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Sample records for burnup dependent group

  1. MTR core loading pattern optimization using burnup dependent group constants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqbal Masood

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A diffusion theory based MTR fuel management methodology has been developed for finding superior core loading patterns at any stage for MTR systems, keeping track of burnup of individual fuel assemblies throughout their history. It is based on using burnup dependent group constants obtained by the WIMS-D/4 computer code for standard fuel elements and control fuel elements. This methodology has been implemented in a computer program named BFMTR, which carries out detailed five group diffusion theory calculations using the CITATION code as a subroutine. The core-wide spatial flux and power profiles thus obtained are used for calculating the peak-to-average power and flux-ratios along with the available excess reactivity of the system. The fuel manager can use the BFMTR code for loading pattern optimization for maximizing the excess reactivity, keeping the peak-to-average power as well as flux-ratio within constraints. The results obtained by the BFMTR code have been found to be in good agreement with the corresponding experimental values for the equilibrium core of the Pakistan Research Reactor-1.

  2. The burnup dependence of light water reactor spent fuel oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, B.D.

    1998-07-01

    Over the temperature range of interest for dry storage or for placement of spent fuel in a permanent repository under the conditions now being considered, UO{sub 2} is thermodynamically unstable with respect to oxidation to higher oxides. The multiple valence states of uranium allow for the accommodation of interstitial oxygen atoms in the fuel matrix. A variety of stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric phases is therefore possible as the fuel oxidizers from UO{sub 2} to higher oxides. The oxidation of UO{sub 2} has been studied extensively for over 40 years. It has been shown that spent fuel and unirradiated UO{sub 2} oxidize via different mechanisms and at different rates. The oxidation of LWR spent fuel from UO{sub 2} to UO{sub 2.4} was studied previously and is reasonably well understood. The study presented here was initiated to determine the mechanism and rate of oxidation from UO{sub 2.4} to higher oxides. During the early stages of this work, a large variability in the oxidation behavior of samples oxidized under nearly identical conditions was found. Based on previous work on the effect of dopants on UO{sub 2} oxidation and this initial variability, it was hypothesized that the substitution of fission product and actinide impurities for uranium atoms in the spent fuel matrix was the cause of the variable oxidation behavior. Since the impurity concentration is roughly proportional to the burnup of a specimen, the oxidation behavior of spent fuel was expected to be a function of both temperature and burnup. This report (1) summarizes the previous oxidation work for both unirradiated UO{sub 2} and spent fuel (Section 2.2) and presents the theoretical basis for the burnup (i.e., impurity concentration) dependence of the rate of oxidation (Sections 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5), (2) describes the experimental approach (Section 3) and results (Section 4) for the current oxidation tests on spent fuel, and (3) establishes a simple model to determine the activation energies

  3. Development of burnup dependent fuel rod model in COBRA-TF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Mine Ozdemir

    The purpose of this research was to develop a burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model within Pennsylvania State University, Reactor Dynamics and Fuel Management Group (RDFMG) version of the subchannel thermal-hydraulics code COBRA-TF (CTF). The model takes into account first, the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity with high burnup; and second, the fuel thermal conductivity dependence on the Gadolinium content for both UO2 and MOX fuel rods. The modified Nuclear Fuel Industries (NFI) model for UO2 fuel rods and Duriez/Modified NFI Model for MOX fuel rods were incorporated into CTF and fuel centerline predictions were compared against Halden experimental test data and FRAPCON-3.4 predictions to validate the burnup dependent fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF. Experimental test cases from Halden reactor fuel rods for UO2 fuel rods at Beginning of Life (BOL), through lifetime without Gd2O3 and through lifetime with Gd 2O3 and a MOX fuel rod were simulated with CTF. Since test fuel rod and FRAPCON-3.4 results were based on single rod measurements, CTF was run for a single fuel rod surrounded with a single channel configuration. Input decks for CTF were developed for one fuel rod located at the center of a subchannel (rod-centered subchannel approach). Fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF were compared against the measurements from Halden experimental test data and the predictions from FRAPCON-3.4. After implementing the new fuel thermal conductivity model in CTF and validating the model with experimental data, CTF model was applied to steady state and transient calculations. 4x4 PWR fuel bundle configuration from Purdue MOX benchmark was used to apply the new model for steady state and transient calculations. First, one of each high burnup UO2 and MOX fuel rods from 4x4 matrix were selected to carry out single fuel rod calculations and fuel centerline temperatures predicted by CTF/TORT-TD were compared against CTF /TORT-TD /FRAPTRAN

  4. Reactivity effect of spent fuel depending on burn-up history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Takafumi [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya, Aichi (Japan); Suyama, Kenya; Nomura, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Mochizuki, Hiroki [The Japan Research Institute, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-06-01

    It is well known that a composition of spent fuel depends on various parameter changes throughout a burn-up period. In this study we aimed at the boron concentration and its change, the coolant temperature and its spatial distribution, the specific power, the operation mode, and the duration of inspection, because the effects due to these parameters have not been analyzed in detail. The composition changes of spent fuel were calculated by using the burn-up code SWAT, when the parameters mentioned above varied in the range of actual variations. Moreover, to estimate the reactivity effect caused by the composition changes, the criticality calculations for an infinite array of spent fuel were carried out with computer codes SRAC95 or MVP. In this report the reactivity effects were arranged from the viewpoint of what parameters gave more positive reactivity effect. The results obtained through this study are useful to choose the burn-up calculation model when we take account of the burn-up credit in the spent fuel management. (author)

  5. Dependence of heavy metal burnup on nuclear data libraries for fast reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ohki, S

    2003-01-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) is considering the highly burnt fuel as well as the recycling of minor actinide (MA) in the development of commercialized fast reactor cycle systems. Higher accuracy in burnup calculation is going to be required for higher mass plutonium isotopes ( sup 2 sup 4 sup 0 Pu, etc.) and MA nuclides. In the framework of research and development aiming at the validation and necessary improvements of fast reactor burnup calculation, we investigated the differences among the burnup calculation results with the major nuclear data libraries: JEF-2.2, ENDF/B-VI Release 5, JENDL-3.2, and JENDL-3.3. We focused on the heavy metal nuclides such as plutonium and MA in the central core region of a conventional sodium-cooled fast reactor. For main heavy metal nuclides ( sup 2 sup 3 sup 5 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U, sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu, sup 2 sup 4 sup 0 Pu, and sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Pu), number densities after 1-cycle burnup did not change over one or two percent. Library dependence was re...

  6. Development and validation of burnup dependent computational schemes for the analysis of assemblies with advanced lattice codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamoorthy, Karthikeyan

    The main aim of this research is the development and validation of computational schemes for advanced lattice codes. The advanced lattice code which forms the primary part of this research is "DRAGON Version4". The code has unique features like self shielding calculation with capabilities to represent distributed and mutual resonance shielding effects, leakage models with space-dependent isotropic or anisotropic streaming effect, availability of the method of characteristics (MOC), burnup calculation with reaction-detailed energy production etc. Qualified reactor physics codes are essential for the study of all existing and envisaged designs of nuclear reactors. Any new design would require a thorough analysis of all the safety parameters and burnup dependent behaviour. Any reactor physics calculation requires the estimation of neutron fluxes in various regions of the problem domain. The calculation goes through several levels before the desired solution is obtained. Each level of the lattice calculation has its own significance and any compromise at any step will lead to poor final result. The various levels include choice of nuclear data library and energy group boundaries into which the multigroup library is cast; self shielding of nuclear data depending on the heterogeneous geometry and composition; tracking of geometry, keeping error in volume and surface to an acceptable minimum; generation of regionwise and groupwise collision probabilities or MOC-related information and their subsequent normalization thereof, solution of transport equation using the previously generated groupwise information and obtaining the fluxes and reaction rates in various regions of the lattice; depletion of fuel and of other materials based on normalization with constant power or constant flux. Of the above mentioned levels, the present research will mainly focus on two aspects, namely self shielding and depletion. The behaviour of the system is determined by composition of resonant

  7. Assessment of the uncertainties of MULTICELL calculations by the OECD NEA UAM PWR pin cell burnup benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kereszturi, Andras [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Centre for Energy Research; Panka, Istvan

    2015-09-15

    Defining precisely the burnup of the nuclear fuel is important from the point of view of core design calculations, safety analyses, criticality calculations (e.g. burnup credit calculations), etc. This paper deals with the uncertainties of MULTICELL calculations obtained by the solution of the OECD NEA UAM PWR pin cell burnup benchmark. In this assessment Monte-Carlo type statistical analyses are applied and the energy dependent covariance matrices of the cross-sections are taken into account. Additionally, the impact of the uncertainties of the fission yields is also considered. The target quantities are the burnup dependent uncertainties of the infinite multiplication factor, the two-group cross-sections, the reaction rates and the number densities of some isotopes up to the burnup of 60 MWd/kgU. In the paper the burnup dependent tendencies of the corresponding uncertainties and their sources are analyzed.

  8. Impacts of burnup-dependent swelling of metallic fuel on the performance of a compact breed-and-burn fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartanto, Donny; Heo, Woong; Kim, Chi Hyung; Kim, Yong Hee [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The U-Zr or U-TRU-Zr cylindrical metallic fuel slug used in fast reactors is known to swell significantly and to grow during irradiation. In neutronics simulations of metallic-fueled fast reactors, it is assumed that the slug has swollen and contacted cladding, and the bonding sodium has been removed from the fuel region. In this research, a realistic burnup-dependent fuel-swelling simulation was performed using Monte Carlo code McCARD for a single-batch compact sodium-cooled breed-and-burn reactor by considering the fuel-swelling behavior reported from the irradiation test results in EBR-II. The impacts of the realistic burnup-dependent fuel swelling are identified in terms of the reactor neutronics performance, such as core lifetime, conversion ratio, axial power distribution, and local burnup distributions. It was found that axial fuel growth significantly deteriorated the neutron economy of a breed-and-burn reactor and consequently impaired its neutronics performance. The bonding sodium also impaired neutron economy, because it stayed longer in the blanket region until the fuel slug reached 2% burnup.

  9. PLUTON: Three-group neutronic code for burnup analysis of isotope generation and depletion in highly irradiated LWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemehov, Sergei E; Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    PLUTON is a three-group neutronic code analyzing, as functions of time and burnup, the change of radial profiles, together with average values, of power density, burnup, concentration of trans-uranium elements, plutonium buildup, depletion of fissile elements, and fission product generation in water reactor fuel rod with standard UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}-Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, inhomogeneous MOX, and UO{sub 2}-ThO{sub 2}. The PLUTON code, which has been designed to be run on Windows PC, has adopted a theoretical shape function of neutron attenuation in pellet, which enables users to perform a very fast and accurate calculation easily. The present code includes the irradiation conditions of the Halden Reactor which gives verification data for the code. The total list of trans-uranium elements included in the calculations consists of {sub 92}U{sup 233-239}, {sub 93}Np{sup 237-239}, {sub 94}Pu{sup 238-243}, {sub 95}Am{sup 241-244} (including isomers), and {sub 96}Cm{sup 242-245}. Poisoning fission products are represented by {sub 54}Xe{sup 131,133,135}, {sub 48}Cd{sup 113}, {sub 62}Sm{sup 149,151,152}, {sub 64}Gd{sup 154-160}, {sub 63}Eu{sup 153,155}, {sub 36}Kr{sup 83,85}, {sub 42}Mo{sup 95}, {sub 43}Tc{sup 99}, {sub 45}Rh{sup 103}, {sub 47}Ag{sup 109}, {sub 53}I{sup 127,129,131}, {sub 55}Cs{sup 133}, {sub 57}La{sup 139}, {sub 59}Pr{sup 141}, {sub 60}Nd{sup 143-150}, {sub 61}Pm{sup 147}. Fission gases and volatiles included in the code are {sub 36}Kr{sup 83-86}, {sub 54}Xe{sup 129-136}, {sub 52}Te{sup 125-130}, {sub 53}I{sup 127-131}, {sub 55}Cs{sup 133-137}, and {sub 56}Ba{sup 135-140}. Verification has been performed up to 83 GWd/tU, and a satisfactory agreement has been obtained. (author)

  10. Fully Coupled Modeling of Burnup-Dependent (U1- y , Pu y )O2- x Mixed Oxide Fast Reactor Fuel Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rong; Zhou, Wenzhong; Zhou, Wei

    2016-03-01

    During the fast reactor nuclear fuel fission reaction, fission gases accumulate and form pores with the increase of fuel burnup, which decreases the fuel thermal conductivity, leading to overheating of the fuel element. The diffusion of plutonium and oxygen with high temperature gradient is also one of the important fuel performance concerns as it will affect the fuel material properties, power distribution, and overall performance of the fuel pin. In order to investigate these important issues, the (U1- y Pu y )O2- x fuel pellet is studied by fully coupling thermal transport, deformation, oxygen diffusion, fission gas release and swelling, and plutonium redistribution to evaluate the effects on each other with burnup-dependent models, accounting for the evolution of fuel porosity. The approach was developed using self-defined multiphysics models based on the framework of COMSOL Multiphysics to manage the nonlinearities associated with fast reactor mixed oxide fuel performance analysis. The modeling results showed a consistent fuel performance comparable with the previous results. Burnup degrades the fuel thermal conductivity, resulting in a significant fuel temperature increase. The fission gas release increased rapidly first and then steadily with the burnup increase. The fuel porosity increased dramatically at the beginning of the burnup and then kept constant as the fission gas released to the fuel free volume, causing the fuel temperature to increase. Another important finding is that the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen affects greatly not only the fuel properties, for example, thermal conductivity, but also the fuel performance, for example, temperature distribution, porosity evolution, grain size growth, fission gas release, deformation, and plutonium redistribution. Special attention needs to be paid to the deviation from stoichiometry of oxygen in fuel fabrication. Plutonium content will also affect the fuel material properties and performance

  11. Integrated burnup calculation code system SWAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Kenya; Hirakawa, Naohiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Iwasaki, Tomohiko

    1997-11-01

    SWAT is an integrated burnup code system developed for analysis of post irradiation examination, transmutation of radioactive waste, and burnup credit problem. It enables us to analyze the burnup problem using neutron spectrum depending on environment of irradiation, combining SRAC which is Japanese standard thermal reactor analysis code system and ORIGEN2 which is burnup code widely used all over the world. SWAT makes effective cross section library based on results by SRAC, and performs the burnup analysis with ORIGEN2 using that library. SRAC and ORIGEN2 can be called as external module. SWAT has original cross section library on based JENDL-3.2 and libraries of fission yield and decay data prepared from JNDC FP Library second version. Using these libraries, user can use latest data in the calculation of SWAT besides the effective cross section prepared by SRAC. Also, User can make original ORIGEN2 library using the output file of SWAT. This report presents concept and user`s manual of SWAT. (author)

  12. Epistemic dependence in interdisciplinary groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Hanne; Wagenknecht, Susann

    2013-01-01

    ignores the issue of differences in background knowledge, or it focuses explicitly on conflicting background knowledge. In this paper we provide an analysis of the interplay between epistemic dependence between individual experts with different areas of expertise. We analyze the cooperative activity...

  13. 多群蒙卡输运与点燃耗耦合程序系统TRITON基准验证%Benchmark Verification of Multi-group Monte Carlo Transport and Point-Burnup Codes Coupling System TRITON

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武祥; 若夕子; 于涛; 谢金森; 陈昊威

    2014-01-01

    TRITON couples multi group Monte Carlo Transport code KENO V. a and point-burnup code ORIGEN-S. It features adaptability on complex geometries,flexible processing ability on cross section and rapid calculating speed. Based on the thorium-based fuel cell benchmark of Idaho National Laboratory ( INL) ,the verification on TRITON burnup calcu-lation was performed,which showed good coincidence with the result of MOCUP code by INL. Furthermore, the results of burnup isotopes selection schemes in TRITON showed that,for thorium based fuel,only important nuclides on Th-U cycle was included,correct results can be obtained by TRITON. Conclusions in the present paper will support further applications of TRITON.%TRITON程序系统耦合了多群蒙特卡罗输运程序KENO V. a与点燃耗程序ORIGEN-S,具有几何适应性强、截面处理能力灵活、计算速度快等显著特点.本文基于爱达荷国家实验室( INL)钍基燃料元件燃耗基准题,开展了TRITON程序燃耗功能的验证,结果与INL采用MOCUP程序给出的结果吻合很好.同时,燃耗核素选取对TRITON计算结果的影响分析表明对于钍基燃料,只有在考虑Th-U循环重要核素的前提下,TRITON才能给出正确结果.上述结论为TRITON程序的应用奠定了基础.

  14. [Bilateral dependency and the minimal group paradigm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, N; Yamagishi, T; Kiyonari, T

    1996-06-01

    Two experiments examined the effect of illusion of control on in-group favoritism found in the minimal group situation (Tajfel, Billig, Bundy, & Flament, 1971). In bilateral dependency condition, each member made allocation decisions for in-group as well as out-group participants. It was exactly the same situation used in the original studies under the minimal group paradigm, and the subjects knew that their reward allocation too depended on others' decisions. In contrast, in unilateral dependency condition, the subjects made allocation decisions knowing that theirs were not dependent on others' decisions. In Experiment 1, an in-group bias in reward distribution was found in the bilateral dependency condition, but not in the unilateral condition. In Experiment 2, it was found that only those who felt illusion of control exhibited such an in-group bias. Results of the experiments therefore confirmed that illusion of control explained in-group favoritism, as Karp, Jin, Yamagishi, and Shinotsuka (1993) originally hypothesized.

  15. Triton burnup measurements in KSTAR using a neutron activation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Jungmin; Cheon, MunSeong; Kim, Jun Young; Rhee, T.; Kim, Junghee; Shi, Yue-Jiang; Isobe, M.; Ogawa, K.; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Hwang, Y. S.

    2016-11-01

    Measurements of the time-integrated triton burnup for deuterium plasma in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) have been performed following the simultaneous detection of the d-d and d-t neutrons. The d-d neutrons were measured using a 3He proportional counter, fission chamber, and activated indium sample, whereas the d-t neutrons were detected using activated silicon and copper samples. The triton burnup ratio from KSTAR discharges is found to be in the range 0.01%-0.50% depending on the plasma conditions. The measured burnup ratio is compared with the prompt loss fraction of tritons calculated with the Lorentz orbit code and the classical slowing-down time. The burnup ratio is found to increase as plasma current and classical slowing-down time increase.

  16. Percolation on networks with conditional dependence group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available Recently, the dependence group has been proposed to study the robustness of networks with interdependent nodes. A dependence group means that a failed node in the group can lead to the failures of the whole group. Considering the situation of real networks that one failed node may not always break the functionality of a dependence group, we study a cascading failure model that a dependence group fails only when more than a fraction β of nodes of the group fail. We find that the network becomes more robust with the increasing of the parameter β. However, the type of percolation transition is always first order unless the model reduces to the classical network percolation model, which is independent of the degree distribution of the network. Furthermore, we find that a larger dependence group size does not always make the networks more fragile. We also present exact solutions to the size of the giant component and the critical point, which are in agreement with the simulations well.

  17. Renormalization Scheme Dependence and Renormalization Group Summation

    CERN Document Server

    McKeon, D G C

    2016-01-01

    We consider logarithmic contributions to the free energy, instanton effective action and Laplace sum rules in QCD that are a consequence of radiative corrections. Upon summing these contributions by using the renormalization group, all dependence on the renormalization scale parameter mu cancels. The renormalization scheme dependence in these processes is examined, and a renormalization scheme is found in which the effect of higher order radiative corrections is absorbed by the behaviour of the running coupling.

  18. Detailed description and user`s manual of high burnup fuel analysis code EXBURN-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Saitou, Hiroaki

    1997-11-01

    EXBURN-I has been developed for the analysis of LWR high burnup fuel behavior in normal operation and power transient conditions. In the high burnup region, phenomena occur which are different in quality from those expected for the extension of behaviors in the mid-burnup region. To analyze these phenomena, EXBURN-I has been formed by the incorporation of such new models as pellet thermal conductivity change, burnup-dependent FP gas release rate, and cladding oxide layer growth to the basic structure of low- and mid-burnup fuel analysis code FEMAXI-IV. The present report describes in detail the whole structure of the code, models, and materials properties. Also, it includes a detailed input manual and sample output, etc. (author). 55 refs.

  19. Calibration of burnup monitor installed in Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeda, Kaoru; Naito, Hirofumi; Hirota, Masanari [Japan Nuclear Fuel Co. Ltd., Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Natsume, Koichiro [Isogo Engineering Center, Toshiba Corporation, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); Kumanomido, Hironori [Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, Toshiba Corporation, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant uses burnup credit for criticality control at the Spent Fuel Storage Facility (SFSF) and the Dissolution Facility. A burnup monitor measures nondestructively burnup value of a spent fuel assembly and guarantees the credit for burnup. For practical reasons, a standard radiation source is not used in calibration of the burnup monitor, but the burnup values of many spent fuel assemblies are measured based on operator-declared burnup values. This paper describes the concept of burnup credit, the burnup monitor, and the calibration method. It is concluded, from the results of calibration tests, that the calibration method is valid. (author)

  20. DSSC anchoring groups: a surface dependent decision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, C; Bowler, D R

    2014-05-14

    Electrodes in dye sensitised solar cells are typically nanocrystalline anatase TiO2 with a majority (1 0 1) surface exposed. Generally the sensitising dye employs a carboxylic anchoring moiety through which it adheres to the TiO₂ surface. Recent interest in exploiting the properties of differing TiO₂ electrode morphologies, such as rutile nanorods exposing the (1 1 0) surface and anatase electrodes with high percentages of the (0 0 1) surface exposed, begs the question of whether this anchoring strategy is best, irrespective of the majority surface exposed. Here we address this question by presenting density functional theory calculations contrasting the binding properties of two promising anchoring groups, phosphonic acid and boronic acid, to that of carboxylic acid. Anchor-electrode interactions are studied for the prototypical anatase (1 0 1) surface, along with the anatase (0 0 1) and rutile (1 1 0) surfaces. Finally the effect of using these alternative anchoring groups to bind a typical coumarin dye (NKX-2311) to these TiO₂ substrates is examined. Significant differences in the binding properties are found depending on both the anchor and surface, illustrating that the choice of anchor is necessarily dependent upon the surface exposed in the electrode. In particular the boronic acid is found to show the potential to be an excellent anchor choice for electrodes exposing the anatase (0 0 1) surface.

  1. Analysis of high burnup fuel safety issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Kim, D. H.; Bang, J. G.; Kim, Y. M.; Yang, Y. S.; Jung, Y. H.; Jeong, Y. H.; Nam, C.; Baik, J. H.; Song, K. W.; Kim, K. S

    2000-12-01

    Safety issues in steady state and transient behavior of high burnup LWR fuel above 50 - 60 MWD/kgU were analyzed. Effects of burnup extension upon fuel performance parameters was reviewed, and validity of both the fuel safety criteria and the performance analysis models which were based upon the lower burnup fuel test results was analyzed. It was found that further tests would be necessary in such areas as fuel failure and dispersion for RIA, and high temperature cladding corrosion and mechanical deformation for LOCA. Since domestic fuels have been irradiated in PWR up to burnup higher than 55 MWD/kgU-rod. avg., it can be said that Korea is in the same situation as the other countries in the high burnup fuel safety issues. Therefore, necessary research areas to be performed in Korea were derived. Considering that post-irradiation examination(PIE) for the domestic fuel of burnup higher than 30 MWD/kgU has not been done so far at all, it is primarily necessary to perform PIE for high burnup fuel, and then simulation tests for RIA and LOCA could be performed by using high burnup fuel specimens. For the areas which can not be performed in Korea, international cooperation will be helpful to obtain the test results. With those data base, safety of high burnup domestic fuels will be confirmed, current fuel safety criteria will be re-evaluated, and finally transient high burnup fuel behavior analysis technology will be developed through the fuel performance analysis code development.

  2. Superrosy dependent groups having finitely satisfiable generics

    CERN Document Server

    Ealy, Clifton; Pillay, Anand

    2007-01-01

    We study a model theoretic context (finite thorn rank, NIP, with finitely satisfiable generics) which is a common generalization of groups of finite Morley rank and definably compact groups in o-minimal structures. We show that assuming thorn rank 1, the group is abelian-by-finite, and assuming thorn rank 2 the group is solvable by finite. Also a field is algebraically closed.

  3. Burnup analysis of the VVER-1000 reactor using thorium-based fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkmaz, Mehmet E.; Agar, Osman; Bueyueker, Eylem [Karamanoglu Mehmetbey Univ., Karaman (Turkey). Faculty of Kamil Ozdag Science

    2014-12-15

    This paper aims to investigate {sup 232}Th/{sup 233}U fuel cycles in a VVER-1000 reactor through calculation by computer. The 3D core geometry of VVER-1000 system was designed using the Serpent Monte Carlo 1.1.19 Code. The Serpent Code using parallel programming interface (Message Passing Interface-MPI), was run on a workstation with 12-core and 48 GB RAM. {sup 232}Th/{sup 235}U/{sup 238}U oxide mixture was considered as fuel in the core, when the mass fraction of {sup 232}Th was increased as 0.05-0.1-0.2-0.3-0.4 respectively, the mass fraction of {sup 238}U equally was decreased. In the system, the calculations were made for 3 000 MW thermal power. For the burnup analyses, the core is assumed to deplete from initial fresh core up to a burnup of 16 MWd/kgU without refuelling considerations. In the burnup calculations, a burnup interval of 360 effective full power days (EFPDs) was defined. According to burnup, the mass changes of the {sup 232}Th, {sup 233}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 241}Am and {sup 244}Cm were evaluated, and also flux and criticality of the system were calculated in dependence of the burnup rate.

  4. Model biases in high-burnup fast reactor simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touran, N.; Cheatham, J.; Petroski, R. [TerraPower LLC, 11235 S.E. 6th St, Bellevue, WA 98004 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A new code system called the Advanced Reactor Modeling Interface (ARMI) has been developed that loosely couples multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulations to provide rapid, user-friendly, high-fidelity full systems analysis. Incorporating neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, safety/transient, fuel performance, core mechanical, and economic analyses, ARMI provides 'one-click' assessments of many multi-disciplined performance metrics and constraints that historically require iterations between many diverse experts. The capabilities of ARMI are implemented in this study to quantify neutronic biases of various modeling approximations typically made in fast reactor analysis at an equilibrium condition, after many repetitive shuffles. Sensitivities at equilibrium that result in very high discharge burnup are considered ( and >20% FIMA), as motivated by the development of the Traveling Wave Reactor. Model approximations discussed include homogenization, neutronic and depletion mesh resolution, thermal-hydraulic coupling, explicit control rod insertion, burnup-dependent cross sections, fission product model, burn chain truncation, and dynamic fuel performance. The sensitivities of these approximations on equilibrium discharge burnup, k{sub eff}, power density, delayed neutron fraction, and coolant temperature coefficient are discussed. (authors)

  5. Investigation on using neutron counting techniques for online burnup monitoring of pebble bed reactor fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang

    Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) is a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear power reactor. This project investigated the feasibility of using the passive neutron counting and active neutron/gamma counting for the on line fuel burnup measurement for MPBR. To investigate whether there is a correlation between neutron emission and fuel burnup, the MPBR fuel depletion was simulated under different irradiation conditions by ORIGEN2. It was found that the neutron emission from an irradiated pebble increases with burnup super-linearly and reaches to 104 neutron/sec/pebble at the discharge burnup. The photon emission from an irradiated pebble was found to be in the order of 1013 photon/sec/pebble at all burnup levels. Analysis shows that the neutron emission rate of an irradiated pebble is sensitive to its burnup history and the spectral-averaged one-group cross sections used in the depletion calculations, which consequently leads to large uncertainty in the correlation between neutron emission and burnup. At low burnup levels, the uncertainty in the neutron emission/burnup correlation is too high and the neutron emission rate is too low so that it is impossible to determine a pebble's burnup by on-line neutron counting at low burnup levels. At high burnup levels, the uncertainty in the neutron emission rate becomes less but is still large in quantity. However, considering the super-linear feature of the correlation, the uncertainty in burnup determination was found to be ˜7% at the discharge burnup, which is acceptable. Therefore, total neutron emission rate of a pebble can be used as a burnup indicator to determine whether a pebble should be discharged or not. The feasibility of using passive neutron counting methods for the on-line burnup measurement was investigated by using a general Monte Carlo code, MCNP, to assess the detectability of the neutron emission and the capability to discriminate gamma noise by commonly used neutron detectors. It was found that both He-3

  6. ISOTOPIC MODEL FOR COMMERCIAL SNF BURNUP CREDIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.H. Wells

    2004-11-17

    The purpose of this report is to demonstrate a process for selecting bounding depletion parameters, show that they are conservative for pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and establish the range of burnup for which the parameters are conservative. The general range of applicability is for commercial light water reactor (LWR) SNF with initial enrichments between 2.0 and 5.0 weight percent {sup 235}U and burnups between 10 and 50 gigawatt-day per metric ton of uranium (GWd/MTU).

  7. A PWR Thorium Pin Cell Burnup Benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Kevan Dean; Zhao, X.; Pilat, E. E; Hejzlar, P.

    2000-05-01

    As part of work to evaluate the potential benefits of using thorium in LWR fuel, a thorium fueled benchmark comparison was made in this study between state-of-the-art codes, MOCUP (MCNP4B + ORIGEN2), and CASMO-4 for burnup calculations. The MOCUP runs were done individually at MIT and INEEL, using the same model but with some differences in techniques and cross section libraries. Eigenvalue and isotope concentrations were compared on a PWR pin cell model up to high burnup. The eigenvalue comparison as a function of burnup is good: the maximum difference is within 2% and the average absolute difference less than 1%. The isotope concentration comparisons are better than a set of MOX fuel benchmarks and comparable to a set of uranium fuel benchmarks reported in the literature. The actinide and fission product data sources used in the MOCUP burnup calculations for a typical thorium fuel are documented. Reasons for code vs code differences are analyzed and discussed.

  8. The clustering of SDSS galaxy groups: mass and color dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yu; Mo, H J; Bosch, Frank C van den; Weinmann, Simone W; Chu, Yaoquan

    2007-01-01

    We use a sample of galaxy groups selected from the SDSS DR 4 with an adaptive halo-based group finder to probe how the clustering strength of groups depends on their masses and colors. In particular, we determine the relative biases of groups of different masses, as well as that of groups with the same mass but with different colors. In agreement with previous studies, we find that more massive groups are more strongly clustered, and the inferred mass dependence of the halo bias is in good agreement with predictions for the $\\Lambda$CDM cosmology. Regarding the color dependence, we find that groups with red centrals are more strongly clustered than groups of the same mass but with blue centrals. Similar results are obtained when the color of a group is defined to be the total color of its member galaxies. The color dependence is more prominent in less massive groups and becomes insignificant in groups with masses $\\gta 10^{14}\\msunh$. We construct a mock galaxy redshift survey constructed from the large Mille...

  9. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Mertyurek, Ugur [ORNL; Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  10. Robustness and Vulnerability of Networks with Dynamical Dependency Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Ya-Nan; Huang, Ning; Wang, Lei; Wu, Zhi-Xi

    2016-11-01

    The dependency property and self-recovery of failure nodes both have great effects on the robustness of networks during the cascading process. Existing investigations focused mainly on the failure mechanism of static dependency groups without considering the time-dependency of interdependent nodes and the recovery mechanism in reality. In this study, we present an evolving network model consisting of failure mechanisms and a recovery mechanism to explore network robustness, where the dependency relations among nodes vary over time. Based on generating function techniques, we provide an analytical framework for random networks with arbitrary degree distribution. In particular, we theoretically find that an abrupt percolation transition exists corresponding to the dynamical dependency groups for a wide range of topologies after initial random removal. Moreover, when the abrupt transition point is above the failure threshold of dependency groups, the evolving network with the larger dependency groups is more vulnerable; when below it, the larger dependency groups make the network more robust. Numerical simulations employing the Erdős-Rényi network and Barabási-Albert scale free network are performed to validate our theoretical results.

  11. On the dimensional dependence of the electromagnetic duality groups

    CERN Document Server

    Wotzasek, C

    1998-01-01

    We study the two-fold dimensional dependence of the electromagnetic duality groups. We introduce the dual projection operation that systematically discloses the presence of an internal space of potentials where the group operation is defined. A two-fold property of the kernel in the projection is shown to define the dimensional dependence of the duality groups. The dual projection is then generalized to reveal another hidden two-dimensional structure. The new unifying concept of the external duality space remove the dimensional dependence of the kernel, allowing the presence of both $Z_2$ and SO(2) duality groups in all even dimensions. This result, ultimately unifies the notion of selfduality to all D=2k+2 dimensions. Finally, we show the presence of an unexpected duality between the internal and external spaces leading to a duality of the duality groups.

  12. Review of Halden Reactor Project high burnup fuel data that can be used in safety analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesenack, W. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    1996-03-01

    The fuels and materials testing programmes carried out at the OECD Halden Reactor Project are aimed at providing data in support of a mechanistic understanding of phenomena, especially as related to high burnup fuel. The investigations are focused on identifying long term property changes, and irradiation techniques and instrumentation have been developed over the years which enable to assess fuel behaviour and properties in-pile. The fuel-cladding gap has an influence on both thermal and mechanical behaviour. Improved gap conductance due to gap closure at high exposure is observed even in the case of a strong contamination with released fission gas. On the other hand, pellet-cladding mechanical interaction, which is measured with cladding elongation detectors and diameter gauges, is re-established after a phase with less interaction and is increasing. These developments are exemplified with data showing changes of fuel temperature, hydraulic diameter and cladding elongation with burnup. Fuel swelling and cladding primary and secondary creep have been successfully measured in-pile. They provide data for, e.g., the possible cladding lift-off to be accounted for at high burnup. Fuel conductivity degradation is observed as a gradual temperature increase with burnup. This affects stored heat, fission gas release and temperature dependent fuel behaviour in general. The Halden Project`s data base on fission gas release shows that the phenomenon is associated with an accumulation of gas atoms at the grain boundaries to a critical concentration before appreciable release occurs. This is accompanied by an increase of the surface-to-volume ratio measured in-pile in gas flow experiments. A typical observation at high burnup is also that a burst release of fission gas may occur during a power decrease. Gas flow and pressure equilibration experiments have shown that axial communication is severely restricted at high burnup.

  13. Sensitivity and parametric evaluations of significant aspects of burnup credit for PWR spent fuel packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1996-05-01

    Spent fuel transportation and storage cask designs based on a burnup credit approach must consider issues that are not relevant in casks designed under a fresh-fuel loading assumption. For example, the spent fuel composition must be adequately characterized and the criticality analysis model can be complicated by the need to consider axial burnup variations. Parametric analyses are needed to characterize the importance of fuel assembly and fuel cycle parameters on spent fuel composition and reactivity. Numerical models must be evaluated to determine the sensitivity of criticality safety calculations to modeling assumptions. The purpose of this report is to describe analyses and evaluations performed in order to demonstrate the effect physical parameters and modeling assumptions have on the criticality analysis of spent fuel. The analyses in this report include determination and ranking of the most important actinides and fission products; study of the effect of various depletion scenarios on subsequent criticality calculations; establishment of trends in neutron multiplication as a function of fuel enrichment, burnup, cooling time- and a parametric and modeling evaluation of three-dimensional effects (e.g., axially varying burnup and temperature/density effects) in a conceptual cask design. The sensitivity and parametric evaluations were performed with the consideration of two different burnup credit approaches: (1) only actinides in the fuel are considered in the criticality analysis, and (2) both actinides and fission products are considered. Calculations described in this report were performed using the criticality and depletion sequences available in the SCALE code system and the SCALE 27-group burnup library. Although the results described herein do not constitute a validation of SCALE for use in spent fuel analysis, independent validation efforts have been completed and are described in other reports.

  14. High burnup effects in WWER fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, V.; Smirnov, A. [RRC Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovqrad (Russian Federation)

    1996-03-01

    Since 1987 at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, the examinations of the WWER spent fuel assemblies has been carried out. These investigations are aimed to gain information on WWER spent fuel conditions in order to validate the fuel assemblies use during the 3 and 4 year fuel cycle in the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 units. At present time, the aim is to reach an average fuel burnup of 55 MWd/kgU. According to this aim, a new investigation program on the WWER spent fuel elements is started. The main objectives of this program are to study the high burnup effects and their influence on the WWER fuel properties. This paper presented the main statistical values of the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors` fuel assemblies and their fragment parameters. Average burnup of fuel in the investigated fuel assemblies was in the range of 13 to 49.7 MWd/kgU. In this case, the numer of fuel cycles was from 1 to 4 during operation of the fuel assemblies.

  15. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    A technical basis for peak reactivity boiling water reactor (BWR) burnup credit (BUC) methods was recently generated, and the technical basis for extended BWR BUC is now being developed. In this paper, a number of effects related to extended BWR BUC are analyzed, including three major operational effects in BWRs: the coolant density axial distribution, the use of control blades during operation, and the axial burnup profile. Specifically, uniform axial moderator density profiles are analyzed and compared to previous results and an additional temporal fidelity study combing moderator density profiles for three different fuel assemblies is presented. Realistic control blade histories and cask criticality results are compared to previously generated constructed control blade histories. Finally, a preliminary study of the axial burnup profile is provided.

  16. Record-dependent measures on the symmetric groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gnedin, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Probability measure P_n on the symmetric group S_n is said to be record-dependent if P_n(s) depends only on the set of records of permutation s. A sequence P=(P_n) of consistent record-dependent measures determines a random order on the set of positive integers. In this paper we describe the extreme elements of the convex set of such P. This problem turns out to be related to the study of asymptotic behavior of permutation-valued growth processes, to random extensions of partial orders, and to the measures on the Young-Fibonacci lattice.

  17. Development of an MCNP-tally based burnup code and validation through PWR benchmark exercises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Bakkari, B. [ERSN-LMR, Department of physics, Faculty of Sciences P.O.Box 2121, Tetuan (Morocco)], E-mail: bakkari@gmail.com; El Bardouni, T.; Merroun, O.; El Younoussi, Ch.; Boulaich, Y. [ERSN-LMR, Department of physics, Faculty of Sciences P.O.Box 2121, Tetuan (Morocco); Chakir, E. [EPTN-LPMR, Faculty of Sciences Kenitra (Morocco)

    2009-05-15

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the capabilities of a newly developed burnup code called BUCAL1. The code provides the full capabilities of the Monte Carlo code MCNP5, through the use of the MCNP tally information. BUCAL1 uses the fourth order Runge Kutta method with the predictor-corrector approach as the integration method to determine the fuel composition at a desired burnup step. Validation of BUCAL1 was done by code vs. code comparison. Results of two different kinds of codes are employed. The first one is CASMO-4, a deterministic multi-group two-dimensional transport code. The second kind is MCODE and MOCUP, a link MCNP-ORIGEN codes. These codes use different burnup algorithms to solve the depletion equations system. Eigenvalue and isotope concentrations were compared for two PWR uranium and thorium benchmark exercises at cold (300 K) and hot (900 K) conditions, respectively. The eigenvalue comparison between BUCAL1 and the aforementioned two kinds of codes shows a good prediction of the systems'k-inf values during the entire burnup history, and the maximum difference is within 2%. The differences between the BUCAL1 isotope concentrations and the predictions of CASMO-4, MCODE and MOCUP are generally better, and only for a few sets of isotopes these differences exceed 10%.

  18. OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Calculational Criticality Benchmark Phase I-B Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1993-01-01

    Burnup credit is an ongoing technical concern for many countries that operate commercial nuclear power reactors. In a multinational cooperative effort to resolve burnup credit issues, a Burnup Credit Working Group has been formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. This working group has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide, and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods are in agreement to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods are within 11% agreement about the average for all fission products studied. Furthermore, most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are {sup 149}Sm, {sup 151}Sm, and {sup 155}Gd.

  19. Revised SWAT. The integrated burnup calculation code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki [Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kiyosumi, Takehide [The Japan Research Institute, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    SWAT is an integrated burnup code system developed for analysis of post irradiation examination, transmutation of radioactive waste, and burnup credit problem. This report shows an outline and a user's manual of revised SWAT. This revised SWAT includes expansion of functions, increasing supported machines, and correction of several bugs reported from users of previous SWAT. (author)

  20. Parametric Study of the Effect of Burnable Poison Rods for PWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2001-09-28

    The Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) issued by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (U.S. NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office recommends restricting the use of burnup credit to assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers. This recommended restriction eliminates a large portion of the currently discharged spent fuel assemblies from cask loading, and thus severely limits the practical usefulness of burnup credit. In the absence of readily available information on burnable poison rod (BPR) design specifications and usage in U.S. pressurized-water-reactors (PWRs), and the subsequent reactivity effect of BPR exposure on discharged spent nuclear fuel (SNF), NRC staff has indicated a need for additional information in these areas. In response, this report presents a parametric study of the effect of BPR exposure on the reactivity of SNF for various BPR designs, fuel enrichments, and exposure conditions, and documents BPR design specifications. Trends in the reactivity effects of BPRs are established with infinite pin-cell and assembly array calculations with the SCALE and HELIOS code packages, respectively. Subsequently, the reactivity effects of BPRs for typical initial enrichment and burnup combinations are quantified based on three-dimensional (3-D) KENO V.a Monte Carlo calculations with a realistic rail-type cask designed for burnup credit. The calculations demonstrate that the positive reactivity effect due to BPR exposure increases nearly linearly with burnup and is dependent on the number, poison loading, and design of the BPRs and the initial fuel enrichment. Expected typical reactivity increases, based on one-cycle BPR exposure, were found to be less than 1% {Delta}k. Based on the presented analysis, guidance is offered on an appropriate approach for calculating bounding SNF isotopic data for assemblies exposed to BPRs. Although the analyses do not address the issue of validation of depletion methods for assembly designs with BPRs

  1. OECD/NEA burnup credit calculational criticality benchmark Phase I-B results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.; Parks, C.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Brady, M.C. [Sandia National Labs., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1996-06-01

    In most countries, criticality analysis of LWR fuel stored in racks and casks has assumed that the fuel is fresh with the maximum allowable initial enrichment. This assumption has led to the design of widely spaced and/or highly poisoned storage and transport arrays. If credit is assumed for fuel burnup, initial enrichment limitations can be raised in existing systems, and more compact and economical arrays can be designed. Such reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control is referred to as burnup credit. The Burnup Credit Working Group, formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods agree to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods agree within 11% about the average for all fission products studied. Most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are Sm 149, Sm 151, and Gd 155.

  2. How groups contest depends on group power and the likelihood that power determines victory and defeat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamans, Elanor; Otten, Sabine; Gordijn, Ernestine H.; Spears, Russell

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to show that the type of conflict behavior (constructive vs. unconstructive) groups use in conflicts depends on their power position as well as the likelihood that power determines victory and defeat. In an alleged online debate, we created a conflict between two opi

  3. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation systems (often referred to as casks) and spent fuel pools (SFPs). This work is divided into two main phases. The first phase investigated the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in SFPs to transportation and storage casks and the validation of reactivity calculations and spent fuel compositions within these methods. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the analysis of the effects of control blade insertion history, and moderator density and burnup axial profiles for extended BWR BUC.

  4. A Simple Global View of Fuel Burnup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Reactor physics and fuel burnup are discussed in order to obtain a simple global view of the effects of nuclear reactor characteristics to fuel cycle system performance. It may provide some idea of free thinking and overall vision, though it is still a small part of nuclear energy system. At the beginning of this lecture, governing equations for nuclear reactors are presented. Since the set of these equations is so big and complicated, it is simplified by imposing some extreme conditions and the nuclear equilibrium equation is derived. Some features of future nuclear equilibrium state are obtained by solving this equation. The contribution of a nucleus charged into reactor core to the system performance indexes such as criticality is worth for understanding the importance of each nuclide. It is called nuclide importance and can be evaluated by using the equations adjoint to the nuclear equilibrium equation. Examples of some importances and their application to criticalily search problem are presented.

  5. Protocol group education for family caregivers of elderly dependents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Anguita Carpio

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Family is the main care source for the dependent person. The act of looking after somebody, involves the development of multiple tasks, apart from spending a lot of time. This implies a series of requirements that would be able to damage the family caregivers’ quality of life, and definitively, their health. Objetive: training for family caregivers to provide quality care, in order to succeed in this project, we establish three specific aims: improving the information and training, increase self-care abilities and focus on resources and support services for informal caregivers. Methods: We are going to implement an educative intervention in a group of 12 informal caregivers of people over 65 years, dependent on chronic diseases and develop home care. The program will be composed of 10 sessions, each one of two-hour-long. The first session will consist of an introduction and the last session will be reserved to solve doubts and to deal with the assessment of the program. Throughout the rest of sessions, contents about training, self, resources and assistance services for caregivers will be proposed. In order to evaluate the efficiency of the program, a multiple choice questionnaire will be taken both al the beginning and at the end of the different sessions. In order to evaluate the human resources and the applied methodology, another questionnaire will be passed.

  6. Determination of deuterium–tritium critical burn-up parameter by four temperature theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazirzadeh, M.; Ghasemizad, A. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, 41335-1914 Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khanbabei, B. [School of Physics, Damghan University, 36716-41167 Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Conditions for thermonuclear burn-up of an equimolar mixture of deuterium-tritium in non-equilibrium plasma have been investigated by four temperature theory. The photon distribution shape significantly affects the nature of thermonuclear burn. In three temperature model, the photon distribution is Planckian but in four temperature theory the photon distribution has a pure Planck form below a certain cut-off energy and then for photon energy above this cut-off energy makes a transition to Bose-Einstein distribution with a finite chemical potential. The objective was to develop four temperature theory in a plasma to calculate the critical burn up parameter which depends upon initial density, the plasma components initial temperatures, and hot spot size. All the obtained results from four temperature theory model are compared with 3 temperature model. It is shown that the values of critical burn-up parameter calculated by four temperature theory are smaller than those of three temperature model.

  7. High burnup fuel behavior related to fission gas effects under reactivity initiated accidents (RIA) conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, F.

    1997-09-01

    Specific aspects of irradiated fuel result from the increasing retention of gaseous and volatile fission products with burnup, which, under overpower conditions, can lead to solid fuel pressurization and swelling causing severe PCMI (pellet clad mechanical interaction). In order to assess the reliability of high burnup fuel under RIAs, experimental programs have been initiated which have provided important data concerning the transient fission gas behavior and the clad loading mechanisms. The importance of the rim zone is demonstrated based on three experiments resulting in clad failure at low enthalpy, which are explained by energetic considerations. High gas release in non-failure tests with low energy deposition underlines the importance of grain boundary and porosity gas. Measured final releases are strongly correlated to the microstructure evolution, depending on energy deposition, pulse width, initial and refabricated fuel rod design. Observed helium release can also increase internal pressure and gives hints to the gas behavior understanding.

  8. Development of a Burnup Module DECBURN Based on the Krylov Subspace Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J. Y.; Kim, K. S.; Shim, H. J.; Song, J. S

    2008-05-15

    This report is to develop a burnup module DECBURN that is essential for the reactor analysis and the assembly homogenization codes to trace the fuel composition change during the core burnup. The developed burnup module solves the burnup equation by the matrix exponential method based on the Krylov Subspace method. The final solution of the matrix exponential is obtained by the matrix scaling and squaring method. To develop DECBURN module, this report includes the followings as: (1) Krylov Subspace Method for Burnup Equation, (2) Manufacturing of the DECBURN module, (3) Library Structure Setup and Library Manufacturing, (4) Examination of the DECBURN module, (5) Implementation to the DeCART code and Verification. DECBURN library includes the decay constants, one-group cross section and the fission yields. Examination of the DECBURN module is performed by manufacturing a driver program, and the results of the DECBURN module is compared with those of the ORIGEN program. Also, the implemented DECBURN module to the DeCART code is applied to the LWR depletion benchmark and a OPR-1000 pin cell problem, and the solutions are compared with the HELIOS code to verify the computational soundness and accuracy. In this process, the criticality calculation method and the predictor-corrector scheme are introduced to the DeCART code for a function of the homogenization code. The examination by a driver program shows that the DECBURN module produces exactly the same solution with the ORIGEN program. DeCART code that equips the DECBURN module produces a compatible solution to the other codes for the LWR depletion benchmark. Also the multiplication factors of the DeCART code for the OPR-1000 pin cell problem agree to the HELIOS code within 100 pcm over the whole burnup steps. The multiplication factors with the criticality calculation are also compatible with the HELIOS code. These results mean that the developed DECBURN module works soundly and produces an accurate solution

  9. Calibration of burnup monitor in the Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oheda, K.; Naito, H.; Hirota, M. [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., Aomori (Japan); Natsume, K. [Toshiba Corp., Yokohama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan); Kumanomido, H. [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    The Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant has adopted a credit for burnup in criticality control in the Spent Fuel Storage Facility (SFSF) and the Dissolution Facility. The burnup monitor system, prepared for BWR and PWR type fuel assemblies, nondestructively measures the burnup value and determines the residual U-235 enrichment in a spent fuel assembly, and criticality is controlled by the value of residual U-235 enrichment in SFSF and by the value of top 50 cm average burnup in the Dissolution Facility. The burnup monitor consists of three measurement systems; a Boss gamma-ray profile measurement system, a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometry system, and a passive neutron measurement system. The monitor sensitivity is calibrated against operator-declared burnup values through repetitive measurements of 100 spent fuel assemblies: BWR 8 X 8, PWR 14 X 14. and 17 X 17. The outline of the measurement methods, objectives of the calibration, actual calibration method, and an example of calibration performed in a demonstration experiment are presented. (author)

  10. Quantification of the computational accuracy of code systems on the burn-up credit using experimental re-calculations; Quantifizierung der Rechengenauigkeit von Codesystemen zum Abbrandkredit durch Experimentnachrechnungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, Matthias; Hannstein, Volker; Kilger, Robert; Moser, Franz-Eberhard; Pfeiffer, Arndt; Stuke, Maik

    2014-06-15

    In order to account for the reactivity-reducing effect of burn-up in the criticality safety analysis for systems with irradiated nuclear fuel (''burnup credit''), numerical methods to determine the enrichment and burnup dependent nuclide inventory (''burnup code'') and its resulting multiplication factor k{sub eff} (''criticality code'') are applied. To allow for reliable conclusions, for both calculation systems the systematic deviations of the calculation results from the respective true values, the bias and its uncertainty, are being quantified by calculation and analysis of a sufficient number of suitable experiments. This quantification is specific for the application case under scope and is also called validation. GRS has developed a methodology to validate a calculation system for the application of burnup credit in the criticality safety analysis for irradiated fuel assemblies from pressurized water reactors. This methodology was demonstrated by applying the GRS home-built KENOREST burnup code and the criticality calculation sequence CSAS5 from SCALE code package. It comprises a bounding approach and alternatively a stochastic, which both have been exemplarily demonstrated by use of a generic spent fuel pool rack and a generic dry storage cask, respectively. Based on publicly available post irradiation examination and criticality experiments, currently the isotopes of uranium and plutonium elements can be regarded for.

  11. Underestimation of nuclear fuel burnup – theory, demonstration and solution in numerical models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajda Paweł

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo methodology provides reference statistical solution of neutron transport criticality problems of nuclear systems. Estimated reaction rates can be applied as an input to Bateman equations that govern isotopic evolution of reactor materials. Because statistical solution of Boltzmann equation is computationally expensive, it is in practice applied to time steps of limited length. In this paper we show that simple staircase step model leads to underprediction of numerical fuel burnup (Fissions per Initial Metal Atom – FIMA. Theoretical considerations indicates that this error is inversely proportional to the length of the time step and origins from the variation of heating per source neutron. The bias can be diminished by application of predictor-corrector step model. A set of burnup simulations with various step length and coupling schemes has been performed. SERPENT code version 1.17 has been applied to the model of a typical fuel assembly from Pressurized Water Reactor. In reference case FIMA reaches 6.24% that is equivalent to about 60 GWD/tHM of industrial burnup. The discrepancies up to 1% have been observed depending on time step model and theoretical predictions are consistent with numerical results. Conclusions presented in this paper are important for research and development concerning nuclear fuel cycle also in the context of Gen4 systems.

  12. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of 3 MW TRIGA Research Reactor of Bangladesh Considering Different Cycles of Burnup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Altaf

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Burnup dependent steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of TRIGA Mark-II research reactor has been carried out utilizing coupled point kinetics, neutronics and thermal hydraulics code EUREKA-2/RR. From the previous calculations of neutronics parameters including percentage burnup of individual fuel elements performed so far for 700 MWD burnt core of TRIGA reactor showed that the fuel rod predicted as hottest at the beginning of cycle (fresh core was found to remain as the hottest until 200 MWD of burn, but, with the progress of core burn, the hottest rod was found to be shifted and another rod in the core became the hottest. The present study intends to evaluate the thermal hydraulic parameters of these hottest fuel rods at different cycles of burnup, from beginning to 700 MWD core burnt considering reactor operates under steady state condition. Peak fuel centerline temperature, maximum cladding and coolant temperatures of the hottest channels were calculated. It revealed that maximum temperature reported for fuel clad and fuel centerline found to lie below their melting points which indicate that there is no chance of burnout on the fuel cladding surface and no blister in the fuel meat throughout the considered cycles of core burnt.

  13. Analysis of the effect of UO{sub 2} high burnup microstructure on fission gas release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernkvist, Lars Olof; Massih, Ali [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park (Sweden)

    2002-10-01

    This report deals with high-burnup phenomena with relevance to fission gas release from UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel. In particular, we study how the fission gas release is affected by local buildup of fissile plutonium isotopes and fission products at the fuel pellet periphery, with subsequent formation of a characteristic high-burnup rim zone micro-structure. An important aspect of these high-burnup effects is the degradation of fuel thermal conductivity, for which prevalent models are analysed and compared with respect to their theoretical bases and supporting experimental data. Moreover, the Halden IFA-429/519.9 high-burnup experiment is analysed by use of the FRAPCON3 computer code, into which modified and extended models for fission gas release are introduced. These models account for the change in Xe/Kr-ratio of produced and released fission gas with respect to time and space. In addition, several alternative correlations for fuel thermal conductivity are implemented, and their impact on calculated fission gas release is studied. The calculated fission gas release fraction in IFA-429/519.9 strongly depends on what correlation is used for the fuel thermal conductivity, since thermal release dominates over athermal release in this particular experiment. The conducted calculations show that athermal release processes account for less than 10% of the total gas release. However, athermal release from the fuel pellet rim zone is presumably underestimated by our models. This conclusion is corroborated by comparisons between measured and calculated Xe/Kr-ratios of the released fission gas.

  14. Analysis of high burnup pressurized water reactor fuel using uranium, plutonium, neodymium, and cesium isotope correlations with burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Suk; Jeon, Young Shin; Park, Soon Dal; Ha, Yeong Keong; Song, Kyu Seok [Nuclear Chemistry Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The correlation of the isotopic composition of uranium, plutonium, neodymium, and cesium with the burnup for high burnup pressurized water reactor fuels irradiated in nuclear power reactors has been experimentally investigated. The total burnup was determined by Nd-148 and the fractional {sup 235}U burnup was determined by U and Pu mass spectrometric methods. The isotopic compositions of U, Pu, Nd, and Cs after their separation from the irradiated fuel samples were measured using thermal ionization mass spectrometry. The contents of these elements in the irradiated fuel were determined through an isotope dilution mass spectrometric method using {sup 233}U, {sup 242}Pu, {sup 150}Nd, and {sup 133}Cs as spikes. The activity ratios of Cs isotopes in the fuel samples were determined using gamma-ray spectrometry. The content of each element and its isotopic compositions in the irradiated fuel were expressed by their correlation with the total and fractional burnup, burnup parameters, and the isotopic compositions of different elements. The results obtained from the experimental methods were compared with those calculated using the ORIGEN-S code.

  15. Burn-up credit in criticality safety of PWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Rowayda F., E-mail: Rowayda_mahmoud@yahoo.com [Metallurgy Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt); Shaat, Mohamed K. [Nuclear Engineering, Reactors Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt); Nagy, M.E.; Agamy, S.A. [Professor of Nuclear Engineering, Nuclear and Radiation Department, Alexandria University (Egypt); Abdelrahman, Adel A. [Metallurgy Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Designing spent fuel wet storage using WIMS-5D and MCNP-5 code. • Studying fresh and burned fuel with/out absorber like “B{sub 4}C and Ag–In–Cd” in racks. • Sub-criticality was confirmed for fresh and burned fuel under specific cases. • Studies for BU credit recommend increasing fuel burn-up to 60.0 GWD/MTU. • Those studies require new core structure materials, fuel composition and cladding. - Abstract: The criticality safety calculations were performed for a proposed design of a wet spent fuel storage pool. This pool will be used for the storage of spent fuel discharged from a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR). The mathematical model based on the international validated codes, WIMS-5 and MCNP-5 were used for calculating the effective multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, for the spent fuel stored in the pool. The data library for the multi-group neutron microscopic cross-sections was used for the cell calculations. The k{sub eff} was calculated for several changes in water density, water level, assembly pitch and burn-up with different initial fuel enrichment and new types and amounts of fixed absorbers. Also, k{sub eff} was calculated for the conservative fresh fuel case. The results of the calculations confirmed that the effective multiplication factor for the spent fuel storage is sub-critical for all normal and abnormal states. The future strategy for the burn-up credit recommends increasing the fuel burn-up to a value >60.0 GWD/MTU, which requires new fuel composition and new fuel cladding material with the assessment of the effects of negative reactivity build up.

  16. Effect of burn-up and high burn-up structure on spent nuclear fuel alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarens, F.; Gonzalez-Robles, E.; Gimenez, F. J.; Casas, I.; Pablo, J. de; Serrano, D.; Wegen, D.; Glatz, J. P.; Martinez-Esparza, A.

    2009-07-01

    In this report the results of the experimental work carried out within the collaboration project between ITU-ENRESA-UPC/CTM on spent fuel (SF) covering the period 2005-2007 were presented. Studies on both RN release (Fast Release Fraction and matrix dissolution rate) and secondary phase formation were carried out by static and flow through experiments. Experiments were focussed on the study of the effect of BU with two PWR SF irradiated in commercial reactors with mean burn-ups of 48 and 60 MWd/KgU and; the effect of High Burn-up Structure (HBS) using powdered samples prepared from different radial positions. Additionally, two synthetic leaching solutions, bicarbonate and granitic bentonite ground wa ter were used. Higher releases were determined for RN from SF samples prepared from the center in comparison with the fuel from the periphery. However, within the studied range, no BU effect was observed. After one year of contact time, secondary phases were observed in batch experiments, covering the SF surface. Part of the work was performed for the Project NF-PRO of the European Commission 6th Framework Programme under contract no 2389. (Author)

  17. Strategies for Application of Isotopic Uncertainties in Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2002-12-23

    Uncertainties in the predicted isotopic concentrations in spent nuclear fuel represent one of the largest sources of overall uncertainty in criticality calculations that use burnup credit. The methods used to propagate the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations to the uncertainty in the predicted neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of the system can have a significant effect on the uncertainty in the safety margin in criticality calculations and ultimately affect the potential capacity of spent fuel transport and storage casks employing burnup credit. Methods that can provide a more accurate and realistic estimate of the uncertainty may enable increased spent fuel cask capacity and fewer casks needing to be transported, thereby reducing regulatory burden on licensee while maintaining safety for transporting spent fuel. This report surveys several different best-estimate strategies for considering the effects of nuclide uncertainties in burnup-credit analyses. The potential benefits of these strategies are illustrated for a prototypical burnup-credit cask design. The subcritical margin estimated using best-estimate methods is discussed in comparison to the margin estimated using conventional bounding methods of uncertainty propagation. To quantify the comparison, each of the strategies for estimating uncertainty has been performed using a common database of spent fuel isotopic assay measurements for pressurized-light-water reactor fuels and predicted nuclide concentrations obtained using the current version of the SCALE code system. The experimental database applied in this study has been significantly expanded to include new high-enrichment and high-burnup spent fuel assay data recently published for a wide range of important burnup-credit actinides and fission products. Expanded rare earth fission-product measurements performed at the Khlopin Radium Institute in Russia that contain the only known publicly-available measurement for {sup 103

  18. Size Design of CdZnTe Detector Shield for Measuring Burnup of Spent Fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>It is important to measure the burnup of spent fuel for nuclear safeguards, burnup credit and critical safety in spent-fuel reprocessing process. The purpose of this work is designing a portable device to

  19. Power excursion analysis for BWR`s at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D.J.; Neymoith, L.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01

    A study has been undertaken to determine the fuel enthalpy during a rod drop accident and during two thermal-hydraulic transients. The objective was to understand the consequences to high burnup fuel and the sources of uncertainty in the calculations. The analysis was done with RAMONA-4B, a computer code that models the neutron kinetics throughout the core along with the thermal-hydraulics in the core, vessel, and steamline. The results showed that the maximum fuel enthalpy in high burnup fuel will be affected by core design, initial conditions, and modeling assumptions. The important parameters in each of these categories are discussed in the paper.

  20. Need for higher fuel burnup at the Hatch Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckhman, J.T. [Georgia Power Co., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Hatch is a BWR 4 and has been in operation for some time. The first unit became commercial about 1975. Obtaining higher burnups, or higher average discharge exposures, is nothing new at Hatch. Since we have started, the discharge exposure of the plant has increased. Now, of course, we are not approaching the numbers currently being discussed but, the average discharge exposure has increased from around 20,000 MWD/MTU in the early to mid-1980s to 34,000 MWD/MTU in 1994, I am talking about batch average values. There are also peak bundle and peak rod values. You will have to make the conversions if you think in one way or the other because I am talking in batch averages. During Hatch`s operating history we have had some problems with fuel failure. Higher burnup fuel raises a concern about how much fuel failure you are going to have. Fuel failure is, of course, an economic issue with us. Back in the early 1980s, we had a problem with crud-induced localized corrosion, known as CILC. We have gotten over that, but we had some times when it was up around 27 fuel failures a year. That is not a pleasant time to live through because it is not what you want from an economic viewpoint or any other. We have gotten that down. We have had some fuel failures recently, but they have not been related to fuel burnup or to corrosion. In fact, the number of failures has decreased from the early 1980s to the 90s even though burnup increased during that time. The fuel failures are more debris-related-type failures. In addition to increasing burnups, utilities are actively evaluating or have already incorporated power uprate and longer fuel cycles (e.g., 2-year cycles). The goal is to balance out the higher power density, longer cycles, higher burnup, and to have no leakers. Why do we as an industry want to have higher burnup fuel? That is what I want to tell you a little bit about.

  1. Spent fuel dissolution rates as a function of burnup and water chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, W.J.

    1998-06-01

    To help provide a source term for performance-assessment calculations, dissolution studies on light-water-reactor (LWR) spent fuel have been conducted over the past few years at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project. This report describes that work for fiscal years 1996 through mid-1998 and includes summaries of some results from previous years for completeness. The following conclusions were based on the results of various flowthrough dissolution rate tests and on tests designed to measure the inventories of {sup 129}I located within the fuel/cladding gap region of different spent fuels: (1) Spent fuels with burnups in the range 30 to 50 MWd/kgM all dissolved at about the same rate over the conditions tested. To help determine whether the lack of burnup dependence extends to higher and lower values, tests are in progress or planned for spent fuels with burnups of 13 and {approximately} 65 MWd/kgM. (2) Oxidation of spent fuel up to the U{sub 4}O{sub 9+x} stage does not have a large effect on intrinsic dissolution rates. However, this degree of oxidation could increase the dissolution rates of relatively intact fuel by opening the grain boundaries, thereby increasing the effective surface area that is available for contact by water. From a disposal viewpoint, this is a potentially more important consideration than the effect on intrinsic rates. (3) The gap inventories of {sup 129}I were found to be smaller than the fission gas release (FGR) for the same fuel rod with the exception of the rod with the highest FGR. Several additional fuels would have to be tested to determine whether a generalized relationship exists between FGR and {sup 129}I gap inventory for US LWR fuels.

  2. The calculational VVER burnup Credit Benchmark No.3 results with the ENDF/B-VI rev.5 (1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Gual, Maritza [Centro de Tecnologia Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba). E-mail: mrgual@ctn.isctn.edu.cu

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this papers to present the results of CB3 phase of the VVER calculational benchmark with the recent evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VI Rev.5 (1999). This results are compared with the obtained from the other participants in the calculations (Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Slovaquia, Spain and the United Kingdom). The phase (CB3) of the VVER calculation benchmark is similar to the Phase II-A of the OECD/NEA/INSC BUC Working Group benchmark for PWR. The cases without burnup profile (BP) were performed with the WIMS/D-4 code. The rest of the cases have been carried with DOTIII discrete ordinates code. The neutron library used was the ENDF/B-VI rev. 5 (1999). The WIMS/D-4 (69 groups) is used to collapse cross sections from the ENDF/B-VI Rev. 5 (1999) to 36 groups working library for 2-D calculations. This work also comprises the results of CB1 (obtained with ENDF/B-VI rev. 5 (1999), too) and CB3 for cases with Burnup of 30 MWd/TU and cooling time of 1 and 5 years and for case with Burnup of 40 MWd/TU and cooling time of 1 year. (author)

  3. Detailed Burnup Calculations for Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leszczynski, F. [Centro Atomico Bariloche (CNEA), 8400 S. C. de Bariloche (Argentina)

    2011-07-01

    tasks for each burn up step: 1) Monte Carlo criticality calculation of the full system tallying spatial power distribution for each spatial region of interest. 2) Preparation of depletion code input and cross- section libraries from Monte Carlo calculation output and other auxiliary code, including normalized power density of each spatial zone with an auxiliary program. The 1 group cross section library needed for depletion calculations can be obtained with a cell code such as DRAGON4 vs. burn up. 3) Depletion calculations of isotope concentrations on the input burn up time-step. 4) Preparation of Monte Carlo calculation input with the new isotope concentrations output of depletion calculation with other auxiliary program. This sequence is implemented in an automatic way. On the first stages of RRMCQ development, a simplified version has been tested with a set of dependent numerical and experimental benchmarks using standard nuclear data libraries at lattice cell level. Then a full core model has been developed and it is to day used on RA6 reactor of Bariloche Atomic Centre. (author)

  4. Design and construction of a prototype advanced on-line fuel burn-up monitoring system for the modular pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Bingjing; Hawari, Ayman, I.

    2004-03-30

    Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) is a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear power reactor currently under study as a next generation reactor system. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multi-pass fuel circulation in which the fuel pebbles are randomly loaded and continuously cycled through the core until they reach their prescribed End-of-Life burn-up limit. Unlike the situation with a conventional light water reactor, depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management for MPBR will be highly inaccurate. An on-line measurement system is needed to accurately assess whether a given pebble has reached its End-of-Life burn-up limit and thereby provide an on-line, automated go/no-go decision on fuel disposition on a pebble-by-pebble basis. This project investigated approaches to analyzing fuel pebbles in real time using gamma spectroscopy and possibly using passive neutron counting of spontaneous fission neutrons to provide the speed, accuracy, and burn-up range required for burnup determination of MPBR. It involved all phases necessary to develop and construct a burn-up monitor, including a review of the design requirements of the system, identification of detection methodologies, modeling and development of potential designs, and finally, the construction and testing of an operational detector system. Based upon the research work performed in this project, the following conclusions are made. In terms of using gamma spectrometry, two possible approaches were identified for burnup assay. The first approach is based on the measurement of the absolute activity of Cs-137. However, due to spectral interference and the need for absolute calibration of the spectrometer, the uncertainty in burnup determination using this approach was found to range from {approx} {+-}40% at beginning of life to {approx} {+-}10% at the discharge burnup. An alternative approach is to use a relative burnup indicator. In this

  5. OREST - The hammer-origen burnup program system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesse, U. (Gesellschaft fur Reaktorsicherheit mbH Forschungsgelande, 8046 Garching bei Munchen (DE))

    1988-08-01

    Reliable prediction of the characteristics of irradiated light water reactor fuels (e.g., afterheat power, neutron and gamma radiation sources, final uranium and plutonium contents) is needed for many aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle. Two main problems must be solved: the simulation of all isotopic nuclear reactions and the simulation of neutron fluxes setting the reactions in motion. In state-of-the-art computer techniques, a combination of specialized codes for lattice cell and burnup calculations is preferred to solve these cross-linked problems in time or burnup step approximation. In the program system OREST, developed for official and commercial tasks in the Federal Republic of Germany nuclear fuel cycle, the well-known codes HAMMER and ORIGEN and directly coupled with a fuel rod temperature module.

  6. ATR PDQ and MCWO Fuel Burnup Analysis Codes Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.S. Chang; P. A. Roth; M. A. Lillo

    2009-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is being studied to determine the feasibility of converting it from the highly enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel that is currently uses to low enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. In order to achieve this goal, it would be best to qualify some different computational methods than those that have been used at ATR for the past 40 years. This paper discusses two methods of calculating the burnup of ATR fuel elements. The existing method, that uses the PDQ code, is compared to a modern method that uses A General Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code (MCNP) combined with the Origen2.2 code. This modern method, MCNP with ORIGEN2.2 (MCWO), is found to give excellent agreement with the existing method (PDQ). Both of MCWO and PDQ are also in a very good agreement to the 235U burnup data generated by an analytical method.

  7. Tritium Burn-up Depth and Tritium Break-Even Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cheng-Yue; DENG Bai-Quan; HUANG Jin-Hua; YAN Jian-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    @@ Similarly to but quite different from the xenon poisoning effects resulting from fission-produced iodine during the restart-up process of a fission reactor, we introduce a completely new concept of the tritium burn-up depth and tritium break-even time in the fusion energy research area. To show what the least required amount of tritium storage is used to start up a fusion reactor and how long a time the fusion reactor needs to be operated for achieving the tritium break-even during the initial start-up phase due to the finite tritium breeding time that is dependent on the tritium breeder, specific structure of breeding zone, layout of coolant flow pipe, tritium recovery scheme, extraction process, the tritium retention of reactor components, unrecoverable tritium fraction in breeder, leakage to the inertial gas container, and the natural decay etc., we describe this new phenomenon and answer this problem by setting up and by solving a set of equations, which express a dynamic subsystem model of the tritium inventory evolution in a fusion experimental breeder (FEB). It is found that the tritium burn-up depth is 317g and the tritium break-even time is approximately 240 full power days for FEB designed detail configuration and it is also found that after one-year operation, the tritium storage reaches 1.18kg that is more than theleast required amount of tritium storage to start up three of FEB-like fusion reactors.

  8. New burnup calculation of TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Campolina, Daniel de A.M.; Santos, Andre A. Campagnole dos; Menezes, Maria A.B.C.; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: sinclercdtn@hotmail.com.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The IPR-R1 TRIGA Mark I research reactor, located at the Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, operates since 1960.The reactor is operating for more than fifty years and has a long history of operation. Determining the current composition of the fuel is very important to calculate various parameters. The reactor burnup calculation has been performed before, however, new techniques, methods, software and increase of the processing capacity of the new computers motivates new investigations to be performed. This work presents the evolution of effective multiplication constant and the results of burnup. This new model has a more detailed geometry with the introduction of the new devices, like the control rods and the samarium discs. This increase of materials in the simulation in burnup calculation was very important for results. For these series of simulations a more recently cross section library, ENDF/B-VII, was used. To perform the calculations two Monte Carlo particle transport code were used: Serpent and MCNPX. The results obtained from two codes are presented and compared with previous studies in the literature. (author)

  9. Fuel burnup calculation of a research reactor plate element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nadia Rodrigues dos; Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: nadiasam@gmail.com, E-mail: zrlima@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This work consists in simulating the burnup of two different plate type fuel elements, where one is the benchmark MTR of the IAEA, which is made of an alloy of uranium and aluminum, while the other belonging to a typical multipurpose reactor is composed of an alloy of uranium and silicon. The simulation is performed using the WIMSD-5B computer code, which makes use of deterministic methods for solving neutron transport. In developing this task, fuel element equivalent cells were calculated representing each of the reactors to obtain the initial concentrations of each isotope constituent element of the fuel cell and the thicknesses corresponding to each region of the cell, since this information is part of the input data. The compared values of the k∞ showed a similar behavior for the case of the MTR calculated with the WIMSD-5B and EPRI-CELL codes. Relating the graphs of the concentrations in the burnup of both reactors, there are aspects very similar to each isotope selected. The application WIMSD-5B code to calculate isotopic concentrations and burnup of the fuel element, proved to be satisfactory for the fulfillment of the objective of this work. (author)

  10. Comparison of neutron cross sections for selected fission products and isotopic composition analyses with burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, D. H.; Gil, C. S.; Kim, J. D.; Jang, J. H.; Lee, Y. D. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea)

    2003-10-01

    The neutron absorption cross sections for 18 fission products evaluated within the framework of the KAERI-BNL international collaboration have been compared with the ENDF/B-VI release 7. Also, the influence of the new evaluations on isotopic compositions of the fission products as a function of burnup has been analyzed through the OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks (Phase 1B) and the LWR/Pu recycling benchmarks. These calculations were performed by WIMSD-5B with the 69 group libraries prepared from three evaluated nuclear data libraries: ENDF/B-VI.7, ENDF/B-VI.8 including new evaluations in resonance region covering thermal region, and ENDF/B-VII expected including those in upper resonance region up to 20 MeV. For Xe-131, the composition calculated with ENDF/B-VI.8 shows maximum difference of 4.78% compared to ENDF/B-VI.7. However, the isotopic compositions of all fission products calculated with ENDF/B-VII shows no differences compared to ENDF/B-VI.7.

  11. Evaluation of the HTTR criticality and burnup calculations with continuous-energy and multigroup cross sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Min-Han; Wang, Jui-Yu [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kung-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Sheu, Rong-Jiun, E-mail: rjsheu@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kung-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering System and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kung-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Liu, Yen-Wan Hsueh [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kung-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering System and Science, National Tsing Hua University, 101, Section 2, Kung-Fu Road, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) in Japan is a helium-cooled graphite-moderated reactor designed and operated for the future development of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. Two detailed full-core models of HTTR have been established by using SCALE6 and MCNP5/X, respectively, to study its neutronic properties. Several benchmark problems were repeated first to validate the calculation models. Careful code-to-code comparisons were made to ensure that two calculation models are both correct and equivalent. Compared with experimental data, the two models show a consistent bias of approximately 20–30 mk overestimation in effective multiplication factor for a wide range of core states. Most of the bias could be related to the ENDF/B-VII.0 cross-section library or incomplete modeling of impurities in graphite. After that, a series of systematic analyses was performed to investigate the effects of cross sections on the HTTR criticality and burnup calculations, with special interest in the comparison between continuous-energy and multigroup results. Multigroup calculations in this study were carried out in 238-group structure and adopted the SCALE double-heterogeneity treatment for resonance self-shielding. The results show that multigroup calculations tend to underestimate the system eigenvalue by a constant amount of ∼5 mk compared to their continuous-energy counterparts. Further sensitivity studies suggest the differences between multigroup and continuous-energy results appear to be temperature independent and also insensitive to burnup effects.

  12. Models for fuel rod behaviour at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jernkvist, Lars O.; Massih, Ali R. [Quantum Technologies AB, Uppsala Science Park, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    This report deals with release of fission product gases and irradiation-induced restructuring in uranium dioxide nuclear fuel. Waterside corrosion of zirconium alloy clad tubes to light water reactor fuel rods is also discussed. Computational models, suitable for implementation in the FRAPCON-3.2 computer code, are proposed for these potentially life-limiting phenomena. Hence, an integrated model for the calculation or thermal fission gas release by intragranular diffusion, gas trapping in grain boundaries, irradiation-induced re-solution, grain boundary saturation, and grain boundary sweeping in UO{sub 2} fuel, under time varying temperature loads, is formulated. After a brief review of the status of thermal fission gas release modelling, we delineate the governing equations for the aforementioned processes. Grain growth kinetic modelling is briefly reviewed and pertinent data on grain growth of high burnup fuel obtained during power ramps in the Third Risoe Fission Gas Release Project are evaluated. Sample computations are performed, which clearly show the connection between fission gas release and gram growth as a function of time at different isotherms. Models are also proposed for the restructuring of uranium dioxide fuel at high burnup, the so-called rim formation, and its effect on fuel porosity build-up, fuel thermal conductivity and fission gas release. These models are assessed by use of recent experimental data from the High Burnup Rim Project, as well as from post irradiation examinations of high-burnup fuel, irradiated in power reactors. Moreover, models for clad oxide growth and hydrogen pickup in PWRs, applicable to Zircaloy-4, ZIRLO or M5 cladding, are formulated, based on recent in-reactor corrosion data for high-burnup fuel rods. Our evaluation of these data indicates that the oxidation rate of ZIRLO-type materials is about 20% lower than for standard Zircaloy-4 cladding under typical PWR conditions. Likewise, the oxidation rate of M5 seems to be

  13. Multiple-membership multiple-classification models for social network and group dependences

    OpenAIRE

    Tranmer, Mark; Steel, David; Browne, William J

    2014-01-01

    The social network literature on network dependences has largely ignored other sources of dependence, such as the school that a student attends, or the area in which an individual lives. The multilevel modelling literature on school and area dependences has, in turn, largely ignored social networks. To bridge this divide, a multiple-membership multiple-classification modelling approach for jointly investigating social network and group dependences is presented. This allows social network and ...

  14. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIA: Criticality calculations of BWR spent fuel assemblies in storage and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ando, Yoshihira [Toshiba Corp., Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-09-01

    The report describes the final results of Phase IIIA Benchmarks conducted by the Burnup Credit Criticality Calculation Working Group under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The benchmarks are intended to confirm the predictive capability of the current computer code and data library combinations for the neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of a layer of irradiated BWR fuel assembly array model. In total 22 benchmark problems are proposed for calculations of k{sub eff}. The effects of following parameters are investigated: cooling time, inclusion/exclusion of FP nuclides and axial burnup profile, and inclusion of axial profile of void fraction or constant void fractions during burnup. Axial profiles of fractional fission rates are further requested for five cases out of the 22 problems. Twenty-one sets of results are presented, contributed by 17 institutes from 9 countries. The relative dispersion of k{sub eff} values calculated by the participants from the mean value is almost within the band of {+-}1%{delta}k/k. The deviations from the averaged calculated fission rate profiles are found to be within {+-}5% for most cases. (author)

  15. Assessing colour-dependent occupation statistics inferred from galaxy group catalogues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Duncan; van den Bosch, Frank C.; Hearin, Andrew; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Berlind, Andreas; Mo, H. J.; Tinker, Jeremy; Yang, Xiaohu

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the ability of current implementations of galaxy group finders to recover colour-dependent halo occupation statistics. To test the fidelity of group catalogue inferred statistics, we run three different group finders used in the literature over a mock that includes galaxy colours in a realistic manner. Overall, the resulting mock group catalogues are remarkably similar, and most colour-dependent statistics are recovered with reasonable accuracy. However, it is also clear that certain systematic errors arise as a consequence of correlated errors in group membership determination, central/satellite designation, and halo mass assignment. We introduce a new statistic, the halo transition probability (HTP), which captures the combined impact of all these errors. As a rule of thumb, errors tend to equalize the properties of distinct galaxy populations (i.e. red versus blue galaxies or centrals versus satellites), and to result in inferred occupation statistics that are more accurate for red galaxies than for blue galaxies. A statistic that is particularly poorly recovered from the group catalogues is the red fraction of central galaxies as a function of halo mass. Group finders do a good job in recovering galactic conformity, but also have a tendency to introduce weak conformity when none is present. We conclude that proper inference of colour-dependent statistics from group catalogues is best achieved using forward modelling (i.e. running group finders over mock data) or by implementing a correction scheme based on the HTP, as long as the latter is not too strongly model dependent.

  16. MONTE-CARLO BURNUP CALCULATION UNCERTAINTY QUANTIFICATION AND PROPAGATION DETERMINATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, T.; Sternat, M.; Charlton, W.

    2011-05-08

    MONTEBURNS is a Monte-Carlo depletion routine utilizing MCNP and ORIGEN 2.2. Uncertainties exist in the MCNP transport calculation, but this information is not passed to the depletion calculation in ORIGEN or saved. To quantify this transport uncertainty and determine how it propagates between burnup steps, a statistical analysis of a multiple repeated depletion runs is performed. The reactor model chosen is the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) in a single assembly, infinite lattice configuration. This model was burned for a 25.5 day cycle broken down into three steps. The output isotopics as well as effective multiplication factor (k-effective) were tabulated and histograms were created at each burnup step using the Scott Method to determine the bin width. It was expected that the gram quantities and k-effective histograms would produce normally distributed results since they were produced from a Monte-Carlo routine, but some of results do not. The standard deviation at each burnup step was consistent between fission product isotopes as expected, while the uranium isotopes created some unique results. The variation in the quantity of uranium was small enough that, from the reaction rate MCNP tally, round off error occurred producing a set of repeated results with slight variation. Statistical analyses were performed using the {chi}{sup 2} test against a normal distribution for several isotopes and the k-effective results. While the isotopes failed to reject the null hypothesis of being normally distributed, the {chi}{sup 2} statistic grew through the steps in the k-effective test. The null hypothesis was rejected in the later steps. These results suggest, for a high accuracy solution, MCNP cell material quantities less than 100 grams and greater kcode parameters are needed to minimize uncertainty propagation and minimize round off effects.

  17. Impact of Reactor Operating Parameters on Cask Reactivity in BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Betzler, Benjamin R [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    This paper discusses the effect of reactor operating parameters used in fuel depletion calculations on spent fuel cask reactivity, with relevance for boiling-water reactor (BWR) burnup credit (BUC) applications. Assessments that used generic BWR fuel assembly and spent fuel cask configurations are presented. The considered operating parameters, which were independently varied in the depletion simulations for the assembly, included fuel temperature, bypass water density, specific power, and operating history. Different operating history scenarios were considered for the assembly depletion to determine the effect of relative power distribution during the irradiation cycles, as well as the downtime between cycles. Depletion, decay, and criticality simulations were performed using computer codes and associated nuclear data within the SCALE code system. Results quantifying the dependence of cask reactivity on the assembly depletion parameters are presented herein.

  18. Thermodynamic analysis for high burn-up fuel internal chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuji, Kensho; Kyoh, Bunkei [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Faculty of Science and Technology

    1997-09-01

    Chemical states of fission products and actinide elements in high burn-up LWR fuel pellets have been analyzed thermodynamically using the computer program SOLGASMIX-PV. Calculations with this computer code have been performed for a complex multi-component system, which comprises 54 chemical species. The analysis shows that neither alkali nor alkaline-earth uranates are formed, but alkali and alkaline-earth molybdates exist in irradiated LWR fuel pellets in contrast with their post irradiation examinations. These molybdates tend to increase with increasing oxygen potential in the fuel under operating conditions, whereas the zirconates decrease. (author)

  19. Determination of IRT-2M fuel burnup by gamma spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleška, Michal; Viererbl, Ladislav; Marek, Milan; Ernest, Jaroslav; Šunka, Michal; Vinš, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    A spectrometric system was developed for evaluating spent fuel in the LVR-15 research reactor, which employs highly enriched (36%) IRT-2M-type fuel. Such system allows the measurement of detailed fission product profiles. Within these measurements, nuclides such as (137)Cs, (134)Cs, (144)Ce, (106)Ru and (154)Eu may be detected in fuel assemblies with different cooling times varying between 1.67 and 7.53 years. Burnup calculations using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code data showed good agreement with measurements, though some discrepancies were observed in certain regions. These discrepancies are attributed to the evaluation of irradiation history, reactor regulation pattern and buildup schemes.

  20. New results from the NSRR experiments with high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuketa, Toyoshi; Ishijima, Kiyomi; Mori, Yukihide [Japan Atomic Research Institute, Toaki, Ibaraki (Japan)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    Results obtained in the NSRR power burst experiments with irradiated PWR fuel rods with fuel burnup up to 50 MWd/kgU are described and discussed in this paper. Data concerning test method, test fuel rod, pulse irradiation, transient records during the pulse and post irradiation examination are described, and interpretations and discussions on fission gas release and fuel pellet fragmentation are presented. During the pulse-irradiation experiment with 50 MWd/kgU PWR fuel rod, the fuel rod failed at considerably low energy deposition level, and large amount of fission gas release and fragmentation of fuel pellets were observed.

  1. Thermal property change of MOX and UO2 irradiated up to high burnup of 74 GWd/t

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakae, Nobuo; Akiyama, Hidetoshi; Miura, Hiromichi; Baba, Toshikazu; Kamimura, Katsuichiro; Kurematsu, Shigeru; Kosaka, Yuji; Yoshino, Aya; Kitagawa, Takaaki

    2013-09-01

    Thermal property is important because it controls fuel behavior under irradiation. The thermal property change at high burnup of more than 70 GWd/t is examined. Two kinds of MOX fuel rods, which were fabricated by MIMAS and SBR methods, and one referenced UO2 fuel rod were used in the experiment. These rods were taken from the pre-irradiated rods (IFA 609/626, of which irradiation test were carried out by Japanese PWR group) and re-fabricated and re-irradiated in HBWR as IFA 702 by JNES. The specification of fuel corresponds to that of 17 × 17 PWR type fuel and the axially averaged linear heat rates (LHR) of MOX rods are 25 kW/m (BOL of IFA 702) and 20 kW/m (EOL of IFA 702). The axial peak burnups achieved are about 74 GWd/t for both of MOX and UO2. Centerline temperature and plenum gas pressure were measured in situ during irradiation. The measured centerline temperature is plotted against LHR at the position where thermocouples are fixed. The slopes of MOX are corresponded to each other, but that of UO2 is higher than those of MOX. This implies that the thermal conductivity of MOX is higher than that of UO2 at high burnup under the condition that the pellet-cladding gap is closed during irradiation. Gap closure is confirmed by the metallography of the postirradiation examinations. It is understood that thermal conductivity of MOX is lower than that of UO2 before irradiation since phonon scattering with plutonium in MOX becomes remarkable. A phonon scattering with plutonium decreases in MOX when burnup proceeds. Thus, thermal conductivity of MOX becomes close to that of UO2. A reverse phenomenon is observed at high burnup region. The phonon scattering with fission products such as Nd and Zr causes a degradation of thermal conductivity of burnt fuel. It might be speculated that this scattering effect causes the phenomenon and the mechanism is discussed here.

  2. Multi-Group Formulation of the Temperature-Dependent Resonance Scattering Model and its Impact on Reactor Core Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghrayeb, Shadi Z. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering; Ougouag, Abderrafi M. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ouisloumen, Mohamed [Westinghouse Electric Company, Cranberry Township, PA (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin N. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering

    2014-01-01

    A multi-group formulation for the exact neutron elastic scattering kernel is developed. It incorporates the neutron up-scattering effects, stemming from lattice atoms thermal motion and accounts for it within the resulting effective nuclear cross-section data. The effects pertain essentially to resonant scattering off of heavy nuclei. The formulation, implemented into a standalone code, produces effective nuclear scattering data that are then supplied directly into the DRAGON lattice physics code where the effects on Doppler Reactivity and neutron flux are demonstrated. The correct accounting for the crystal lattice effects influences the estimated values for the probability of neutron absorption and scattering, which in turn affect the estimation of core reactivity and burnup characteristics. The results show an increase in values of Doppler temperature feedback coefficients up to -10% for UOX and MOX LWR fuels compared to the corresponding values derived using the traditional asymptotic elastic scattering kernel. This paper also summarizes the results done on this topic to date.

  3. Evaluation of Isotopic Measurements and Burn-up Value of Sample GU3 of ARIANE Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tore, C.; Rodriguez Rivada, A.

    2014-07-01

    Estimation of the burn-up value of irradiated fuel and its isotopic composition are important for criticality analysis, spent fuel management and source term estimation. The practical way to estimate the irradiated fuel composition and burn.up value is calculation with validated code and nuclear data. Such validation of the neutronic codes and nuclear data requires the benchmarking with measured values. (Author)

  4. Calibration of burnup monitor of spent nuclear fuel installed at Rokkasho reprocessing plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oeda, Kaoru; Matoba, Masaru; Wakabayashi, Genichiro [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Naito, Hirofumi; Hirota, Masanari [Nuclear Fuel Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Morizaki, Hidetoshi; Kumanomido, Hironori; Natsume, Koichiro [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-05-01

    The spent nuclear fuel storage pool of Rokkasho reprocessing plant adopts the burnup credit' conception. Spent fuel assemblies are measured every one by one, by burnup monitors, and stored to a storage rack which is designed with specified residual enrichment. For nuclear criticality control, it is necessary for the burnup monitor that the measured value includes a kind of margin, which consists of errors of the monitor. In this paper, we describe the error of the burnup monitors, and the way of taking of the margin. From the result of calibration of the burnup monitor carried out from July through November, 1999, we describe that the way of taking of the margin is validated. And comments about possibility of error reduction are remarked. (author)

  5. Assessing Colour-dependent Occupation Statistics Inferred from Galaxy Group Catalogues

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Duncan; Hearin, Andrew; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Berlind, Andreas; Mo, H J; Tinker, Jeremy; Yang, Xiaohu

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the ability of current implementations of galaxy group finders to recover colour-dependent halo occupation statistics. To test the fidelity of group catalogue inferred statistics, we run three different group finders used in the literature over a mock that includes galaxy colours in a realistic manner. Overall, the resulting mock group catalogues are remarkably similar, and most colour-dependent statistics are recovered with reasonable accuracy. However, it is also clear that certain systematic errors arise as a consequence of correlated errors in group membership determination, central/satellite designation, and halo mass assignment. We introduce a new statistic, the halo transition probability (HTP), which captures the combined impact of all these errors. As a rule of thumb, errors tend to equalize the properties of distinct galaxy populations (i.e. red vs. blue galaxies or centrals vs. satellites), and to result in inferred occupation statistics that are more accurate for red galaxies than f...

  6. Preparation of data relevant to ''Equivalent Uniform Burnup'' and Equivalent Initial Enrichment'' for burnup credit evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Yasushi; Okuno, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Murazaki, Minoru [Tokyo Nuclear Service Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-11-01

    Based on the PWR spent fuel composition data measured at JAERI, two kinds of simplified methods such as ''Equivalent Uniform Burnup'' and ''Equivalent Initial Enrichment'' have been introduced. And relevant evaluation curves have been prepared for criticality safety evaluation of spent fuel storage pool and transport casks, taking burnup of spent fuel into consideration. These simplified methods can be used to obtain an effective neutron multiplication factor for a spent fuel storage/transportation system by using the ORIGEN2.1 burnup code and the KENO-Va criticality code without considering axial burnup profile in spent fuel and other various factors introducing calculated errors. ''Equivalent Uniform Burnup'' is set up for its criticality analysis to be reactivity equivalent with the detailed analysis, in which the experimentally obtained isotopic composition together with a typical axial burnup profile and various factors such as irradiation history are considered on the conservative side. On the other hand, Equivalent Initial Enrichment'' is set up for its criticality analysis to be reactivity equivalent with the detailed analysis such as above when it is used in the so called fresh fuel assumption. (author)

  7. High-Resolution Crystal Structures Elucidate the Molecular Basis of Cholera Blood Group Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggelund, Julie Elisabeth; Burschowsky, Daniel; Bjørnestad, Victoria Ariel; Hodnik, Vesna; Anderluh, Gregor; Krengel, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Cholera is the prime example of blood-group-dependent diseases, with individuals of blood group O experiencing the most severe symptoms. The cholera toxin is the main suspect to cause this relationship. We report the high-resolution crystal structures (1.1-1.6 Å) of the native cholera toxin B-pentamer for both classical and El Tor biotypes, in complexes with relevant blood group determinants and a fragment of its primary receptor, the GM1 ganglioside. The blood group A determinant binds in the opposite orientation compared to previously published structures of the cholera toxin, whereas the blood group H determinant, characteristic of blood group O, binds in both orientations. H-determinants bind with higher affinity than A-determinants, as shown by surface plasmon resonance. Together, these findings suggest why blood group O is a risk factor for severe cholera.

  8. RAPID program to predict radial power and burnup distribution of UO{sub 2} fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Song, Jae Sung; Bang, Je Gun; Kim, Dae Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-02-01

    Due to the radial variation of the neutron flux and its energy spectrum inside UO{sub 2} fuel, the fission density and fissile isotope production rates are varied radially in the pellet, and it becomes necessary to know the accurate radial power and burnup variation to predict the high burnup fuel behavior such as rim effects. Therefore, to predict the radial distribution of power, burnup and fissionable nuclide densities in the pellet with the burnup and U-235 enrichment, RAPID(RAdial power and burnup Prediction by following fissile Isotope Distribution in the pellet) program was developed. It considers the specific radial variation of the neutron reaction of the nuclides while the constant radial variation of neutron reaction except neutron absorption of U-238 regardless of the nuclides, the burnup and U-235 enrichment is assumed in TUBRNP model which is recognized as the one of the most reliable models. Therefore, it is expected that RAPID may be more accurate than TUBRNP, specially at high burnup region. RAPID is based upon and validated by the detailed reactor physics code, HELIOS which is one of few codes that can calculates the radial variations of the nuclides inside the pellet. Comparison of RAPID prediction with the measured data of the irradiated fuels showed very good agreement. RAPID can be used to calculate the local variations of the fissionable nuclide concentrations as well as the local power and burnup inside that pellet as a function of the burnup up to 10 w/o U-235 enrichment and 150 MWD/kgU burnup under the LWR environment. (author). 8 refs., 50 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Extension and validation of the TRANSURANUS burn-up model for helium production in high burn-up LWR fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botazzoli, Pietro; Luzzi, Lelio; Brémier, Stephane; Schubert, Arndt; Van Uffelen, Paul; Walker, Clive T.; Haeck, Wim; Goll, Wolfgang

    2011-12-01

    The TRANSURANUS burn-up model (TUBRNP) calculates the local concentration of the actinides, the main fission products, and 4He as a function of the radial position across a fuel rod. In this paper, the improvements in the helium production model as well as the extensions in the simulation of 238-242Pu, 241Am, 243Am and 242-245Cm isotopes are described. Experimental data used for the extended validation include new EPMA measurements of the local concentrations of Nd and Pu and recent SIMS measurements of the radial distributions of Pu, Am and Cm isotopes, both in a 3.5% enriched commercial PWR UO 2 fuel with a burn-up of 80 and 65 MWd/kgHM, respectively. Good agreement has been found between TUBRNP and the experimental data. The analysis has been complemented by detailed neutron transport calculations (VESTA code), and also revealed the need to update the branching ratio for the 241Am(n,γ) 242mAm reaction in typical PWR conditions.

  10. Effectiveness of Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy Compared to the Usual Opioid Dependence Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Imani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Objective: This study investigated the effectiveness of mindfulness-based group therapy (MBGT compared to the usual opioid dependence treatment (TAU.Thirty outpatients meeting the DSM-IV-TR criteria for opioid dependence from Iranian National Center for Addiction Studies (INCAS were randomly assigned into experimental (Mindfulness-Based Group Therapy and control groups (the Usual Treatment.The experimental group undertook eight weeks of intervention, but the control group received the usual treatment according to the INCAS program.  Methods:The Five Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ and the Addiction Sevier Index (ASI were administered at pre-treatment and post-treatment assessment periods. Thirteen patients from the experimental group and 15 from the control group completed post-test assessments. Results:The results of MANCOVA revealed an increase in mean scores in observing, describing, acting with awareness, non-judging, non-reacting, and decrease in mean scores of alcohol and opium in MBGT patient group. Conclusion:The effectiveness of MBGT, compared to the usual treatment, was discussed in this paper as a selective protocol in the health care setting for substance use disorders.

  11. Efficacy of Group Motivational Interviewing (GMI) for Psychiatric Inpatients with Chemical Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Ana, Elizabeth J.; Wulfert, Edelgard; Nietert, Paul J.

    2007-01-01

    Dually diagnosed patients with chemical dependency and a comorbid psychiatric disorder typically show poor compliance with aftercare treatment, which may result in costly and pervasive individual and societal problems. In this study, the authors investigated the effect of adding motivational interviewing in a group format to standard treatment for…

  12. Burnup calculations for the HOMER-15 and SAFE-300 reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Benjamin W.; Poston, David I.

    2002-01-01

    The Heatpipe Power System (HPS) is a near-term low-cost space fission power system. As the U-235 fuel of the HPS is burned, higher actinides and fission products will be produced. This will cause changes in system reactivity, radioactivity, and decay power. One potential concern is that gaseous fission products may exert excessive pressure on the fuel pin cladding. To evaluate these issues, simulations were run in MONTEBURNS. MONTEBURNS is an automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. This paper describes the results of these simulations, as well as how those results compare with the current experimental database of irradiated materials. .

  13. Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes testing designed to determine the ability of high burnup (HBU) (>45 GWd/MTU) spent fuel to maintain its integrity under normal conditions of transportation. An innovative system, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT), has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test and evaluate the mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under conditions relevant to storage and transportation. The CIRFT system is composed of a U-frame equipped with load cells for imposing the pure bending loads on the SNF rod test specimen and measuring the in-situ curvature of the fuel rod during bending using a set up with three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs).

  14. Manufacturing Data Uncertainties Propagation Method in Burn-Up Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Frosio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A nuclear data-based uncertainty propagation methodology is extended to enable propagation of manufacturing/technological data (TD uncertainties in a burn-up calculation problem, taking into account correlation terms between Boltzmann and Bateman terms. The methodology is applied to reactivity and power distributions in a Material Testing Reactor benchmark. Due to the inherent statistical behavior of manufacturing tolerances, Monte Carlo sampling method is used for determining output perturbations on integral quantities. A global sensitivity analysis (GSA is performed for each manufacturing parameter and allows identifying and ranking the influential parameters whose tolerances need to be better controlled. We show that the overall impact of some TD uncertainties, such as uranium enrichment, or fuel plate thickness, on the reactivity is negligible because the different core areas induce compensating effects on the global quantity. However, local quantities, such as power distributions, are strongly impacted by TD uncertainty propagations. For isotopic concentrations, no clear trends appear on the results.

  15. Simulation of triton burn-up in JET plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughlin, M.J.; Balet, B.; Jarvis, O.N.; Stubberfield, P.M. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents the first triton burn-up calculations for JET plasmas using the transport code TRANSP. Four hot ion H-mode deuterium plasmas are studied. For these discharges, the 2.5 MeV emission rises rapidly and then collapses abruptly. This phenomenon is not fully understood but in each case the collapse phase is associated with a large impurity influx known as the ``carbon bloom``. The peak 14 MeV emission occurs at this time, somewhat later than that of the 2.5 MeV neutron peak. The present results give a clear indication that there are no significant departures from classical slowing down and spatial diffusion for tritons in JET plasmas. (authors). 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Assessment of reactivity transient experiments with high burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozer, O.; Yang, R.L.; Rashid, Y.R.; Montgomery, R.O.

    1996-03-01

    A few recent experiments aimed at determining the response of high-burnup LWR fuel during a reactivity initiated accident (RIA) have raised concerns that existing failure criteria may be inappropriate for such fuel. In particular, three experiments (SPERT CDC-859, NSRR HBO-1 and CABRI REP Na-1) appear to have resulted in fuel failures at only a fraction of the anticipated enthalpy levels. In evaluating the results of such RIA simulation experiments, however, it is necessary that the following two key considerations be taken into account: (1) Are the experiments representative of conditions that LWR fuel would experience during an in-reactor RIA event? (2) Is the fuel that is being utilized in the tests representative of the present (or anticipated) population of LWR fuel? Conducting experiments under conditions that can not occur in-reactor can trigger response modes that could not take place during in-reactor operation. Similarly, using unrepresentative fuel samples for the tests will produce failure information that is of limited relevance to commercial LWR fuel. This is particularly important for high-burnup fuel since the manner under which the test samples are base-irradiated prior to the test will impact the mechanical properties of the cladding and will therefore affect the RIA response. A good example of this effect can be seen in the results of the SPERT CDC-859 test and in the NSRR JM-4 and JM-5 tests. The conditions under which the fuel used for these tests was fabricated and/or base-irradiated prior to the RIA pulse resulted in the formation of multiple cladding defects in the form of hydride blisters. When this fuel was subjected to the RIA power pulse, it failed by developing multiple cracks that were closely correlated with the locations of the pre-existing hydride blisters. In the case of the JM tests, many of the cracks formed within the blisters themselves and did not propagate beyond the heavily hydrided regions.

  17. Burnup measurements on spent fuel elements of the RP-10 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vela Mora, Mariano; Gallardo Padilla, Alberto; Palomino, Jose Luis Castro, E-mail: mvela@ipen.gob.p [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear (IPEN/Peru), Lima (Peru). Grupo de Calculo, Analisis y Seguridad de Reactores; Terremoto, Luis Antonio Albiac, E-mail: laaterre@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work describes the measurement, using nondestructive gamma-ray spectroscopy, of the average burnup attained by Material Testing Reactor (MTR) fuel elements irradiated in the RP-10 research reactor. Measurements were performed at the reactor storage pool area using {sup 137}Cs as the only burnup monitor, even for spent fuel elements with cooling times much shorter than two years. The experimental apparatus was previously calibrated in efficiency to obtain absolute average burnup values, which were compared against corresponding ones furnished by reactor physics calculations. The mean deviation between both values amounts to 6%. (author)

  18. Development of Monteburns: A Code That Links MCNP and ORIGEN2 in an Automated Fashion for Burnup Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holly R. Trellue

    1998-12-01

    Monteburns is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code 0RIGEN2. Monteburns produces many criticality and burnup computational parameters based on material feed/removal specifications, power(s), and time intervals. This code processes input from the user indicating the system geometry, initial material compositions, feed/removal, and other code-specific parameters. Results from MCNP, 0RIGEN2, and other calculations are then output successively as the code runs. The principle function of monteburns is to first transfer one-group cross sections and fluxes from MCNP to 0RIGEN2, and then transfer the resulting material compositions (after irradiation and/or decay) from 0RIGEN2 back to MCNP in a repeated, cyclic fashion. The main requirement of the code is that the user have a working MCNP input file and other input parameters; all interaction with 0RIGEN2 and other calculations are performed by monteburns. This report presents the results obtained from the benchmarking of monteburns to measured and previously obtained data from traditional Light Water Reactor systems. The majority of the differences seen between the two were less than five percent. These were primarily a result of variances in cross sections between MCNP, cross section libraries used by other codes, and observed values. With this understanding, this code can now be used with confidence for burnup calculations in three-dimensional systems. It was designed for use in the Accelerator Transmutation of Waste project at Los Alamos National Laboratory but is also being applied to the analysis of isotopic production/destruction of transuranic actinides in a reactor system. The code has now been shown to sufficiently support these calculations.

  19. On the "Dependence" of "Independent" Group EEG Sources; an EEG Study on Two Large Databases.

    OpenAIRE

    Congedo, Marco; John, Roy; RIDDER, Dirk De; Prichep, Leslie; Isenhart, Robert

    2010-01-01

    International audience; The aim of this work is to study the coherence profile (dependence) of robust eyes-closed resting EEG sources isolated by group blind source separation (gBSS). We employ a test-retest strategy using two large sample normative databases (N = 57 and 84). Using a BSS method in the complex Fourier domain, we show that we can rigourously study the out-of-phase dependence of the extracted components, albeit they are extracted so as to be in-phase independent (by BSS definiti...

  20. Non-nearest-neighbor dependence of stability for group III RNA single nucleotide bulge loops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Jessica L; McCann, Michael D; Phillips, Daniel; Panaro, Brandon L; Lim, Geoffrey F S; Serra, Martin J

    2014-06-01

    Thirty-five RNA duplexes containing single nucleotide bulge loops were optically melted and the thermodynamic parameters for each duplex determined. The bulge loops were of the group III variety, where the bulged nucleotide is either a AG/U or CU/G, leading to ambiguity to the exact position and identity of the bulge. All possible group III bulge loops with Watson-Crick nearest-neighbors were examined. The data were used to develop a model to predict the free energy of an RNA duplex containing a group III single nucleotide bulge loop. The destabilization of the duplex by the group III bulge could be modeled so that the bulge nucleotide leads to the formation of the Watson-Crick base pair rather than the wobble base pair. The destabilization of an RNA duplex caused by the insertion of a group III bulge is primarily dependent upon non-nearest-neighbor interactions and was shown to be dependent upon the stability of second least stable stem of the duplex. In-line structure probing of group III bulge loops embedded in a hairpin indicated that the bulged nucleotide is the one positioned further from the hairpin loop irrespective of whether the resulting stem formed a Watson-Crick or wobble base pair. Fourteen RNA hairpins containing group III bulge loops, either 3' or 5' of the hairpin loop, were optically melted and the thermodynamic parameters determined. The model developed to predict the influence of group III bulge loops on the stability of duplex formation was extended to predict the influence of bulge loops on hairpin stability.

  1. Water Contact Angle Dependence with Hydroxyl Functional Groups on Silica Surfaces under CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cong; Zhang, Ning; Li, Weizhong; Song, Yongchen

    2015-12-15

    Functional groups on silica surfaces under CO2 sequestration conditions are complex due to reactions among supercritical CO2, brine and silica. Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the effects of hydroxyl functional groups on wettability. It has been found that wettability shows a strong dependence on functional groups on silica surfaces: silanol number density, space distribution, and deprotonation/protonation degree. For neutral silica surfaces with crystalline structure (Q(3), Q(3)/Q(4), Q(4)), as silanol number density decreases, contact angle increases from 33.5° to 146.7° at 10.5 MPa and 318 K. When Q(3) surface changes to an amorphous structure, water contact angle increases 20°. Water contact angle decreases about 12° when 9% of silanol groups on Q(3) surface are deprotonated. When the deprotonation degree increases to 50%, water contact angle decreases to 0. The dependence of wettability on silica surface functional groups was used to analyze contact angle measurement ambiguity in literature. The composition of silica surfaces is complicated under CO2 sequestration conditions, the results found in this study may help to better understand wettability of CO2/brine/silica system.

  2. Technical Development on Burn-up Credit for Spent LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2001-12-26

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled ''Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels.'' Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burnup and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report.

  3. ThO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} annular pins for high burnup fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caner, Marc; Dugan, Edward T

    2000-06-01

    The main purpose of this work is to investigate the use of annular fuel pins (particularly pins containing thorium dioxide) for high burnup fuel. The following parameters were evaluated and compared between postulated mixed thorium-uranium dioxide standard and annular (9% void fraction) type fuel assemblies, as a function of burnup: the infinite multiplication factor, the uranium and plutonium isotopic compositions, the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity and the conversion ratio. We used the SCALE-4.3 code system. The calculation method consisted in obtaining actinide and fission product number densities as functions of assembly burnup, by means of a 1-D transport calculation combined with a 0-D burnup calculation. These number densities were then used in a 3-D Monte Carlo code for obtaining k{sub {infinity}} from two-dimensional-symmetry 'snapshots'.

  4. Fission-gas release at extended burnups: effect of two-dimensional heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayal, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Yu, S.D. [Ryerson Polytechnic Univ., Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Lau, J.H.K

    2000-09-01

    To better simulate the performance of high-burnup CANDU fuel, a two-dimensional model for heat transfer between the pellet and the sheath has been added to the computer code ELESTRES. The model covers four relative orientations of the pellet and the sheath and their impacts on heat transfer and fission-gas release. The predictions of the code were compared to a database of 27 experimental irradiations involving extended burnups and normal burnups. The calculated values of fission gas release matched the measurements to an average of 94%. Thus, the two-dimensional heat transfer model increases the versatility of the ELESTRES code to better simulate fuels at normal as well as at extended burnups. (author)

  5. Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Yoshinori; Suyama, Kenya; Suzaki, Takenori [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-10-01

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled 'Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels'. Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burn-up and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report. (author)

  6. Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this topical report is to present to the NRC for review and acceptance a methodology for using burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems for PWR spent fuel transportation packages, while maintaining the criticality safety margins and related requirements of 10 CFR Part 71 and 72. The proposed methodology consists of five major steps as summarized below: (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations in SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, keff, of a spent nuclear fuel package. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). and (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper fuel assembly selection prior to loading. (This step is required but the details are outside the scope of this topical report.) When reviewed and accepted by the NRC, this topical report will serve as a criterion document for criticality control analysts and will provide steps for the use of actinide-only burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems. The NRC-accepted burnup credit methodology will be used by commercial SNF storage and transportation package designers. Design-specific burnup credit criticality analyses will be defined, developed, and documented in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for each specific storage or transportation package that uses burnup credit. These SARs will then be submitted to the NRC for review and approval. This topical report is expected to be referenced in a number of storage and transportation cask applications to be submitted by commercial cask and canister designers to the NRC. Therefore, NRC acceptance of this topical report will result in increased efficiency of the

  7. French investigations of high burnup effect on LOCA thermomecanical behavior. Part two. Oxidation and quenching experiments under simulated LOCA conditions with high burnup clad material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GrandJean, C. [IPSN, Cadarache (France); Cauvin, R.; Lebuffe, C. [EDF/SCMI, Chinon (France)] [and others

    1997-01-01

    In the frame of the high burnup fuel studies to support a possible extension of the current discharge burnup limit, experimental programs have been undertaken, jointly by EDF and IPSN in order to study the thermal-shock behavior of high burnup fuel claddings under typical LOCA conditions. The TAGUS program used unirradiated cladding samples, bare or bearing a pre-corrosion state simulating the end-of-life state of high burnup fuel claddings: the TAGCIR program used actually irradiated cladding samples taken from high burnup rods irradiated over 5 cycles in a commercial EDF PWR and having reached a rod burnup close to 60 GWd/tU. The thermal-shock failure tests consisted in oxidizing the cladding samples under steam flow, on both inner and outer faces or on the outer face alone, and subjecting them to a final water quench. The heating was provided by an inductive furnace the power of which being regulated through monitoring of the sample surface temperature with use of a single-wave optical pyrometer. Analysis of the irradiated tests (TAGCIR series) evidenced an increased oxidation rate as compared to similar tests on unirradiated samples. Results of the quenching tests series on unirradiated and irradiated samples are plotted under the usual presentation of failure maps relative to the oxidation parameters ECR (equivalent cladding reacted) or e{sub {beta}} (thickness of the remaining beta phase layer) as a function of the oxidation temperature. Comparison of the failure limits for irradiated specimens to those for unirradiated specimens indicates a lower brittleness under two side oxidation and possibly the opposite under one-side oxidation. The tentative analysis of the oxidation and quenching tests results on irradiated samples reveals the important role played by the hydrogen charged during in-reactor corrosion on the oxidation kinetics and the failure bearing capability of the cladding under LOCA transient conditions.

  8. Prize reinforcement contingency management for cocaine dependence: integration with group therapy in a methadone clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Martin, Bonnie; Simcic, Francis

    2005-04-01

    In this study, the authors evaluated a low-cost contingency management (CM) procedure for reducing cocaine use and enhancing group therapy attendance in 77 cocaine-dependent methadone patients. Patients were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of standard treatment or standard treatment with CM, in which patients earned the opportunity to win prizes ranging from $1 to $100 for submitting cocainenegative samples and attending therapy. Patients in the CM condition submitted more cocaine-negative samples and attended more groups than patients in standard treatment. The best predictor of cocaine abstinence at follow-up was duration of abstinence during treatment. On average, patients in the CM condition earned $117 in prizes. Data from this study suggest that some aspects of reinforcement can be implemented in group therapy in community-based clinics.

  9. MCNPX Monte Carlo burnup simulations of the isotope correlation experiments in the NPP Obrigheim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Yan, E-mail: ycao@anl.go [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Gohar, Yousry [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Broeders, Cornelis H.M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    This paper describes the simulation work of the Isotope Correlation Experiment (ICE) using the MCNPX Monte Carlo computer code package. The Monte Carlo simulation results are compared with the ICE-Experimental measurements for burnup up to 30 GWD/t. The comparison shows the good capabilities of the MCNPX computer code package for predicting the depletion of the uranium fuel and the buildup of the plutonium isotopes in a PWR thermal reactor. The Monte Carlo simulation results show also good agreements with the experimental data for calculating several long-lived and stable fission products. However, for the americium and curium actinides, it is difficult to judge the predication capabilities for these actinides due to the large uncertainties in the ICE-Experimental data. In the MCNPX numerical simulations, a pin cell model is utilized to simulate the fuel lattice of the nuclear power reactor. Temperature dependent libraries based on JEFF3.1 nuclear data files are utilized for the calculations. In addition, temperature dependent libraries based ENDF/B-VII nuclear data files are utilized and the obtained results are very close to the JEFF3.1 results, except for {approx}10% differences in the prediction of the minor actinide isotopes buildup.

  10. Neutron Transport and Nuclear Burnup Analysis for the Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion-Fission Energy (LIFE) Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, K J; Latkowski, J F; Abbott, R P; Boyd, J K; Powers, J J; Seifried, J E

    2008-10-24

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is currently developing a hybrid fusion-fission nuclear energy system, called LIFE, to generate power and burn nuclear waste. We utilize inertial confinement fusion to drive a subcritical fission blanket surrounding the fusion chamber. It is composed of TRISO-based fuel cooled by the molten salt flibe. Low-yield (37.5 MJ) targets and a repetition rate of 13.3 Hz produce a 500 MW fusion source that is coupled to the subcritical blanket, which provides an additional gain of 4-8, depending on the fuel. In the present work, we describe the neutron transport and nuclear burnup analysis. We utilize standard analysis tools including, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code, ORIGEN2 and Monteburns to perform the nuclear design. These analyses focus primarily on a fuel composed of depleted uranium not requiring chemical reprocessing or enrichment. However, other fuels such as weapons grade plutonium and highly-enriched uranium are also under consideration. In addition, we have developed a methodology using {sup 6}Li as a burnable poison to replace the tritium burned in the fusion targets and to maintain constant power over the lifetime of the engine. The results from depleted uranium analyses suggest up to 99% burnup of actinides is attainable while maintaining full power at 2GW for more than five decades.

  11. Reduction of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors during development of benzodiazepine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Ritsuko; Itoh, Yoshinori; Murata, Yusuke; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hosoi, Masako; Mine, Kazunori

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged use of benzodiazepines often leads to dependence and withdrawal syndrome. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying benzodiazepine dependence have not been fully clarified. Several investigators have shown an involvement of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in the pathophysiology of dependence or withdrawal. This study was performed to elucidate the role of mGluRs in benzodiazepine dependence. Withdrawal signs were precipitated in mice by flumazenil injection (25 mg/kg) after continuous subcutaneous infusion of benzodiazepines for 7 days, and the effects of several Gi-coupled receptor ligands on forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation were examined in the cerebral cortex of mice. The mRNA expression for mGluRs was determined by RT-PCR. A single injection of flumazenil precipitated typical withdrawal signs such as tail elevation and tremor in mice treated with diazepam or alprazolam, but not quazepam. The inhibitory effect of nonselective mGluR ligands on adenylate cyclase activity was diminished in mice that showed signs of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The mRNA expression levels of mGluR2 and mGluR3 were lowered in the cerebral cortex of mice pretreated with diazepam or alprazolam. Our findings suggest that the reduction in the expression of group II mGluRs subunits may be involved in the development of benzodiazepine dependence.

  12. Aroma of Turmeric: Dependence on the Combination of Groups of Several Odor Constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Toshio; Nakatani, Kenta; Fujihara, Takashi; Yamada, Hideo

    2015-06-01

    Turmeric is a popular material that plays an important role in the flavor and fragrance industries. Although many compounds have been reported as components of turmeric, its aroma profile has not been clarified. Recently we have developed a new approach for evaluating the complex odors of materials based on recent research on the mechanism of odor recognition. Here we report the characteristic aroma properties of turmeric obtained through the investigation of its aroma profile. The hexane extract of turmeric had a turmeric-like odor, whereas the steam distillate of turmeric had a pungent, non-turmeric-like odor. We carried out bulb-to-bulb distillations of the extract and the steam distillate. For the hexane extract, two fractions with completely different odors were obtained. One was a high boiling point fraction (group A) with a turmeric-like odor, which consisted of ar-turmerone and β-turmerone as the main components, and the other was a low boiling point fraction (group B), which consisted of α-curcumene and β-sesquiphellandrene. In contrast, the bulb-to-bulb distillation of the steam distillate gave a fraction (group C) with a very different odor from groups A and B. Group C was composed of several kinds of alcohols that were not present in groups A and B. These results indicate that the group C fraction causes the different, pungent odor of the turmeric oil obtained by steam distillation. The variation in the aroma of turmeric depended on the combination of these three groups of odor constituents.

  13. The criterion-related validity of the Northwick Park Dependency Score as a generic nursing dependency instrument for different rehabilitation patient groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plantinga, E.; Tiesinga, L. J.; van der Schans, C. P.; Middel, B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the criterion or concurrent validity of the Northwick Park Dependency Score (NPDS) for determining nursing dependence in different rehabilitation groups, with the Barthel Index (BI) and the Care Dependency Scale (C D S). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: Centre for Re

  14. Technical Data to Justify Full Burnup Credit in Criticality Safety Licensing Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enercon Services, Inc.

    2011-03-14

    Enercon Services, Inc. (ENERCON) was requested under Task Order No.2 to identify scientific and technical data needed to benchmark and justify Full Burnup Credit, which adds 16 fission products and 4 minor actinides1 to Actinide-Only burnup credit. The historical perspective for Full Burnup Credit is discussed, and interviews of organizations participating in burnup credit activities are summarized as a basis for identifying additional data needs and making recommendation. Input from burnup credit participants representing two segments of the commercial nuclear industry is provided. First, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been very active in the development of Full Burnup Credit, representing the interests of nuclear utilities in achieving capacity gains for storage and transport casks. EPRI and its utility customers are interested in a swift resolution of the validation issues that are delaying the implementation of Full Burnup Credit [EPRI 2010b]. Second, used nuclear fuel storage and transportation Cask Vendors favor improving burnup credit beyond Actinide-Only burnup credit, although their discussion of specific burnup credit achievements and data needs was limited citing business sensitive and technical proprietary concerns. While Cask Vendor proprietary items are not specifically identified in this report, the needs of all nuclear industry participants are reflected in the conclusions and recommendations of this report. In addition, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) were interviewed for their input into additional data needs to achieve Full Burnup Credit. ORNL was very open to discussions of Full Burnup Credit, with several telecoms and a visit by ENERCON to ORNL. For many years, ORNL has provided extensive support to the NRC regarding burnup credit in all of its forms. Discussions with ORNL focused on potential resolutions to the validation issues for the use of fission products. SNL was helpful in

  15. High Burn-Up Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Rob L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) approach to successfully demonstrate the controllable fatigue fracture on high burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a normal vibration mode. CIRFT enables examination of the underlying mechanisms of SNF system dynamic performance. Due to the inhomogeneous composite structure of the SNF system, the detailed mechanisms of the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interactions and the stress concentration effects at the pellet-pellet interface cannot be readily obtained from a CIRFT system measurement. Therefore, finite element analyses (FEAs) are used to translate the global moment-curvature measurement into local stress-strain profiles for further investigation. The major findings of CIRFT on the HBU SNF are as follows: SNF system interface bonding plays an important role in SNF vibration performance. Fuel structure contributes to SNF system stiffness. There are significant variations in stress and curvature of SNF systems during vibration cycles resulting from segment pellets and clad interactions. SNF failure initiates at the pellet-pellet interface region and appears to be spontaneous.

  16. Do the stellar populations of the brightest two group galaxies depend on the magnitude gap?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, M.; Mamon, G. A.; Khosroshahi, H. G.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate how the stellar populations of the inner regions of the first and the second brightest group galaxies (respectively BGGs and SBGGs) vary as a function of magnitude gap, using a Sloan Digital Sky Survey-based sample of 550 groups with elliptical BGGs. The sample is complete in redshift, luminosity, and for Δ M_{12} up to 2.5 mag, and contains 59 large-gap groups (LGGs, with Δ M_{12} > 2.0 mag). We determine ages, metallicities, and star formation histories (SFHs) of BGGs and SBGGs using the STARLIGHT code with two different single stellar population models (which lead to important disagreements in SFHs), and also compute [α/Fe] from spectral indices. After removing the dependence with galaxy velocity dispersion or with stellar mass, there is no correlation with magnitude gap of BGG ages, metallicities, [α/Fe], and SFHs. The lack of trends of BGG SFHs with magnitude gap suggests that BGGs in LGGs have undergone more mergers than those in small-gap groups, but these mergers are either dry or occurred at very high redshift, which in either case would leave no detectable imprint in their spectra. We show that SBGGs in LGGs lie significantly closer to the BGGs (in projection) than galaxies with similar stellar masses in normal groups, which appears to be a sign of the earlier entry of the former into their groups. Nevertheless, the stellar population properties of the SBGGs in LGGs are compatible with those of the general population of galaxies with similar stellar masses residing in normal groups.

  17. A questionnaire on survival of kittens depending on the blood groups of the parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axnér, Eva

    2014-10-01

    Cats more than 2 months of age have alloantibodies against the blood type antigen that they do not possess. Maternal antibodies, including alloantibodies against blood groups, are transferred to the kittens' systemic circulation when they suckle colostrum during the first 12-16 h after birth. If kittens with blood group A or AB nurse from a mother with blood group B they may develop neonatal isoerythrolysis (NI). Breeders can prevent kittens at risk of NI from nursing during the first 16-24 h; after this period it is safe to let them nurse. Kittens depend, however, on the passive transfer of antibodies from the colostrum for early protection against infections. Although it is known that kittens deprived of colostrum will also be deprived of passive systemic immunity, it is not known if this will affect their health. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate kitten mortality in litters with B-mothers and A-fathers compared to litters with A-mothers. In addition, the aim was to evaluate the effects of colostrum deprivation on the health of the mothers, and the breeders' opinions and experiences of these combinations of breedings. A web-based questionnaire was constructed and distributed to breeders. The results indicate that there is no difference in mortality between planned litters that have mothers with blood group A and litters with mothers that have blood group B and fathers that have blood group A. When managing blood group incompatibility in cat all factors affecting the health of the cats, including genetic variation, should be considered.

  18. Topical report on actinide-only burnup credit for PWR spent nuclear fuel packages. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1997-04-01

    A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}/Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and UO{sub 2}/PuO{sub 2} critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on k{sub eff} (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased k{sub eff}, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package

  19. Tritium release from EXOTIC-7 orthosilicate pebbles. Effect of burnup and contact with beryllium during irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaffidi-Argentina, F.; Werle, H. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1998-03-01

    EXOTIC-7 was the first in-pile test with {sup 6}Li-enriched (50%) lithium orthosilicate (Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4}) pebbles and with DEMO representative Li-burnup. Post irradiation examinations of the Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} have been performed at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FZK), mainly to investigate the tritium release kinetics as well as the effect of Li-burnup and/or contact with beryllium during irradiation. The release rate of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from pure Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} bed of capsule 28.1-1 is characterized by a broad main peak at about 400degC and by a smaller peak at about 800degC, and that from the mixed beds of capsule 28.2 and 26.2-1 shows again these two peaks, but most of the tritium is now released from the 800degC peak. This shift of release from low to high temperature may be due to the higher Li-burnup and/or due to contact with Be during irradiation. Due to the very difficult interpretation of the in-situ tritium release data, residence times have been estimated on the basis of the out-of-pile tests. The residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 28.1-1 irradiated at 10% Li-burnup agrees quite well with that of the same material irradiated at Li-burnup lower than 3% in the EXOTIC-6 experiment. In spite of the observed shift in the release peaks from low to high temperature, also the residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 26.2-1 irradiated at 13% Li-burnup agrees quite well with the data from EXOTIC-6 experiment. On the other hand, the residence time for Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} from caps. 28.2 (Li-burnup 18%) is about a factor 1.7-3.8 higher than that for caps. 26.2-1. Based on these data on can conclude that up to 13% Li-burnup neither the contact with beryllium nor the Li-burnup have a detrimental effect on the tritium release of Li{sub 4}SiO{sub 4} pebbles, but at 18% Li-burnup the residence time is increased by about a factor three. (J.P.N.)

  20. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I' region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin A; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I' band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D₂O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  1. Temperature dependence of C-terminal carboxylic group IR absorptions in the amide I‧ region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Benjamin A.; Literati, Alex; Ball, Borden; Kubelka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Studies of structural changes in peptides and proteins using IR spectroscopy often rely on subtle changes in the amide I‧ band as a function of temperature. However, these changes can be obscured by the overlap with other absorptions, namely the side-chain and terminal carboxylic groups. The former were the subject of our previous report (Anderson et al., 2014). In this paper we investigate the IR spectra of the asymmetric stretch of α-carboxylic groups for amino acids representing all major types (Gly, Ala, Val, Leu, Ser, Thr, Asp, Glu, Lys, Asn, His, Trp, Pro) as well as the C-terminal groups of three dipeptides (Gly-Gly, Gly-Ala, Ala-Gly) in D2O at neutral pH. Experimental temperature dependent IR spectra were analyzed by fitting of both symmetric and asymmetric pseudo-Voigt functions. Qualitatively the spectra exhibit shifts to higher frequency, loss in intensity and narrowing with increased temperature, similar to that observed previously for the side-chain carboxylic groups of Asp. The observed dependence of the band parameters (frequency, intensity, width and shape) on temperature is in all cases linear: simple linear regression is therefore used to describe the spectral changes. The spectral parameters vary between individual amino acids and show systematic differences between the free amino acids and dipeptides, particularly in the absolute peak frequencies, but the temperature variations are comparable. The relative variations between the dipeptide spectral parameters are most sensitive to the C-terminal amino acid, and follow the trends observed in the free amino acid spectra. General rules for modeling the α-carboxylic IR absorption bands in peptides and proteins as the function of temperature are proposed.

  2. Do the stellar populations of the brightest two group galaxies depend on the magnitude gap?

    CERN Document Server

    Trevisan, M; Khosroshahi, H G

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how the stellar populations of first and second brightest group galaxies (respectively BGGs and SBGGs) vary as a function of the magnitude gap, {\\Delta}M_12, using an SDSS-based sample of 569 groups with elliptical BGGs. The sample is complete in redshift, luminosity and for {\\Delta}M_12 up to 2.5 mag, and contains 75 optical fossil groups (FGs, with {\\Delta}M_12 > 2.0 mag). We determine ages, metallicities, and star formation histories (SFHs) of BGGs and SBGGs using the STARLIGHT code with two single stellar population (SSP) models, one of which (MILES) leads to significantly more extended SFHs than the other (BC03). After removing the dependence with stellar mass, there is no correlation with magnitude gap of BGG ages, metallicities, and SFHs derived with the BC03 model. However, with the MILES model, the BGGs in FGs appear to have more extended SFHs than those in regular groups. But this signature with MILES is not seen in the colours, specific star formation rates nor in the 4000 A breaks, ...

  3. Summary of high burnup fuel issues and NRC`s plan of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, R.O.

    1997-01-01

    For the past two years the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research has concentrated mostly on the so-called reactivity-initiated accidents -- the RIAs -- in this session of the Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting, but this year there is a more varied agenda. RIAs are, of course, not the only events of interest for reactor safety that are affected by extended burnup operation. Their has now been enough time to consider a range of technical issues that arise at high burnup, and a list of such issues being addressed in their research program is given here. (1) High burnup capability of the steady-state code (FRAPCON) used for licensing audit calculations. (2) General capability (including high burnup) of the transient code (FRAPTRAN) used for special studies. (3) Adequacy at high burnup of fuel damage criteria used in regulation for reactivity accidents. (4) Adequacy at high burnup of models and fuel related criteria used in regulation for loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). (5) Effect of high burnup on fuel system damage during normal operation, including control rod insertion problems. A distinction is made between technical issues, which may or may not have direct licensing impacts, and licensing issues. The RIAs became a licensing issue when the French test in CABRI showed that cladding failures could occur at fuel enthalpies much lower than a value currently used in licensing. Fuel assembly distortion became a licensing issue when control rod insertion was affected in some operating plants. In this presentation, these technical issues will be described and the NRC`s plan of action to address them will be discussed.

  4. New high burnup fuel models for NRC`s licensing audit code, FRAPCON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L. [Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Fuel behavior models have recently been updated within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission steady-state FRAPCON code used for auditing of fuel vendor/utility-codes and analyses. These modeling updates have concentrated on providing a best estimate prediction of steady-state fuel behavior up to the maximum burnup level s of current data (60 to 65 GWd/MTU rod-average). A decade has passed since these models were last updated. Currently, some U.S. utilities and fuel vendors are requesting approval for rod-average burnups greater than 60 GWd/MTU; however, until these recent updates the NRC did not have valid fuel performance models at these higher burnup levels. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has reviewed 15 separate effects models within the FRAPCON fuel performance code (References 1 and 2) and identified nine models that needed updating for improved prediction of fuel behavior at high burnup levels. The six separate effects models not updated were the cladding thermal properties, cladding thermal expansion, cladding creepdown, fuel specific heat, fuel thermal expansion and open gap conductance. Comparison of these models to the currently available data indicates that these models still adequately predict the data within data uncertainties. The nine models identified as needing improvement for predicting high-burnup behavior are fission gas release (FGR), fuel thermal conductivity (accounting for both high burnup effects and burnable poison additions), fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, fuel-cladding contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion, cladding mechanical properties and cladding axial growth. Each of the updated models will be described in the following sections and the model predictions will be compared to currently available high burnup data.

  5. Possible Involvement of Hydrosulfide in B12-Dependent Methyl Group Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John I. Toohey

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from several fields of investigation lead to the hypothesis that the sulfur atom is involved in vitamin B12-dependent methyl group transfer. To compile the evidence, it is necessary to briefly review the following fields: methylation, the new field of sulfane sulfur/hydrogen sulfide (S°/H2S, hydrosulfide derivatives of cobalamins, autoxidation of hydrosulfide radical, radical S-adenosylmethionine methyl transfer (RSMT, and methionine synthase (MS. Then, new reaction mechanisms for B12-dependent methyl group transfer are proposed; the mechanisms are facile and overcome difficulties that existed in previously-accepted mechanisms. Finally, the theory is applied to the effect of S°/H2S in nerve tissue involving the “hypomethylation theory” that was proposed 50 years ago to explain the neuropathology resulting from deficiency of vitamin B12 or folic acid. The conclusions are consistent with emerging evidence that sulfane sulfur/hydrogen sulfide may be beneficial in treating Alzheimer’s disease.

  6. Conformational dependence of {sup 13}C shielding and coupling constants for methionine methyl groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterfoss, Glenn L. [New York University, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences and the Center for Genomics and Systems Biology (United States); DeRose, Eugene F.; Gabel, Scott A.; Perera, Lalith; Krahn, Joseph M.; Mueller, Geoffrey A.; Zheng Xunhai; London, Robert E., E-mail: London@niehs.nih.go [National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), NIH, Laboratory of Structural Biology (United States)

    2010-09-15

    Methionine residues fulfill a broad range of roles in protein function related to conformational plasticity, ligand binding, and sensing/mediating the effects of oxidative stress. A high degree of internal mobility, intrinsic detection sensitivity of the methyl group, and low copy number have made methionine labeling a popular approach for NMR investigation of selectively labeled protein macromolecules. However, selective labeling approaches are subject to more limited information content. In order to optimize the information available from such studies, we have performed DFT calculations on model systems to evaluate the conformational dependence of {sup 3}J{sub CSCC}, {sup 3}J{sub CSCH}, and the isotropic shielding, {sigma}{sub iso}. Results have been compared with experimental data reported in the literature, as well as data obtained on [methyl-{sup 13}C]methionine and on model compounds. These studies indicate that relative to oxygen, the presence of the sulfur atom in the coupling pathway results in a significantly smaller coupling constant, {sup 3}J{sub CSCC}/{sup 3}J{sub COCC} {approx} 0.7. It is further demonstrated that the {sup 3}J{sub CSCH} coupling constant depends primarily on the subtended CSCH dihedral angle, and secondarily on the CSCC dihedral angle. Comparison of theoretical shielding calculations with the experimental shift range of the methyl group for methionine residues in proteins supports the conclusion that the intra-residue conformationally-dependent shift perturbation is the dominant determinant of {delta}{sup 13}C{epsilon}. Analysis of calmodulin data based on these calculations indicates that several residues adopt non-standard rotamers characterized by very large {approx}100{sup o} {chi}{sup 3} values. The utility of the {delta}{sup 13}C{epsilon} as a basis for estimating the gauche/trans ratio for {chi}{sup 3} is evaluated, and physical and technical factors that limit the accuracy of both the NMR and crystallographic analyses are

  7. Alone against the group: A unanimously disagreeing group leads to conformity, but cardiovascular threat depends on one's goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seery, Mark D; Gabriel, Shira; Lupien, Shannon P; Shimizu, Mitsuru

    2016-08-01

    A long history of research in psychology has studied the consequences of when individuals face a group that unanimously disagrees with them. However, relatively little research has attempted to understand individuals' internal reactions to such disagreement while it is experienced. Psychophysiological measures are particularly well suited for this purpose. We used the perspective of the biopsychosocial model of challenge/threat to test whether and under what circumstances expressing one's political opinion to a disagreeing group led to a cardiovascular threat response (high total peripheral resistance, low cardiac output). We hypothesized that, when participants were provided with a goal to fit in with the group, a disagreeing group would elicit cardiovascular responses consistent with greater threat than an agreeing group, but that this effect would disappear if not reverse when participants were provided with a goal to express their individuality. Results supported hypotheses and further revealed a divergence between cardiovascular responses and conformity behavior, such that a disagreeing group fostered conformity regardless of goal condition. These findings suggest that (a) facing the prospect of a disagreeing group need not necessarily result in the negative experience of threat (reflecting evaluating low resources/high demands), and (b) conformity behavior can mask a range of internal states.

  8. Model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Hongxing; Long, Chongsheng; Chen, Hongsheng

    2016-04-01

    The restructuring process of the high burnup structure (HBS) formation in UO2 fuel results in sub-micron size grains that accelerate the fission gas swelling, which will raise some concern over the safety of extended the nuclear fuel operation life in the reactor. A mechanistic and engineering model for evolution of grain size in the rim region of high burnup UO2 fuel based on the experimental observations of the HBS in the literature is presented. The model takes into account dislocations evolution under irradiation and the grain subdivision occur successively at increasing local burnup. It is assumed that the original driving force for subdivision of grain in the HBS of UO2 fuel is the production and accumulation of dislocation loops during irradiation. The dislocation loops can also be annealed through thermal diffusion when the temperature is high enough. The capability of this model is validated by the comparison with the experimental data of temperature threshold of subdivision, dislocation density and sub-grain size as a function of local burnup. It is shown that the calculated results of the dislocation density and subdivided grain size as a function of local burnup are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  9. Plutonium and Minor Actinides Recycling in Standard BWR using Equilibrium Burnup Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Waris

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Plutonium (Pu and minor actinides (MA recycling in standard BWR with equilibrium burnup model has been studied. We considered the equilibrium burnup model as a simple time independent burnup method, which can manage all possible produced nuclides in any nuclear system. The equilibrium burnup code was bundled with a SRAC cell-calculation code to become a coupled cell-burnup calculation code system. The results show that the uranium enrichment for the criticality of the reactor, the amount of loaded fuel and the required natural uranium supply per year decrease for the Pu recycling and even much lower for the Pu & MA recycling case compared to those of the standard once-through BWR case. The neutron spectra become harder with the increasing number of recycled heavy nuclides in the reactor core. The total fissile rises from 4.77% of the total nuclides number density in the reactor core for the standard once-through BWR case to 6.64% and 6.72% for the Plutonium recycling case and the Pu & MA recycling case, respectively. The two later data may become the main basis why the required uranium enrichment declines and consequently diminishes the annual loaded fuel and the required natural uranium supply. All these facts demonstrate the advantage of plutonium and minor actinides recycling in BWR.

  10. IL-33-Dependent Group 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells Promote Cutaneous Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rak, Gregory D; Osborne, Lisa C; Siracusa, Mark C; Kim, Brian S; Wang, Kelvin; Bayat, Ardeshir; Artis, David; Volk, Susan W

    2016-02-01

    Breaches in the skin barrier initiate an inflammatory immune response that is critical for successful wound healing. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently identified population of immune cells that reside at epithelial barrier surfaces such as the skin, lung, and gut, and promote proinflammatory or epithelial repair functions after exposure to allergens, pathogens, or chemical irritants. However, the potential role of ILCs in regulating cutaneous wound healing remains undefined. Here, we demonstrate that cutaneous injury promotes an IL-33-dependent group 2 ILC (ILC2) response and that abrogation of this response impairs re-epithelialization and efficient wound closure. In addition, we provide evidence suggesting that an analogous ILC2 response is operational in acute wounds of human skin. Together, these results indicate that IL-33-responsive ILC2s are an important link between the cutaneous epithelium and the immune system, acting to promote the restoration of skin integrity after injury.

  11. Nonperturbative renormalization group preserving full-momentum dependence: implementation and quantitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, F; Blaizot, J-P; Chaté, H; Delamotte, B; Méndez-Galain, R; Wschebor, N

    2012-02-01

    We present the implementation of the Blaizot-Méndez-Wschebor approximation scheme of the nonperturbative renormalization group we present in detail, which allows for the computation of the full-momentum dependence of correlation functions. We discuss its significance and its relation with other schemes, in particular, the derivative expansion. Quantitative results are presented for the test ground of scalar O(N) theories. Besides critical exponents, which are zero-momentum quantities, we compute the two-point function at criticality in the whole momentum range in three dimensions and, in the high-temperature phase, the universal structure factor. In all cases, we find very good agreement with the best existing results.

  12. A mechanism for the dependence of sunspot group tilt angles on cycle strength

    CERN Document Server

    Işık, Emre

    2015-01-01

    The average tilt angle of sunspot groups emerging throughout the solar cycle determines the net magnetic flux crossing the equator, which is correlated with the strength of the subsequent cycle. I suggest that a deep-seated, non-local process can account for the observed cycle-dependent changes in the average tilt angle. Motivated by helioseismic observations indicating cycle-scale variations in the sound speed near the base of the convection zone, I determined the effect of a thermally perturbed overshoot region on the stability of flux tubes and on the tilt angles of emerging flux loops. I found that 5-20 K of cooling is sufficient for emerging flux loops to reproduce the reported amplitude of cycle-averaged tilt angle variations, suggesting that it is a plausible effect responsible for the nonlinearity of the solar activity cycle.

  13. Development of a method for xenon determination in the microstructure of high burn-up nuclear fuel[Dissertation 17527

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, M. I

    2008-07-01

    , relevant Xe isotope concentrations in fission gas inclusions have not been reported yet. The aim of this work was focused on quantitative analysis of Xe isotope concentrations in inclusions of high burn-up samples to determine gas pressures within fuel pores. Therefore, various calibration strategies were studied in great detail. The investigation of Xe-implantation showed that the uncertainties in Xe ion implantation are too high to produce suitable Xe-implanted standard materials. The generation of Xe-bubbles in Plexiglass was also investigated and Xe inclusions of different bubble sizes were generated. However, the size determinations of the inclusions, the opening and possible gas losses through the Plexiglass were factors preventing accurate Xe quantification. The use of direct Xe gas injection was considered as a suitable strategy for establishing calibration curves. The Xe response was studied in dependence on gas concentration, gas volume and presence or absence of matrix in the ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma). To investigate the ionization behavior of Xe in the ICP, the ablation behavior of ZrO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} was determined in dependence on different wavelengths (266 nm, 193 nm), crater diameters, repetition rates and carrier gases (Ar, He). The mass ablated per laser pulse was very similar for the two matrices. The simultaneous introduction of matrix and gas into the ICP showed insignificant matrix effects. Even the absence of matrix effects was shown, filtering of the matrix before entering the plasma was evaluated to be crucial. Applying a filter leads to a complete gas/solid separation and opens access to the matrix interfering {sup 134}Xe and {sup 136}Xe isotopes. Thus, calibration gas addition in combination with an aerosol filter was the key strategy for quantification of Xe fission gas production in high burn-up fuel samples. Gas addition in volumes of 1 to 100 {mu}l and at a concentration of 20 and 200 {mu}g/g provided linear calibration curves

  14. Fossil group origins V. The dependence of the luminosity function on the magnitude gap

    CERN Document Server

    Zarattini, S; Sanchez-Janssen, R; Barrena, R; Boschin, W; del Burgo, C; Castro-Rodriguez, N; Corsini, E M; D'Onghia, E; Girardi, M; Iglesias-Paramo, J; Kundert, A; Mendez-Abreu, J; Vilchez, J M

    2015-01-01

    In nature we observe galaxy aggregations that span a wide range of magnitude gaps between the two first-ranked galaxies of a system ($\\Delta m_{12}$). There are systems with gaps close to zero (e.g., the Coma cluster), and at the other extreme of the distribution, the largest gaps are found among the so-called fossil systems. Fossil and non-fossil systems could have different galaxy populations that should be reflected in their luminosity functions. In this work we study, for the first time, the dependence of the luminosity function parameters on $\\Delta m_{12}$ using data obtained by the fossil group origins (FOGO) project. We constructed a hybrid luminosity function for 102 groups and clusters at $z \\le 0.25$. We stacked all the individual luminosity functions, dividing them into bins of $\\Delta m_{12}$, and studied their best-fit Schechter parameters. We additionally computed a relative luminosity function, expressed as a function of the central galaxy luminosity, which boosts our capacity to detect differ...

  15. Rice rhizodeposition and its utilization by microbial groups depends on nitrogen fertilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Tida; Zhu, Zhenke; Wu, Jinshui

    2016-04-01

    Rhizodeposited carbon (C) has received considerable attention because it plays an important role in regulating soil C sequestration and global C cycling, and represents the main C source for rhizosphere microorganisms. However, limited information exists on the utilization of rhizodeposited C by different microbial groups, its role in the turnover of soil organic matter (SOM) pools in rice paddies and how this is influenced by nitrogen (N) fertilization. Rice (Oryza sativa L.) was grown in soil at one of five N fertilization rates (0, 10, 20, 40, or 60 mg N kg-1 soil) and then continuously labeled by exposure to a 13CO2 atmosphere for 18 days. The utilization of root-derived C by microbial groups within the rhizosphere was assessed by following the incorporation of 13C into phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). Rice shoot and root biomass strongly increased with N fertilization rate. Rhizodeposition was greater, but total 13C incorporation into microorganisms was lower, in N-fertilized soils than in unfertilized soil. The contribution of root-derived 13C to SOM formation increased with root biomass. The roots tended to grow into large aggregates (0.25-2.0 mm diameter), and N fertilization stimulated incorporation of 13C into these macroaggregates, presumably due to the relatively high root biomass. The ratio of 13C in soil pools (SOM, microbial biomass) to 13C in roots decreased as a result of N fertilization. N fertilization increased 13C incorporation into fungi (18:2ω6, 9c, 18:1ω9c), AM fungi (16:1ω5c), and actinomycetes (10Me 16:0, 10Me 18:0), but decreased 13C incorporation into Gram-positive (i14:0, i15:0, a15:0, i16:0, i17:0, a17:0) and Gram-negative (16:1ω7c, 18:1ω7c, cy17:0, cy19:0) bacteria. Thus, the uptake and processing of root-derived C by microbial groups depended on soil N status. Relative to the unfertilized controls, the contribution of rhizodeposited-C to SOM and microorganisms was increased by low to intermediate N fertilization rates, but

  16. Group boundary permeability moderates the effect of a dependency meta-stereotype on help-seeking behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lange; Kou, Yu; Zhao, Yunlong; Fu, Xinyuan

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have found that when low-status group members are aware that their in-group is stereotyped as dependent by a specific out-group (i.e. a dependency meta-stereotype is salient), they are reluctant to seek help from the high-status out-group to avoid confirming the negative meta-stereotype. However, it is unclear whether low-status group members would seek more help in the context of a salient dependency meta-stereotype when there is low (vs. high) group boundary permeability. Therefore, we conducted two experiments to examine the moderating effect of permeability on meta-stereotype confirmation with a real group. In study 1, we manipulated the salience of the dependency meta-stereotype, measured participants' perceived permeability and examined their help-seeking behaviour in a real-world task. Participants who perceived low permeability sought more help when the meta-stereotype was salient (vs. not salient), whereas participants who perceived high permeability sought the same amount of help across conditions. In study 2, we manipulated the permeability levels and measured the dependency meta-stereotype. Participants who endorsed a high-dependency meta-stereotype sought more help than participants who endorsed a low-dependency meta-stereotype; this effect was particularly strong in the low-permeability condition. The implications of these results for social mobility and intergroup helping are discussed.

  17. Impact investigation of reactor fuel operating parameters on reactivity for use in burnup credit applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloma, Tanya Noel

    When representing the behavior of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF), credit is sought for the reduced reactivity associated with the net depletion of fissile isotopes and the creation of neutron-absorbing isotopes, a process that begins when a commercial nuclear reactor is first operated at power. Burnup credit accounts for the reduced reactivity potential of a fuel assembly and varies with the fuel burnup, cooling time, and the initial enrichment of fissile material in the fuel. With regard to long-term SNF disposal and transportation, tremendous benefits, such as increased capacity, flexibility of design and system operations, and reduced overall costs, provide an incentive to seek burnup credit for criticality safety evaluations. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued Interim Staff Guidance 8, Revision 2 in 2002, endorsing burnup credit of actinide composition changes only; credit due to actinides encompasses approximately 30% of exiting pressurized water reactor SNF inventory and could potentially be increased to 90% if fission product credit were accepted. However, one significant issue for utilizing full burnup credit, compensating for actinide and fission product composition changes, is establishing a set of depletion parameters that produce an adequately conservative representation of the fuel's isotopic inventory. Depletion parameters can have a significant effect on the isotopic inventory of the fuel, and thus the residual reactivity. This research seeks to quantify the reactivity impact on a system from dominant depletion parameters (i.e., fuel temperature, moderator density, burnable poison rod, burnable poison rod history, and soluble boron concentration). Bounding depletion parameters were developed by statistical evaluation of a database containing reactor operating histories. The database was generated from summary reports of commercial reactor criticality data. Through depletion calculations, utilizing the SCALE 6 code package, several light

  18. Preliminary Neutronic Design of High Burnup OTTO Cycle Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Setiadipura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The pebble bed type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR is among the interesting nuclear reactor designs in terms of safety and flexibility for co-generation applications. In addition, the strong inherent safety characteristics of the pebble bed reactor (PBR which is based on natural mechanisms improve the simplicity of the PBR design, in particular for the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO cycle PBR design. One of the important challenges of the OTTO cycle PBR design, and nuclear reactor design in general, is improving the nuclear fuel utilization which is shown by attaining a higher burnup value. This study performed a preliminary neutronic design study of a 200 MWt OTTO cycle PBR with high burnup while fulfilling the safety criteria of the PBR design.The safety criteria of the design was represented by the per-fuel-pebble maximum power generation of 4.5 kW/pebble. The maximum burnup value was also limited by the tested maximum burnup value which maintained the integrity of the pebble fuel. Parametric surveys were performed to obtain the optimized parameters used in this study, which are the fuel enrichment, per-pebble heavy metal (HM loading, and the average axial speed of the fuel. An optimum design with burnup value of 131.1 MWd/Kg-HM was achieved in this study which is much higher compare to the burnup of the reference design HTR-MODUL and a previously proposed OTTO-cycle PBR design. This optimum design uses 17% U-235 enrichment with 4 g HM-loading per fuel pebble

  19. Post Irradiation Examination Plan for High-Burnup Demonstration Project Sister Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scaglione, John M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Montgomery, Rose [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This test plan describes the experimental work to be implemented by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) to characterize high burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in conjunction with the High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project and serves to coordinate and integrate the multi-year experimental program to collect and develop data regarding the continued storage and eventual transport of HBU (i.e., >45 GWd/MTU) SNF. The work scope involves the development, performance, technical integration, and oversight of measurements and collection of relevant data, guided by analyses and demonstration of need.

  20. Fuel burnup calculation of Ghana MNSR using ORIGEN2 and REBUS3 codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrefah, R G; Nyarko, B J B; Fletcher, J J; Akaho, E H K

    2013-10-01

    Ghana Research Reactor-1 core is to be converted from HEU fuel to LEU fuel in the near future and managing the spent nuclear fuel is very important. A fuel depletion analysis of the GHARR-1 core was performed using ORIGEN2 and REBUS3 codes to estimate the isotopic inventory at end-of-cycle in order to help in the design of an appropriate spent fuel cask. The results obtained for both codes were consistent for U-235 burnup weight percent and Pu-239 build up as a result of burnup.

  1. Progress of the RIA experiments with high burnup fuels and their evaluation in JAERI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishijima, Kiyomi; Fuketa, Toyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1997-01-01

    Recent results obtained in the NSRR power burst experiments with high burnup PWR fuel rods are described and discussed in this paper. Data concerning test condition, transient records during pulse irradiation and post irradiation examination are described. Another high burnup PWR fuel rod failed in the test HBO-5 at the slightly higher energy deposition than that in the test HBO-1. The failure mechanism of the test HBO-5 is the same as that of the test HBO-1, that is, hydride-assisted PCMI. Some influence of the thermocouples welding on the failure behavior of the HBO-5 rod was observed.

  2. Comparison between SERPENT and MONTEBURNS codes applied to burnup calculations of a GFR-like configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chersola, Davide [GeNERG – DIME/TEC, University of Genova, via all’Opera Pia 15/a, 16145 Genova (Italy); INFN, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Lomonaco, Guglielmo, E-mail: guglielmo.lomonaco@unige.it [GeNERG – DIME/TEC, University of Genova, via all’Opera Pia 15/a, 16145 Genova (Italy); INFN, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Marotta, Riccardo [GeNERG – DIME/TEC, University of Genova, via all’Opera Pia 15/a, 16145 Genova (Italy); INFN, via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Mazzini, Guido [Centrum výzkumu Řež (Research Centre Rez), Husinec-Rez, cp. 130, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • MC codes are widely adopted to analyze nuclear facilities, including GEN-IV reactors. • Burnup calculations are an efficient tool to test neutronic Monte Carlo codes. • In this comparison the used codes show some differences but a good agreement exists. - Abstract: This paper presents the comparison between two Monte Carlo based burnup codes: SERPENT and MONTEBURNS. Monte Carlo codes are fully and worldwide adopted to perform analyses on nuclear facilities, also in the frame of Generation IV advanced reactors simulations. Thus, faster and most powerful calculation codes are needed with the aim to analyze complex geometries and specific neutronic behaviors. Burnup calculations are an efficient tool to test neutronic Monte Carlo codes: indeed these calculations couple transport and depletion procedures, so that neutronic reactor behavior can be simulated in its totality. Comparisons have been performed on a configuration representing the Allegro MOX 75 MW{sub th} reactor proposed by the European GoFastR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor) Project in the frame of the 7th Euratom Framework Program. Although in burnup and criticality comparisons the codes used in simulations show different calculation times and some differences in amounts and in precision (in term of statistical errors), a reasonably good agreement between them exists.

  3. Computational simulation of fuel burnup estimation for research reactors plate type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nadia Rodrigues dos, E-mail: nadiasam@gmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ), Paracambi, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: zrlima@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is to estimate the spatial fuel burnup, through computational simulation, in two research reactors plate type, loaded with dispersion fuel: the benchmark Material Test Research - International Atomic Energy Agency (MTR-IAEA) and a typical multipurpose reactor (MR). The first composed of plates with uranium oxide dispersed in aluminum (UAlx-Al) and a second composed with uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) dispersed in aluminum. To develop this work we used the deterministic code, WIMSD-5B, which performs the cell calculation solving the neutron transport equation, and the DF3DQ code, written in FORTRAN, which solves the three-dimensional neutron diffusion equation using the finite difference method. The methodology used was adequate to estimate the spatial fuel burnup , as the results was in accordance with chosen benchmark, given satisfactorily to the proposal presented in this work, even showing the possibility to be applied to other research reactors. For future work are suggested simulations with other WIMS libraries, other settings core and fuel types. Comparisons the WIMSD-5B results with programs often employed in fuel burnup calculations and also others commercial programs, are suggested too. Another proposal is to estimate the fuel burnup, taking into account the thermohydraulics parameters and the Xenon production. (author)

  4. Fission Gas Release in LWR Fuel Rods Exhibiting Very High Burn-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, H.

    1980-01-01

    Two UO2Zr BWR type test fuel rods were irradiated to a burn-up of about 38000 MWd/tUO2. After non-destructive characterization, the fission gas released to the internal free volume was extracted and analysed. The irradiation was simulated by means of the Danish fuel performance code WAFER-2, which...

  5. Oxygen potential measurements in high burnup LWR U0 2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, Hj.

    1995-05-01

    A miniature solid state galvanic cell was used to measure the oxygen potential Δ overlineG( O2) of reactor irradiated U0 2 fuel at different burnups in the range of 28 to ⩾ 150 GWd d/t M. This very high burnup was achieved in the rim region of a fuel with a cross section average burnup of 75 GWd d/t M. The fuels had different enrichments and therefore different contributions of fission of 235U and 239Pu. The temperature range covered was 900 to 1350 K. None of the fuels showed a significant oxidation. Rather, if allowance is made for the dissolved rare earth fission products and the Pu formed during irradiation, some of the fuels were very slightly substoichiometric and the highest possible degree of oxidation corresponded to U0 2.001. In general, the Δ overlineG( O2) at 750°C was about -400 kJ/mol, corresponding to the Δ overlineG( O2) of the reaction Mo + O 2 → MoO 2. The implication of these results which are in contrast to commonly assumed ideas that U0 2 fuel oxidizes due to burnup, are discussed and the importance of the fission product Mo and of the zircaloy clad as oxygen buffers is outlined.

  6. Thermal properties of U–Mo alloys irradiated to moderate burnup and power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E., E-mail: Douglas.Burkes@pnnl.gov; Casella, Andrew M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Pool, Karl N.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Smith, Frances N.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • Thermal properties of irradiated U–Mo alloy monolithic fuel samples were measured. • Density, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity are influenced by increasing burnup. • U–Mo chemistry and specific heat capacity was not as sensitive to increasing burnup. • Thermal conductivity decreased approximately 45% for a fission density of 4.52 × 10{sup 21} fissions cm{sup −3} at 200 °C. • An empirical model developed previously agrees well with the experimental measurements. - Abstract: A variety of physical and thermal property measurements as a function of temperature and fission density were performed on irradiated U–Mo alloy monolithic fuel samples with a Zr diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061. The U–Mo alloy density, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity are strongly influenced by increasing burnup, mainly as the result of irradiation induced recrystallization and fission gas bubble formation and coalescence. U–Mo chemistry, specifically Mo content, and specific heat capacity was not as sensitive to increasing burnup. Measurements indicated that thermal conductivity of the U–Mo alloy decreased approximately 30% for a fission density of 3.30 × 10{sup 21} fissions cm{sup −3} and approximately 45% for a fission density of 4.52 × 10{sup 21} fissions cm{sup −3} from unirradiated values at 200 °C. An empirical thermal conductivity degradation model developed previously and summarized here agrees well with the experimental measurements.

  7. Radiochemical Assays of Irradiated VVER-440 Fuel for Use in Spent Fuel Burnup Credit Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L J

    2005-04-25

    The objective of this spent fuel burnup credit work was to study and describe a VVER-440 reactor spent fuel assembly (FA) initial state before irradiation, its operational irradiation history and the resulting radionuclide distribution in the fuel assembly after irradiation. This work includes the following stages: (1) to pick out and select a specific spent (irradiated) FA for examination; (2) to describe the FA initial state before irradiation; (3) to describe the irradiation history, including thermal calculations; (4) to examine the burnup distribution of select radionuclides along the FA height and cross-section; (5) to examine the radionuclide distributions; (6) to determine the Kr-85 release into the plenum; (7) to select and prepare FA rod specimens for destructive examinations; (8) to determine the radionuclide compositions, isotope masses and burnup in the rod specimens; and (9) to analyze, document and process the results. The specific workscope included the destructive assay (DA) of spent fuel assembly rod segments with an {approx}38.5 MWd/KgU burnup from a single VVER-440 fuel assembly from the Novovorenezh reactor in Russia. Based on irradiation history criteria, four rods from the fuel assembly were selected and removed from the assembly for examination. Next, 8 sections were cut from the four rods and sent for destructive analysis of radionuclides by radiochemical analyses. The results were documented in a series of seven reports over a period of {approx}1 1/2 years.

  8. A simple gamma spectrometry method for evaluating the burnup of MTR-type HEU fuel elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makmal, T.; Aviv, O.; Gilad, E.

    2016-10-01

    A simple method for the evaluation of the burnup of a materials testing reactor (MTR) fuel element by gamma spectrometry is presented. The method was applied to a highly enriched uranium MTR nuclear fuel element that was irradiated in a 5 MW pool-type research reactor for a total period of 34 years. The experimental approach is based on in-situ measurements of the MTR fuel element in the reactor pool by a portable high-purity germanium detector located in a gamma cell. To corroborate the method, analytical calculations (based on the irradiation history of the fuel element) and computer simulations using a dedicated fuel cycle burnup code ORIGEN2 were performed. The burnup of the MTR fuel element was found to be 52.4±8.8%, which is in good agreement with the analytical calculations and the computer simulations. The method presented here is suitable for research reactors with either a regular or an irregular irradiation regime and for reactors with limited infrastructure and/or resources. In addition, its simplicity and the enhanced safety it confers may render this method suitable for IAEA inspectors in fuel element burnup assessments during on-site inspections.

  9. Using a Random Dependent Group Contingency to Increase On-Task Behaviors of High School Students with High Incidence Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Brenda D.; Campbell-Whatley, Gloria D.; Lo, Ya-yu

    2009-01-01

    Group contingencies have the advantages of encouraging individual students to collectively feel responsible for appropriate and inappropriate classroom behaviors and have shown effectiveness in improving students' behavior. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a random dependent group contingency on the on-task behaviors of…

  10. Exploring Secondary Students' Epistemological Features Depending on the Evaluation Levels of the Group Model on Blood Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shinyoung; Kim, Heui-Baik

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the epistemological features and model qualities depending on model evaluation levels and to explore the reasoning process behind high-level evaluation through small group interaction about blood circulation. Nine groups of three to four students in the eighth grade participated in the modeling practice.…

  11. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-dependent cell responses by extracellular high mobility group box 1 protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Pedrazzi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Extracellular high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein can operate in a synergistic fashion with different signal molecules promoting an increase of cell Ca(2+ influx. However, the mechanisms responsible for this effect of HMGB1 are still unknown. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate that, at concentrations of agonist per se ineffective, HMGB1 potentiates the activation of the ionotropic glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR in isolated hippocampal nerve terminals and in a neuroblastoma cell line. This effect was abolished by the NMDA channel blocker MK-801. The HMGB1-facilitated NMDAR opening was followed by activation of the Ca(2+-dependent enzymes calpain and nitric oxide synthase in neuroblastoma cells, resulting in an increased production of NO, a consequent enhanced cell motility, and onset of morphological differentiation. We have also identified NMDAR as the mediator of HMGB1-stimulated murine erythroleukemia cell differentiation, induced by hexamethylenebisacetamide. The potentiation of NMDAR activation involved a peptide of HMGB1 located in the B box at the amino acids 130-139. This HMGB1 fragment did not overlap with binding sites for other cell surface receptors of HMGB1, such as the advanced glycation end products or the Toll-like receptor 4. Moreover, in a competition assay, the HMGB1((130-139 peptide displaced the NMDAR/HMGB1 interaction, suggesting that it comprised the molecular and functional site of HMGB1 regulating the NMDA receptor complex. CONCLUSION: We propose that the multifunctional cytokine-like molecule HMGB1 released by activated, stressed, and damaged or necrotic cells can facilitate NMDAR-mediated cell responses, both in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues, independently of other known cell surface receptors for HMGB1.

  12. Temperature and Burnup Correlated FCCI in U-10Zr Metallic Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William J. Carmack

    2012-05-01

    Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors. The experience basis for metallic fuels is extensive and includes development and qualification of fuels for the Experimental Breeder Reactor I, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II, FERMI-I, and the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) reactors. Metallic fuels provide a number of advantages over other fuel types in terms of fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Key to the performance of all nuclear fuel systems is the resistance to “breach” and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the primary coolant system of the nuclear power plant. In metallic fuel, the experience is that significant fuel-cladding chemical (FCCI) interaction occurs and becomes prevalent at high power-high temperature operation and ultimately leads to fuel pin breach and failure. Empirical relationships for metallic fuel pin failure have been developed from a large body of in-pile and out of pile research, development, and experimentation. It has been found that significant in-pile acceleration of the FCCI rate is experienced over similar condition out-of-pile experiments. The study of FCCI in metallic fuels has led to the quantification of in-pile failure rates to establish an empirical time and temperature dependent failure limit for fuel elements. Up until now the understanding of FCCI layer formation has been limited to data generated in EBR-II experiments. This dissertation provides new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of metallic fuel irradiations performed in the FFTF. These fuel assemblies contain valuable information on the formation of FCCI in metallic fuels at a variety of temperature and burnup conditions and in fuel with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. The longer fuel column in the FFTF and the fuel pins examined have significantly different flux, power, temperature, and FCCI profiles than that found in similar tests conducted in

  13. Application of Genetic Algorithm methodologies in fuel bundle burnup optimization of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayalal, M.L., E-mail: jayalal@igcar.gov.in [Electronics, Instrumentation and Radiological Safety Group (EIRSG), Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Ramachandran, Suja [Electronics, Instrumentation and Radiological Safety Group (EIRSG), Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Rathakrishnan, S. [Reactor Physics Section, Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Satya Murty, S.A.V. [Electronics, Instrumentation and Radiological Safety Group (EIRSG), Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Sai Baba, M. [Resources Management Group (RMG), Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • We study and compare Genetic Algorithms (GA) in the fuel bundle burnup optimization of an Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) of 220 MWe. • Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are considered. • For the selected problem, Multi Objective GA performs better than Penalty Functions based GA. • In the present study, Multi Objective GA outperforms Penalty Functions based GA in convergence speed and better diversity in solutions. - Abstract: The work carried out as a part of application and comparison of GA techniques in nuclear reactor environment is presented in the study. The nuclear fuel management optimization problem selected for the study aims at arriving appropriate reference discharge burnup values for the two burnup zones of 220 MWe Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) core. Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are applied in this study. The study reveals, for the selected problem of PHWR fuel bundle burnup optimization, Multi Objective GA is more suitable than Penalty Functions based GA in the two aspects considered: by way of producing diverse feasible solutions and the convergence speed being better, i.e. it is capable of generating more number of feasible solutions, from earlier generations. It is observed that for the selected problem, the Multi Objective GA is 25.0% faster than Penalty Functions based GA with respect to CPU time, for generating 80% of the population with feasible solutions. When average computational time of fixed generations are considered, Penalty Functions based GA is 44.5% faster than Multi Objective GA. In the overall performance, the convergence speed of Multi Objective GA surpasses the computational time advantage of Penalty Functions based GA. The ability of Multi Objective GA in producing more diverse feasible solutions is a desired feature of the problem selected, that helps the

  14. Propagation of statistical and nuclear data uncertainties in Monte Carlo burn-up calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Herranz, Nuria [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain)], E-mail: nuria@din.upm.es; Cabellos, Oscar [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain); Sanz, Javier [Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, UNED (Spain); Juan, Jesus [Laboratorio de Estadistica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain); Kuijper, Jim C. [NRG - Fuels, Actinides and Isotopes Group, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-04-15

    Two methodologies to propagate the uncertainties on the nuclide inventory in combined Monte Carlo-spectrum and burn-up calculations are presented, based on sensitivity/uncertainty and random sampling techniques (uncertainty Monte Carlo method). Both enable the assessment of the impact of uncertainties in the nuclear data as well as uncertainties due to the statistical nature of the Monte Carlo neutron transport calculation. The methodologies are implemented in our MCNP-ACAB system, which combines the neutron transport code MCNP-4C and the inventory code ACAB. A high burn-up benchmark problem is used to test the MCNP-ACAB performance in inventory predictions, with no uncertainties. A good agreement is found with the results of other participants. This benchmark problem is also used to assess the impact of nuclear data uncertainties and statistical flux errors in high burn-up applications. A detailed calculation is performed to evaluate the effect of cross-section uncertainties in the inventory prediction, taking into account the temporal evolution of the neutron flux level and spectrum. Very large uncertainties are found at the unusually high burn-up of this exercise (800 MWd/kgHM). To compare the impact of the statistical errors in the calculated flux with respect to the cross uncertainties, a simplified problem is considered, taking a constant neutron flux level and spectrum. It is shown that, provided that the flux statistical deviations in the Monte Carlo transport calculation do not exceed a given value, the effect of the flux errors in the calculated isotopic inventory are negligible (even at very high burn-up) compared to the effect of the large cross-section uncertainties available at present in the data files.

  15. High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project, Final Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-02-27

    EPRI is leading a project team to develop and implement the first five years of a Test Plan to collect data from a SNF dry storage system containing high burnup fuel.12 The Test Plan defined in this document outlines the data to be collected, and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary to implement the Test Plan.13 The main goals of the proposed test are to provide confirmatory data14 for models, future SNF dry storage cask design, and to support license renewals and new licenses for ISFSIs. To provide data that is most relevant to high burnup fuel in dry storage, the design of the test storage system must mimic real conditions that high burnup SNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying, inert gas backfilling, and transfer to the ISFSI for multi-year storage.15 Along with other optional modeling, SETs, and SSTs, the data collected in this Test Plan can be used to evaluate the integrity of dry storage systems and the high burnup fuel contained therein over many decades. It should be noted that the Test Plan described in this document discusses essential activities that go beyond the first five years of Test Plan implementation.16 The first five years of the Test Plan include activities up through loading the cask, initiating the data collection, and beginning the long-term storage period at the ISFSI. The Test Plan encompasses the overall project that includes activities that may not be completed until 15 or more years from now, including continued data collection, shipment of the Research Project Cask to a Fuel Examination Facility, opening the cask at the Fuel Examination Facility, and examining the high burnup fuel after the initial storage period.

  16. Interdependent Group Contingency Management for Cocaine-Dependent Methadone Maintenance Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Kimberly C.; Kerwin, MaryLouise E.; Carpenedo, Carolyn M.; Rosenwasser, Beth J.; Gardner, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Contingency management (CM) for drug abstinence has been applied to individuals independently even when delivered in groups. We developed a group CM intervention in which the behavior of a single, randomly selected, anonymous individual determined reinforcement delivery for the entire group. We also compared contingencies placed only on cocaine…

  17. Behaviour of fission gas in the rim region of high burn-up UO 2 fuel pellets with particular reference to results from an XRF investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, M.; Pearce, J. H.; Walker, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    XRF and EPMA results for retained xenon from Battelle's high burn-up effects program are re-evaluated. The data reviewed are from commercial low enriched BWR fuel with burn-ups of 44.8-54.9 GWd/tU and high enriched PWR fuel with burn-ups from 62.5 to 83.1 GWd/tU. It is found that the high burn-up structure penetrated much deeper than initially reported. The local burn-up threshold for the formation of the high burn-up structure in those fuels with grain sizes in the normal range lay between 60 and 75 GWd/tU. The high burn-up structure was not detected by EPMA in a fuel that had a grain size of 78 μm although the local burn-up at the pellet rim had exceeded 80 GWd/tU. It is concluded that fission gas had been released from the high burn-up structure in three PWR fuel sections with burn-ups of 70.4, 72.2 and 83.1 GWd/tU. In the rim region of the last two sections at the locations where XRF indicated gas release the local burn-up was higher than 75 GWd/tU.

  18. Burnup calculation by the method of first-flight collision probabilities using average chords prior to the first collision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpushkin, T. Yu.

    2012-12-01

    A technique to calculate the burnup of materials of cells and fuel assemblies using the matrices of first-flight neutron collision probabilities rebuilt at a given burnup step is presented. A method to rebuild and correct first collision probability matrices using average chords prior to the first neutron collision, which are calculated with the help of geometric modules of constructed stochastic neutron trajectories, is described. Results of calculation of the infinite multiplication factor for elementary cells with a modified material composition compared to the reference one as well as calculation of material burnup in the cells and fuel assemblies of a VVER-1000 are presented.

  19. Critical mass and the dependency of research quality on group size

    CERN Document Server

    Kenna, Ralph

    2010-01-01

    Academic research groups are treated as complex systems and their cooperative behaviour is analysed from a mathematical and statistical viewpoint. Contrary to the naive expectation that the quality of a research group is simply given by the mean calibre of its individual scientists, we show that intra-group interactions play a dominant role. Our model manifests phenomena akin to phase transitions which are brought about by these interactions, and which facilitate the quantification of the notion of critical mass for research groups. We present these critical masses for many academic areas. A consequence of our analysis is that overall research performance of a given discipline is improved by supporting medium-sized groups over large ones, while small groups must strive to achieve critical mass.

  20. Analytic parameter dependence of Harish-Chandra modules for real reductive Lie groups - a family affair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Noort, V.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is written in the subfield of mathematics known as representation theory of real reductive Lie groups. Let G be a Lie group in the Harish-Chandra class with maximal compact subgroup K and Lie algebra g. Let Omega be a connected complex manifold. By a family of G-representations parametri

  1. Young Children Enforce Social Norms Selectively Depending on the Violator's Group Affiliation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Marco F. H.; Rakoczy, Hannes; Tomasello, Michael

    2012-01-01

    To become cooperative members of their cultural groups, developing children must follow their group's social norms. But young children are not just blind norm followers, they are also active norm enforcers, for example, protesting and correcting when someone plays a conventional game the "wrong" way. In two studies, we asked whether young children…

  2. Is in-group bias culture-dependent? A meta-analysis across 18 societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Ronald; Derham, Crysta

    2016-01-01

    We report a meta-analysis on the relationship between in-group bias and culture. Our focus is on whether broad macro-contextual variables influence the extent to which individuals favour their in-group. Data from 21,266 participants from 18 societies included in experimental and survey studies were available. Using Hofstede's (1980) and Schwartz (2006) culture-level predictors in a 3-level mixed-effects meta-analysis, we found strong support for the uncertainty-reduction hypothesis. An interaction between Autonomy and real vs artificial groups suggested that in low autonomy contexts, individuals show greater in-group bias for real groups. Implications for social identity theory and intergroup conflict are outlined.

  3. Functional delineation of three groups of the ATP-dependent family of chromatin remodeling enzymes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyer, L.A.; Logie, C.; Bonte, E; Becker, P.B.; Wade, P.A.; Wolff, A.P.; Wu, C.; Imbalzano, A.N.; Peterson, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling enzymes antagonize the inhibitory effects of chromatin. We compare six different remodeling complexes: ySWI/SNF, yRSC, hSWI/SNF, xMi-2, dCHRAC, and dNURF. We find that each complex uses similar amounts of ATP to remodel nucleosomal arrays at nearly identical rates.

  4. Handling requirements dependencies in agile projects: a focus group with agile software development practitioners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martakis, Aias; Daneva, Maya; Wieringa, R.J.; Jean-Louis Cavarero, S.; Rolland, C.; Cavarero, J.-L.

    2013-01-01

    Agile practices on requirements dependencies are a relatively unexplored topic in literature. Empirical studies on it are scarce. This research sets out to uncover concepts that practitioners in companies of various sizes across the globe and in various industries, use for dealing with requirements

  5. Conductance of Conjugated Molecular Wires: Length Dependence, Anchoring Groups, and Band Alignment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Guowen; Strange, Mikkel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer

    2009-01-01

    The conductance of π-conjugated molecular wires bonded to gold electrodes at zero bias is studied using density functional theory combined with nonequilibrium Green’s function method. For all systems considered, we find that the conductance length dependence follows the simple exponential law...

  6. FRAPCON-3: Modifications to fuel rod material properties and performance models for high-burnup application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    This volume describes the fuel rod material and performance models that were updated for the FRAPCON-3 steady-state fuel rod performance code. The property and performance models were changed to account for behavior at extended burnup levels up to 65 Gwd/MTU. The property and performance models updated were the fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, solid-solid contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion and hydriding, cladding mechanical properties, and cladding axial growth. Each updated property and model was compared to well characterized data up to high burnup levels. The installation of these properties and models in the FRAPCON-3 code along with input instructions are provided in Volume 2 of this report and Volume 3 provides a code assessment based on comparison to integral performance data. The updated FRAPCON-3 code is intended to replace the earlier codes FRAPCON-2 and GAPCON-THERMAL-2. 94 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Draft evaluation of the frequency for gas sampling for the high burnup confirmatory data project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockman, Christine T. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alsaed, Halim A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-03-26

    This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-15SN0802041, “Draft Evaluation of the Frequency for Gas Sampling for the High Burn-up Storage Demonstration Project” under Work Package FT-15SN080204, “ST Field Demonstration Support – SNL”. This report provides a technically based gas sampling frequency strategy for the High Burnup (HBU) Confirmatory Data Project. The evaluation of: 1) the types and magnitudes of gases that could be present in the project cask and, 2) the degradation mechanisms that could change gas compositions culminates in an adaptive gas sampling frequency strategy. This adaptive strategy is compared against the sampling frequency that has been developed based on operational considerations. Gas sampling will provide information on the presence of residual water (and byproducts associated with its reactions and decomposition) and breach of cladding, which could inform the decision of when to open the project cask.

  8. Experience with incomplete control rod insertion in fuel with burnup exceeding approximately 40 GWD/MTU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kee, E. [Houston Lighting & Power Co., Wadworth, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Analysis and measurement experience with fuel assemblies having incomplete control rod insertion at burnups of approximately 40 GWD/MTU is presented. Control rod motion dynamics and simplified structural analyses are presented and compared to measurement data. Fuel assembly growth measurements taken with the plant Refueling Machine Z-Tape are described and presented. Bow measurements (including plug gauging) are described and potential improvements are suggested. The measurements described and analysis performed show that sufficient guide tube bow (either from creep or yield buckling) is present in some high burnup assemblies to stop the control rods before they reach their full limit of travel. Recommendations are made that, if implemented, could improve cost performance related to testing and analysis activities.

  9. Thermal properties of U–Mo alloys irradiated to moderate burnup and power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E.; Casella, Andrew M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Buck, Edgar C.; Pool, Karl N.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Smith, Frances N.

    2015-09-01

    A variety of physical and thermal property measurements as a function of temperature and fission density were performed on irradiated U-Mo alloy monolithic fuel samples with a Zr diffusion barrier and clad in aluminum alloy 6061. The U-Mo alloy density, thermal diffusivity, and thermal conductivity are strongly influenced by increasing burnup, mainly as the result of irradiation induced recrystallization and fission gas bubble formation and coalescence. U-Mo chemistry, specifically Mo content, and specific heat capacity was not as sensitive to increasing burnup. Measurements indicated that thermal conductivity of the U-Mo alloy decreased approximately 30% for a fission density of 2.88 × 1021 fissions cm-3 and approximately 45% for a fission density of 4.08 × 1021 fissions cm-3 from unirradiated values at 200 oC. An empirical thermal conductivity degradation model developed previously and summarized here agrees well with the experimental measurements.

  10. 75 FR 27121 - Interim Final Rules for Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Dependent...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... Crowd-out Rates fro the State Children's Health Insurance Program.'' Journal of Policy Analysis and... Administration 29 CFR Part 2590 Department of Health and Human Services 45 CFR Parts 144, 146, and 147 Group Health Plans and Health Insurance Issuers Relating to Dependent Coverage of Children to Age 26 Under...

  11. Development of a method for xenon determination in the microstructure of high burn-up nuclear fuel[Dissertation 17527

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, M. I

    2008-07-01

    , relevant Xe isotope concentrations in fission gas inclusions have not been reported yet. The aim of this work was focused on quantitative analysis of Xe isotope concentrations in inclusions of high burn-up samples to determine gas pressures within fuel pores. Therefore, various calibration strategies were studied in great detail. The investigation of Xe-implantation showed that the uncertainties in Xe ion implantation are too high to produce suitable Xe-implanted standard materials. The generation of Xe-bubbles in Plexiglass was also investigated and Xe inclusions of different bubble sizes were generated. However, the size determinations of the inclusions, the opening and possible gas losses through the Plexiglass were factors preventing accurate Xe quantification. The use of direct Xe gas injection was considered as a suitable strategy for establishing calibration curves. The Xe response was studied in dependence on gas concentration, gas volume and presence or absence of matrix in the ICP (Inductively Coupled Plasma). To investigate the ionization behavior of Xe in the ICP, the ablation behavior of ZrO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} was determined in dependence on different wavelengths (266 nm, 193 nm), crater diameters, repetition rates and carrier gases (Ar, He). The mass ablated per laser pulse was very similar for the two matrices. The simultaneous introduction of matrix and gas into the ICP showed insignificant matrix effects. Even the absence of matrix effects was shown, filtering of the matrix before entering the plasma was evaluated to be crucial. Applying a filter leads to a complete gas/solid separation and opens access to the matrix interfering {sup 134}Xe and {sup 136}Xe isotopes. Thus, calibration gas addition in combination with an aerosol filter was the key strategy for quantification of Xe fission gas production in high burn-up fuel samples. Gas addition in volumes of 1 to 100 {mu}l and at a concentration of 20 and 200 {mu}g/g provided linear calibration curves

  12. Assessing the effects of cocaine dependence and pathological gambling using group-wise sparse representation of natural stimulus FMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yudan; Fang, Jun; Lv, Jinglei; Hu, Xintao; Guo, Cong Christine; Guo, Lei; Xu, Jiansong; Potenza, Marc N; Liu, Tianming

    2016-10-04

    Assessing functional brain activation patterns in neuropsychiatric disorders such as cocaine dependence (CD) or pathological gambling (PG) under naturalistic stimuli has received rising interest in recent years. In this paper, we propose and apply a novel group-wise sparse representation framework to assess differences in neural responses to naturalistic stimuli across multiple groups of participants (healthy control, cocaine dependence, pathological gambling). Specifically, natural stimulus fMRI (N-fMRI) signals from all three groups of subjects are aggregated into a big data matrix, which is then decomposed into a common signal basis dictionary and associated weight coefficient matrices via an effective online dictionary learning and sparse coding method. The coefficient matrices associated with each common dictionary atom are statistically assessed for each group separately. With the inter-group comparisons based on the group-wise correspondence established by the common dictionary, our experimental results demonstrated that the group-wise sparse coding and representation strategy can effectively and specifically detect brain networks/regions affected by different pathological conditions of the brain under naturalistic stimuli.

  13. Assessing the Effect of Fuel Burnup on Control Rod Worth for HEU and LEU Cores of Gharr-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.K. Boafo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available An important parameter in the design and analysis of a nuclear reactor is the reactivity worth of the control rod which is a measure of the efficiency of the control rod to absorb excess reactivity. During reactor operation, the control rod worth is affected by factors such as the fuel burnup, Xenon concentration, Samarium concentration and the position of the control rod in the core. This study investigates the effect of fuel burnup on the control rod worth by comparing results of a fresh and an irradiated core of Ghana's Miniature Neutron Source Reactor for both HEU and LEU cores. In this study, two codes have been utilized namely BURNPRO for fuel burnup calculation and MCNP5 which uses densities of actinides of the irradiated fuel obtained from BURNPRO. Results showed a decrease of the control rod worth with burnup for the LEU while rod worth increased with burnup for the HEU core. The average thermal flux in both inner and outer irradiation sites also decreased significantly with burnup for both cores.

  14. S∧4 Reactor: Operating Lifetime and Estimates of Temperature and Burnup Reactivity Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jeffrey C.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    2006-01-01

    The S∧4 reactor has a sectored, Mo-14%Re solid core for avoidance of single point failures in reactor cooling and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) energy conversion. The reactor is loaded with UN fuel, cooled with a He-Xe gas mixture at ~1200 K and operates at steady thermal power of 550 kW. Following a launch abort accident, the axial and radial BeO reflectors easily disassemble upon impact so that the bare reactor is subcriticial when submerged in wet sand or seawater and the core voids are filled with seawater. Spectral Shift Absorber (SSA) additives have been shown to increase the UN fuel enrichment and significantly reduce the total mass of the reactor. This paper investigates the effects of SSA additions on the temperature and burnup reactivity coefficients and the operational lifetime of the S∧4 reactor. SSAs slightly decrease the temperature reactivity feedback coefficient, but significantly increase the operating lifetime by decreasing the burnup reactivity coefficient. With no SSAs, fuel enrichment is only 58.5 wt% and the estimated operating lifetime is the shortest (7.6 years) with the highest temperature and burnup reactivity feedback coefficients (-0.2709 ¢/K and -1.3470 $/atom%). With europium-151 and gadolinium-155 additions, the enrichment (91.5 and 94 wt%) and operating lifetime (9.9 and 9.8 years) of the S∧4 reactor are the highest while the temperature and burnup reactivity coefficients (-0.2382 and -0.2447 ¢/K -0.9073 and 0.8502 $/atom%) are the lowest.

  15. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur Motta; Yong Hwan Jeong; R.J. Comstock; G.S. Was; Y.S. Kim

    2006-10-31

    The objective of this collaboration between four institutions in the US and Korea is to demonstrate a technical basis for the improvement of the corrosion resistance of zirconium-based alloys in more extreme operating environments (such as those present in severe fuel duty,cycles (high burnup, boiling, aggressive chemistry) andto investigate the feasibility (from the point of view of corrosion rate) of using advanced zirconium-based alloys in a supercritical water environment.

  16. Angra 1 high burnup fuel behaviour under reactivity initiated accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Daniel de Souza; Silva, Antonio Teixeira e, E-mail: dsgomes@ipen.b, E-mail: teixeira@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The 16x16 NGF (Next Generation Fuel) fuel assembly, comprising of highly corrosive-resistant ZIRLO clad fuel rods, been replacing the current 16x16 Standard (16STD) fuel assembly in the Angra 1, a pressurized water reactor, with a net output of 626 MWe. The 16x16 NGF fuel assemblies are designed for a peak rod average burnup of up to 75 GWd/MTU, thus improving fuel utilization and reducing spent fuel storage issues. A design basis accident, the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA), became a concern for a further increase in burnup as the simulated RIA tests revealed a lower enthalpy threshold for fuel failure. Two fuel performance codes, FRAPCON and FRAPTRAN, were used to predict high burnup behavior of Angra 1, during an RIA. The maximum average linear fuel rating used was 17.62 KW/m. The FRAPCON 3.4 code was applied to simulate the steady-state performance of the 16 NGF fuel rods up to a burnup of 55 GWd/MTU. With FRAPTRAN-1.4 the fuel behavior was simulated for an RIA power pulse of 4.5 ms (FHWH), and enthalpy peak of 130 Cal/g. With FRAPCON-3.4, the corrosion and hydrogen pickup characteristics of the advanced ZIRLO clad fuel rods were added to the code by modifying the actual corrosion model for Zircaloy-4 through the multiplication of empirical factors, which were appropriate to each alloy, and by means of reducing the current hydrogen pickup fraction. (author)

  17. Luminosity function of galaxies in groups in the SDSS DR7: the dependence on mass, environment and galaxy type

    CERN Document Server

    Zandivarez, Ariel

    2010-01-01

    We perform an analysis of the luminosities of galaxies in groups in the SDSS DR7. We analyse the luminosity function (LF) as a function of group mass for different photometric bands, galaxy populations, galaxy positions within the groups, and the group surrounding large scale density. We find that M* brightens and alpha becomes steeper as a function of mass in all SDSS photometric bands, in agreement with previous results. From the analysis of different galaxy populations, we observe that different methods to split galaxy populations, based on the concentration index or the colour-magnitude diagram, produce quite different behaviours in the luminosity trends, mainly for alpha. These discrepancies and the trends with mass mentioned above are explained when analysing the LF of galaxies classified simultaneously according to their concentrations and colours. We find that only the red spheroids have a LF that strongly depends on group mass. Late type galaxies, whether blue or red, have luminosity functions that d...

  18. Effects of cognitive and experiential group therapy on self-efficacy and perceptions of employability of chemically dependent women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, O

    1999-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study assessed effects of cognitive and experiential group therapy on self-efficacy and perceptions of employability for 52 chemically dependent adult women. The sample was 98% African American. Therapy consisted of six 90-min group sessions held twice weekly. The participants were pre- and posttested with the Self-Efficacy Scale (M. Sherer et al., 1982) and the Ghiselli Self-Description Inventory (E. E. Ghiselli, 1975). After the intervention, the cognitive group had significantly higher levels than the experiential group of social self-efficacy and need for self-actualization, an indicator of aspiration for employment. General self-efficacy and decisiveness, indicators of employability, significantly increased over time for both groups. Interventions to enhance people's belief in their ability to successfully perform tasks and control outcomes, promote personal growth, teach responsibility, and enhance self-awareness could be used to develop employability skills that reduce recidivism.

  19. The effect of boldness on decision-making in barnacle geese is group-size-dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurvers, R.H.J.M.; Adamczyk, M.A.P.; Wieren, van S.E.; Prins, H.H.T.

    2011-01-01

    In group-living species, decisions made by individuals may result in collective behaviours. A central question in understanding collective behaviours is how individual variation in phenotype affects collective behaviours. However, how the personality of individuals affects collective decisions in gr

  20. Differential Effectiveness of Interdependent and Dependent Group Contingencies in Reducing Disruptive Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Kelsey; Gresham, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Disruptive behavior in the classroom negatively affects all students' academic engagement, achievement, and behavior. Group contingencies have been proven effective in reducing disruptive behavior as part of behavior interventions in the classroom. The Good Behavior Game is a Tier 1 classwide intervention that utilizes an interdependent group…

  1. Anomalous length dependence of conductance of aromatic nanoribbons with amine anchoring groups

    KAUST Repository

    Bilić, Ante

    2012-09-06

    Two sets of aromatic nanoribbons, based around a common hexagonal scaffolding, with single and dual terminal amine groups have been considered as potential molecular wires in a junction formed by gold leads. Charge transport through the two-terminal device has been modeled using density functional theory (with and without self-interaction correction) and the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function method. The effects of wire length, multiple terminal contacts, and pathways across the junction have been investigated. For nanoribbons with the oligopyrene motif and conventional single amine terminal groups, an increase in the wire length causes an exponential drop in the conductance. In contrast, for the nanoribbons with the oligoperylene motif and dual amine anchoring groups the predicted conductance rises with the wire length over the whole range of investigated lengths. Only when the effects of self-interaction correction are taken into account, the conductance of the oligoperylene ribbons exhibits saturation for longer members of the series. The oligoperylene nanoribbons, with dual amine groups at both terminals, show the potential to fully harness the highly conjugated system of π molecular orbitals across the junction. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  2. Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

  3. Irradiation performance of PFBR MOX fuel after 112 GWd/t burn-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkiteswaran, C. N.; Jayaraj, V. V.; Ojha, B. K.; Anandaraj, V.; Padalakshmi, M.; Vinodkumar, S.; Karthik, V.; Vijaykumar, Ran; Vijayaraghavan, A.; Divakar, R.; Johny, T.; Joseph, Jojo; Thirunavakkarasu, S.; Saravanan, T.; Philip, John; Rao, B. P. C.; Kasiviswanathan, K. V.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-06-01

    The 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) which is in advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam, India, will use mixed oxide (MOX) fuel with a target burnup of 100 GWd/t. The fuel pellet is of annular design to enable operation at a peak linear power of 450 W/cm with the requirement of minimum duration of pre-conditioning. The performance of the MOX fuel and the D9 clad and wrapper material was assessed through Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE) after test irradiation of 37 fuel pin subassembly in Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) to a burn-up of 112 GWd/t. Fission product distribution, swelling and fuel-clad gap evolution, central hole diameter variation, restructuring, fission gas release and clad wastage due to fuel-clad chemical interaction were evaluated through non-destructive and destructive examinations. The examinations have indicated that the MOX fuel can safely attain the desired target burn-up in PFBR.

  4. Needs of reliable nuclear data and covariance matrices for Burnup Credit in JEFF-3 library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecarpentier D.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Burnup Credit (BUC is the concept which consists in taking into account credit for the reduction of nuclear spent fuel reactivity due to its burnup. In the case of PWR-MOx spent fuel, studies pointed out that the contribution of the 15 most absorbing, stable and non-volatile fission products selected to the credit is as important as the one of the actinides. In order to get a “best estimate” value of the keff, biases of their inventory calculation and individual reactivity worth should be considered in criticality safety studies. This paper enhances the most penalizing bias towards criticality and highlights possible improvements of nuclear data for the 15 FPs of PWRMOx BUC. Concerning the fuel inventory, trends in function of the burnup can be derived from experimental validation of the DARWIN-2.3 package (using the JEFF-3.1.1/SHEM library. Thanks to the BUC oscillation programme of separated FPs in the MINERVE reactor and fully validated scheme PIMS, calculation over experiment ratios can be accurately transposed to tendencies on the FPs integral cross sections.

  5. Burnup simulations of different fuel grades using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asah-Opoku Fiifi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global energy problems range from the increasing cost of fuel to the unequal distribution of energy resources and the potential climate change resulting from the burning of fossil fuels. A sustainable nuclear energy would augment the current world energy supply and serve as a reliable future energy source. This research focuses on Monte Carlo simulations of pressurized water reactor systems. Three different fuel grades - mixed oxide fuel (MOX, uranium oxide fuel (UOX, and commercially enriched uranium or uranium metal (CEU - are used in this simulation and their impact on the effective multiplication factor (Keff and, hence, criticality and total radioactivity of the reactor core after fuel burnup analyzed. The effect of different clad materials on Keff is also studied. Burnup calculation results indicate a buildup of plutonium isotopes in UOX and CEU, as opposed to a decline in plutonium radioisotopes for MOX fuel burnup time. For MOX fuel, a decrease of 31.9% of the fissile plutonium isotope is observed, while for UOX and CEU, fissile plutonium isotopes increased by 82.3% and 83.8%, respectively. Keff results show zircaloy as a much more effective clad material in comparison to zirconium and stainless steel.

  6. Burn-up characteristics of ADS system utilizing the fuel composition from MOX PWRs spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsodi E-mail: marsodi@batan.go.id; Lasman, K.A.S.; Nishihara, K. E-mail: nishi@omega.tokai.jaeri.go.jp; Osugi, T.; Tsujimoto, K.; Marsongkohadi; Su' ud, Z. E-mail: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id

    2002-12-01

    Burn-up characteristics of accelerator-driven system, ADS has been evaluated utilizing the fuel composition from MOX PWRs spent fuel. The system consists of a high intensity proton beam accelerator, spallation target, and sub-critical reactor core. The liquid lead-bismuth, Pb-Bi, as spallation target, was put in the center of the core region. The general approach was conducted throughout the nitride fuel that allows the utilities to choose the strategy for destroying or minimizing the most dangerous high level wastes in a fast neutron spectrum. The fuel introduced surrounding the target region was the same with the composition of MOX from 33 GWd/t PWRs spent-fuel with 5 year cooling and has been compared with the fuel composition from 45 and 60 GWd/t PWRs spent-fuel with the same cooling time. The basic characteristics of the system such as burn-up reactivity swing, power density, neutron fluxes distribution, and nuclides densities were obtained from the results of the neutronics and burn-up analyses using ATRAS computer code of the Japan Atomic Energy research Institute, JAERI.

  7. Oxygen potential in the rim region of high burnup UO 2 fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzke, Hj.

    1994-01-01

    Small specimens from the rim region (fuel surface) of a UO 2 fuel rod with an average burnup of 7.6% FIMA were analysed in a miniaturized galvanic cell to determine their oxygen potential Δ Ḡ(O 2) . These fuel pieces represented the porous rim structure with very small grains known to be formed near the periphery of high burnup UO 2 fuel pellets. The oxygen potential of the rim material was very low, corresponding to that of unirradiated stoichiometric UO 2, or to that of slightly substoichiometric UO 2 containing rare earth fission products. No indication of oxidation due to fission was found, though most fission was that of Pu. Measurements on pieces from the inner, unrestructured fuel showed somewhat higher oxygen potentials corresponding to those of very slightly substoichiometric fuel if allowance is made for the incorporation of rare earths. These results are in contrast to some generally accepted ideas of burnup effects, and the possible reasons and implications are discussed.

  8. Group-size-dependent punishment of idle subordinates in a cooperative breeder where helpers pay to stay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Stefan; Zöttl, Markus; Groenewoud, Frank; Taborsky, Barbara

    2014-08-22

    In cooperative breeding systems, dominant breeders sometimes tolerate unrelated individuals even if they inflict costs on the dominants. According to the 'pay-to-stay' hypothesis, (i) subordinates can outweigh these costs by providing help and (ii) dominants should be able to enforce help by punishing subordinates that provide insufficient help. This requires that dominants can monitor helping and can recognize group members individually. In a field experiment, we tested whether cooperatively breeding cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher subordinates increase their help after a forced 'idle' period, how other group members respond to a previously idle helper, and how helper behaviour and group responses depend on group size. Previously, idle helpers increased their submissiveness and received more aggression than control helpers, suggesting that punishment occurred to enforce help. Subordinates in small groups increased their help more than those in large groups, despite receiving less aggression. When subordinates were temporarily removed, dominants in small groups were more likely to evict returning subordinates. Our results suggest that only in small groups do helpers face a latent threat of punishment by breeders as predicted by the pay-to-stay hypothesis. In large groups, cognitive constraints may prevent breeders from tracking the behaviour of a large number of helpers.

  9. Conclusions Regarding Cross-Group Differences in Happiness Depend on Difficulty of Reaching Respondents*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffetz, Ori; Rabin, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    A growing literature explores differences in subjective well-being across demographic groups, often relying on surveys with high nonresponse rates. By using the reported number of call attempts made to participants in the University of Michigan’s Surveys of Consumers, we show that comparisons among easy-to-reach respondents differ from comparisons among hard-to-reach ones. Notably, easy-to-reach women are happier than easy-to-reach men, but hard-to-reach men are happier than hard-to-reach women, and conclusions of a survey could reverse with more attempted calls. Better alternatives to comparing group sample averages might include putting greater weight on hard-to-reach respondents or even extrapolating trends in responses. PMID:26316655

  10. Benefits of Group Foraging Depend on Prey Type in a Small Marine Predator, the Little Penguin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Grace J.; Hoskins, Andrew J.; Arnould, John P. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Group foraging provides predators with advantages in over-powering prey larger than themselves or in aggregating small prey for efficient exploitation. For group-living predatory species, cooperative hunting strategies provide inclusive fitness benefits. However, for colonial-breeding predators, the benefit pay-offs of group foraging are less clear due to the potential for intra-specific competition. We used animal-borne cameras to determine the prey types, hunting strategies, and success of little penguins (Eudyptula minor), a small, colonial breeding air-breathing marine predator that has recently been shown to display extensive at-sea foraging associations with conspecifics. Regardless of prey type, little penguins had a higher probability of associating with conspecifics when hunting prey that were aggregated than when prey were solitary. In addition, success was greater when individuals hunted schooling rather than solitary prey. Surprisingly, however, success on schooling prey was similar or greater when individuals hunted on their own than when with conspecifics. These findings suggest individuals may be trading-off the energetic gains of solitary hunting for an increased probability of detecting prey within a spatially and temporally variable prey field by associating with conspecifics. PMID:26674073

  11. Benefits of Group Foraging Depend on Prey Type in a Small Marine Predator, the Little Penguin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Grace J; Hoskins, Andrew J; Arnould, John P Y

    2015-01-01

    Group foraging provides predators with advantages in over-powering prey larger than themselves or in aggregating small prey for efficient exploitation. For group-living predatory species, cooperative hunting strategies provide inclusive fitness benefits. However, for colonial-breeding predators, the benefit pay-offs of group foraging are less clear due to the potential for intra-specific competition. We used animal-borne cameras to determine the prey types, hunting strategies, and success of little penguins (Eudyptula minor), a small, colonial breeding air-breathing marine predator that has recently been shown to display extensive at-sea foraging associations with conspecifics. Regardless of prey type, little penguins had a higher probability of associating with conspecifics when hunting prey that were aggregated than when prey were solitary. In addition, success was greater when individuals hunted schooling rather than solitary prey. Surprisingly, however, success on schooling prey was similar or greater when individuals hunted on their own than when with conspecifics. These findings suggest individuals may be trading-off the energetic gains of solitary hunting for an increased probability of detecting prey within a spatially and temporally variable prey field by associating with conspecifics.

  12. Benefits of Group Foraging Depend on Prey Type in a Small Marine Predator, the Little Penguin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace J Sutton

    Full Text Available Group foraging provides predators with advantages in over-powering prey larger than themselves or in aggregating small prey for efficient exploitation. For group-living predatory species, cooperative hunting strategies provide inclusive fitness benefits. However, for colonial-breeding predators, the benefit pay-offs of group foraging are less clear due to the potential for intra-specific competition. We used animal-borne cameras to determine the prey types, hunting strategies, and success of little penguins (Eudyptula minor, a small, colonial breeding air-breathing marine predator that has recently been shown to display extensive at-sea foraging associations with conspecifics. Regardless of prey type, little penguins had a higher probability of associating with conspecifics when hunting prey that were aggregated than when prey were solitary. In addition, success was greater when individuals hunted schooling rather than solitary prey. Surprisingly, however, success on schooling prey was similar or greater when individuals hunted on their own than when with conspecifics. These findings suggest individuals may be trading-off the energetic gains of solitary hunting for an increased probability of detecting prey within a spatially and temporally variable prey field by associating with conspecifics.

  13. Renault tackling new designs for fuel burnup and pollution cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2000-02-01

    Over the past years, auto-makers have made great strides in gasoline and diesel motorization. Indeed, new cars burn up less fuel and release smaller amounts of polluting emissions. The Renault group has long been addressing an environmentally friendly policy, and accordingly manufacturing vehicles that burn up less fuel. Renault developments have spurred the most recent advances in this area. The group is now tackling new designs, such as the ADIVI or the Camless engine. The auto-maker is now working on substitute fuels such as natural gas, and on advanced post-treatment solutions. Renault has already engineered a Scenic 1.6 16V, low emissions demonstrator. (authors)

  14. An empirical formulation to describe the evolution of the high burnup structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemes, Martín; Soba, Alejandro; Denis, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    In the present work the behavior of fuel pellets for LWR power reactors in the high burnup range (average burnup higher than about 45 MWd/kgU) is analyzed. For extended irradiation periods, a considerable Pu concentration is reached in the pellet periphery (rim zone), that contributes to local burnup. Gradually, a new microstructure develops in that ring, characterized by small grains and large pores as compared with those of the original material. In this region Xe is absent from the solid lattice (although it continues to be dissolved in the rest of the pellet). The porous microstructure in the pellet edge causes local changes in the mechanical and thermal properties, thus affecting the overall fuel behavior. It is generally accepted that the evolution of porosity in the high burnup structure (HBS) is determinant of the retention capacity of the fission gases rejected from the fuel matrix. This is the reason why, during the latest years a considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the parameters that influence porosity. Although the mechanisms governing the microstructural transformation have not been completely elucidated yet, some empirical expressions can be given, and this is the intention of the present work, for representing the main physical parameters. Starting from several works published in the open literature, some mathematical expressions were developed to describe the behavior and progress of porosity at local burnup values ranging from 60 to 300 MWd/kgU. The analysis includes the interactions of different orders between pores, the growth of the pore radius by capturing vacancies, the evolution of porosity, pore number density and overpressure within the closed pores, the inventory of fission gas dissolved in the matrix and retained in the pores. The model is mathematically expressed by a system of non-linear differential equations. In the present work, results of this calculation scheme are compared with experimental data available in

  15. Oligomers Solidification Depending on the Nature, Molecular Mass, Type and Reactional Group Containing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliyp. Medvedev

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to regularity defining of curing oligomers, and prepolymers with hydroxyl and isocyanate groups and double bonds reactive oligomers.The features of the spatial structure of elasticpolyurethane based oligomers and prepolymers with the definition of the physical and chemical bonds share, as well as the chain interval length between grid points were researched. The possibility of oligodiendiolecuring in the presence of a methacrylate component on the mechanism of radical polymerization was experimentally confirmed.To achieve the objectives rheokinetic method of analysis (rotational viscometer, thermometric and iodometric methods, IR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetrywere used.

  16. Chemical modification and pH dependence of kinetic parameters to identify functional groups in a glucosyltransferase from Strep. Mutans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J.E.; Leone, A.; Bell, E.T.

    1986-05-01

    A glucosyltransferase, forming a predominantly al-6 linked glucan, was partially purified from the culture filtrate of S. mutans GS-5. The kinetic properties of the enzyme, assessed using the transfer of /sup 14/C glucose from sucrose into total glucan, were studied at pH values from pH 3.5 to 6.5. From the dependence of km on pH, a group with pKa = 5.5 must be protonated to maximize substrate binding. From plots of V/sub max/ vs pH two groups, with pKa's of 4.5 and 5.5 were indicated. The results suggest the involvement of either two carboxyl groups (one protonated, one unprotonated in the native enzyme) or a carboxyl group (unprotonated) and some other protonated group such as histidine, cysteine. Chemical modification studies showed that Diethylyrocarbonate (histidine specific) had no effect on enzyme activity while modification with p-phydroxy-mercuribenzoate or iodoacetic acid (sulfhydryl reactive) and carbodimide reagents (carboxyl specific) resulted in almost complete inactivation. Activity loss was dependent upon time of incubation and reagent concentration. The disaccharide lylose, (shown to be an inhibitor of the enzyme with similar affinity to sucrose) offers no protection against modification by the sulfhydryl reactive reagents.

  17. On the dimensional dependence of duality groups for massive p-forms

    CERN Document Server

    Noronha, J L; Guimarães, M S; Wotzasek, C

    2003-01-01

    We study the soldering formalism in the context of abelian p-form theories. We develop further the fusion process of massless antisymmetric tensors of different ranks into a massive p-form and establish its duality properties. To illustrate the formalism we consider two situations. First the soldering mass generation mechanism is compared with the Higgs and Julia-Toulouse mechanisms for mass generation due to condensation of electric and magnetic topological defects. We show that the soldering mechanism interpolates between them for even dimensional spacetimes, in this way confirming the Higgs/Julia-Toulouse duality proposed by Quevedo and Trugenberger \\cite{QT} a few years ago. Next, soldering is applied to the study of duality group classification of the massive forms. We show a dichotomy controlled by the parity of the operator defining the symplectic structure of the theory and find their explicit actions.

  18. A deep-seated mechanism for cycle-dependent sunspot group tilt angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isik, Emre

    2016-07-01

    The cycle-averaged tilt angle of sunspot groups is an important quantity in determining the magnetic flux diffusing across the equator, which is highly correlated with the strength of the next cycle. This quantity has recently been reported to be anti-correlated with the strength of the solar cycle. I suggest that a deep-seated thermodynamic cycle can be responsible for the observed correlation. Motivated by helioseismic indications, I calculate the effect of cooling of the convective overshoot region on the stability and dynamics of thin, unstable flux tubes. I find that only 5-20 K of cooling in the layer can explain the observed range of tilt angle fluctuations among different cycles. This mechanism can play a role in the nonlinear saturation and amplitude fluctuations of the solar dynamo.

  19. Phase behavior of semifluorinated catanionic mixtures: head group dependence and spontaneous formation of vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Elena; Olsson, Ulf; Ruso, Juan M; Schulz, Pablo C; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Félix

    2009-03-15

    Hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (C(16)TAB)-sodium perfluorooctanoate (C(8)FONa) and hexadecylpyridynium bromide (C(16)PyB)-C(8)FONa catanionic semifluorinated mixtures have been studied by conductivity, dynamic light scattering (DLS), cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) and polarizing microscopy. The regular solution theory, applicable for a limited fluorinated molar ratio, does not predict long-range electrostatic interactions. The results are consistent with the fact that in the hydrogenated-rich region the interaction is attractive in both catanionic mixtures. The systems containing pyridinium headgroups were of the stronger interaction. A transition from micelles was found in both mixtures as a function of fluorinated molar ratio. Special attention was devoted to the effect of the head group in the system properties. The information related with the mean vesicle radius measured by DLS was compared with the vesicle size distribution as well as the elastic properties of the bilayer measured with cryo-TEM.

  20. Trithorax and Polycomb group-dependent regulation: a tale of opposing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisler, Sarah J; Paro, Renato

    2015-09-01

    Intricate layers of regulation determine the unique gene expression profiles of a given cell and, therefore, underlie the immense phenotypic diversity observed among cell types. Understanding the mechanisms that govern which genes are expressed and which genes are silenced is a fundamental focus in biology. The Polycomb and Trithorax group chromatin proteins play important roles promoting the stable and heritable repression and activation of gene expression, respectively. These proteins, which are conserved across metazoans, modulate post-translational modifications on histone tails and regulate nucleosomal structures. Here, we review recent advances that have shed light on the mechanisms by which these two classes of proteins act to maintain epigenetic memory and allow dynamic switches in gene expression during development.

  1. Evolutionary trails of plant group II Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Type II pyridoxal phosphate-dependent decarboxylase (PLP_deC enzymes play important metabolic roles during nitrogen metabolism. Recent evolutionary profiling of these genes revealed a sharp expansion of histidine decarboxylase (HDC genes in the members of Solanaceae family. In spite of the high sequence homology shared by PLP_deC orthologs, these enzymes display remarkable differences in their substrate specificities. Currently, limited information is available on the gene repertoires and substrate specificities of PLP_deCs which renders their precise annotation challenging and offers technical challenges in the immediate identification and biochemical characterization of their full gene complements in plants. Herein, we explored their evolutionary trails in a comprehensive manner by taking advantage of high-throughput data accessibility and computational approaches. We discussed the premise that has enabled an improved reconstruction of their evolutionary lineage and evaluated the factors offering constraints in their rapid functional characterization, till date. We envisage that the synthesized information herein would act as a catalyst for the rapid exploration of their biochemical specificity and physiological roles in more plant species.

  2. Review of Technical Issues Related to Predicting Isotopic Compositions and Source Terms for High-Burnup LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I. C.; Parks, C. V.

    2000-12-11

    This report has been prepared to review the technical issues important to the prediction of isotopic compositions and source terms for high-burnup, light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel as utilized in the licensing of spent fuel transport and storage systems. The current trend towards higher initial 235U enrichments, more complex assembly designs, and more efficient fuel management schemes has resulted in higher spent fuel burnups than seen in the past. This trend has led to a situation where high-burnup assemblies from operating LWRs now extend beyond the area where available experimental data can be used to validate the computational methods employed to calculate spent fuel inventories and source terms. This report provides a brief review of currently available validation data, including isotopic assays, decay heat measurements, and shielded dose-rate measurements. Potential new sources of experimental data available in the near term are identified. A review of the background issues important to isotopic predictions and some of the perceived technical challenges that high-burnup fuel presents to the current computational methods are discussed. Based on the review, the phenomena that need to be investigated further and the technical issues that require resolution are presented. The methods and data development that may be required to address the possible shortcomings of physics and depletion methods in the high-burnup and high-enrichment regime are also discussed. Finally, a sensitivity analysis methodology is presented. This methodology is currently being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a computational tool to better understand the changing relative significance of the underlying nuclear data in the different enrichment and burnup regimes and to identify the processes that are dominant in the high-burnup regime. The potential application of the sensitivity analysis methodology to help establish a range of applicability for experimental

  3. The Norwegian Voice Handicap Index (VHI-N) patient scores are dependent on voice-related disease group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsen, Tom; Heimdal, John-Helge; Grieg, Anne Rita Hella; Aarstad, Hans Jørgen

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study is to determine to what extent the Voice Handicap Index-Norwegian (VHI-N) is scored depending on specific laryngological disease. In a multi-center study, 126 healthy subjects and 355 patients with different voice-related diseases answered the VHI-N. The VHI-N scores showed high Cronbach's alpha. Analyses of variance were performed with VHI-N dependent and specific voice-related disease as independent variable, and showed highly significant dependence by group allocation (F(7,461) = 28.0; p VHI-N scores. The VHI-N is a psychometrically well-functioning instrument, also at disease-specific levels and discriminates well between health and voice diseases, as well as between different voice-related diseases. The VHI-N may be recommended to be used when monitoring voice-related disease treatment.

  4. A criticality analysis of the GBC-32 dry storage cask with Hanbit nuclear power plant unit 3 fuel assemblies from the viewpoint of burnup credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hyung Ju; Kim, Do Yeon; Park, Kwang Heon; Hong, Ser Gi [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Nuclear criticality safety analyses (NCSAs) considering burnup credit were performed for the GBC-32 cask. The used nuclear fuel assemblies (UNFAs) discharged from Hanbit Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 Cycle 6 were loaded into the cask. Their axial burnup distributions and average discharge burnups were evaluated using the DeCART and Multi-purpose Analyzer for Static and Transient Effects of Reactors (MASTER) codes, and NCSAs were performed using SCALE 6.1/STandardized Analysis of Reactivity for Burnup Credit using SCALE (STARBUCS) and Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code, version 6 (MCNP 6). The axial burnup distributions were determined for 20 UNFAs with various initial enrichments and burnups, which were applied to the criticality analysis for the cask system. The UNFAs for 20- and 30-year cooling times were assumed to be stored in the cask. The criticality analyses indicated that keff values for UNFAs with nonuniform axial burnup distributions were larger than those with a uniform distribution, that is, the end effects were positive but much smaller than those with the reference distribution. The axial burnup distributions for 20 UNFAs had shapes that were more symmetrical with a less steep gradient in the upper region than the reference ones of the United States Department of Energy. These differences in the axial burnup distributions resulted in a significant reduction in end effects compared with the reference.

  5. Personality-dependent dispersal in the invasive mosquitofish: group composition matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Julien; Fogarty, Sean; Brodin, Tomas; Weinersmith, Kelly; Sih, Andrew

    2011-06-07

    Understanding/predicting ecological invasions is an important challenge in modern ecology because of their immense economical and ecological costs. Recent studies have revealed that within-species variation in behaviour (i.e. animal personality) can shed light on the invasion process. The general hypothesis is that individuals' personality type may affect their colonization success, suggesting that some individuals might be better invaders than others. We have recently shown that, in the invasive mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), social personality trait was an important indicator of dispersal distance, with more asocial individuals dispersing further. Here, we tested how mean personality within a population, in addition to individual personality type, affect dispersal and settlement decisions in the mosquitofish. We found that individual dispersal tendencies were influenced by the population's mean boldness and sociability score. For example, individuals from populations with more asocial individuals or with more bold individuals are more likely to disperse regardless of their own personality type. We suggest that identifying behavioural traits facilitating invasions, even at the group level, can thus have direct applications in pest management.

  6. Interaction of PAMAM dendrimers with bovine insulin depends on nanoparticle end-groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowacka, Olga; Milowska, Katarzyna, E-mail: milowska@biol.uni.lodz.pl; Bryszewska, Maria

    2015-06-15

    We have looked at the interactions between polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers with different terminal groups (−COOH, −NH{sub 2}, −OH) and bovine insulin. The influence of PAMAM dendrimers on insulin was tested by measuring zeta potential and fluorescence quenching. The secondary structure of insulin in the presence of dendrimers was examined by circular dichroism. The effect of dendrimers on dithiotreitol-induced aggregation of insulin was investigated by spectrophotometry. Dendrimers quenched the fluorescence of insulin, but did not change its secondary structure. Thus dendrimers neither induce hormone aggregation nor inhibit the aggregation process induced by dithiotreitol (DTT), except at 0.01 µmol/l. Dendrimers–insulin interactions are mainly electrostatic. - Highlight: • The interactions between PAMAM dendrimers and insulin were investigated. • The PAMAM dendrimers can quench the fluorescence of insulin. • The PAMAM dendrimers did not change the secondary structure of insulin. • Dendrimers did not induce aggregation of hormone. • Dendrimers–insulin interaction is mainly electrostatic.

  7. Dependence of micelle size and shape on detergent alkyl chain length and head group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C Oliver

    Full Text Available Micelle-forming detergents provide an amphipathic environment that can mimic lipid bilayers and are important tools for solubilizing membrane proteins for functional and structural investigations in vitro. However, the formation of a soluble protein-detergent complex (PDC currently relies on empirical screening of detergents, and a stable and functional PDC is often not obtained. To provide a foundation for systematic comparisons between the properties of the detergent micelle and the resulting PDC, a comprehensive set of detergents commonly used for membrane protein studies are systematically investigated. Using small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS, micelle shapes and sizes are determined for phosphocholines with 10, 12, and 14 alkyl carbons, glucosides with 8, 9, and 10 alkyl carbons, maltosides with 8, 10, and 12 alkyl carbons, and lysophosphatidyl glycerols with 14 and 16 alkyl carbons. The SAXS profiles are well described by two-component ellipsoid models, with an electron rich outer shell corresponding to the detergent head groups and a less electron dense hydrophobic core composed of the alkyl chains. The minor axis of the elliptical micelle core from these models is constrained by the length of the alkyl chain, and increases by 1.2-1.5 Å per carbon addition to the alkyl chain. The major elliptical axis also increases with chain length; however, the ellipticity remains approximately constant for each detergent series. In addition, the aggregation number of these detergents increases by ∼16 monomers per micelle for each alkyl carbon added. The data provide a comprehensive view of the determinants of micelle shape and size and provide a baseline for correlating micelle properties with protein-detergent interactions.

  8. A Four Group Reference Code for Solving Neutron Diffusion Equation in a VVER-440 Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saarinen, Simo [Fortum Nuclear Services Ltd., P.O. Box 100, 00048 Fortum (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    Nuclear reactor core power calculation is essential in the analysis of the nuclear power plant and especially the core. Currently, the core power distribution in Loviisa VVER-440 core is calculated using nodal code HEXBU-3D and pin-power reconstruction code ELSI-1440 that solve the two group neutron diffusion equation. The computer power available has increased significantly during the last decades allowing us to develop a fine mesh code HEXRE for solving the four group diffusion equation. The diffusion equations are discretized using piecewise linear polynomials. The core is discretized using one node per fuel pin cell. The axial discretization can be chosen freely. The boundary conditions are described using diffusion theory and albedos. Burnup dependence is modelled by tabulating diffusion parameters at certain burnup values and using interpolation for the intermediate values. A two degree polynomial is used for the modelling of the feedback effects. Eigenvalue calculation for both boron concentration and multiplication factor control has been formulated. A possibility to perform fuel loading and shuffling operations is implemented. HEXRE has been thoroughly compared with HEXBU-3D and ELSI-1440. The effect of the different energy and space discretizations used is investigated. Some safety criteria for the core calculated with the HEXRE and HEXBU-3D/ELSI-1440 have been compared. From the calculations (e.g. the safety criteria) we can estimate whether there exists systematic deviations in HEXBU- 3D/ELSI-1440 calculations or not. (author)

  9. Burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core using MCNPX.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a reactor design with a burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core that was evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). The current trend in advanced reactor design is the concept of a small modular reactor (SMR). However, very few of the SMR designs attempt to substantially increase the lifetime of a reactor core, especially without zone loading, fuel reshuffling, or other artificial mechanisms in the core that %E2%80%9Cflatten%E2%80%9D the power profile, including non-uniform cooling, non-uniform moderation, or strategic poison placement. Historically, the limitations of computing capabilities have prevented acceptable margins in the temporal component of the spatial excess reactivity in a reactor design, due primarily to the error in burnup calculations. This research was performed as an initial scoping analysis into the concept of a long-life fast reactor. It can be shown that a long-life fast reactor concept can be modeled using MCNPX to predict burnup and neutronics behavior. The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs. For the purpose of this study, a single core design was investigated: a relatively small reactor core, yielding a medium amount of power (~200 to 400 MWth). The results of this scoping analysis were successful in providing a preliminary reactor design involving metal U-235/U-238 fuel with HT-9 fuel cladding and sodium coolant at a 20% volume fraction.

  10. Criticality Analysis of Assembly Misload in a PWR Burnup Credit Cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J. C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-01-31

    The Interim Staff Guidance on bumup credit (ISG-8) for spent fuel in storage and transportation casks, issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Spent Fuel Project Office, recommends a bumup measurement for each assembly to confirm the reactor record and compliance with the assembly bumup value used for loading acceptance. This recommendation is intended to prevent unauthorized loading (misloading) of assemblies due to inaccuracies in reactor burnup records and/or improper assembly identification, thereby ensuring that the appropriate subcritical margin is maintained. This report presents a computational criticality safety analysis of the consequences of misloading fuel assemblies in a highcapacity cask that relies on burnup credit for criticality safety. The purpose of this report is to provide a quantitative understanding of the effects of fuel misloading events on safety margins. A wide variety of fuel-misloading configurations are investigated and results are provided for informational purposes. This report does not address the likelihood of occurrence for any of the misload configurations considered. For representative, qualified bumup-enrichment combinations, with and without fission products included, misloading two assemblies that are underburned by 75% results in an increase in keff of 0.025-0.045, while misloading four assemblies that are underburned by 50% also results in an increase in keff of 0.025-0.045. For the cask and conditions considered, a reduction in bumup of 20% in all assemblies results in an increase in kff of less than 0.035. Misloading a single fresh assembly with 3, 4, or 5 wt% 235U enrichment results in an increase in keffof--0.02, 0.04, or 0.06, respectively. The report concludes with a summary of these and other important findings, as well as a discussion of relevant issues that should be considered when assessing the appropriate role of burnup measurements.

  11. Herschel-ATLAS/GAMA:How does the far-IR luminosity function depend on galaxy group properties?

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Qi; Norberg, Peder; Cole, Shaun; Baugh, Carlton; Frenk, Carlos; Cooray, Asantha; Dye, Simon; Bourne, N; Dunne, L; Eales, S; Ivison, R J; Maddox, S J; Alpasan, M; Baldry, I; Driver, S P; Robotham, A

    2014-01-01

    We use the Herschel ATLAS (H-ATLAS) Phase I data to study the conditional luminosity function of far-IR (250 um) selected galaxies in optically-selected galaxy groups from the GAMA spectroscopic survey, as well as environmental effects on the far-IR-to-optical colour. We applied two methods, which gave consistent results for the far-IR conditional luminosity functions. The direct matching method matches H-ATLAS sources to GAMA/SDSS galaxies, then links the optical counterparts to GAMA groups. The stacking method counts the number of far-IR sources within the projected radii of GAMA groups, subtracting the local background. We investigated the dependence of the far-IR (250 um) luminosity function on group mass in the range 10d12 10d12Msun/h. We also find that the far-IR-to-optical colours of H-ATLAS galaxies are independent of group mass over the range 10d12 < M_h <10d14Msun/h in the local universe. We also compare our observational results with recent semi-analytical models, and find that none of these...

  12. Thermodynamic analysis for high burn-up fuel internal chemistry. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuji, Kensho; Kyoh, Bunkei [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan)

    1998-09-01

    Thermodynamic calculations with the computer program SOLGASMIX-PV have been performed for the chemical states expected in irradiated fast breeder reactor (FBR) fuels containing transuranium (TRU) elements. The analysis shows that A (alkali and alkaline-earth)-molybdates exist, but neither A-uranates nor A-zirconates are formed in FBR fuel pellets irradiated to high burn-up. And increase of oxygen potential in irradiated FBR fuel is ascribed to growing amount of rare earth, noble metal and TRU elements. (author)

  13. Effects of Lower Drying-Storage Temperature on the Ductility of High-Burnup PWR Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billone, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Burtseva, T. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-08-30

    The purpose of this research effort is to determine the effects of canister and/or cask drying and storage on radial hydride precipitation in, and potential embrittlement of, high-burnup (HBU) pressurized water reactor (PWR) cladding alloys during cooling for a range of peak drying-storage temperatures (PCT) and hoop stresses. Extensive precipitation of radial hydrides could lower the failure hoop stresses and strains, relative to limits established for as-irradiated cladding from discharged fuel rods stored in pools, at temperatures below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT).

  14. Time-dependent Multi-group Multidimensional Relativistic Radiative Transfer Code Based On Spherical Harmonic Discrete Ordinate Method

    CERN Document Server

    Tominaga, Nozomu; Blinnikov, Sergei I

    2015-01-01

    We develop a time-dependent multi-group multidimensional relativistic radiative transfer code, which is required to numerically investigate radiation from relativistic fluids involved in, e.g., gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei. The code is based on the spherical harmonic discrete ordinate method (SHDOM) that evaluates a source function including anisotropic scattering in spherical harmonics and implicitly solves the static radiative transfer equation with a ray tracing in discrete ordinates. We implement treatments of time dependence, multi-frequency bins, Lorentz transformation, and elastic Thomson and inelastic Compton scattering to the publicly available SHDOM code. Our code adopts a mixed frame approach; the source function is evaluated in the comoving frame whereas the radiative transfer equation is solved in the laboratory frame. This implementation is validated with various test problems and comparisons with results of a relativistic Monte Carlo code. These validations confirm that the code ...

  15. Heat evolution of micelle formation, dependence of enthalpy, and heat capacity on the surfactant chain length and head group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatowski, Ella; Kozlov, Michael M; Pinchuk, Ilya; Lichtenberg, Dov

    2002-02-15

    Micelle formation by many surfactants is endothermic at low temperatures but exothermic at high temperatures. In this respect, dissociation of micelles (demicellization) is similar to dissolving hydrocarbons in water. However, a remarkable difference between the two processes is that dissolving hydrocarbons is isocaloric at about 25 degrees C, almost independently of the hydrocarbon chain length, whereas the temperature (T*) at which demicellization of different surfactants is athermal varies over a relatively large range. We have investigated the temperature dependence of the heat of demicellization of three alkylglucosides with hydrocarbon chains of 7, 8, and 9 carbon atoms. At about 25 degrees C, the heat of demicellization of the three studied alkylglucosides varied within a relatively small range (DeltaH=-7.8+/-0.4 kJ/mol). The temperature dependence of DeltaH(demic) indicates that within the studied temperature range the heat capacity of demicellization (DeltaC(P,demic)) is about constant. The value of DeltaC(P,demic) exhibited an apparently linear dependence on the surfactant's chain length (DeltaC(P,demic)/n(CH(2))=47+/-7 kJ/mol K). Our interpretation of these results is that (i) the transfer of the head groups from micelles to water is exothermic and (ii) the temperature dependence of the heat associated with water-hydrocarbon interactions is only slightly affected by the head group. This implies that the deviation of the value of T* from 25 degrees C results from the contribution of the polar head to the overall heat of demicellization. Calorimetric studies of other series of amphiphiles will have to be conducted to test whether the latter conclusion is general.

  16. A semi-empirical model for the formation and depletion of the high burnup structure in UO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzocri, D.; Cappia, F.; Luzzi, L.; Pastore, G.; Rondinella, V. V.; Van Uffelen, P.

    2017-04-01

    In the rim zone of UO2 nuclear fuel pellets, the combination of high burnup and low temperature drives a microstructural change, leading to the formation of the high burnup structure (HBS). In this work, we propose a semi-empirical model to describe the formation of the HBS, which embraces the polygonisation/recrystallization process and the depletion of intra-granular fission gas, describing them as inherently related. For this purpose, we performed grain-size measurements on samples at radial positions in which the restructuring was incomplete. Based on these new experimental data, we infer an exponential reduction of the average grain size with local effective burnup, paired with a simultaneous depletion of intra-granular fission gas driven by diffusion. The comparison with currently used models indicates the applicability of the herein developed model within integral fuel performance codes.

  17. Assesment of advanced step models for steady state Monte Carlo burnup calculations in application to prismatic HTGR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kępisty Grzegorz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we compare the methodology of different time-step models in the context of Monte Carlo burnup calculations for nuclear reactors. We discuss the differences between staircase step model, slope model, bridge scheme and stochastic implicit Euler method proposed in literature. We focus on the spatial stability of depletion procedure and put additional emphasis on the problem of normalization of neutron source strength. Considered methodology has been implemented in our continuous energy Monte Carlo burnup code (MCB5. The burnup simulations have been performed using the simplified high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR system with and without modeling of control rod withdrawal. Useful conclusions have been formulated on the basis of results.

  18. A multi-platform linking code for fuel burnup and radiotoxicity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, R.; Pereira, C.; Veloso, M. A. F.; Cardoso, F.; Costa, A. L.

    2014-02-01

    A linking code between ORIGEN2.1 and MCNP has been developed at the Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear/UFMG to calculate coupled neutronic/isotopic results for nuclear systems and to produce a large number of criticality, burnup and radiotoxicity results. In its previous version, it evaluated the isotopic composition evolution in a Heat Pipe Power System model as well as the radiotoxicity and radioactivity during lifetime cycles. In the new version, the code presents features such as multi-platform execution and automatic results analysis. Improvements made in the code allow it to perform simulations in a simpler and faster way without compromising accuracy. Initially, the code generates a new input for MCNP based on the decisions of the user. After that, MCNP is run and data, such as recoverable energy per prompt fission neutron, reaction rates and keff, are automatically extracted from the output and used to calculate neutron flux and cross sections. These data are then used to construct new ORIGEN inputs, one for each cell in the core. Each new input is run on ORIGEN and generates outputs that represent the complete isotopic composition of the core on that time step. The results show good agreement between GB (Coupled Neutronic/Isotopic code) and Monteburns (Automated, Multi-Step Monte Carlo Burnup Code System), developed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  19. Fuel burnup analysis for IRIS reactor using MCNPX and WIMS-D5 codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, E. A.; Bashter, I. I.; Hassan, Nabil M.; Mustafa, S. S.

    2017-02-01

    International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) reactor is a compact power reactor designed with especial features. It contains Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber (IFBA). The core is heterogeneous both axially and radially. This work provides the full core burn up analysis for IRIS reactor using MCNPX and WIMDS-D5 codes. Criticality calculations, radial and axial power distributions and nuclear peaking factor at the different stages of burnup were studied. Effective multiplication factor values for the core were estimated by coupling MCNPX code with WIMS-D5 code and compared with SAS2H/KENO-V code values at different stages of burnup. The two calculation codes show good agreement and correlation. The values of radial and axial powers for the full core were also compared with published results given by SAS2H/KENO-V code (at the beginning and end of reactor operation). The behavior of both radial and axial power distribution is quiet similar to the other data published by SAS2H/KENO-V code. The peaking factor values estimated in the present work are close to its values calculated by SAS2H/KENO-V code.

  20. EBSD and TEM characterization of high burn-up mixed oxide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, Melissa; Gorman, Brian; Miller, Brandon; King, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and studying the irradiation behavior of high burn-up oxide fuel is critical to licensing of future fast breeder reactors. Advancements in experimental techniques and equipment are allowing for new insights into previously irradiated samples. In this work dual column focused ion beam (FIB)/scanning electron microscope (SEM) was utilized to prepared transmission electron microscope samples from mixed oxide fuel with a burn-up of 6.7% FIMA. Utilizing the FIB/SEM for preparation resulted in samples with a dose rate of <0.5 mRem/h compared to ∼1.1 R/h for a traditionally prepared TEM sample. The TEM analysis showed that the sample taken from the cooler rim region of the fuel pellet had ∼2.5× higher dislocation density than that of the sample taken from the mid-radius due to the lower irradiation temperature of the rim. The dual column FIB/SEM was additionally used to prepared and serially slice ∼25 μm cubes. High quality electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD) were collected from the face at each step, showing, for the first time, the ability to obtain EBSD data from high activity irradiated fuel.

  1. Development of Burnup Calculation Function in Reactor Monte Carlo Code RMC%堆用蒙卡程序燃耗计算功能开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佘顶; 王侃; 余纲林

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the burnup calculation capability of RMC, which is a new Monte Carlo (MC) neutron transport code developed by Reactor Engineering Analysis Laboratory (REAL) in Tsinghua university of China. Unlike most of existing MC depletion codes which explicitly couple the depletion module, RMC incorporates ORIGEN 2.1 in an implicit way. Different burn step strategies, including the middle-of-step approximation and the predictor-corrector method, are adopted by RMC to assure the accuracy under large burnup step size. RMC employs a spectrum-based method of tallying one-group cross section, which can considerably saves computational time with negligible accuracy loss. According to the validation results of benchmarks and examples, it is proved that the burnup function of RMC performs quite well in accuracy and efficiency.%堆用蒙卡程序(RMC)是由清华大学工程物理系REAL实验室自主开发的用于反应堆物理分析的中子输运蒙卡程序,本文主要介绍其燃耗计算功能的开发与验证.RMC的燃耗计算功能具有的特点:内部耦合ORIGEN,相比于外耦合方式,更加灵活和高效;使用基于能谱的单群截面统计方法,可在保证精度的前提下,显著提高计算效率;采取预估修正和中点近似等多种燃耗步策略,减小大燃耗步长时的计算误差.通过计算压水堆栅元、沸水堆组件、快堆等一系列基准题和算例,验证了RMC燃耗计算的正确性和速度优势.

  2. Instant release fraction and matrix release of high burn-up UO2 spent nuclear fuel: Effect of high burn-up structure and leaching solution composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Purroy, D.; Clarens, F.; González-Robles, E.; Glatz, J. P.; Wegen, D. H.; de Pablo, J.; Casas, I.; Giménez, J.; Martínez-Esparza, A.

    2012-08-01

    Two weak points in Performance Assessment (PA) exercises regarding the alteration of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are the contribution of the so-called Instant Release Fraction (IRF) and the effect of High Burn-Up Structure (HBS). This manuscript focuses on the effect of HBS in matrix (long term) and instant release of a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) SNF irradiated in a commercial reactor with a mean Burn-Up (BU) of 60 GWd/tU. In order to study the HBS contribution, two samples from different radial positions have been prepared. One from the centre of the SNF, labelled CORE, and one from the periphery, enriched with HBS and labelled OUT. Static leaching experiments have been carried out with two synthetic leaching solutions: bicarbonate (BIC) and Bentonitic Granitic Groundwater (BGW), and in all cases under oxidising conditions. IRF values have been calculated from the determined Fraction of Inventory in Aqueous Phase (FIAP). In all studied cases, some radionuclides (RN): Rb, Sr and Cs, have shown higher release rates than uranium, especially at the beginning of the experiment, and have been considered as IRF. Redox sensitive RN like Mo and Tc have been found to dissolve slightly faster than uranium and further studies might be needed to confirm if they can also be considered part of the IRF. Most of the remaining studied RN, mainly actinides and lanthanides, have been found to dissolve congruently with the uranium matrix. Finally, Zr, Ru and Rh presented lower release rates than the matrix. Higher matrix release has been determined for CORE than for OUT samples showing that the formation of HBS might have a protective effect against the oxidative corrosion of the SNF. On the contrary, no significant differences have been observed between the two studied leaching solutions (BIC and BGW). Two different IRF contributions have been determined. One corresponding to the fraction of inventory segregated in the external open grain boundaries, directly available to water and

  3. Conceptual design study on an upgraded future Monju core (2). Core concept with extended refueling interval and increased fuel burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinjo, Hidehito; Ishibashi, Jun-ichi; Nishi, Hiroshi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tsuruga Head Office, International Cooperation and Technology Development Center, Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan); Kageyama, Takeshi [Nuclear Energy System Inc., Tokyo (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    A conceptual design study has been performed at the International Cooperation and Technology Development Center to investigate the feasibility of upgraded future Monju cores with extended refueling intervals of 365efpd/cycle and increased fuel burnup of 150 GWd/t. The goal of this study is to demonstrate the possible contribution of Monju to the improved economy and to efficient utilization, as one of the major facilities for fast neutron irradiation. Two design measures have been mainly taken to improve the core fuel burnup and reactivity control characteristics for the extended operating cycle length of 1 year: (1) The driver fuel pin specification with both increased pin diameter of 7.7mm and increased active core height of about 100cm has been chosen to reduce the burnup reactivity swing, (2) The absorber control rod specification has also been changed to enhance the control rod reactivity worth by increasing {sup 10}B-enrichment and absorber length, and to adequately secure the shutdown reactivity margin. The major core characteristics have been evaluated on the core power distribution, safety parameters such as sodium void reactivity and Doppler effect, thermal hydraulics and reactivity control characteristics. The results show that this core could achieve the targeted core performances of 1-year operating cycle as well as 150GWd/t discharged burnup, without causing any significant drawback on the core characteristics and safety aspects. The upgraded core concepts have, therefore, been confirmed as feasible. (author)

  4. 78 FR 67348 - Invitation for Public Comment on Draft Test Plan for the High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-12

    ...: U.S. Department of Energy, C/O Melissa Bates, 1955 Freemont Ave., MS 1235, Idaho Falls, ID 83415..., 1955 Fremont Ave., Attn: Melissa Bates, Idaho Falls, ID, between 8 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. MT, Monday.... Melissa Bates, Contracting Officers Representative, High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and...

  5. Kinetic parameters study based on burn-up for improving the performance of research reactor equilibrium core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Atta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study kinetic parameters, effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron generation time have been investigated at different burn-up stages for research reactor's equilibrium core utilizing low enriched uranium high density fuel (U3Si2-Al fuel with 4.8 g/cm3 of uranium. Results have been compared with reference operating core of Pakistan research Reactor-1. It was observed that by increasing fuel burn-up, effective delayed neutron fraction is decreased while prompt neutron generation time is increased. However, over all ratio beff/L is decreased with increasing burn-up. Prompt neutron generation time L in the understudy core is lower than reference operating core of reactor at all burn-up steps due to hard spectrum. It is observed that beff is larger in the understudy core than reference operating core of due to smaller size. Calculations were performed with the help of computer codes WIMSD/4 and CITATION.

  6. Bacterial histo-blood group antigens contributing to genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with a microfiltration membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasiri, Mohan; Hashiba, Satoshi; Miura, Takayuki; Nakagomi, Toyoko; Nakagomi, Osamu; Ishii, Satoshi; Okabe, Satoshi; Sano, Daisuke

    2016-05-15

    We demonstrated the genotype-dependent removal of human norovirus particles with a microfiltration (MF) membrane in the presence of bacteria bearing histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs). Three genotypes (GII.3, GII.4, and GII.6) of norovirus-like particles (NoVLPs) were mixed with three bacterial strains (Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, Escherichia coli O86:K61:B7, and Staphylococcus epidermidis), respectively, and the mixture was filtered with an MF membrane having a nominal pore size of 0.45 μm. All NoVLP genotypes were rejected by the MF membrane in the presence of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6, which excreted HBGAs as extracellular polymeric substances (EPS). This MF membrane removal of NoVLPs was not significant when EPS was removed from cells of Enterobacter sp. SENG-6. GII.6 NoVLP was not rejected with the MF membrane in the presence of E. coli O86:K61:B7, but the removal of EPS of E. coli O86:K61:B7 increased the removal efficiency due to the interaction of NoVLPs with the exposed B-antigen in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of E. coli O86:K61:B7. No MF membrane removal of all three genotypes was observed when S. epidermidis, an HBGA-negative strain, was mixed with NoVLPs. These results demonstrate that the location of HBGAs on bacterial cells is an important factor in determining the genotype-dependent removal efficiency of norovirus particles with the MF membrane. The presence of HBGAs in mixed liquor suspended solids from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) pilot plant was confirmed by immune-transmission electron microscopy, which implies that bacterial HBGAs can contribute to the genotype-dependent removal of human noroviruses with MBR using MF membrane.

  7. Extended calculations of OECD/NEA phase II-C burnup credit criticality benchmark problem for PWR spent fuel transport cask by using MCNP-4B2 code and JENDL-3.2 library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroishi, Takeshi; Hoang, Anh Tuan; Nomura, Yasushi; Okuno, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The reactivity effect of the asymmetry of axial burnup profile in burnup credit criticality safety is studied for a realistic PWR spent fuel transport cask proposed in the current OECD/NEA Phase II-C benchmark problem. The axial burnup profiles are simulated in 21 material zones based on in-core flux measurements varying from strong asymmetry to more or less no asymmetry. Criticality calculations in a 3-D model have been performed using the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B2 and the nuclear data library JENDL-3.2. Calculation conditions are determined with consideration of the axial fission source convergence. Calculations are carried out not only for cases proposed in the benchmark but also for additional cases assuming symmetric burnup profile. The actinide-only approach supposed for first domestic introduction of burnup credit into criticality evaluation is also considered in addition to the actinide plus fission product approach adopted in the benchmark. The calculated results show that k{sub eff} and the end effect increase almost linearly with increasing burnup axial offset that is defined as one of typical parameters showing the intensity of axial burnup asymmetry. The end effect is more sensitive to the asymmetry of burnup profile for the higher burnup. For an axially distributed burnup, the axial fission source distribution becomes strongly asymmetric as its peak shifts toward the top end of the fuel's active zone where the local burnup is less than that of the bottom end. The peak of fission source distribution becomes higher with the increase of either the asymmetry of burnup profile or the assembly-averaged burnup. The conservatism of the assumption of uniform axial burnup based on the actinide-only approach is estimated quantitatively in comparison with the k{sub eff} result calculated with experiment-based strongest asymmetric axial burnup profile with the actinide plus fission product approach. (author)

  8. Applicability of the MCNP-ACAB system to inventory prediction in high-burnup fuels: sensitivity/uncertainty estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Herranz, N.; Cabellos, O. [Madrid Polytechnic Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering (Spain); Cabellos, O.; Sanz, J. [Madrid Polytechnic Univ., 2 Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (Spain); Sanz, J. [Univ. Nacional Educacion a Distancia, Dept. of Power Engineering, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    We present a new code system which combines the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C and the inventory code ACAB as a suitable tool for high burnup calculations. Our main goal is to show that the system, by means of ACAB capabilities, enables us to assess the impact of neutron cross section uncertainties on the inventory and other inventory-related responses in high burnup applications. The potential impact of nuclear data uncertainties on some response parameters may be large, but only very few codes exist which can treat this effect. In fact, some of the most reported effective code systems in dealing with high burnup problems, such as CASMO-4, MCODE and MONTEBURNS, lack this capability. As first step, the potential of our system, ruling out the uncertainty capability, has been compared with that of those code systems, using a well referenced high burnup pin-cell benchmark exercise. It is proved that the inclusion of ACAB in the system allows to obtain results at least as reliable as those obtained using other inventory codes, such as ORIGEN2. Later on, the uncertainty analysis methodology implemented in ACAB, including both the sensitivity-uncertainty method and the uncertainty analysis by the Monte Carlo technique, is applied to this benchmark problem. We estimate the errors due to activation cross section uncertainties in the prediction of the isotopic content up to the high-burnup spent fuel regime. The most relevant uncertainties are remarked, and some of the most contributing cross sections to those uncertainties are identified. For instance, the most critical reaction for Am{sup 242m} is Am{sup 241}(n,{gamma}-m). At 100 MWd/kg, the cross-section uncertainty of this reaction induces an error of 6.63% on the Am{sup 242m} concentration.The uncertainties in the inventory of fission products reach up to 30%.

  9. Comparison of nuclear data uncertainty propagation methodologies for PWR burn-up simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Diez, Carlos Javier; Hoefer, Axel; Porsch, Dieter; Cabellos, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Several methodologies using different levels of approximations have been developed for propagating nuclear data uncertainties in nuclear burn-up simulations. Most methods fall into the two broad classes of Monte Carlo approaches, which are exact apart from statistical uncertainties but require additional computation time, and first order perturbation theory approaches, which are efficient for not too large numbers of considered response functions but only applicable for sufficiently small nuclear data uncertainties. Some methods neglect isotopic composition uncertainties induced by the depletion steps of the simulations, others neglect neutron flux uncertainties, and the accuracy of a given approximation is often very hard to quantify. In order to get a better sense of the impact of different approximations, this work aims to compare results obtained based on different approximate methodologies with an exact method, namely the NUDUNA Monte Carlo based approach developed by AREVA GmbH. In addition, the impact ...

  10. Effects of microstructural constraints on the transport of fission products in uranium dioxide at low burnups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Harn Chyi; Rudman, Karin; Krishnan, Kapil; McDonald, Robert; Dickerson, Patricia; Gong, Bowen; Peralta, Pedro

    2016-08-01

    Diffusion of fission gases in UO2 is studied at low burnups, before bubble growth and coalescence along grain boundaries (GBs) become dominant, using a 3-D finite element model that incorporates actual UO2 microstructures. Grain boundary diffusivities are assigned based on crystallography with lattice and GB diffusion coupled with temperature to account for temperature gradients. Heterogeneity of GB properties and connectivity can induce regions where concentration is locally higher than without GB diffusion. These regions are produced by "bottlenecks" in the GB network because of lack of connectivity among high diffusivity GBs due to crystallographic constraints, and they can lead to localized swelling. Effective diffusivities were calculated assuming a uniform distribution of high diffusivity among GBs. Results indicate an increase over the bulk diffusivity with a clear grain size effect and that connectivity and properties of different GBs become important factors on the variability of fission product concentration at the microscale.

  11. Accident source terms for boiling water reactors with high burnup cores.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

    2007-11-01

    The primary objective of this report is to provide the technical basis for development of recommendations for updates to the NUREG-1465 Source Term for BWRs that will extend its applicability to accidents involving high burnup (HBU) cores. However, a secondary objective is to re-examine the fundamental characteristics of the prescription for fission product release to containment described by NUREG-1465. This secondary objective is motivated by an interest to understand the extent to which research into the release and behaviors of radionuclides under accident conditions has altered best-estimate calculations of the integral response of BWRs to severe core damage sequences and the resulting radiological source terms to containment. This report, therefore, documents specific results of fission product source term analyses that will form the basis for the HBU supplement to NUREG-1465. However, commentary is also provided on observed differences between the composite results of the source term calculations performed here and those reflected NUREG-1465 itself.

  12. Propagation of Uncertainty in System Parameters of a LWR Model by Sampling MCNPX Calculations - Burnup Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolina, Daniel de A. M.; Lima, Claubia P. B.; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.

    2014-06-01

    For all the physical components that comprise a nuclear system there is an uncertainty. Assessing the impact of uncertainties in the simulation of fissionable material systems is essential for a best estimate calculation that has been replacing the conservative model calculations as the computational power increases. The propagation of uncertainty in a simulation using a Monte Carlo code by sampling the input parameters is recent because of the huge computational effort required. In this work a sample space of MCNPX calculations was used to propagate the uncertainty. The sample size was optimized using the Wilks formula for a 95th percentile and a two-sided statistical tolerance interval of 95%. Uncertainties in input parameters of the reactor considered included geometry dimensions and densities. It was showed the capacity of the sampling-based method for burnup when the calculations sample size is optimized and many parameter uncertainties are investigated together, in the same input.

  13. Burn-Up Determination by High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry: Axial and Diametral Scanning Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, R.S.; Blackadder, W.H.; Ronqvist, N.

    1967-02-15

    In the gamma spectrometric determination of burn-up the use of a single fission product as a monitor of the specimen fission rate is subject to errors caused by activity saturation or, in certain cases, fission product migration. Results are presented of experiments in which all the resolvable gamma peaks in the fission product spectrum have been used to calculate the fission rate; these results form a pattern which reflect errors in the literature values of the gamma branching ratios, fission yields etc., and also represent a series of empirical correction factors. Axial and diametral scanning experiments on a long-irradiated low-enrichment fuel element are also described and demonstrate that it is possible to differentiate between fissions in U-235 and in Pu-239 respectively by means of the ratios of the Ru-106 activity to the activities of the other fission products.

  14. Data Mining Techniques to Estimate Plutonium, Initial Enrichment, Burnup, and Cooling Time in Spent Fuel Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trellue, Holly Renee [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fugate, Michael Lynn [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tobin, Stephen Joesph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-19

    The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI), Office of Nonproliferation and Arms Control (NPAC), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored a multi-laboratory, university, international partner collaboration to (1) detect replaced or missing pins from spent fuel assemblies (SFA) to confirm item integrity and deter diversion, (2) determine plutonium mass and related plutonium and uranium fissile mass parameters in SFAs, and (3) verify initial enrichment (IE), burnup (BU), and cooling time (CT) of facility declaration for SFAs. A wide variety of nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques were researched to achieve these goals [Veal, 2010 and Humphrey, 2012]. In addition, the project includes two related activities with facility-specific benefits: (1) determination of heat content and (2) determination of reactivity (multiplication). In this research, a subset of 11 integrated NDA techniques was researched using data mining solutions at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for their ability to achieve the above goals.

  15. Investigation of the fundamental constants stability based on the reactor Oklo burn-up analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Onegin, M S

    2010-01-01

    The burn-up for SC56-1472 sample of the natural Oklo reactor zone 3 was calculated using the modern Monte Carlo codes. We reconstructed the neutron spectrum in the core by means of the isotope ratios: $^{147}$Sm/$^{148}$Sm and $^{176}$Lu/$^{175}$Lu. These ratios unambiguously determine the spectrum index and core temperature. The effective neutron absorption cross section of $^{149}$Sm calculated using this spectrum was compared with experimental one. The disagreement between these two values allows to limit a possible shift of the low laying resonance of $^{149}$Sm even more . Then, these limits were converted to the limits for the change of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$. We found that for the rate of $\\alpha$ change the inequality $|\\delta \\dot{\\alpha}/\\alpha| \\le 5\\cdot 10^{-18}$ is fulfilled, which is of the next higher order than our previous limit.

  16. Investigation of the Fundamental Constants Stability Based on the Reactor Oklo Burn-Up Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onegin, M. S.; Yudkevich, M. S.; Gomin, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    The burn-up of few samples of the natural Oklo reactor zones 3, 5 was calculated using the modern Monte Carlo code. We reconstructed the neutron spectrum in the core by means of the isotope ratios: 147Sm/148Sm and 176Lu/175Lu. These ratios unambiguously determine the water content and core temperature. The isotope ratio of the 149Sm in the sample calculated using this spectrum was compared with experimental one. The disagreement between these two values allows one to limit a possible shift of the low lying resonance of 149Sm. Then, these limits were converted to the limits for the change of the fine structure constant α. We have found out, that for the rate of α change, the inequality ěrt˙ {α }/α ěrt<= 5× 10-18 is fulfilled, which is one order higher than our previous limit.

  17. Development, implementation, and verification of multicycle depletion perturbation theory for reactor burnup analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, J.R.

    1980-08-01

    A generalized depletion perturbation formulation based on the quasi-static method for solving realistic multicycle reactor depletion problems is developed and implemented within the VENTURE/BURNER modular code system. The present development extends the original formulation derived by M.L. Williams to include nuclide discontinuities such as fuel shuffling and discharge. This theory is first described in detail with particular emphasis given to the similarity of the forward and adjoint quasi-static burnup equations. The specific algorithm and computational methods utilized to solve the adjoint problem within the newly developed DEPTH (Depletion Perturbation Theory) module are then briefly discussed. Finally, the main features and computational accuracy of this new method are illustrated through its application to several representative reactor depletion problems.

  18. Utilizing the burnup capability in MCNPX to perform depletion analysis of an MNSR fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boafo, Emmanuel [Ghana atomic Energy Commission, Accra (Ghana)

    2013-07-01

    The burnup capability in the MCNPX code was utilized to perform fuel depletion analysis of the MNSR LEU core by estimating the amount of fissile material (U-235) consumed as well as the amount of plutonium formed after the reactor core expected life. The decay heat removal rate for the MNSR after reactor shutdown was also investigated due to its significance to reactor safety. The results show that 0.568 % of U-235 was burnt up after 200 days of reactor operation while the amount of plutonium formed was not significant. The study also found that the decay heat decreased exponentially after reactor shutdown confirming that the decay heat will be removed from the system by natural circulation after shut down and hence safety of the reactor is assured.

  19. Evaluation of fission product worth margins in PWR spent nuclear fuel burnup credit calculations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomquist, R.N.; Finck, P.J.; Jammes, C.; Stenberg, C.G.

    1999-02-17

    Current criticality safety calculations for the transportation of irradiated LWR fuel make the very conservative assumption that the fuel is fresh. This results in a very substantial overprediction of the actual k{sub eff} of the transportation casks; in certain cases, this decreases the amount of spent fuel which can be loaded in a cask, and increases the cost of transporting the spent fuel to the repository. Accounting for the change of reactivity due to fuel depletion is usually referred to as ''burnup credit.'' The US DOE is currently funding a program aimed at establishing an actinide only burnup credit methodology (in this case, the calculated reactivity takes into account the buildup or depletion of a limited number of actinides). This work is undergoing NRC review. While this methodology is being validated on a significant experimental basis, it implicitly relies on additional margins: in particular, the absorption of neutrons by certain actinides and by all fission products is not taken into account. This provides an important additional margin and helps guarantee that the methodology is conservative provided these neglected absorption are known with reasonable accuracy. This report establishes the accuracy of fission product absorption rate calculations: (1) the analysis of European fission product worth experiments demonstrates that fission product cross-sections available in the US provide very good predictions of fission product worth; (2) this is confirmed by a direct comparison of European and US cross section evaluations; (3) accuracy of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) fission product content predictions is established in a recent ORNL report where several SNF isotopic assays are analyzed; and (4) these data are then combined to establish in a conservative manner the fraction of the predicted total fission product absorption which can be guaranteed based on available experimental data.

  20. Neutron transport-burnup code MCORGS and its application in fusion fission hybrid blanket conceptual research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xue-Ming; Peng, Xian-Jue

    2016-09-01

    Fusion science and technology has made progress in the last decades. However, commercialization of fusion reactors still faces challenges relating to higher fusion energy gain, irradiation-resistant material, and tritium self-sufficiency. Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactors (FFHR) can be introduced to accelerate the early application of fusion energy. Traditionally, FFHRs have been classified as either breeders or transmuters. Both need partition of plutonium from spent fuel, which will pose nuclear proliferation risks. A conceptual design of a Fusion Fission Hybrid Reactor for Energy (FFHR-E), which can make full use of natural uranium with lower nuclear proliferation risk, is presented. The fusion core parameters are similar to those of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. An alloy of natural uranium and zirconium is adopted in the fission blanket, which is cooled by light water. In order to model blanket burnup problems, a linkage code MCORGS, which couples MCNP4B and ORIGEN-S, is developed and validated through several typical benchmarks. The average blanket energy Multiplication and Tritium Breeding Ratio can be maintained at 10 and 1.15 respectively over tens of years of continuous irradiation. If simple reprocessing without separation of plutonium from uranium is adopted every few years, FFHR-E can achieve better neutronic performance. MCORGS has also been used to analyze the ultra-deep burnup model of Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) from LLNL, and a new blanket design that uses Pb instead of Be as the neutron multiplier is proposed. In addition, MCORGS has been used to simulate the fluid transmuter model of the In-Zinerater from Sandia. A brief comparison of LIFE, In-Zinerater, and FFHR-E will be given.

  1. Triton burnup study using scintillating fiber detector on JT-60U

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harano, Hideki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    1997-09-01

    The DT fusion reactor cannot be realized without knowing how the fusion-produced 3.5 MeV {alpha} particles behave. The {alpha} particles` behavior can be simulated using the 1 MeV triton. To investigate the 1 MeV triton`s behavior, a new type of directional 14 MeV neutron detector, scintillating fiber (Sci-Fi) detector has been developed and installed on JT-60U in the cooperation with LANL as part of a US-Japan collaboration. The most remarkable feature of the Sci-Fi detector is that the plastic scintillating fibers are employed for the neutron sensor head. The Sci-Fi detector measures and extracts the DT neutrons from the fusion radiation field in high time resolution (10 ms) and wide dynamic range (3 decades). Triton burnup analysis code TBURN has been made in order to analyze the time evolution of DT neutron emission rate obtained by the Sci-Fi detector. The TBURN calculations reproduced the measurements fairly well, and the validity of the calculation model that the slowing down of the 1 MeV triton was classical was confirmed. The Sci-Fi detector`s directionality indicated the tendency that the DT neutron emission profile became more and more peaked with the time progress. In this study, in order to examine the effect of the toroidal field ripple on the triton burnup, R{sub p}-scan and n{sub e}-scan experiments have been performed. The R{sub p}-scan experiment indicates that the triton`s transport was increased as the ripple amplitude over the triton became larger. In the n{sub e}-scan experiment, the DT neutron emission showed the characteristic changes after the gas puffing injection. It was theoretically confirmed that the gas puffing was effective for the collisionality scan. (J.P.N.) 127 refs.

  2. High burnup effects on fuel behaviour under accident conditions: the tests CABRI REP-Na

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Franz; Papin, Joelle

    A large, performance based, knowledge and experience in the field of nuclear fuel behaviour is available for nominal operation conditions. The database is continuously completed and precursor assembly irradiations are performed for testing of new materials and innovative designs. This procedure produces data and arguments to extend licencing limits in the permanent research for economic competitiveness. A similar effort must be devoted to the establishment of a database for fuel behaviour under off-normal and accident conditions. In particular, special attention must be given to the so-called design-basis-accident (DBA) conditions. Safety criteria are formulated for these situations and must be respected without consideration of the occurrence probability and the risk associated to the accident situation. The introduction of MOX fuel into the cores of light water reactors and the steadily increasing goal burnup of the fuel call for research work, both experimental and analytical, in the field of fuel response to DBA conditions. In 1992, a significant programme step, CABRI REP-Na, has been launched by the French Nuclear Safety and Protection Institute (IPSN) in the field of the reactivity initiated accident (RIA). After performing the nine experiments of the initial test matrix it can be concluded that important new findings have been evidenced. High burnup clad corrosion and the associated degradation of the mechanical properties of the ZIRCALOY4 clad is one of the key phenomena of the fuel behaviour under accident conditions. Equally important is the evidence that transient, dynamic fission gas effects resulting from the close to adiabatic heating introduces a new explosive loading mechanism which may lead to clad rupture under RIA conditions, especially in the case of heterogeneous MOX fuel.

  3. Transport and Burnup Numerical Simulation on the Liquid Blanket Burnup of In-Zinerater%In-Zinerater液态包层输运燃耗数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    师学明; 杨俊云; 刘成安

    2014-01-01

    Z-Pinch惯性约束聚变是未来一种有竞争力的能源候选方案。Z-Pinch驱动的聚变裂变混合堆可高效地嬗变反应堆乏燃料中分离出的超铀元素。对美国Sandia国家实验室提出的In-Zinerater混合堆概念进行了中子学分析和数值模拟。在三维输运燃耗耦合程序MCORGS中增加了处理在线添加燃料与去除裂变产物的功能,实现了对液态燃料燃耗过程的模拟。增加6Li丰度和燃料初装量保持寿期初反应性不变,可以减缓寿期内反应性下降趋势。逐步增加包层内超铀元素装量,可以控制整个寿期内反应性基本恒定。聚变功率取20 MW,通过反应性控制,5年内包层能量放大倍数在160∼180之间,氚增殖比在1.5∼1.7之间,优于In-Zinerater基准设计方案。%Z-Pinch Inertial confinement fusion is a competitive candidate for future energy solution. A fusion-fission hybrid driven by Z-Pinch can be used to transmute transuranic elements from spent fuels of reactors efficiently. Analysis and numerical simulation of blanket neutronics of In-Zinerater, which is a fusion-fission hybrid concept design in Sandia National Laboratories, is given in this paper. Modification to the three dimension transport and burnup code MCORGS are done, so as to simulate continuous feeding and continuous chemical processing of the liquid fuel. Different combination of initial enrichment of 6Li and fuels loading in the blanket are selected to keep the same reactivity at begin of core. By this way, the decreasing trend of reactivity at life of the core can be lowered. The reactivity can be maintained constant by increasing the fuel loading in the core gradually as the burnup deepens. Given a 20 MW fusion power, by reactivity control, the blanket energy multiplication is around 160∼180 and tritium breed ratio 1.5∼1.7 in 5 years, which is a better result than Sandia’s original design.

  4. Qualification of the B and W Mark B fuel assembly for high burnup. Third semi-annual progress report, July-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, T.A.

    1980-03-01

    Five Babcock and Wilcox-designed Mark B (15 x 15) pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies were irradiated to extended burnups in Duke Power Company's Oconee Unit 1 reactor. An assembly average burnup of 40,000 MWd/mtU, which is about 29% greater than previous discharge burnups at Oconee 1, was attained. The nondestructive examination of these five assemblies, which have been irradiated for four fuel cycles, was begun. Data obtained included fuel assembly and fuel dimensions, water channel spacings, fuel rod surface deposit samples, and holddown spring preload forces. Visual examination of the assemblies indicated that good fuel performance was maintained through four cycles of irradiation.

  5. DNase Sda1 allows invasive M1T1 Group A Streptococcus to prevent TLR9-dependent recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Uchiyama

    Full Text Available Group A Streptococcus (GAS has developed a broad arsenal of virulence factors that serve to circumvent host defense mechanisms. The virulence factor DNase Sda1 of the hyperinvasive M1T1 GAS clone degrades DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps allowing GAS to escape extracellular killing. TLR9 is activated by unmethylated CpG-rich bacterial DNA and enhances innate immune resistance. We hypothesized that Sda1 degradation of bacterial DNA could alter TLR9-mediated recognition of GAS by host innate immune cells. We tested this hypothesis using a dual approach: loss and gain of function of DNase in isogenic GAS strains and presence and absence of TLR9 in the host. Either DNA degradation by Sda1 or host deficiency of TLR9 prevented GAS induced IFN-α and TNF-α secretion from murine macrophages and contributed to bacterial survival. Similarly, in a murine necrotizing fasciitis model, IFN-α and TNF-α levels were significantly decreased in wild type mice infected with GAS expressing Sda1, whereas no such Sda1-dependent effect was seen in a TLR9-deficient background. Thus GAS Sda1 suppressed both the TLR9-mediated innate immune response and macrophage bactericidal activity. Our results demonstrate a novel mechanism of bacterial innate immune evasion based on autodegradation of CpG-rich DNA by a bacterial DNase.

  6. First-Principles Momentum Dependent Local Ansatz Approach to the Ground-State Properties of Iron-Group Transition Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakehashi, Yoshiro; Chandra, Sumal

    2016-08-01

    The ground-state properties of iron-group transition metals from Sc to Cu have been investigated on the basis of the first-principles momentum dependent local ansatz (MLA) theory. Correlation energy gain is found to show large values for Mn and Fe: 0.090 Ry (Mn) and 0.094 Ry (Fe). The Hund-rule coupling energies are found to be 3000 K (Fe), 1400 K (Co), and 300 K (Ni). It is suggested that these values can resolve the inconsistency in magnetic energy between the density functional theory and the first-principles dynamical coherent potential approximation theory at finite temperatures. Charge fluctuations are shown to be suppressed by the intra-orbital correlations and inter-orbital charge-charge correlations, so that they show nearly constant values from V to Fe: 1.57 (V and Cr), 1.52 (Mn), and 1.44 (Fe), which are roughly twice as large as those obtained by the d band model. The amplitudes of local moments are enhanced by the intra-orbital and inter-orbital spin-spin correlations and show large values for Mn and Fe: 2.87 (Mn) and 2.58 (Fe). These values are in good agreement with the experimental values estimated from the effective Bohr magneton number and the inner core photoemission data.

  7. Research and verification of Monte Carlo burnup calculations based on Chebyshev rational approximation method%基于切比雪夫有理逼近方法的蒙特卡罗燃耗计算研究与验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范文玎; 孙光耀; 张彬航; 陈锐; 郝丽娟

    2016-01-01

    -ADS benchmark.Conclusion:Depending on these results, the correctness of burnup calculations method implemented by this paper has been verified.

  8. Burnup determination of a fuel element concerning different cooling times; Seguimiento del quemado de un elemento combustible, para diferentes tiempos de enfriamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriquez, C.; Navarro, G.; Pereda, C.; Mutis, O. [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile). Dept. de Aplicaciones Nucleares. Unidad de Reactores; Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Zeituni, Carlos A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    In this work we report a complete set of measurements and some relevant results regarding the burnup process of a fuel element containing low enriched nuclear fuel. This fuel element was fabricated at the Plant of Fuel Elements of the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN). Measurements were carried out using gamma-ray spectroscopy and the absolute burnup of the fuel element was determined. (author)

  9. Evaluation technology for burnup and generated amount of plutonium by measurement of xenon isotopic ratio in dissolver off-gas at reprocessing facility (Joint research)

    OpenAIRE

    岡野 正紀; 久野 剛彦; 高橋 一朗; 白水 秀知; Charlton, W. S.; Wells, C. A.; Hemberger, P. H.; 山田 敬二; 酒井 敏雄

    2006-01-01

    The amount of Pu in the spent fuel was evaluated from Xe isotopic ratio in off-gas in reprocessing facility, is related to burnup. Six batches of dissolver off-gas at spent fuel dissolution process were sampled from the main stack in Tokai Reprocessing Plant during BWR fuel reprocessing campaign. Xenon isotopic ratio was determined with GC/MS. Burnup and generated amount of Pu were evaluated with Noble Gas Environmental Monitoring Application code (NOVA), developed by Los Alamos National Labo...

  10. THE INVESTIGATION OF BURNUP CHARACTERISTICS USING THE SERPENT MONTE CARLO CODE FOR A SODIUM COOLED FAST REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MEHMET E. KORKMAZ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, we investigated the burnup characteristics and the conversion of fertile 232Th into fissile 233U in the core of a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR. The SFR fuel assemblies were designed for burning 232Th fuel (fuel pin 1 and 233U fuel (fuel pin 2 and include mixed minor actinide compositions. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using Serpent Code1.1.19 to compare with CRAM (Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method and TTA (Transmutation Trajectory Analysis method in the burnup calculation mode. The total heating power generated in the system was assumed to be 2000 MWth. During the reactor operation period of 600 days, the effective multiplication factor (keff was between 0.964 and 0.954 and peaking factor is 1.88867.

  11. The investigation of burnup characteristics using the serpent Monte Carlo code for a sodium cooled fast reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkmaz, Mehmet E.; Agar, Osman [Karamanoglu Mehmetbey University, Faculty of Kamil Oezdag Science, Karaman (Turkmenistan)

    2014-06-15

    In this research, we investigated the burnup characteristics and the conversion of fertile {sup 232}Th into fissile {sup 233}U in the core of a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). The SFR fuel assemblies were designed for burning {sup 232}Th fuel (fuel pin 1) and {sup 233}U fuel (fuel pin 2) and include mixed minor actinide compositions. Monte Carlo simulations were performed using Serpent Code1.1.19 to compare with CRAM (Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method) and TTA (Transmutation Trajectory Analysis) method in the burnup calculation mode. The total heating power generated in the system was assumed to be 2000 MWth. During the reactor operation period of 600 days, the effective multiplication factor (keff) was between 0.964 and 0.954 and peaking factor is 1.88867.

  12. Study of irradiation induced restructuring of high burnup fuel - Use of computer and accelerator for fuel science and engineering -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sataka, M.; Ishikawa, N.; Chimn, Y.; Nakamura, J.; Amaya, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka Gun (Japan); Iwasawa, M.; Ohnuma, T.; Sonoda, T. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Kinoshita, M.; Geng, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Kaneta, Y. [The Univ. of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Yasunaga, K.; Matsumura, S.; Yasuda, K. [Kyushu Univ., Motooka (Japan); Iwase [Osaka Prefecture Univ., Osaka (Japan); Ichinomiya, T.; Nishiuran, Y. [Hokkaido Univ., Kitaku (Japan); Matzke, HJ. [Academy of Ceramics, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    In order to develop advanced fuel for future LWR reactors, trials were made to simulate the high burnup restructuring of the ceramics fuel, using accelerator irradiation out of pile and with computer simulation. The target is to reproduce the principal complex process as a whole. The reproduction of the grain subdivision (sub grain formation) was successful at experiments with sequential combined irradiation. It was made by recovery process of the accumulated dislocations, making cells and sub-boundaries at grain boundaries and pore surfaces. Details of the grain sub division mechanism is now in front of us outside of the reactor. Extensive computer science studies, first principle and molecular dynamics gave behavior of fission gas atoms and interstitial oxygen, assisting the high burnup restructuring.

  13. Coolant Density and Control Blade History Effects in Extended BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase investigates the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used for spent fuel pools to spent fuel storage and transportation casks and the validation of reactivity (keff) calculations and predicted spent fuel compositions. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents work performed to date investigating some aspects of extended BUC. (The technical basis for application of peak reactivity methods to BWR fuel in storage and transportation systems is presented in a companion paper.) Two reactor operating parameters are being evaluated to establish an adequate basis for extended BWR BUC: (1) the effect of axial void profile and (2) the effect of control blade utilization during operation. A detailed analysis of core simulator data for one cycle of a modern operating BWR plant was performed to determine the range of void profiles and the variability of the profile experienced during irradiation. Although a single cycle does not provide complete data, the data obtained are sufficient to determine the primary effects and to identify conservative modeling approaches. These data were used in a study of the effect of axial void profile. The first stage of the study was determination of the necessary moderator density temporal fidelity in depletion modeling. After the required temporal fidelity was established, multiple void profiles were used to examine the effect on cask reactivity. The results of these studies are being used to develop recommendations for conservatively modeling the void profile effects for BWR depletion calculations. The second operational parameter studied was control blade history. Control blades are inserted in

  14. Temperature and burnup correlated fuel-cladding chemical interaction in U-10ZR metallic fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmack, William J.

    Metallic fuels are proposed for use in advanced sodium cooled fast reactors and provide a number of advantages over other fuel types considering their fabricability, performance, recyclability, and safety. Resistance to cladding "breach" and subsequent release of fission products and fuel constituents to the nuclear power plant primary coolant system is a key performance parameter for a nuclear fuel system. In metallic fuel, FCCI weakens the cladding, especially at high power-high temperature operation, contributing to fuel pin breach. Empirical relationships for FCCI have been developed from a large body of data collected from in-pile (EBR-II) and out-of-pile experiments [1]. However, these relationships are unreliable in predicting FCCI outside the range of EBR-II experimental data. This dissertation examines new FCCI data extracted from the MFF-series of prototypic length metallic fuel irradiations performed in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The fuel in these assemblies operated a temperature and burnup conditions similar to that in EBR-II but with axial fuel height three times longer than EBR-II experiments. Comparing FCCI formation data from FFTF and EBR-II provides new insight into FCCI formation kinetics. A model is developed combining both production and diffusion of lanthanides to the fuel-cladding interface and subsequent reaction with the cladding. The model allows these phenomena to be influenced by fuel burnup (lanthanide concentrations) and operating temperature. Parameters in the model are adjusted to reproduce measured FCCI layer thicknesses from EBR-II and FFTF. The model predicts that, under appropriate conditions, rate of FCCI formation can be controlled by either fission product transport or by the reaction rate of the interaction species at the fuel-cladding interface. This dissertation will help forward the design of metallic fuel systems for advanced sodium cooled fast reactors by allowing the prediction of FCCI layer formation in full

  15. A feasibility study to determine cooling time and burnup of ATR fuel using a nondestructive technique and three types of gamma-ray detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, J.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Nigg, D.W. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this work was to perform a feasibility study and establish measurement techniques to determine the burnup of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuels at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Three different detectors of high purity germanium (HPGe), lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}), and high pressure xenon (HPXe) in two detection system configurations of below and above the water pool were used in this study. The last two detectors were used for the first time in fuel burnup measurements. The results showed that a better quality spectra can be achieved with the above the water pool configuration. Both short and long cooling time fuels were investigated in order to determine which measurement technique, absolute or fission product ratio, is better suited in each scenario and also to establish what type of detector should be used in each case for the best burnup measurement. The burnup and cooling time calibrations were established using experimental absolute activities or isotopic ratios and ORIGEN burnup calculations. A method was developed to do burnup and cooling time calibrations using fission isotopes activities without the need to know the exact geometry. (authors)

  16. In Comparative Analysis for Fuel Burnup of Fuel Assembly Designs for the 300 kW Small Medical Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambuu, Odmaa; Nanzad, Norov

    2009-03-01

    A 300 kW small medical reactor was designed to be used for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) at KAIST in 1996 [1]. In this paper, analysis for the core life cycle of the original design of the BNCT facility and modifications of the fuel assembly configuration and enrichment to get a proper life cycle were performed and a criticality, neutron flux distribution and fuel burnup calculations were carried out.

  17. Recent view to the results of pulse tests in the IGR reactor with high burn-up fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmolov, V.; Yegorova, L. [Russian Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-03-01

    Testing of 43 fuel elements (13 fuel elements with high burn-up fuel, 10 fuel elements with preirradiated cladding and fresh fuel, and 20 non-irradiated fuel elements) was carried out in the IGR pulse reactor with a half width of the reactor power pulse of about 0.7 sec. Tests were conducted in capsules with no coolant flow and with standard initial conditions in the capsule of 20{degrees}C and 0.2 MPa. Two types of coolant were used: water and air. One purpose of the test program was to determine the thresholds and mechanisms of fuel rod failure under RIA conditions for VVER fuel rods over their entire exposure range, from zero to high burn-up. These failure thresholds are often used in safety analyses. The tests and analyses were designed to reveal the influence on fuel rod failure of (1) the mechanical properties of the cladding, (2) the pellet-to-cladding gap, (3) fuel burn-up, (4) fuel-to-coolant heat transfer, and other parameters. The resulting data base can also be used for validation of computer codes used for analyzing fuel rod behavior. Three types of test specimens were used in the tests, and diagrams of these specimens are shown in Fig. 1. {open_quotes}Type-C{close_quotes} specimens were re-fabricated from commercial fuel rods of the VVER-1000 type that had been subjected to many power cycles of operation in the Novovoronezh Nuclear Power Plant (NV NPP). {open_quotes}Type-D{close_quotes} specimens were fabricated from the same commercial fuel rods used above, but the high burn-up oxide fuel was removed from the cladding and was replaced with fresh oxide fuel pellets. {open_quotes}Type-D{close_quotes} specimens thus provided a means of separating the effects of the cladding and the oxide fuel pellets and were used to examine cladding effects only.

  18. Characterization of the non-uniqueness of used nuclear fuel burnup signatures through a Mesh-Adaptive Direct Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skutnik, Steven E., E-mail: sskutnik@utk.edu; Davis, David R.

    2016-05-01

    The use of passive gamma and neutron signatures from fission indicators is a common means of estimating used fuel burnup, enrichment, and cooling time. However, while characteristic fission product signatures such as {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 154}Eu, and others are generally reliable estimators for used fuel burnup within the context where the assembly initial enrichment and the discharge time are known, in the absence of initial enrichment and/or cooling time information (such as when applying NDA measurements in a safeguards/verification context), these fission product indicators no longer yield a unique solution for assembly enrichment, burnup, and cooling time after discharge. Through the use of a new Mesh-Adaptive Direct Search (MADS) algorithm, it is possible to directly probe the shape of this “degeneracy space” characteristic of individual nuclides (and combinations thereof), both as a function of constrained parameters (such as the assembly irradiation history) and unconstrained parameters (e.g., the cooling time before measurement and the measurement precision for particular indicator nuclides). In doing so, this affords the identification of potential means of narrowing the uncertainty space of potential assembly enrichment, burnup, and cooling time combinations, thereby bounding estimates of assembly plutonium content. In particular, combinations of gamma-emitting nuclides with distinct half-lives (e.g., {sup 134}Cs with {sup 137}Cs and {sup 154}Eu) in conjunction with gross neutron counting (via {sup 244}Cm) are able to reasonably constrain the degeneracy space of possible solutions to a space small enough to perform useful discrimination and verification of fuel assemblies based on their irradiation history.

  19. Blood Group O-Dependent Cellular Responses to Cholera Toxin: Parallel Clinical and Epidemiological Links to Severe Cholera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, F Matthew; Santhanam, Srikanth; Kumar, Pardeep; Luo, Qingwei; Ciorba, Matthew A; Fleckenstein, James M

    2016-08-03

    Because O blood group has been associated with more severe cholera infections, it has been hypothesized that cholera toxin (CT) may bind non-O blood group antigens of the intestinal mucosae, thereby preventing efficient interaction with target GM1 gangliosides required for uptake of the toxin and activation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signaling in target epithelia. Herein, we show that after exposure to CT, human enteroids expressing O blood group exhibited marked increase in cAMP relative to cells derived from blood group A individuals. Likewise, using CRISPR/Cas9 engineering, a functional group O line (HT-29-A(-/-)) was generated from a parent group A HT-29 line. CT stimulated robust cAMP responses in HT-29-A(-/-) cells relative to HT-29 cells. These findings provide a direct molecular link between blood group O expression and differential cellular responses to CT, recapitulating clinical and epidemiologic observations.

  20. Meta-Analysis with Complex Research Designs: Dealing with Dependence from Multiple Measures and Multiple Group Comparisons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scammacca, Nancy; Roberts, Greg; Stuebing, Karla K.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that treating dependent effect sizes as independent inflates the variance of the mean effect size and introduces bias by giving studies with more effect sizes more weight in the meta-analysis. This article summarizes the different approaches to handling dependence that have been advocated by methodologists, some of…

  1. Dependence of X-Ray Luminosity on Temperature for Groups and Clusters with the Moving Median Statistics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈黎

    2002-01-01

    We re-analyse the relationship between the x-ray luminosity (Lx ) and the temperature (T) of groups and clusters of galaxies, based on the largest sample of 40 groups and 188 clusters. We employ the moving median statistics for the data set, along with the proper linear regression. Our newly established Lx - T relations for groups and clusters show no significant difference within statistical uncertainties, yielding LX ∝ T2.79±0.01 (groups) and LX ∝ T2.54±0.004 (clusters). This also supports the hierarchical scenario of structure formation in which groups are simply the scale-down version of clusters. It is argued that the break in the Lx - T relation on group scales detected in previous studies may suffer from sparse data sample and poor statistical methods.

  2. SEM Characterization of the High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Adam Robinson; Pavel Medvedev; James Madden; Dan Wachs; M. Teague

    2014-04-01

    During irradiation, the microstructure of U-7Mo evolves until at a fission density near 5x1021 f/cm3 a high-burnup microstructure exists that is very different than what was observed at lower fission densities. This microstructure is dominated by randomly distributed, relatively large, homogeneous fission gas bubbles. The bubble superlattice has collapsed in many microstructural regions, and the fuel grain sizes, in many areas, become sub-micron in diameter with both amorphous fuel and crystalline fuel present. Solid fission product precipitates can be found inside the fission gas bubbles. To generate more information about the characteristics of the high-fission density microstructure, three samples irradiated in the RERTR-7 experiment have been characterized using a scanning electron microscope equipped with a focused ion beam. The FIB was used to generate samples for SEM imaging and to perform 3D reconstruction of the microstructure, which can be used to look for evidence of possible fission gas bubble interlinkage.

  3. Propagation of Nuclear Data Uncertainties for ELECTRA Burn-up Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöstrand, H.; Alhassan, E.; Duan, J.; Gustavsson, C.; Koning, A. J.; Pomp, S.; Rochman, D.; Österlund, M.

    2014-04-01

    The European Lead-Cooled Training Reactor (ELECTRA) has been proposed as a training reactor for fast systems within the Swedish nuclear program. It is a low-power fast reactor cooled by pure liquid lead. In this work, we propagate the uncertainties in 239Pu transport data to uncertainties in the fuel inventory of ELECTRA during the reactor lifetime using the Total Monte Carlo approach (TMC). Within the TENDL project, nuclear models input parameters were randomized within their uncertainties and 740 239Pu nuclear data libraries were generated. These libraries are used as inputs to reactor codes, in our case SERPENT, to perform uncertainty analysis of nuclear reactor inventory during burn-up. The uncertainty in the inventory determines uncertainties in: the long-term radio-toxicity, the decay heat, the evolution of reactivity parameters, gas pressure and volatile fission product content. In this work, a methodology called fast TMC is utilized, which reduces the overall calculation time. The uncertainty of some minor actinides were observed to be rather large and therefore their impact on multiple recycling should be investigated further. It was also found that, criticality benchmarks can be used to reduce inventory uncertainties due to nuclear data. Further studies are needed to include fission yield uncertainties, more isotopes, and a larger set of benchmarks.

  4. Fuel burnup analysis of the TRIGA Mark II Reactor at the University of Pavia

    CERN Document Server

    Chiesa, Davide; Pozzi, Stefano; Previtali, Ezio; Sisti, Monica; Alloni, Daniele; Magrotti, Giovanni; Manera, Sergio; Prata, Michele; Salvini, Andrea; Cammi, Antonio; Zanetti, Matteo; Sartori, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    A time evolution model was developed to study fuel burnup for the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the University of Pavia. The results were used to predict the effects of a complete core reconfiguration and the accuracy of this prediction was tested experimentally. We used the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 to reproduce system neutronics in different operating conditions and to analyse neutron fluxes in the reactor core. The software that took care of time evolution, completely designed in-house, used the neutron fluxes obtained by MCNP5 to evaluate fuel consumption. This software was developed specifically to keep into account some features that differentiate experimental reactors from power ones, such as the daily ON/OFF cycle and the long fuel lifetime. These effects can not be neglected to properly account for neutron poison accumulation. We evaluated the effect of 48 years of reactor operation and predicted a possible new configuration for the reactor core: the objective was to remove some of the fuel elements from the...

  5. Cladding stress during extended storage of high burnup spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynaud, Patrick A. C.; Einziger, Robert E.

    2015-09-01

    In an effort to assess the potential for low temperature creep and delayed hydride cracking failures in high burnup spent fuel cladding during extended dry storage, the U.S. NRC analytical fuel performance tools were used to predict cladding stress during a 300 year dry storage period for UO2 fuel burned up to 65 GWd/MTU. Fuel swelling correlations were developed and used along with decay gas production and release fractions to produce circumferential average cladding stress predictions with the FRAPCON-3.5 fuel performance code. The resulting stresses did not result in cladding creep failures. The maximum creep strains accumulated were on the order of 0.54-1.04%, but creep failures are not expected below at least 2% strain. The potential for delayed hydride cracking was assessed by calculating the critical flaw size required to trigger this failure mechanism. The critical flaw size far exceeded any realistic flaw expected in spent fuel at end of reactor life.

  6. Fuel failure and fission gas release in high burnup PWR fuels under RIA conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuketa, Toyoshi; Sasajima, Hideo; Mori, Yukihide; Ishijima, Kiyomi

    1997-09-01

    To study the fuel behavior and to evaluate the fuel enthalpy threshold of fuel rod failure under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions, a series of experiments using pulse irradiation capability of the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) has been performed. During the experiments with 50 MWd/kg U PWR fuel rods (HBO test series; an acronym for high burnup fuels irradiated in Ohi unit 1 reactor), significant cladding failure occurred. The energy deposition level at the instant of the fuel failure in the test is 60 cal/g fuel, and is considerably lower than those expected and pre-evaluated. The result suggests that mechanical interaction between the fuel pellets and the cladding tube with decreased integrity due to hydrogen embrittlement causes fuel failure at the low energy deposition level. After the pulse irradiation, the fuel pellets were found as fragmented debris in the coolant water, and most of these were finely fragmented. This paper describes several key observations in the NSRR experiments, which include cladding failure at the lower enthalpy level, possible post-failure events and large fission gas release.

  7. Development and verification of fuel burn-up calculation model in a reduced reactor geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sembiring, Tagor Malem [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety (PTKRN), National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Kawasan PUSPIPTEK Gd. No. 80, Serpong, Tangerang 15310 (Indonesia)], E-mail: tagorms@batan.go.id; Liem, Peng Hong [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactor (RLNR), Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech), O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2008-02-15

    A fuel burn-up model in a reduced reactor geometry (2-D) is successfully developed and implemented in the Batan in-core fuel management code, Batan-FUEL. Considering the bank mode operation of the control rods, several interpolation functions are investigated which best approximate the 3-D fuel assembly radial power distributions across the core as function of insertion depth of the control rods. Concerning the applicability of the interpolation functions, it can be concluded that the optimal coefficients of the interpolation functions are not very sensitive to the core configuration and core or fuel composition in RSG GAS (MPR-30) reactor. Consequently, once the optimal interpolation function and its coefficients are derived then they can be used for 2-D routine operational in-core fuel management without repeating the expensive 3-D neutron diffusion calculations. At the selected fuel elements (at H-9 and G-6 core grid positions), the discrepancy of the FECFs (fuel element channel power peaking factors) between the 2-D and 3-D models are within the range of 3.637 x 10{sup -4}, 3.241 x 10{sup -4} and 7.556 x 10{sup -4} for the oxide, silicide cores with 250 g {sup 235}U/FE and the silicide core with 300 g {sup 235}U/FE, respectively.

  8. TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Dennis Keiser; Adam Robinson; James Madden; Pavel Medvedev; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01

    As an essential part of global nuclear non-proliferation effort, the RERTR program is developing low enriched U-Mo fuels (< 20% U-235) for use in research and test reactors that currently employ highly enriched uranium fuels. One type of fuel being developed is a dispersion fuel plate comprised of U-7Mo particles dispersed in Al alloy matrix. Recent TEM characterizations of the ATR irradiated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates include the samples with a local fission densities of 4.5, 5.2, 5.6 and 6.3 E+21 fissions/cm3 and irradiation temperatures of 101-136?C. The development of the irradiated microstructure of the U-7Mo fuel particles consists of fission gas bubble superlattice, large gas bubbles, solid fission product precipitates and their association to the large gas bubbles, grain subdivision to tens or hundreds of nanometer size, collapse of bubble superlattice, and amorphisation. This presentation will describe the observed microstructures specifically focusing on the U-7Mo fuel particles. The impact of the observed microstructure on the fuel performance and the comparison of the relevant features with that of the high burn-up UO2 fuels will be discussed.

  9. Fuel Burnup and Fuel Pool Shielding Analysis for Bushehr Nuclear Reactor VVER-1000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadad, Kamal; Ayobian, Navid

    Bushehr Nuclear power plant (BNPP) is currently under construction. The VVER-1000 reactor will be loaded with 126 tons of about 4% enriched fuel having 3-years life cycle. The spent fuel (SF) will be transferred into the spent fuel pool (SPF), where it stays for 8 years before being transferred to Russia. The SPF plays a crucial role during 8 years when the SP resides in there. This paper investigates the shielding of this structure as it is designed to shield the SF radiation. In this study, the SF isotope inventory, for different cycles and with different burnups, was calculated using WIMS/4D transport code. Using MCNP4C nuclear code, the intensity of γ rays was obtained in different layers of SFP shields. These layers include the water above fuel assemblies (FA) in pool, concrete wall of the pool and water laid above transferring fuels. Results show that γ rays leakage from the shield in the mentioned layers are in agreement with the plant's PSAR data. Finally we analyzed an accident were the water height above the FA in the pool drops to 47 cm. In this case it was observed that exposure dose above pool, 10 and 30 days from the accident, are still high and in the levels of 1000 and 758 R/hr.

  10. Propagation of nuclear data uncertainties for ELECTRA burn-up calculations

    CERN Document Server

    ostrand, H; Duan, J; Gustavsson, C; Koning, A; Pomp, S; Rochman, D; Osterlund, M

    2013-01-01

    The European Lead-Cooled Training Reactor (ELECTRA) has been proposed as a training reactor for fast systems within the Swedish nuclear program. It is a low-power fast reactor cooled by pure liquid lead. In this work, we propagate the uncertainties in Pu-239 transport data to uncertainties in the fuel inventory of ELECTRA during the reactor life using the Total Monte Carlo approach (TMC). Within the TENDL project the nuclear models input parameters were randomized within their uncertainties and 740 Pu-239 nuclear data libraries were generated. These libraries are used as inputs to reactor codes, in our case SERPENT, to perform uncertainty analysis of nuclear reactor inventory during burn-up. The uncertainty in the inventory determines uncertainties in: the long-term radio-toxicity, the decay heat, the evolution of reactivity parameters, gas pressure and volatile fission product content. In this work, a methodology called fast TMC is utilized, which reduces the overall calculation time. The uncertainty in the ...

  11. A feasibility and optimization study to determine cooling time and burnup of advanced test reactor fuels using a nondestructive technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Jorge [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method

  12. Structure-dependent tuning of electro-optic and thermoplastic properties in triphenyl groups containing molecular glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traskovskis, Kaspars, E-mail: kaspars.traskovskis@rtu.lv [Riga Technical University, Faculty of Materials Science and Applied Chemistry, 3/7 Paula Valdena Street, Riga LV-1048 (Latvia); Zarins, Elmars; Laipniece, Lauma [Riga Technical University, Faculty of Materials Science and Applied Chemistry, 3/7 Paula Valdena Street, Riga LV-1048 (Latvia); Tokmakovs, Andrejs [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Street, Riga LV-1063 (Latvia); Kokars, Valdis [Riga Technical University, Faculty of Materials Science and Applied Chemistry, 3/7 Paula Valdena Street, Riga LV-1048 (Latvia); Rutkis, Martins [Institute of Solid State Physics, University of Latvia, 8 Kengaraga Street, Riga LV-1063 (Latvia)

    2015-04-01

    The series of seven molecular compounds composed of D–π–A chromophores and triphenylmethyl auxiliary groups were characterized by UV–Vis spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry and quantum chemical calculations. Nonlinear optical (NLO) properties of compounds were determined by second harmonic generation measurements in corona poled thin glassy films. The results show that triphenylmethyl auxiliary groups are effective at shielding undesirable dipole interactions in solid phase thus increasing NLO efficiency of materials. Thermal stability up to 108 °C was achieved for a polar order in poled samples. - Highlights: • Triphenylmethyl groups can be used to reduce solid phase dipole interactions in organic molecular materials. • NLO efficiency of a poled material is higher, if a number of present triphenyl groups increases. • NLO efficiency of materials decreases, if polarity of used chromophores increases. • Thermal stability of polar order up to 108 °C can be achieved in poled organic glasses.

  13. Hybrid Pareto artificial bee colony algorithm for multi-objective single machine group scheduling problem with sequence-dependent setup times and learning effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Lei; Guan, Zailin; Saif, Ullah; Zhang, Fei; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Group scheduling is significant for efficient and cost effective production system. However, there exist setup times between the groups, which require to decrease it by sequencing groups in an efficient way. Current research is focused on a sequence dependent group scheduling problem with an aim to minimize the makespan in addition to minimize the total weighted tardiness simultaneously. In most of the production scheduling problems, the processing time of jobs is assumed as fixed. However, the actual processing time of jobs may be reduced due to "learning effect". The integration of sequence dependent group scheduling problem with learning effects has been rarely considered in literature. Therefore, current research considers a single machine group scheduling problem with sequence dependent setup times and learning effects simultaneously. A novel hybrid Pareto artificial bee colony algorithm (HPABC) with some steps of genetic algorithm is proposed for current problem to get Pareto solutions. Furthermore, five different sizes of test problems (small, small medium, medium, large medium, large) are tested using proposed HPABC. Taguchi method is used to tune the effective parameters of the proposed HPABC for each problem category. The performance of HPABC is compared with three famous multi objective optimization algorithms, improved strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm (SPEA2), non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm II (NSGAII) and particle swarm optimization algorithm (PSO). Results indicate that HPABC outperforms SPEA2, NSGAII and PSO and gives better Pareto optimal solutions in terms of diversity and quality for almost all the instances of the different sizes of problems.

  14. A Shriek From the Protomental System: Faint as a result of a failure in containing the group's latent dependency

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    One of Wilfred Bion's most original conceptsis the "protomental system" (PMS). This, which transcends clinical experience, he defined as a "hypothetical" place in human psyche where in the physical and the psychical are undifferentiated, and where in the non-operative basic assumptions are repressed as a result of aconspiracy between the dominant basic assumption group and the work group. According to the protomental system hypothesis, those repressed basic assumptions would form apsychosomat...

  15. Nuclear Data Uncertainty Propagation in Depletion Calculations Using Cross Section Uncertainties in One-group or Multi-group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, C. J.; Cabellos, O.; Martínez, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    Several approaches have been developed in last decades to tackle nuclear data uncertainty propagation problems of burn-up calculations. One approach proposed was the Hybrid Method, where uncertainties in nuclear data are propagated only on the depletion part of a burn-up problem. Because only depletion is addressed, only one-group cross sections are necessary, and hence, their collapsed one-group uncertainties. This approach has been applied successfully in several advanced reactor systems like EFIT (ADS-like reactor) or ESFR (Sodium fast reactor) to assess uncertainties on the isotopic composition. However, a comparison with using multi-group energy structures was not carried out, and has to be performed in order to analyse the limitations of using one-group uncertainties.

  16. Sphingolipid-dependent fusion of Semliki Forest virus with cholesterol-containing liposomes requires both the 3-hydroxyl group and the double bond of the sphingolipid backbone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corver, J; Moesby, Lise; Erukulla, R K;

    1995-01-01

    , we demonstrate that sphingolipid-dependent fusion of SFV with cholesterol-containing liposomes exhibits remarkable molecular specificity, the 3-hydroxyl group and the 4,5-trans carbon-carbon double bond of the sphingosine backbone being critical for the sphingolipid to mediate the process...

  17. Source Term Analysis for Reactor Coolant System with Consideration of Fuel Burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yu Jong; Ahn, Joon Gi; Hwang, Hae Ryong [KEPCO EnC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The radiation source terms in reactor coolant system (RCS) of pressurized water reactor (PWR) are basic design information for ALARA design such as radiation protection and shielding. Usually engineering companies own self-developed computer codes to estimate the source terms in RCS. DAMSAM and FIPCO are the codes developed by engineering companies. KEPCO E and C has developed computer code, RadSTAR, for use in the Radiation Source Term Analysis for Reactor coolant system during normal operation. The characteristics of RadSTAR are as follows. (1) RadSTAR uses fuel inventory data calculated by ORIGEN, such as ORIGEN2 or ORIGEN-S to consider effects of the fuel burnup. (2) RadSTAR estimates fission products by using finite differential method and analytic method to minimize numerical error. (3) RadSTAR enhances flexibility by adding the function to build the nuclide data library (production pathway library) for user-defined nuclides from ORIGEN data library. (4) RadSTAR consists of two modules. RadSTAR-BL is to build the nuclide data library. RadSTAR-ST is to perform numerical analysis on source terms. This paper includes descriptions on the numerical model, the buildup of nuclide data library, and the sensitivity analysis and verification of RadSTAR. KEPCO E and C developed RadSTAR to calculate source terms in RCS during normal operation. Sensitivity analysis and accuracy verification showed that RadSTAR keeps stability at Δt of 0.1 day and gives more accurate results in comparison with DAMSAM. After development, RadSTAR will replace DAMSAM. The areas, necessary to further development of RadSTAR, are addition of source term calculations for activation products and for shutdown operation.

  18. FY14 Status Report: CIRFT Testing Results on High Burnup UNF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Jiang, Hao [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a systematic study of SNF/UNF (spent nuclear fuel/or used nuclear fuel) integrity under simulated transportation environments by using hot cell testing technology developed recently at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), CIRFT (Cyclic Integrated Reversible-Bending Fatigue Tester). Under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) sponsorship, ORNL completed four benchmarking tests, four static tests, and twelve dynamic or cycle tests on H. B. Robinson (HBR) high burn-up (HBU) fuel. With support from the US Department of Energy and the NRC, CIRFT testing has been continued. The CIRFT testing was conducted on three HBR rods (R3, R4, and R5), with two specimens failed and one specimen un-failed. The total number of cycles in the test of un-failed specimens went over 2.23 107; the test was stopped as because the specimen did not show any sign of failure. The data analysis on all the HBR SNF rods demonstrated that it is necessary to characterize the fatigue life of used fuel rods in terms of both the curvature amplitude and the maximum of absolute of curvature extremes. The latter is significant because the maxima of extremes signify the maximum of tensile stress of the outer fiber of the bending rod. So far, a large variety of hydrogen contents has been covered in the CIRFT testing on HBR rods. It has been shown that the load amplitude is the dominant factor that controls the lifetime of bending rods, but the hydrogen content also has an important effect on the lifetime attained, according to the load range tested.

  19. Ion mobility studies of carbohydrates as group I adducts: isomer specific collisional cross section dependence on metal ion radius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuting; Dodds, Eric D

    2013-10-15

    Carbohydrates play numerous critical roles in biological systems. Characterization of oligosaccharide structures is essential to a complete understanding of their functions in biological processes; nevertheless, their structural determination remains challenging in part due to isomerism. Ion mobility spectrometry provides the means to resolve gas phase ions on the basis of their shape-to-charge ratios, thus providing significant potential for separation and differentiation of carbohydrate isomers. Here, we report on the determination of collisional cross sections for four groups of isomeric carbohydrates (including five isomeric disaccharides, four isomeric trisaccharides, two isomeric pentasaccharides, and two isomeric hexasaccharides) as their group I metal ion adducts (i.e., [M + Li](+), [M + Na](+), [M + K](+), [M + Rb](+), and [M + Cs](+)). In all, 65 collisional cross sections were measured, the great majority of which have not been previously reported. As anticipated, the collisional cross sections of the carbohydrate metal ion adducts generally increase with increasing metal ion radius; however, the collisional cross sections were found to scale with the group I cation size in isomer specific manners. Such measurements are of substantial analytical value, as they illustrate how the selection of charge carrier influences carbohydrate ion mobility determinations. For example, certain pairs of isomeric carbohydrates assume unique collisional cross sections upon binding one metal ion, but not another. On the whole, these data suggest a role for the charge carrier as a probe of carbohydrate structure and thus have significant implications for the continued development and application of ion mobility spectrometry for the distinction and resolution of isomeric carbohydrates.

  20. Accident source terms for pressurized water reactors with high-burnup cores calculated using MELCOR 1.8.5.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauntt, Randall O.; Powers, Dana Auburn; Ashbaugh, Scott G.; Leonard, Mark Thomas; Longmire, Pamela

    2010-04-01

    In this study, risk-significant pressurized-water reactor severe accident sequences are examined using MELCOR 1.8.5 to explore the range of fission product releases to the reactor containment building. Advances in the understanding of fission product release and transport behavior and severe accident progression are used to render best estimate analyses of selected accident sequences. Particular emphasis is placed on estimating the effects of high fuel burnup in contrast with low burnup on fission product releases to the containment. Supporting this emphasis, recent data available on fission product release from high-burnup (HBU) fuel from the French VERCOR project are used in this study. The results of these analyses are treated as samples from a population of accident sequences in order to employ approximate order statistics characterization of the results. These trends and tendencies are then compared to the NUREG-1465 alternative source term prescription used today for regulatory applications. In general, greater differences are observed between the state-of-the-art calculations for either HBU or low-burnup (LBU) fuel and the NUREG-1465 containment release fractions than exist between HBU and LBU release fractions. Current analyses suggest that retention of fission products within the vessel and the reactor coolant system (RCS) are greater than contemplated in the NUREG-1465 prescription, and that, overall, release fractions to the containment are therefore lower across the board in the present analyses than suggested in NUREG-1465. The decreased volatility of Cs2MoO4 compared to CsI or CsOH increases the predicted RCS retention of cesium, and as a result, cesium and iodine do not follow identical behaviors with respect to distribution among vessel, RCS, and containment. With respect to the regulatory alternative source term, greater differences are observed between the NUREG-1465 prescription and both HBU and LBU predictions than exist between HBU and LBU

  1. Study of the triton-burnup process in different JET scenarios using neutron monitor based on CVD diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtsev, G.; Amosov, V.; Meshchaninov, S.; Popovichev, S.; Rodionov, R.

    2016-11-01

    We present the results of analysis of triton burn-up process using the data from diamond detector. Neutron monitor based on CVD diamond was installed in JET torus hall close to the plasma center. We measure the part of 14 MeV neutrons in scenarios where plasma current varies in a range of 1-3 MA. In this experiment diamond neutron monitor was also able to detect strong gamma bursts produced by runaway electrons arising during the disruptions. We can conclude that CVD diamond detector will contribute to the study of fast particles confinement and help predict the disruption events in future tokamaks.

  2. On the use of SERPENT Monte Carlo code to generate few group diffusion constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piovezan, Pamela, E-mail: pamela.piovezan@ctmsp.mar.mil.b [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Carluccio, Thiago; Domingos, Douglas Borges; Rossi, Pedro Russo; Mura, Luiz Felipe, E-mail: fermium@cietec.org.b, E-mail: thiagoc@ipen.b [Fermium Tecnologia Nuclear, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The accuracy of diffusion reactor codes strongly depends on the quality of the groups constants processing. For many years, the generation of such constants was based on 1-D infinity cell transport calculations. Some developments using collision probability or the method of characteristics allow, nowadays, 2-D assembly group constants calculations. However, these 1-D and 2-D codes how some limitations as , for example, on complex geometries and in the neighborhood of heavy absorbers. On the other hand, since Monte Carlos (MC) codes provide accurate neutro flux distributions, the possibility of using these solutions to provide group constants to full-core reactor diffusion simulators has been recently investigated, especially for the cases in which the geometry and reactor types are beyond the capability of the conventional deterministic lattice codes. The two greatest difficulties on the use of MC codes to group constant generation are the computational costs and the methodological incompatibility between analog MC particle transport simulation and deterministic transport methods based in several approximations. The SERPENT code is a 3-D continuous energy MC transport code with built-in burnup capability that was specially optimized to generate these group constants. In this work, we present the preliminary results of using the SERPENT MC code to generate 3-D two-group diffusion constants for a PWR like assembly. These constants were used in the CITATION diffusion code to investigate the effects of the MC group constants determination on the neutron multiplication factor diffusion estimate. (author)

  3. The origin of multiply sigmoid curves of pH-dependence. The partitioning of groups among titration pK values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, H B; Clarke, S D; Smith, G A; Carne, T K

    1991-08-15

    An acid, HnA, with n ionizing groups is known to have the same titration curve as an equimolar mixture of n hypothetical monobasic acids, whose dissociation constants are known as the 'titration constants' of the real acid. We show that the pH-dependence of any property of HnA is also represented by the sum of one-site titration curves, characterized by these same titration constants. Since one such property is the degree of dissociation of one of the dissociating groups, a fraction of each group shows each of the various titration pK values, so that the group partitions among them. The n groups therefore share the same n titration pK values but differ in the fractions belonging to each. The one H+ ion per molecule that titrates with each pK is thus made up of the fractions, one from each group, that share this pK value. A group may possess a single pK value, in that it contributes virtually all of this pK and almost nothing to the others, only if either (1) in titrates in a different pH range from the other groups or (2) its affinity for H+ is unaffected by their ionization state.

  4. Efficient and Accurate Calculation of Burnup Problems with Short-Lived Nuclides by a Krylov Subspace Method with the Newton Divided Difference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yoon Hee; Cho, Nam Zin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    Nowadays lattice physics codes tend to utilize a detailed burnup chain including short-lived nuclides in order to perform more accurate burnup calculations. But, since production codes, for example, ORIGEN2, take account of nuclides which have relatively long half-life, it is inappropriate for such detailed burnup chain calculation. To enhance that drawback, many matrix exponential calculation methods have been developed. Recently, a Krylov subspace method with the PADE approximation was used. In this paper, a Krylov subspace method based on spectral decomposition property of the matrix function theory with the Newton divided difference (NDD) is introduced. It is tested with a sample problem and compared with simple Taylor expansion method

  5. Chemical states of fission products in irradiated (U 0.3Pu 0.7)C 1+ x fuel at high burn-ups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Renu; Venugopal, V.

    2006-12-01

    The chemical states of fission products have been theoretically determined for the irradiated carbide fuel of Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam, India, at different burn-ups. The SOLGASMIX-PV computer code was used to determine the equilibrium chemical composition of the fuel. The system was assumed to be composed of a gaseous phase at one atmosphere pressure, and various solid phases. The distribution of elements in these phases and their chemical states at different temperatures were calculated as a function of burn-up. The FBTR fuel, (U 0.3Pu 0.7)C 1+ x, was loaded with C/M values in the range, 1.03-1.06. The present calculations indicated that even for the lowest starting C/M of 1.03 in the FBTR fuel, the liquid metal phase of (U, Pu), should not appear at a burn-up as high as 150 GWd/t.

  6. Instant release of fission products in leaching experiments with high burn-up nuclear fuels in the framework of the Euratom project FIRST- Nuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, K.; González-Robles, E.; Kienzler, B.; Curti, E.; Serrano-Purroy, D.; Sureda, R.; Martínez-Torrents, A.; Roth, O.; Slonszki, E.; Mennecart, T.; Günther-Leopold, I.; Hózer, Z.

    2017-02-01

    The instant release of fission products from high burn-up UO2 fuels and one MOX fuel was investigated by means of leach tests. The samples covered PWR and BWR fuels at average rod burn-up in the range of 45-63 GWd/tHM and included clad fuel segments, fuel segments with opened cladding, fuel fragments and fuel powder. The tests were performed with sodium chloride - bicarbonate solutions under oxidizing conditions and, for one test, in reducing Ar/H2 atmosphere. The iodine and cesium release could be partially explained by the differences in sample preparation, leading to different sizes and properties of the exposed surface areas. Iodine and cesium releases tend to correlate with FGR and linear power rating, but the scatter of the data is significant. Although the gap between the fuel and the cladding was closed in some high burn-up samples, fissures still provide possible preferential transport pathways.

  7. The impact of phenotypic appearance on body weight and egg production in laying hens: a group-size- and experience-dependent phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, R H; Liste, M G; Campderrich, I; Estevez, I

    2014-07-01

    Alterations of birds' phenotypic appearance (PA) may lead to unwanted behaviors, potentially impairing poultry welfare, health, and productive performance. Likewise, group size may play an important role modulating the expression of adaptive behaviors. This study evaluates whether changes in the PA of Hy-line Brown laying hens may affect their BW and egg production, and if so, whether these effects depend on group size. A total of 1,050 one-day-old chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of 45 pens. Groups were of 10, 20, or 40 individuals (8 hens/m(2)). At arrival, the PA of 0, 30, 50, 70, or 100% of the birds within each group was artificially altered by marking the back of their heads black. The remaining birds within groups were unaltered. The 30% marked hens within groups of 10 individuals had a lower BW at 24 wk of age than their 70% unmarked counterparts, whereas the other groups showed similar BW. No differences were detected in egg laying performance during this phase. Next, within the initially homogeneous groups (0 and 100%), 30, 50, and 70% of the hens were either marked or unmarked (PA changed) sequentially at 34, 38, and 44 wk of age. Hens within the initially heterogeneous groups of 30, 50, and 70% marked birds remained unchanged and were used as controls. Groups of 40 individuals showed a reduction in BW gain and weekly hen-day-egg production after 30% PA changes, as compared with control counterparts. No differences were found in pens of 10 hens, and the groups of 20 showed intermediate results. A transient reduction in egg production was found after 50% PA changes. No further productive effects were observed after 70% changes. Our findings suggest that differences in hen appearance, which may occur due to variations in health status, injuries, and other natural causes, can be critical for production and welfare management practices depending both on the flock size and the birds' previous experience in exposure to group phenotypic heterogeneity.

  8. Changes in bird functional diversity across multiple land uses: interpretations of functional redundancy depend on functional group identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Gary W; Carter, Andrew; Smallbone, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Examinations of the impact of land-use change on functional diversity link changes in ecological community structure driven by land modification with the consequences for ecosystem function. Yet, most studies have been small-scale, experimental analyses and primarily focussed on plants. There is a lack of research on fauna communities and at large-scales across multiple land uses. We assessed changes in the functional diversity of bird communities across 24 land uses aligned along an intensification gradient. We tested the hypothesis that functional diversity is higher in less intensively used landscapes, documented changes in diversity using four diversity metrics, and examined how functional diversity varied with species richness to identify levels of functional redundancy. Functional diversity, measured using a dendogram-based metric, increased from high to low intensity land uses, but observed values did not differ significantly from randomly-generated expected values. Values for functional evenness and functional divergence did not vary consistently with land-use intensification, although higher than expected values were mostly recorded in high intensity land uses. A total of 16 land uses had lower than expected values for functional dispersion and these were mostly low intensity native vegetation sites. Relations between functional diversity and bird species richness yielded strikingly different patterns for the entire bird community vs. particular functional groups. For all birds and insectivores, functional evenness, divergence and dispersion showed a linear decline with increasing species richness suggesting substantial functional redundancy across communities. However, for nectarivores, frugivores and carnivores, there was a significant hump-shaped or non-significant positive linear relationship between these functional measures and species richness indicating less redundancy. Hump-shaped relationships signify that the most functionally diverse

  9. Solvation free energy of the peptide group: its model dependence and implications for the additive-transfer free-energy model of protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomar, Dheeraj S; Asthagiri, D; Weber, Valéry

    2013-09-17

    The group-additive decomposition of the unfolding free energy of a protein in an osmolyte solution relative to that in water poses a fundamental paradox: whereas the decomposition describes the experimental results rather well, theory suggests that a group-additive decomposition of free energies is, in general, not valid. In a step toward resolving this paradox, here we study the peptide-group transfer free energy. We calculate the vacuum-to-solvent (solvation) free energies of (Gly)n and cyclic diglycine (cGG) and analyze the data according to experimental protocol. The solvation free energies of (Gly)n are linear in n, suggesting group additivity. However, the slope interpreted as the free energy of a peptide unit differs from that for cGG scaled by a factor of half, emphasizing the context dependence of solvation. However, the water-to-osmolyte transfer free energies of the peptide unit are relatively independent of the peptide model, as observed experimentally. To understand these observations, a way to assess the contribution to the solvation free energy of solvent-mediated correlation between distinct groups is developed. We show that linearity of solvation free energy with n is a consequence of uniformity of the correlation contributions, with apparent group-additive behavior in the water-to-osmolyte transfer arising due to their cancellation. Implications for inferring molecular mechanisms of solvent effects on protein stability on the basis of the group-additive transfer model are suggested.

  10. H-bond length dependence of the distortion in acid tetrahedron groups H nAsO 4 ( n=1-3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, Mizuhiko

    1988-07-01

    The H-bond length O⋯O dependence of the distortions of the AsO 4 tetrahedra of acid arsenate groups H nAsO 4 ( n=1-3) have been studied by examining the correlations of the As sbnd O bond lengths, OAsO angles, O sbnd O lengths and Baur's distortion indices (DI) with O⋯O and comparing them with those of the corresponding H nPO 4 groups previously reported. The behavior of the O⋯O dependence of the AsO 4 distortion is analogous to that of PO 4 distortion as a whole, that is (a) all DI increase with increasing O⋯O, and correspondingly some of the individual or average As sbnd O lengths, OAsO angles and O sbnd O lengths correlate with O⋯O consistently; (b) the overall mean values of As sbnd O, OAsO and O sbnd O are reasonably constant in each H nAsO 4 type, most notably in the case of OAsO. The dependence of the PO 4 distortion on O⋯O can be described approximately by a model in which the P atom shifts away from the centroid of the regular tetrahedral framework, but the O⋯O dependence of the AsO 4 distortion is more complicated.

  11. The expansion of thymopoiesis in neonatal mice is dependent on expression of high mobility group a 2 protein (Hmga2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berent-Maoz, Beata; Montecino-Rodriguez, Encarnacion; Fice, Michael; Casero, David; Seet, Christopher S; Crooks, Gay M; Lowry, William; Dorshkind, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Cell number in the mouse thymus increases steadily during the first two weeks after birth. It then plateaus and begins to decline by seven weeks after birth. The factors governing these dramatic changes in cell production are not well understood. The data herein correlate levels of High mobility group A 2 protein (Hmga2) expression with these temporal changes in thymopoiesis. Hmga2 is expressed at high levels in murine fetal and neonatal early T cell progenitors (ETP), which are the most immature intrathymic precursors, and becomes almost undetectable in these progenitors after 5 weeks of age. Hmga2 expression is critical for the initial, exponential expansion of thymopoiesis, as Hmga2 deficient mice have a deficit of ETPs within days after birth, and total thymocyte number is repressed compared to wild type littermates. Finally, our data raise the possibility that similar events occur in humans, because Hmga2 expression is high in human fetal thymic progenitors and falls in these cells during early infancy.

  12. The expansion of thymopoiesis in neonatal mice is dependent on expression of high mobility group a 2 protein (Hmga2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Berent-Maoz

    Full Text Available Cell number in the mouse thymus increases steadily during the first two weeks after birth. It then plateaus and begins to decline by seven weeks after birth. The factors governing these dramatic changes in cell production are not well understood. The data herein correlate levels of High mobility group A 2 protein (Hmga2 expression with these temporal changes in thymopoiesis. Hmga2 is expressed at high levels in murine fetal and neonatal early T cell progenitors (ETP, which are the most immature intrathymic precursors, and becomes almost undetectable in these progenitors after 5 weeks of age. Hmga2 expression is critical for the initial, exponential expansion of thymopoiesis, as Hmga2 deficient mice have a deficit of ETPs within days after birth, and total thymocyte number is repressed compared to wild type littermates. Finally, our data raise the possibility that similar events occur in humans, because Hmga2 expression is high in human fetal thymic progenitors and falls in these cells during early infancy.

  13. Surface modification of bacterial cellulose nanofibers for property enhancement of optically transparent composites: dependence on acetyl-group DS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifuku, Shinsuke; Nogi, Masaya; Abe, Kentaro; Handa, Keishin; Nakatsubo, Fumiaki; Yano, Hiroyuki

    2007-06-01

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) nanofibers were acetylated to enhance the properties of optically transparent composites of acrylic resin reinforced with the nanofibers. A series of BC nanofibers acetylated from degree-of-substitution (DS) 0 to 1.76 were obtained. X-ray diffraction profiles indicated that acetylation proceeded from the surface to the core of BC nanofibers, and scanning electron microscopy images showed that the volume of nanofibers increases by the bulky acetyl group. Since acetylation decreased the refractive index of cellulose, regular transmittance of composites comprised of 63% BC nanofiber was improved, and deterioration at 580 nm because of fiber reinforcement was suppressed to only 3.4%. Acetylation of nanofibers changed their surface properties and reduced the moisture content of the composite to about one-third that of untreated composite, although excessive acetylation increased hygroscopicity. Furthermore, acetylation was found to reduce the coefficient of thermal expansion of a BC sheet from 3 x 10(-6) to below 1 x 10(-6) 1/K.

  14. Accident source terms for light-water nuclear power plants using high-burnup or MOX fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salay, Michael (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Gauntt, Randall O.; Lee, Richard Y. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, D.C.); Powers, Dana Auburn; Leonard, Mark Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Representative accident source terms patterned after the NUREG-1465 Source Term have been developed for high burnup fuel in BWRs and PWRs and for MOX fuel in a PWR with an ice-condenser containment. These source terms have been derived using nonparametric order statistics to develop distributions for the timing of radionuclide release during four accident phases and for release fractions of nine chemical classes of radionuclides as calculated with the MELCOR 1.8.5 accident analysis computer code. The accident phases are those defined in the NUREG-1465 Source Term - gap release, in-vessel release, ex-vessel release, and late in-vessel release. Important differences among the accident source terms derived here and the NUREG-1465 Source Term are not attributable to either fuel burnup or use of MOX fuel. Rather, differences among the source terms are due predominantly to improved understanding of the physics of core meltdown accidents. Heat losses from the degrading reactor core prolong the process of in-vessel release of radionuclides. Improved understanding of the chemistries of tellurium and cesium under reactor accidents changes the predicted behavior characteristics of these radioactive elements relative to what was assumed in the derivation of the NUREG-1465 Source Term. An additional radionuclide chemical class has been defined to account for release of cesium as cesium molybdate which enhances molybdenum release relative to other metallic fission products.

  15. Study on core radius minimization for long life Pb-Bi cooled CANDLE burnup scheme based fast reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifah, Maryam; Miura, Ryosuke; Su'ud, Zaki; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, H.

    2015-09-01

    Fast Breeder Reactor had been interested to be developed over the world because it inexhaustible source energy, one of those is CANDLE reactor which is have strategy in burn-up scheme, need not control roads for control burn-up, have a constant core characteristics during energy production and don't need fuel shuffling. The calculation was made by basic reactor analysis which use Sodium coolant geometry core parameter as a reference core to study on minimum core reactor radius of CANDLE for long life Pb-Bi cooled, also want to perform pure coolant effect comparison between LBE and sodium in a same geometry design. The result show that the minimum core radius of Lead Bismuth cooled CANDLE is 100 cm and 500 MWth thermal output. Lead-Bismuth coolant for CANDLE reactor enable to reduce much reactor size and have a better void coefficient than Sodium cooled as the most coolant for FBR, then we will have a good point in safety analysis.

  16. Benchmark calculation of SCALE-PC 4.3 CSAS6 module and burnup credit criticality analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Hee Sung; Ro, Seong Gy; Shin, Young Joon; Kim, Ik Soo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-12-01

    Calculation biases of SCALE-PC CSAS6 module for PWR spent fuel, metallized spent fuel and solution of nuclear materials have been determined on the basis of the benchmark to be 0.01100, 0.02650 and 0.00997, respectively. With the aid of the code system, nuclear criticality safety analysis for the spent fuel storage pool has been carried out to determine the minimum burnup of spent fuel required for safe storage. The criticality safety analysis is performed using three types of isotopic composition of spent fuel: ORIGEN2-calculated isotopic compositions; the conservative inventory obtained from the multiplication of ORIGEN2-calculated isotopic compositions by isotopic correction factors; the conservative inventory of only U, Pu and {sup 241}Am. The results show that the minimum burnup for three cases are 990,6190 and 7270 MWd/tU, respectively in the case of 5.0 wt% initial enriched spent fuel. (author). 74 refs., 68 figs., 35 tabs.

  17. Dependence of the Sunspot-group Size on the Level of Solar Activity and its Influence on the Calibration of Solar Observers

    CERN Document Server

    Usoskin, I G; Chatzistergos, T

    2016-01-01

    The distribution of the sunspot group size (area) and its dependence on the level of solar activity is studied. It is shown that the fraction of small groups is not constant but decreases with the level of solar activity so that high solar activity is largely defined by big groups. We study the possible influence of solar activity on the ability of a realistic observer to see and report the daily number of sunspot groups. It is shown that the relation between the number of sunspot groups as seen by different observers with different observational acuity thresholds is strongly non-linear and cannot be approximated by the traditionally used linear scaling ($k-$factors). The observational acuity threshold [$A_{\\rm th}$] is considered to quantify the quality of each observer, instead of the traditional relative $k-$factor. A nonlinear $c-$factor based on $A_{\\rm th}$ is proposed, which can be used to correct each observer to the reference conditions. The method is tested on a pair of principal solar observers, Wo...

  18. Anomalous role change of tertiary amino and ester groups as hydrogen acceptors in eudragit E based solid dispersion depending on the concentration of naproxen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Shinobu; Kikuchi, Junko; Ida, Yasuo; Kadota, Kazunori; Tozuka, Yuichi

    2015-04-01

    Eudragit E (EGE) is a basic polymer incorporating tertiary amino and ester groups. The role of the functional groups of EGE in the formation of solid dispersion (SD) with Naproxen (NAP) was investigated. The glass transition temperature (Tg) of EGE decreased with the plasticizing effect of NAP up to 20% weight ratio. Addition of NAP at over 30% induced a rise in Tg, with the maximum value being reached at 60% NAP. Further addition of NAP led to a rapid drop of the Tg. A dramatic difference of physical stability between the SDs including 60 and 70% NAP was confirmed. The SD including 70% NAP rapidly crystallized at 40 °C with 75% relative humidity, while the amorphous state could be maintained over 6 months in the SD with 60% NAP. The infrared and (13)C solid state-NMR spectra of the SDs suggested a formation of ionic interaction between the carboxylic acid of NAP and the amino group of EGE. The SD with 20% NAP raised the (13)C spin-lattice relaxation (T1) of the amino group, but it decreased with over 30% NAP. The change in the (13)C-T1 disappeared with 70% NAP. The (13)C-T1 of the ester group rose depending on the amount of NAP. From these findings, we concluded that the role as hydrogen acceptor shifted from the amine to the ester group with an increase in amount of NAP. Furthermore, the amino group of EGE did not contribute to the interaction at over 70% NAP. These phenomena could be strongly correlated with Tg and stability.

  19. Burn-up calculation of different thorium-based fuel matrixes in a thermal research reactor using MCNPX 2.6 code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamzadeh Zohreh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Decrease of the economically accessible uranium resources and the inherent proliferation resistance of thorium fuel motivate its application in nuclear power systems. Estimation of the nuclear reactor’s neutronic parameters during different operational situations is of key importance for the safe operation of nuclear reactors. In the present research, thorium oxide fuel burn-up calculations for a demonstrative model of a heavy water- -cooled reactor have been performed using MCNPX 2.6 code. Neutronic parameters for three different thorium fuel matrices loaded separately in the modelled thermal core have been investigated. 233U, 235U and 239Pu isotopes have been used as fissile element in the thorium oxide fuel, separately. Burn-up of three different fuels has been calculated at 1 MW constant power. 135X and 149Sm concentration variations have been studied in the modelled core during 165 days burn-up. Burn-up of thorium oxide enriched with 233U resulted in the least 149Sm and 135Xe productions and net fissile production of 233U after 165 days. The negative fuel, coolant and void reactivity of the used fuel assures safe operation of the modelled thermal core containing (233U-Th O2 matrix. Furthermore, utilisation of thorium breeder fuel demonstrates several advantages, such as good neutronic economy, 233U production and less production of long-lived α emitter high radiotoxic wastes in biological internal exposure point of view

  20. Estimate of fuel burnup spatial a multipurpose reactor in computer simulation; Estimativa da queima espacial do combustivel de um reator multiproposito por simulacao computacional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Nadia Rodrigues dos, E-mail: nadia.santos@ifrj.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Rio de Janeiro (IFRJ), Paracambi, RJ (Brazil); Lima, Zelmo Rodrigues de; Moreira, Maria de Lourdes, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br, E-mail: zrlima@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    In previous research, which aimed, through computer simulation, estimate the spatial fuel burnup for the research reactor benchmark, material test research - International Atomic Energy Agency (MTR/IAEA), it was found that the use of the code in FORTRAN language, based on the diffusion theory of neutrons and WIMSD-5B, which makes cell calculation, bespoke be valid to estimate the spatial burnup other nuclear research reactors. That said, this paper aims to present the results of computer simulation to estimate the space fuel burnup of a typical multipurpose reactor, plate type and dispersion. the results were considered satisfactory, being in line with those presented in the literature. for future work is suggested simulations with other core configurations. are also suggested comparisons of WIMSD-5B results with programs often employed in burnup calculations and also test different methods of interpolation values obtained by FORTRAN. Another proposal is to estimate the burning fuel, taking into account the thermohydraulics parameters and the appearance of xenon. (author)

  1. Corrosion studies with high burnup light water reactor fuel. Release of nuclides into simulated groundwater during accumulated contact time of up to two years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwicky, Hans-Urs (Zwicky Consulting GmbH, Remigen (Switzerland)); Low, Jeanett; Ekeroth, Ella (Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden))

    2011-03-15

    In the framework of comprehensive research work supporting the development of a Swedish concept for the disposal of highly radioactive waste and spent fuel, Studsvik has performed a significant number of spent fuel corrosion studies under a variety of different conditions. These experiments, performed between 1990 and 2002, covered a burnup range from 27 to 49 MWd/kgU, which was typical for fuel to be disposed at that time. As part of this work, the so called Series 11 tests were performed under oxidising conditions in synthetic groundwater with fuel samples from a rod irradiated in the Ringhals 1 Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). In the meantime, Swedish utilities tend to increase the discharge burnup of fuel operated in their reactors. This means that knowledge of spent fuel corrosion performance has to be extended to higher burnup as well. Therefore, a series of experiments has been started at Studsvik, aiming at extending the data base acquired in the Series 11 corrosion tests to higher burnup fuel. Fuel burnup leads to complex and significant changes in the composition and properties of the fuel. The transformed microstructure, which is referred to as the high burnup structure or rim structure in the outer region of the fuel, consists of small grains of submicron size and a high concentration of pores of typical diameter 1 to 2 mum. This structure forms in UO{sub 2} fuel at a local burnup above 50 MWd/kgU, as long as the temperature is below 1,000-1,100 deg C. The high burnup at the pellet periphery is the consequence of plutonium build-up by neutron capture in 238U followed by fission of the formed plutonium. The amount of fission products in the fuel increases more or less linearly with burnup, in contrast to alpha emitting actinides that increase above average. As burnup across a spent fuel pellet is not uniform, but increases towards the periphery, the radiation field is also larger at the pellet surface. At the same time, it is easier for water to access the

  2. A study of fuel failure behavior in high burnup HTGR fuel. Analysis by STRESS3 and STAPLE codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, David G.; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Ueta, Shouhei; Sumita, Junya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    2001-05-01

    In current high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), Tri-isotropic coated fuel particles are employed as fuel. In safety design of the HTGR fuels, it is important to retain fission products within particles so that their release to primary coolant does not exceed an acceptable level. From this point of view, the basic design criteria for the fuel are to minimize the failure fraction of as-fabricated fuel coating layers and to prevent significant additional fuel failures during operation. This report attempts to model fuel behavior in irradiation tests using the U.K. codes STRESS3 and STAPLE. Test results in 91F-1A and HRB-22 capsules irradiation tests, which were carried out at the Japan Materials Testing Reactor of JAERI and at the High Flux Isotope Reactor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, respectively, were employed in the calculation. The maximum burnup and fast neutron fluence were about 10%FIMA and 3 x 10{sup 25} m{sup -2}, respectively. The fuel for the irradiation tests was called high burnup fuel, whose target burnup and fast neutron fluence were higher than those of the first-loading fuel of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor. The calculation results demonstrated that if only mean fracture stress values of PyC and SiC are used in the calculation it is not possible to predict any particle failures, by which is meant when all three load bearing layers have failed. By contrast, when statistical variations in the fracture stresses and particle specifications are taken into account, as is done in the STAPLE code, failures can be predicted. In the HRB-22 irradiation test, it was concluded that the first two particles which had failed were defective in some way, but that the third and fourth failures can be accounted for by the pressure vessel model. In the 91F-1A irradiation test, the result showed that 1 or 2 particles had failed towards the end of irradiation in the upper capsule and no particles failed in the lower capsule. (author)

  3. Recursive solutions for multi-group neutron kinetics diffusion equations in homogeneous three-dimensional rectangular domains with time dependent perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Claudio Z. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Capao do Leao (Brazil). Programa de Pos Graduacao em Modelagem Matematica; Bodmann, Bardo E.J.; Vilhena, Marco T. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Programa de Pos-graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Barros, Ricardo C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Inst. Politecnico

    2014-12-15

    In the present work we solve in analytical representation the three dimensional neutron kinetic diffusion problem in rectangular Cartesian geometry for homogeneous and bounded domains for any number of energy groups and precursor concentrations. The solution in analytical representation is constructed using a hierarchical procedure, i.e. the original problem is reduced to a problem previously solved by the authors making use of a combination of the spectral method and a recursive decomposition approach. Time dependent absorption cross sections of the thermal energy group are considered with step, ramp and Chebyshev polynomial variations. For these three cases, we present numerical results and discuss convergence properties and compare our results to those available in the literature.

  4. A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique and Three Types of Gamma-ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorge Navarro; Rahmat Aryaeinejad,; David W. Nigg

    2011-05-01

    A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique1 Rahmat Aryaeinejad, Jorge Navarro, and David W Nigg Idaho National Laboratory Abstract Effective and efficient Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel management require state of the art core modeling tools. These new tools will need isotopic and burnup validation data before they are put into production. To create isotopic, burn up validation libraries and to determine the setup for permanent fuel scanner system a feasibility study was perform. The study consisted in measuring short and long cooling time fuel elements at the ATR canal. Three gamma spectroscopy detectors (HPGe, LaBr3, and HPXe) and two system configurations (above and under water) were used in the feasibility study. The first stage of the study was to investigate which detector and system configuration would be better suited for different scenarios. The second stage of the feasibility study was to create burnup and cooling time calibrations using experimental isotopic data collected and ORIGEN 2.2 burnup data. The results of the study establish that a better spectra resolution is achieve with an above the water configuration and that three detectors can be used in the permanent fuel scanner system for different situations. In addition it was conclude that a number of isotopic ratios and absolute measurements could be used to predict ATR fuel burnup and cooling times. 1This work was supported by the U.S. Depart¬ment of Energy (DOE) under Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Contract No. DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  5. French investigations of high burnup effect on LOCA thermomechanical behavior: Part 1. Experimental programmes in support of LOCA design methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waeckel, N. [EDF/SEPTEN Villeurbanne (France); GrandJean, C. [IPSN, Cadarache (France); Cauvin, R.; Lebuffe, C. [EDF/SCMI, Chinon (France)

    1997-01-01

    Within the framework of Burn-Up extension request, EDF, FRAMATOME, CEA and IPSN have carried out experimental programmes in order to provide the design of fuel rods under LOCA conditions with relevant data. The design methods used in France for LOCA are based on standard Appendix K methodology updated to take into account some penalties related to the actual conditions of the Nuclear Power Plant. Best-Estimate assessments are used as well. Experimental programmes concern plastic deformation and burst behavior of advanced claddings (EDGAR) and thermal shock quenching behavior of highly irradiated claddings (TAGCIR). The former reveals the important role played by the {alpha}/{beta} transformation kinetics related to advanced alloys (Niobium alloys) and the latter the significative impact of hydrogen charged during in-reactor corrosion on oxidation kinetics and failure behavior in terms of cooling rates.

  6. Verification of spectral burn-up codes on 2D fuel assemblies of the GFR demonstrator ALLEGRO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Čerba, Štefan, E-mail: stefan.cerba@stuba.sk [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Vrban, Branislav; Lüley, Jakub [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Dařílek, Petr [VUJE a.s., Okružná 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Zajac, Radoslav, E-mail: radoslav.zajac@vuje.sk [VUJE a.s., Okružná 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Nečas, Vladimír; Haščik, Ján [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Ilkovičova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Verification of the MCNPX, HELIOS and SCALE codes. • MOX and ceramic fuel assembly. • Gas-cooled fast reactor. • Burnup calculation. - Abstract: The gas-cooled fast reactor, which is one of the six GEN IV reactor concepts, is characterized by high operational temperatures and a hard neutron spectrum. The utilization of commonly used spectral codes, developed mainly for LWR reactors operated in the thermal/epithermal neutron spectrum, may be connected with systematic deviations since the main development effort of these codes has been focused on the thermal part of the neutron spectrum. To be able to carry out proper calculations for fast systems the used codes have to account for neutron resonances including the self-shielding effect. The presented study aims at verifying the spectral HELIOS, MCNPX and SCALE codes on the basis of depletion calculations of 2D MOX and ceramic fuel assemblies of the ALLEGRO gas-cooled fast reactor demonstrator in infinite lattice.

  7. Analysis of Corrosion Residues Collected from the Aluminum Basket Rails of the High-Burnup Demonstration Cask.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryan, Charles R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    On September, 2015, an inspection was performed on the TN-32B cask that will be used for the high-burnup demonstration project. During the survey, wooden cribbing that had been placed within the cask eleven years earlier to prevent shifting of the basket during transport was removed, revealing two areas of residue on the aluminum basket rails, where they had contacted the cribbing. The residue appeared to be a corrosion product, and concerns were raised that similar attack could exist at more difficult-to-inspect locations in the canister. Accordingly, when the canister was reopened, samples of the residue were collected for analysis. This report presents the results of that assessment, which determined that the corrosion was due to the presence of the cribbing. The corrosion was associated with fungal material, and fungal activity likely contributed to an aggressive chemical environment. Once the cask has been cleaned, there will be no risk of further corrosion.

  8. The retrohoming of linear group II intron RNAs in Drosophila melanogaster occurs by both DNA ligase 4-dependent and -independent mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis B White

    Full Text Available Mobile group II introns are bacterial retrotransposons that are thought to have invaded early eukaryotes and evolved into introns and retroelements in higher organisms. In bacteria, group II introns typically retrohome via full reverse splicing of an excised intron lariat RNA into a DNA site, where it is reverse transcribed by the intron-encoded protein. Recently, we showed that linear group II intron RNAs, which can result from hydrolytic splicing or debranching of lariat RNAs, can retrohome in eukaryotes by performing only the first step of reverse splicing, ligating their 3' end to the downstream DNA exon. Reverse transcription then yields an intron cDNA, whose free end is linked to the upstream DNA exon by an error-prone process that yields junctions similar to those formed by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ. Here, by using Drosophila melanogaster NHEJ mutants, we show that linear intron RNA retrohoming occurs by major Lig4-dependent and minor Lig4-independent mechanisms, which appear to be related to classical and alternate NHEJ, respectively. The DNA repair polymerase θ plays a crucial role in both pathways. Surprisingly, however, mutations in Ku70, which functions in capping chromosome ends during NHEJ, have only moderate, possibly indirect effects, suggesting that both Lig4 and the alternate end-joining ligase act in some retrohoming events independently of Ku. Another potential Lig4-independent mechanism, reverse transcriptase template switching from the intron RNA to the upstream exon DNA, occurs in vitro, but gives junctions differing from the majority in vivo. Our results show that group II introns can utilize cellular NHEJ enzymes for retromobility in higher organisms, possibly exploiting mechanisms that contribute to retrotransposition and mitigate DNA damage by resident retrotransposons. Additionally, our results reveal novel activities of group II intron reverse transcriptases, with implications for retrohoming mechanisms and

  9. Hydrocarbons depending on the chain length and head group adopt different conformations within a water-soluble nanocapsule: 1H NMR and molecular dynamics studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Rajib; Barman, Arghya; Prabhakar, Rajeev; Ramamurthy, V

    2013-01-10

    In this study we have examined the conformational preference of phenyl-substituted hydrocarbons (alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes) of different chain lengths included within a confined space provided by a molecular capsule made of two host cavitands known by the trivial name "octa acid" (OA). One- and two-dimensional (1)H NMR experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to probe the location and conformation of hydrocarbons within the OA capsule. In general, small hydrocarbons adopted a linear conformation while longer ones preferred a folded conformation. In addition, the extent of folding and the location of the end groups (methyl and phenyl) were dependent on the group (H(2)C-CH(2), HC═CH, and C≡C) adjacent to the phenyl group. In addition, the rotational mobility of the hydrocarbons within the capsule varied; for example, while phenylated alkanes tumbled freely, phenylated alkenes and alkynes resisted such a motion at room temperature. Combined NMR and MD simulation studies have confirmed that molecules could adopt conformations within confined spaces different from that in solution, opening opportunities to modulate chemical behavior of guest molecules.

  10. Group psycho-education in patients with bipolar disorder associated with a dependency of toxic substances in patients who are in abstinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia González Alegre

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The high comorbility that exists among psychiatric disorders and addictive is important. In the latest years it is produced an increase of the sensibility related to this problem. A great deal it is due to the demand of Mental Health Services and also due to drug dependency, as a consequence of the lack of an integral approach. Because of this fact and because of the mentioned demand, we though it should be pertinent developing a research project in order to check if the carrying the psycho-educative preventive group project out in patients with a diagnose of bipolar disorder with an abuse of drugs history and/or dependency of toxic substance in abstinence at the moment influents in a positive way in the course of the number of relapses in the toxic consumption during at least six months subsequent to the intervention. And at this way, these patients will purchase a greater consciousness of the important of healthy habits in the bipolar disorder and the recovery in the toxic substance abuse. The program will be developed in an experimental research where the patients will be randomly assigned in group control/ experimentally, the intervention will last twenty sessions, each session will be an hour and a half long and will be held weekly. In these sessions we will deal with topics related to the psychiatric disorder and the toxic consume. At the same time we will bank on the development of practical relaxation workshops on in some of the sessions with the object of providing a resource in view of stress situations.

  11. Dependency Analysis Guidance Nordic/German Working Group on Common Cause Failure analysis. Phase 2, Development of Harmonized Approach and Applications for Common Cause Failure Quantification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Guenter; Johanson, Gunnar; Lindberg, Sandra; Vaurio, Jussi

    2009-03-15

    The Regulatory Code SSMFS 2008:1 of Swedish Radiation Safety Authority (SSM) includes requirements regarding the performance of probabilistic safety assessments (PSA), as well as PSA activities in general. Therefore, the follow-up of these activities is part of the inspection tasks of SSM. According to the SSMFS 2008:1, the safety analyses shall be based on a systematic identification and evaluation of such events, event sequences and other conditions which may lead to a radiological accident. The research report Nordic/German Working Group on Common cause Failure analysis. Phase 2 project report: Development of Harmonized Approach and Applications for Common Cause Failure Quantification has been developed under a contract with the Nordic PSA Group (NPSAG) and its German counterpart VGB, with the aim to create a common experience base for defence and analysis of dependent failures i.e. Common Cause Failures CCF. Phase 2 in this project if a deepened data analyses of CCF events and a demonstration on how the so called impact vectors can be constructed and on how CCF parameters are estimated. The word Guidance in the report title is used in order to indicate a common methodological guidance accepted by the NPSAG, based on current state of the art concerning the analysis of dependent failures and adapted to conditions relevant for Nordic sites. This will make it possible for the utilities to perform cost effective improvements and analyses. The report presents a common attempt by the authorities and the utilities to create a methodology and experience base for defence and analysis of dependent failures. The performed benchmark application has shown how important the interpretation of base data is to obtain robust CCF data and data analyses results. Good features were found in all benchmark approaches. The obtained experiences and approaches should now be used in harmonised procedures. A next step could be to develop and agree on event and formula driven impact vector

  12. Two-dimensional, Time-dependent, Multi-group, Multi-angle Radiation Hydrodynamics Test Simulation in the Core-Collapse Supernova Context

    CERN Document Server

    Livne, E; Walder, R; Lichtenstadt, I; Thompson, T A; Livne, Eli; Burrows, Adam; Walder, Rolf; Lichtenstadt, Itamar; Thompson, Todd A.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a time-dependent, multi-energy-group, and multi-angle (S$_n$) Boltzmann transport scheme for radiation hydrodynamics simulations, in one and two spatial dimensions. The implicit transport is coupled to both 1D (spherically-symmetric) and 2D (axially-symmetric) versions of the explicit Newtonian hydrodynamics code VULCAN. The 2D variant, VULCAN/2D, can be operated in general structured or unstructured grids and though the code can address many problems in astrophysics it was constructed specifically to study the core-collapse supernova problem. Furthermore, VULCAN/2D can simulate the radiation/hydrodynamic evolution of differentially rotating bodies. We summarize the equations solved and methods incorporated into the algorithm and present results of a time-dependent 2D test calculation. A more complete description of the algorithm is postponed to another paper. We highlight a 2D test run that follows for 22 milliseconds the immediate post-bounce evolution of a collapsed core. We present the r...

  13. Anisotropies in the Neutrino Fluxes and Heating Profiles in Two-dimensional, Time-dependent, Multi-group Radiation Hydrodynamics Simulations of Rotating Core-Collapse Supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Walder, R; Ott, C D; Livne, E; Jarrah, M

    2004-01-01

    Using the 2D multi-group, flux-limited diffusion version of the code VULCAN/2D, that also incorporates rotation, we have calculated the collapse, bounce, shock formation, and early post-bounce evolutionary phases of a core-collapse supernova for a variety of initial rotation rates. This is the first series of such multi-group calculations undertaken in supernova theory with fully multi-D tools. We find that though rotation generates pole-to-equator angular anisotropies in the neutrino radiation fields, the magnitude of the asymmetries is not as large as previously estimated. Moreover, we find that the radiation field is always more spherically symmetric than the matter distribution, with its plumes and convective eddies. We present the dependence of the angular anisotropy of the neutrino fields on neutrino species, neutrino energy, and initial rotation rate. Only for our most rapidly rotating model do we start to see qualitatively different hydrodynamics, but for the lower rates consistent with the pre-collap...

  14. Determination of burnup grade of fuel plates by gamma spectrometry; Determinacao do grau de queima em elementos combustiveis tipo placa por meio de espectrometria gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terremoto, Luis A.A.; Zeituni, Carlos A.; Perrotta, Jose A. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Div. de Engenharia do Nucleo

    1999-11-01

    This work describes absolute burnup measurements on spent MTR fuel elements by means of non-destructive gamma-ray spectroscopy which correlates activities of radioactive fission products with the fissioned mass of {sup 235} U. Experiments based on such method were performed at the storage pool area of the IEA-R1 research reactor. The obtained results were compared with calculational ones based on neutronics. (author) 7 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.; e-mail: laaterre at net.ipen.br

  15. Isotopic analyses and calculation by use of JENDL-3.2 for high burn-up UO{sub 2} and MOX spent fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasahara, Akihiro; Matsumura, Tetsuo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.; Nicolaou, G.; Betti, M.; Walker, C.T.

    1997-03-01

    The post irradiation examinations (PIE) were carried out for high burn-up UO{sub 2} spent fuel (3.8%U235, average burn-up:60GWd/t) and mixed oxide (MOX) spent fuel (5.07%Pu, average burn-up:45GWd/t). The PIE includes, (a) isotopic analysis, (b) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) in pellet cross section and so on. The results of isotopic analyses and EPMA were compared with ORIGEN2/82 and VIM-BURN calculation results. In VIM-BURN calculation, the nuclear data of actinides were proceeded from new data file, JENDL-3.2. The sensitivities of power history and moderator density to nuclides composition were investigated by VIM-BURN calculation and consequently power history mainly effected on Am241 and Am242m and moderator density effected on fissile nuclides. From EPMA results of U and Pu distribution in pellet, VIM-BURN calculation showed reasonable distribution in pellet cross section. (author)

  16. Raman micro-spectroscopy of UOX and MOX spent nuclear fuel characterization and oxidation resistance of the high burn-up structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegou, C.; Gennisson, M.; Peuget, S.; Desgranges, L.; Guimbretière, G.; Magnin, M.; Talip, Z.; Simon, P.

    2015-03-01

    Raman micro-spectroscopy was applied to study the structure and oxidation resistance of UO2 (burnup 60 GWd/tHM) and MOX (burnup 47 GWd/tHM) irradiated fuels. The Raman technique, adapted to working under extreme conditions, enabled structural information to be obtained at the cubic micrometer scale in various zones of interest within irradiated fuel (central and zones like the Rim for UOX60, and the plutonium-enriched agglomerates for MOX47 characterized by a high burn-up structure), and the study of their oxidation resistance. As regards the structural information after irradiation, the spectra obtained make up a set of data consistent with the systematic presence of the T2g band characteristic of the fluorite structure, and of a triplet band located between 500 and 700 cm-1. The existence of this triplet can be attributed to the presence of defects originating in changes to the fuel chemistry occurring in the reactor (presence of fission products) and to the accumulation of irradiation damage. As concerns the oxidation resistance of the different zones of interest, Raman spectroscopy results confirmed the good stability of the restructured zones (plutonium-enriched agglomerates and Rim) rich in fission products compared to the non-restructured UO2 grains. A greater structural stability was noticed in the case of high plutonium content agglomerates, as this element favors the maintenance of the fluorite structure.

  17. Measurement of the composition of noble-metal particles in high-burnup CANDU fuel by wavelength dispersive X-ray microanalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocking, W.H.; Szostak, F.J

    1999-09-01

    An investigation of the composition of the metallic inclusions in CANDU fuel, which contain Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh and Pd, has been conducted as a function of burnup by wavelength dispersive X-ray (WDX) microanalysis. Quantitative measurements were performed on micrometer sized particles embedded in thin sections of fuel using elemental standards and the ZAF method. Because the fission yields of the noble metals change with burnup, as a consequence of a shift from almost entirely {sup 235}U fission to mainly {sup 239}Pu fission, their inventories were calculated from the fuel power histories using the WIMS-Origin code for comparison with experiment. Contrary to expectations that the oxygen potential would be buffered by progressive Mo oxidation, little evidence was obtained for reduced incorporation of Mo in the noble-metal particles at high burnup. These surprising results are discussed with respect to the oxygen balance in irradiated CANDU fuels and the likely intrinsic and extrinsic sinks for excess oxygen. (author)

  18. Analysis of high burnup fuel behavior under control rod ejection accident in Korea standard nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bok; Lee, Chung Chan; Kim, Oh Hwan; Kim, Jong Jin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-07-01

    Test results of high burnup fuel behavior under RIA(reactivity insertion accident) indicated that fuel might fail at the fuel enthalpy lower than that in the current fuel failure criteria was derived by the conservative assumptions and analysis of fuel failure mechanisms, and applied to the analysis of control rod ejection accident in the 1,000 MWe Korea standard PWR. Except that three dimensional core analysis was performed instead of conventional zero dimensional analysis, all the other conservative assumptions were kept. Analysis results showed that less than on percent of the fuel rods in the core has failed which was much less than the conventional fuel failure fraction, 9.8 %, even though a newly derived fuel failure criteria -Fuel failure occurs at the power level lower than that in the current fuel failure criteria. - was applied, since transient fuel rod power level was significantly decreased by analyzing the transient fuel rod power level was significantly decreased by analyzing the transient core three dimensionally. Therefore, it can be said that results of the radiological consequence analysis for the control rod ejection accident in the FSAR where fuel failure fraction was assumed 9.8 % is still bounding. 18 tabs., 48 figs., 39 refs. (Author).

  19. Thermochemical prediction of chemical form distributions of fission products in LWR oxide fuels irradiated to high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriyama, Kouki; Furuya, Hirotaka [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-09-01

    Based on the result of micro-gamma scanning of a fuel pin irradiated to high burnup in a commercial PWR, the radial distribution of chemical forms of fission products (FPs) in LWR fuel pins was theoretically predicted by a thermochemical computer code SOLGASMIX-PV. The absolute amounts of fission products generated in the fuel was calculated by ORIGEN-2 code, and the radial distributions of temperature and oxygen potential were calculated by taking the neutron depression and oxygen redistribution in the fuel into account. A fuel pellet was radially divided into 51 sections and chemical forms of FPs were calculated in each section. In addition, the effects of linear heat rating (LHR) and average O/U ratio on radial distribution of chemical form were evaluated. It was found that approximately 13 mole% of the total amount of Cs compounds exists as CsI and virtually remaining fraction as Cs{sub 2}MoO{sub 4} under the operation condition of LHR below 400 W/cm. On the other hand, when LHR is beyond 400 W/cm under the transient operation condition, its distribution did not change so much from the one under normal operation condition. (author)

  20. Core burnup calculation and accidents analyses of a pressurized water reactor partially loaded with rock-like oxide fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akie, H.; Sugo, Y.; Okawa, R.

    2003-06-01

    A rock-like oxide (ROX) fuel - light water reactor (LWR) burning system has been studied for efficient plutonium transmutation. For the improvement of small negative reactivity coefficients and severe transient behaviors of ROX fueled LWRs, a partial loading core of ROX fuel assemblies with conventional UO 2 assemblies was considered. As a result, although the reactivity coefficients could be improved, the power peaking tends to be large in this heterogeneous core configuration. The reactivity initiated accident (RIA) and loss of coolant accident (LOCA) behaviors were not sufficiently improved. In order to reduce the power peaking, the fuel composition and the assembly design of the ROX fuel were modified. Firstly, erbium burnable poison was added as Er 2O 3 in the ROX fuel to reduce the burnup reactivity swing. Then pin-by-pin Pu enrichment and Er content distributions within the ROX fuel assembly were considered. In addition, the Er content distribution was also considered in the axial direction of the ROX fuel pin. With these modifications, a power peaking factor even lower than the one in a conventional UO 2 fueled core can be obtained. The RIA and LOCA analyses of the modified core have also shown the comparable transient behaviors of ROX partial loading core to those of the UO 2 core.

  1. The antioxidant behaviour of melatonin and structural analogues during lipid peroxidation depends not only on their functional groups but also on the assay system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagali, Natalia; Catalá, Angel

    2012-07-13

    There is no general agreement yet on the antioxidant effect of pineal indoles against lipid peroxidation. Accordingly, the main goal of the present work was to study the antioxidant activity of melatonin (MLT), N-acetylserotonin (NAS), 5-HO-tryptophan (5HO-TRP) and 5-methoxytryptamine (5MTP) in two different lipid systems with high content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs): triglycerides (rich in 20:5 n-3, 22:6 n-3) dissolved in chloroform and sonicated liposomes made of retinal lipids (rich in 22:6 n-3). In the triglyceride-chloroform-system the peroxidation reaction was initiated by cumene hydroperoxide (CHP) whereas liposomes were peroxidized with Fe(2+). The techniques employed at the present work were: (1) TBARS production, (2) DPPH assay, (3) determination of conjugated dienes production and (4) analysis of fatty acid profile by GC-MS. Butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) was employed as a reference because of its well known antioxidant capacity. Our results showed that MLT and 5MTP were unable to protect PUFAs against lipid peroxidation in both systems, whereas NAS and 5HO-TRP were better antioxidants that BHT in the triglyceride-system but ineffective in the liposome-system. We conclude that the antioxidant behaviour of pineal indoles depends not only on their functional groups but also on the assay system and could be explained by the polar paradox theory.

  2. Substitutional group dependent colori/fluorimetric sensing of Mn2+, Fe3+ and Zn2+ ions by simple Schiff base chemosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariharan, P. S.; Anthony, Savarimuthu Philip

    2015-02-01

    Schiff base is one of the easiest synthesizable chemosensor and exhibit strong coordination with metal ions; the property that has been vastly exploited for metal ions sensing. Simple Schiff base chemosensors (1a-d and 2a-d) were synthesized and demonstrated substitutional group dependent colorimetric sensing of metal ions. Chemosensor without (1a, 2a) and OCH3 substitution (1b, 2b) did not show any significant colour change for metal ions. However, a highly selective colorimetric change (colourless to pink) for Mn2+ ions (10-6 M) was observed with diethylamine substituted 1c, 2c. Hydroxyl substitution (1d, 2d) leads to selective colorimetric sensing (colourless to orange) of Fe3+ ions (10-6 M). PVA thin films of 2c/2d were fabricated and demonstrated selective colorimetric sensing of Mn2+ and Fe3+ ions. The practical applicability of the synthesized chemosensors were also demonstrated by performing selective colorimetric sensing of Mn2+ and Fe3+ ions in real samples such as tap, ground, pond and river water. Effect of substitution on the fluorescence selectivity of Zn2+ has also been investigated.

  3. Experimental and theoretical study of hydroxyquinolines: hydroxyl group position dependent dipole moment and charge-separation in the photoexcited state leading to fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Mehata, Mohan; Singh, Ajay K.; Sinha, Ravindra Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Optical absorption and fluorescence (FL) spectra of 2-, 6-, 7-, 8-hydroxyquinolines (2-,6-,7- and 8-HQs) have been measured at room temperature in the wide range of solvents of different polarities, dielectric constant and refractive index. The ground state dipole moment (µ g) and excited state dipole moment (µ e) of 2-, 6-, 7- and 8-HQs were obtained using solvatochromic shift (SS) methods and microscopic solvent polarity parameters (MSPP). Change in the dipole moment (Δµ) between the ground and photo-excited states was estimated from SS and MSPP methods. DFT and TDDFT based theoretical calculations were performed for the ground and excited states dipole moments, and for vertical transitions. A significant enhancement in the excited state dipole moment was observed following photo-excitation. The large value of Δµ clearly indicates to the charge-separation in the photo-excited states, which in turn depends on the position of the hydroxyl group in the ring.

  4. Epithelial Expression of Human ABO Blood Group Genes Is Dependent upon a Downstream Regulatory Element Functioning through an Epithelial Cell-specific Transcription Factor, Elf5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Rie; Nakajima, Tamiko; Takahashi, Yoichiro; Kubo, Rieko; Kobayashi, Momoko; Takahashi, Keiko; Takeshita, Haruo; Ogasawara, Kenichi; Kominato, Yoshihiko

    2016-10-21

    The human ABO blood group system is of great importance in blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The ABO system is composed of complex carbohydrate structures that are biosynthesized by A- and B-transferases encoded by the ABO gene. However, the mechanisms regulating ABO gene expression in epithelial cells remain obscure. On the basis of DNase I-hypersensitive sites in and around ABO in epithelial cells, we prepared reporter plasmid constructs including these sites. Subsequent luciferase assays and histone modifications indicated a novel positive regulatory element, designated the +22.6-kb site, downstream from ABO, and this was shown to enhance ABO promoter activity in an epithelial cell-specific manner. Expression of ABO and B-antigen was reduced in gastric cancer KATOIII cells by biallelic deletion of the +22.6-kb site using the CRISPR/Cas9 system. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that the site bound to an epithelial cell-specific transcription factor, Elf5. Mutation of the Ets binding motifs to abrogate binding of this factor reduced the regulatory activity of the +22.6-kb site. Furthermore, ELF5 knockdown with shRNA reduced both endogenous transcription from ABO and B-antigen expression in KATOIII cells. Thus, Elf5 appeared to be involved in the enhancer potential of the +22.6-kb site. These results support the contention that ABO expression is dependent upon a downstream positive regulatory element functioning through a tissue-restricted transcription factor, Elf5, in epithelial cells.

  5. Separation of metallic residues from the dissolution of a high-burnup BWR fuel using nitrogen trifluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Bruce K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buck, Edgar C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Soderquist, Chuck Z. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Frances N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mausolf, Edward J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Scheele, Randall D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-03-23

    Nitrogen trifluoride (NF3) was used to fluorinate the metallic residue from the dissolution of a high burnup, boiling water reactor fuel (~70 MWd/kgU). The metallic residue included the noble metal phase (containing ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, technetium, and molybdenum), and smaller amounts of zirconium, selenium, tellurium, and silver. Exposing the noble metal phase to 10% NF3 in argon between 400 and 550°C, removed molybdenum and technetium near 400°C as their volatile fluorides, and ruthenium near 500C as its volatile fluoride. The events were thermally and temporally distinct and the conditions specified are a recipe to separate these transition metals from each other and from the noble metal phase nonvolatile residue. Depletion of the volatile fluorides resulted in substantial exothermicity. Thermal excursion behavior was recorded under non-adiabatic, isothermal conditions that typically minimize heat release. Physical characterization of the metallic noble phase and its thermal behavior are consistent with high kinetic velocity reactions encouraged by the nanoparticulate phase or perhaps catalytic influences of the mixed platinum metals with nearly pure phase structure. Post-fluorination, only two phases were present in the residual nonvolatile fraction. These were identified as a nano-crystalline, metallic palladium cubic phase and a hexagonal rhodium trifluoride (RhF3) phase. The two phases were distinct as the sub-µm crystallites of metallic palladium were in contrast to the RhF3 phase, which grew from the parent nano-crystalline noble-metal phase during fluorination, to acicular crystals exceeding 20-µm in length.

  6. An attempt to reproduce high burn-up structure by ion irradiation of SIMFUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranov, V.G. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoye Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Lunev, A.V., E-mail: AVLunev@mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoye Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Reutov, V.F. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR), Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR), 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Tenishev, A.V.; Isaenkova, M.G.; Khlunov, A.V. [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Kashirskoye Shosse 31, Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2014-09-15

    Experiments in IC-100 and U-400 cyclotrons were conducted with SIMFUEL pellets (11.47 wt.% of fission products simulators) to reproduce some aspects of the long-term irradiation conditions in epithermal reactors. Pellets were irradiated with Xe{sup 16+}, Xe{sup 24+} and He{sup +} at energies ranging from 20 keV (He{sup +}) to 320 keV (Xe{sup 16+}) and 1–90 MeV (Xe{sup 24+}). Some samples were subsequently annealed to obtain larger grain sizes and to study defects recovery. The major microstructural changes consisted in grain sub-division observed on SEM and AFM images and change in composition registered by EPMA (pellets irradiated with 1–90 MeV Xe{sup 24+} ions at fluence of 5 × 10{sup 15} cm{sup −2}). Lattice distortion and increase in dislocation density is also noted according to X-ray data. At low energies and high fluences formation of bubbles (20 keV He{sup +} at 5.5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}) was observed. Grain sub-division exhibits full coverage of the grain body and preservation of former grain boundaries. The size of sub-grains depends on local dislocation density and changes from 200 nm to 400 nm along the irradiated surface. Beneath it the size ranges from 150 to 600 nm. Sub-grains are not observed in samples irradiated by low-energy ions even at high dislocation densities.

  7. Analysis of fresh fuel critical experiments appropriate for burnup credit validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.; Bowman, S.M.

    1995-10-01

    The ANS/ANS-8.1 standard requires that calculational methods used in determining criticality safety limits for applications outside reactors be validated by comparison with appropriate critical experiments. This report provides a detailed description of 34 fresh fuel critical experiments and their analyses using the SCALE-4.2 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. The 34 critical experiments were selected based on geometry, material, and neutron interaction characteristics that are applicable to a transportation cask loaded with pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel. These 34 experiments are a representative subset of a much larger data base of low-enriched uranium and mixed-oxide critical experiments. A statistical approach is described and used to obtain an estimate of the bias and uncertainty in the calculational methods and to predict a confidence limit for a calculated neutron multiplication factor. The SCALE-4.2 results for a superset of approximately 100 criticals are included in uncertainty analyses, but descriptions of the individual criticals are not included.

  8. Analysis of Fresh Fuel Critical Experiments Appropriate for Burnup Credit Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The ANS/ANS-8.1 standard requires that calculational methods used in determining criticality safety limits for applications outside reactors be validated by comparison with appropriate critical experiments. This report provides a detailed description of 34 fresh fuel critical experiments and their analyses using the SCALE-4.2 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. The 34 critical experiments were selected based on geometry, material, and neutron interaction characteristics that are applicable to a transportation cask loaded with pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel. These 34 experiments are a representative subset of a much larger data base of low-enriched uranium and mixed-oxide critical experiments. A statistical approach is described and used to obtain an estimate of the bias and uncertainty in the calculational methods and to predict a confidence limit for a calculated neutron multiplication factor. The SCALE-4.2 results for a superset of approximately 100 criticals are included in uncertainty analyses, but descriptions of the individual criticals are not included.

  9. An extended version of the SERPENT-2 code to investigate fuel burn-up and core material evolution of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufiero, M.; Cammi, A.; Fiorina, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, CeSNEF (Enrico Fermi Center for Nuclear Studies), via Ponzio, 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Leppänen, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1000, FI-02044 VTT (Finland); Luzzi, L., E-mail: lelio.luzzi@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, CeSNEF (Enrico Fermi Center for Nuclear Studies), via Ponzio, 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Ricotti, M.E. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, CeSNEF (Enrico Fermi Center for Nuclear Studies), via Ponzio, 34/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    In this work, the Monte Carlo burn-up code SERPENT-2 has been extended and employed to study the material isotopic evolution of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This promising GEN-IV nuclear reactor concept features peculiar characteristics such as the on-line fuel reprocessing, which prevents the use of commonly available burn-up codes. Besides, the presence of circulating nuclear fuel and radioactive streams from the core to the reprocessing plant requires a precise knowledge of the fuel isotopic composition during the plant operation. The developed extension of SERPENT-2 directly takes into account the effects of on-line fuel reprocessing on burn-up calculations and features a reactivity control algorithm. It is here assessed against a dedicated version of the deterministic ERANOS-based EQL3D procedure (PSI-Switzerland) and adopted to analyze the MSFR fuel salt isotopic evolution. Particular attention is devoted to study the effects of reprocessing time constants and efficiencies on the conversion ratio and the molar concentration of elements relevant for solubility issues (e.g., trivalent actinides and lanthanides). Quantities of interest for fuel handling and safety issues are investigated, including decay heat and activities of hazardous isotopes (neutron and high energy gamma emitters) in the core and in the reprocessing stream. The radiotoxicity generation is also analyzed for the MSFR nominal conditions. The production of helium and the depletion in tungsten content due to nuclear reactions are calculated for the nickel-based alloy selected as reactor structural material of the MSFR. These preliminary evaluations can be helpful in studying the radiation damage of both the primary salt container and the axial reflectors.

  10. An extended version of the SERPENT-2 code to investigate fuel burn-up and core material evolution of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufiero, M.; Cammi, A.; Fiorina, C.; Leppänen, J.; Luzzi, L.; Ricotti, M. E.

    2013-10-01

    In this work, the Monte Carlo burn-up code SERPENT-2 has been extended and employed to study the material isotopic evolution of the Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR). This promising GEN-IV nuclear reactor concept features peculiar characteristics such as the on-line fuel reprocessing, which prevents the use of commonly available burn-up codes. Besides, the presence of circulating nuclear fuel and radioactive streams from the core to the reprocessing plant requires a precise knowledge of the fuel isotopic composition during the plant operation. The developed extension of SERPENT-2 directly takes into account the effects of on-line fuel reprocessing on burn-up calculations and features a reactivity control algorithm. It is here assessed against a dedicated version of the deterministic ERANOS-based EQL3D procedure (PSI-Switzerland) and adopted to analyze the MSFR fuel salt isotopic evolution. Particular attention is devoted to study the effects of reprocessing time constants and efficiencies on the conversion ratio and the molar concentration of elements relevant for solubility issues (e.g., trivalent actinides and lanthanides). Quantities of interest for fuel handling and safety issues are investigated, including decay heat and activities of hazardous isotopes (neutron and high energy gamma emitters) in the core and in the reprocessing stream. The radiotoxicity generation is also analyzed for the MSFR nominal conditions. The production of helium and the depletion in tungsten content due to nuclear reactions are calculated for the nickel-based alloy selected as reactor structural material of the MSFR. These preliminary evaluations can be helpful in studying the radiation damage of both the primary salt container and the axial reflectors.

  11. A multi-center, randomized controlled trial of a group psychological intervention for psychosis with comorbid cannabis dependence over the early course of illness.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madigan, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Patients who experience the onset of psychotic illness with a comorbid diagnosis of cannabis dependence experience poor clinical outcomes. Few studies have identified interventions that reduce cannabis use and improve clinical outcome in this population.

  12. Modeling of PWR fuel at extended burnup; Estudo de modelos para o comportamento a altas queimas de varetas combustiveis de reatores a agua leve pressurizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Raphael Mejias

    2016-11-01

    This work studies the modifications implemented over successive versions in the empirical models of the computer program FRAPCON used to simulate the steady state irradiation performance of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods under high burnup condition. In the study, the empirical models present in FRAPCON official documentation were analyzed. A literature study was conducted on the effects of high burnup in nuclear fuels and to improve the understanding of the models used by FRAPCON program in these conditions. A steady state fuel performance analysis was conducted for a typical PWR fuel rod using FRAPCON program versions 3.3, 3.4, and 3.5. The results presented by the different versions of the program were compared in order to verify the impact of model changes in the output parameters of the program. It was observed that the changes brought significant differences in the results of the fuel rod thermal and mechanical parameters, especially when they evolved from FRAPCON-3.3 version to FRAPCON-3.5 version. Lower temperatures, lower cladding stress and strain, lower cladding oxide layer thickness were obtained in the fuel rod analyzed with the FRAPCON-3.5 version. (author)

  13. Child Maltreatment as a Risk Factor for Opioid Dependence: Comparison of Family Characteristics and Type and Severity of Child Maltreatment with a Matched Control Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Elizabeth; Degenhardt, Louisa; Mattick, Richard P.; Nelson, Elliot C.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the prevalence, characteristics and risk factors for child maltreatment among opioid-dependent persons compared to a community sample of similar social disadvantage. Method: The study employed a case-control design. Cases had a history of opioid pharmacotherapy. Controls were frequency matched to cases with regard to age, sex…

  14. Sense of coherence and substance use in Spanish adolescents. Does the effect of SOC depend on patterns of substance use in their peer group?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Moya, Irene; Jiménez-Iglesias, Antonia; Moreno, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this work were to analyse the relationships between sense of coherence (SOC) and substance use among Spanish adolescents and to examine the potential moderator effect of the patterns of substance use in the peer group. Sample consisted of 5475 Spanish adolescents aged 15 to 18 from the 2010 edition of the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study. Statistical analysis included cluster analysis to identify groups of adolescents according to their peer group's patterns of substance use and logistic regression with SOC and peers' pattern of consumption as predictors of current tobacco use, current alcohol use, life-time drunkenness and current drunkenness. The results showed that a strong SOC seemed to reduce the adolescents' likelihood of involving in tobacco use and drunkenness, but it was not associated with being a current drinker. In addition, the protective effect of SOC was moderated by peers' patterns of substance use. Specifically, SOC had a significant protective influence in adolescents whose peer group showed either a nonconsumption pattern or a pattern of frequent alcohol use and occasional drunkenness; but the protective effect of SOC disappeared if peers showed a pattern of consumption that included illegal drugs. In conclusion, SOC tends to act as a protective personal variable with respect to substance use during adolescence, but the influence exerted by the peer group seems to moderate the aforementioned protective effect of SOC.

  15. De incidentie van diabetes mellitus bij 0-19 jarigen in nederland (1988-1990) [The incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in the age group of 0-19 years in the Netherlands (1988-1990

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirasing, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    Objective: To determine if the incidence of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in the age group of 0-19 years in the Netherlands in the period 1988-1990 had changed in comparison with the period 10 years before. Design: Retrospective. Setting: The Netherlands. Method: In 1991 a questionnaire

  16. Neutronic Study of Burnup, Radiotoxicity, Decay Heat and Basic Safety Parameters of Mono-Recycling of Americium in French Pressurised Water Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Bright Mawuko Sogbadji

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The reprocessing of actinides with long half-life has been non-existent except for plutonium (Pu. This work looks at reducing the actinides inventory nuclear fuel waste meant for permanent disposal. The uranium oxide fuel (UOX assembly, as in the open cycle system, was designed to reach a burnup of 46GWd/T and 68GWd/T using the MURE code. The MURE code is based on the coupling of a static Monte Carlo code and the calculation of the evolution of the fuel during irradiation and cooling periods. The MURE code has been used to address two different questions concerning the mono-recycling of americium (Am in present French pressurised water reactors (PWR. These are reduction of americium in the clear fuel cycle and the safe quantity of americium that can be introduced into mixed oxide (MOX as fuel. The spent UOX was reprocessed to fabricate MOX assemblies, by the extraction of plutonium and addition of depleted uranium to reach burnups of 46GWd/T and 68GWd/T, taking into account various cooling times of the spent UOX assembly in the repository. The effect of cooling time on burnup and radiotoxicity was then ascertained. After 30 years of cooling in the repository, the spent UOX fuel required a higher concentration of Pu to be reprocessed into MOX fuel due to the decay of Pu-241. Americium, with a mean half-life of 432 years, has a high radiotoxicity level, high mid-term residual heat and is a precursor for other long-lived isotopes. An innovative strategy would be to reprocess not only the plutonium from the UOX spent fuel but also the americium isotopes, which presently dominate the radiotoxicity of waste. The mono-recycling of Am is not a definitive solution because the once-through MOX cycle transmutation of Am in a PWR is not enough to destroy all americium. The main objective is to propose a ‘waiting strategy’ for both Am and Pu in the spent fuel so that they can be made available for further transmutation strategies. The MOX and

  17. The Impact of Affect on Out-Group Judgments Depends on Dominant Information-Processing Styles: Evidence From Incidental and Integral Affect Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isbell, Linda M; Lair, Elicia C; Rovenpor, Daniel R

    2016-04-01

    Two studies tested the affect-as-cognitive-feedback model, in which positive and negative affective states are not uniquely associated with particular processing styles, but rather serve as feedback about currently accessible processing styles. The studies extend existing work by investigating (a) both incidental and integral affect, (b) out-group judgments, and (c) downstream consequences. We manipulated processing styles and either incidental (Study 1) or integral (Study 2) affect and measured perceptions of out-group homogeneity. Positive (relative to negative) affect increased out-group homogeneity judgments when global processing was primed, but under local priming, the effect reversed (Studies 1 and 2). A similar interactive effect emerged on attributions, which had downstream consequences for behavioral intentions (Study 2). These results demonstrate that both incidental and integral affect do not directly produce specific processing styles, but rather influence thinking by providing feedback about currently accessible processing styles.

  18. The phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent fructose-specific phosphotransferase system in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides : Energetics of the phosphoryl group transfer from phosphoenolpyruvate to fructose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, Juke S.; Hoeve-Duurkens, Ria H. ten; Robillard, George T.

    1986-01-01

    Energy coupling to fructose transport in Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides is achieved by phosphorylation of the membrane-spanning fructose-specific carrier protein, EIIFru. The phosphoryl group of phosphoenolpyruvate is transferred to EIIFru via the cytoplasmic component SF (soluble factor). The standar

  19. Are N-methyl groups of Tetramethylurea (TMU) Hydrophobic? A composition and temperature-dependent fluorescence spectroscopic investigation of TMU/water binary mixtures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SANDIPA INDRA; RANJIT BISWAS

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports results from temperature and composition dependent steady state UV-Visibleabsorption and fluorescence measurements and time-resolved fluorescence experiments, using a dipolar probecoumarin 153 (C153), in TMU/water binary mixtures.Q1Both steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic dataindicate, much like in water/alcohol mixtures, TMU-induced structural stiffening and transition of the tetrahedralH-bond network of water. The structural transition referred to above means cosolvent-induced transitionof three dimensional tetrahedral H-bond network to two dimensional zig-zag chain-like structure often foundin alcohols. A comparison to the results obtained for aqueous alcohol solutions suggests that the cosolvent concentrationat which the structural transition occurs depends both on the polarity of the cosolvent and the size ofthe cosolvent molecules. UV-Visible absorption measurements reveal aggregation among TMU molecules atlower TMU concentration which shows a temperature maximum. In addition, red edge excitation effects havebeen observed at very dilute TMU concentration suggesting distribution of C153 among heterogeneous environments.All these results indicate hydrophobic interaction-induced aggregation of TMU in dilute aqueoussolutions which corroborate well with the existing simulation observation.

  20. Burn-up Function of Fuel Management Code for Aqueous Homogeneous Reactors and Its Validation%溶液堆物理计算程序FMCAHR燃耗功能及其验证

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪量子; 姚栋; 王侃

    2011-01-01

    介绍了FMCAHR程序的燃耗计算模型及流程,并使用燃耗基准题和DRAGON程序对燃耗计算结果进行验证.验证结果表明,FMCAHR燃耗计算功能的准确性较高,适用于溶液堆的燃耗计算分析.%Fuel Management Code for Aqueous Homogeneous Reactors(FMCAHR)is developed based on the Monte Carlo transport method,to analyze the physics characteristics of aqueous homogeneous reactors. FMCAHR has the ability of doing resonance treatment,searching for critical rod heights,thermal hydraulic parameters calculation,radiolytic-gas bubbles' calculation and burn-up calculation. This paper introduces the theory model and scheme of its bum-up function,and then compares its calculation results with benchmarks and with DRAGON'S burn-up results,which confirms its burn-up computing precision and its applicability in the burn-up calculation and analysis for aqueous solution reactors.

  1. A 7-year follow-up of multidisciplinary rehabilitation among chronic neck and back pain patients. Is sick leave outcome dependent on psychologically derived patient groups?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergström, Gunnar; Bergström, Cecilia; Hagberg, Jan; Bodin, Lennart; Jensen, Irene

    2010-04-01

    A valid method for classifying chronic pain patients into more homogenous groups could be useful for treatment planning, that is, which treatment is effective for which patient, and as a marker when evaluating treatment outcome. One instrument that has been used to derive subgroups of patients is the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate a classification method based on the Swedish version of the MPI, the MPI-S, to predict sick leave among chronic neck and back pain patients for a period of 7 years after vocational rehabilitation. As hypothesized, dysfunctional patients (DYS), according to the MPI-S, showed a higher amount of sickness absence and disability pension expressed in days than adaptive copers (AC) during the 7-years follow-up period, even when adjusting for sickness absence prior to rehabilitation (355.8days, 95% confidence interval, 71.7; 639.9). Forty percent of DYS patients and 26.7% of AC patients received disability pension during the follow-up period. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Further analyses showed that the difference between patient groups was most pronounced among patients with more than 60days of sickness absence prior to rehabilitation. Cost-effectiveness calculations indicated that the DYS patients showed an increase in production loss compared to AC patients. The present study yields support for the prognostic value of this subgroup classification method concerning long-term outcome on sick leave following this type of vocational rehabilitation.

  2. Analysis of BMP4 and BMP7 signaling in breast cancer cells unveils time-dependent transcription patterns and highlights a common synexpression group of genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodriguez-Martinez Alejandra

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs are members of the TGF-beta superfamily of growth factors. They are known for their roles in regulation of osteogenesis and developmental processes and, in recent years, evidence has accumulated of their crucial functions in tumor biology. BMP4 and BMP7, in particular, have been implicated in breast cancer. However, little is known about BMP target genes in the context of tumor. We explored the effects of BMP4 and BMP7 treatment on global gene transcription in seven breast cancer cell lines during a 6-point time series, using a whole-genome oligo microarray. Data analysis included hierarchical clustering of differentially expressed genes, gene ontology enrichment analyses and model based clustering of temporal data. Results Both ligands had a strong effect on gene expression, although the response to BMP4 treatment was more pronounced. The cellular functions most strongly affected by BMP signaling were regulation of transcription and development. The observed transcriptional response, as well as its functional outcome, followed a temporal sequence, with regulation of gene expression and signal transduction leading to changes in metabolism and cell proliferation. Hierarchical clustering revealed distinct differences in the response of individual cell lines to BMPs, but also highlighted a synexpression group of genes for both ligands. Interestingly, the majority of the genes within these synexpression groups were shared by the two ligands, probably representing the core molecular responses common to BMP4 and BMP7 signaling pathways. Conclusions All in all, we show that BMP signaling has a remarkable effect on gene transcription in breast cancer cells and that the functions affected follow a logical temporal pattern. Our results also uncover components of the common cellular transcriptional response to BMP4 and BMP7. Most importantly, this study provides a list of potential novel BMP target

  3. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Piersanti

    Full Text Available Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2 are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR.

  4. Understanding the anchoring behavior of titanium carbide-based MXenes depending on the functional group in Lisbnd S batteries: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Eun Seob; Yi, Gyu Seong; Je, Minyeong; Lee, Youngbin; Chung, Yong-Chae

    2017-02-01

    In this study, the properties of F-functionalized Ti2C (Ti2CF2) and O-functionalized Ti2C (Ti2CO2) as conductive anchoring materials for lithium-sulfur (Lisbnd S) batteries were investigated using the density functional theory (DFT). It was confirmed that both of Ti2CF2 and Ti2CO2 will suppress the shuttle effect by different suppressing mechanisms depending on the Ti2CF2 and Ti2CO2. The F-functionalized surface of Ti2CF2 suppresses the shuttle effect by strong interaction with lithium polysulfides (LiPSs). On the other hand, the shuttle effect is suppressed on the O-functionalized surface by converting soluble high-order LiPSs (Li2S8, Li2S7, and Li2S6) to insoluble elemental sulfur. In addition, the redox reaction of anchored LiPSs takes place because Ti2CF2 and Ti2CO2 show metallic properties after anchoring the LiPSs. As a result, the Fsbnd and O-functionalized surfaces of the Ti2C-based MXenes will contribute to suppressing the shuttle effect as conductive anchoring materials for Lisbnd S batteries. This theoretical study will provide further insight into the application of MXenes as a conductive anchoring material for Lisbnd S batteries.

  5. Preliminary Content Evaluation of the North Anna High Burn-Up Sister Fuel Rod Segments for Transportation in the 10-160B and NAC-LWT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) Program has transported high-burnup nuclear sister fuel rods from a commercial nuclear power plant for purposes of evaluation and testing. The evaluation and testing of high-burnup used nuclear fuel is integral to DOE initiatives to collect information useful in determining the integrity of fuel cladding for future safe transportation of the fuel, and for determining the effects of aging, on the integrity of UNF subjected to extended storage and subsequent transportation. The UFDC Program, in collaboration with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the commercial nuclear industry, has obtained individual used nuclear fuel rods for testing. The rods have been received at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for both separate effects testing (SET) and small-scale testing (SST). To meet the research objectives, testing on multiple 6 inch fuel rod pins cut from the rods at ORNL will be performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Up to 10 rod equivalents will be shipped. Options were evaluated for multiple shipments using the 10-160B (based on 4.5 rod equivalents) and a single shipment using the NAC-LWT. Based on the original INL/Virginia Power transfer agreement, the rods are assumed to 152 inches in length with a 0.374-inch diameter. This report provides a preliminary content evaluation for use of the 10-160B and NAC-LWT for transporting those fuel rod pins from ORNL to PNNL. This report documents the acceptability of using these packagings to transport the fuel segments from ORNL to PNNL based on the following evaluations: enrichment, A2 evaluation, Pu-239 FGE evaluation, heat load, shielding (both gamma and neutron), and content weight/structural evaluation.

  6. The pH-dependent release of platinum group elements (PGEs) from gasoline and diesel fuel catalysts: Implication for weathering in soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchá, Veronika; Mihaljevič, Martin; Ettler, Vojtěch; Strnad, Ladislav

    2016-04-15

    Powdered samples of new and old gasoline catalysts (Pt, Pd, Rh) and new and old diesel (Pt) catalysts were subjected to a pH-static leaching procedure (pH 2-9) coupled with thermodynamic modeling using PHREEQC-3 to verify the release and mobility of PGEs (platinum group elements). PGEs were released under acidic conditions, mostly exhibiting L-shaped leaching patterns: diesel old: 5.47, 0.005, 0.02; diesel new: 68.5, 0.23, 0.11; gasoline old: 0.1, 11.8, 4.79; gasoline new 2.6, 25.2, 35.9 in mg kg(-1) for Pt, Pd and Rh, respectively. Only the new diesel catalyst had a strikingly different leaching pattern with elevated concentrations at pH 4, probably influenced by the dissolution of the catalyst carrier and washcoat. The pH-static experiment coupled with thermodynamic modeling was found to be an effective instrument for understanding the leaching behavior of PGEs under various environmental conditions, and indicated that charged Pt and Rh species may be adsorbed on the negatively charged surface of kaolinite or Mn oxides in the soil system, whereas uncharged Pd and Rh species may remain mobile in soil solutions.

  7. [BPO-Specific, complement-dependant cell-lysis of differently sensitized sheep red cells: evaluation of haptenic groups and their influence on IgM and IgG-induced lysis (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedermann, G; Stemberger, H; Förster, O; Müller, M

    1976-04-01

    Sheep erythrocytes were coated with bencylpenicilloyl-(BPO)groups. Different incubation periods resulted in erythrocyte preparations with different hapten density. Complement dependent lysis induced by IgM or IgG antibodies was studied with the cell preparations. The calculation of hapten density on the erythrocyte surface was not possible by direct measurement of coupled radioactive BPO since more than 90% of radioactive material was found in the soluble supernatant after osmotic cell lysis and less than 10% was fixed to the cellular membrane. Measurement of membrane bound immunologically relevant BPO-groups was achieved, therefore, by comparison of the inhibitory capacity of the test cells with that of a standard cell preparation. The latter consisted of tannic acid treated erythrocytes coated with protein complexed radioactive BPO. Surface hapten density of the different target cell preparations varied between 1.9 x 10(5) and 4.8 10(5) BPO-groups per cell depending on the time of incubation. Complement dependent antibody mediated cell lysis was significantly reduced by reduction of haptenic sites per target cell, IgG induced lysis being much more affected than hemolysis induced by IgM antibodies. Statistical calculations led to the conclusion that 18,000 protein islets per cell bearing 4 or more BPO-groups are not sufficient for hemolysis induced by IgG antibodies. 48,000 protein islets with this hapten density are necessary for "optimal" sensitization. IgG antibodies must be apparently bound to the cell surface in bivalent form.

  8. "The contribution of chronic diseases to the prevalence of dependence among older people in Latin America, China and India: a 10/66 Dementia Research Group population-based survey"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salas Aquiles

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The number of older people is set to increase dramatically worldwide. Demographic changes are likely to result in the rise of age-related chronic diseases which largely contribute to years lived with a disability and future dependence. However dependence is much less studied although intrinsically linked to disability. We investigated the prevalence and correlates of dependence among older people from middle income countries. Methods A one-phase cross-sectional survey was carried out at 11 sites in seven countries (urban sites in Cuba, Venezuela, and Dominican Republic, urban and rural sites in Peru, Mexico, China and India. All those aged 65 years and over living in geographically defined catchment areas were eligible. In all, 15,022 interviews were completed with an informant interview for each participant. The full 10/66 Dementia Research Group survey protocol was applied, including ascertainment of depression, dementia, physical impairments and self-reported diagnoses. Dependence was interviewer-rated based on a key informant's responses to a set of open-ended questions on the participant's needs for care. We estimated the prevalence of dependence and the independent contribution of underlying health conditions. Site-specific prevalence ratios were meta-analysed, and population attributable prevalence fractions (PAPF calculated. Results The prevalence of dependence increased with age at all sites, with a tendency for the prevalence to be lower in men than in women. Age-standardised prevalence was lower in all sites than in the USA. Other than in rural China, dementia made the largest independent contribution to dependence, with a median PAPF of 34% (range 23%-59%. Other substantial contributors were limb impairment (9%, 1%-46%, stroke (8%, 2%-17%, and depression (8%, 1%-27%. Conclusion The demographic and health transitions will lead to large and rapid increases in the numbers of dependent older people particularly in

  9. The effect of dissolved hydrogen on the dissolution of {sup 233}U doped UO{sub 2}(s) high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbol, P. [Inst. for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Spahiu, K. (ed.) [and others

    2005-03-01

    In this report the results of the experimental work carried out in a large EU-research project (SFS, 2001-2004) on spent fuel stability in the presence of various amounts of near field hydrogen are presented. Studies of the dissolution of {sup 233}U doped UO{sub 2}(s) simulating 'old' spent fuel were carried out as static leaching tests, autoclave tests with various hydrogen concentrations and electrochemical tests. The results of the leaching behaviour of a high burn-up spent fuel pellet in 5 M NaCl solutions in the presence of 3.2 bar H{sub 2} pressure and of MOX fuel in dilute synthetic groundwater under 53 bar H{sub 2} pressure are also presented. In all the experimental studies carried out in this project, a considerable effect of hydrogen in the dissolution rates of radioactive materials was observed. The experimental results obtained in this project with a-doped UO{sub 2}, high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel together with literature data give a reliable background to use fractional alteration/dissolution rates for spent fuel of the order of 10{sup -6}/yr - 10{sup -8}/yr with a recommended value of 4x10{sup -7}/yr for dissolved hydrogen concentrations above 10{sup -3} M and Fe(II) concentrations typical for European repository concepts. Finally, based on a review of the experimental data and available literature data, potential mechanisms of the hydrogen effect are also discussed. The work reported in this document was performed as part of the Project SFS of the European Commission 5th Framework Programme under contract no FIKW-CT-2001-20192 SFS. It represents the deliverable D10 of the experimental work package 'Key experiments using a-doped UO{sub 2} and real spent fuel', coordinated by SKB with the participation of ITU, FZK-INE, ENRESA, CIEMAT, ARMINES-SUBATECH and SKB.

  10. Calculation of Effect of Burnup History on Spent Fuel Reactivity Based on CASMO5%基于CASMO5的燃耗历史对乏燃料反应性的影响计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓波; 夏兆东; 朱庆福

    2015-01-01

    Based on the burnup credit of actinides+fission products (APU‐2) which are usually considered in spent fuel package ,the effect of power density and operating histo‐ry on k∞ was studied .All the burnup calculations are based on the two‐dimensional fuel assembly burnup program CASMO5 . The results show that taking the core average power density of specified power plus a bounding margin of 0.002 3 to k∞ ,and taking the operating history of specified power without shutdown during cycle and between cycles plus a bounding margin of 0.004 5 to k∞ can meet the bounding principle of burnup credit .%基于乏燃料贮存领域常用的锕系加裂变产物(APU‐2)级燃耗信任制,应用二维组件燃耗计算程序CASMO5,计算了燃耗过程中功率密度和运行历史对乏燃料 k∞的影响。结果表明:燃耗计算中,选择堆芯额定功率对应的平均功率密度,同时k∞附加0.0023的包络裕度,运行历史选择循环内及循环间无停堆额定功率运行,同时 k∞附加0.0045的包络裕度,可满足燃耗信任制中包络性原则。

  11. Development of Burnup Calculation Code for Pebble-bed High Temperature Reactor at Equilibrium State%球床高温堆平衡态燃耗计算程序的开发

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱贵凤; 邹杨; 李明海; 严睿; 彭红花; 徐洪杰

    2015-01-01

    The burnup calculation code PBRE coupling MCNP5 and ORIGEN2 was developed for pebble‐bed high temperature reactor at equilibrium state ,and it can be used to analyze the neutronic performance of equilibrium core .The iteration method was optimized in order to save Monte Carlo calculation time ,and the convergence can be reached in 10 iterative steps .The average discharged burnup for HTR‐10 is consistent with literature ,and it indicates that the PBRE is suitable to analyze the burnup for pebble‐bed reactor at equilibrium state .%基于MCNP5和ORIGEN2耦合方法,开发了平衡态下球床高温堆的燃耗计算程序PBRE ,用于堆的性能价值分析。为节省蒙特卡罗计算时间,对迭代收敛的方法进行优化,使之可在10个迭代步内收敛。使用PBRE对清华大学H T R‐10进行建模计算,得到的平均卸料燃耗深度与文献报道值一致,表明PBRE程序适用于球床堆平衡态的燃耗分析。

  12. Chemical states of fission products in irradiated (U{sub 0.3}Pu{sub 0.7})C{sub 1+x} fuel at high burn-ups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Renu [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)]. E-mail: arenu@barc.gov.in; Venugopal, V. [Fuel Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2006-12-01

    The chemical states of fission products have been theoretically determined for the irradiated carbide fuel of Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam, India, at different burn-ups. The SOLGASMIX-PV computer code was used to determine the equilibrium chemical composition of the fuel. The system was assumed to be composed of a gaseous phase at one atmosphere pressure, and various solid phases. The distribution of elements in these phases and their chemical states at different temperatures were calculated as a function of burn-up. The FBTR fuel (U{sub 0.3}Pu{sub 0.7})C{sub 1+x}, was loaded with C/M values in the range, 1.03-1.06. The present calculations indicated that even for the lowest starting C/M of 1.03 in the FBTR fuel, the liquid metal phase of (U, Pu), should not appear at a burn-up as high as 150 GWd/t.

  13. Electron probe microanalysis of a METAPHIX UPuZr metallic alloy fuel irradiated to 7.0 at.% burn-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brémier, S.; Inagaki, K.; Capriotti, L.; Poeml, P.; Ogata, T.; Ohta, H.; Rondinella, V. V.

    2016-11-01

    The METAPHIX project is a collaboration between CRIEPI and JRC-ITU investigating safety and performance of a closed fuel cycle option based on fast reactor metal alloy fuels containing Minor Actinides (MA). The aim of the project is to investigate the behaviour of this type of fuel and demonstrate the transmutation of MA under irradiation. A UPuZr metallic fuel sample irradiated to a burn-up of 7 at.% was examined by electron probe microanalysis. The fuel sample was extensively characterised qualitatively and quantitatively using elemental X-ray imaging and point analysis techniques. The analyses reveal a significant redistribution of the fuel components along the fuel radius highlighting a nearly complete depletion of Zr in the central part of the fuel. Numerous rare earth and fission products secondary phases are present in various compositions. Fuel cladding chemical interaction was observed with creation of a number of intermediary layers affecting a cladding depth of 15-20 μm and migration of cladding elements to the fuel.

  14. Heterogeneous UO2 fuel irradiated up to a high burn-up: Investigation of the HBS and of fission product releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirot, J.; Lamontagne, J.; Nakae, N.; Kitagawa, T.; Kosaka, Y.; Tverberg, T.

    2013-11-01

    A UO2 fuel with a heterogeneous distribution of 235U was irradiated up to a high burn-up in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR). The last 100 days of irradiation were performed with an increased level of linear power. The effect of the heterogeneous fissile isotope distribution on the formation of the HBS was studied free of the possible influence of Pu which exists in heterogeneous MOX fuels. The HBS formed in 235U-rich agglomerates and its main characteristics were very similar to those of the HBS formed in Pu-rich agglomerates of heterogeneous MOX fuels. The maximum local contents of Nd and Xe before HBS formation were studied in this fuel. In addition to a Pu effect that promotes the HBS phenomenon, comparison with previous results for heterogeneous MOX fuels showed that the local fission product concentration was not the only parameter that has to be taken into consideration. It appears that the local actinide depletion by fission and/or the energy locally deposited through electronic interactions in the fission fragment recoils also have an effect on the HBS formation threshold. Moreover, a major release of fission gases from the peripheral 235U-rich agglomerates of HBS bubbles and a Cs radial movement are also evidenced in this heterogeneous UO2. Cs deposits on the peripheral grain boundaries, including the HBS grain boundaries, are considered to reveal the release paths. SUP>235U-rich agglomerates, SUP>235U-poor areas, an intermediate phase with intermediate 235U concentrations. Short fuel rods were fabricated with these pellets. The main characteristics of these fuel rods are shown in Table 1.These rods were irradiated to high burn-ups in the IFA-609/626 of the HBWR and then one was irradiated in the IFA-702 for 100 days. Fig. 2 shows the irradiation history of this fuel. The final average burn-up of the rod was 69 GWd/tU. Due to the flux differences along the rod, however, the average burn-up of the cross section examined was 63 GWd/tU. This fuel

  15. Postirradiation examinations of fuel pins from the GCFR F-1 series of mixed-oxide fuel pins at 5. 5 at. % burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strain, R V; Johnson, C E

    1978-05-01

    Postirradiation examinations were performed on five fuel pins from the Gas-Cooled Fast-Breeder Reactor F-1 experiment irradiated in EBR-II to a peak burnup of approximately 5.5 at. %. These encapsulated fuel pins were irradiated at peak-power linear ratings from approximately 13 to 15 kW/ft and peak cladding inside diameter temperatures from approximately 625 to 760/sup 0/C. The maximum diametral change that occurred during irradiation was 0.2% ..delta..D/D/sub 0/. The maximum fuel-cladding chemical interaction depth was 2.6 mils in fuel pin G-1 and 1 mil or less in the other three pins examined destructively. Significant migration of the volatile fission products occurred axially to the fuel-blanket interfaces. Teh postirradiation examination data indicate that fuel melted at the inner surface of the annular fuel pellets in the two highest power rating fuel pins, but little axial movement of fuel occurred.

  16. On the oxidation state of UO 2 nuclear fuel at a burn-up of around 100 MWd/kgHM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. T.; Rondinella, V. V.; Papaioannou, D.; Winckel, S. Van; Goll, W.; Manzel, R.

    2005-10-01

    Results for the radial distribution of the oxygen potential and stoichiometry of a PWR fuel with an average pellet burn-up of 102 MWd/kgHM are presented. The local Δ G bar (O2) of the fuel was measured using a miniature solid state galvanic cell, the local O/U ratio was calculated from the lattice parameter measured by micro-X-ray diffraction and the local O/M ratio was derived from the fuel composition determined by ICP-MS. During irradiation the O/U ratio of the fuel decreased from 2.005 to 1.991 ± 0.008. The average fuel O/M ratio was 1.973 compared with the stoichiometric value of 1.949. The amount of free oxygen in the fuel, represented by the difference between these two quantities, increased from the centre to periphery of the pellet. Similarly, the Δ G bar (O2) of the fuel increased from -370 kJ mol-1 at r/r0 = 0.1 to -293 kJ mol-1 at r/r0 = 0.975. Thus, the Δ G bar (O2) of the fuel had not been buffered by the oxidation of fission product Mo. About one-quarter of the free oxygen accumulated during the irradiation had been gettered by the Zircaloy cladding.

  17. Determination of plutonium content in high burnup pressurized water reactor fuel samples and its use for isotope correlations for isotopic composition of plutonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joe, Kihsoo; Jeon, Young-Shin; Han, Sun-Ho; Lee, Chang-Heon; Ha, Yeong-Keong; Song, Kyuseok

    2012-06-01

    The content of plutonium isotopes in high burnup pressurized water reactor fuel samples was examined using both alpha spectrometry and mass spectrometry after anion exchange separation. The measured values were compared with results calculated by the ORIGEN-2 code. On average, the ratios (m/c) of the measured values (m) over the calculated values (c) were 1.22±0.16 for (238)Pu, 1.02±0.14 for (239)Pu, 1.08±0.06 for (240)Pu, 1.06±0.16 for (241)Pu, and 1.13±0.08 for (242)Pu. Using the Pu data obtained in this work, correlations were derived between the alpha activity ratios of (238)Pu/((239)Pu+(240)Pu), the alpha specific activities of Pu, and the atom % abundances of the Pu isotopes. Using these correlations, the atom % abundances of the plutonium isotopes in the target samples were calculated. These calculated results agreed within a range from 2 to 8% of the experimentally derived values according to the isotopes of plutonium.

  18. Group I mGluR activation reverses cocaine-induced accumulation of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors in nucleus accumbens synapses via a protein kinase C-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, James E; Loweth, Jessica A; Ford, Kerstin A; Marinelli, Michela; Wolf, Marina E; Tseng, Kuei Y

    2011-10-12

    Following prolonged withdrawal from extended access cocaine self-administration in adult rats, high conductance Ca2+ -ermeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) accumulate in nucleus accumbens (NAc) synapses and mediate the expression of "incubated" cue-induced cocaine craving. Using patch-clamp recordings from NAc slices prepared after extended access cocaine self-administration and >45 d of withdrawal, we found that group I metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) stimulation using 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG; 50 μm) rapidly eliminates the postsynaptic CP-AMPAR contribution to NAc synaptic transmission. This is accompanied by facilitation of Ca2+ -impermeable AMPAR (CI-AMPAR)-mediated transmission, suggesting that DHPG may promote an exchange between CP-AMPARs and CI-AMPARs. In saline controls, DHPG also reduced excitatory transmission but this occurred through a CB1 receptor-dependent presynaptic mechanism rather than an effect on postsynaptic AMPARs. Blockade of CB1 receptors had no significant effect on the alterations in AMPAR transmission produced by DHPG in the cocaine group. Interestingly, the effect of DHPG in the cocaine group was mediated by mGluR1 whereas its effect in the saline group was mediated by mGluR5. These results indicate that regulation of synaptic transmission in the NAc is profoundly altered after extended access cocaine self-administration and prolonged withdrawal. Furthermore, they suggest that activation of mGluR1 may represent a potential strategy for reducing cue-induced cocaine craving in abstinent cocaine addicts.

  19. Optimization of FRAM precision for isotopic measurements on large samples of low-burnup PuO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vo, Duc T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wenz, Tracy R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sampson, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The gamma ray spectrum of plutonium contains measurable gamma rays ranging in energy from 60 keV to above 1 MeV. The FRAM gamma ray isotopic analysis code can analyze data from all types of HPGe detectors in this energy range typically using planar detectors in the energy range 60-210 keV or 120-451 keV and using coaxial detectors in the energy ranges 120-451 keV or 200-1001 keV. The statistical measurement precision depends upon the detector/energy range combination as well as the characteristics of the sample and any addition filters. In this paper we carry out the optimization of measurement precision for the important case of a multi-kg sample of low bumup PuO{sub 2} contained in a DOE 3013 Standard-compatible long-teml storage container.

  20. Nicotine Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotine dependence Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Nicotine dependence ― also called tobacco dependence ― is an addiction to tobacco products caused by the drug nicotine. Nicotine dependence means you can't stop using the substance, ...

  1. Bias estimates used in lieu of validation of fission products and minor actinides in MCNP Keff calculations for PWR burnup credit casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Don [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL; Bowen, Douglas G [ORNL

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation recently issued Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) 8, Revision 3. This ISG provides guidance for burnup credit (BUC) analyses supporting transport and storage of PWR pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in casks. Revision 3 includes guidance for addressing validation of criticality (keff) calculations crediting the presence of a limited set of fission products and minor actinides (FP&MA). Based on previous work documented in NUREG/CR-7109, recommendation 4 of ISG-8, Rev. 3, includes a recommendation to use 1.5 or 3% of the FP&MA worth to conservatively cover the bias due to the specified FP&MAs. This bias is supplementary to the bias and bias uncertainty resulting from validation of keff calculations for the major actinides in SNF and does not address extension to actinides and fission products beyond those identified herein. The work described in this report involves comparison of FP&MA worths calculated using SCALE and MCNP with ENDF/B-V, -VI, and -VII based nuclear data and supports use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias when either SCALE or MCNP codes are used for criticality calculations, provided the other conditions of the recommendation 4 are met. The method used in this report may also be applied to demonstrate the applicability of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias to other codes using ENDF/B V, VI or VII based nuclear data. The method involves use of the applicant s computational method to generate FP&MA worths for a reference SNF cask model using specified spent fuel compositions. The applicant s FP&MA worths are then compared to reference values provided in this report. The applicants FP&MA worths should not exceed the reference results by more than 1.5% of the reference FP&MA worths.

  2. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  3. Amygdalar activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors produces anti- and pro-conflict effects depending upon animal sex in a sexually dimorphic conditioned conflict-based anxiety model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jesús-Burgos, María I; González-García, Stephanie; Cruz-Santa, Yanira; Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L

    2016-04-01

    Women are more susceptible than men to develop anxiety disorders, however, the mechanisms involved are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs), a target for anxiety disorders, and whether estradiol may modulate conflict-based anxiety in female rats by using the Vogel Conflict Test (VCT). We used ovariectomized female rats with high (OVX+EB) and low (OVX) estradiol levels and intact male rats to evaluate sex differences. Infusion of (S)-3,5-Dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG), a group I mGluR agonist, into the basolateral amygdala, a region involved in anxiety-responses, statistically increased the number of shocks in OVX, but not OVX+EB female rats at 0.1, nor at 1.0 μM. In contrast, DHPG statistically decreased the number of shocks in male rats at 1.0 μM only. DHPG (0.1 μM) increased the number of recoveries in OVX, but not OVX+EB or male rats. Sex differences were detected for the number of shocks, recoveries and punished licks, where female rats displayed more conflict than male rats. Western blot analyses showed that protein expression of mGluR1, but not mGluR5 was higher in OVX+EB>OVX>male rats in the amygdala, whereas no significant differences were detected in the hippocampus, olfactory bulb and/or the periaqueductal gray. Therefore, DHPG produced paradoxical effects that are sex dependent; producing anxiolytic-like effects in female rats, while anxiogenic-like effects in male rats according to the VCT. These results highlight the importance of including female experimental models to underpin the neural circuitry of anxiety according to sex and for the screening of novel anxiolytic compounds.

  4. Group morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, Jos B.T.M.

    2000-01-01

    In its original form, mathematical morphology is a theory of binary image transformations which are invariant under the group of Euclidean translations. This paper surveys and extends constructions of morphological operators which are invariant under a more general group TT, such as the motion group

  5. Numerical simulation of radioisotope's dependency on containment performance for large dry PWR containment under severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehboob, Khurram, E-mail: khurramhrbeu@gmail.com [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 145-31 Nantong Street, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Xinrong, Cao [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 145-31 Nantong Street, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Ahmed, Raheel [College of Automation, Harbin Engineering University, 145-31 Nantong Street, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Ali, Majid [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 145-31 Nantong Street, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Calculation and comparison of activity of BURN-UP code with ORIGEN2 code. • Development of SASTC computer code. • Radioisotopes dependency on containment ESFs. • Mitigation in atmospheric release with ESFs operation. • Variation in radioisotopes source term with spray flow and pH value. -- Abstract: During the core melt accidents large amount of fission products can be released into the containment building. These fission products escape into the environment to contribute in accident source term. The mitigation in environmental release is demanded for such radiological consequences. Thus, countermeasures to source term, mitigations of release of radioactivity have been studied for 1000 MWe PWR reactor. The procedure of study is divided into five steps: (1) calculation and verification of core inventory, evaluated by BURN-UP code, (2) containment modeling based on radioactivity removal factors, (3) selection of potential accidents initiates the severe accident, (4) calculation of release of radioactivity, (5) study the dependency of release of radioactivity on containment engineering safety features (ESFs) inducing mitigation. Loss of coolant accident (LOCA), small break LOCA and flow blockage accidents (FBA) are selected as initiating accidents. The mitigation effect of ESFs on source term has been studied against ESFs performance. Parametric study of release of radioactivity has been carried out by modeling and simulating the containment parameters in MATLAB, which takes BURN-UP outcomes as input along with the probabilistic data. The dependency of iodine and aerosol source term on boric and caustic acid spray has been determined. The variation in source term mitigation with the variation of containment spray flow rate and pH values have been studied. The variation in containment retention factor (CRF) has also been studied with the ESF performance. A rapid decrease in source term is observed with the increase in pH value.

  6. Group devaluation and group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, C.W.; Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M.; Vliek, M.L.W.; Hirt, E.

    2010-01-01

    In three studies, we showed that increased in-group identification after (perceived or actual) group devaluation is an assertion of a (preexisting) positive social identity that counters the negative social identity implied in societal devaluation. Two studies with real-world groups used order manip

  7. Path Dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Setterfield

    2015-01-01

    Path dependency is defined, and three different specific concepts of path dependency – cumulative causation, lock in, and hysteresis – are analyzed. The relationships between path dependency and equilibrium, and path dependency and fundamental uncertainty are also discussed. Finally, a typology of dynamical systems is developed to clarify these relationships.

  8. "The contribution of chronic diseases to the prevalence of dependence among older people in Latin America, China and India: a 10/66 Dementia Research Group population-based survey"

    OpenAIRE

    Salas Aquiles; de Rodriguez Juan; Pichardo Guillermina; Liu Zhaorui; Hernandez Milagros; Jacob KS; AT, Jotheeswaran; Huang Yueqin; Guerra Mariella; Acosta Daisy; Ferri Cleusa P; Sousa Renata M; Sosa Ana; Williams Joseph; Zuniga Tirso

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The number of older people is set to increase dramatically worldwide. Demographic changes are likely to result in the rise of age-related chronic diseases which largely contribute to years lived with a disability and future dependence. However dependence is much less studied although intrinsically linked to disability. We investigated the prevalence and correlates of dependence among older people from middle income countries. Methods A one-phase cross-sectional survey was ...

  9. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  10. MUYANG GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ With its headquarters in the historic city of Yangzhou,Jiangsu Muyang Group Co.,Ltd has since its founding in 1967 grown into a well-known group corporation whose activities cover research&development.project design,manufacturing,installation and services in a multitude of industries including feed machinery and engineering,storage engineering,grain machinery and engineering,environmental protection,conveying equipment and automatic control systems.

  11. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  12. Visual dependence and BPPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, K; Bronstein, A M; Faldon, M E; Mandalà, M; Murray, K; Silove, Y

    2012-06-01

    The increased visual dependence noted in some vestibular patients may be secondary to their vertigo. We examine whether a single, brief vertigo attack, such as in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), modifies visual dependency. Visual dependency was measured before and after the Hallpike manoeuvre with (a) the Rod and Frame and the Rod and Disc techniques whilst seated and (b) the postural sway induced by visual roll-motion stimulation. Three subject groups were studied: 20 patients with BPPV (history and positive Hallpike manoeuvre; PosH group), 20 control patients (history of BPPV but negative Hallpike manoeuvre; NegH group) and 20 normal controls. Our findings show that while both patient groups showed enhanced visual dependency, the PosH and the normal control group decreased visual dependency on repetition of the visual tasks after the Hallpike manoeuvre. NegH patients differed from PosH patients in that their high visual dependency did not diminish on repetition of the visual stimuli; they scored higher on the situational characteristic questionnaire ('visual vertigo' symptoms) and showed higher incidence of migraine. We conclude that long term vestibular symptoms increase visual dependence but a single BPPV attack does not increase it further. Repetitive visual motion stimulation induces adaptation in visual dependence in peripheral vestibular disorders such as BPPV. A positional form of vestibular migraine may underlie the symptoms of some patients with a history of BPPV but negative Hallpike manoeuvre. The finding that they have non adaptable increased visual dependency may explain visuo-vestibular symptoms in this group and, perhaps more widely, in patients with migraine.

  13. Algebraic Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    of algebraic groups (in a broad sense) has seen important developments in several directions, also related to representation theory and algebraic geometry. The workshop aimed at presenting some of these developments in order to make them accessible to a "general audience" of algebraic group......-theorists, and to stimulate contacts between participants. Each of the first four days was dedicated to one area of research that has recently seen decisive progress: \\begin{itemize} \\item structure and classification of wonderful varieties, \\item finite reductive groups and character sheaves, \\item quantum cohomology...... of homogeneous varieties, \\item representation categories and their connections to orbits and flag varieties. \\end{itemize} The first three days started with survey talks that will help to make the subject accessible to the next generation. The talks on the last day introduced to several recent advances...

  14. Group Anonymity

    CERN Document Server

    Chertov, Oleg; 10.1007/978-3-642-14058-7_61

    2010-01-01

    In recent years the amount of digital data in the world has risen immensely. But, the more information exists, the greater is the possibility of its unwanted disclosure. Thus, the data privacy protection has become a pressing problem of the present time. The task of individual privacy-preserving is being thoroughly studied nowadays. At the same time, the problem of statistical disclosure control for collective (or group) data is still open. In this paper we propose an effective and relatively simple (wavelet-based) way to provide group anonymity in collective data. We also provide a real-life example to illustrate the method.

  15. Informal groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. van den Berg; P. van Houwelingen; J. de Hart

    2011-01-01

    Original title: Informele groepen Going out running with a group of friends, rather than joining an official sports club. Individuals who decide to take action themselves rather than giving money to good causes. Maintaining contact with others not as a member of an association, but through an Inter

  16. An investigation into the origen of the interference generated during the measurement of the reactivity in a high burn-up reactor core%高燃耗堆芯反应性测量的干扰源研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈雄月; 吕大军; 裘希春; 韩承慈; 夏应军; 邓朝平; 张仲元

    2012-01-01

    回顾了1980年9月实验前,在反应堆噪声分析领域的技术发展概况.展示了在实验动力堆燃耗末、卸料前,用双探测器互相关频谱分析法(CCFS)测得的一组数据;和经过离线去本底拟合计算后,获得的动力学参数测量结果:αc=(144.57±2.09)s-1.介绍了数据获取过程中出现的异常情况;离线处理的方法;本底谱选定;拟合计算程序;计算结果和结论.还简要介绍了干扰源的来源及其强度计算概况.数据处理结果证明:在长期燃耗后的堆芯上应用噪声分析法,除了要克服大γ场的干扰外,还要严格消除本底中子场产生的不相关噪声干扰.%After a general review for the technical development before 1980's in the area of nuclear reactor noise analysis,a reactor dynamic parameter,ac = (144. 57 + 2. 09)s~1 , obtained through off-line background processing, is shown. The processed data is measured through double- detector cross correlation frequency spectral analysis (CCFS) for the experimental nuclear power reactor at the burn-up end in sept. 1980. This paper also presents the abnormal situations for data acquisition, the off-line data processing method,the background spectra selection for data processing and the program for the least-squares fit calculation. Here also explains how neutron background is generated and how its strength is calculated. This verifies the fact that after a long-term burn-up run, large y field must be suppressed and also more attention must be paid to the uncorrelated neutron noise from the fuel burn-up.

  17. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide that are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS offline and computing operations, hosting dedicated analysis efforts such as during the CMS Heavy Ion lead-lead running. With a majority of CMS sub-detectors now operating in a “shifterless” mode, many monitoring operations are now routinely performed from there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. The CMS Communications Group, CERN IT and the EVO team are providing excellent videoconferencing support for the rapidly-increasing number of CMS meetings. In parallel, CERN IT and ...

  18. Group play

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tychsen, Anders; Hitchens, Michael; Brolund, Thea

    2008-01-01

    of group dynamics, the influence of the fictional game characters and the comparative play experience between the two formats. The results indicate that group dynamics and the relationship between the players and their digital characters, are integral to the quality of the gaming experience in multiplayer......Role-playing games (RPGs) are a well-known game form, existing in a number of formats, including tabletop, live action, and various digital forms. Despite their popularity, empirical studies of these games are relatively rare. In particular there have been few examinations of the effects...... of the various formats used by RPGs on the gaming experience. This article presents the results of an empirical study, examining how multi-player tabletop RPGs are affected as they are ported to the digital medium. Issues examined include the use of disposition assessments to predict play experience, the effect...

  19. Lego Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence......, the management had, among many initiatives, decided to offshore and outsource a major chunk of its production to Flextronics. In this pursuit of rapid cost-cutting sourcing advantages, the LEGO Group planned to license out as much as 80 per cent of its production besides closing down major parts...... of the production in high cost countries. Confident with the prospects of the new partnership, the company signed a long-term contract with Flextronics. This decision eventually proved itself to have been too hasty, however. Merely three years after the contracts were signed, LEGO management announced that it would...

  20. Group Connections: Whole Group Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Dorothy

    2002-01-01

    A learner-centered approach to adult group instruction involved learners in investigating 20th-century events. The approach allowed learners to concentrate on different activities according to their abilities and gave them opportunities to develop basic skills and practice teamwork. (SK)

  1. Dependent Classes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gasiunas, Vaidas; Mezini, Mira; Ostermann, Klaus

    2007-01-01

    Virtual classes allow nested classes to be refined in subclasses. In this way nested classes can be seen as dependent abstractions of the objects of the enclosing classes. Expressing dependency via nesting, however, has two limitations: Abstractions that depend on more than one object cannot...... be modeled and a class must know all classes that depend on its objects. This paper presents dependent classes, a generalization of virtual classes that expresses similar semantics by parameterization rather than by nesting. This increases expressivity of class variations as well as the flexibility...... of their modularization. Besides, dependent classes complement multi-methods in scenarios where multi-dispatched abstractions rather than multi-dispatched method are needed. They can also be used to express more precise signatures of multi-methods and even extend their dispatch semantics. We present a formal semantics...

  2. Dependency Parsing

    CERN Document Server

    Kubler, Sandra; Nivre, Joakim

    2009-01-01

    Dependency-based methods for syntactic parsing have become increasingly popular in natural language processing in recent years. This book gives a thorough introduction to the methods that are most widely used today. After an introduction to dependency grammar and dependency parsing, followed by a formal characterization of the dependency parsing problem, the book surveys the three major classes of parsing models that are in current use: transition-based, graph-based, and grammar-based models. It continues with a chapter on evaluation and one on the comparison of different methods, and it close

  3. Burnup extension and evolution in the fuel management of EDF's nuclear power plants; Accroissement des taux de combustion et impact des evolutions de gestion sur l'exploitation des reacteurs du parc EDF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provost, J.L.; Thibault, X. [Electricite de France (EDF/DPN), 93 - Saint-Denis (France); Debes, M. [Electricite de France (EDF/DCN), 92 - Clamart (France); Kaplan, P. [Cogema, 78 - Velizy Villacoublay (France)

    2004-07-01

    Today the use of enhanced nuclear fuels that can sustain higher burnups has allowed a better optimization of the fuel management in nuclear power plants. The optimization for the near future is based on 3 aims: -) a better competitiveness of nuclear energy, longer campaigns mean a higher availability and less refueling so it has a direct impact on costs, -) a better flexibility to meet energy demand: a modulation of cycle lengths by more or less 2 months is possible by introducing or withdrawing 8 assemblies in the refueling load, this modulation will allow an optimization of the scheduling of the refueling shutdowns with respect to the seasonal energy demand peaks, -) a reduced volume of spent fuels (but with a higher level of radioactivity). (A.C.)

  4. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group, established at the start of 2010, has been strengthening the activities in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The Communications Group has invested a lot of effort to support the operations needs of CMS. Hence, the CMS Centres where physicists work on remote CMS shifts, Data Quality Monitoring, and Data Analysis are running very smoothly. There are now 55 CMS Centres worldwide, up from just 16 at the start of CMS data-taking. The latest to join are Imperial College London, the University of Iowa, and the Università di Napoli. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, which is now full repaired after the major flooding at the beginning of the year, has been at the centre of CMS offline and computing operations, most recently hosting a large fraction of the CMS Heavy Ion community during the lead-lead run. A number of sub-detector shifts can now take pla...

  5. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Communications Group has been busy in all three areas of its responsibility: (1) Communications Infrastructure, (2) Information Systems, and (3) Outreach and Education. Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin, is the centre of the CMS Offline and Computing operations, and a number of subdetector shifts can now take place there, rather than in the main Control Room at P5. A new CMS meeting room has been equipped for videoconferencing in building 42, next to building 40. Our building 28 meeting room and the facilities at P5 will be refurbished soon and plans are underway to steadily upgrade the ageing equipment in all 15 CMS meeting rooms at CERN. The CMS evaluation of the Vidyo tool indicates that it is not yet ready to be considered as a potential replacement for EVO. The Communications Group provides the CMS-TV (web) cha...

  6. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favalli, A., E-mail: afavalli@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vo, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Grogan, B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jansson, P. [Uppsala University, Uppsala (Sweden); Liljenfeldt, H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mozin, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Schwalbach, P. [European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg (Luxembourg); Sjöland, A. [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, Stockholm (Sweden); Tobin, S.J.; Trellue, H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vaccaro, S. [European Commission, DG Energy, Euratom Safeguards Luxemburg, Luxemburg (Luxembourg)

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)–Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI–SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute {sup 137}Cs count rate and the {sup 154}Eu/{sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs, {sup 106}Ru/{sup 137}Cs, and {sup 144}Ce/{sup 137}Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity’s behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  7. Determining initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel assemblies by analyzing passive gamma spectra measured at the Clab interim-fuel storage facility in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favalli, A.; Vo, D.; Grogan, B.; Jansson, P.; Liljenfeldt, H.; Mozin, V.; Schwalbach, P.; Sjöland, A.; Tobin, S. J.; Trellue, H.; Vaccaro, S.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI)-Spent Fuel (SF) project is to strengthen the technical toolkit of safeguards inspectors and/or other interested parties. The NGSI-SF team is working to achieve the following technical goals more easily and efficiently than in the past using nondestructive assay measurements of spent fuel assemblies: (1) verify the initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time of facility declaration; (2) detect the diversion or replacement of pins; (3) estimate the plutonium mass [which is also a function of the variables in (1)]; (4) estimate the decay heat; and (5) determine the reactivity of spent fuel assemblies. Since August 2013, a set of measurement campaigns has been conducted at the Central Interim Storage Facility for Spent Nuclear Fuel (Clab), in collaboration with Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB). One purpose of the measurement campaigns was to acquire passive gamma spectra with high-purity germanium and lanthanum bromide scintillation detectors from Pressurized Water Reactor and Boiling Water Reactor spent fuel assemblies. The absolute 137Cs count rate and the 154Eu/137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs, 106Ru/137Cs, and 144Ce/137Cs isotopic ratios were extracted; these values were used to construct corresponding model functions (which describe each measured quantity's behavior over various combinations of burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) and then were used to determine those same quantities in each measured spent fuel assembly. The results obtained in comparison with the operator declared values, as well as the methodology developed, are discussed in detail in the paper.

  8. Dipendenza-Indipendenza dal Campo e Linguaggio Scritto: Uno Studio su Gruppi di Studenti di Scuola Media Superiore (Field Dependence-Field Independence and the Written Language: A Study of Groups of Senior High School Students).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletto, Anna Maria

    1995-01-01

    This article describes research carried out with 389 Italian senior high school students to test the hypothesis that there is a relationship between one's written language and cognitive style. This study takes previous research in the area of field dependence and field independence in a new direction. (CFM)

  9. [Affective dependency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scantamburlo, G; Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

    2013-01-01

    Affective dependency is characterized by emotional distress (insecure attachment) and dependency to another person with a low self-esteem and reassurance need. The paper proposes a reflection on the definition of emotional dependency and the confusion caused by various denominations. Overprotective and authoritarian parenting, cultural and socio-environmental factors may contribute to the development of dependent personality. Psychological epigenetic factors, such as early socio-emotional trauma could on neuronal circuits in prefronto-limbic regions that are essential for emotional behaviour.We also focus on the interrelations between dependent personality, domestic violence and addictions. The objective for the clinician is to propose a restoration of self-esteem and therapeutic strategies focused on autonomy.

  10. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  11. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2010-01-01

    The recently established CMS Communications Group, led by Lucas Taylor, has been busy in all three of its main are areas of responsibility: Communications Infrastructure, Information Systems, and Outreach and Education Communications Infrastructure The damage caused by the flooding of the CMS Centre@CERN on 21st December has been completely repaired and all systems are back in operation. Major repairs were made to the roofs, ceilings and one third of the floor had to be completely replaced. Throughout these works, the CMS Centre was kept operating and even hosted a major press event for first 7 TeV collisions, as described below. Incremental work behind the scenes is steadily improving the quality of the CMS communications infrastructure, particularly Webcasting, video conferencing, and meeting rooms at CERN. CERN/IT is also deploying a pilot service of a new videoconference tool called Vidyo, to assess whether it might provide an enhanced service at a lower cost, compared to the EVO tool currently in w...

  12. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Communications Infrastructure The 55 CMS Centres worldwide are well used by physicists working on remote CMS shifts, Computing operations, data quality monitoring, data analysis and outreach. The CMS Centre@CERN in Meyrin is particularly busy at the moment, hosting about 50 physicists taking part in the heavy-ion data-taking and analysis. Three new CMS meeting room will be equipped for videoconferencing in early 2012: 40/5B-08, 42/R-031, and 28/S-029. The CMS-TV service showing LHC Page 1, CMS Page 1, etc. (http://cmsdoc.cern.ch/cmscc/projector/index.jsp) is now also available for mobile devices: http://cern.ch/mcmstv. Figure 12: Screenshots of CMS-TV for mobile devices Information Systems CMS has a new web site: (http://cern.ch/cms) using a modern web Content Management System to ensure content and links are managed and updated easily and coherently. It covers all CMS sub-projects and groups, replacing the iCMS internal pages. It also incorporates the existing CMS public web site (http:/...

  13. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  14. Path Dependence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mogens Ove

    Begrebet Path Dependence blev oprindelig udviklet inden for New Institutionel Economics af bl.a. David, Arthur og North. Begrebet har spredt sig vidt i samfundsvidenskaberne og undergået en udvikling. Dette paper propagerer for at der er sket så en så omfattende udvikling af begrebet, at man nu kan...... tale om 1. og 2. generation af Path Dependence begrebet. Den nyeste udvikling af begrebet har relevans for metodologi-diskusionerne i relation til Keynes...

  15. Angular and dose dependence of CR-39 neutron response for shape-selected tracks

    CERN Document Server

    Tam, N C; Lakosi, L

    1999-01-01

    A shape selection method corresponding to an energy discrimination was used to eliminate unwanted events disturbing evaluation of CR-39 detectors in detecting tracks induced by particles both of perpendicular and oblique incidence. The angular dependence of the response was examined, detecting fast neutrons from sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf with shape selection technique at various angles and distances. Also, the CR-39 track detectors with the sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf source were exposed to high gamma-intensity of a sup 6 sup 0 Co irradiation facility in the range 0.1 to 4.5 kGy, similar to the exposures inside spent fuel assemblies. Using the two functions the lower limit of burnup could be determined by the method.

  16. From mapping class groups to automorphism groups of free groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahl, Nathalie

    2005-01-01

    We show that the natural map from the mapping class groups of surfaces to the automorphism groups of free groups, induces an infinite loop map on the classifying spaces of the stable groups after plus construction. The proof uses automorphisms of free groups with boundaries which play the role...... of mapping class groups of surfaces with several boundary components....

  17. Modular realizations of hyperbolic Weyl groups

    CERN Document Server

    Kleinschmidt, Axel; Palmkvist, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We study the recently discovered isomorphisms between hyperbolic Weyl groups and unfamiliar modular groups. These modular groups are defined over integer domains in normed division algebras, and we focus on the cases involving quaternions and octonions. We outline how to construct and analyse automorphic forms for these groups; their structure depends on the underlying arithmetic properties of the integer domains. We also give a new realization of the Weyl group W(E8) in terms of unit octavians and their automorphism group.

  18. Integrated Groups and Smooth Distribution Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pedro J. MIANA

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we prove directly that α-times integrated groups define algebra homo-morphisms. We also give a theorem of equivalence between smooth distribution groups and α-times integrated groups.

  19. Group typicality, group loyalty and cognitive development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Meagan M

    2014-09-01

    Over the course of childhood, children's thinking about social groups changes in a variety of ways. Developmental Subjective Group Dynamics (DSGD) theory emphasizes children's understanding of the importance of conforming to group norms. Abrams et al.'s study, which uses DSGD theory as a framework, demonstrates the social cognitive skills underlying young elementary school children's thinking about group norms. Future research on children's thinking about groups and group norms should explore additional elements of this topic, including aspects of typicality beyond loyalty.

  20. Which finite simple groups are unit groups?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Occhipinti, Tommy

    2014-01-01

    We prove that if G is a finite simple group which is the unit group of a ring, then G is isomorphic to either (a) a cyclic group of order 2; (b) a cyclic group of prime order 2^k −1 for some k; or (c) a projective special linear group PSLn(F2) for some n ≥ 3. Moreover, these groups do all occur a...

  1. Background independence in a background dependent renormalization group

    CERN Document Server

    Labus, Peter; Slade, Zoë H

    2016-01-01

    Within the derivative expansion of conformally reduced gravity, the modified split Ward identities are shown to be compatible with the flow equations if and only if either the anomalous dimension vanishes or the cutoff profile is chosen to be power law. No solutions exist if the Ward identities are incompatible. In the compatible case, a clear reason is found for why Ward identities can still forbid the existence of fixed points; however, for any cutoff profile, a background independent (and parametrisation independent) flow equation is uncovered. Finally, expanding in vertices, the combined equations are shown generically to become either over-constrained or highly redundant beyond the six-point level.

  2. Group Cohesion in Experiential Growth Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Sam; Vasserman-Stokes, Elaina; Vannatta, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the effect of web-based journaling on changes in group cohesion within experiential growth groups. Master's students were divided into 2 groups. Both used a web-based platform to journal after each session; however, only 1 of the groups was able to read each other's journals. Quantitative data collected before and…

  3. Group Work Publication-1991.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimpfer, David G.

    1992-01-01

    Lists 21 new publications in group work, of which 9 are reviewed. Those discussed include publications on group counseling and psychotherapy, structured groups, support groups, psychodrama, and social group work. (Author/NB)

  4. Mechanism of Path Dependence and Path Creation in Organizational Structure Change:The Case of Lenovo Group%组织结构变革中的路径依赖与路径创造机制研究——以联想集团为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李海东; 林志扬

    2012-01-01

    Due to the strong tendency of historical determinism, the classical path dependence theory can not explain the significant technical and institutional change and the generation of a new path. These issues promote the researchers to switch the research perspective and pay more attention to the path creation and path breaking. Strategic action has a attribute of path dependence, and according to the contention that strategy determines structure and structure follows strategy, the article illustrates that path dependence is embedded in organizational structure system. From the perspective of the organizational structure model evolution! the mechanism of path dependence formation and path creation is discussed. At the same time, the dual impact of path dependence and path creation in organizational structure change on organizational operation is also discussed. Finally, the article takes Lenovo Group of China modern IT industry as an example to illustrates path dependence and path creation in the evolution process of Lenovo Group's organizational structure model.%经典的路径依赖理论因具有较强的历史决定论倾向,因而无法解释重大的技术和制度变革以及新路径的产生,这些问题推动着研究者将研究视角转向了路径创造和路径突破.战略行为具有路径依赖的特征,根据“战略决定结构、结构跟随战略”的思想,组织结构系统内生地蕴含着路径依赖特性.从组织结构模式演进的角度对组织中的路径依赖形成机制和路径创造机制进行研究,并讨论了组织结构变革中的路径依赖和路径创造对组织运行的双重影响.以联想集团为例,探讨了联想集团组织结构模式选择演化历程中的路径依赖和路径创造.

  5. Working Group Report: Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  6. Grouping Synonyms by Definitions

    CERN Document Server

    Falk, Ingrid; Jacquey, Evelyne; Venant, Fabienne

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for grouping the synonyms of a lemma according to its dictionary senses. The senses are defined by a large machine readable dictionary for French, the TLFi (Tr\\'esor de la langue fran\\c{c}aise informatis\\'e) and the synonyms are given by 5 synonym dictionaries (also for French). To evaluate the proposed method, we manually constructed a gold standard where for each (word, definition) pair and given the set of synonyms defined for that word by the 5 synonym dictionaries, 4 lexicographers specified the set of synonyms they judge adequate. While inter-annotator agreement ranges on that task from 67% to at best 88% depending on the annotator pair and on the synonym dictionary being considered, the automatic procedure we propose scores a precision of 67% and a recall of 71%. The proposed method is compared with related work namely, word sense disambiguation, synonym lexicon acquisition and WordNet construction.

  7. Renormalization Group Therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Tomboulis, E T

    2007-01-01

    We point out a general problem with the procedures commonly used to obtain improved actions from MCRG decimated configurations. Straightforward measurement of the couplings from the decimated configurations, by one of the known methods, can result into actions that do not correctly reproduce the physics on the undecimated lattice. This is because the decimated configurations are generally not representative of the equilibrium configurations of the assumed form of the effective action at the measured couplings. Curing this involves fine-tuning of the chosen MCRG decimation procedure, which is also dependent on the form assumed for the effective action. We illustrate this in decimation studies of the SU(2) LGT using Swendsen and Double Smeared Blocking decimation procedures. A single-plaquette improved action involving five group representations and free of this pathology is given.

  8. 1D Burnup Calculation of Fusion-Fission Hybrid Energy Reactor%聚变-裂变混合能源堆一维计算模型燃耗分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李茂生; 师学明; 伊炜伟

    2012-01-01

    Fusion-fission hybrid energy reactor is driven by Tokamak fusion source for energy production. Its subcritical zone uses the natural uranium as fuel and water as coolant. The neutron multiplication constant keff, energy multiplication factor M and tritium breeding ratio TBR of the ID hybrid energy reactor model were calculated by transport burnup code MCORGS. The neutron spectrum and nuclear density changing as a function of time show the characteristics of the hybrid energy reactors, which differs from the hybrid reactor for breed nuclear fuel and for spent fuel transmutation. The definition and results may be a reference to the other conceptual analysis.%聚变-裂变混合能源堆包括聚变中子源和以天然铀为燃料、水为冷却剂的次临界包层,主要目标是生产电力.利用输运燃耗耦合程序系统MCORGS计算了混合能源堆一维模型的燃耗,给出了中子有效增殖因数keff、能量放大倍数M、氚增殖比TBR等物理量随时间的变化.通过分析能谱和重要核素随燃耗时间的变化,说明混合能源堆与核燃料增殖、核废料嬗变混合堆的不同特点.本文给出的结果可作为混合堆中子输运、燃耗分析程序校验的参考数据,为混合堆概念研究提供了基础数据.

  9. Results of irradiation of (U0.55Pu0.45)N and (U0.4Pu0.6)N fuels in BOR-60 up to ˜12 at.% burn-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogozkin, B. D.; Stepennova, N. M.; Fedorov, Yu. Ye.; Shishkov, M. G.; Kryukov, F. N.; Kuzmin, S. V.; Nikitin, O. N.; Belyaeva, A. V.; Zabudko, L. M.

    2013-09-01

    In the article presented are the results of post-irradiation tests of helium bonded fuel pins with mixed mononitride fuel (U0.55Pu0.45)N and (U0.4Pu0.6)N having 85% density irradiated in BOR-60 reactor. Achieved maximum burn-up was, respectively, equal to 9.4 and 12.1 at.% with max linear heat rates 41.9 and 54.5 kW/m. Maximum irradiation dose was 43 dpa. No damage of claddings made of ChS-68 steel (20% cold worked) was observed, and ductility margin existed. Maximum depth of cladding corrosion was within 15 μm. Swelling rates of (U0.4Pu0.6)N and (U0.55Pu0.45)N were, respectively, ˜1.1% and ˜0.68% per 1 at.%. Gas release rate did not exceed 19.3% and 19%. Pattern of porosity distribution in the fuel influenced fuel swelling and gas release rates. Plutonium and uranium are uniformly distributed in the fuel, local minimum values of their content being caused by pores and cracks in the pellets. The observable peaks in content distribution are probably connected with the local formation of isolated phases (e.g. Mo, Pd) while the minimum values refer to fuel pores and cracks. Xenon and cesium tend to migrate from the hot sections of fuel, and therefore their min content is observed in the central section of the fuel pellets. Phase composition of the fuel was determined with X-ray diffractometer. The X-ray patterns of metallographic specimens were obtained by the scanning method (the step was 0.02°, the step exposition was equal to 2 s). From the X-ray diffraction analysis data, it follows that the nitrides of both fuel types have the single-phase structure with an FCC lattice (see Table 6).

  10. Group theories: relevance to group safety studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevento, A L

    1998-01-01

    Promoting safety in the workplace has been attempted in a variety of ways. Increasingly, industries are using groups such as safety teams and quality circles to promote worker safety. Group influences on individual behavior and attitudes have long been studied in the social psychology literature, but the theories have not been commonly found outside the psychology arena. This paper describes the group theories of group polarization, risky shift, social loafing, groupthink and team think and attempts to apply these theories to existing studies that examine work group influences on safety. Interesting parallels were found but only one study examined group influences as their primary focus of research. Since groups are increasingly used for safety promotion, future research on safety that studies group influences with respect to current group theories is recommended.

  11. Group Life Insurance

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The CERN Administration would like to remind you that staff members and fellows have the possibility to take out a life insurance contract on favourable terms through a Group Life Insurance.   This insurance is provided by the company Helvetia and is available to you on a voluntary basis. The premium, which varies depending on the age and gender of the person insured, is calculated on the basis of the amount of the death benefit chosen by the staff member/fellow and can be purchased in slices of 10,000 CHF.    The contract normally ends at the retirement age (65/67 years) or when the staff member/fellow leaves the Organization. The premium is deducted monthly from the payroll.   Upon retirement, the staff member can opt to maintain his membership under certain conditions.   More information about Group Life Insurance can be found at: Regulations (in French) Table of premiums The Pension Fund Benefit Service &...

  12. Interagency mechanical operations group numerical systems group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report consists of the minutes of the May 20-21, 1971 meeting of the Interagency Mechanical Operations Group (IMOG) Numerical Systems Group. This group looks at issues related to numerical control in the machining industry. Items discussed related to the use of CAD and CAM, EIA standards, data links, and numerical control.

  13. AREVA group overview; Presentation du groupe AREVA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-08

    This document presents the Group Areva, a world nuclear industry leader, from a financial holding company to an industrial group, operating in two businesses: the nuclear energy and the components. The structure and the market of the group are discussed, as the financial assets. (A.L.B.)

  14. Why some groups just feel better : The regulatory fit of group power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassenberg, K.; Jonas, K.J; Shah, J.Y; Brazy, P.C

    2007-01-01

    The current research applied the regulatory fit hypothesis (E. T. Higgins, 2000) to the evaluation of groups, suggesting that individuals' group appraisal depends on how well the groups fit their regulatory needs. Specifically, it was predicted that higher power groups would fit and be more valued b

  15. Chemical Dependence and Personality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Henrique Sancineto da Silva Nunes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the relationships between chemical dependency and personalitystructure in a Brazilian sample. Participants were college students (n=35 and patients of a drug recovery center (n= 48. Two personality scales based on the Big-5 Model were used to measure Extraversion and Agreeableness. A semi-structured interview was used to identify events in the patients' life histories that might support specific classifications. Participants' scores were also compared to Brazilian normative samples. The results showed significant differences between clinical and non-clinical groups in Agreeableness, but not in Extraversion. Logistic regression analyses were conducted using scales and interview aspects for predicting group membership. The model showed 92.1% general predictive power. Results pointed to the advantage of using both interview and objective techniques to assess individuals with antisocial personality symptoms.

  16. Introduction to Sporadic Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis J. Boya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an introduction to finite simple groups, in particular sporadic groups, intended for physicists. After a short review of group theory, we enumerate the 1+1+16=18 families of finite simple groups, as an introduction to the sporadic groups. These are described next, in three levels of increasing complexity, plus the six isolated ''pariah'' groups. The (old five Mathieu groups make up the first, smallest order level. The seven groups related to the Leech lattice, including the three Conway groups, constitute the second level. The third and highest level contains the Monster group M, plus seven other related groups. Next a brief mention is made of the remaining six pariah groups, thus completing the 5+7+8+6=26 sporadic groups. The review ends up with a brief discussion of a few of physical applications of finite groups in physics, including a couple of recent examples which use sporadic groups.

  17. Interpersonal dependency in alcoholic and obese men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, J K

    1995-06-01

    While psychological conflict about dependency needs of alcoholic and obese persons has been widely observed, few studies have examined differences in dependency characteristics between these clinical groups. The Interpersonal Dependency Inventory was administered to 22 alcoholic and 8 morbidly obese men in intensive treatment for alcohol and obesity. The original hypothesis that alcoholic and obese men would show similar dependency needs was supported. Dependency correlates of personality may serve as useful predictor variables in the clinical treatment of alcoholic and obese persons.

  18. Estimating Causal Effects from Multilevel Group-Allocation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gitelman, Alix I.

    2005-01-01

    In group-allocation studies for comparing behavioral, social, or educational interventions, subjects in the same group necessarily receive the same treatment, whereby a group and/or group-dynamic effect can confound the treatment effect. General counterfactual outcomes that depend on group characteristics, group membership, and treatment are…

  19. Free Boolean Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol’ga Sipacheva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Known and new results on free Boolean topological groups are collected. An account of the properties that these groups share with free or free Abelian topological groups and properties specific to free Boolean groups is given. Special emphasis is placed on the application of set-theoretic methods to the study of Boolean topological groups.

  20. Group Work: How to Use Groups Effectively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Alison

    2011-01-01

    Many students cringe and groan when told that they will need to work in a group. However, group work has been found to be good for students and good for teachers. Employers want college graduates to have developed teamwork skills. Additionally, students who participate in collaborative learning get better grades, are more satisfied with their…

  1. Homomorphisms of quantum groups

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Ralf; Woronowicz, Stanisław Lech

    2010-01-01

    We introduce some equivalent notions of homomorphisms between quantum groups that behave well with respect to duality of quantum groups. Our equivalent definitions are based on bicharacters, coactions, and universal quantum groups, respectively.

  2. MSUD Family Support Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Group The MSUD Family Support Group is a non-profit 501 (c)(3) organization for those with MSUD ... Family Support Group is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with no paid staff. Funds are needed ...

  3. Food Groups Recipes

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    15 pages In 2011, My Plate replaced the Food Pyramid as a visual representation for the USDA Dietary Guidelines. This publication, a group of recipes based on this new division of food groups, reflects the effort of the USDA and other groups to translate science-based research into everyday practice for Americans. Fifteen recipes (3 from each food group) show ways to use foods from each food group. They are complete with basic nutritional analyses and food group amounts.

  4. Locally minimal topological groups

    OpenAIRE

    Außenhofer, Lydia; Chasco, María Jesús; Dikranjan, Dikran; Domínguez, Xabier

    2009-01-01

    A Hausdorff topological group $(G,\\tau)$ is called locally minimal if there exists a neighborhood $U$ of 0 in $\\tau$ such that $U$ fails to be a neighborhood of zero in any Hausdorff group topology on $G$ which is strictly coarser than $\\tau.$ Examples of locally minimal groups are all subgroups of Banach-Lie groups, all locally compact groups and all minimal groups. Motivated by the fact that locally compact NSS groups are Lie groups, we study the connection between local minimality and the ...

  5. Ordered groups and infinite permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    1996-01-01

    The subjects of ordered groups and of infinite permutation groups have long en­ joyed a symbiotic relationship. Although the two subjects come from very different sources, they have in certain ways come together, and each has derived considerable benefit from the other. My own personal contact with this interaction began in 1961. I had done Ph. D. work on sequence convergence in totally ordered groups under the direction of Paul Conrad. In the process, I had encountered "pseudo-convergent" sequences in an ordered group G, which are like Cauchy sequences, except that the differences be­ tween terms of large index approach not 0 but a convex subgroup G of G. If G is normal, then such sequences are conveniently described as Cauchy sequences in the quotient ordered group GIG. If G is not normal, of course GIG has no group structure, though it is still a totally ordered set. The best that can be said is that the elements of G permute GIG in an order-preserving fashion. In independent investigations around that t...

  6. Communication in Organizational Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Monica RADU

    2007-01-01

    Organizational group can be defined as some persons between who exist interactive connections (functional, communication, affective, normative type). Classification of these groups can reflect the dimension, type of relationship or type of rules included. Organizational groups and their influence over the individual efficiency and the efficiency of the entire group are interconnected. Spontaneous roles in these groups sustain the structure of the relationship, and the personality of each indi...

  7. Group Psychotherapy in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ívarsson, Ómar

    2015-10-01

    In this overview of group psychotherapy in Iceland, an attempt will be made to describe how it is practiced today, give some glimpses into its earlier history, and clarify seven issues: (1) the standing of group psychotherapy in Iceland, its previous history, and the theoretical orientation of dynamic group therapy in the country; (2) the role of group therapy in the health care system; (3) how training in group therapy is organized; (4) the relationship between group psychotherapy research and clinical practice; (5) which issues/processes can be identified as unique to therapy groups in Iceland; and (6) how important are group-related issues within the social background of the country; and (7) what group work holds for the future.

  8. Toleration, Groups, and Multiculturalism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2014-01-01

    . The chapter relates the different possible meanings of groups toleration to widespread criticisms of multiculturalism for being excessively 'groupist' (e.g. to essentialise or reify groups), to promote group rights over individual rights, or to deny or ignore the internal heterogeneity of groups...... or the multiple identity affiliations of individuals. The chapter suggests that some of these standard criticisms of multiculturalism for being overly tolerant of minority groups, or being so in a way elevating groups over individuals, are less pressing on some understandings of the meaning of 'group......' as an object of policies of multicultural toleration than on others. So the chapter both contributes to the conceptual understanding of toleration and groups and to the normative debates about multiculturalism insofar as these turn on the toleration of groups....

  9. Locally minimal topological groups

    CERN Document Server

    enhofer, Lydia Au\\ss; Dikranjan, Dikran; Domínguez, Xabier

    2009-01-01

    A Hausdorff topological group $(G,\\tau)$ is called locally minimal if there exists a neighborhood $U$ of 0 in $\\tau$ such that $U$ fails to be a neighborhood of zero in any Hausdorff group topology on $G$ which is strictly coarser than $\\tau.$ Examples of locally minimal groups are all subgroups of Banach-Lie groups, all locally compact groups and all minimal groups. Motivated by the fact that locally compact NSS groups are Lie groups, we study the connection between local minimality and the NSS property, establishing that under certain conditions, locally minimal NSS groups are metrizable. A symmetric subset of an abelian group containing zero is said to be a GTG set if it generates a group topology in an analogous way as convex and symmetric subsets are unit balls for pseudonorms on a vector space. We consider topological groups which have a neighborhood basis at zero consisting of GTG sets. Examples of these locally GTG groups are: locally pseudo--convex spaces, groups uniformly free from small subgroups (...

  10. 小组心理护理对酒依赖患者戒断症状和心理渴求的影响%Effect of group psychological care on the withdrawal symptoms and psychological craving of patients with alcohol dependence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐秀玲

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect of group psychological care on the withdrawal symptoms and psychological craving of patients with alcohol dependence. Methods: 48 patients with alcohol dependence were randomly divided into a study group and a control group ( 24 cases in each group ). The patients in both groups were given conventional treatment and nursing care and the patients in the study group were given extra group psychological care. AWS and AUQ were used to make an assessment of the patients respectively on admission and in the 4th week after admission. Results: The repeated survey variance analysis showed that the time factor had main effect on psychiatric symptoms, autonomic nerve symptoms and psychological craving scores ( P <0. 01 );the intervention factors had main effect on psychiatric symptoms and psychological craving scores ( P <0. 05 ,P <0. 01 );the intervention factors and time factor had interaction effect on psychiatric symptoms and psychological craving scores(P <0. 05,P <0.01 );the stepwise regression analysis found that the reduction value after alcohol withdrawal was influenced by psychiatric symptoms and psychological nursing intervention before the intervention ( P < 0. 01 );the reduction value of autonomic nerve symptoms was influenced by autonomic nerve symptoms and drinking time before the intervention ( P <0. 05 ,P <0. 01 );the reduction value of psychological craving was influenced by psychological craving,psychological nursing intervention and drinking time before the intervention ( P <0. 01 ). Conclusion: The group psychological care can markedly alleviate the withdrawal symptoms and psychological craving symptoms. And the symptoms before intervention and drinking time may affect the degree of improvement of withdrawal symptoms and psychological craving.%目的:探讨小组心理护理对酒依赖患者戒断症状和心理渴求的影响.方法:将48例酒依赖患者随机分为研究组和对照组各24例,均给予戒酒科常

  11. Higher arithmetic Chow groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gil, J I Burgos

    2009-01-01

    We give a new construction of higher arithmetic Chow groups for quasi-projective arithmetic varieties over a field. Our definition agrees with the higher arithmetic Chow groups defined by Goncharov for projective arithmetic varieties over a field. These groups are the analogue, in the Arakelov context, of the higher algebraic Chow groups defined by Bloch. The degree zero group agrees with the arithmetic Chow groups of Burgos. Our new construction is shown to be a contravariant functor and is endowed with a product structure, which is commutative and associative.

  12. Psychological characteristics of group cohesion athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheriff Sarhan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The basic components of group cohesion in sport teams. An analysis of publications on cohesion within the groups where an interconnection of individual goals of each participant group with common goals and the end result of teamwork. The concept of harmony in the team sports, where the rate of group cohesion is dependent on such integrative index as psychological climate. It is established that a number of athletes to achieve high results require high cohesion, unity, value-normative orientation, deep identification and responsibility for the results of the joint group activities.

  13. Authenticated Key Agreement in Group Settings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ming; WANG Yong; GU Da-wu; BAI Ying-cai

    2006-01-01

    An enhanced definition of implicit key authentication and a secure group key agreement scheme from pairings are presented. This scheme combines the merits of group public key and key trees to achieve a communication-efficient and authenticated group key agreement protocol. Besides, it avoids dependence on signature or MAC by involving member's long-term keys and short-term keys in the group key. Furthermore, the idea behind this design can be employed as a general approach to extend the authenticated two-party Diffie-Hellman protocols to group settings.

  14. Group Decision Process Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, John; Hijikata, Masao

    1997-01-01

    Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists.......Introducing the notion of Group Decision Process Support Systems (GDPSS) to traditional decision-support theorists....

  15. About group digital signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Cristina Enache

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Group signatures try to combine security (no framing, no cheating and privacy(anonymity, unlinkability.A group digital signature is a digital signature with enhanced privacy features that allows members of a given group to anonymously sign messages on behalf of the group, producing a group signature. However, in the case of dispute the identity of the signature's originator can be revealed by a designated entity (group manager. The present paper describes the main concepts about group signatures, along with a brief state of the art and shows a personal cryptographic library implemented in Java that includes two group signatures.

  16. Working with Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Joan, Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Describes nine Canadian programs for counseling groups of students. Topics include introducing computer-assisted guidance, future challenges for counselors, sociometry, sexuality, parent counseling, reluctant students, shyness, peer groups, education for living, and guidance advisory committees. (JAC)

  17. Group B streptococcus - pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000511.htm Group B streptococcus - pregnancy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a type of bacteria that ...

  18. Gestalt Interactional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Robert L.; Franklin, Richard W.

    1975-01-01

    Gestalt therapy in groups is not limited to individual work in the presence of an audience. Describes several ways to involve gestalt groups interactionally. Interactions described focus on learning by doing and discovering, and are noninterpretive. (Author/EJT)

  19. Fast Overlapping Group Lasso

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jun

    2010-01-01

    The group Lasso is an extension of the Lasso for feature selection on (predefined) non-overlapping groups of features. The non-overlapping group structure limits its applicability in practice. There have been several recent attempts to study a more general formulation, where groups of features are given, potentially with overlaps between the groups. The resulting optimization is, however, much more challenging to solve due to the group overlaps. In this paper, we consider the efficient optimization of the overlapping group Lasso penalized problem. We reveal several key properties of the proximal operator associated with the overlapping group Lasso, and compute the proximal operator by solving the smooth and convex dual problem, which allows the use of the gradient descent type of algorithms for the optimization. We have performed empirical evaluations using the breast cancer gene expression data set, which consists of 8,141 genes organized into (overlapping) gene sets. Experimental results demonstrate the eff...

  20. Multicultural group work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Annette Skovsted

    2014-01-01

    Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds.......Motivation for the activity I use this strategy for forming groups to ensure diverse/multicultural groups that combine a variety of different strengths and resources based on student's academic, disciplinary, linguistic, national, personal and work backgrounds....

  1. Generalized Group Signature Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The concept of generalized group signature scheme will bepresent. Based on the generalized secret sharing scheme proposed by Lin and Ha rn, a non-interactive approach is designed for realizing such generalized group signature scheme. Using the new scheme, the authorized subsets of the group in w hich the group member can cooperate to produce the valid signature for any messa ge can be randomly specified

  2. Counting primes, groups, and manifolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfeld, Dorian; Lubotzky, Alexander; Nikolov, Nikolay; Pyber, László

    2004-09-14

    Let Lambda=SL(2)(Z) be the modular group and let c(n)(Lambda) be the number of congruence subgroups of Lambda of index at most n. We prove that lim(n--> infinity )(log c(n)(Lambda)/((log n)(2)/log log n))=(3-2(sqrt)2)/4. The proof is based on the Bombieri-Vinogradov "Riemann hypothesis on the average" and on the solution of a new type of extremal problem in combinatorial number theory. Similar surprisingly sharp estimates are obtained for the subgroup growth of lattices in higher rank semisimple Lie groups. If G is such a Lie group and Gamma is an irreducible lattice of G it turns out that the subgroup growth of Gamma is independent of the lattice and depends only on the Lie type of the direct factors of G. It can be calculated easily from the root system. The most general case of this result relies on the Generalized Riemann Hypothesis, but many special cases are unconditional. The proofs use techniques from number theory, algebraic groups, finite group theory, and combinatorics.

  3. Groups, combinatorics and geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, A A; Saxl, J

    2003-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, the theory of groups in particular simplegroups, finite and algebraic has influenced a number of diverseareas of mathematics. Such areas include topics where groups have beentraditionally applied, such as algebraic combinatorics, finitegeometries, Galois theory and permutation groups, as well as severalmore recent developments.

  4. Asymmetry within social groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barker, Jessie; Loope, Kevin J.; Reeve, H. Kern

    2016-01-01

    Social animals vary in their ability to compete with group members over shared resources and also vary in their cooperative efforts to produce these resources. Competition among groups can promote within-group cooperation, but many existing models of intergroup cooperation do not explicitly account...

  5. Isotropy in group cohomology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben David, Nir; Ginosar, Yuval; Meir, Ehud

    2014-01-01

    groups of central type from such quotients, known as Involutive Yang–Baxter groups. Another motivation for the search of normal Lagrangians comes from a non-commutative generalization of Heisenberg liftings that require normality. Although it is true that symplectic forms over finite nilpotent groups...

  6. Higher arithmetic Chow groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, J. I. Burgos; Feliu, Elisenda

    2012-01-01

    We give a new construction of higher arithmetic Chow groups for quasi-projective arithmetic varieties over a field. Our definition agrees with the higher arithmetic Chow groups defined by Goncharov for projective arithmetic varieties over a field. These groups are the analogue, in the Arakelov co...

  7. Why some groups just feel better: the regulatory fit of group power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassenberg, Kai; Jonas, Kai J; Shah, James Y; Brazy, Paige C

    2007-02-01

    The current research applied the regulatory fit hypothesis (E. T. Higgins, 2000) to the evaluation of groups, suggesting that individuals' group appraisal depends on how well the groups fit their regulatory needs. Specifically, it was predicted that higher power groups would fit and be more valued by those individuals with a promotion focus because these groups provide a better opportunity to sustain nurturance and achievement needs. Alternatively, lower power groups were predicted to fit and be more valued by those individuals with a prevention focus because these groups necessitate (and thus sustain) a focus on safety and security. Five studies found support for these predictions by both assessing and manipulating regulatory focus and group power and by using explicit and implicit measures of group attraction. Moreover, these regulatory fit effects occurred specifically for group power and not for general differences in group status.

  8. CHAOTIC GROUP ACTIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShiEnhui; ZhouLizhen; ZhouYoucheng

    2003-01-01

    It is proved that there is no chaotic group actions on any topological space with free arc.In this paper the chaotic actions of the group like G×F,where F is a finite group,are studied.In particular,under a suitable assumption ,if F is a cyclic group,then the topological space which admits a chaotic action of Z×F must admit a chatotic homeomorphism.A topological space which admits a chaotic group action but admits no chaotic horneomorphism is constructed.

  9. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J [Bellaire, TX; Coit, William George [Bellaire, TX; Griffin, Peter Terry [Brixham, GB; Hamilton, Paul Taylor [Houston, TX; Hsu, Chia-Fu [Granada Hills, CA; Mason, Stanley Leroy [Allen, TX; Samuel, Allan James [Kular Lumpar, ML; Watkins, Ronnie Wade [Cypress, TX

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  10. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  11. On -nilpotent abelian groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mohammad Mehdi Nasrabadi; Ali Gholamian

    2014-11-01

    Let be a group and $A = \\text{Aut}(G)$ be the group of automorphisms of . Then, the element $[g, ] = g^{-1}(g)$ is an autocommutator of $g \\in G$ and $ \\in A$. Hence, for any natural number the -th autocommutator subgroup of is defined as $K_{m}(G)=\\langle [g,_{1},\\ldots,_{m}]|g\\in G,_{1},\\ldots,_{m}\\in A\\rangle$, where $[g, _{1}, _{2},\\ldots, _{m}] = [[g,_{1},\\ldots,_{m−1}], _{m}]$. In this paper, we introduce the new notion of -nilpotent groups and classify all abelian groups which are -nilpotent groups.

  12. Group I intron ribozymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Group I intron ribozymes constitute one of the main classes of ribozymes and have been a particularly important model in the discovery of key concepts in RNA biology as well as in the development of new methods. Compared to other ribozyme classes, group I intron ribozymes display considerable......, the intronic products of these pathways have the potential to integrate into targets and to form various types of circular RNA molecules. Thus, group I intron ribozymes and associated elements found within group I introns is a rich source of biological phenomena. This chapter provides a strategy and protocols...... for initial characterization of new group I intron ribozymes....

  13. Group theory I essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Emil G

    2012-01-01

    REA's Essentials provide quick and easy access to critical information in a variety of different fields, ranging from the most basic to the most advanced. As its name implies, these concise, comprehensive study guides summarize the essentials of the field covered. Essentials are helpful when preparing for exams, doing homework and will remain a lasting reference source for students, teachers, and professionals. Group Theory I includes sets and mapping, groupoids and semi-groups, groups, isomorphisms and homomorphisms, cyclic groups, the Sylow theorems, and finite p-groups.

  14. E-groups training

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    There will be an e-groups training course on 16 March 2012 which will cover the main e-groups functionalities i.e.: creating and managing e-groups, difference between static and dynamic e-groups, configuring posting restrictions and archives, examples of where e-groups can be used in daily work. Even if you have already worked with e-groups, this may be a good opportunity to learn about the best practices and security related recommendations when using e-groups. You can find more details as well as enrolment form for the training (it’s free) here. The number of places is limited, so enrolling early is recommended.   Technical Training Tel. 72844

  15. Topics in cohomology of groups

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Serge

    1996-01-01

    The book is a mostly translated reprint of a report on cohomology of groups from the 1950s and 1960s, originally written as background for the Artin-Tate notes on class field theory, following the cohomological approach. This report was first published (in French) by Benjamin. For this new English edition, the author added Tate's local duality, written up from letters which John Tate sent to Lang in 1958 - 1959. Except for this last item, which requires more substantial background in algebraic geometry and especially abelian varieties, the rest of the book is basically elementary, depending only on standard homological algebra at the level of first year graduate students.

  16. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress.

  17. Stochastic Lie group integrators

    CERN Document Server

    Malham, Simon J A

    2007-01-01

    We present Lie group integrators for nonlinear stochastic differential equations with non-commutative vector fields whose solution evolves on a smooth finite dimensional manifold. Given a Lie group action that generates transport along the manifold, we pull back the stochastic flow on the manifold to the Lie group via the action, and subsequently pull back the flow to the corresponding Lie algebra via the exponential map. We construct an approximation to the stochastic flow in the Lie algebra via closed operations and then push back to the Lie group and then to the manifold, thus ensuring our approximation lies in the manifold. We call such schemes stochastic Munthe-Kaas methods after their deterministic counterparts. We also present stochastic Lie group integration schemes based on Castell--Gaines methods. These involve using an underlying ordinary differential integrator to approximate the flow generated by a truncated stochastic exponential Lie series. They become stochastic Lie group integrator schemes if...

  18. Blood groups systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranadhir Mitra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available International Society of Blood Transfusion has recently recognized 33 blood group systems. Apart from ABO and Rhesus system, many other types of antigens have been noticed on the red cell membranes. Blood grouping and cross-matching is one of the few important tests that the anaesthesiologist orders during perioperative period. Hence, a proper understanding of the blood group system, their clinical significance, typing and cross-matching tests, and current perspective are of paramount importance to prevent transfusion-related complications. Nonetheless, the knowledge on blood group system is necessary to approach blood group-linked diseases which are still at the stage of research. This review addresses all these aspects of the blood groups system.

  19. Quantum isometry groups

    CERN Document Server

    Goswami, Debashish

    2016-01-01

    This book offers an up-to-date overview of the recently proposed theory of quantum isometry groups. Written by the founders, it is the first book to present the research on the “quantum isometry group”, highlighting the interaction of noncommutative geometry and quantum groups, which is a noncommutative generalization of the notion of group of isometry of a classical Riemannian manifold. The motivation for this generalization is the importance of isometry groups in both mathematics and physics. The framework consists of Alain Connes’ “noncommutative geometry” and the operator-algebraic theory of “quantum groups”. The authors prove the existence of quantum isometry group for noncommutative manifolds given by spectral triples under mild conditions and discuss a number of methods for computing them. One of the most striking and profound findings is the non-existence of non-classical quantum isometry groups for arbitrary classical connected compact manifolds and, by using this, the authors explicitl...

  20. Group Problem Solving

    CERN Document Server

    Laughlin, Patrick R

    2011-01-01

    Experimental research by social and cognitive psychologists has established that cooperative groups solve a wide range of problems better than individuals. Cooperative problem solving groups of scientific researchers, auditors, financial analysts, air crash investigators, and forensic art experts are increasingly important in our complex and interdependent society. This comprehensive textbook--the first of its kind in decades--presents important theories and experimental research about group problem solving. The book focuses on tasks that have demonstrably correct solutions within mathematical

  1. Definably amenable NIP groups

    OpenAIRE

    Chernikov, Artem; Simon, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    We study definably amenable NIP groups. We develop a theory of generics, showing that various definitions considered previously coincide, and study invariant measures. Applications include: characterization of regular ergodic measures, a proof of the conjecture of Petrykowski connecting existence of bounded orbits with definable amenability in the NIP case, and the Ellis group conjecture of Newelski and Pillay connecting the model-theoretic connected component of an NIP group with the ideal s...

  2. Semisimple Metacyclic Group Algebras

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gurmeet K Bakshi; Shalini Gupta; Inder Bir S Passi

    2011-11-01

    Given a group of order $p_1p_2$, where $p_1,p_2$ are primes, and $\\mathbb{F}_q$, a finite field of order coprime to $p_1p_2$, the object of this paper is to compute a complete set of primitive central idempotents of the semisimple group algebra $\\mathbb{F}_q[G]$. As a consequence, we obtain the structure of $\\mathbb{F}_q[G]$ and its group of automorphisms.

  3. Presentations of groups

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, D L

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this book is to provide an introduction to combinatorial group theory. Any reader who has completed first courses in linear algebra, group theory and ring theory will find this book accessible. The emphasis is on computational techniques but rigorous proofs of all theorems are supplied. This new edition has been revised throughout, including new exercises and an additional chapter on proving that certain groups are infinite.

  4. E-Group Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylesworth, Grant R.

    Group E at Uaxactún has long been considered an ancient Maya observatory in which an observer could see the sun rise along architectural alignments at the solstices and equinoxes. E-Groups named for the architectural complex list identified in Group E at Uaxactún, typically consist of a large radial pyramid on their west side and three temples on a raised platform on their east side.

  5. CLASSIFICATION OF CRIMINAL GROUPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Romanova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available New types of criminal groups are emerging in modern society.  These types have their special criminal subculture. The research objective is to develop new parameters of classification of modern criminal groups, create a new typology of criminal groups and identify some features of their subculture. Research methodology is based on the system approach that includes using the method of analysis of documentary sources (materials of a criminal case, method of conversations with themembers of the criminal group, method of testing the members of the criminal group and method of observation. As a result of the conducted research, we have created a new classification of criminal groups. The first type is a lawful group in its form and criminal according to its content (i.e., its target is criminal enrichment. The second type is a criminal organization which is run by so-called "white-collars" that "remain in the shadow". The third type is traditional criminal groups.  The fourth type is the criminal group, which openly demonstrates its criminal activity.

  6. Explosive Technology Group

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Explosive Technology Group (ETG) provides diverse technical expertise and an agile, integrated approach to solve complex challenges for all classes of energetic...

  7. Dependence logic theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kontinen, Juha; Väänänen, Jouko; Vollmer, Heribert

    2016-01-01

    In this volume, different aspects of logics for dependence and independence are discussed, including both the logical and computational aspects of dependence logic, and also applications in a number of areas, such as statistics, social choice theory, databases, and computer security. The contributing authors represent leading experts in this relatively new field, each of whom was invited to write a chapter based on talks given at seminars held at the Schloss Dagstuhl Leibniz Center for Informatics in Wadern, Germany (in February 2013 and June 2015) and an Academy Colloquium at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (March 2014). Altogether, these chapters provide the most up-to-date look at this developing and highly interdisciplinary field and will be of interest to a broad group of logicians, mathematicians, statisticians, philosophers, and scientists. Topics covered include a comprehensive survey of many propositional, modal, and first-order variants of dependence logic; new results concerning ...

  8. CHINA INTERNATIONAL PUBLISHING GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The China International Publishing Group (CIPG) specializes in international communications. Its operationsencompass reporting, editing, translation, publishing, printing, distribution, and the Internet. It incorporates sevenpublishing companies, five magazines and 19 periodicals, published in over 20 languages. The ChinaInternational Book Trading Corporation, another group facet, distributes all of these to over 180 countries and

  9. Group Work. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen

    2010-01-01

    According to Johnson and Johnson, group work helps increase student retention and satisfaction, develops strong oral communication and social skills, as well as higher self-esteem (University of Minnesota, n.d.). Group work, when planned and implemented deliberately and thoughtfully helps students develop cognitive and leadership skills as well as…

  10. Small Group Inquiry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koller, Martin M.

    Learning in small groups is a practical way to bring about behavior change. The inquiry learning process is perceived to be the most natural and scientific way of learning. Skills developed include those of problem-solving task analysis, decision-making, value formation and adaptability. The art of small group interaction is developed. Factual…

  11. Democratic Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Erik K.; Tate, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    For a century, democratic values have called for abandoning coercive approaches and teaching children and youth to be responsible citizens. The authors explore strategies for creating respectful environments and positive group cultures with challenging youth. They offer suggestions to adult group facilitators to support youth in developing…

  12. Study Groups in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul G.

    2007-01-01

    Since 1998 European Study Groups have been held in Denmark, and Danish companies from LEGO and NOVO to very small high-tech firms have participated. I briefly describe the history, the organisation and the format of the Danish Study Groups, and highlight a few problem solutions....

  13. Fairness and Ability Grouping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strike, Kenneth A.

    1983-01-01

    A recent controversy regarding ability grouping is that it is often perceived as a means whereby racial or class bias can be subtly transformed into mechanisms of discrimination which exhibit the appearance of fairness and objectivity. This article addresses the question of fairness in ability grouping. (CJB)

  14. Automorphism groups of Quandles

    CERN Document Server

    Elhamdadi, M; Restrepo, R

    2010-01-01

    We prove that the automorphism group of the dihedral quandle with n elements is isomorphic to the affine group of the integers mod n, and also obtain the inner automorphism group of this quandle. In [9], automorphism groups of quandles (up to isomorphisms) of order less than or equal to 5 were given. With the help of the software Maple, we compute the inner and automorphism groups of all seventy three quandles of order six listed in the appendix of [4]. Since computations of automorphisms of quandles relates to the problem of classification of quandles, we also describe an algorithm implemented in C for computing all quandles (up to isomorphism) of order less than or equal to nine.

  15. Perceiving persons and groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D L; Sherman, S J

    1996-04-01

    This article analyzes the similarities and differences in forming impressions of individuals and in developing conceptions of groups. In both cases, the perceiver develops a mental conception of the target (individual or group) on the basis of available information and uses that information to make judgments about that person or group. However, a review of existing evidence reveals differences in the outcomes of impressions formed of individual and group targets, even when those impressions are based on the very same behavioral information. A model is proposed to account for these differences. The model emphasizes the role of differing expectancies of unity and coherence in individual and group targets, which in turn engage different mechanisms for processing information and making judgments. Implications of the model are discussed.

  16. Supervision and group dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Søren; Jensen, Lars Peter

    2004-01-01

    as well as at Aalborg University. The first visible result has been participating supervisors telling us that the course has inspired them to try supervising group dynamics in the future. This paper will explore some aspects of supervising group dynamics as well as, how to develop the Aalborg model...... An important aspect of the problem based and project organized study at Aalborg University is the supervision of the project groups. At the basic education (first year) it is stated in the curriculum that part of the supervisors' job is to deal with group dynamics. This is due to the experience...... that many students are having difficulties with practical issues such as collaboration, communication, and project management. Most supervisors either ignore this demand, because they do not find it important or they find it frustrating, because they do not know, how to supervise group dynamics...

  17. Completeness and consistency of renormalisation group flows

    CERN Document Server

    Litim, Daniel F; Litim, Daniel F.; Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2002-01-01

    We study different renormalisation group flows for scale dependent effective actions, including exact and proper-time renormalisation group flows. These flows have a simple one loop structure. They differ in their dependence on the full field-dependent propagator, which is linear for exact flows. We investigate the inherent approximations of flows with a non-linear dependence on the propagator. We check explicitly that standard perturbation theory is not reproduced. We explain the origin of the discrepancy by providing links to exact flows both in closed expressions and in given approximations. We show that proper-time flows are approximations to Callan-Symanzik flows. Within a background field formalism, we provide a generalised proper-time flow, which is exact. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  18. Power in group contexts: the influence of group status on promotion and prevention decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Daan; Ellemers, Naomi; Sassenberg, Kai

    2013-06-01

    This research examines how group status affects the impact of individual power positions on promotion versus prevention choices in group decision making. We consider that high power not only implies control, but also indicates responsibility for the achievement of group goals. We argue that the nature of these goals depends on the current status of the group. In Experiment 1, individuals who were accorded high power showed more promotion-oriented decisions in the low group status condition while decisions were more prevention oriented under high group status. Experiment 2 replicated these effects, and further demonstrated that they only emerge when those in power are explicitly made accountable for the achievement of group goals. These results are discussed in relation to regulatory focus theory, power theories, and the role of social identities and group goals in group dynamics.

  19. Impedance group summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaskiewicz, M.; Dooling, J.; Dyachkov, M.; Fedotov, A.; Gluckstern, R.; Hahn, H.; Huang, H.; Kurennoy, S.; Linnecar, T.; Shaposhnikova, E.; Stupakov, G.; Toyama, T.; Wang, J. G.; Weng, W. T.; Zhang, S. Y.; Zotter, B.

    1999-12-01

    The impedance working group was charged to reply to the following 8 questions relevant to the design of high-intensity proton machines such as the SNS or the FNAL driver. These questions were first discussed one by one in the whole group, then each ne of them assigned to one member to summarize. On the lst morning these contributions were publicly read, re-discussed and re-written where required—hence they are not the opinion of a particular person, but rather the averaged opinion of all members of the working group. (AIP)

  20. Building Bunk Group Buddies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Denise Cabrero

    2000-01-01

    Describes how camp counselors can foster camaraderie among campers through participative decision making, name games, listening, adventure courses, storytelling, spending time in nature, decorating cabins, avoiding favoritism, setting rules, admitting faults, setting group goals, and praising sincere efforts. (TD)

  1. Homogenous finitary symmetric groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto‎. ‎H‎. Kegel

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We characterize strictly diagonal type of embeddings of finitary symmetric groups in terms of cardinality and the characteristic. Namely, we prove the following. Let kappa be an infinite cardinal. If G=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupG i , where G i =FSym(kappan i , (H=underseti=1stackrelinftybigcupH i , where H i =Alt(kappan i , is a group of strictly diagonal type and xi=(p 1 ,p 2 ,ldots is an infinite sequence of primes, then G is isomorphic to the homogenous finitary symmetric group FSym(kappa(xi (H is isomorphic to the homogenous alternating group Alt(kappa(xi , where n 0 =1,n i =p 1 p 2 ldotsp i .

  2. Groups – Additive Notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We translate the articles covering group theory already available in the Mizar Mathematical Library from multiplicative into additive notation. We adapt the works of Wojciech A. Trybulec [41, 42, 43] and Artur Korniłowicz [25].

  3. Homogeneous group, research, institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Natascia Vasta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The work outlines the complex connection among empiric research, therapeutic programs and host institution. It is considered the current research state in Italy. Italian research field is analyzed and critic data are outlined: lack of results regarding both the therapeutic processes and the effectiveness of eating disorders group analytic treatment. The work investigates on an eating disorders homogeneous group, led into an eating disorder outpatient service. First we present the methodological steps the research is based on including the strong connection among theory and clinical tools. Secondly clinical tools are described and the results commented. Finally, our results suggest the necessity of validating some more specifical hypothesis: verifying the relationship between clinical improvement (sense of exclusion and painful emotions reduction and specific group therapeutic processes; verifying the relationship between depressive feelings, relapses and transition trough a more differentiated groupal field.Keywords: Homogeneous group; Eating disorders; Institutional field; Therapeutic outcome

  4. Language and Group Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milroy, Leslie

    1982-01-01

    Explores the tension between the manner in which intergroup language differences are used to symbolize group membership and the manner in which they mirror and reinforce social class and power distinctions. (EKN)

  5. Radiation Protection Group

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The Radioactive Waste Section of the Radiation Protection Group wishes to inform you that the Radioactive Waste Treatment Centre will be closed on the afternoon of Tuesday 19 December 2006. Thank-you for your understanding.

  6. Cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis after chronic cocaine abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Cher-Ming; Tsai, Shiow-Chwen; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Ting, Hua; Lee, Shin-Da

    2014-04-09

    To evaluate whether chronic cocaine abuse will increase cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways, thirty-two male Wistar rats at 3-4 months of age were randomly divided into a vehicle-treated group (phosphate-buffered saline, PBS, 0.5 mL, SQ per day) and a cocaine-treated group (Cocaine, 10 mg/kg, SQ per day). After 3 months of treatment, the excised left ventricles were measured by H&E staining, Western blotting, DAPI staining and TUNEL assays. More cardiac TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were observed in the Cocaine group than the PBS group. Protein levels of TNF-alpha, Fas ligand, Fas death receptor, FADD, activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3 (Fas-dependent apoptosis) extracted from excised hearts in the Cocaine group were significantly increased, compared to the PBS group. Protein levels of cardiac Bax, cytosolic cytochrome c, t-Bid-to-Bid, Bak-to-Bcl-xL, Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio, activated caspase-9, and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptosis) were significantly increased in the Cocaine group, compared to the PBS group. Chronic cocaine exposure appeared to activate the cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, which may indicate a possible mechanism for the development of cardiac abnormalities in humans with chronic cocaine abuse.

  7. Cardiac Fas-Dependent and Mitochondria-Dependent Apoptosis after Chronic Cocaine Abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cher-Ming Liou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether chronic cocaine abuse will increase cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathways, thirty-two male Wistar rats at 3–4 months of age were randomly divided into a vehicle-treated group (phosphate-buffered saline, PBS, 0.5 mL, SQ per day and a cocaine-treated group (Cocaine, 10 mg/kg, SQ per day. After 3 months of treatment, the excised left ventricles were measured by H&E staining, Western blotting, DAPI staining and TUNEL assays. More cardiac TUNEL-positive apoptotic cells were observed in the Cocaine group than the PBS group. Protein levels of TNF-alpha, Fas ligand, Fas death receptor, FADD, activated caspase-8, and activated caspase-3 (Fas-dependent apoptosis extracted from excised hearts in the Cocaine group were significantly increased, compared to the PBS group. Protein levels of cardiac Bax, cytosolic cytochrome c, t-Bid-to-Bid, Bak-to-Bcl-xL, Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio, activated caspase-9, and activated caspase-3 (mitochondria-dependent apoptosis were significantly increased in the Cocaine group, compared to the PBS group. Chronic cocaine exposure appeared to activate the cardiac Fas-dependent and mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, which may indicate a possible mechanism for the development of cardiac abnormalities in humans with chronic cocaine abuse.

  8. LDF (Lag Dependence Functions)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    LDF (Lag Dependence Functions) is an S-PLUS library for identification of non-linear dependencies in univariate time series. The methods can be considered generalizations of the tools applicable for linear time series.......LDF (Lag Dependence Functions) is an S-PLUS library for identification of non-linear dependencies in univariate time series. The methods can be considered generalizations of the tools applicable for linear time series....

  9. [Evaluating tobacco dependance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etter, Jean-François

    2006-11-29

    Good science needs good measurement instruments, and this is also true for the study of tobacco dependence. In this paper, we present and criticize the most frequently used instrument, the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence. This test, published 28 years ago, does not reflect current definitions of dependence. Several alternative approaches to the measurement of tobacco dependence are discussed, and more recent instruments are presented.

  10. Parton Distributions Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Barbaro, L.; Keller, S. A.; Kuhlmann, S.; Schellman, H.; Tung, W.-K.

    2000-07-20

    This report summarizes the activities of the Parton Distributions Working Group of the QCD and Weak Boson Physics workshop held in preparation for Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron. The main focus of this working group was to investigate the different issues associated with the development of quantitative tools to estimate parton distribution functions uncertainties. In the conclusion, the authors introduce a Manifesto that describes an optimal method for reporting data.

  11. Networks and Small Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Kadushin, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Homans' insights that interaction and sentiment are in a feedback loop that includes clique formation, social ranking and leadership are formalized and derived from a set of limited assumptions and propositions. Freeman's model of groups is used to detect pure informal groups, those that are not consequential upon anything else than sheer hanging around. It produces a system of cliques and rankings based purely on the rates of transitive triads that may include a third who is only weakly conn...

  12. Fuzzy Soft Topological Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Nazmul

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Notions of Lowen type fuzzy soft topological space are introduced and some of their properties are established in the present paper. Besides this, a combined structure of a fuzzy soft topological space and a fuzzy soft group, which is termed here as fuzzy soft topological group is introduced. Homomorphic images and preimages are also examined. Finally, some definitions and results on fuzzy soft set are studied.

  13. Groups, rings, modules

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This classic monograph is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The treatment presupposes some familiarity with sets, groups, rings, and vector spaces. The four-part approach begins with examinations of sets and maps, monoids and groups, categories, and rings. The second part explores unique factorization domains, general module theory, semisimple rings and modules, and Artinian rings. Part three's topics include localization and tensor products, principal ideal domains, and applications of fundamental theorem. The fourth and final part covers algebraic field extensions

  14. Analysis of the underclass’s mentality of using micro-media in group events based on media dependency theory%群体性事件中底层群体对微媒介的使用心理--基于媒介依赖理论的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛靖; 李春雷

    2015-01-01

    转型期的中国,群体性事件频发,底层群体期待通过媒体表达利益诉求,但囿于客观体制框架的限制,大众传媒往往对底层需求习惯性过滤。在传统媒介生态背景下,微媒介的特性恰巧弥合了体制内困境,衍变成新时期底层群体媒介使用图景,组织行为在群体心理的驱使下呈现出趋同的微媒介依赖。在此种语境下,底层群体对微媒介的依赖实质上更是一种心理上的群体趋同和行动上的突围预备。试图依托媒介依赖理论,通过对心理认知的层级叠加,厘清底层群体在事件进程中的媒介使用动因,勾勒出群体性事件视阈下底层群体微媒介使用心理的学理性框架,并关注在微媒介使用过程中的失范行为,进而考量其异化行为的纾解机制。%During the transitional period,the group events are taking place frequently,and the people from the social bottom look forward to expressing their appeal through media. However,due to the restraint of the objective institu-tional framework,mass media tend to filter their appeal. In the traditional media environment,micro-media happens to mend the defect of the present system and form a new vision of the media application for the underclass. In this context,we believe that the underclass’s dependency on micro-media is actually a club convergence in mentality and a preparation in action. This article tries to clarify the motivation of the underclass’s using media and sketch out the psychic frame of micro-media application. In addition,we are concerned with the anomic behavior in the process of micro-media application and investigate the alleviating mechanism of alienated behavior.

  15. N-ary Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Gal'mak, Alexander M

    2011-01-01

    The book "N-ary Groups" (in Russian) consists of two Parts. It is intended on the one hand as an initial introduction to the theory of n-ary groups, and on the other hand it contains the published results by the author on this subject. At present, the theory of n-ary groups developing but slowly from group theory. Nonetheless, ternary and n-ary structures have recently been applied to modern models of elementary particle physics. One of the author's goals in this book is to draw the attention of mathematicians and theoretical physicists to the theory of n-ary groups, to some of its distinguishing features, and to details relevant to its further development and application. Part I: Theorems of Post and Gluskin-Hosszu. 1.1. Classical definitions of n-ary groups. Examples. 1.2. Analogies of identity and inverse elements. 1.3. Equivalent sequences. 1.4. Post's coset theorem. 1.5. Theorem of Gluskin-Hosszu. 1.6. Connection between the Post's coset theorem and theorem of Gluskin-Hosszu. Addition and comments. Part ...

  16. Conflicting social motives in negotiating groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, Laurie R; Brett, Jeanne M; Olekalns, Mara; Smith, Philip L

    2007-12-01

    Negotiators' social motives (cooperative vs. individualistic) influence their strategic behaviors. In this study, the authors used multilevel modeling and analyses of strategy sequences to test hypotheses regarding how negotiators' social motives and the composition of the group influence group members' negotiation strategies. Four-person groups negotiating a 5-issue mixed-motive decision-making task were videotaped, and the tapes were transcribed and coded. Group composition included 2 homogeneous conditions (all cooperators and all individualists) and 3 heterogeneous conditions (3 cooperators and 1 individualist, 2 cooperators and 2 individualists, 1 cooperator and 3 individualists). Results showed that cooperative negotiators adjusted their use of integrative and distributive strategies in response to the social-motive composition of the group, but individualistic negotiators did not. Results from analyses of strategy sequences showed that cooperators responded more systematically to others' behaviors than did individualists. They also redirected the negotiation depending on group composition.

  17. Decreased group velocity in compositionally graded films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei

    2006-03-01

    A theoretical formalism is presented that describes the group velocity of electromagnetic signals in compositionally graded films. The theory is first based on effective medium approximation or the Maxwell-Garnett approximation to obtain the equivalent dielectric function in a z slice. Then the effective dielectric tensor of the graded film is directly determined, and the group velocities for ordinary and extraordinary waves in the film are derived. It is found that the group velocity is sensitively dependent on the graded profile. For a power-law graded profile f(x)=ax(m), increasing m results in the decreased extraordinary group velocity. Such a decreased tendency becomes significant when the incident angle increases. Therefore the group velocity in compositionally graded films can be effectively decreased by our suitable adjustment of the total volume fraction, the graded profile, and the incident angle. As a result, the compositionally graded films may serve as candidate material for realizing small group velocity.

  18. Coordinating Group report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-01

    In December 1992, western governors and four federal agencies established a Federal Advisory Committee to Develop On-site Innovative Technologies for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (the DOIT Committee). The purpose of the Committee is to advise the federal government on ways to improve waste cleanup technology development and the cleanup of federal sites in the West. The Committee directed in January 1993 that information be collected from a wide range of potential stakeholders and that innovative technology candidate projects be identified, organized, set in motion, and evaluated to test new partnerships, regulatory approaches, and technologies which will lead to improve site cleanup. Five working groups were organized, one to develop broad project selection and evaluation criteria and four to focus on specific contaminant problems. A Coordinating Group comprised of working group spokesmen and federal and state representatives, was set up to plan and organize the routine functioning of these working groups. The working groups were charged with defining particular contaminant problems; identifying shortcomings in technology development, stakeholder involvement, regulatory review, and commercialization which impede the resolution of these problems; and identifying candidate sites or technologies which could serve as regional innovative demonstration projects to test new approaches to overcome the shortcomings. This report from the Coordinating Group to the DOIT Committee highlights the key findings and opportunities uncovered by these fact-finding working groups. It provides a basis from which recommendations from the DOIT Committee to the federal government can be made. It also includes observations from two public roundtables, one on commercialization and another on regulatory and institutional barriers impeding technology development and cleanup.

  19. Facilities removal working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This working group`s first objective is to identify major economic, technical, and regulatory constraints on operator practices and decisions relevant to offshore facilities removal. Then, the group will try to make recommendations as to regulatory and policy adjustments, additional research, or process improvements and/or technological advances, that may be needed to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the removal process. The working group will focus primarily on issues dealing with Gulf of Mexico platform abandonments. In order to make the working group sessions as productive as possible, the Facilities Removal Working Group will focus on three topics that address a majority of the concerns and/or constraints relevant to facilities removal. The three areas are: (1) Explosive Severing and its Impact on Marine Life, (2) Pile and Conductor Severing, and (3) Deep Water Abandonments This paper will outline the current state of practice in the offshore industry, identifying current regulations and specific issues encountered when addressing each of the three main topics above. The intent of the paper is to highlight potential issues for panel discussion, not to provide a detailed review of all data relevant to the topic. Before each panel discussion, key speakers will review data and information to facilitate development and discussion of the main issues of each topic. Please refer to the attached agenda for the workshop format, key speakers, presentation topics, and panel participants. The goal of the panel discussions is to identify key issues for each of the three topics above. The working group will also make recommendations on how to proceed on these key issues.

  20. Sensory processing disorders among substance dependents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batya Engel-Yeger

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: (1 To compare sensory processing patterns as expressed in daily life between substance dependents and typical controls; (2 profile the prevalence of sensory processing disorders (SPD among substance dependents; and (3 examine gender effect on SPD within and between groups. Methods: Two hundred ninety people aged 19-64 participated in this study. The study group included 145 individuals who lived in the community or took part in an outpatient program because of addiction to drugs/alcohol and had been clean for over three months. The control group included 145 individuals who were not exposed to drugs or alcohol on a regular basis and did not suffer from addictive behavior. All participants filled a demographic questionnaire. Those who met the inclusion criteria completed the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP so that their sensory processing patterns could be assessed. Results: When comparing both groups, the study group showed greater sensory sensitivity and significantly higher prevalence of SPD. Significant group/gender interaction was found in regard to sensation seeking. Discussion: SPD among substance dependents may be expressed in daily life by either hypersensitivity or hyposensitivity. The behavioral outcomes reflected by the AASP support neurophysiological manifestations about SPD of substance dependents. The evaluation process of substance dependents should refer to their sensory processing abilities. In case SPD is diagnosed, Occupational Therapy and specific sensory–based interventions should be considered in order to fit the specific needs of individuals and enhance their performance, meaningful participation, and quality of life.