuel storage criticality safety analysis .Based on typical PWR fuel assembly with different enrichment ,burnup and cooling time combinations , important nuclides in criticality safety analysis were selected according to nuclide importance ranking in terms of their fractional neutron absorptions . The results show that 47 nuclides can bound 99%nuclides w hich affect the spent fuel storage system reactivity during 0‐20 a after shut‐dow n .T he validation analysis show s that the selection method is reasonable and the selected nuclides can adequately represent all dominant nuclides in system reactivity calculation .

  13. Crud formation on low duty PWR fuel in the Halden reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A previous paper summarised observations on the effects of water chemistry and thermal-hydraulic conditions on crud formation on PWR fuel in the Halden reactor. These observations led to the conclusion that a critical degree of fuel duty (which can be expressed as degree of coolant sub-cooled boiling, void fraction or mass evaporation rate) was required for the formation of tenacious crud deposits. Recent measurements of the oxide layers on low duty PWR fuel have revealed the formation of tenacious crud deposits. This paper describes the operating history of the fuel rods, including water chemistry and thermal-hydraulic conditions, and suggests reasons for the sudden appearance of the crud deposits. (author)

  14. Contribution to the study of the conversion PWR type reactors to the thorium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the thorium cycle in PWR reactors is discussed. The fuel has been calculated in the equilibrium condition for a economic comparison with the uranium cycle (in the same condition). First of all, a code named EQUILIBRIO has been developed for the fuel equilibrium calculation. The results gotten by this code, were introduced in the LEOPARD code for the fuel depletion calculation (in the equilibrium cycle). Same important physics details of fuel depletion are studied, for instance: the neutron balance, power sharing, fuel burnup, etc. The calculations have been done taking as reference the Angra-1 PWR reactor. (Author)

  15. Cladding stress during extended storage of high burnup spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In an effort to assess the potential for low temperature creep and delayed hydride cracking failures in high burnup spent fuel cladding during extended dry storage, the U.S. NRC analytical fuel performance tools were used to predict cladding stress during a 300 year dry storage period for UO2 fuel burned up to 65 GWd/MTU. Fuel swelling correlations were developed and used along with decay gas production and release fractions to produce circumferential average cladding stress predictions with the FRAPCON-3.5 fuel performance code. The resulting stresses did not result in cladding creep failures. The maximum creep strains accumulated were on the order of 0.54–1.04%, but creep failures are not expected below at least 2% strain. The potential for delayed hydride cracking was assessed by calculating the critical flaw size required to trigger this failure mechanism. The critical flaw size far exceeded any realistic flaw expected in spent fuel at end of reactor life

  16. Cladding stress during extended storage of high burnup spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Patrick A. C.; Einziger, Robert E.

    2015-09-01

    In an effort to assess the potential for low temperature creep and delayed hydride cracking failures in high burnup spent fuel cladding during extended dry storage, the U.S. NRC analytical fuel performance tools were used to predict cladding stress during a 300 year dry storage period for UO2 fuel burned up to 65 GWd/MTU. Fuel swelling correlations were developed and used along with decay gas production and release fractions to produce circumferential average cladding stress predictions with the FRAPCON-3.5 fuel performance code. The resulting stresses did not result in cladding creep failures. The maximum creep strains accumulated were on the order of 0.54-1.04%, but creep failures are not expected below at least 2% strain. The potential for delayed hydride cracking was assessed by calculating the critical flaw size required to trigger this failure mechanism. The critical flaw size far exceeded any realistic flaw expected in spent fuel at end of reactor life.

  17. Development of destructive methods of burn-up determination and their application on WWER type nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are described of a cooperation between the Central Institute of Nuclear Research Rossendorf and the Radium Institute 'V.G. Chlopin' Leningrad in the field of destructive burn-up determination. Laboratory methods of burn-up determination using the classical monitors 137Cs, 106Ru, 148Nd and isotopes of heavy metals (U, Pu) as well as the usefulness of 90Sr, stable isotopes of Ru and Mo as monitors are dealt with. The analysis of the fuel components uranium (spectrophotometry, potentiometric titration, mass-spectrometric isotope dilution) and plutonium (spectrophotometry, coulometric titration, mass- and alpha-spectrometric isotope dilution) is fully described. Possibilities of increasing the reproducibility (automatic adjusting of measurement conditions) and the sensibility (ion impuls counting) of mass-spectrometric measurements are proposed and applied to a precise determination of Am and Cm isotopic composition. The methods have been used for burn-up analysis of spent WWER (especially WWER-440) fuel. (author)

  18. Preparation of uranium-plutonium carbide-based fuels simulating high burnup by carbothermic reduction and their properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three types, hypostoichiometric, nearly stoichiometric and hyperstoichiometric, of uranium-plutonium carbide fuels simulating 10 at.% burnup were prepared by carbothermic reduction of oxide containing fission product elements. The carbides contained fission product phases such as the UMoC2 and the U2RuC2 type or the RECsub(1.5-2.0) phases (RE:rare earth). Composite theoretical densities of heterogenious carbides containing the UC, U2C3 type and fission product phases were calculated from the proportions and densities of these phases. By comparison of specific volume of the carbide between of 0 at.% and 10 at.% burnup, the solid fission product swelling rate of a carbide-based fuel was estimated to be 0.4-0.5 % per at.% burnup. (author)

  19. Gamma-ray measurements of spent PWR fuel and determination of residual power

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Peter; Håkansson, Ane; Bäcklin, Anders

    1997-01-01

    The method for determining residual thermal power in spent BWR fuel described in ISV-4/97 have been used in an extended study where spent PWR fuel assemblies have been considered. The experimental work has been carried out at the interim storage CLAB. By using the 137Cs radiation it is shown in the present study that it is possible to experimentally determine the residual thermal power within 3%.

  20. Methods and computer programs for PWR's fuel management: Programs Sothis and Ciclon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methos and computer programs developed at JEN for fuel management in PWR are discussed, including scope of model, procedures for sistematic selection of alternatives to be evaluated, basis of model for neutronic calculation, methods for fuel costs calculation, procedures for equilibrium and trans[tion cycles calculation with Soth[s and Ciclon codes and validation of methods by comparison of results with others of reference (author) '

  1. MELCOR model for an experimental 17x17 spent fuel PWR assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoni, Jeffrey

    2010-11-01

    A MELCOR model has been developed to simulate a pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 assembly in a spent fuel pool rack cell undergoing severe accident conditions. To the extent possible, the MELCOR model reflects the actual geometry, materials, and masses present in the experimental arrangement for the Sandia Fuel Project (SFP). The report presents an overview of the SFP experimental arrangement, the MELCOR model specifications, demonstration calculation results, and the input model listing.

  2. Practices and developments in spent fuel burnup credit applications. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a technical committee Meeting on Requirements, Practices and Developments in Burnup Credit (BUC) Applications in Madrid, Spain, from 22 to 26 April 2002. The purpose of this meeting was to explore the progress and status of international activities related to the BUC applications for spent nuclear fuel. This meeting was the third major meeting on the uses of BUC for spent fuel management systems held since the IAEA began to monitor the uses of BUC in spent fuel management systems in 1997. The first major meeting was an Advisory Group meeting (AGM), which was held in Vienna, in October 1997. The second major meeting was a technical committee meeting (TCM), which was held in Vienna, in July 2000. Several consultants meetings were held since 1997 to advise and assist the IAEA in planning and conducting its BUC activities. The proceedings of the 1997 AGM were published as IAEA-TECDOC-1013, and the proceedings of the 2000 TCM as IAEA-TECDOC-1241. BUC for wet and dry storage systems, spent fuel transport, reprocessing and final disposal is needed in many Member States to allow for increased enrichment, and to increase storage capacities, cask capacities and dissolver capacities avoiding the need for extensive modifications. The use of BUC is a necessity for spent fuel disposal

  3. Burn-up credit criticality benchmark. Phase 4-B: results and analysis of MOX fuel depletion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DECD/NEA Expert Group on Burn-up Credit was established in 1991 to address scientific and technical issues connected with the use of burn-up credit in nuclear fuel cycle operations. Following the completion of six benchmark exercises with uranium oxide (UOX) fuels irradiated in pressurised water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs), the present report concerns mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) fuels irradiated in PWRs. The exercises consisted of inventory calculations of MOX fuels for two initial plutonium compositions. The depletion calculations were carried out using three representations of the MOX assemblies and their interface with UOX assemblies. This enabled the investigation of the spatial and spectral effects during the irradiation of the MOX fuels. (author)

  4. Depleting a CANDU-6 fuel assembly using detailed burnup data and reactionwise energy release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temporal behavior of reactor fuel assembly due to neutron exposure is an integral part of lattice analysis. It is important to estimate the production of actinides and fission products as a function of burnup so as to decide the quality of fuel for further energy production. It is also important from the point of view of post irradiation behavior of fuel. The information on heat production during and after irradiation helps in determining the amount of time a fuel assembly needs to be cooled before taking it up for storage or reprocessing. In the present study we have considered the CANDU-6 fuel assembly as reference. Lattice analysis has been performed using development version of code DRAGON. A total of 192 nuclides have been selected as part of the analysis, of which 19 are actinides, 151 are fission products and the rest are structural elements. The fission products have been treated explicitly. There is no pseudo fission product. Using DRAGR module, a multigroup microscopic cross section library in DRAGLIB format has been generated. An important aspect of this library is the explicit treatment of most neutron induced reactions. We have for the first time attempted to perform power normalization due to energy from various neutron induced reactions including (n, γ), (n, f), (n, 2n), (n, 3n), (n, 4n), (n, α), (n, p), (n, 2α), (n, np), (n, d), (n, t). Energy due to decay has also been considered explicitly. Even though the decay energy contributes very little relative to the neutron induced reactions, the information will be very useful for post irradiation behavior of fuel. It was observed that the maximum contributing reactions for the power normalization are (n, f), (n, γ) and (n, 2n). We have assessed the contribution of fission products and actinides towards power normalization as a function of burnup. We have also studied the pinwise contribution towards power normalization in each ring of CANDU-6 fuel. We have attempted to compare the effect of

  5. Burn-up effect on instant release from an initial corrosion of UO2 and MOX fuel under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the work is to obtain instant release experimental values for different radionuclides as a function of spent fuel type (UO2 and MOX) and burn-up (from 30 to 63 MWd/kgU) that will be useful for the performance assessment studies related to the behaviour of spent fuel under repository conditions or, in any case, spent fuel conditions in which labile radionuclides can be released. To determine the instant release source terms, sets of leaching experiments were conducted with spent UO2 and MOX fuel with burnups ranging from 30 to 63 MWd/kg U in presence of cladding as the container material. The fuels were leached in carbonated groundwater (CW) having a buffered pH of 7.5 at room temperature. Some observations are also made of the differences in matrix dissolution behaviour of the different fuels based on observed U, Pu and Np concentrations The ultimate issue is to evaluate the differences in the ''instant'' inventory measurements for spent fuels in order to provide experimental data that allow to evaluate the source terms used in the safety-assessment calculations, and to improve the accuracy of such data for the future. It is important to remark that the quality of the experimental results obtained describes the influence of the spent fuel (SF) burn-up on fast release of inventory fraction (release under 200 days). (authors)

  6. Advances in fuel pellet technology for improved performance at high burnup. Proceedings of a Technical Committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has recently completed two co-ordinated Research Programmes (CRPs) on The Development of Computer Models for Fuel Element Behaviour in Water Reactors, and on Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup. Through these CRPs it became evident that there was a need to obtain data on fuel behaviour at high burnup. Data related o thermal behaviour, fission gas release and pellet to clad mechanical interaction were obtained and presented at the Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Fuel Pellet Technology for Improved Performance at High Burnup which was recommended by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT). The 34 papers from 10 countries are published in this proceedings and presented by a separate abstract. The papers were grouped in 6 sessions. First two sessions covered the fabrication of both UO2 fuel and additives and MOX fuel. Sessions 3 and 4 covered the thermal behaviour of both types of fuel. The remaining two sessions dealt with fission gas release and the mechanical aspects of pellet to clad interaction

  7. Study of morphology on the oxidation and the annealing of high burn-up UO{sub 2} spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Jae Geun; Yang, Yong Sik; Song, Keun Woo; Lee, Hyung Kwon; Kwon, Hyung Moon [KAERI, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    The morphology of the high burnup UO{sub 2} spent fuel, which was oxidized and annealed in a PIA (Post Irradiation Annealing) apparatus, has been observed. The high burnup fuel irradiated in Ulchin Unit 2, average rod burnup 57,000 MWd/tU, was transported to the KAERI's PIEF. The test specimen was used with about 200 mg of the spent UO{sub 2} fuel fragment of the local burnup 65,000 MWd/tU. This specimen was annealed at 1400 .deg. C for 4hrs after the oxidation for 3hrs to grain boundary using the PIA apparatus in a hot-cell. In order to oxidize the grain boundary, the oxidation temperature increased up to 500 .deg. C and held for 3hrs in the mixed gas (60 ml He and 100 ml STD-air) atmosphere. The amount of 85Kr during the whole test process was measured to know the fission gas release behavior using the online system of a beta counter and a gamma counter. The detailed micro-structure was observed by a SEM to confirm the change of the fuel morphology after this test. As the annealing temperature increased, the fission products were observed to move to the grain surface and grain boundary of the UO{sub 2} matrix. This specimen was re-structured through the reduction process, and the grain sizes were distributed from 5 to 10 {mu}m.

  8. Preparation of data relevant to ''Equivalent Uniform Burnup'' and Equivalent Initial Enrichment'' for burnup credit evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Okuno, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Murazaki, Minoru [Tokyo Nuclear Service Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    Based on the PWR spent fuel composition data measured at JAERI, two kinds of simplified methods such as ''Equivalent Uniform Burnup'' and ''Equivalent Initial Enrichment'' have been introduced. And relevant evaluation curves have been prepared for criticality safety evaluation of spent fuel storage pool and transport casks, taking burnup of spent fuel into consideration. These simplified methods can be used to obtain an effective neutron multiplication factor for a spent fuel storage/transportation system by using the ORIGEN2.1 burnup code and the KENO-Va criticality code without considering axial burnup profile in spent fuel and other various factors introducing calculated errors. ''Equivalent Uniform Burnup'' is set up for its criticality analysis to be reactivity equivalent with the detailed analysis, in which the experimentally obtained isotopic composition together with a typical axial burnup profile and various factors such as irradiation history are considered on the conservative side. On the other hand, Equivalent Initial Enrichment'' is set up for its criticality analysis to be reactivity equivalent with the detailed analysis such as above when it is used in the so called fresh fuel assumption. (author)

  9. Transnucleaire's experience with burnup credit in transport operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facing a continued increase in fuel enrichment values, Transnucleaire has progressively implemented a burnup credit programme in order to maintain or, where possible, to improve the capacity of its transport packagings without physical modification. Many package design approvals, based on a notion of burnup credit, have been granted by the French competent authority for transport since the early eighties, and many of these approvals have been validated by foreign competent authorities. Up to now, these approvals are restricted to fuel assemblies made of enriched uranium and irradiated in pressurized water reactors (PWR). The characterization of the irradiated fuel and the reactivity of the package are evaluated by calculation, performed using qualified French codes developed by the CEA (Commisariat a l'Energie Atomique/French Atomic Energy Commission): CESAR as a depletion code and APOLO-MORET as a criticality code. The approvals are based on the hypothesis that the burnup considered is that applied on the least irradiated region of the fuel assemblies, the conservative approach being not to take credit for any axial profile of burnup along the fuel assembly. The most reactive configuration is calculated and the burnup credit is also restricted to major actinides only. On the operational side and in compliance with regulatory requirements, verification is made before transport, in order to meet safety objectives as required by the transport regulations. Besides a review of documentation related to the irradiation history of each fuel assembly, it consists of either a qualitative (go/no-go) verification or of a quantitative measurement, depending on the level of burnup credit. Thus the use of burnup credit is now a common practice with Transnucleaire's packages, particularly in France and Germany. New improvements are still in progress and qualifications of the calculation code are now well advanced, which will allow in the near future the use of six selected

  10. Analysis of difficulties accounting and evaluating nuclear material of PWR fuel plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Nuclear materials accountancy must be developed for nuclear facilities, which is required by regulatory in China. Currently, there are some unresolved problems for nuclear materials accountancy of bulk nuclear facilities. Purpose: The retention values and measurement errors are analyzed in nuclear materials accountancy of Power Water Reactor (PWR) fuel plant to meet the regulatory requirements. Methods: On the basis of nuclear material accounting and evaluation data of PWR fuel plant, a deep analysis research including ratio among random error variance, long-term systematic error variance, short-term systematic error variance and total error involving Material Unaccounted For (MUF) evaluation is developed by the retention value measure in equipment and pipeline. Results: In the equipment pipeline, the holdup estimation error and its total proportion are not more than 5% and 1.5%, respectively. And the holdup estimation can be regraded as a constant in the PWR nuclear material accountancy. Random error variance, long-term systematic error variance, short-term systematic error variance of overall measurement, and analytical and sampling methods are also obtained. A valuable reference is provided for nuclear material accountancy. Conclusion: In nuclear material accountancy, the retention value can be considered as a constant. The long-term systematic error is a main factor in all errors, especially in overall measurement error and sampling error: The long-term systematic errors of overall measurement and sampling are considered important in the PWR nuclear material accountancy. The proposals and measures are applied to the nuclear materials accountancy of PWR fuel plant, and the capacity of nuclear materials accountancy is improved. (authors)

  11. Data Mining Techniques to Estimate Plutonium, Initial Enrichment, Burnup, and Cooling Time in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trellue, Holly Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fugate, Michael Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tobin, Stephen Joesph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-19

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a multi-laboratory, university, international partner collaboration to (1) detect replaced or missing pins from spent fuel assemblies (SFA) to confirm item integrity and deter diversion, (2) determine plutonium mass and related plutonium and uranium fissile mass parameters in SFAs, and (3) verify initial enrichment (IE), burnup (BU), and cooling time (CT) of facility declaration for SFAs. A wide variety of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques were researched to achieve these goals [Veal, 2010 and Humphrey, 2012]. In addition, the project includes two related activities with facility-specific benefits: (1) determination of heat content and (2) determination of reactivity (multiplication). In this research, a subset of 11 integrated NDA techniques was researched using data mining solutions at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for their ability to achieve the above goals.

  12. Utilizing the burnup capability in MCNPX to perform depletion analysis of an MNSR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boafo, Emmanuel [Ghana atomic Energy Commission, Accra (Ghana)

    2013-07-01

    The burnup capability in the MCNPX code was utilized to perform fuel depletion analysis of the MNSR LEU core by estimating the amount of fissile material (U-235) consumed as well as the amount of plutonium formed after the reactor core expected life. The decay heat removal rate for the MNSR after reactor shutdown was also investigated due to its significance to reactor safety. The results show that 0.568 % of U-235 was burnt up after 200 days of reactor operation while the amount of plutonium formed was not significant. The study also found that the decay heat decreased exponentially after reactor shutdown confirming that the decay heat will be removed from the system by natural circulation after shut down and hence safety of the reactor is assured.

  13. Fuel burnup analysis of the TRIGA Mark II Reactor at the University of Pavia

    CERN Document Server

    Chiesa, Davide; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Alloni, Daniele; Magrotti, Giovanni; Manera, Sergio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Cammi, Antonio; Zanetti, Matteo; Sartori, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A time evolution model was developed to study fuel burnup for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia. The results were used to predict the effects of a complete core reconfiguration and the accuracy of this prediction was tested experimentally. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 to reproduce system neutronics in different operating conditions and to analyse neutron fluxes in the reactor core. The software that took care of time evolution, completely designed in-house, used the neutron fluxes obtained by MCNP5 to evaluate fuel consumption. This software was developed specifically to keep into account some features that differentiate experimental reactors from power ones, such as the daily ON/OFF cycle and the long fuel lifetime. These effects can not be neglected to properly account for neutron poison accumulation. We evaluated the effect of 48 years of reactor operation and predicted a possible new configuration for the reactor core: the objective was to remove some of the fuel elements from the...

  14. IFPE/SPC-RE-GINNA, Full Length and Segmented Fuel Rodlet Irradiation in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this program was to develop a fuel design with increased margin to pellet-to-clad interaction (PCI) failure threshold and increased potential for higher burnup. The means by which this objective was to be attained was with annular pellets and zirconium barrier cladding. The annular pellets used have a void volume of approximately 10% higher than comparable solid pellets. Barrier cladding consists of Zircaloy-4 tubes with an integral inner layer of unalloyed zirconium comprising approximately 10% of the total wall thickness. The overall cladding dimensions are the same as the standard cladding. Four Siemens Power Corporation (SPC) 14x14 lead fuel assemblies (XT01, XT02, XT03 and XT04) were inserted into the R.E. Ginna reactor. The program included design and fabrication of the assemblies, irradiation in the R.E. Ginna reactor, pool-side examination and measurements, and post irradiation hot cell examination of selected segmented fuel rodlets in the CEA Laboratories in Grenoble. The aim of the program was to demonstrate and evaluate the in-reactor performance of the assemblies at high burnup, and the potential of annular pellets and zirconium barrier cladding for resisting fuel failures due to PCI. Each assembly contained 179 fuel rods, 16 guide tubes, and one instrument tube. XT03 and XT04 each contained 30 fully characterized fuel rods. 19 of the characterized fuel rods in each assembly were full length, annular pellet, zirconium barrier clad rods, and the remaining 11 rods were segmented fuel rods with different combinations of solid and annular pellets, standard and barrier cladding, and controlled variations in pellet-to-cladding gap. Three of the lead fuel assemblies were irradiated for four cycles to an average burnup of 42.5 MWd/kgU, while XT03 was irradiated for five cycles. This assembly reached an average burnup of 52.1 MWd/kgU, while the two central rodlets contained in the eleven segmented rods achieved a burnup of 52 MWd/kgU for solid

  15. Burn-Up Calculations for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel bum-up calculations for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor involve a distribution of the thermal megawatt days of operations to the fuel elements in proportion to the average thermal neutron flux at their location in the reactor. The megawatt days so assigned can be converted to equivalent uranium-235 consumption when needed. The original fuel loading for the BGRR was neutral uranium and a single calculation was performed on each fuel element upon discharge from the reactor. A subsequent change to a fully enriched uranium-235 fuel element, however, introduced complications. The average loading of enriched uranium involves about 4800 individual elements, each occupying four different reactor positions during its term in the reactor. The total term for a central channel element is about one year as against six to eight years for an element in a peripheral channel. With the large number of individual fuel elements involved and the approximately monthly small changes needed for operation, it was necessary to resort to a computer programme to follow the burn-up of all the elements on the reactor continuously. Both this and other functions of the computer programme are discussed in the paper. To date, uranium has been recovered from two batches of spent fuel. On the first, involving 3674 elements discharged from the reactor over a period of 4.9 years, the recovery figures were 5.5% higher than the calculated total of 32.3 kg uranium-235. On the second batch, involving 1296 elements discharged from the reactor over a period of one year, the recovery figures were 2.3% higher than the calculated figures of 10.8 kg uranium-235. This relatively close agreement seems to indicate that the assumptions made to simplify the programme are acceptable and that the results of the programme are satisfactory for our particular accounting and operating requirements. (author)

  16. Evaluation of the characteristics of uranium and plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel having high burnup and high plutonium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two kinds of MOX fuel irradiation tests, i.e., MOX irradiation test up to high burnup and MOX having high plutonium content irradiation test, have been performed since JFY 2007 for five years in order to establish technical data concerning MOX fuel behavior during irradiation, which shall be needed in safety regulation of MOX fuel with high reliability. The high burnup MOX irradiation test consists of irradiation extension and post irradiation examination (PIE). The activities done in JFY 2010 are PIE at Kjeller (85 Kr gamma spectrometry and fuel rod puncture test), PIE at Cadarache (destructive post irradiation examination (D-PIE) such as density measurement, optical microscope, SEM and EPMA), and PIE data analysis. In the frame of irradiation test of high plutonium enriched MOX fuel programme, MOX fuel rods with about 14wt % Pu content are being irradiated at BR-2 reactor and corresponding PIE is also being done at PIE facility in Belgium. The activities done in JFY 2010 are irradiation extension through the irradiation cycles from BR-2 02/2010 to BR-2 01/2011 and gamma spectrometry measurement which has been performed as intermittent PIE and can give burnup, power distribution and FP gas release rate. (author)

  17. Conceptual design study of small long-life PWR based on thorium cycle fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subkhi, M. Nurul [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia) and Physics Dept., Faculty of Science and Technology, State Islamic University of Sunan Gunung (Indonesia); Su' ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Permana, Sidik [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Ganesha 10 Bandung) (Indonesia)

    2014-09-30

    A neutronic performance of small long-life Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) using thorium cycle based fuel has been investigated. Thorium cycle which has higher conversion ratio in thermal region compared to uranium cycle produce some significant of {sup 233}U during burn up time. The cell-burn up calculations were performed by PIJ SRAC code using nuclear data library based on JENDL 3.3, while the multi-energy-group diffusion calculations were optimized in whole core cylindrical two-dimension R-Z geometry by SRAC-CITATION. this study would be introduced thorium nitride fuel system which ZIRLO is the cladding material. The optimization of 350 MWt small long life PWR result small excess reactivity and reduced power peaking during its operation.

  18. Experience of Areva in fuel services for PWR and BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AREVA being an integrated supplier of fuel assemblies has included in its strategy to develop services and solutions to customers who desire to improve the performance and safety of their fuel. These services go beyond the simple 'after sale' services that can be expected from a fuel supplier: The portfolio of AREVA includes a wide variety of services, from scientific calculations to fuel handling services in a nuclear power plant. AREVA is committed to collaborate and to propose best-in-class solutions that really make the difference for the customer, based on 40 years of Fuel design and manufacturing experience. (Author)

  19. Total evaluation of in bundle void fraction measurement test of PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation is performing the various proof or verification tests on safety and reliability of nuclear power plants under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. As one program of these Japanese national projects, an in bundle void fraction measurement test of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assembly was started in 1987 and finished at the end of 1994. The experiments were performed using the 5 x 5 square array rod bundle test sections. The rod bundle test section simulates the partial section and full length of a 17 x 17 type Japanese PWR fuel assembly. A distribution of subchannel averaged void fraction in a rod bundle test section was measured by the gamma-ray attenuation method using the stationary multi beam systems. The additional single channel test was performed to obtain the required information for the calibration of the rod bundle test data and the assessment of the void prediction method. Three test rod bundles were prepared to analyze an axial power distribution effect, an unheated rod effect, and a grid spacer effect. And, the obtained data were used for the assessment of the void prediction method relevant to the subchannel averaged void fraction of PWR fuel assemblies. This paper describes the outline of the experiments, the evaluation of the experimental data and the assessment of void prediction method

  20. Effects of fuel burn-up and cooling periods on thermal responses in a repository for spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flexible methods and codes have been developed to calculate thermal responses in a spent nuclear fuel repository located in granitic bedrock. The thermal resistance of the backfill material makes an essential contribution to the temperature at the canister surface. The backfill is however so thin compared to the rock masses of the repository that a stationary solution for the temperature drop across the backfill can be used. Combining analytical solutions of thermal diffusion in the rock and the stationary temperature following the released heat power across the backfill gives a very good description of the thermal behaviour of a repository. Temperatures at different points in a repository were calculated for encapsuled spent fuel with different cooling times (10, 20, 30 and 40 years) and having different burn-up values (33, 35 and 45 MWd/kgU). The amount of spent fuel in each canister was supposed to originate from 1.4 tons of fresh Uranium in the calculated examples. A more crucial variable in a thermal analysis of a repository configuration is however the heat power of canisters as a function of time and not the content of canisters. The study shows that the largest temperature rise at the boundary of a centrally located canister and buffer mass will be at most 85 K with assumed thermal data, when the heat power of 900 canisters does not exceed 1200-1400 W each at the time of emplacement depending on burn-up and cooling time. Assuming a higher value for the heat conductivity of the buffer material corresponding to that of the water saturated bentonite gives 15% higher limits respectively. The canisters were supposed to be placed in 15 rows 25 m apart from each other and 60 canisters in each row. The distance between canisters was taken to be 6 m

  1. A feasibility and optimization study to determine cooling time and burnup of advanced test reactor fuels using a nondestructive technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Jorge [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method

  2. Effect of spent fuel burnup and composition on alteration of the U(Pu)O2 matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a potential performance assessment of direct disposal of spent fuel in a nuclear waste repository, the chemical reactions between the fuel and possible intruding water must be understood and the resulting radionuclide release must be quantified. Leaching experiments were performed with five spent fuel samples from French power reactors (four UO2 fuel samples with burnup ratings of 22, 37, 47 and 60 GWd.THM-1 and a MOX fuel sample irradiated to 47 GWd.THM-1) to determine the release kinetics of the matrix containing most (over 95%) of the radionuclides. The experiments were carried out with granitic groundwater on previously leached sections of clad fuel rods in static mode, in an aerated medium at room temperature (25 deg C) in a hot cell. After 1000 or 2000 days of leaching, the Sr/U congruence ratios for all the UO2 fuel samples ranged from 1 to 2, allowing for the experimental uncertainty, strontium can thus be considered as a satisfactory matrix alteration tracer. No significant burnup effect was observed on the alteration of the UO2 fuel matrix. The daily strontium release factor was approximately 1 x 10-7 d-1 for UO2 fuel, and five to six times higher for MOX fuel. Several alteration mechanisms (radiolysis, solubility, precipitation/clogging) are examined to account for the experimental findings. Copyright (2001) Material Research Society

  3. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel.

  4. AREVA's fuel assemblies addressing high performance requirements of the worldwide PWR fleet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking advantage of its presence in the fuel activities since the start of commercial nuclear worldwide operation, AREVA is continuing to support the customers with the priority on reliability, to: >participate in plant operational performance for the in core fuel reliability, the Zero Tolerance for Failure ZTF as a continuous improvement target and the minimisation of manufacturing/quality troubles, >guarantee the supply chain a proven product stability and continuous availability, >support performance improvements with proven design and technology for fuel management updating and cycle cost optimization, >support licensing assessments for fuel assembly and reloads, data/methodologies/services, >meet regulatory challenges regarding new phenomena, addressing emergent performance issues and emerging industry challenges for changing operating regimes. This capacity is based on supplies by AREVA accumulating very large experience both in manufacturing and in plant operation, which is demonstrated by: >manufacturing location in 4 countries including 9 fuel factories in USA, Germany, Belgium and France. Up to now about 120,000 fuel assemblies and 8,000 RCCA have been released to PWR nuclear countries, from AREVA European factories, >irradiation performed or in progress in about half of PWR world wide nuclear plants. Our optimum performances cover rod burn ups of to 82GWD/tU and fuel assemblies successfully operated under various world wide fuel management types. AREVA's experience, which is the largest in the world, has the extensive support of the well known fuel components such as the M5'TM'cladding, the MONOBLOC'TM'guide tube, the HTP'TM' and HMP'TM' structure components and the comprehensive services brought in engineering, irradiation and post irradiation fields. All of AREVA's fuel knowledge is devoted to extend the definition of fuel reliability to cover the whole scope of fuel vendor support. Our Top Reliability and Quality provide customers with continuous

  5. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyun Soo; Lee, Jae Sul; Choi, Jong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    This report summarizes the second year progress of phase II of DUPIC program which aims to verify experimentally the feasibility of direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors. The project is to provide the experimental facilities and technologies that are required to perform the DUPIC experiment. As an early part of the project, engineering analysis of those facilities and construction of mock-up facility are described. Another scope of the project is to assess the DUPIC fuel cycle system and facilitate international cooperation. The progresses in this scope of work made during the fiscal year are also summarized in the report. 38 figs, 44 tabs, 8 refs. (Author).

  6. Research on Power Ramp Testing Method for PWR Fuel Rod at Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to develop high performance fuel assembly for domestic nuclear power plant, it is necessary to master some fundamental test technology. So the research on the power ramp testing methods is proposed. A tentative power ramp test for short PWR fuel rod has been conducted at the heavy water research reactor (HWRR) in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE) in May of 2001. The in-pile test rig was placed into the central channel of the reactor . The test rig consists of pressure pipe assembly, thimble, solid neutron absorbing screen and its driving parts, etc.. The test

  7. A criticality analysis of the GBC-32 dry storage cask with Hanbit nuclear power plant unit 3 fuel assemblies from the viewpoint of burnup credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hyung Ju; Kim, Do Yeon; Park, Kwang Heon; Hong, Ser Gi [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Nuclear criticality safety analyses (NCSAs) considering burnup credit were performed for the GBC-32 cask. The used nuclear fuel assemblies (UNFAs) discharged from Hanbit Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 Cycle 6 were loaded into the cask. Their axial burnup distributions and average discharge burnups were evaluated using the DeCART and Multi-purpose Analyzer for Static and Transient Effects of Reactors (MASTER) codes, and NCSAs were performed using SCALE 6.1/STandardized Analysis of Reactivity for Burnup Credit using SCALE (STARBUCS) and Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code, version 6 (MCNP 6). The axial burnup distributions were determined for 20 UNFAs with various initial enrichments and burnups, which were applied to the criticality analysis for the cask system. The UNFAs for 20- and 30-year cooling times were assumed to be stored in the cask. The criticality analyses indicated that keff values for UNFAs with nonuniform axial burnup distributions were larger than those with a uniform distribution, that is, the end effects were positive but much smaller than those with the reference distribution. The axial burnup distributions for 20 UNFAs had shapes that were more symmetrical with a less steep gradient in the upper region than the reference ones of the United States Department of Energy. These differences in the axial burnup distributions resulted in a significant reduction in end effects compared with the reference.

  8. A sensitivity study on DUPIC fuel composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hang Bok; Roh, Gyu Hong

    1997-01-01

    In DUPIC fuel cycle, the spent pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel is refabricated as a DUPIC fuel by a dry process. Because the spent PWR fuel composition depends on the initial enrichment and burnup condition of PWR fuel, the composition of a DUPIC fuel is not uniquely defined. Therefore, for the purpose of reducing the effects of such a composition heterogeneity on core performance, a composition adjustment of DUPIC fuel was studies. The composition adjustment was made in two steps: mixing two spent PWR fuel assemblies of higher and lower {sup 239}Pu contents and blending in fresh uranium with the mixed spent PWR fuels. Because the fuel and core performances depend on both the absolute amount of fissile isotopes and the ratio of major fissile isotope contents, a parametric study was performed to determine the reference compositions of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu. The reference enrichments of {sup 235}U and {sup 239}Pu were determined such that the DUPIC core performance is comparable to that of a natural uranium core with high spent PWR fuel utilization and low fuel cycle cost. Under this condition, it is possible to utilize 90% of spent PWR fuels as the DUPIC fuel formula. On average, the amounts of slightly enriched and depleted uranium used for blending correspond to 8.6% and 10.6%, respectively, of the mass of candidate spent PWR fuels. (author). 16 refs., 30 tabs., 9 figs.

  9. Methods used in burn-up determination of the irradiated fuel rods at TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short presentation of the methods used at INR TRIGA reactor for the burn-up determination is given together with some considerations on ORIGEN 2 computer code used for calculating fission products activities and nuclide concentration. Burn-up is determined by gamma spectroscopy and thermal power monitoring. (Author)

  10. Production of 232U from irradiation of standard and thorium-based fuels in PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of small quantities of 232U can induce radiation protection issues in the back end of the fuel cycle, particularly for thorium-based fuels. This is due to its relatively short half life (69 years) and the emission of a high energy gamma ray of 2.6 MeV at the end of its decay chain. With the depletion code MURE, we determine the different reactions pathways, and their proportions, leading to the synthesis of 232U in UO2 and (Th,Pu)O2 fuels irradiated in a PWR. Moreover, the impact, on the 232U production, of cycle times such as time separating the fabrication of the fuel and its irradiation as well as influence of the fissile content has been investigated for UO2 fuel. The impact of the thorium ore provenance and of the plutonium quality has been studied for the (Th,Pu)O2 case. (author)

  11. Nuclear feasibility study on thorium fueled PWR core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Myung Hyun; Woo, Il Tak; Lim, Jae Yong; Ku, Bon Seung; Kim, Jong Chae; Lee, Sang Yun [Kyunghee University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    A computer code system, HELIOS and NESTLE or MASTER was established and checked for its reliability for the calculation of thorium fueled reactor. Previous results for the thorium fuel applications were evaluated including RTR reactor concept. Based on the detailed analysis on RTR, a new design concept was proposed. Characteristics of designed core should be checked for conversion ratio, nuclear design feasibility, proliferation resistance, fuel cycle economics, thermal-hydraulic safety, etc. Research was done only for the nuclear feasibility and high conversion in this 1st year. In order to seek for the design methodology, parametric studies were done for the following design parameters-fuel pin size, seed/blanket ratio, fuel material composition, and fissile enrichment. An optimization was done based on once-through fuel cycle with UO{sub 2} seed and (U, Th)O{sub 2} blanket. Economics, safety, non-proliferation, and waste transmutation will be checked in the future research works. (author). 19 refs., 39 figs., 39 tabs.

  12. Current status of research and development of nuclear fuel elements for PWR in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The energy need of Indonesia is increasing due to the population growth and for the economic progress. The government of Indonesia intends to apply an optimum energy mix comprising all viable prospective energy sources. The Government Regulation No. 5 year 2006 indicates the target of energy mix until 2025 and the share of nuclear energy is about 2% of primary energy or 4% of electricity (4000 MWe). The first two units of NPP is expected to be operated before 2020 as stated in Act No. 17 year 2007 on National Long Term Development Planning 2005-2025. The first NPP to be operated in Indonesia is PWR type with capacity of 1000 MWe/unit. One of the strategies to strength and increase national capacity in the program for NPP introduction is domestication industry for nuclear fuel. To reach this purpose, the activities of research and development is focus on nuclear fuel production technology for PWR. Currently research and development activity in Indonesia is to produce prototype of nuclear fuel element for PWR in the form of test fuel pin or mini pin. In this paper we will presenting the pelletization and fabrication technology development. The existing facility was designed for PHWR fuel element of CIRENE type. Development of pelletization technology is carried out by modifying the compacting machine. Parameters of compacting and sintering are determined based on both compressibility and compactibility of the pellet as indicated by density and mechanical strength of the UO2 green pellets. The sintering parameters to be determined are temperature, heating rate, and soaking time. Currently, the fabrication process is under experiment. All of the data resulted from the experiment that will be presented in this meeting. (author)

  13. Development and application of methods and computer codes of fuel management and nuclear design of reload cycles in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of methods and computer codes for Fuel Management and Nuclear Design of Reload Cycles in PWR, developed at JEN by adaptation of previous codes (LEOPARD, NUTRIX, CITATION, FUELCOST) and implementation of original codes (TEMP, SOTHIS, CICLON, NUDO, MELON, ROLLO, LIBRA, PENELOPE) and their application to the project of Management and Design of Reload Cycles of a 510 Mwt PWR, including comparison with results of experimental operation and other calculations for validation of methods. (author)

  14. Techniques and devices developed by the CEA for hot cell and in-situ examinations of PWR components and PWR fuel assembliess after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of the electro-nuclear development of the PWR system, the CEA has provided itself with facilities for developing techniques for analyzing assemblies, pins and fuels. These are examinations and tests on irradiated heads and assemblies with the aid of the Fuel Examination Module (FEM), of machining of assemblies and examinations in the Celimene hot laboratory or detailed examinations and analyses on fuel elements using eddy currents, the electronic microprobe and the Fisher ''permeascope'' which enables the outline of the oxide coat present on the cladding to be followed

  15. Influence of rounds sub-grains in high burnup UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a recent paper, it has been shown that the so called 'rim structure' in high burnup UO2 fuel contains in fact two types of sub-grains: polyhedral and round ones. Polyhedral sub-grains have an average size of approximately 0.5 μm, and have been observed for more than ten years. The faceted porosity associated to these polyhedral sub-grains is characteristic of the rim effect. Round sub-grains have an average size of approximately 0.2 μm and are found to be formed on the free surface of initial grains or of polyhedral sub-grains. Round sub-grains can be observed in the rim area and also continuously from the periphery to the mid-pellet. This suggests that round sub-grains do not depend on rim effect, but are more likely to derive from a surface effect. In this contribution SEM photographs showing the evolution of the round sub-grains morphology will support a proposed mechanism for round sub-grains formation. This mechanism involves a surface modification due to stresses applied on a free surface using the Greenfeld formalism. These stresses could be due to segregation of fission products on some grain faces. This supposition is supported by EPMA experiments which show the segregation of some fission products on surfaces where round sub-grains are observed, while other surfaces with no round sub-grains have the same concentration in fission products as the bulk of the grains. Segregation of fission products on surface has also been observed in CANDU fuel by XPS. This specific behaviour of fission products gives a new insight in the chemistry of irradiated fuel and asks the question of the influence of round sub-grains formations on the release of fission products. (author)

  16. Burnup analysis and in-core fuel management study of the 3 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objective of this study is to formulate an effective optimal fuel management strategy for the TRIGA MARK II research reactor at AERE, Savar. The core management study has been performed by utilizing four basic types of information calculated for the reactor: criticality, power peaking, neutron flux and burnup calculation. This paper presents the results of the burnup calculations for TRIGA LEU fuel elements. The fuel element burnup for approximately 20 years of operation was calculated using the TRIGAP compute code. The calculation is performed in one-dimensional radial geometry in TRIGAP. Inter-comparison of TRIGAP results with other two calculations performed by MVP-BURN and MCNP4C-ORIGEN2.1 show very good agreement. Reshuffling at 20,000 MWh step provides the highest core lifetime of the reactor, which is 64,500 MWh. Besides, the study gives valuable insight into the behaviour of the reactor and will ensure better utilization and operation of the reactor in future

  17. Fully Coupled Modeling of Burnup-Dependent (U1- y , Pu y )O2- x Mixed Oxide Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Zhou, Wenzhong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-03-01

    During the fast reactor nuclear fuel fission reaction, fission gases accumulate and form pores with the increase of fuel burnup, which decreases the fuel thermal conductivity, leading to overheating of the fuel element. The diffusion of plutonium and oxygen with high temperature gradient is also one of the important fuel performance concerns as it will affect the fuel material properties, power distribution, and overall performance of the fuel pin. In order to investigate these important issues, the (U1- y Pu y )O2- x fuel pellet is studied by fully coupling thermal transport, deformation, oxygen diffusion, fission gas release and swelling, and plutonium redistribution to evaluate the effects on each other with burnup-dependent models, accounting for the evolution of fuel porosity. The approach was developed using self-defined multiphysics models based on the framework of COMSOL Multiphysics to manage the nonlinearities associated with fast reactor mixed oxide fuel performance analysis. The modeling results showed a consistent fuel performance comparable with the previous results. Burnup degrades the fuel thermal conductivity, resulting in a significant fuel temperature increase. The fission gas release increased rapidly first and then steadily with the burnup increase. The fuel porosity increased dramatically at the beginning of the burnup and then kept constant as the fission gas released to the fuel free volume, causing the fuel temperature to increase. Another important finding is that the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen affects greatly not only the fuel properties, for example, thermal conductivity, but also the fuel performance, for example, temperature distribution, porosity evolution, grain size growth, fission gas release, deformation, and plutonium redistribution. Special attention needs to be paid to the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen in fuel fabrication. Plutonium content will also affect the fuel material properties and performance

  18. Assessment of Welding System Modification of The Candu and PWR Fuel Element Types end Plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To anticipate future possibility of a nuclear fuel element industry in Indonesia, research on other types of nuclear fuel element beside Cirene type has to be done. It can be accomplished, one of them, by modifying the already available equipment. Based on the sheath material, the sheath dimension and the welding process parameters such as welding current and welding cycles, the available Magnetic Force Welding can be used for welding end plug of Candu nuclear fuel element by modifying some of its components (tube clamp, plug clamp, etc). The available Pellet drying and element filling furnace with its supporting system with includes helium gas filling, welding chamber, argon gas supply, vacuum system, sheath clamp and sheath driving system can be used for welding end plug with sheath of PWR nuclear fuel element by adding og Tungsten inert Gas (TIG) welding machine in the welding chamber and modifying a few components (seal clamp, sheath clamp)

  19. San Onofre PWR Data for Code Validation of MOX Fuel Depletion Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, O.W.

    1999-09-01

    The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide fuel (fabricated with both uranium and plutonium isotope) discharged from reactors is of interest to the Fissile Material Disposition Program. The validation of depletion codes used to predict isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to studies concerning uranium-only fueled reactors, thus, is very important. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program was conducted to examine the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit I, during cycles 2 and 3. The data usually required as input to depletion codes, either one-dimensional or lattice codes, were taken from various sources and compiled into this report. Where data were either lacking or determined inadequate, the appropriate data were supplied from other references. The scope of the reactor operations and design data, in addition to the isotopic analyses, were considered to be of sufficient quality for depletion code validation.

  20. San Onofre PWR Data for Code Validation of MOX Fuel Depletion Analyses -- Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, O.W.

    2000-03-16

    The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide fuel (fabricated with both uranium and plutonium isotopes) discharged from reactors is of interest to the Fissile Material Disposition Program. The validation of depletion codes used to predict isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to studies concerning uranium-only fueled reactors, thus, is very important. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program was conducted to examine the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit I, during cycles 2 and 3. The data, usually required as input to depletion codes, either one-dimensional or lattice codes, were taken from various sources and compiled into this report. Where data were either lacking or determined inadequate, the appropriate data were supplied from other references. The scope of the reactor operations and design data, in addition to the isotopic analyses, was considered to be of sufficient quality for depletion code validation.

  1. Preliminary evaluation of the transportation cost for PWR spent fuels in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is expected that a substantial amount of spent fuels will be transported from the four nuclear power plant sites in Korea to a hypothetical centralized interim storage facility or a final repository in the near future. The cost for the transportation is proportional to the amount of spent fuels. In this paper we established a cost estimate model based on the conceptual design of a transportation system and a logistics analysis. Using the developed model, the transportation cost for PWR spent fuels from the Yonggwang nuclear power plants to a centralized interim storage facility and a final repository was estimated. The result shows that the unit transportation cost is around 36 million won per one TU of spent fuel

  2. Application of the ballooning analysis code MATARE on a generic PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MATARE (MAbel-TAlink-RElap) code is a new multi-pin deformation analysis code created through the dynamic coupling between the thermal-hydraulic code RELAP5 and multiple instances of the single-pin thermal-mechanics code MABEL. A multi-pin representation of different zones of a typical PWR fuel assembly under post-LOCA reflooding conditions was analysed including some of the most relevant features that characterise a typical nuclear reactor fuel assembly and evaluate their effect on the behaviour of the fuel rods under conditions leading to clad ballooning. The code was able to simulate the deformation of wide regions of a fuel assembly under reflood conditions and has shown how differences in pin pressure and the presence of rod with burnable poisons and control rod guide thimbles also contribute to a substantial incoherent ballooning in agreement with the experimental data. (author)

  3. Nuclear criticality safety analysis for the traveller PWR fuel shipping package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vescovi, P.J.; Kent, N.A.; Casado, C.A. [Westinghouse Electric Co., LLC, Columbia, SC (United States)]|[ENUSA Industrias Avanzadas SA, Madrid (Spain)

    2004-07-01

    The Traveller PWR fresh fuel shipping package represents a radical departure from conventional PWR fuel package designs. Two immediately noticeable features of the Traveller are that it carries a single fuel assembly instead of two as do other package designs, and that it has built-in moderator, which forms part of the flux-trap system. The criticality safety case shows that the Traveller satisfies both U.S. and IAEA licensing requirements, and demonstrates that the package remains acceptably subcritical under normal conditions and hypothetical accident conditions of transport. This paper looks at the modeling techniques that were used to analyze the several accident scenarios that were considered, including: Lattice pitch expansion; Lattice pitch expansion along the fuel assembly length; Preferential flooding (selective flooding of different cavities); Differential flooding (varying water levels inside different cavities); Partial flooding (varying water density); Axial rod displacement; o Sensitivity studies of variable foam densities and boron content in packaging; Analysis for carrying loose rods in a rodbox; The criticality safety case for the Traveller proved to be a successful cooperative effort between ENUSA and Westinghouse.

  4. Nuclear criticality safety analysis for the traveller PWR fuel shipping package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Traveller PWR fresh fuel shipping package represents a radical departure from conventional PWR fuel package designs. Two immediately noticeable features of the Traveller are that it carries a single fuel assembly instead of two as do other package designs, and that it has built-in moderator, which forms part of the flux-trap system. The criticality safety case shows that the Traveller satisfies both U.S. and IAEA licensing requirements, and demonstrates that the package remains acceptably subcritical under normal conditions and hypothetical accident conditions of transport. This paper looks at the modeling techniques that were used to analyze the several accident scenarios that were considered, including: Lattice pitch expansion; Lattice pitch expansion along the fuel assembly length; Preferential flooding (selective flooding of different cavities); Differential flooding (varying water levels inside different cavities); Partial flooding (varying water density); Axial rod displacement; o Sensitivity studies of variable foam densities and boron content in packaging; Analysis for carrying loose rods in a rodbox; The criticality safety case for the Traveller proved to be a successful cooperative effort between ENUSA and Westinghouse

  5. Analysis of Fuel Temperature Reactivity Coefficients According to Burn-up and Pu-239 Production in CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonances for some kinds of nuclides such as U-238 and Pu-239 are not easy to be accurately processed. In addition, the Pu-239 productions from burnup are also significant in CANDU, where the natural uranium is used as a fuel. In this study, the FTCs were analyzed from the viewpoints of the resonance self-shielding methodology and Pu-239 build-up. The lattice burnup calculations were performed using the TRITON module in the SCALE6 code system, and the BONAMI module was executed to obtain self-shielded cross sections using the Bondarenko approach. Two libraries, ENDF/B-VI.8 and ENDF/B-VII.0, were used to compare the Pu-239 effect on FTC, since the ENDF/B-VII has updated the Pu-239 cross section data. The FTCs of the CANDU reactor were newly analyzed using the TRITON module in the SCALE6 code system, and the BONAMI module was executed to apply the Bondarenko approach for self-shielded cross sections. When compared with some reactor physics codes resulting in slightly positive FTC in the specific region, the FTCs evaluated in this study showed a clear negativity over the entire fuel temperature range on fresh/equilibrium fuel. In addition, the FTCs at 960.15 K were slightly negative during the entire burnup. The effects on FTCs from the library difference between ENDF/B-VI.8 and ENDF/B-VII.0 are recognized to not be large; however, they appear more positive when more Pu-239 productions with burnup are considered. This feasibility study needs an additional benchmark evaluation for FTC calculations, but it can be used as a reference for a new FTC analysis in CANDU reactors

  6. Applicability of the MCNP-ACAB system to inventory prediction in high-burnup fuels: sensitivity/uncertainty estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Herranz, N.; Cabellos, O. [Madrid Polytechnic Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering (Spain); Cabellos, O.; Sanz, J. [Madrid Polytechnic Univ., 2 Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (Spain); Sanz, J. [Univ. Nacional Educacion a Distancia, Dept. of Power Engineering, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    We present a new code system which combines the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C and the inventory code ACAB as a suitable tool for high burnup calculations. Our main goal is to show that the system, by means of ACAB capabilities, enables us to assess the impact of neutron cross section uncertainties on the inventory and other inventory-related responses in high burnup applications. The potential impact of nuclear data uncertainties on some response parameters may be large, but only very few codes exist which can treat this effect. In fact, some of the most reported effective code systems in dealing with high burnup problems, such as CASMO-4, MCODE and MONTEBURNS, lack this capability. As first step, the potential of our system, ruling out the uncertainty capability, has been compared with that of those code systems, using a well referenced high burnup pin-cell benchmark exercise. It is proved that the inclusion of ACAB in the system allows to obtain results at least as reliable as those obtained using other inventory codes, such as ORIGEN2. Later on, the uncertainty analysis methodology implemented in ACAB, including both the sensitivity-uncertainty method and the uncertainty analysis by the Monte Carlo technique, is applied to this benchmark problem. We estimate the errors due to activation cross section uncertainties in the prediction of the isotopic content up to the high-burnup spent fuel regime. The most relevant uncertainties are remarked, and some of the most contributing cross sections to those uncertainties are identified. For instance, the most critical reaction for Am{sup 242m} is Am{sup 241}(n,{gamma}-m). At 100 MWd/kg, the cross-section uncertainty of this reaction induces an error of 6.63% on the Am{sup 242m} concentration.The uncertainties in the inventory of fission products reach up to 30%.

  7. Pressure equalization system in PWR-fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pressure equalization system, developed on the basis of activated charcoal, is capable of reducing the internal pressure rise in fuel rods by adsorption of the fission gases. He-prepressure does not affect the system and Helium will not be adsorbed. Irradiation does not reduce the adsorption capacity of activated charcoal down to an unacceptable limit. Shaped activated charcoal is a suitable material which can be well defined and characterized. Feasible techniques of activating and assembling methods can be proposed. (orig.)

  8. Nondestructive testing of PWR type fuel rods by eddy currents and metrology in the OSIRIS reactor pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Saclay Reactor Department has developed a nondestructive test bench, now installed above channel 1 of the OSIRIS reactor. As part of investigations into the dynamics of PWR fuel degradation, a number of fuel rods underwent metrological and eddy current inspection, after irradiation

  9. Determination of Plutonium Contribution to the Total Burnup of a Spent Nuclear Fuel by Mass Spectrometric Measurements of Uranium and Ruthenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U and Ru isotope patterns provide information on the real irradiation characteristics which are necessary for evaluating a fuel's performance in a reactor. A comparison of the Pu contribution values determined independently provides a promising way to check on the validity of the results. In order to check the consistency of the post-irradiation analysis results, correlations between the parameters of the irradiated nuclear fuels such as the concentration of the heavy elements and fission products, ratios of their isotopes and burnup were established. These correlations can be used to identify the reactor fuels and to estimate the burnup and Pu production. A new approach was carried out with Ru isotopic ratio for the determination of Pu contribution to the total burnup of a spent nuclear fuel from a power reactor. The principle of this approach was based on the use of the difference in the fission yield ratios of the Ru fission products involved for the three main fissionable nuclides such as 235U, 239Pu, and 241Pu. In this work, to determine the contribution of Pu to the total burnup of the fuel, the following two independent methods have been applied: by measuring the isotope ratios of the stable Ru fission products 101Ru/104Ru, and by determining the total burnup by Nd-148 method and subtracting partial burnup, which is determined form the measured values of U isotope ratios

  10. Water reactor fuel element modelling at high burnup and its experimental support. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Technical Committee Meeting on Fuel Element Modelling at High Burnup and its Experimental Support was recommended by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT). Its subject had been touched on in many of the IAEA's activities; however for the first time modellers and experimentalists were brought together to have an exchange of views on the research under way and to identify areas where new knowledge is necessary to improve the safety, reliability and/or economics of nuclear fuel. The timely organization of this meeting in conjunction with the second meeting of the Co-ordinated Research Programme on Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup, in short ''FUMEX'', allowed fruitful participation of representatives of developing countries which are only rarely exposed to such a scientific event. The thirty-nine papers presented covered the status of codes and experimental facilities and the main phenomena affecting the fuel during irradiation, namely: thermal fuel performance, clad corrosion and pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) and fission gas release (FGR). Refs, figs, tabs

  11. Impacts of the use of spent nuclear fuel burnup credit on DOE advanced technology legal weight truck cask GA-4 fleet size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this paper is to study the impact of full and partial spent fuel burnup credit on the capacity of the Legal Weight Truck Spent Fuel Shipping Cask (GA-4) and to determine the numbers of additional spent fuel assemblies which could be accommodated as a result. The scope of the study comprised performing nuclear criticality safety scoping calculations using the SCALE-PC software package and the 1993 spent fuel database to determine logistics for number of spent fuel assemblies to be shipped. The results of the study indicate that more capacity than 2 or 3 pressurized water reactor assemblies could be gained for GA-4 casks when burnup credit is considered. Reduction in GA-4 fleet size and number of shipments are expected to result from the acceptance of spent fuel burnup credit

  12. Testing and analyses of the TN-24P PWR spent-fuel dry storage cask loaded with consolidated fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKinnon, M A; Michener, T E; Jensen, M F; Rodman, G R

    1989-02-01

    A performance test of a Transnuclear, Inc. TN-24P storage cask configured for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel was performed. The work was performed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and the Electric Power Research Institute. The performance test consisted of loading the TN-24P cask with 24 canisters of consolidated PWR spent fuel from Virginia Power's Surry and Florida Power and Light's Turkey Point reactors. Cask surface and fuel canister guide tube temperatures were measured, as were cask surface gamma and neutron dose rates. Testing was performed with vacuum, nitrogen, and helium backfill environments in both vertical and horizontal cask orientations. Transnuclear, Inc., arranged to have a partially insulated run added to the end of the test to simulate impact limiters. Limited spent fuel integrity data were also obtained. From both heat transfer and shielding perspectives, the TN-24P cask with minor refinements can be effectively implemented at reactor sites and central storage facilities for safe storage of unconsolidated and consolidated spent fuel. 35 refs., 93 figs., 17 tabs.

  13. Overview of the Vercors Programme Devoted to Safety Studies on Irradiated PWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first objective of the Heva-Vercors Program is to improve the data of fission product release and behaviour after an extensive fuel temperature increase and loss of integrity of the fuel elements that occur in case of severe PWR accident. The program is co-funded by the French Nuclear Protection and Safety Institute (IPSN) and Electricite de France (EDF). The experiments are conducted in a shielded cell of the French Grenoble Nuclear Centre. For these tests, industrial fuel from French PWR reactor plants is used. In order to rebuild the short lived fission product inventory, a reirradiation is performed in the experimental Siloe reactor, prior to the test. Eight tests have been conducted in the frame of the Heva Program up to 2370 K in the 1983-1988 period. The main outcomes of these studies were linked to the volatile fission product release. This program has been extended by the Vercors one with higher fuel temperature (2600 K) and improved instrumentation: gamma spectrometry, emission tomography, metallography, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction are some of the experimental techniques used for on line and post test characterization. The knowledge of the behavior of low volatile fission product has been significantly improved with the six Vercors tests. The results of the Vercors 4 test (38 GWd/t(U), 2570 K, reducing atmosphere) are presented here as an example. The key parameters are exhibited. The next step of these studies will use the Vercors HT loop that is planned to be operational at the beginning of 1996 to reach fuel melting temperature. The first aim of these future tests is to study the behaviour of non volatile and transuranic elements. An even more sophisticated instrumentation is implemented to reach the goal. The use of MOX fuel, the interaction between fission product aerosols and structural materials (Ag-In-Cd) and the fuel granulometry effect will be the next steps of the experimental program

  14. Single PWR spent fuel assembly heat transfer data for computer code evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The descriptions and results of two separate heat transfer tests designed to investigate the dry storage of commercial PWR spent fuel assemblies are presented. Presented first are descriptions and selected results from the Fuel Temperature Test performed at the Engine Maintenance and Disassembly facility on the Nevada Test Site. An actual spent fuel assembly from the Turkey Point Unit Number 3 Reactor with a decay heat level of 1.17 KW, was installed vertically in a test stand mounted canister/liner assembly. The boundary temperatures were controlled and the canister backfill gases were alternated between air, helium and vacuum to investigate the primary heat transfer mechanisms of convection, conduction and radiation. The assembly temperature profiles were experimentally measured using installed thermocouple instrumentation. Also presented are the results from the Single Assembly Heat Transfer Test designed and fabricated by Allied General Nuclear Services, under contract to the Department of Energy, and ultimately conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. For this test, an electrically heated 15 x 15 rod assembly was used to model a single PWR spent fuel assembly. The electrically heated model fuel assembly permitted various ''decay heat'', levels to be tested; 1.0 KW and 0.5 KW were used for these tests. The model fuel assembly was positioned within a prototypic fuel tube and in turn placed within a double-walled sealed cask. The complete test assembly could be positioned at any desired orientation (horizontal, vertical, and 250 from horizontal for the present work) and backfilled as desired (air, helium, or vacuum). Tests were run for all combinations of ''decay heat,'' backfill, and orientation. Boundary conditions were imposed by temperature controlled guard heaters installed on the cask exterior surface

  15. Calibration of burnup monitor installed in Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeda, Kaoru; Naito, Hirofumi; Hirota, Masanari [Japan Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd., Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Natsume, Koichiro [Isogo Engineering Center, Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Kumanomido, Hironori [Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant uses burnup credit for criticality control at the Spent Fuel Storage Facility (SFSF) and the Dissolution Facility. A burnup monitor measures nondestructively burnup value of a spent fuel assembly and guarantees the credit for burnup. For practical reasons, a standard radiation source is not used in calibration of the burnup monitor, but the burnup values of many spent fuel assemblies are measured based on operator-declared burnup values. This paper describes the concept of burnup credit, the burnup monitor, and the calibration method. It is concluded, from the results of calibration tests, that the calibration method is valid. (author)

  16. SCALE 5.1 Predictions of PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Isotopic Compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this calculation report is to document the comparison to measurement of the isotopic concentrations for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel determined with the Standardized Computer Analysis for Licensing Evaluation (SCALE) 5.1 (Ref. ) epletion calculation method. Specifically, the depletion computer code and the cross-section library being evaluated are the twodimensional (2-D) transport and depletion module, TRITON/NEWT,2, 3 and the 44GROUPNDF5 (Ref. 4) cross-section library, respectively, in the SCALE .1 code system.

  17. Dissolution experiments of commercial PWR (52 MWd/kgU) and BWR (53 MWd/kgU) spent nuclear fuel cladded segments in bicarbonate water under oxidizing conditions. Experimental determination of matrix and instant release fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Robles, E.; Serrano-Purroy, D.; Sureda, R.; Casas, I.; de Pablo, J.

    2015-10-01

    The denominated instant release fraction (IRF) is considered in performance assessment (PA) exercises to govern the dose that could arise from the repository. A conservative definition of IRF comprises the total inventory of radionuclides located in the gap, fractures, and the grain boundaries and, if present, in the high burn-up structure (HBS). The values calculated from this theoretical approach correspond to an upper limit that likely does not correspond to what it will be expected to be instantaneously released in the real system. Trying to ascertain this IRF from an experimental point of view, static leaching experiments have been carried out with two commercial UO2 spent nuclear fuels (SNF): one from a pressurized water reactor (PWR), labelled PWR, with an average burn-up (BU) of 52 MWd/kgU and fission gas release (FGR) of 23.1%, and one from a boiling water reactor (BWR), labelled BWR, with an average BU of and 53 MWd/kgU and FGR of 3.9%. One sample of each SNF, consisting of fuel and cladding, has been leached in bicarbonate water during one year under oxidizing conditions at room temperature (25 ± 5)°C. The behaviour of the concentration measured in solution can be divided in two according to the release rate. All radionuclides presented an initial release rate that after some days levels down to a slower second one, which remains constant until the end of the experiment. Cumulative fraction of inventory in aqueous phase (FIAPc) values has been calculated. Results show faster release in the case of the PWR SNF. In both cases Np, Pu, Am, Cm, Y, Tc, La and Nd dissolve congruently with U, while dissolution of Zr, Ru and Rh is slower. Rb, Sr, Cs and Mo, dissolve faster than U. The IRF of Cs at 10 and 200 days has been calculated, being (3.10 ± 0.62) and (3.66 ± 0.73) for PWR fuel, and (0.35 ± 0.07) and (0.51 ± 0.10) for BWR fuel.

  18. Theory of VVER-1000 fuel rearrangement optimization taking into account both fuel cladding durability and burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the VVER-1000 fuel element (FE) cladding failure estimation method based on creep energy theory (CET-method), it is shown that practically FE cladding rupture life at normal operation conditions can be controlled by an optimal assignment of fuel assembly (FA) rearrangement algorithm. The probabilistic FA rearrangement efficiency criterion based on Monte Carlo Sampling takes into account robust operation conditions and gives results corresponding to the deterministic ones in principle, though the robust efficiency estimation is more conservative. It is proved that CET-method allows us to create an automated complex controlling FE cladding durability in VVER-1000.

  19. Preliminary TRIGA fuel burn-up evaluation by means of Monte Carlo code and computation based on total energy released during reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of this work was to perform a rough preliminary evaluation of the burn-up of the fuel of TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the Applied Nuclear Energy Laboratory (LENA) of the Univ. of Pavia. In order to achieve this goal a computation of the neutron flux density in each fuel element was performed by means of Monte Carlo code MCNP (Version 4C). The results of the simulations were used to calculate the effective cross sections (fission and capture) inside fuel and, at the end, to evaluate the burn-up and the uranium consumption in each fuel element. The evaluation, showed a fair agreement with the computation for fuel burn-up based on the total energy released during reactor operation. (authors)

  20. Modeling of the PWR fuel mechanical behaviour and particularly study of the pellet-cladding interaction in a fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) power plants, fuel cladding constitutes the first containment barrier against radioactive contamination. Computer codes, developed with the help of a large experimental knowledge, try to predict cladding failures which must be limited in order to maintain a maximal safety level. Until now, fuel rod design calculus with unidimensional codes were adequate to prevent cladding failures in standard PWR's operating conditions. But now, the need of nuclear power plant availability increases. That leads to more constraining operating condition in which cladding failures are strongly influenced by the fuel rod mechanical behaviour, mainly at high power level. Then, the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) becomes important, and is characterized by local effects which description expects a multidimensional modelization. This is the aim of the TOUTATIS 2D-3D code, that this thesis contributes to develop. This code allows to predict non-axisymmetric behaviour too, as rod buckling which has been observed in some irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS. By another way, PCI is influenced by under irradiation experiments and identified with the help of TOUTATIS which includes a densification model and a swelling model. The latter can only be used in standard operating conditions. However, the processing structure of this modulus provides the possibility to include any type of model corresponding with other operating conditions. In last, we show the result of these fuel volume variations on the cladding mechanical conditions. (author). 25 refs., 89 figs., 2 tabs., 12 photos., 5 appends

  1. Development of a method for xenon determination in the microstructure of high burn-up nuclear fuel[Dissertation 17527

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, M. I

    2008-07-01

    In nuclear fuel, in approximately one quarter of the fissions, one of the two formed fission products is gaseous. These are mainly the noble gases xenon and krypton with isotopes of xenon contributing up to 90% of the product gases. These noble fission gases do not combine with other species, and have a low solubility in the normally used uranium oxide matrix. They can be dissolved in the fuel matrix or precipitate in nanometer-sized bubbles within the fuel grain, in micrometer-sized bubbles at the grain boundaries, and a fraction also precipitates in fuel pores, coming from fuel fabrication. A fraction of the gas can also be released into the plenum of the fuel rod. With increasing fission, and therefore burn-up, the ceramic fuel material experiences a transformation of its structure in the 'cooler' rim region of the fuel. A subdivision occurs of the original fuel grains of few microns size into thousands of small grains of sub-micron sizes. Additionally, larger pores are formed, which also leads into an increasing porosity in the fuel rim, called high burn-up structure. In this structure, only a small fraction of the fission gas remains in the matrix, the major quantity is said to accumulate in these pores. Because of this accumulation, the knowledge of the quantities of gas within these pores is of major interest in consideration to burn-up, fuel performance and especially for safety issues. In case of design based accidents, i.e. rapidly increasing temperature transients, the behavior of the fuel has to be estimated. Various analytical techniques have been used to determine the Xe concentration in nuclear fuel samples. The capabilities of EPMA (Electron Probe Micro-Analyser) and SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) have been studied and provided some qualitative information, which has been used for determining Xe-matrix concentrations. First approaches combining these two techniques to estimate pore pressures have been recently reported. However

  2. Solvent extraction studies with high-burnup Fast Flux Test Facility fuel in the Solvent Extraction Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benker, D.E.; Bigelow, J.E.; Bond, W.D.; Chattin, F.R.; King, L.J.; Kitts, F.G.; Ross, R.G.; Stacy, R.G.

    1986-10-01

    A batch of high-burnup fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was processed in the Solvent Extraction Test Facility (SETF) during Campaign 9. The fuel had a burnup of {similar_to}0 MWd/kg and a cooling time of {similar_to} year. Two runs were made with this fuel; in the first, the solvent contained 30% tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) and partitioning of the uranium and plutonium was effected by reducing the plutonium with hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN); in the second, the solvent contained 10% TBP and a low operating temperature was used in an attempt to partition without reducing the plutonium valence. The plutonium reoxidation problem, which was present in previous runs that used HAN, may have been solved by lowering the temperature and acidity in the partition contactor. An automatic control system was used to maintain high loadings of heavy metals in the coextraction-coscrub contactor in order to increase its efficiency while maintaining low losses of uranium and plutonium to the aqueous raffinate. An in-line photometer system was used to measure the plutonium concentration in an intermediate extraction stage; and based on this data, a computer algorithm determined the appropriate adjustments in the addition rate of the extractant. The control system was successfully demonstrated in a preliminary run with purified uranium. However, a variety of equipment and start up problems prevented an extended demonstration from being accomplished during the runs with the FFTF fuel.

  3. Evaluation of Physical Characteristics of PWR Cores with Accident Tolerant Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); In, Wang Kee [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The accident tolerant fuels (ATF) considered in this work includes metallic microcell UO{sub 2} pellets and outer Cr-based alloy coating on cladding, which is being developed in KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute). Chromium metals have been used in many fields because of its hardness and corrosion-resistance. The use of the chromium metal in nuclear fuel rod can enhance the conductivity of pellets and corrosion-resistance of cladding. The objective of this work is to study the neutronic performances and characteristics of the commercial PWR core loaded the ATF-bearing assemblies. In this work, we studied the PWR cores which are loaded with ATF assemblies to improve the safety of reactor core. The ATF rod consists of the metallic microcell UO2 pellet which includes chromium of 3.34 wt% and the outer 0.05mm thick coating of Cr-based alloy with atomic number ratio of 85:15. We performed the cycle-by-cycle reload core analysis from the cycle 8 at which the ATF fuel assemblies start to be loaded into the core. The target nuclear power plant is the Hanbit-3 nuclear power plant. From the analysis, it was found that 1) the uranium enrichment is required to be increased up to 5.20/4.70 wt% in order to satisfy a required cycle length of 480 EFPDs, 2) the cycle length for the core using ATF fuel assemblies with the same uranium enrichments as those in the reference UO{sub 2} fueled core is decreased from 480 EFPDs to 430 EFPDs.

  4. Demonstration Test Program for Long-Term Dry Storage of PWR Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, interim storage in multipurpose dry metal casks for maximum 50 years is planned for management of spent fuel until reprocessing. In the interim storage, cladding integrity of spent fuel will be maintained and safety of transportation will be ensured after the storage based on the knowledge and experience concerning integrity of spent fuel during dry storage in Japan and overseas. To ensure safety of transportation after storage, some of Japanese electric companies (The Japan Atomic Power Company, The Kansai Electric Company and Kyusyu Electric Company (hereinafter called “the utilities”)) are planning to conduct a long-term storage test of PWR spent fuel assemblies, which have not been used for dry storage in Japan, in the similar environment to actual casks and to confirm maintenance of the spent fuel integrity. In this test, the utilities plan to install a compact test container in the research facility, store one or two spent fuel assemblies in inert atmosphere for up to 60 years. Also, they plan to analyze the internal gas periodically and confirm the fuel cladding integrity. This document introduces the backgrounds, the overall test plan and designing of the test container. (author)

  5. Conceptual Core Analysis of Long Life PWR Utilizing Thorium-Uranium Fuel Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouf; Su'ud, Zaki

    2016-08-01

    Conceptual core analysis of long life PWR utilizing thorium-uranium based fuel has conducted. The purpose of this study is to evaluate neutronic behavior of reactor core using combined thorium and enriched uranium fuel. Based on this fuel composition, reactor core have higher conversion ratio rather than conventional fuel which could give longer operation length. This simulation performed using SRAC Code System based on library SRACLIB-JDL32. The calculation carried out for (Th-U)O2 and (Th-U)C fuel with uranium composition 30 - 40% and gadolinium (Gd2O3) as burnable poison 0,0125%. The fuel composition adjusted to obtain burn up length 10 - 15 years under thermal power 600 - 1000 MWt. The key properties such as uranium enrichment, fuel volume fraction, percentage of uranium are evaluated. Core calculation on this study adopted R-Z geometry divided by 3 region, each region have different uranium enrichment. The result show multiplication factor every burn up step for 15 years operation length, power distribution behavior, power peaking factor, and conversion ratio. The optimum core design achieved when thermal power 600 MWt, percentage of uranium 35%, U-235 enrichment 11 - 13%, with 14 years operation length, axial and radial power peaking factor about 1.5 and 1.2 respectively.

  6. PWR-FBR with closed fuel cycle for a sustainable nuclear energy supply in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Mi

    2007-01-01

    From the thermal reactor to the fast reactor and then to the fusion reactor; this is the three-step strategy that has been decided for a sustainable nuclear energy supply in China. As the main thermal reactor type, the commercialized development phase of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) has been stepped up. The development of the fast reactor (FBR) is still in the early stage, marked by China experimental fast reactor (CEFR), which is currently under construction. According to the strategy study on the fast reactor development in China, its engineering development will be divided into three steps: the CEFR with a power of 65 MWt 20 Mwe; the China prototype fast reactor (CPFR) with a power of 1 500 MWt/600 Mwe; and the China demonstration fast reactor (CDFR) with a power of 2 500-3 750 MWt 1 000-1 500 Mwe. With regards to the fuel cycle, a 100 ta PWR spent fuel reprocessing pilot plant and a 500 kg/a MOX fabrication plant are under construction. A project involving the construction of an industrial reprocessing plant and an MOX fabrication plant are also under application phase.

  7. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIA: Criticality calculations of BWR spent fuel assemblies in storage and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ando, Yoshihira [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    The report describes the final results of Phase IIIA Benchmarks conducted by the Burnup Credit Criticality Calculation Working Group under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The benchmarks are intended to confirm the predictive capability of the current computer code and data library combinations for the neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of a layer of irradiated BWR fuel assembly array model. In total 22 benchmark problems are proposed for calculations of k{sub eff}. The effects of following parameters are investigated: cooling time, inclusion/exclusion of FP nuclides and axial burnup profile, and inclusion of axial profile of void fraction or constant void fractions during burnup. Axial profiles of fractional fission rates are further requested for five cases out of the 22 problems. Twenty-one sets of results are presented, contributed by 17 institutes from 9 countries. The relative dispersion of k{sub eff} values calculated by the participants from the mean value is almost within the band of {+-}1%{delta}k/k. The deviations from the averaged calculated fission rate profiles are found to be within {+-}5% for most cases. (author)

  8. Spent Fuel Behaviour During Interim Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: Review of spent fuel data relevant for future storage in Spain Perform destructive and non-destructive examinations on irradiated and non-irradiated fuel rods relevant to Spanish spent fuel management. Research approach: Among the programmes initiated in the last years (finished or about to be finished) one may highlight the following ones: • Isotopic measurements on high burnup fuels: up to 75 GW·d·t(U)-1 PWR and 53 GW·d·t(U)-1 BWR peak values; • Mechanical tests on high burnup PWR (ZIRLO) cladding and BWR (Zry-2) cladding samples; • Mechanical tests on unirradiated ZIRLO rods. Influence of hydrides content; • Modelling of mechanical tests with unirradiated claddings; • Interim storage creep modelling; • Burnup measurement equipment; • Fuel database

  9. Parametric study on parallel flow induced damping of PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a mechanism of parallel flow-induced changes in vibrational characteristics of PWR fuel assemblies that has been studied through a series of hydraulic tests using reduced-and full-scale prototype mockups. Measured data and analytical evaluations showed the phenomenon stands on essentially the same basis as the dynamics and stability of flexible cylinders subjected to a parallel flow. In the mathematical model, the effects of rod bundle geometries and boundaries formed by walls or adjacent bundles can be exactly incorporated in the form of added mass coefficients, velocity coupling coefficients and other fluid forces. From a full scale test, it has been shown that coolant temperature has little effect up to reactor operating conditions. The updated FEM model has been verified to be applicable in describing the vibrational characteristics of from an isolated cylinder to a full scale fuel assembly in terms of the consistent properties

  10. Validation of gadolinium burnout using PWR benchmark specification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oettingen, Mikołaj, E-mail: moettin@agh.edu.pl; Cetnar, Jerzy, E-mail: cetnar@mail.ftj.agh.edu.pl

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We present methodology for validation of gadolinium burnout in PWR. • We model 17 × 17 PWR fuel assembly using MCB code. • We demonstrate C/E ratios of measured and calculated concentrations of Gd isotopes. • The C/E for Gd154, Gd156, Gd157, Gd158 and Gd160 shows good agreement of ±10%. • The C/E for Gd152 and Gd155 shows poor agreement below ±10%. - Abstract: The paper presents comparative analysis of measured and calculated concentrations of gadolinium isotopes in spent nuclear fuel from the Japanese Ohi-2 PWR. The irradiation of the 17 × 17 fuel assembly containing pure uranium and gadolinia bearing fuel pins was numerically reconstructed using the Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code – MCB. The reference concentrations of gadolinium isotopes were measured in early 1990s at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. It seems that the measured concentrations were never used for validation of gadolinium burnout. In our study we fill this gap and assess quality of both: applied numerical methodology and experimental data. Additionally we show time evolutions of infinite neutron multiplication factor K{sub inf}, FIMA burnup, U235 and Gd155–Gd158. Gadolinium-based materials are commonly used in thermal reactors as burnable absorbers due to large neutron absorption cross-section of Gd155 and Gd157.

  11. Validation of gadolinium burnout using PWR benchmark specification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We present methodology for validation of gadolinium burnout in PWR. • We model 17 × 17 PWR fuel assembly using MCB code. • We demonstrate C/E ratios of measured and calculated concentrations of Gd isotopes. • The C/E for Gd154, Gd156, Gd157, Gd158 and Gd160 shows good agreement of ±10%. • The C/E for Gd152 and Gd155 shows poor agreement below ±10%. - Abstract: The paper presents comparative analysis of measured and calculated concentrations of gadolinium isotopes in spent nuclear fuel from the Japanese Ohi-2 PWR. The irradiation of the 17 × 17 fuel assembly containing pure uranium and gadolinia bearing fuel pins was numerically reconstructed using the Monte Carlo Continuous Energy Burnup Code – MCB. The reference concentrations of gadolinium isotopes were measured in early 1990s at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. It seems that the measured concentrations were never used for validation of gadolinium burnout. In our study we fill this gap and assess quality of both: applied numerical methodology and experimental data. Additionally we show time evolutions of infinite neutron multiplication factor Kinf, FIMA burnup, U235 and Gd155–Gd158. Gadolinium-based materials are commonly used in thermal reactors as burnable absorbers due to large neutron absorption cross-section of Gd155 and Gd157

  12. Water-side oxide layer thickness measurement of the irradiated PWR fuel rod by NDT method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been known that water-side corrosion of fuel rods in nuclear reactor is accompanied with the loss of metallic wall thickness and pickup of hydrogen. This corrosion is one of the important limiting factors in the operating life of fuel rods. In connection with the fuel cladding corrosion, a device to measure the water-side oxide layer thickness by means of the eddy-current method without destructing the fuel rod was developed by KAERI. The device was installed on the multi-function testing bench in the nondestructive test hot-cell and its calibration was carried out successfully for the standard rod attached with plastic thin films whose thicknesses are predetermined. It shows good precision within about 10% error. And a PWR fuel rod, one of the J-44 assembly discharged from Kori nuclear power plant Unit-2, has been selected for oxide layer thickness measurements. With the result of data analysis, it appeared that the oxide layer thicknesses of Zircaloy cladding vary with the length of the fuel rod, and their thicknesses were compared with those of the destructive test results to confirm the real thicknesses

  13. Experimental Fission Gas Release Determination at High Burnup by Means of Gamma Measurements on Fuel Rods in OL2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the results from the gamma measurements performed on a selection of fuel rods from two SVEA-96 Optima fuel assemblies in Olkiluoto unit 2 (OL2) during February 2008. The measurements were funded by Teollisuuden Voima Oyj (TVO) and carried out by Westinghouse Electric Sweden AB (WSE). The goal of the measurements was to obtain plant specific fission gas release data from OL2 which will later be used to support TVO's burnup increase. The measurements were performed by means of detecting and recording information on gamma rays emanating from radioactive fission products within the fuel rods. A fuel assembly under operation in the reactor will be subject to fission gas release, meaning that gaseous fission products in the fuel matrix will leak out into the fuel rod free volumes, including the upper fuel rod plenum. The magnitude of fission gas release is closely related to the operation conditions, such as burnup and the pellet power/temperature history. Fission gas which is released into the plenum leads to an increased pressure within the fuel rod. Since the gas plenum is a volume free of fuel pellets, radioactive gases present here are therefore relatively easy to measure. A suitable gaseous radioactive fission product is 85Kr which has a gamma energy of 514 keV, and a half life of 10.8 years. Measuring the amount of 85Kr can then be used to quantify the amount of fission gases release during operation. Other sources of gamma rays in the plenum with similar energies are the β+-emitting 58Co and the 106Ru. The half lives of 58Co and 106Ru are 71 days and 372 days, respectively, with corresponding gamma ray energies of 511 keV and 512 keV, respectively. In total, three different gamma rays with similar energies must be resolved by the detector system. In order to perform the measurements, 58Co must have decayed to an extent that allows the 514 keV line to be resolved from the 511 keV positron annihilation gamma ray. The 106Ru is, on the other

  14. Burn-up calculation of different thorium-based fuel matrixes in a thermal research reactor using MCNPX 2.6 code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamzadeh Zohreh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Decrease of the economically accessible uranium resources and the inherent proliferation resistance of thorium fuel motivate its application in nuclear power systems. Estimation of the nuclear reactor’s neutronic parameters during different operational situations is of key importance for the safe operation of nuclear reactors. In the present research, thorium oxide fuel burn-up calculations for a demonstrative model of a heavy water- -cooled reactor have been performed using MCNPX 2.6 code. Neutronic parameters for three different thorium fuel matrices loaded separately in the modelled thermal core have been investigated. 233U, 235U and 239Pu isotopes have been used as fissile element in the thorium oxide fuel, separately. Burn-up of three different fuels has been calculated at 1 MW constant power. 135X and 149Sm concentration variations have been studied in the modelled core during 165 days burn-up. Burn-up of thorium oxide enriched with 233U resulted in the least 149Sm and 135Xe productions and net fissile production of 233U after 165 days. The negative fuel, coolant and void reactivity of the used fuel assures safe operation of the modelled thermal core containing (233U-Th O2 matrix. Furthermore, utilisation of thorium breeder fuel demonstrates several advantages, such as good neutronic economy, 233U production and less production of long-lived α emitter high radiotoxic wastes in biological internal exposure point of view

  15. Impacts of burnup-dependent swelling of metallic fuel on the performance of a compact breed-and-burn fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartanto, Donny; Heo, Woong; Kim, Chi Hyung; Kim, Yong Hee [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The U-Zr or U-TRU-Zr cylindrical metallic fuel slug used in fast reactors is known to swell significantly and to grow during irradiation. In neutronics simulations of metallic-fueled fast reactors, it is assumed that the slug has swollen and contacted cladding, and the bonding sodium has been removed from the fuel region. In this research, a realistic burnup-dependent fuel-swelling simulation was performed using Monte Carlo code McCARD for a single-batch compact sodium-cooled breed-and-burn reactor by considering the fuel-swelling behavior reported from the irradiation test results in EBR-II. The impacts of the realistic burnup-dependent fuel swelling are identified in terms of the reactor neutronics performance, such as core lifetime, conversion ratio, axial power distribution, and local burnup distributions. It was found that axial fuel growth significantly deteriorated the neutron economy of a breed-and-burn reactor and consequently impaired its neutronics performance. The bonding sodium also impaired neutron economy, because it stayed longer in the blanket region until the fuel slug reached 2% burnup.

  16. Recent Progress on the DUPIC Fuel Fabrication Technology at KAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung-Won Lee; Ho-Jin Ryu; Geun-Il Park; Kee-Chan Song [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-ku, Daejeon, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-01

    Since 1991, KAERI has been developing the DUPIC fuel cycle technology. The concept of a direct use of spent PWR fuel in Candu reactors (DUPIC) is based on a dry processing method to re-fabricate Candu fuel from spent PWR fuel without any intentional separation of the fissile materials and fission products. A DUPIC fuel pellet was successfully fabricated and the DUPIC fuel element fabrication processes were qualified on the basis of a Quality Assurance program. Consequently, the DUPIC fuel fabrication technology was verified and demonstrated on a laboratory-scale. Recently, the fuel discharge burn-up of PWRs has been extended to reduce the amount of spent fuel and the fuel cycle costs. Considering this trend of extending the fuel burn-up in PWRs, the DUPIC fuel fabrication technology should be improved to process high burn-up spent fuels. Particularly the release behavior of cesium from the pellet prepared with a high burn-up spent fuel was assessed. an improved DUPIC fuel fabrication technology was experimentally established with a fuel burn-up of 65,000 MWd/tU. (authors)

  17. Fuel cycle cost, reactor physics and fuel manufacturing considerations for Erbia-bearing PWR fuel with > 5 wt% U-235 content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efforts to reduce fuel cycle cost have driven LWR fuel close to the licensed limit in fuel fissile content, 5.0 wt% U-235 enrichment, and the acceptable duty on current Zr-based cladding. An increase in the fuel enrichment beyond the 5 wt% limit, while certainly possible, entails costly investment in infrastructure and licensing. As a possible way to offset some of these costs, the addition of small amounts of Erbia to the UO2 powder with >5 wt% U-235 has been proposed, so that its initial reactivity is reduced to that of licensed fuel and most modifications to the existing facilities and equipment could be avoided. This paper discusses the potentialities of such a fuel on the US market from a vendor's perspective. An analysis of the in-core behavior and fuel cycle performance of a typical 4-loop PWR with 18 and 24-month operating cycles has been conducted, with the aim of quantifying the potential economic advantage and other operational benefits of this concept. Subsequently, the implications on fuel manufacturing and storage are discussed. While this concept has certainly good potential, a compelling case for its short-term introduction as PWR fuel for the US market could not be determined. (authors)

  18. Fission Gas Release in LWR Fuel Rods Exhibiting Very High Burn-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, H.

    1980-01-01

    uses an empirical gas release model combined with a strongly burn-up dependent correction term, developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The paper presents the experimental results and the code calculations. It is concluded that the model predictions are in reasonable agreement (within 15...

  19. Cogema and the nuclear fuel. A clue role in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present issue of 'Les Cahiers de COGEMAGAZINE' addresses the topics of nuclear fuel production especially for PWR and Breeder Reactors. The papers deal with: the sketchy history of French nuclear industry, the economy and fuel marketing, the situation of the PWR programme, the fuels for breeder and research reactors. In the end prospective and concluding considerations are given. The most significant lines of progress related to the new fuels are estimated to be: high burn-up (by increasing the resistance to fission gas pressure and irradiation), improvement of response to power excursions, fuel matrices of stronger retention, increase in the plutonium content of MOF, 100% MOF-fuelled reactors, optimizing the utilization of consumable poisons (for PWR) and very high burn-up and very long service lifetimes (for breeders)

  20. A quantitative comparison of loading pattern optimization methods for in-core fuel management of PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of several loading pattern(LP) optimization methods was quantitatively compared through a benchmark problem of PWR LP optimization. The simulated annealing(SA) method, the genetic algorithms(GA) method, the direct search(DS) method based on assembly multiple shuffling and the binary exchange(BE) method based on fuel assembly binary exchange were investigated as candidates for the optimization techniques. Hybrid strategy which combined different optimization methods was newly proposed, and the performances of two different new hybrid methods, which combined DS with BE and GA with BE were examined. From the results of the LP optimization benchmark problem, the superiority and inferiority of each method were clarified. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the GA+BE hybrid strategy performed best among these methods. By combining GA with BE, the weaknesses of these two methods were compensated for with each other and the optimization performance was improved significantly. Therefore, the GA+BE hybrid method is quite effective for the LP optimization problems of PWR. (author)

  1. The high burn-up restructuring of fuel, the so called rim effect: a consideration of its impact on steady-state and transient behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report sets out to investigate our current understanding on the occurrence, properties and effect of restructured fuel material as observed in the pellet rim of high burn-up fuel. It appears that restructuring occurs solely as a function of burn-up and temperature. In this case, the driving force is likely to be the accumulation of irradiation damage and fission products. There are differing theories for which of these dominate the transformation, although the conditions for HBS formation are well established. The major part of the report addressed the influence this HBS has on fuel performance and to this end a simple model for the restructuring thickness and local swelling was inserted into a code to calculate fuel temperatures and Fission Gas Release. By running this code for three Halden experiments it was shown that inclusion of a rim had a measurable effect on both centreline temperatures and FGR. The calculations have shown that the effect of the HBS increases FGR by around 30% or 10% depending on the assumption made as to the HBS matrix thermal conductivity. From an appraisal of several experiments, it is proposed that fuel immediately prior to restructuring has the most influence on PCMI and fuel dispersal in high burn-up RIA. It is suggested that in the forthcoming IFA-655 test, the transient behaviours of fuel at less than the maximum burn-up of 100 MWd/kg is investigated. (Author)

  2. Diametral strain of fast reactor MOX fuel pins with austenitic stainless steel cladding irradiated to high burnup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Ito, Masahiro; Maeda, Koji

    2011-09-01

    The C3M irradiation test, which was conducted in the experimental fast reactor, "Joyo", demonstrated that mixed oxide (MOX) fuel pins with austenitic steel cladding could attain a peak pellet burnup of about 130 GWd/t safely. The test fuel assembly consisted of 61 fuel pins, whose design specifications were similar to those of driver fuel pins of a prototype fast breeder reactor, "Monju". The irradiated fuel pins exhibited diametral strain due to cladding void swelling and irradiation creep. The cladding irradiation creep strain were due to the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI) as well as the internal gas pressure. From the fuel pin ceramographs and 137Cs gamma scanning, it was found that the PCMI was associated with the pellet swelling which was enhanced by the rim structure formation or by cesium uranate formation. The PCMI due to cesium uranate, which occurred near the top of the MOX fuel column, significantly affected cladding hoop stress and thermal creep, and the latter effect tended to increase the cumulative damage fraction (CDF) of the cladding though the CDF indicated that the cladding still had some margin to failure due to the creep damage.

  3. Fission gas release from high burnup ThO2 and ThO2-UO2 fuels irradiated at low temperature. (LWBR/AWBA development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission gas release data are presented for five fuel rods irradiated at low fuel temperature (below 27000F) with burnups up to 90,000 MWD/MTM. Four of these rods contained ThO2-UO2 (33.6 weight percent UO2) fuel pellets; the fifth rod contained ThO2 pellets. These data supplement fission gas release information previously reported for 54 rods containing ThO2-UO2 and ThO2 fuel, some of which experienced fuel temperaures up to 50000F and burnups to 56,000 MWD/MTM. These new data suggest that at burnups exceeding about 80,000 MWD/MTM a sharp increase in fission gas release occurs, possibly caused by microstructural changes in the fuel. This is similar to the behavior of UO2 except that the increase occurs in UO2 at lower burnup (approximately 40,000 MWD/MTM). The fission gas release calculational model previously reported has been modified to account for the observed increase in the low temperature component. The revised model provides a good best estimate of all the fission gas release data

  4. Verification of spectral burn-up codes on 2D fuel assemblies of the GFR demonstrator ALLEGRO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Čerba, Štefan, E-mail: stefan.cerba@stuba.sk [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Vrban, Branislav; Lüley, Jakub [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Dařílek, Petr [VUJE a.s., Okružná 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Zajac, Radoslav, E-mail: radoslav.zajac@vuje.sk [VUJE a.s., Okružná 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Nečas, Vladimír; Haščik, Ján [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Verification of the MCNPX, HELIOS and SCALE codes. • MOX and ceramic fuel assembly. • Gas-cooled fast reactor. • Burnup calculation. - Abstract: The gas-cooled fast reactor, which is one of the six GEN IV reactor concepts, is characterized by high operational temperatures and a hard neutron spectrum. The utilization of commonly used spectral codes, developed mainly for LWR reactors operated in the thermal/epithermal neutron spectrum, may be connected with systematic deviations since the main development effort of these codes has been focused on the thermal part of the neutron spectrum. To be able to carry out proper calculations for fast systems the used codes have to account for neutron resonances including the self-shielding effect. The presented study aims at verifying the spectral HELIOS, MCNPX and SCALE codes on the basis of depletion calculations of 2D MOX and ceramic fuel assemblies of the ALLEGRO gas-cooled fast reactor demonstrator in infinite lattice.

  5. Investigation of the nuclear inventories of high-exposure PWR mixed-oxide fuels with multiple recycling of self-generated plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the use of the Joint Evaluated File (JEF-1) with the KARBUS burnup code system and subsequent KORIGEN code calculations, the characteristics of spent pressurized water reactor mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels are analyzed. Actinide masses, decay heat, radioactivities, and radiation are discussed for burnups of 40 to 55 GWd/ton HM for MOX fuels based on natural uranium and on uranium tailings. Multiple plutonium recycling is considered at a burnup of 50 GWd/ton HM. The results are compared with earlier data at a burnup of 33 GWd/ton HM. The high-exposure MOX fuels are found to contain large amounts of the heat-releasing and radiating nuclides, 238Pu and 244Cm. The 238Pu in the plutonium, which is to be used for the fabrication of fuel elements from recycled MOX, requires special shielding or a change from glove box techniques to an automated treatment

  6. Application of the RTOP-CA code for analysis of MIR-reactor high burnup experiments and activity release from WWER fuel of new generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the RTOP-CA code calculations for experiments in the research MIR reactor are presented. The MIR-reactor tests were made to study the activity release from defective WWER fuel at high burnup (∼60 MWd/kgU). The RTOP-CA calculations are compared to experimental data on radial distributions of burnup as well as radial profiles of Pu and Xe concentrations in fuel pellets. The RTOP-CA predictions are also compared to the data on activity release (radionuclides of I, Cs, Xe and Kr) from the test fuel rod with an artificial defect in cladding. Additional calculations were performed for WWER-1000 fuel of an advanced design. In these calculation series the effect of design innovations on activity release from defective fuel rods was estimated. It is demonstrated that in case of a failure the new generation of WWER fuel shows lower levels of activity release into primary coolant. (authors)

  7. The impact of burn-up credit in criticality studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays optimization goes with everything. So French engineering firms try to demonstrate that fuel transport casks and storage pools are able to receive assemblies with higher 235U initial enrichments. Fuel Burnup distribution contributes to demonstrate it. This instruction has to elaborate a way to take credit of burnup effects on criticality safety designs. The calculation codes used are CESAR 4.21-APOLLO 1-MORET III. The assembly studied (UO2) is irradiated in a French Pressurized Water Reactor like EDF nuclear power reactor: PWR 1300 MWe, 17 x 17 array. Its initial enrichment in 235U equals 4.5%. The studies exposed in this report have evaluated the effects of: i) the 15 fission products considered in Burnup Credit (95Mo, 99Tc, 101Ru, 103Rh, 109Ag, 133Cs, 143Nd, 145Nd, 147Sm, 149Sm, 150Sm, 151Sm, 152Sm, 153Eu, 155Gd), ii) the calculated abundances corrected or not by fixed factors, iii) the choice of one cross sections library used by CESAR 4.21, iu) the zone number elected in the axial burnup distribution zoning, u) the kind of cut applied on (regular/optimized). Two axial distribution profiles are studied: one with 44 GWd/t average burnup, the other with 20 GWd/t average burnup. The second one considers a shallow control rods insertion in the upper limit of the assembly. The results show a margin in reactivity about 0.045 with consideration of the 6 most absorbent fission products (103Rh, 133Cs, 143Nd, 149Sm, 152Sm, 155Gd), and about 0.06 for all Burnup Credit fission products whole. Those results have been calculated with an average burnup of 44 GWj/t. In a conservative approach, corrective factors must be apply on the abundance of some fission products. The cross sections library used by CESAR 4.21 (BBL 4) is sufficient and gives satisfactory results. The zoning of the assembly axial distribution burnup in 9 regular zones grants a satisfying calculation time/result precision compromise. (author)

  8. Temperature escalation in PWR fuel rod simulators due to the zircaloy/steam reaction: Tests ESSI-1,2,3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the test conduct, results, and posttest appearance of three scoping tests (ESSI-1,2,3) investigating temperature escalation in zircaloy clad fuel rods. The experiments are part of an out-of-pile program using electrically heated fuel rod simulators to investigate PWR fuel element behavior up to temperatures of 20000C. These experiments are part of the PNS Severe Fuel Damage Program. The temperature escalation is caused by the exothermal zircaloy/steam reaction, whose reaction rate increases exponentially with the temperature. The tests were performed using different initial oxide layers as a major parameter, obtained by varying the heatup rates and steam exposure times. (orig./RW)

  9. Uranium resource utilization improvements in the once-through PWR fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In support of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), Combustion Engineering, Inc. performed a comprehensive analytical study of potential uranium utilization improvement options that can be backfit into existing PWRs operating on the once-through uranium fuel cycle. A large number of potential improvement options were examined as part of a preliminary survey of candidate options. The most attractive of these, from the standpoint of uranium utilization improvement, economic viability, and ease of implementation, were then selected for detailed analysis and were included in a single composite improvement case. This composite case represents an estimate of the total savings in U3O8 consumption that can be achieved in current-design PWRs by implementing improvements which can be developed and demonstrated in the near term. The improvement options which were evaluated in detail and included in the composite case were a new five-batch, extended-burnup fuel management scheme, low-leakage fuel management, modified lattice designs, axial blankets, reinsertion of initial core batches, and end-of-cycle stretchout

  10. Considerations on burn-up dependent RIA and LOCA criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For RIA transients, a fuel failure threshold has been derived and compared with recent experimental data relevant for BWR and PWR fuel. The threshold can be applied to HZP and CZP transients, account taken for the different initial enthalpy and for the lower ductility at cold conditions. It can also be used for non-zero power transients, provided that a term accounting for the initial power is incorporated. The proposed threshold predicts reasonably well the results obtained in the CABRI and NSRR tests when the different state of the cladding, i.e. ductile or brittle, is taken into account. Apart from some exceptions discussed in the paper, such as the effect of oxide spalling, one should consider ductile state for HZP conditions and brittle state for CZP conditions. The threshold applies equally well to UO2 and MOX fuel, but the database on MOX is limited. For LOCA transients, the cladding limit may decrease with burn-up due to cladding corrosion and hydrogen pick-up. A provisional criterion shows that the predicted burn-up effect is moderate or negligible if one uses the results obtained with actual high burn-up cladding. On the other hand, a large effect is predicted based on the results obtained with non-irradiated, pre-hydrided cladding specimens. There is a question however on as to whether these specimens can be representative for high burn-up material. The experimental evidence is still scarce and more data on high burn-up cladding is needed in order to arrive to firm conclusions. Most of the data currently available relates to Zr-4 cladding. The experiments made on ZIRLO and M5 cladding show that these alloys have a RIA and LOCA behaviour similar to or better than Zr-4. However, the data is limited, especially for LOCA conditions, where only un-irradiated specimens have been tested so far. (author)

  11. Validation of the scale system for PWR spent fuel isotopic composition analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The validity of the computation of pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel isotopic composition by the SCALE system depletion analysis was assessed using data presented in the report. Radiochemical measurements and SCALE/SAS2H computations of depleted fuel isotopics were compared with 19 benchmark-problem samples from Calvert Cliffs Unit 1, H. B. Robinson Unit 2, and Obrigheim PWRs. Even though not exhaustive in scope, the validation included comparison of predicted and measured concentrations for 14 actinides and 37 fission and activation products. The basic method by which the SAS2H control module applies the neutron transport treatment and point-depletion methods of SCALE functional modules (XSDRNPM-S, NITAWL-II, BONAMI, and ORIGEN-S) is described in the report. Also, the reactor fuel design data, the operating histories, and the isotopic measurements for all cases are included in detail. The underlying radiochemical assays were conducted by the Materials Characterization. Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Approved Testing Material program and by four different laboratories in Europe on samples processed at the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant

  12. Validation of the scale system for PWR spent fuel isotopic composition analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, O.W.; Bowman, S.M.; Parks, C.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brady, M.C. [Sandia National Laboratories, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1995-03-01

    The validity of the computation of pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel isotopic composition by the SCALE system depletion analysis was assessed using data presented in the report. Radiochemical measurements and SCALE/SAS2H computations of depleted fuel isotopics were compared with 19 benchmark-problem samples from Calvert Cliffs Unit 1, H. B. Robinson Unit 2, and Obrigheim PWRs. Even though not exhaustive in scope, the validation included comparison of predicted and measured concentrations for 14 actinides and 37 fission and activation products. The basic method by which the SAS2H control module applies the neutron transport treatment and point-depletion methods of SCALE functional modules (XSDRNPM-S, NITAWL-II, BONAMI, and ORIGEN-S) is described in the report. Also, the reactor fuel design data, the operating histories, and the isotopic measurements for all cases are included in detail. The underlying radiochemical assays were conducted by the Materials Characterization. Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of the Approved Testing Material program and by four different laboratories in Europe on samples processed at the Karlsruhe Reprocessing Plant.

  13. Development of a method for xenon determination in the microstructure of high burn-up nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear fuel, in approximately one quarter of the fissions, one of the two formed fission products is gaseous. These are mainly the noble gases xenon and krypton with isotopes of xenon contributing up to 90% of the product gases. These noble fission gases do not combine with other species, and have a low solubility in the normally used uranium oxide matrix. They can be dissolved in the fuel matrix or precipitate in nanometer-sized bubbles within the fuel grain, in micrometer-sized bubbles at the grain boundaries, and a fraction also precipitates in fuel pores, coming from fuel fabrication. A fraction of the gas can also be released into the plenum of the fuel rod. With increasing fission, and therefore burn-up, the ceramic fuel material experiences a transformation of its structure in the 'cooler' rim region of the fuel. A subdivision occurs of the original fuel grains of few microns size into thousands of small grains of sub-micron sizes. Additionally, larger pores are formed, which also leads into an increasing porosity in the fuel rim, called high burn-up structure. In this structure, only a small fraction of the fission gas remains in the matrix, the major quantity is said to accumulate in these pores. Because of this accumulation, the knowledge of the quantities of gas within these pores is of major interest in consideration to burn-up, fuel performance and especially for safety issues. In case of design based accidents, i.e. rapidly increasing temperature transients, the behavior of the fuel has to be estimated. Various analytical techniques have been used to determine the Xe concentration in nuclear fuel samples. The capabilities of EPMA (Electron Probe Micro-Analyser) and SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) have been studied and provided some qualitative information, which has been used for determining Xe-matrix concentrations. First approaches combining these two techniques to estimate pore pressures have been recently reported. However, relevant Xe

  14. Design and construction of a prototype advanced on-line fuel burn-up monitoring system for the modular pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Bingjing; Hawari, Ayman, I.

    2004-03-30

    Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) is a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear power reactor currently under study as a next generation reactor system. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multi-pass fuel circulation in which the fuel pebbles are randomly loaded and continuously cycled through the core until they reach their prescribed End-of-Life burn-up limit. Unlike the situation with a conventional light water reactor, depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management for MPBR will be highly inaccurate. An on-line measurement system is needed to accurately assess whether a given pebble has reached its End-of-Life burn-up limit and thereby provide an on-line, automated go/no-go decision on fuel disposition on a pebble-by-pebble basis. This project investigated approaches to analyzing fuel pebbles in real time using gamma spectroscopy and possibly using passive neutron counting of spontaneous fission neutrons to provide the speed, accuracy, and burn-up range required for burnup determination of MPBR. It involved all phases necessary to develop and construct a burn-up monitor, including a review of the design requirements of the system, identification of detection methodologies, modeling and development of potential designs, and finally, the construction and testing of an operational detector system. Based upon the research work performed in this project, the following conclusions are made. In terms of using gamma spectrometry, two possible approaches were identified for burnup assay. The first approach is based on the measurement of the absolute activity of Cs-137. However, due to spectral interference and the need for absolute calibration of the spectrometer, the uncertainty in burnup determination using this approach was found to range from {approx} {+-}40% at beginning of life to {approx} {+-}10% at the discharge burnup. An alternative approach is to use a relative burnup indicator. In this

  15. The effects of fuel microstructure evolution on thermal performance in fast reactor type uranium-plutonium oxide fuel pins up to high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higher power density and larger thermal gradients in fast reactor type uranium-plutonium oxide fuel pins than in water reactor type fuel rods induces the drastic fuel microstructure evolutions, which are useful for estimating the thermal condition at power in the fuel pellets. Recently, fuel-to-cladding gap reopen phenomena is paid attention to due to the influences on the heat transfer behaviors. The objectives of this work are to clarify the dominant factors for fuel microstructure evolution and investigate the gap reopen phenomena on the fuel pin thermal performance up to high burnup. The results of irradiation tests accumulated in JOYO Mk-II core, FFTF, Phenix were exhaustively collected and compiled to the database in this work. Then, the influences of irradiation conditions on the extent of microstructure evolution, such as central void, columnar grain, gas bubble region, densified region, dark ring, and residual gap (including gap reopen phenomena), were reviewed and investigated. Also the thermal behaviors in fuel pins were modeled to apply for the thermal analysis based on the recent knowledge referred to water reactor fuel experiences. It was revealed that the gap reopen phenomena related directly with the fission gas release behaviors in JOYO Mk-II J2 type driver fuel pins whose fabrication, irradiation, and post-irradiation conditions were well characterized. The results of one dimensional thermal analysis at the transverse sections were proved that gap conductance were improved by the condensed material which fills the gap even after the gap reopen phenomena. (author)

  16. A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique and Three Types of Gamma-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Navarro; Rahmat Aryaeinejad,; David W. Nigg

    2011-05-01

    A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique1 Rahmat Aryaeinejad, Jorge Navarro, and David W Nigg Idaho National Laboratory Abstract Effective and efficient Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel management require state of the art core modeling tools. These new tools will need isotopic and burnup validation data before they are put into production. To create isotopic, burn up validation libraries and to determine the setup for permanent fuel scanner system a feasibility study was perform. The study consisted in measuring short and long cooling time fuel elements at the ATR canal. Three gamma spectroscopy detectors (HPGe, LaBr3, and HPXe) and two system configurations (above and under water) were used in the feasibility study. The first stage of the study was to investigate which detector and system configuration would be better suited for different scenarios. The second stage of the feasibility study was to create burnup and cooling time calibrations using experimental isotopic data collected and ORIGEN 2.2 burnup data. The results of the study establish that a better spectra resolution is achieve with an above the water configuration and that three detectors can be used in the permanent fuel scanner system for different situations. In addition it was conclude that a number of isotopic ratios and absolute measurements could be used to predict ATR fuel burnup and cooling times. 1This work was supported by the U.S. Depart¬ment of Energy (DOE) under Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Contract No. DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  17. Effects of burnup on fuel failure. Power burst tests on fuel rods with 13,000 and 32,000 MWd/MTU burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are presented from preliminary tests designed to investigate the behavior of preirradiated fuel rods under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. The tests were conducted in 1970 as part of the SPERT/Capsule Driver Core (CDC) program. The report was intended to be published in a series of Idaho Nuclear Corporation Interim Technical Reports (IN-ITRs); however, the CDC program was terminated before the report could be released. In September 1975, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission concluded that the data contained in the report could be a valuable reference in planning future water reactor safety program tests and requested its release

  18. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for UO2 and MOX fueled PWR cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A method for calculating sensitivity coefficients has been improved. • The IR approximation was used in order to get accurate results. • Sensitivities and uncertainties are calculated using the improved method. • The method is applied for UO2 and MOX fueled PWR cells. • The verification was performed by comparing our results with MCNP6 and TSUNAMI-1D. - Abstract: This paper discusses the improvement of a method for calculating sensitivity coefficients of neutronics parameters relative to infinite dilution cross-sections because the conventional method neglects resonance self-shielding effect. In this study, the self-shielding effect is taken into account by using the intermediate resonance approximation in order to get accurate results in both high and low energy groups. The improved method is applied to calculate sensitivity coefficients and uncertainties of eigenvalue responses for UO2 and MOX (ThO2–UO2 and PuO2–UO2) fueled pressurized water reactor cells. The verification of the improved method was performed by comparing the sensitivities with MCNP6 and TSUNAMI-1D. For uncertainty, calculation comparisons were done with TSUNAMI-1D, and we demonstrate that the differences are caused by the use of different covariance matrices

  19. Postirradiation examinations of fuel pins from the GCFR F-1 series of mixed-oxide fuel pins at 5. 5 at. % burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, R V; Johnson, C E

    1978-05-01

    Postirradiation examinations were performed on five fuel pins from the Gas-Cooled Fast-Breeder Reactor F-1 experiment irradiated in EBR-II to a peak burnup of approximately 5.5 at. %. These encapsulated fuel pins were irradiated at peak-power linear ratings from approximately 13 to 15 kW/ft and peak cladding inside diameter temperatures from approximately 625 to 760/sup 0/C. The maximum diametral change that occurred during irradiation was 0.2% ..delta..D/D/sub 0/. The maximum fuel-cladding chemical interaction depth was 2.6 mils in fuel pin G-1 and 1 mil or less in the other three pins examined destructively. Significant migration of the volatile fission products occurred axially to the fuel-blanket interfaces. Teh postirradiation examination data indicate that fuel melted at the inner surface of the annular fuel pellets in the two highest power rating fuel pins, but little axial movement of fuel occurred.

  20. Passive neutron assay of irradiated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passive neutron assay of irradiated nuclear fuel has been investigated by calculations and experiments as a simple, complementary technique to the gamma assay. From the calculations it is found that the neutron emission arises mainly from the curium isotopes, the neutrons exhibit very good penetrability of the assemblies, and the neutron multiplication is not affected by the burnup. From the experiments on BWR and PWR assemblies, it is found that the neutron emission rate is proportional to burnup raised to 3.4 power. Recent investigations indicate that the passive neutron assay is a simple and useful technique to determine the consistency of burnups between assemblies. 10 refs

  1. Passive neutron assay of irradiated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passive neutron assay of irradiated nuclear fuel has been investigated by calculations and experiments as a simple, complementary technique to the gamma assay. From the calculations it was found that the neutron emission arises mainly from the curium isotopes, the neutrons exhibit very good penetrability of the assemblies, and the neutron multiplication is not affected by the burnup. From the experiments on BWR and PWR assemblies, the neutron emission rate is proportional to burnup raised to 3.4 power. The investigations indicate that the passive neutron assay is a simple and useful technique to determine the consistency of burnups between assemblies

  2. Zircaloy PWR fuel cladding deformation tests under mainly convective cooling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a loss-of-coolant accident the temperature of the cladding of the fuel rods may rise to levels (650-8100C) where the ductility of Zircaloy is high (approximately 80%). The net outward pressure which will obtain if the coolant pressure falls to a small fraction of its normal working value produces stresses in the cladding which can result in large strain through secondary creep. An earlier study of the deformation of specimens of PWR Zircaloy cladding tubing 450 mm long under internal pressure had shown that strains of over 50% could be produced over considerable lengths (greater than twenty tube diameters). Extended deformation of this sort might be unacceptable if it occurred in a fuel element. The previous tests had been carried out under conditions of uniform radiative heat loss, and the work reported here extends the study to conditions of mainly convective heat loss believed to be more representative of a fuel element following a loss of coolant. Zircaloy-4 cladding specimens 450 mm long were filled with alumina pellets and tested at temperatures between 630 and 8450C in flowing steam at atmospheric pressure. Internal test pressures were in the range 2.9-11.0 MPa (400-1600 1b/in2). Maximum strains were observed of the same magnitude as those seen in the previous tests, but the shape of the deformation differed; in these tests the deformation progressively increased in the direction of the steam flow. These results are compared with those from multi-rod tests elsewhere, and it is suggested that heat transfer has a dominant effect in determining deformation. The implications for the behaviour of fuel elements in a loss-of-coolant accident are outlined. (author)

  3. Needs of reliable nuclear data and covariance matrices for Burnup Credit in JEFF-3 library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnup Credit (BUC) is the concept which consists in taking into account credit for the reduction of nuclear spent fuel reactivity due to its burnup. In the case of PWR-MOx spent fuel, studies pointed out that the contribution of the 15 most absorbing, stable and non-volatile fission products selected to the credit is as important as the one of the actinides. In order to get a 'best estimate' value of the keff, biases of their inventory calculation and individual reactivity worth should be considered in criticality safety studies. This paper enhances the most penalizing bias towards criticality and highlights possible improvements of nuclear data for the 15 fission products (FPs) of PWR-MOx BUC. Concerning the fuel inventory, trends in function of the burnup can be derived from experimental validation of the DARWIN-2.3 package (using the JEFF- 3.1.1/SHEM library). Thanks to the BUC oscillation programme of separated FPs in the MINERVE reactor and fully validated scheme PIMS, calculation over experiment ratios can be accurately transposed to tendencies on the FPs integral cross sections. (authors)

  4. Estimate of fuel burnup spatial a multipurpose reactor in computer simulation; Estimativa da queima espacial do combustivel de um reator multiproposito por simulacao computacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nadia Rodrigues dos, E-mail: nadia.santos@ifrj.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ), Paracambi, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br, E-mail: zrlima@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In previous research, which aimed, through computer simulation, estimate the spatial fuel burnup for the research reactor benchmark, material test research - International Atomic Energy Agency (MTR/IAEA), it was found that the use of the code in FORTRAN language, based on the diffusion theory of neutrons and WIMSD-5B, which makes cell calculation, bespoke be valid to estimate the spatial burnup other nuclear research reactors. That said, this paper aims to present the results of computer simulation to estimate the space fuel burnup of a typical multipurpose reactor, plate type and dispersion. the results were considered satisfactory, being in line with those presented in the literature. for future work is suggested simulations with other core configurations. are also suggested comparisons of WIMSD-5B results with programs often employed in burnup calculations and also test different methods of interpolation values obtained by FORTRAN. Another proposal is to estimate the burning fuel, taking into account the thermohydraulics parameters and the appearance of xenon. (author)

  5. Burn-up calculation of different thorium-based fuel matrixes in a thermal research reactor using MCNPX 2.6 code

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamzadeh Zohreh; Hossein Feghhi Seyed Amir; Soltani Leila; Rezazadeh Marzieh; Tenreiro Claudio; Joharifard Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Decrease of the economically accessible uranium resources and the inherent proliferation resistance of thorium fuel motivate its application in nuclear power systems. Estimation of the nuclear reactor’s neutronic parameters during different operational situations is of key importance for the safe operation of nuclear reactors. In the present research, thorium oxide fuel burn-up calculations for a demonstrative model of a heavy water- -cooled reactor have been performed using MCNPX 2.6 code. N...

  6. Experimental Comparison between High Purity Germanium and Scintillator Detectors for Determining Burnup, Cooling Time and Decay Heat of Used Nuclear Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Peter; Grape, Sophie; Tobin, Steve; Liljenfeldt, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    A experimental study of the gamma-ray energy spectra from used nuclear fuel has been performed. Four types of detectors were used to measure spectra from three PWR used fuel assemblies stored at the interim storage for used fuel in Sweden, CLAB: HPGe, LaBr3, NaI and BGO. The study was performed in the context of used fuel characterization for the back end of the fuel cycle in Sweden. Specifically, the purpose was to evaluate the behaviour of the different scintillator detectors (LaBr3, NaI an...

  7. Contribution to fuel depletion study in PWR type reactors, reactor core with three and four regions of enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main methods for calculation of fuel depletion are studied and some approaches to do it are mentioned; the LEOPARD Code is described and full details are given for each subroutine, flow charts are included; the method given by the code for calculation of fuel depletion is described; some imperfections from the IPR's version are listed, and corrected, for instance: the method for burn-up calculation of heavy isotopes; the results of calculations for a reference reactor based on data of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for Angra I Nuclear Power Plant are presented and discussed. (author)

  8. A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU -The technology development for nuclear material safeguards-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research contents of the non-destructive assay real time accounting system and the preparation of DIQ. The quantity and neutron emission rate variation of curium and plutonium was investigated with respect to burnup. Also, the neutron detection probability was examined in the neutron slowing down medium and shielding calculation was carried out against the intense gamma rays emitted from the spent fuel. The investigation of the variation of plutonium and curium contents was very helpful to design of nondestructive assay system from the emitted neutrons in the spent fuel. 24 figs, 2 tabs, 20 refs. (Author)

  9. Burnup credit activities in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers progress in burnup credit activities that have occurred in the United States of America (USA) since the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on Burnup Credit was convened in October 1997. The Proceeding of the AGM were issued in April 1998 (IAEA-TECDOC-1013, April 1998). The three applications of the use of burnup credit that are discussed in this report are spent fuel storage, spent fuel transportation, and spent fuel disposal. (author)

  10. French investigations of high burnup effect on LOCA thermomecanical behavior. Part two. Oxidation and quenching experiments under simulated LOCA conditions with high burnup clad material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GrandJean, C. [IPSN, Cadarache (France); Cauvin, R.; Lebuffe, C. [EDF/SCMI, Chinon (France)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    In the frame of the high burnup fuel studies to support a possible extension of the current discharge burnup limit, experimental programs have been undertaken, jointly by EDF and IPSN in order to study the thermal-shock behavior of high burnup fuel claddings under typical LOCA conditions. The TAGUS program used unirradiated cladding samples, bare or bearing a pre-corrosion state simulating the end-of-life state of high burnup fuel claddings: the TAGCIR program used actually irradiated cladding samples taken from high burnup rods irradiated over 5 cycles in a commercial EDF PWR and having reached a rod burnup close to 60 GWd/tU. The thermal-shock failure tests consisted in oxidizing the cladding samples under steam flow, on both inner and outer faces or on the outer face alone, and subjecting them to a final water quench. The heating was provided by an inductive furnace the power of which being regulated through monitoring of the sample surface temperature with use of a single-wave optical pyrometer. Analysis of the irradiated tests (TAGCIR series) evidenced an increased oxidation rate as compared to similar tests on unirradiated samples. Results of the quenching tests series on unirradiated and irradiated samples are plotted under the usual presentation of failure maps relative to the oxidation parameters ECR (equivalent cladding reacted) or e{sub {beta}} (thickness of the remaining beta phase layer) as a function of the oxidation temperature. Comparison of the failure limits for irradiated specimens to those for unirradiated specimens indicates a lower brittleness under two side oxidation and possibly the opposite under one-side oxidation. The tentative analysis of the oxidation and quenching tests results on irradiated samples reveals the important role played by the hydrogen charged during in-reactor corrosion on the oxidation kinetics and the failure bearing capability of the cladding under LOCA transient conditions.

  11. Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment, Burn-up and Cooling Time of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-13

    An outline of this presentation of what a Differential Die-Away (DDA) instrument can do are: (1) Principle of operation of DDA instrument; (2) Determination of initial enrichment (IE) ({sigma} < 5%); (3) Determination of burn up (BU) ({sigma} {approx} 6%); (4) Determination of cooling time (CT) ({sigma} {approx} 20-50%); and (5) DDA instrument as a standalone device. DDA response (fresh fuel vs. spent fuel) is: (1) Fresh fuel => DDA response increases (die-away time is longer) with increasing fissile content; and (2) Spent fuel => DDA response decreases (die-away time is shorter) with higher burn-up (i.e. more neutron absorbers present).

  12. Out-of-pile performances of new zirconium alloys for PWR fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two new zirconium alloys, N18 and N36, containing Sn, Nb, Fe and Cr have been developed to use as superior PWR fuel rod cladding materials. The results are obtained from the out-of-pile performance tests on these advanced alloy claddings or materials. Analytical electron microscopy demonstrated that the best out-of-pile corrosion resistance was obtained for microstructure containing a fine and uniform distribution of β-Nb and/or Zr(Fe, Cr)2 particles. Autoclave testing indicated that N18 and N36 alloys possessed superior corrosion resistance including uniform and nodular corrosion. It has been demonstrated that the hydrogen absorption data for all of alloys from corrosion reactions under various corrosion conditions showed a linear increase with the exposure time or oxide thickness, and hydrogen absorption rate of both alloys is quite low compared to that of Zircaloy-4. These alloys have demonstrated superior out-of-pile tensile strength, burst and creep properties relative to Zircaloy-4. In addition, the thermal physical properties, texture, Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) for two new zirconium alloys have been examined, which also showed a good results compared to Zircaloy-4. (author)

  13. PLUTON: Three-group neutronic code for burnup analysis of isotope generation and depletion in highly irradiated LWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PLUTON is a three-group neutronic code analyzing, as functions of time and burnup, the change of radial profiles, together with average values, of power density, burnup, concentration of trans-uranium elements, plutonium buildup, depletion of fissile elements, and fission product generation in water reactor fuel rod with standard UO2, UO2-Gd2O3, inhomogeneous MOX, and UO2-ThO2. The PLUTON code, which has been designed to be run on Windows PC, has adopted a theoretical shape function of neutron attenuation in pellet, which enables users to perform a very fast and accurate calculation easily. The present code includes the irradiation conditions of the Halden Reactor which gives verification data for the code. The total list of trans-uranium elements included in the calculations consists of 92U233-239, 93Np237-239, 94Pu238-243, 95Am241-244 (including isomers), and 96Cm242-245. Poisoning fission products are represented by 54Xe131,133,135, 48Cd113, 62Sm149,151,152, 64Gd154-160, 63Eu153,155, 36Kr83,85, 42Mo95, 43Tc99, 45Rh103, 47Ag109, 53I127,129,131, 55Cs133, 57La139, 59Pr141, 60Nd143-150, 61Pm147. Fission gases and volatiles included in the code are 36Kr83-86, 54Xe129-136, 52Te125-130, 53I127-131, 55Cs133-137, and 56Ba135-140. Verification has been performed up to 83 GWd/tU, and a satisfactory agreement has been obtained. (author)

  14. Neutronic Analysis on the Fuel Pin Reshuffling Options for PWR In-Core Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Such estimation has been verified by comparing with the neutronic performance of the reference design. Two feasible scenarios have been studied by targeting on the improvement of the uniform flux spatial distribution and on the enhancement of neutron economy leading to economic incentives. In the first scenario, for making flux more uniform spatial distribution, the existing fuel pins are relocated to have fuel pins burnt more evenly. It is expected to result in minimization of nuclear power peaking while maximizing neutron economy at the core edge. Secondly, with the help of the intra-fuel assembly reshuffling option, the spent fuel pins could be reused again by combining other available twice burnt fuel pins so that numbers of new fresh FAs as well as discharged FAs will be reduced. In scenario-1, the operating time was merely somewhat increased for few minutes by keeping enough safety margins. The secnario-2 was proved to reduce 4 fresh FAs loading without largely losing any targeted parameters from the safety aspect despite loss of 14 effective full power days for operation at reference plant full rated power. In brief, the OPR-S1-a and the OPR-S1-b designs could not bring distinctive economic benefits if only few fuel assemblies would be treated through the intra-fuel assembly reshuffling strategy. The OPR-S2 design was proved to be acceptable except slightly larger nuclear power peaking factor. Because of reduction fresh fuel assembly loading, that will bring more economic incentives. It is, though, still left to investigate more into the intra-fuel assembly reshuffling despite hardship for handling massive numbers of fuel pins, and their radiotoxicity and complexity. If these obstacles could be overcome, it would be worth to examine significant economy incentives and safety performance benefits

  15. Graphical and tabular summaries of decay characteristics for once-through PWR, LMFBR, and FFTF fuel cycle materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the results of ORIGEN2 and a newly developed code called ORMANG, graphical and summary tabular characteristics of spent fuel, high-level waste, and fuel assembly structural material (cladding) waste are presented for a generic pressurized-water reactor (PWR), a liquid-metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The characteristics include radioactivity, thermal power, and toxicity (water dilution volume). Given are graphs and summary tables containing characteristic totals and the principal nuclide contributors as well as graphs comparing the three reactors for a single material and the three materials for a single reactor

  16. Distribution of equilibrium burnup for an homogeneous core with fuel elements of slightly enriched uranium (0.85% U-235) at Atucha I nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Atucha I, the present fuel management with natural uranium comprises three burnup areas and one irradiation path, sometimes performing four steps in the reactor core, according to the requirements. The discharge burnup is 6.0 Mw d/kg U for a waste reactivity of 6.5 m k and a heavy water purity of 99.75%. This is a preliminary study to obtain the distribution of equilibrium burnup of an homogeneous core with slightly enriched uranium (0.85% by weight U-235), using the time-averaged method implemented in the code PUMA and a representative model of one third of core and fixed rod position. It was found a strategy of three areas and two paths that agrees with the present limits of channel power and specific power in fuel rod. The discharge burnup obtained is 11.6 Mw d/kg U. This strategy is calculated with the same method and a full core representation model is used to verify the obtained results. (Author)

  17. Rapid aqueous release of fission products from high burn-up LWR fuel: Experimental results and correlations with fission gas release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Günther-Leopold, I.; Kobler Waldis, J.; Linder, H. P.; Low, J.; Cui, D.; Ekeroth, E.; Spahiu, K.; Evins, L. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the rapid aqueous release of fission products from UO 2 and MOX fuel are of interest for the assessment of the safety of geological disposal of spent fuel, because of the associated potential contribution to dose in radiological safety assessment. Studies have shown that correlations between fission gas release (FGR) and the fraction rapidly leached of various long-lived fission products can provide a useful method to obtain some of this information. Previously, these studies have been limited largely to fuel with burn-up values below 50 MWd/kg U. Collaborative studies involving SKB, Studsvik, Nagra and PSI have provided new data on short-term release of 137Cs and 129I for a number of fuels irradiated to burn-ups of 50-75 MWd/kgU. In addition a method for analysis of leaching solutions for 79Se was developed. The results of the studies show that the fractional release of 137Cs is usually much lower than the FGR covering the entire range of burn-ups studied. Fractional 129I releases are somewhat larger, but only in cases in which the fuel was forcibly extracted from the cladding. Despite the expected high degree of segregation of fission gas (and by association 137Cs and 129I) in the high burn-up rim, no evidence was found for a significant contribution to release from the rim region. The method for 79Se analysis developed did not permit its detection. Nonetheless, based on the detection limit, the results suggest that 79Se is not preferentially leached from spent fuel.

  18. PWR core and spent fuel pool analysis using scale and nestle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J. E.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States); St Clair, R.; Orr, D. [Duke Energy, 526 S. Church St, Charlotte, NC 28202 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The SCALE nuclear analysis code system [SCALE, 2011], developed and maintained at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is widely recognized as high quality software for analyzing nuclear systems. The SCALE code system is composed of several validated computer codes and methods with standard control sequences, such as the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics sequence, which supplies dependable and accurate analyses for industry, regulators, and academia. Although TRITON generates energy-collapsed and space-homogenized few group cross sections, SCALE does not include a full-core nodal neutron diffusion simulation module within. However, in the past few years, the open-source NESTLE core simulator [NESTLE, 2003], originally developed at North Carolina State Univ. (NCSU), has been updated and upgraded via collaboration between ORNL and the Univ. of Tennessee (UT), so it now has a growingly seamless coupling to the TRITON/NEWT lattice physics [Galloway, 2010]. This study presents the methodology used to couple lattice physics data between TRITON and NESTLE in order to perform a three-dimensional full-core analysis employing a 'real-life' Duke Energy PWR as the test bed. The focus for this step was to compare the key parameters of core reactivity and radial power distribution versus plant data. Following the core analysis, following a three cycle burn, a spent fuel pool analysis was done using information generated from NESTLE for the discharged bundles and was compared to Duke Energy spent fuel pool models. The KENO control module from SCALE was employed for this latter stage of the project. (authors)

  19. Post-irradiation examination of a bowed PWR fuel rod with contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During reactor operation in the Ringhals 2 PWR a fuel rod bowed and as a result came in contact with an adjacent rod. The rod contact in one of the lower grid spans was observed during visual inspection at the end of life. The visual appearance suggested that there was possibly increased cladding corrosion on both the contacting rods at and close to the position of contact. One of the contacting rods was sent to Studsvik’s Hot Cell Laboratory for investigation where fission gas analysis, gamma scanning, EC oxide thickness, metallography (optical microscopy) and cladding microhardness measurements were performed in order to verify the impact of the bow and the contact on the fuel rod performance, with particular focus on the local cladding corrosion. The influence of the reduction of moderator in the region of the contact point was seen in the Cs-137 axial gamma scanning and in the Ce-144 rotational gamma scanning, which show a local reduction of both the pellet-average power, in the contact region, and specifically on the side with the contact. Visual inspection revealed increased corrosion in the rod-rod contact position. Metallographic examination of a cross-section at the elevation with the contact showed that increased corrosion and loss of material had occurred at the contact position. Outside of the immediate vicinity of the contact region the corrosion was not affected. The cladding microhardness was measured at different radial positions both at the contact position and at other positions around the cladding circumference. Based on the relationship between the microhardness and local temperature during operation on fully wetted cladding, it was possible to estimate the cladding surface temperature at the contact point to approximately 360°C. This local overheating and conditions arising from the local overheating can explain the higher local oxidation of the cladding observed in the visual inspection and metallography. (author)

  20. Tentative evaluation of consequences of extended burnup on reprocessing of LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate the impact of extended burn up LWR fuels on the back end of fuel cycle, a comparison of these fuels with standard ones has been made. As standard fuel one have considered 3.5% uranium enrichment with an irradiation of 33.000 MWdt-1 while for high burn up fuels 4.5% uranium enriched with irradiation of 45000 - 48000 and 52000 were choosen. Increased neutron emission of these last fuels may raised some problems for transport and reception. For these operations and the fuel dissolution a careful control of the fuel irradiation -then of the residual fissile uranium- is necessary. The α activity of the high burn up fuel will lead to an accelerate degradation of the organic solvent TBP used in the solvent extraction cycles. It could reduce their efficiency. Higher α activity and neutron emission of plutonium dioxide from these fuels are to be considered in the transport, storage and future uses of this material

  1. New Strategies for Licensing the Storage and Transportation of High Burn-up Spent Nuclear Fuel in the United States - 12546

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative approach may be needed to the licensing of high-burnup fuel for storage and transportation based on the assumption that spent fuel cladding may not always remain intact. The approach would permit spent fuel to be retrieved on a canister basis and could lessen the need for repackaging of spent fuel. This approach is being presented as a possible engineering solution to address the uncertainties and lack of data availability for cladding properties for high burnup fuel and extended storage time frames. The proposed approach does not involve relaxing current safety standards for criticality safety, containment, or permissible external dose rates. Packaging strategies and regulations should be developed to reduce the potential for requiring fuel to be repackaged unnecessarily. This would lessen the chance of accidents and mishaps during loading and unloading of casks, and decrease dose to workers. A packaging approach that shifts the safety basis from reliance upon the fuel condition to reliance upon an inner canister could eliminate or lessen the need for repackaging. In addition, the condition of canisters can be more readily monitored and inspected than the condition of fuel cladding. Canisters can also be repaired and/or replaced when deemed necessary. In contrast, once a fuel assembly is loaded into a canister and placed in a storage overpack, there is little opportunity to monitor its condition or take mitigating measures if cladding degradation is suspected or proven to occur. (authors)

  2. Measurement of the composition of noble-metal particles in high-burnup CANDU fuel by wavelength dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocking, W.H.; Szostak, F.J

    1999-09-01

    An investigation of the composition of the metallic inclusions in CANDU fuel, which contain Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh and Pd, has been conducted as a function of burnup by wavelength dispersive X-ray (WDX) microanalysis. Quantitative measurements were performed on micrometer sized particles embedded in thin sections of fuel using elemental standards and the ZAF method. Because the fission yields of the noble metals change with burnup, as a consequence of a shift from almost entirely {sup 235}U fission to mainly {sup 239}Pu fission, their inventories were calculated from the fuel power histories using the WIMS-Origin code for comparison with experiment. Contrary to expectations that the oxygen potential would be buffered by progressive Mo oxidation, little evidence was obtained for reduced incorporation of Mo in the noble-metal particles at high burnup. These surprising results are discussed with respect to the oxygen balance in irradiated CANDU fuels and the likely intrinsic and extrinsic sinks for excess oxygen. (author)

  3. The effect of dissolved hydrogen on the dissolution of {sup 233}U doped UO{sub 2}(s) high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbol, P. [Inst. for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Spahiu, K. (ed.) [and others

    2005-03-01

    In this report the results of the experimental work carried out in a large EU-research project (SFS, 2001-2004) on spent fuel stability in the presence of various amounts of near field hydrogen are presented. Studies of the dissolution of {sup 233}U doped UO{sub 2}(s) simulating 'old' spent fuel were carried out as static leaching tests, autoclave tests with various hydrogen concentrations and electrochemical tests. The results of the leaching behaviour of a high burn-up spent fuel pellet in 5 M NaCl solutions in the presence of 3.2 bar H{sub 2} pressure and of MOX fuel in dilute synthetic groundwater under 53 bar H{sub 2} pressure are also presented. In all the experimental studies carried out in this project, a considerable effect of hydrogen in the dissolution rates of radioactive materials was observed. The experimental results obtained in this project with a-doped UO{sub 2}, high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel together with literature data give a reliable background to use fractional alteration/dissolution rates for spent fuel of the order of 10{sup -6}/yr - 10{sup -8}/yr with a recommended value of 4x10{sup -7}/yr for dissolved hydrogen concentrations above 10{sup -3} M and Fe(II) concentrations typical for European repository concepts. Finally, based on a review of the experimental data and available literature data, potential mechanisms of the hydrogen effect are also discussed. The work reported in this document was performed as part of the Project SFS of the European Commission 5th Framework Programme under contract no FIKW-CT-2001-20192 SFS. It represents the deliverable D10 of the experimental work package 'Key experiments using a-doped UO{sub 2} and real spent fuel', coordinated by SKB with the participation of ITU, FZK-INE, ENRESA, CIEMAT, ARMINES-SUBATECH and SKB.

  4. Probabilistic-statistical analysis of WWER fuel element leaking causes and comparative analysis of the fuel reliability indicator on NPPs with WWER and PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a comparative analysis of the fuel reliability indicator on NPPs with WWER and PWR reactors are presented in this report. As an exponent for a comparative reliability analysis of the WANO fuel reliability indicator is used. The fuel reliability indicator provides a general measure of the extent to which the reactor coolant activity is increased as a result of fuel damage. The analysis of fuel reliability indicator values during 1991-2001 at NPPs with WWER-1000 and WWER-440 reactors (Russia, Ukraine, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Finland) is carried out. The high level of WWER fuel reliability is scored except for cases of fuel failures in separate operating periods of some units. (author)

  5. Benchmark of SCALE (SAS2H) isotopic predictions of depletion analyses for San Onofre PWR MOX fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, O.W.

    2000-02-01

    The isotopic composition of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, fabricated with both uranium and plutonium, after discharge from reactors is of significant interest to the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. The validation of the SCALE (SAS2H) depletion code for use in the prediction of isotopic compositions of MOX fuel, similar to previous validation studies on uranium-only fueled reactors, has corresponding significance. The EEI-Westinghouse Plutonium Recycle Demonstration Program examined the use of MOX fuel in the San Onofre PWR, Unit 1, during cycles 2 and 3. Isotopic analyses of the MOX spent fuel were conducted on 13 actinides and {sup 148}Nd by either mass or alpha spectrometry. Six fuel pellet samples were taken from four different fuel pins of an irradiated MOX assembly. The measured actinide inventories from those samples has been used to benchmark SAS2H for MOX fuel applications. The average percentage differences in the code results compared with the measurement were {minus}0.9% for {sup 235}U and 5.2% for {sup 239}Pu. The differences for most of the isotopes were significantly larger than in the cases for uranium-only fueled reactors. In general, comparisons of code results with alpha spectrometer data had extreme differences, although the differences in the calculations compared with mass spectrometer analyses were not extremely larger than that of uranium-only fueled reactors. This benchmark study should be useful in estimating uncertainties of inventory, criticality and dose calculations of MOX spent fuel.

  6. Instrument for measuring a burnup degree of reactor fuel elements by gamma-scanning method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozefowicz, E.T.; Kilim, S.; Lewicki, K.; Rusinowski, Z. (Institute of Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland))

    1979-01-01

    The principle of gamma scanning of fuel elements is presented. The measuring instrument built in the Institute of Nuclear Research at Swierk and used for gamma scanning of EK-10, WWR-SM, MR and WWER fuel elements is described. The technical drawing of the instrument is given.

  7. Dimensional changes in operating UO2 fuel elements: effect of pellet density, burnup and ramp rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used an in-reactor diameter measuring rig, in combination with a He-3 coil associated with the X-6 loop of the NRX reactor, to determine the dimensional response of CANDU-type UO2 fuel elements as a function of power, prior irradiation, fuel density and ramp rate. The maximum diametral increase accompanying a ramp was about 1% for high density fuel. No elements failed, despite, in the most severe case, a 1.5 h hold at 56 kW/m, after a ramp from 30 kW/m in less than three minutes. (author)

  8. A state of the Art report on Manufacturing technology of high burn-up fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Ho; Nam, Cheol; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Byung Kwon; Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Myung Ho; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    1999-09-01

    In order to manufacturing the prototype fuel cladding, overall manufacturing processes and technologies should be thoroughly understood on the manufacturing processes and technologies of foreign cladding tubes. Generally, the important technology related to fuel cladding tube manufacturing processes for PWRs/PHWRs is divided into three stages. The first stage is to produce the zirconium sponge from zirconium sand, the second stage is to produce the zircaloy shell or TREX from zirconium sponge ingot and finally, cladding is produced from TREX or zircaloy shell. Therefore, the manufacturing processes including the first and second stages are described in brief in this technology report in order to understand the whole fuel cladding manufacturing processes. (author)

  9. Optimization of Water Chemistry to Ensure Reliable Water Reactor Fuel Performance at High Burnup and in Ageing Plant (FUWAC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Optimization of Water Chemistry to Ensure Reliable Water Reactor Fuel Performance at High Burnup and in Ageing Plants (FUWAC, 2006-2009). It provides an overview of the results of the investigations into the current state of water chemistry practice and concerns in the primary circuit of water cooled power reactors including: corrosion of primary circuit materials; deposit composition and thickness on the fuel; crud induced power shift; fuel oxide growth and thickness; radioactivity buildup in the reactor coolant system (RCS). The FUWAC CRP is a follow-up to the DAWAC CRP (Data Processing Technologies and Diagnostics for Water Chemistry and Corrosion Control in Nuclear Power Plants 2001-2005). The DAWAC project improved the data processing technologies and diagnostics for water chemistry and corrosion control in nuclear power plants (NPPs). With the improved methods for controlling and monitoring water chemistry now available, it was felt that a review of the principles of water chemistry management should be undertaken in the light of new materials, more onerous operating conditions, emergent issues such as CIPS, also known as axial offset anomaly (AOA) and the ageing of operating power plant. In the framework of this CRP, water chemistry specialists from 16 nuclear utilities and research organizations, representing 15 countries, exchanged experimental and operational data, models and insights into water chemistry management. The CD-ROM attached to this IAEA-TECDOC includes the report itself, detailed progress reports of three Research Coordination Meetings (RCMs) (Annexes I-III) and the reports and presentations made during the project by the participants.

  10. Optimisation of the Core Management Scenario to Reach High Fuel Burnup in the MYRRHA Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrahim, H. Ait [General Management, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK CEN, Boeretang 200, BE-2400, Mol (Belgium); Baeten, P.; Eynde, G. Van Den [Advanced Nuclear Systems, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK CEN, Boeretang 200, BE-2400, Mol (Belgium); Sobolev, V. [Nuclear Materials Science, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK CEN, Boeretang 200, BE-2400, Mol (Belgium); Nishihara, K. [Center for Neutron Science, Japanese Agency for Atomic Energy (JAEA), Muramatsu 124-2, 319-1112 Tokai-Mura, Ibaraki-Ken (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    An innovative fast spectrum experimental facility MYRRHA has being developed by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK CEN. The MYRRHA is an accelerator-driven system with a core loaded with fast reactor MOX fuel and cooled by liquid lead-bismuth eutectic. At this stage the selection of the facility operation mode and the fuel management scenario is of great importance. In the present article two different modes of the MYRRHA core management are compared: at constant power and at constant proton beam current. The results of neutronic and thermo-mechanical modeling are presented. It is shown that safer thermomechanical conditions for the fuel elements are predicted in the case of the core reshuffling with batches of ten fuel assemblies and with the ADS operation mode at a constant proton beam current. (author)

  11. Separation of Uranium From Spent Fuel Solution in Burnup Measurements Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    In order to establish an automatic radiochemistry separation procedure of U from spent fuel solution, a method of separating U quickly and effectively from the feed solution is needed. TBP exctraction chromograph method had been adopted

  12. Fuel Management Study on PWR Core Included of 157 Fuel Assemblies%157组燃料组件组成的堆芯燃料管理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚红

    2013-01-01

    The fuel management of the PWR reactor core reload optimization was studied with SCIENCE codes in the paper ,the PWR core consists of 157 fuel assemblies .The paper studied five strategies ,three strategies are one-year reload and the other two are 18-month reload strategies .The main results of the eight cycles for the five strategies were given ,and the results were compared with each other .In conclusion ,the power peak of the OU T-IN strategy loading pattern is lower ,and the power peak of the IN-OU T loading pattern is higher ,but all of them are satisfied with design limitation .The average discharge burnup of the quarter core strategy is the highest ,which means that the assemblies of this strategy are burned the most sufficiently , so the economic efficiency of the quarter core strategy is the best .%本文应用SCIENCE程序包对157组燃料组件组成的压水堆堆芯进行换料优化燃料管理研究,给出了3个年换料和2个18个月换料共5个设计方案,每个设计方案给出了从首循环到第8循环共8个循环的主要计算结果,并进行了分析比较。综合来看,OUT-IN装载的设计方案功率峰值偏低,IN-OUT装载的设计方案功率峰值偏高,但均在设计限值以内;1/4堆芯换料设计方案的平均卸料燃耗最深,表明其组件燃耗得最充分,经济性较好。

  13. Raman micro-spectroscopy of UOX and MOX spent nuclear fuel characterization and oxidation resistance of the high burn-up structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegou, C.; Gennisson, M.; Peuget, S.; Desgranges, L.; Guimbretière, G.; Magnin, M.; Talip, Z.; Simon, P.

    2015-03-01

    Raman micro-spectroscopy was applied to study the structure and oxidation resistance of UO2 (burnup 60 GWd/tHM) and MOX (burnup 47 GWd/tHM) irradiated fuels. The Raman technique, adapted to working under extreme conditions, enabled structural information to be obtained at the cubic micrometer scale in various zones of interest within irradiated fuel (central and zones like the Rim for UOX60, and the plutonium-enriched agglomerates for MOX47 characterized by a high burn-up structure), and the study of their oxidation resistance. As regards the structural information after irradiation, the spectra obtained make up a set of data consistent with the systematic presence of the T2g band characteristic of the fluorite structure, and of a triplet band located between 500 and 700 cm-1. The existence of this triplet can be attributed to the presence of defects originating in changes to the fuel chemistry occurring in the reactor (presence of fission products) and to the accumulation of irradiation damage. As concerns the oxidation resistance of the different zones of interest, Raman spectroscopy results confirmed the good stability of the restructured zones (plutonium-enriched agglomerates and Rim) rich in fission products compared to the non-restructured UO2 grains. A greater structural stability was noticed in the case of high plutonium content agglomerates, as this element favors the maintenance of the fluorite structure.

  14. Oxide fuel fabrication technology development of the FaCT project (5). Current status on 9Cr-ODS steel cladding development for high burn-up fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes evaluation results of in-reactor integrity of 9Cr and 12Cr-ODS steel cladding tubes and the plan for reliability improvement in homogeneous tube production, both of which are key points for the commercialized use of ODS steels as long-life fuel cladding tubes. A fuel assembly in the BOR-60 irradiation test including 9Cr and 12Cr-ODS fuel pins has achieved the highest burn-up, i.e. peak burn-up of 11.9at% and peak neutron dose of 51dpa, without any fuel pin rupture and microstructure instability. In another fuel assembly containing 9Cr and 12Cr-ODS steel fuel pins whose peak burn-up was 10.5at%, one 9Cr-ODS steel fuel pin failed near the upper end of the fuel column. A peculiar microstructure change occurred in the vicinity of the ruptured area. The primary cause of this fuel pin rupture and microstructure change was shown to be the presence of metallic Cr inclusions in the 9Cr-ODS steel tube, which had passed an ultrasonic inspection test for defects. In the next stage from 2011 to 2013, the fabrication technology of full pre-alloy 9Cr-ODS steel cladding tube will be developed, where the handling of elemental powder is prohibited in the process. (author)

  15. Preliminary Content Evaluation of the North Anna High Burn-Up Sister Fuel Rod Segments for Transportation in the 10-160B and NAC-LWT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) Program has transported high-burnup nuclear sister fuel rods from a commercial nuclear power plant for purposes of evaluation and testing. The evaluation and testing of high-burnup used nuclear fuel is integral to DOE initiatives to collect information useful in determining the integrity of fuel cladding for future safe transportation of the fuel, and for determining the effects of aging, on the integrity of UNF subjected to extended storage and subsequent transportation. The UFDC Program, in collaboration with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the commercial nuclear industry, has obtained individual used nuclear fuel rods for testing. The rods have been received at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for both separate effects testing (SET) and small-scale testing (SST). To meet the research objectives, testing on multiple 6 inch fuel rod pins cut from the rods at ORNL, will be performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Up to 10 rod equivalents will be shipped. Options were evaluated for multiple shipments using the 10-160B (based on 4.5 rod equivalents) and a single shipment using the NAC-LWT.

  16. Implementation of burnup and control rod credit for storage of spent nuclear fuel in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary analysis of the regulations in force in Ukraine concerning nuclear safety of spent nuclear fuel management systems shows that some regulatory requirements in force are too conservative in view of current international practice. The extent of conservatism can be determined and reduced, if necessary, only using calculated studies for analyzing the criticality of spent nuclear fuel management systems. Such activity is consistent with the requirements posed by state-of-the-art production requirements. However, this can be only based on improving our level of understanding the processes occurring in nuclear dangerous systems and improving our capabilities as regards accuracy, correctness, and reliability in numerical modeling these processes. This work was intended to demonstrate that the excessive conservatism laid previously into the requirements on nuclear safety in Ukraine due to insufficient development of means for modeling processes in nuclear fuel can be considerably decreased through using more real modeling fuel systems. If such modeling is performed with the use of state-of-the-art software and computers, based on more complete understanding the processes in fuel systems, then removal of the excessive conservatism does will not reduce the safety of nuclear dangerous systems. (author)

  17. PLUTON: Three-group neutronic code for burnup analysis of isotope generation and depletion in highly irradiated LWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemehov, Sergei E; Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    PLUTON is a three-group neutronic code analyzing, as functions of time and burnup, the change of radial profiles, together with average values, of power density, burnup, concentration of trans-uranium elements, plutonium buildup, depletion of fissile elements, and fission product generation in water reactor fuel rod with standard UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, inhomogeneous MOX, and UO{sub 2}-ThO{sub 2}. The PLUTON code, which has been designed to be run on Windows PC, has adopted a theoretical shape function of neutron attenuation in pellet, which enables users to perform a very fast and accurate calculation easily. The present code includes the irradiation conditions of the Halden Reactor which gives verification data for the code. The total list of trans-uranium elements included in the calculations consists of {sub 92}U{sup 233-239}, {sub 93}Np{sup 237-239}, {sub 94}Pu{sup 238-243}, {sub 95}Am{sup 241-244} (including isomers), and {sub 96}Cm{sup 242-245}. Poisoning fission products are represented by {sub 54}Xe{sup 131,133,135}, {sub 48}Cd{sup 113}, {sub 62}Sm{sup 149,151,152}, {sub 64}Gd{sup 154-160}, {sub 63}Eu{sup 153,155}, {sub 36}Kr{sup 83,85}, {sub 42}Mo{sup 95}, {sub 43}Tc{sup 99}, {sub 45}Rh{sup 103}, {sub 47}Ag{sup 109}, {sub 53}I{sup 127,129,131}, {sub 55}Cs{sup 133}, {sub 57}La{sup 139}, {sub 59}Pr{sup 141}, {sub 60}Nd{sup 143-150}, {sub 61}Pm{sup 147}. Fission gases and volatiles included in the code are {sub 36}Kr{sup 83-86}, {sub 54}Xe{sup 129-136}, {sub 52}Te{sup 125-130}, {sub 53}I{sup 127-131}, {sub 55}Cs{sup 133-137}, and {sub 56}Ba{sup 135-140}. Verification has been performed up to 83 GWd/tU, and a satisfactory agreement has been obtained. (author)

  18. Burn-up and Operation Time of Fuel Elements Produced in IPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondin, Julio Benedito Marin; Filho, Tufic Madi

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the developed work along the operational and reliability tests of fuel elements produced in the Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research, IPEN-CNEN/SP, from the 1980's. The study analyzed the U-235 burn evolution and the element remain in the research reactor IEA-R1. The fuel elements are of the type MTR (Material Testing Reactor), the standard with 18 plates and a 12-plate control, with a nominal mean enrichment of 20%.

  19. Research of natural resources saving by design studies of Pressurized Light Water Reactors and High Conversion PWR cores with mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of innovative neutronic conception of Pressurized Light Water Reactors (PWR) of 3. generation, saving of natural resources is of paramount importance for sustainable nuclear energy production. This study consists in the one hand to design high Conversion Reactors exploiting mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium, and in the other hand, to elaborate multi-recycling strategies of both plutonium and 233U, in order to maximize natural resources economy. This study has two main objectives: first the design of High Conversion PWR (HCPWR) with mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium, and secondly the setting up of multi-recycling strategies of both plutonium and 233U, to better natural resources economy. The approach took place in four stages. Two ways of introducing thorium into PWR have been identified: the first is with low moderator to fuel volume ratios (MR) and ThPuO2 fuel, and the second is with standard or high MR and ThUO2 fuel. The first way led to the design of under-moderated HCPWR following the criteria of high 233U production and low plutonium consumption. This second step came up with two specific concepts, from which multi-recycling strategies have been elaborated. The exclusive production and recycling of 233U inside HCPWR limits the annual economy of natural uranium to approximately 30%. It was brought to light that the strong need in plutonium in the HCPWR dedicated to 233U production is the limiting factor. That is why it was eventually proposed to study how the production of 233U within PWR (with standard MR), from 2020. It was shown that the anticipated production of 233U in dedicated PWR relaxes the constraint on plutonium inventories and favours the transition toward a symbiotic reactor fleet composed of both PWR and HCPWR loaded with thorium fuel. This strategy is more adapted and leads to an annual economy of natural uranium of about 65%. (author)

  20. Burnup credit issues in spent fuel transportation workshop - Overview and objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA) of 1987 the US DOE will ship spent fuels from commercial sites (reactors and storage facilities) to a federal repository using shipping casks certified by the US NRC. Requirements for shipping commercially generated, spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel to receiving facilities at the turn of the century will differ considerably from those existing in the US at present. The number of future shipments to repositories will represent a substantial increase over current experience as evidenced by comparison of the projected minimum transport rate of 3000 MTU/yr (metric tons uranium per year) with a total movement of 6000 MTU over the last 25 years in the US. Also, future casks will be required to only accommodate much older spent fuel. Since current casks are predominately designed for much shorter-cooled spent fuels (180 days out of the reactor), the development of more efficient, new generation casks is warranted because of the potential for large increases in payload capacity. As new casks are developed, private industry is being encouraged to be innovative in designing features to enhance both safety and operational efficiency

  1. A study of the effects of changing burn-up and gap gaseous compound on the gap convection coefficient (in a hot fuel pin) in VVER-1000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article we worked on the result and process of calculation of the gap heat transfer coefficient for a hot fuel pin in accordance with burn-up changes in the VVER-1000 reactor at the Bushehr nuclear power plant (Iran). With regard to the fact that in calculating the fuel gap heat transfer coefficient, various parameters are effective and the need for designing a model is being felt, therefore, in this article we used Ross and Stoute gap model to study impacts of different effective parameters such as thermal expansion and gaseous fission products on the hgap change rate. Over time and with changes in fuel burn-up some gaseous fission products such as xenon, argon and krypton gases are released to the gas mixture in the gap, which originally contained helium. In this study, the composition of gaseous elements in the gap volume during different times of reactor operation was found using ORIGEN code. Considering that the thermal conduction of these gases is lower than that of helium, and by using the Ross and Stoute gap model, we find first that the changes in gaseous compounds in the gap reduce the values of gap thermal conductivity coefficient, but considering thermal expansion (due to burn-up alterations) of fuel and clad resulting in the reduction of gap thickness we find that the gap heat transfer coefficient will augment in a broad range of burn-up changes. These changes result in a higher rate of gap thickness reduction than the low rate of decrease of heat conduction coefficient of the gas in the gap during burn-up. Once these changes have been defined, we can proceed with the analysis of the results of calculations based on the Ross and Stoute model and compare the results obtained with the experimental results for a hot fuel pin as presented in the final safety analysis report of the VVER-1000 reactor at Bushehr. It is noteworthy that the results of accomplished calculations based on the Ross and Stoute model correspond well with the existing

  2. Analysis of experimental measurements of PWR fresh and spent fuel assemblies using Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a new NDA technique that was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to improve existing nuclear safeguards measurements for LWR fuel assemblies. The SINRD detector consists of four fission chambers (FCs) wrapped with different absorber filters to isolate different parts of the neutron energy spectrum and one ion chamber (IC) to measure the gross gamma rate. As a result, two different techniques can be utilized using the same SINRD detector unit and hardware. These techniques are the Passive Neutron Multiplication Counter (PNMC) method and the SINRD method. The focus of the work described in this paper is the analysis of experimental measurements of fresh and spent PWR fuel assemblies that were performed at LANL and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), respectively, using the SINRD detector. The purpose of these experiments was to assess the following capabilities of the SINRD detector: 1) reproducibility of measurements to quantify systematic errors, 2) sensitivity to water gap between detector and fuel assembly, 3) sensitivity and penetrability to the removal of fuel rods from the assembly, and 4) use of PNMC/SINRD ratios to quantify neutron multiplication and/or fissile content. The results from these simulations and measurements provide valuable experimental data that directly supports safeguards research and development (R&D) efforts on the viability of passive neutron NDA techniques and detector designs for partial defect verification of spent fuel assemblies. - Highlights: • Experimental measurements of PWR fresh and spent FAs were performed with SINRD. • Good agreement of MCNPX and measured results confirmed accuracy of SINRD model. • For fresh fuel, SINRD and PNMC ratios were not sensitive to water gaps of ≤5-mm. • Practical use of SINRD would be in Fork detector to reduce systematic uncertainties

  3. An extended version of the SERPENT-2 code to investigate fuel burn-up and core material evolution of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufiero, M.; Cammi, A.; Fiorina, C.; Leppänen, J.; Luzzi, L.; Ricotti, M. E.

    2013-10-01

    In this work, the Monte Carlo burn-up code SERPENT-2 has been extended and employed to study the material isotopic evolution of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This promising GEN-IV nuclear reactor concept features peculiar characteristics such as the on-line fuel reprocessing, which prevents the use of commonly available burn-up codes. Besides, the presence of circulating nuclear fuel and radioactive streams from the core to the reprocessing plant requires a precise knowledge of the fuel isotopic composition during the plant operation. The developed extension of SERPENT-2 directly takes into account the effects of on-line fuel reprocessing on burn-up calculations and features a reactivity control algorithm. It is here assessed against a dedicated version of the deterministic ERANOS-based EQL3D procedure (PSI-Switzerland) and adopted to analyze the MSFR fuel salt isotopic evolution. Particular attention is devoted to study the effects of reprocessing time constants and efficiencies on the conversion ratio and the molar concentration of elements relevant for solubility issues (e.g., trivalent actinides and lanthanides). Quantities of interest for fuel handling and safety issues are investigated, including decay heat and activities of hazardous isotopes (neutron and high energy gamma emitters) in the core and in the reprocessing stream. The radiotoxicity generation is also analyzed for the MSFR nominal conditions. The production of helium and the depletion in tungsten content due to nuclear reactions are calculated for the nickel-based alloy selected as reactor structural material of the MSFR. These preliminary evaluations can be helpful in studying the radiation damage of both the primary salt container and the axial reflectors.

  4. Improve Design of Fuel Shear for Fast Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO; Wei; OUYANG; Ying-gen; LI; Wei-min

    2012-01-01

    <正>Due to the deeper burnup and higher fuel swelling, fast reactor metal fuel rod using 316 stainless steel cladding, replacing the traditional zirconia cladding. The diameter of fuel rod of fast reactor is much longer than that of PWR, and the cladding of stainless steel has better ductility than zirconia cladding. Using the existing shear still will cause several aspects of problem: 1) Longer diameter of rod leads to

  5. Experimental Investigation of Burnup Credit for Safe Transport, Storage, and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Gary A.; Helmick, Paul H.; Ford, John T.; Walker, Sharon A.; Berry, Donald T.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2004-04-01

    This report describes criticality benchmark experiments containing rhodium that were conducted as part of a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project. Rhodium is an important fission product absorber. A capability to perform critical experiments with low-enriched uranium fuel was established as part of the project. Ten critical experiments, some containing rhodium and others without, were conducted. The experiments were performed in such a way that the effects of the rhodium could be accurately isolated. The use of the experimental results to test neutronics codes is demonstrated by example for two Monte Carlo codes. These comparisons indicate that the codes predict the behavior of the rhodium in the critical systems within the experimental uncertainties. The results from this project, coupled with the results of follow-on experiments that investigate other fission products, can be used to quantify and reduce the conservatism of spent nuclear fuel safety analyses while still providing the necessary level of safety.

  6. Experimental investigation of burnup credit for safe transport, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Donald T.; Harms, Gary A.; Ford, John T.; Walker, Sharon Ann; Helmick, Paul H.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2004-04-01

    This report describes criticality benchmark experiments containing rhodium that were conducted as part of a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project. Rhodium is an important fission product absorber. A capability to perform critical experiments with low-enriched uranium fuel was established as part of the project. Ten critical experiments, some containing rhodium and others without, were conducted. The experiments were performed in such a way that the effects of the rhodium could be accurately isolated. The use of the experimental results to test neutronics codes is demonstrated by example for two Monte Carlo codes. These comparisons indicate that the codes predict the behavior of the rhodium in the critical systems within the experimental uncertainties. The results from this project, coupled with the results of follow-on experiments that investigate other fission products, can be used to quantify and reduce the conservatism of spent nuclear fuel safety analyses while still providing the necessary level of safety.

  7. Isotopic analyses and calculation by use of JENDL-3.2 for high burn-up UO{sub 2} and MOX spent fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasahara, Akihiro; Matsumura, Tetsuo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.; Nicolaou, G.; Betti, M.; Walker, C.T.

    1997-03-01

    The post irradiation examinations (PIE) were carried out for high burn-up UO{sub 2} spent fuel (3.8%U235, average burn-up:60GWd/t) and mixed oxide (MOX) spent fuel (5.07%Pu, average burn-up:45GWd/t). The PIE includes, (a) isotopic analysis, (b) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) in pellet cross section and so on. The results of isotopic analyses and EPMA were compared with ORIGEN2/82 and VIM-BURN calculation results. In VIM-BURN calculation, the nuclear data of actinides were proceeded from new data file, JENDL-3.2. The sensitivities of power history and moderator density to nuclides composition were investigated by VIM-BURN calculation and consequently power history mainly effected on Am241 and Am242m and moderator density effected on fissile nuclides. From EPMA results of U and Pu distribution in pellet, VIM-BURN calculation showed reasonable distribution in pellet cross section. (author)

  8. Burnup determination of silicide MTR fuel elements (20% 235U) in the LFR laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LFR facility is a radiochemical laboratory designed and constructed with a hot-cells line, a glove-box and a fume hood, all of them suited to work radioactive materials. At the beginning of the LFR operation a series of dissolutions of MTR irradiated silicide fuel elements was performed, and determined its isotopic composition of 235U, 239Pu and 148Nd (the last one as burn up monitor), by the thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS). These assays are linked to the IAEA RLA/4/018 Regional Project 'Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors'. It is concluded that this technique of burn up measurement is powerful and accurate when properly applied, and permit to validate the calculation codes when isotopic dilution is performed. It is worth noticed the LFR capacity to carry on different research and development programs in the nuclear fuel cycle field, such as the previously mentioned absolute burn up measurements, or the evaluation of radioactive waste immobilization processes and researches on burnable poisons. (author)

  9. The 1st Irradiation Test Results of the High Burn-up Large Grain UO{sub 2} Pellets in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Jae Geun; Yang, Yong Sik; Song, Keun Woo; Kim, Sun Kee; Kim, Young Min; Seo, Chul Gyo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The large grain UO{sub 2} pellet developed for the high burn-up PWR fuel was finished the 1st irradiation test in the HANARO since July of 2002. The large grain UO{sub 2} pellets will be irradiated up to the burn-up higher than 70 MWD/kgU. To irradiate the UO{sub 2} pellets up to the burn-up 70 MWD/kgU, it will take about 60 months. Now the 1st irradiation test for about 30 months was finished. The burn-up of the fuel rods was 33.62 MWD/kgU for the upper three fuel rods and 37.39 MWD/kgU for the lower three fuel rods, as of the June of 2005 by which the effective irradiation time is 320.6 day at the OR-4 of HANARO. These test rods were burned the lower about 9 % against target burn-up because the control rod of HANARO was operated at the lower position than analysis condition. The lower test rod assembly is loading into the new non-instrument capsule for the 2nd irradiation test and the 2nd irradiation test will be started in time.

  10. In-reactor behaviour of centrifugally atomized U3Si dispersion fuel irradiated up to high burn-up for HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation test on atomized and comminuted U3Si dispersion mini-element fuels has been performed up to about 69 at.% U-235 burn-up under normal linear power condition in OR-4 hole position of HANARO reactor, in order to examine the irradiation performance of the atomized U3Si for the driver fuels of HANARO. Irrespective of the powdering method, the in-reactor interaction of U3Si dispersion fuel meats is generally assumed to be acceptable with the range of ca. 9 μm in average thickness. The U3Si particles have relatively fine and uniform bubble size distribution, irrespective of the powdering method. Both the atomized and comminuted U3Si dispersion mini-element fuels exhibit sound swelling behaviours with the swelling range of ca. 5 % in ΔV/Vm, which meets with the safety criterion of the fuel rod, 20vol.% for HANARO. (author)

  11. Lateral hydraulic forces calculation on PWR fuel assemblies with computational fluid dynamics codes; Calculo de fuerzas laterales hidraulicas en elementos combustibles tipo PWR con codigos de dinamica de fluidos coputacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corpa Masa, R.; Jimenez Varas, G.; Moreno Garcia, B.

    2016-08-01

    To be able to simulate the behavior of nuclear fuel under operating conditions, it is required to include all the representative loads, including the lateral hydraulic forces which were not included traditionally because of the difficulty of calculating them in a reliable way. Thanks to the advance in CFD codes, now it is possible to assess them. This study calculates the local lateral hydraulic forces, caused by the contraction and expansion of the flow due to the bow of the surrounding fuel assemblies, on of fuel assembly under typical operating conditions from a three loop Westinghouse PWR reactor. (Author)

  12. In-Core Fuel Managements for PWRs: Investigation on solution for optimal utilization of PWR fuel through the use of fuel assemblies with differently enriched {sup 235}U fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caprioli, Sara

    2004-04-01

    A possibility for more efficient use of the nuclear fuel in a pressurized water reactor is investigated. The alternative proposed here consists of the implementation of PWR fuel assemblies with differently enriched {sup 235}U fuel pins. This possibility is examined in comparison with the standard assembly design. The comparison is performed both in terms of single assembly performance and in the terms of nuclear reactor core performance and fuel utility. For the evaluation of the actual performance of the new assembly types, 5 operated fuel core sequences of R3 (Ringhals' third unit), for the period 1999 - 2004 (cycles 17 - 21) were examined. For every cycle, the standard fresh fuel assemblies have been identified and taken as reference cases for the study of the new type of assemblies with differently enriched uranium rods. In every cycle, assemblies with and without burnable absorber are freshly loaded into the core. The axial enrichment distribution is kept uniform, allowing for a radial (planar) enrichment level distribution only. At an assembly level, it has been observed that the implementation of the alternative enrichment configuration can lead to lower and flatter internal peaking factor distribution with respect to the uniformly enriched reference assemblies. This can be achieved by limiting the enrichment levels distribution to a rather narrow range. The highest enrichment level chosen has the greatest impact on the power distribution of the assemblies. As it increases, the enrichment level drives the internal peaking factor to greater values than in the reference assemblies. Generally, the highest enrichment level that would allow an improvement in the power performance of the assembly lies between 3.95 w/o and 4.17 w/o. The highest possible enrichment level depends on the average enrichment of the overall assembly, which is kept constant to the average enrichment of the reference assemblies. The improvements that can be obtained at this level are

  13. Transmutation, Burn-Up and Fuel Fabrication Trade-Offs in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor Thorium Fuel Cycles - 13502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindley, Benjamin A.; Parks, Geoffrey T. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Franceschini, Fausto [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Multiple recycle of long-lived actinides has the potential to greatly reduce the required storage time for spent nuclear fuel or high level nuclear waste. This is generally thought to require fast reactors as most transuranic (TRU) isotopes have low fission probabilities in thermal reactors. Reduced-moderation LWRs are a potential alternative to fast reactors with reduced time to deployment as they are based on commercially mature LWR technology. Thorium (Th) fuel is neutronically advantageous for TRU multiple recycle in LWRs due to a large improvement in the void coefficient. If Th fuel is used in reduced-moderation LWRs, it appears neutronically feasible to achieve full actinide recycle while burning an external supply of TRU, with related potential improvements in waste management and fuel utilization. In this paper, the fuel cycle of TRU-bearing Th fuel is analysed for reduced-moderation PWRs and BWRs (RMPWRs and RBWRs). RMPWRs have the advantage of relatively rapid implementation and intrinsically low conversion ratios. However, it is challenging to simultaneously satisfy operational and fuel cycle constraints. An RBWR may potentially take longer to implement than an RMPWR due to more extensive changes from current BWR technology. However, the harder neutron spectrum can lead to favourable fuel cycle performance. A two-stage fuel cycle, where the first pass is Th-Pu MOX, is a technically reasonable implementation of either concept. The first stage of the fuel cycle can therefore be implemented at relatively low cost as a Pu disposal option, with a further policy option of full recycle in the medium term. (authors)

  14. The database system for the management of technical documentations of PWR fuel design project using CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the database system developed for the management of technical documentation of PWR fuel design project using CD-ROM (compact disk - read only memory) is described. The database system, KIRDOCM (KAERI Initial and Reload Fuel project technical documentation management), is developed and installed on PC using Visual Foxpro 3.0. Descriptions are focused on the user interface of the KIRDOCM. Introduction addresses the background and concept of the development. The main chapter describes the user requirements, the analysis of computing environment, the design of KIRDOCM, the implementation of the KIRDOCM, user's manual of KIRDOCM and the maintenance of the KIRDOCM for future improvement. The implementation of KIRDOCM system provides the efficiency in the management, maintenance and indexing of the technical documents. And, it is expected that KIRDOCM may be a good reference in applying Visual Foxpro for the development of information management system. (author). 2 tabs., 13 figs., 8 refs

  15. Preliminary Content Evaluation of the North Anna High Burn-Up Sister Fuel Rod Segments for Transportation in the 10-160B and NAC-LWT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) Program has transported high-burnup nuclear sister fuel rods from a commercial nuclear power plant for purposes of evaluation and testing. The evaluation and testing of high-burnup used nuclear fuel is integral to DOE initiatives to collect information useful in determining the integrity of fuel cladding for future safe transportation of the fuel, and for determining the effects of aging, on the integrity of UNF subjected to extended storage and subsequent transportation. The UFDC Program, in collaboration with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the commercial nuclear industry, has obtained individual used nuclear fuel rods for testing. The rods have been received at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for both separate effects testing (SET) and small-scale testing (SST). To meet the research objectives, testing on multiple 6 inch fuel rod pins cut from the rods at ORNL will be performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Up to 10 rod equivalents will be shipped. Options were evaluated for multiple shipments using the 10-160B (based on 4.5 rod equivalents) and a single shipment using the NAC-LWT. Based on the original INL/Virginia Power transfer agreement, the rods are assumed to 152 inches in length with a 0.374-inch diameter. This report provides a preliminary content evaluation for use of the 10-160B and NAC-LWT for transporting those fuel rod pins from ORNL to PNNL. This report documents the acceptability of using these packagings to transport the fuel segments from ORNL to PNNL based on the following evaluations: enrichment, A2 evaluation, Pu-239 FGE evaluation, heat load, shielding (both gamma and neutron), and content weight/structural evaluation.

  16. Axial gas transport and loss of pressure after ballooning rupture of high burn-up fuel rods subjected to LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project has implemented integral in-pile tests on issues related to fuel behaviour under LOCA conditions. In this test series, the interaction of bonded fuel and cladding, the behaviour of fragmented fuel around the ballooning area, and the axial gas communication in high burn-up rods as affected by gap closure and fuel-clad bonding are of major interest for the investigations. In the Halden reactor tests, the decay heat is simulated by a low level of nuclear heating, in contrast to the heating conditions implemented in hot laboratory set-ups, and the thermal expansion of fuel and cladding relative to each other is more similar to the real event. The paper deals with observations regarding the loss of rod pressure following the rupture of the cladding. In the majority of the tests conducted so far, the rod pressure dropped practically instantaneously as a consequence of ballooning rupture, while one test showed a remarkably slow pressure loss. The slow loss of pressure in this test was analysed, showing that the 'hydraulic diameter' of the rod over an un-distended upper part was about 30 - 35 μm which is typical of high burn-up fuel at hot-standby conditions. The 'plug' of fuel restricts the gas flow from the plenum through the fuel column and thus limits the availability of high pressure gas for driving the ballooning. This observation is relevant for the analysis of the behaviour of a full length fuel rod under LOCA conditions since restricted gas flow may influence bundle blockage and the number of failures. (authors)

  17. Burnup measurement and its relation to the amounts of 149Sm and 150Sm and the ratios of 154Eu/155Eu and 154Eu/152Eu in spent fuel of a power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amounts of 148Nd, 149Sm and 150Sm by the isotope dilution mass spectrography and the ratios of 154Eu/155Eu and 154Eu/152Eu by the γ-spectrography in the spent fuel of a power reactor have been measured. The amouns of 150Sm is directly proportional to that of 148Nd and burnup can be determined by 150Sm. Relation of the ratios of 154Eu/155Eu with respect to the burnup is plotted

  18. Evaluation of Thermal Creep and Hydride Re-orientation Properties of High Burnup Spent Fuel Cladding under Long Term Dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, spent fuels will be reprocessed as recyclable energy source at a reprocessing plant. The first commercial plant is under-constructing and will start operation in 2008. It is necessary that spent fuels should be stored in the independent interim storage facilities (ISF) until reprocessing. Utilities plan the operation of the first ISF in 2010. JNES has a mission to support the safety body by researching the data of technical standard and regulation. Investigating of spent fuel integrity during long term dry storage is one of them. The objectives are: 1) Evaluation of the effects of material design changes on creep properties of high burnup spent fuel cladding; 2) Evaluation of the effects of alloy elements and texture of irradiated Zircaloy on hydride re-orientation properties and the effects of radial hydrides on cladding mechanical properties; 3) Evaluation of the effects of temperature on irradiation hardening recovery.

  19. PWR ENDF/B-VII Cross-Section Libraries for ORIGEN-ARP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New pressurized water reactor (PWR) cross-section libraries were generated for use with the ORIGEN-ARP depletion sequence in the SCALE nuclear analysis code system. These libraries are based on ENDF/B-VII nuclear data and were generated using the two-dimensional depletion sequence, TRITON/NEWT, in SCALE 6.1. The libraries contain multiple burnup-dependent cross-sections for seven PWR fuel designs, with enrichments ranging from 1.5 to 6 wt% 235U. The burnup range has been extended from the 72 GWd/MTU used in previous versions of the libraries to 90 GWd/MTU. Validation of the libraries using radiochemical assay measurements and decay heat measurements for PWR spent fuel showed good agreement between calculated and experimental data. Verification against detailed TRITON simulations for the considered assembly designs showed that depletion calculations performed in ORIGEN-ARP with the pre-generated libraries provide similar results as obtained with direct TRITON depletion, while greatly reducing the computation time.

  20. Electron probe microanalysis of a METAPHIX UPuZr metallic alloy fuel irradiated to 7.0 at.% burn-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brémier, S.; Inagaki, K.; Capriotti, L.; Poeml, P.; Ogata, T.; Ohta, H.; Rondinella, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The METAPHIX project is a collaboration between CRIEPI and JRC-ITU investigating safety and performance of a closed fuel cycle option based on fast reactor metal alloy fuels containing Minor Actinides (MA). The aim of the project is to investigate the behaviour of this type of fuel and demonstrate the transmutation of MA under irradiation. A UPuZr metallic fuel sample irradiated to a burn-up of 7 at.% was examined by electron probe microanalysis. The fuel sample was extensively characterised qualitatively and quantitatively using elemental X-ray imaging and point analysis techniques. The analyses reveal a significant redistribution of the fuel components along the fuel radius highlighting a nearly complete depletion of Zr in the central part of the fuel. Numerous rare earth and fission products secondary phases are present in various compositions. Fuel cladding chemical interaction was observed with creation of a number of intermediary layers affecting a cladding depth of 15-20 μm and migration of cladding elements to the fuel.

  1. Benefits of the delta K of depletion benchmarks for burnup credit validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) burnup credit validation is demonstrated using the benchmarks for quantifying fuel reactivity decrements, published as 'Benchmarks for Quantifying Fuel Reactivity Depletion Uncertainty,' EPRI Report 1022909 (August 2011). This demonstration uses the depletion module TRITON available in the SCALE 6.1 code system followed by criticality calculations using KENO-Va. The difference between the predicted depletion reactivity and the benchmark's depletion reactivity is a bias for the criticality calculations. The uncertainty in the benchmarks is the depletion reactivity uncertainty. This depletion bias and uncertainty is used with the bias and uncertainty from fresh UO2 critical experiments to determine the criticality safety limits on the neutron multiplication factor, keff. The analysis shows that SCALE 6.1 with the ENDF/B-VII 238-group cross section library supports the use of a depletion bias of only 0.0015 in delta k if cooling is ignored and 0.0025 if cooling is credited. The uncertainty in the depletion bias is 0.0064. Reliance on the ENDF/B V cross section library produces much larger disagreement with the benchmarks. The analysis covers numerous combinations of depletion and criticality options. In all cases, the historical uncertainty of 5% of the delta k of depletion ('Kopp memo') was shown to be conservative for fuel with more than 30 GWD/MTU burnup. Since this historically assumed burnup uncertainty is not a function of burnup, the Kopp memo's recommended bias and uncertainty may be exceeded at low burnups, but its absolute magnitude is small. (authors)

  2. RANS modeling for flow in nuclear fuel bundle in pressurized water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents use of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) based turbulence model for single-phase CFD analysis of flow in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Assemblies. An open source code called OpenFoam was used for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study using computational meshes generated using Shari Harpoon. The PWR assembly design used in this analysis represents a 5 x 5 pin design including structural grid equipped with mixing vanes. The design specifications used in this study were obtained from the experimental setup at Texas A&M University and the results obtained are used to validate the CFD software, algorithm, and the turbulence model used in this analysis. (author)

  3. Analysis of experimental measurements of PWR fresh and spent fuel assemblies using Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFleur, Adrienne M.; Menlove, Howard O.

    2015-05-01

    Self-Interrogation Neutron Resonance Densitometry (SINRD) is a new NDA technique that was developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to improve existing nuclear safeguards measurements for LWR fuel assemblies. The SINRD detector consists of four fission chambers (FCs) wrapped with different absorber filters to isolate different parts of the neutron energy spectrum and one ion chamber (IC) to measure the gross gamma rate. As a result, two different techniques can be utilized using the same SINRD detector unit and hardware. These techniques are the Passive Neutron Multiplication Counter (PNMC) method and the SINRD method. The focus of the work described in this paper is the analysis of experimental measurements of fresh and spent PWR fuel assemblies that were performed at LANL and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), respectively, using the SINRD detector. The purpose of these experiments was to assess the following capabilities of the SINRD detector: 1) reproducibility of measurements to quantify systematic errors, 2) sensitivity to water gap between detector and fuel assembly, 3) sensitivity and penetrability to the removal of fuel rods from the assembly, and 4) use of PNMC/SINRD ratios to quantify neutron multiplication and/or fissile content. The results from these simulations and measurements provide valuable experimental data that directly supports safeguards research and development (R&D) efforts on the viability of passive neutron NDA techniques and detector designs for partial defect verification of spent fuel assemblies.

  4. Optimization of the distribution of bars with gadolinium oxide in reactor fuel elements PWR; Optimizacion de la distribucion de barras con oxido de gadolinio en elementos combustibles para reactores PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melgar Santa Cecilia, P. A.; Velazquez, J.; Ahnert Iglesias, C.

    2014-07-01

    In the schemes of low leakage, currently used in the majority of PWR reactors, it makes use of absorbent consumables for the effective control of the factors of peak, the critical concentration of initial boron and the moderator temperature coefficient. One of the most used absorbing is the oxide of gadolinium, which is integrated within the fuel pickup. Occurs a process of optimization of fuel elements with oxide of gadolinium, which allows for a smaller number of configurations with a low peak factor for bar. (Author)

  5. A study on the radioactive waste management for DUPIC fuel cycle - A study on the direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hyeon Soo; Chun, Kwan Sik; Kim, Jong Ho; Cho, Yeong Hyeon; Paek, Seung Uh; Kang, Hee Seok; Na, Jeong Won; Choi, Jong Won; Lee, Hu Keun; Park, Keun Il; Yang, Seung Yeong [Korea Atomic Energy Res. Inst., Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    The characteristics of the radioactive wastes coming from the DUPIC fuel manufacturing process were analyzed and evaluated. The release amounts of nuclides were estimated, and the characteristics of the oxides of semi-volatile nuclides such as Ru and Cs were analyzed and also these trapping and fixation technologies were assessed. The conceptual methods of experiment including apparatus and procedure were completed to define the vaporization behavior of nuclides. The gross {alpha}-activity and {alpha}-, {gamma}-spectrum of irradiated zircaloy specimens from KORI unit 1 were analyzed and the press to test the compaction of hulls was manufactured. Ingestion hazard index for the disposal of spent DUPIC fuel were calculated using ORIGEN 2 code and compared with the disposal of once-through spent PWR and CANDU fuels, and then the index per kwh for DUPIC cycle was 1/8 {approx} 1/4 lower than that for once-through cycle. (Author).

  6. Scoping design analyses for optimized shipping casks containing 1-, 2-, 3-, 5-, 7-, or 10-year-old PWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    This report details many of the interrelated considerations involved in optimizing large Pb, Fe, or U-metal spent fuel shipping casks containing 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, or 10-year-old PWR fuel assemblies. Scoping analyses based on criticality, shielding, and heat transfer considerations indicate that some casks may be able to hold as many as 18 to 21 ten-year-old PWR fuel assemblies. In the criticality section, a new type of inherently subcritical fuel assembly separator is described which uses hollow, borated stainless-steel tubes in the wall-forming structure between the assemblies. In another section, details of many n/..gamma.. shielding optimization studies are presented, including the optimal n/..gamma.. design points and the actual shielding requirements for each type of cask as a function of the age of the spent fuel and the number of assemblies in the cask. Multigroup source terms based on ORIGEN2 calculations at these and other decay times are also included. Lastly, the numerical methods and experimental correlations used in the steady-state and transient heat transfer analyses are fully documented, as are pertinent aspects of the SCOPE code for Shipping Cask Optimization and Parametric Evaluation. (While only casks for square, intact PWR fuel assemblies were considered in this study, the SCOPE code may also be used to design and analyze casks containing canistered spent fuel or other waste material. An abbreviated input data guide is included as an appendix).

  7. High-temperature compatibility between liquid metal as PWR fuel gap filler and stainless steel and high-density concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongsawaeng, Doonyapong; Jumpee, Chayanit; Jitpukdee, Manit

    2014-08-01

    In conventional nuclear fuel rods for light-water reactors, a helium-filled as-fabricated gap between the fuel and the cladding inner surface accommodates fuel swelling and cladding creep down. Because helium exhibits a very low thermal conductivity, it results in a large temperature rise in the gap. Liquid metal (LM; 1/3 weight portion each of lead, tin, and bismuth) has been proposed to be a gap filler because of its high thermal conductivity (∼100 times that of He), low melting point (∼100 °C), and lack of chemical reactivity with UO2 and water. With the presence of LM, the temperature drop across the gap is virtually eliminated and the fuel is operated at a lower temperature at the same power output, resulting in safer fuel, delayed fission gas release and prevention of massive secondary hydriding. During normal reactor operation, should an LM-bonded fuel rod failure occurs resulting in a discharge of liquid metal into the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel, it should not corrode stainless steel. An experiment was conducted to confirm that at 315 °C, LM in contact with 304 stainless steel in the PWR water chemistry environment for up to 30 days resulted in no observable corrosion. Moreover, during a hypothetical core-melt accident assuming that the liquid metal with elevated temperature between 1000 and 1600 °C is spread on a high-density concrete basement of the power plant, a small-scale experiment was performed to demonstrate that the LM-concrete interaction at 1000 °C for as long as 12 h resulted in no penetration. At 1200 °C for 5 h, the LM penetrated a distance of ∼1.3 cm, but the penetration appeared to stop. At 1400 °C the penetration rate was ∼0.7 cm/h. At 1600 °C, the penetration rate was ∼17 cm/h. No corrosion based on chemical reactions with high-density concrete occurred, and, hence, the only physical interaction between high-temperature LM and high-density concrete was from tiny cracks generated from thermal stress. Moreover

  8. Needs of reliable nuclear data and covariance matrices for Burnup Credit in JEFF-3 library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecarpentier D.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Burnup Credit (BUC is the concept which consists in taking into account credit for the reduction of nuclear spent fuel reactivity due to its burnup. In the case of PWR-MOx spent fuel, studies pointed out that the contribution of the 15 most absorbing, stable and non-volatile fission products selected to the credit is as important as the one of the actinides. In order to get a “best estimate” value of the keff, biases of their inventory calculation and individual reactivity worth should be considered in criticality safety studies. This paper enhances the most penalizing bias towards criticality and highlights possible improvements of nuclear data for the 15 FPs of PWRMOx BUC. Concerning the fuel inventory, trends in function of the burnup can be derived from experimental validation of the DARWIN-2.3 package (using the JEFF-3.1.1/SHEM library. Thanks to the BUC oscillation programme of separated FPs in the MINERVE reactor and fully validated scheme PIMS, calculation over experiment ratios can be accurately transposed to tendencies on the FPs integral cross sections.

  9. Direct reuse of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Nader M.A., E-mail: mnader73@yahoo.com

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new design for the PWR assemblies for direct use of spent fuel was proposed. • The PWR spent fuel will be transferred directly (after a certain cooling time) to CANDU reactors. • The proposed assembly has four zircaloy-4 tubes contains a number of CANDU fuel bundles (7 or 8 bundles per tube) stacked end to end. • MCNPX is used for the calculations that showed that the burnup can be increased by about 25%. • Acceptable linear heat generation rate in hot rods and improved Pu proliferation resistance. - Abstract: In this paper we proposed a new design for the PWR fuel assembly for direct use of the PWR spent fuel without processing. The PWR spent fuel will be transferred directly (after a certain cooling time) to CANDU reactors which preferably built in the same site to avoid the problem of transportations. The proposed assembly has four zircaloy-4 tubes contains a number of CANDU fuel bundles (7 or 8 bundles per tube) stacked end to end. Each tube has the same inner diameter of that of CANDU pressure tube. The spaces between the tubes contain low enriched UO{sub 2} fuel rods and guide tubes. MCNPX code is used for the simulation and calculation of the burnup of the proposed assembly. The bundles after the discharge from the PWR with their materials inventories are burned in a CANDU cell after a certain decay time. The results were compared with reference results and the impact of this new design on the uranium utilization improvement and on the proliferation resistance of plutonium is discussed. The effect of this new design on the power peaking, moderator temperature coefficient of reactivity and CANDU coolant void reactivity are discussed as well.

  10. Study of transient heat transfer in a fuel rod 3D, in a situation of unplanned shutdown of a PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Affonso, Renato Raoni Werneck; Martins, Rodolfo Ienny; Sampaio, Paulo Augusto Berquo de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: rodolfoienny@gmail.com, E-mail: sampaio@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The study, in situations involving accidents, of heat transfer in fuel rods is of known importance, since it can be used to predict the temperature limits in designing a nuclear reactor, to assist in making more efficient fuel rods, and to increase the knowledge about the behavior of the reactor's components, a crucial aspect for safety analysis. This study was conducted using as parameter the fuel rod that has the highest average power in a typical PWR reactor. For this, we developed a program (Fuel{sub R}od{sub 3}D) in Fortran language using the Finite Elements Method (FEM) for the discretization of a fuel rod and coolant channel, in order to study the temperature distribution in both the fuel rod and the coolant channel. Transient parameters were coupled to the heat transfer equations in order to obtain details of the behavior of the rod and the channel, which allows the analysis of the temperature distribution and its change over time. This work aims to present a study case of an accident where there is a lack of energy in the reactor's coolant pumps and in the diesel engines, resulting in an unplanned shutdown of the reactor. In order to achieve the intended goal, the present work was divided as follows: a short introduction about heat transfer, including the equations concerning the fuel rod and the energy equation in the channel, an explanation about how the verification of the Fuel{sub R}od{sub 3}D program was made, and the analysis of the results. (author)

  11. Fabrication, irradiation and post-irradiation examinations of MO2 and UO2 sphere-pac and UO2 pellet fuel pins irradiated in a PWR loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three fuel pin bundles, R-109/1, 2 and 3, were irradiated in a PWR loop in the HFR at Petten during respectively 131, 57 and 57 effective full power days at average powers of approximately 39 kW.m-1 and at peak powers of approximately 60 kW.m-1. The results of the post-irradiation examinations of these fuel bundles are presented. (Auth.)