WorldWideScience

Sample records for burnup credit applications

  1. Studies on future application of burnup credit in Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the present status of the fuel storage and the possible future applications of burnup credit in wet and dry storage systems in Hungary. It gives a survey of the activities planned in AERI concerning the burnup credit. Some part of these investigations dealing with the influence of the axial changing of the assembly burnup are given in more details. (author)

  2. The applications of burnup credit and the measurement techniques of burnup verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The factors of influencing criticality safety, implementing criticality control conditions, the calculation methods for predicting criticality, casks design and cask loading graph are described. The problems in the application of burnup credit and the dominant error in burnup credit operation are analysed. In order to avoid the operation error, requirements of measurement techniques and the most suitable measurement method are introduced

  3. Advances In Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analysis Methods And Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An International Workshop on “Advances in Applications of Burnup Credit for Spent Fuel Storage, Transport, Reprocessing, and Disposition” organized by the Nuclear Safety Council of Spain (CSN) in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was held at Córdoba, Spain, on October 27– 30, 2009. The objectives of this workshop were to identify the benefits that accrue from recent improvements of the burnup credit (BUC) analysis methodologies, to analyze the implications of applying improved BUC methodologies, focusing on both the safety-related and operational aspects, and to foster the exchange of international experience in licensing and implementation of BUC applications. In the paper on hand the attention is focused on the improvements of BUC analysis methodologies. (author)

  4. Burnup credit in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of development of burnup credit for criticality safety analyses in Spain is described in this paper. Ongoing activities in the country in this field, both national and international, are resumed. Burnup credit is currently being applied to wet storage of PWR fuel, and credit to integral burnable absorbers is given for BWR fuel storage. It is envisaged to apply burnup credit techniques to the new generation of transport casks now in the design phase. The analysis methodologies submitted for the analyses of PWR and BWR fuel wet storage are outlined. Analytical activities in the country are described, as well as international collaborations in this field. Perspectives for future research and development of new applications are finally resumed. (author)

  5. Application of burnup credit with partial boron credit to PWR spent fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outcome of performing a burnup credit criticality safety analysis of a PWR spent fuel storage pool is the determination of burnup credit loading curves BLC=BLC(e) for the spent fuel storage racks designed for burnup credit, cp. Reference. A burnup credit loading curve BLC=BLC(e) specifies the loading criterion by indicating the minimum burnup BLC(e) necessary for the fuel assembly with a specific initial enrichment e to be placed in storage racks designed for burnup credit. (orig.)

  6. An overview of burnup credit application in spent nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current status of burnup credit application has been overviewed for spent nuclear fuel management. It was revealed that the use of burnup credit is practically limited to spent nuclear fuel storage, for which selected actinides-only are taken into account

  7. Strategies for Application of Isotopic Uncertainties in Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2002-12-23

    Uncertainties in the predicted isotopic concentrations in spent nuclear fuel represent one of the largest sources of overall uncertainty in criticality calculations that use burnup credit. The methods used to propagate the uncertainties in the calculated nuclide concentrations to the uncertainty in the predicted neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) of the system can have a significant effect on the uncertainty in the safety margin in criticality calculations and ultimately affect the potential capacity of spent fuel transport and storage casks employing burnup credit. Methods that can provide a more accurate and realistic estimate of the uncertainty may enable increased spent fuel cask capacity and fewer casks needing to be transported, thereby reducing regulatory burden on licensee while maintaining safety for transporting spent fuel. This report surveys several different best-estimate strategies for considering the effects of nuclide uncertainties in burnup-credit analyses. The potential benefits of these strategies are illustrated for a prototypical burnup-credit cask design. The subcritical margin estimated using best-estimate methods is discussed in comparison to the margin estimated using conventional bounding methods of uncertainty propagation. To quantify the comparison, each of the strategies for estimating uncertainty has been performed using a common database of spent fuel isotopic assay measurements for pressurized-light-water reactor fuels and predicted nuclide concentrations obtained using the current version of the SCALE code system. The experimental database applied in this study has been significantly expanded to include new high-enrichment and high-burnup spent fuel assay data recently published for a wide range of important burnup-credit actinides and fission products. Expanded rare earth fission-product measurements performed at the Khlopin Radium Institute in Russia that contain the only known publicly-available measurement for {sup 103

  8. Application of a burnup verification meter to actinide-only burnup credit for spent PWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A measurement system to verify reactor records for burnup of spent fuel at pressurized water reactors (PWR) has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories and tested at US nuclear utility sites. The system makes use of the Fork detector designed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the safeguards program of the International Atomic Energy Agency. A single-point measurement of the neutrons and gamma- rays emitted from a PWR assembly is made at the center plane of the assembly while it is partially raised from its rack in the spent fuel pool. The objective of the measurements is to determine the variation in burnup assignments among a group of assemblies, and to identify anomalous assemblies that might adversely affect nuclear criticality safety. The measurements also provide an internal consistency check for reactor records of cooling time and initial enrichment. The burnup verification system has been proposed for qualifying spent fuel assemblies for loading into containers designed using burnup credit techniques. The system is incorporated in the US Department of Energy's.''Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages'' [DOE/RW 19951

  9. Burnup credit activities in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report covers progress in burnup credit activities that have occurred in the United States of America (USA) since the International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA's) Advisory Group Meeting (AGM) on Burnup Credit was convened in October 1997. The Proceeding of the AGM were issued in April 1998 (IAEA-TECDOC-1013, April 1998). The three applications of the use of burnup credit that are discussed in this report are spent fuel storage, spent fuel transportation, and spent fuel disposal. (author)

  10. Phenomena and Parameters Important to Burnup Credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the mid-1980s, a significant number of studies have been directed at understanding the phenomena and parameters important to implementation of burnup credit in out-of-reactor applications involving pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) spent fuel. The efforts directed at burnup credit involving boiling-water-reactor (BWR) spent fuel have been more limited. This paper reviews the knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the US and other countries in the study of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation for transport and dry cask storage is given

  11. Phenomena and parameters important to burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the mid-1980s, a significant number of studies have been directed at understanding the phenomena and parameters important to implementation of burnup credit in out-of-reactor applications involving pressurized-water- reactor (PWR) spent fuel. The efforts directed at burnup credit involving boiling-water-reactor (BWR) spent fuel have been more limited. This paper reviews the knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the United States and other countries in the study of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation for transport and dry cask storage is given. (author)

  12. Issues for effective implementation of burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the United States, burnup credit has been used in the criticality safety evaluation for storage pools at pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and considerable work has been performed to lay the foundation for use of burnup credit in dry storage and transport cask applications and permanent disposal applications. Many of the technical issues related to the basic physics phenomena and parameters of importance are similar in each of these applications. However, the nuclear fuel cycle in the United States has never been fully integrated and the implementation of burnup credit to each of these applications is dependent somewhat on the specific safety bases developed over the history of each operational area. This paper will briefly review the implementation status of burnup credit for each application area and explore some of the remaining issues associated with effective implementation of burnup credit. (author)

  13. Burn-up credit applications for UO2 and MOX fuel assemblies in AREVA/COGEMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the last seven years, AREVA/COGEMA has been implementing the second phase of its burn-up credit program (the incorporation of fission products). Since the early nineties, major actinides have been taken into account in criticality analyses first for reprocessing applications, then for transport and storage of fuel assemblies Next year (2004) COGEMA will take into account the six main fission products (Rh103, Cs133, Nd143, Sm149, Sm152 and Gd155) that make up 50% of the anti-reactivity of all fission products. The experimental program will soon be finished. The new burn-up credit methodology is in progress. After a brief overview of BUC R and D program and COGEMA's application of the BUC, this paper will focus on the new burn-up measurement for UO2 and MOX fuel assemblies. It details the measurement instrumentation and the measurement experiments on MOX fuels performed at La Hague in January 2003. (author)

  14. Advances in applications of burnup credit to enhance spent fuel transportation, storage, reprocessing and disposition. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Given a trend towards higher burnup power reactor fuel, the IAEA began an active programme in burnup credit (BUC) with major meetings in 1997 (IAEA-TECDOC-1013), 2000 (IAEA-TECDOC-1241) and 2002 (IAEA-TECDOC-1378) exploring worldwide interest in using BUC in spent fuel management systems. This publication contains the proceedings of the IAEA's 4th major BUC meeting, held in London. Sixty participants from 18 countries addressed calculation methodology, validation and criticality, safety criteria, procedural compliance with safety criteria, benefits of BUC applications, and regulatory aspects in BUC. This meeting encouraged the IAEA to continue its activities on burnup credit including dissemination of related information, given the number of Member States having to deal with increased spent fuel quantities and extended durations. A 5th major meeting on burnup credit is planned 2008. Burnup credit is a concept that takes credit for the reduced reactivity of fuel discharged from the reactor to improve loading density of irradiated fuel assemblies in storage, transportation, and disposal applications, relative to the assumption of fresh fuel nuclide inventories in loading calculations. This report has described a general four phase approach to be considered in burnup credit implementation. Much if not all of the background research and data acquisition necessary for successful burnup credit development in preparation for licensing has been completed. Many fuel types, facilities, and analysis methods are encompassed in the public knowledge base, such that in many cases this guidance will provide a means for rapid development of a burnup credit program. For newer assembly designs, higher enrichment fuels, and more extensive nuclide credit, additional research and development may be necessary, but even this work can build on the foundation that has been established to date. Those, it is hoped that this report will serve as a starting point with sufficient reference to

  15. Development and Applications of a Prototypic SCALE Control Module for Automated Burnup Credit Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Consideration of the depletion phenomena and isotopic uncertainties in burnup-credit criticality analysis places an increasing reliance on computational tools and significantly increases the overall complexity of the calculations. An automated analysis and data management capability is essential for practical implementation of large-scale burnup credit analyses that can be performed in a reasonable amount of time. STARBUCS is a new prototypic analysis sequence being developed for the SCALE code system to perform automated criticality calculations of spent fuel systems employing burnup credit. STARBUCS is designed to help analyze the dominant burnup credit phenomena including spatial burnup gradients and isotopic uncertainties. A search capability also allows STARBUCS to iterate to determine the spent fuel parameters (e.g., enrichment and burnup combinations) that result in a desired keff for a storage configuration. Although STARBUCS was developed to address the analysis needs for spent fuel transport and storage systems, it provides sufficient flexibility to allow virtually any configuration of spent fuel to be analyzed, such as storage pools and reprocessing operations. STARBUCS has been used extensively at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study burnup credit phenomena in support of the NRC Research program

  16. Application of SCALE4.4 system for burnup credit criticality analysis of PWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation on the application of burnup credit for a PWR spent fuel storage pool has been carried out with the use of the SCALE 4.4 computer code system consisting of SAS2H and CSAS6 modules in association with 44-group SCALE cross-section library. Prior to the application of the computer code system, a series of bench markings have been performed in comparison with available data. A benchmarking of the SAS2h module has been done for experimental concentration data of 54 PWR spent fuel and then correction factors with a 95% probability at a 95% confidence level have been determined on the basis of the calculated and measured concentrations of 38 nuclides. After that, the bias which might have resulted from the use of the CSAS6 module has been calculated for 46 criticality experimental data of UO2 fuel and MOX fuel assemblies. The calculation bias with one-sided tolerance limit factor (2.086) corresponding to a 95% probability at a 95% confidence level has consequently been obtained to be 0.00834. Burnup credit criticality analysis has been done for the PWR spent fuel storage pool by means of the benchmarked or validated code system. It is revealed that the minimum burnup for safe storage is 7560 MWd/tU in 5 wt% enriched fuel if both actinides and fission products in spent fuel are taken into account. However, the minimum value required seems to be 9,565 MWd/tU in the same enriched fuel provided that only the actinides are taken into consideration. (author)

  17. Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improved calculational methods allow one to take credit for the reactivity reduction associated with fuel burnup. This means reducing the analysis conservatism while maintaining an adequate safety margin. The motivation for using burnup credit in criticality safety applications is based on economic considerations and additional benefits contributing to public health and safety and resource conservation. Interest in the implementation of burnup credit has been shown by many countries. In 1997, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started a task to monitor the implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems, to provide a forum to exchange information, to discuss the matter and to gather and disseminate information on the status of national practices of burnup credit implementation in the Member States. The task addresses current and future aspects of burnup credit. This task was continued during the following years. (author)

  18. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ''end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified

  19. Review of Axial Burnup Distribution Considerations for Burnup Credit Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.; DeHart, M.D.

    2000-03-01

    This report attempts to summarize and consolidate the existing knowledge on axial burnup distribution issues that are important to burnup credit criticality safety calculations. Recently released Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff guidance permits limited burnup credit, and thus, has prompted resolution of the axial burnup distribution issue. The reactivity difference between the neutron multiplication factor (keff) calculated with explicit representation of the axial burnup distribution and keff calculated assuming a uniform axial burnup is referred to as the ``end effect.'' This end effect is shown to be dependent on many factors, including the axial-burnup profile, total accumulated burnup, cooling time, initial enrichment, assembly design, and the isotopics considered (i.e., actinide-only or actinides plus fission products). Axial modeling studies, efforts related to the development of axial-profile databases, and the determination of bounding axial profiles are also discussed. Finally, areas that could benefit from further efforts are identified.

  20. Application of scale-4 depletion/criticality sequences in burnup credit analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of allowing reactivity credit for the transmuted state of spent fuel complicates the criticality analysis by requiring the specification of the fuel mixture to potentially include large numbers of isotopes representative of the fuel conditions. These conditions include the initial enrichment, local or average burnup conditions depending on the analysis approach, and the post-shutdown cooling time. In the development of an analysis methodology to evaluate spent fuel shipping and transport casks (flasks) based on this burnup credit, commercial reactor critical configurations were evaluated as potential experimental spent fuel criticals. This paper describes how the SCALE-4 depletion sequences (SAS2H), the cross-section processing sequence (CSASN), and the criticality module (KENO V.a) were used to evaluate these reactor criticals. A description of a newly developed sequence for linking SAS2H calculated burnup-dependent isotopics to KENO V.a mixing tables [SAS2H Nuclide Inventories for KENO Runs (SNIKR)] is also included

  1. Specific application of burnup credit for MOX PWR fuels in the rotary dissolver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In prospect of a Mixed OXide spent fuels processing in the rotary dissolver in COGEMA/La Hague plant, it is interesting to quantify the criticality-safety margins from the burnup credit. Using the current production computer codes and considering a minimal fuel irradiation of 3 200 megawatt-day per ton, this paper shows the impact of burnup credit on industrial parameters such as the permissible concentration in the dissolution solution or the permissible oxide mass in the rotary dissolver. Moreover, the burnup credit is broken down into five sequences in order to quantify the contribution of fissile nuclides decrease and of minor actinides and fission products formation. The implementation of the burnup credit in the criticality-safety analysis of the rotary dissolver may lead to workable industrial conditions for the particular MOX fuel studied. It can eventually be noticed that minor actinides contribution is negligible and that considering only the six major fission products is sufficient, owing to the weak fuel irradiation contemplated. (author)

  2. Probabilistic assessment of dry transport with burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The general concept of probabilistic analysis and its application to the use of burnup credit in spent fuel transport is explored. Discussion of the probabilistic analysis method is presented. The concepts of risk and its perception are introduced, and models are suggested for performing probability and risk estimates. The general probabilistic models are used for evaluating the application of burnup credit for dry spent nuclear fuel transport. Two basic cases are considered. The first addresses the question of the relative likelihood of exceeding an established criticality safety limit with and without burnup credit. The second examines the effect of using burnup credit on the overall risk for dry spent fuel transport. Using reasoned arguments and related failure probability and consequence data analysis is performed to estimate the risks of using burnup credit for dry transport of spent nuclear fuel. (author)

  3. Non destructive assay of nuclear LEU spent fuels for burnup credit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criticality safety analysis devoted to spent fuel storage and transportation has to be conservative in order to be sure no accident will ever happen. In the spent fuel storage field, the assumption of freshness has been used to achieve the conservative aspect of criticality safety procedures. Nevertheless, after being irradiated in a reactor core, the fuel elements have obviously lost part of their original reactivity. The concept of taking into account this reactivity loss in criticality safety analysis is known as Burnup credit. To be used, Burnup credit involves obtaining evidence of the reactivity loss with a Burnup measurement. Many non destructive assays (NDA) based on neutron as well as on gamma ray emissions are devoted to spent fuel characterization. Heavy nuclei that compose the fuels are modified during irradiation and cooling. Some of them emit neutrons spontaneously and the link to Burnup is a power link. As a result, burn-up determination with passive neutron measurement is extremely accurate. Some gamma emitters also have interesting properties in order to characterize spent fuels but the convenience of the gamma spectrometric methods is very dependent on characteristics of spent fuel. In addition, contrary to the neutron emission, the gamma signal is mostly representative of the peripheral rods of the fuels. Two devices based on neutron methods but combining different NDA methods which have been studied in the past are described in detail: 1. The PYTHON device is a combination of a passive neutron measurement, a collimated total gamma measurement, and an online depletion code. This device, which has been used in several Nuclear Power Plants in western Europe, gives the average Burnup within a 5% uncertainty and also the extremity Burnup, 2. The NAJA device is an automatic device that involves three nuclear methods and an online depletion code. It is designed to cover the whole fuel assembly panel (Active Neutron Interrogation, Passive Neutron

  4. Future disposal burnup credit process and effort

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United States Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has developed a risk-informed, performance based methodology for disposal criticality analyses. The methodology is documented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report, YMP/TR-004Q (YMP 2000). The methodology includes taking credit for the burnup of irradiated commercial light water reactor fuel in criticality analyses, i.e., burnup credit. This paper summarizes the ongoing and planned future burnup credit activities associated with the methodology. (author)

  5. Details on an actinide-only burnup credit application in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Details on the Actinide-Only burnup credit assumptions that will be used for the CASTOR X/32 S cask are presented. Preliminary results show that using a conservative set of assumptions the cask will allow most fuel to be loaded without the addition of any additional reactivity control. With the addition of 8 control rod elements it is possible to load most of the rest of the fuel. (author)

  6. Practices and developments in spent fuel burnup credit applications. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency convened a technical committee Meeting on Requirements, Practices and Developments in Burnup Credit (BUC) Applications in Madrid, Spain, from 22 to 26 April 2002. The purpose of this meeting was to explore the progress and status of international activities related to the BUC applications for spent nuclear fuel. This meeting was the third major meeting on the uses of BUC for spent fuel management systems held since the IAEA began to monitor the uses of BUC in spent fuel management systems in 1997. The first major meeting was an Advisory Group meeting (AGM), which was held in Vienna, in October 1997. The second major meeting was a technical committee meeting (TCM), which was held in Vienna, in July 2000. Several consultants meetings were held since 1997 to advise and assist the IAEA in planning and conducting its BUC activities. The proceedings of the 1997 AGM were published as IAEA-TECDOC-1013, and the proceedings of the 2000 TCM as IAEA-TECDOC-1241. BUC for wet and dry storage systems, spent fuel transport, reprocessing and final disposal is needed in many Member States to allow for increased enrichment, and to increase storage capacities, cask capacities and dissolver capacities avoiding the need for extensive modifications. The use of BUC is a necessity for spent fuel disposal

  7. Burnup credit demands for spent fuel management in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fact, till now, burnup credit has not be applied in Ukrainian nuclear power for spent fuel management systems (storage and transport). However, application of advanced fuel at VVER reactors, arising spent fuel amounts, represent burnup credit as an important resource to decrease spent fuel management costs. The paper describes spent fuel management status in Ukraine from viewpoint of subcriticality assurance under spent fuel storage and transport. It also considers: 1. Regulation basis concerning subcriticality assurance, 2. Basic spent fuel and transport casks characteristics, 3. Possibilities and demands for burnup credit application at spent fuel management systems in Ukraine. (author)

  8. Burnup credit application in criticality analysis of storage casks with spent RBMK-1500 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear criticality safety analysis of two types of the casks CASTOR RBMK-1500 and CONSTOR RBMK-1500 was performed using the SCALE 4.3 computer code system. These casks are planned for an interim dry storage of spent nuclear fuel at Ignalina nuclear power plant. Effective neutron multiplication factor keff was calculated for different density of the water inside the casks for unfavorable operational cases and for assumed hypothetical accident conditions when fuel in the system is fresh and fuel is depleted (i.e. burnup credit taken into account). Results show that for all cases effective neutron multiplication factor keff is less then allowable value 0.95. (author)

  9. Burnup credit issues in transportation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control during transportation and storage is referred to as burnup credit. This concept has attracted international interest and is being actively pursued in the United States in the development of a new generation of transport casks. An overview of the US experience in developing a methodology to implement burnup credit in an integrated approach to transport cask design is presented in this paper. Specifically, technical issues related to the analysis, validation and implementation of burnup credit are identified and discussed

  10. Burnup credit issues in transportation and storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control during transportation and storage is referred to as burnup credit. This concept has attracted international interest and is being actively pursued in the United States in the development of a new generation of transport casks. An overview of the U.S. experience in developing a methodology to implement burnup credit in an integrated approach to transport cask design is presented in this paper. Specifically, technical issues related to the analysis, validation and implementation of burnup credit are identified and discussed. (author)

  11. UK regulatory perspective on the application of burn-up credit to the BNFL thorp head end plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the UK the Health and Safety Executive, which incorporates the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII), is responsible for regulation of safety on nuclear sites. This paper reports progress made in the application and development of a UK regulatory position for assessing licensee's plant safety caes which invoke the use of Burn-up Credit for criticality applications. The NII's principles and strategy for the assessment of this technical area have been developed over a period of time following expressions of interest from UK industry and subsequent involvement in the international collaborations and debate in this area. This experience has now been applied to the first main plant safety case application claiming Burn-up Credit. This case covers the BNFL Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) dissolver at Sellafield, where dissolved gadolinium neutron poison is used as a criticality control. The case argues for a reduction in gadolinium content by taking credit for the burn-up of input fuel. The UK regulatory process, assessment principles and criteria are briefly outlined, showing the regulatory framework used to review the case. These issues include the fundamental requirement in UK Health and Safety law to demonstrate that risks have been reduced to as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP), the impact on safety margins, compliance and operability procedures, and the need for continuing review. Novel features of methodology, using a ''Residual Enrichment'' and ''Domain Boundary'' approach, were considered and accepted. The underlying validation, both of criticality methodology and isotopic determination, was also reviewed. Compliance was seen to rely heavily on local in-situ measurements of spent fuel used to determine ''Residual Enrichment'' and other parameters, requiring review of the development and basis of the correlations used to underpin the measurement process. Overall, it was concluded that the case as presented was adequate. Gadolinium reduction

  12. VVER-related burnup credit calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The calculations related to a VVER burnup credit calculational benchmark proposed to the Eastern and Central European research community in collaboration with the OECD/NEA/NSC Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark Working Group (working under WPNCS - Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety) are described. The results of a three-year effort by analysts from the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Hungary, Russia, Slovakia and the United Kingdom are summarized and commented on. (author)

  13. Final evaluation of the CB3+burnup credit benchmark addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1966 a series of benchmarks focused on the application of burnup credit in WWER spent fuel management system was launched by L.Markova (1). The four phases of the proposed benchmark series corresponded to the phases of the Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark organised by the OECD/NEA.These phases referred as CB1, CB2, CB3 and CB4 benchmarks were designed to investigate the main features of burnup credit in WWER spent fuel management systems. In the CB1 step, the multiplication factor of an infinite array of spent fuel rods was calculated taking the burnup, cooling time and different group of nuclides as parameters. The fuel compositions was given in the benchmark specification (Authors)

  14. Disposal criticality analysis methodology's principal isotope burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the burnup credit aspects of the United States Department of Energy Yucca Mountain Project's methodology for performing criticality analyses for commercial light-water-reactor fuel. The disposal burnup credit methodology uses a 'principal isotope' model, which takes credit for the reduced reactivity associated with the build-up of the primary principal actinides and fission products in irradiated fuel. Burnup credit is important to the disposal criticality analysis methodology and to the design of commercial fuel waste packages. The burnup credit methodology developed for disposal of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel can also be applied to storage and transportation of irradiated commercial nuclear fuel. For all applications a series of loading curves are developed using a best estimate methodology and depending on the application, an additional administrative safety margin may be applied. The burnup credit methodology better represents the 'true' reactivity of the irradiated fuel configuration, and hence the real safety margin, than do evaluations using the 'fresh fuel' assumption. (author)

  15. Burnup credit implementation in spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criticality safety analysis of spent fuel management systems has traditionally assumed that the fuel is fresh. This results in significant conservatism in the calculated value of the system's reactivity. The concept of allowing reactivity credit for spent fuel offers economic incentives. Burnup Credit (BUC) could reduce mass limitation during dissolution of highly enriched PWR assemblies at the La Hague reprocessing plant. Furthermore, accounting for burnup credit enables the operator to avoid the use of Gd soluble poison in the dissolver for MOX assemblies. Analyses performed by DOE and its contractors have indicated that using BUC to maximize spent fuel transportation cask capacities is a justifiable concept that would result in public risk benefits and cost savings while fully maintaining criticality safety margins. In order to allow for Fission Products and Actinides in Criticality-Safety analyses, an extensive BUC experimental programme has been developed in France in the framework of the CEA-COGEMA collaboration. The use of burnup credit implies a verification of the fuel burnup before loading for transport, storage, disposal, or reprocessing each assembly, to make sure that the burnup level achieved complies with the criteria established. Independent measurement systems, e.g. gamma spectrum detection systems, are needed to perform a true independent measurement of assembly burnup, without reliance on reactor records, using the gamma emission signatures fission products (mainly Cesium isotopes). (author)

  16. REBUS: A burnup credit experimental programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international programme called REBUS (REactivity tests for a direct evaluation of the Burn-Up credit on Selected irradiated LWR fuel bundles) for the investigation of the burn-up credit has been initiated by the Belgian Nuclear Research Center SCK-CEN and Belgonucleaire. At present it is sponsored by USNRC, EdF from France and VGB, representing German nuclear utilities. The programme aims to establish a neutronic benchmark for reactor physics codes. This benchmark would qualify the codes to perform calculations of the burn-up credit. The benchmark exercise will investigate the following fuel types with associated burn-up. 1. Reference absorber test bundle, 2. Fresh commercial PWR UO2 fuel, 3. Irradiated commercial PWR UO2 fuel (50 GWd/tM), 4. Fresh PWR UO2 fuel, 5. Irradiated PWR UO2 fuel (30 GWd/tM). Reactivity effects will be measured in the critical facility VENUS. The accumulated burn-up of all rods will be measured non-destructively by gamma-spectrometry. Some rods will be analyzed destructively with respect to accumulated burn-up, actinides content and TOP-18 fission products (i.e. those non-gaseous fission products that have most implications on the reactivity). The experimental implementation of the programme will start in 2000. (author)

  17. Study on the conservative factors for burnup credit criticality calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When applies the burnup credit technology to perform criticality safety analysis for spent fuel storage or transportation problems, it is important for one to confirm that all the conditions adopted are adequate to cover the severest conditions that may encounter in the engineering applications. Taking the OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks as sample problems, we study the effect of some important factors that may affect the conservatism of' the results for spent fuel system criticality safety analysis. Effects caused by different nuclides credit strategy, different cooling time and axial burnup profile are studied by use of the STARBUCS module of SCALE5. 1 software package, and related conclusions about the conservatism of these factors are drawn. (authors)

  18. Validation issues for depletion and criticality analysis in burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews validation issues associated with implementation of burnup credit in transport, dry storage, and disposal. The issues discussed are ones that have been identified by one or more constituents of the United States technical community (national laboratories, licensees, and regulators) that have been exploring the use of burnup credit. There is not necessarily agreement on the importance of the various issues, which sometimes is what creates the issue. The broad issues relate to the paucity of available experimental data (radiochemical assays and critical experiments) covering the full range and characteristics of spent nuclear fuel in away-from-reactor systems. The paper will also introduce recent efforts initiated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to provide technical information that can help better assess the value of different experiments. The focus of the paper is on experience with validation issues related to use of burnup credit for transport and dry storage applications. (author)

  19. COGEMA/TRANSNUCLEAIRE's experience with burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facing a continuous increase in the fuel enrichments, COGEMA and TRANSNUCLEAIRE have implemented step by step a burnup credit programme to improve the capacity of their equipment without major physical modification. Many authorizations have been granted by the French competent authority in wet storage, reprocessing and transport since 1981. As concerns transport, numerous authorizations have been validated by foreign competent authorities. Up to now, those authorizations are restricted to PWR Fuel type assemblies made of enriched uranium. The characterization of the irradiated fuel and the reactivity of the systems are evaluated by calculations performed with well qualified French codes developed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission): CESAR as a depletion code and APPOLO-MORET as a criticality code. The authorizations are based on the assurance that the burnup considered is met on the least irradiated part of the fuel assemblies. Besides, the most reactive configuration is calculated and the burnup credit is restricted to major actinides only. This conservative approach allows not to take credit for any axial profile. On the operational side, the procedures have been reevaluated to avoid misloadings and a burnup verification is made before transport, storage and reprocessing. Depending on the level of burnup credit, it consists of a qualitative (go/no-go) verification or of a quantitative measurement. Thus the use of burnup credit is now a common practice in France and Germany and new improvements are still in progress: extended qualifications of the codes are made to enable the use of six selected fission products in the criticality evaluations. (author)

  20. Practical issues with implementation of burnup credit in the USA for storage and transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US NRC issued an interim staff guidance (ISG8 rev1) allowing for burnup credit applications for storage and transport casks in July of 1999. In over two and a half years there has still not been a license submittal using burnup credit. ISG8 rev1 does not provide sufficient burnup credit to allow loading of 5 wt% enriched fuel in a 32 PWR assembly cask without the addition of absorber rod inserts. Pressure to allow all assemblies to contain inserts from the utility, force continued investigation into alternative levels of burnup credit. Utilities do not wish to measure to confirm burnup. This measurement costs, which range form $10 000 to $50 000 per cask and must be done prior to loading. Since burnup credit is actually only needed for transport, and transport is not expected for many years, many utilities are considering keeping the money in the bank until the time of transport. In order to address the need perceived for additional burnup credit beyond actinide-only burnup credit (ISG8), investigations have moved beyond into assuming moderator exclusion during transport and the use of burnup credit to cover a beyond design basis accident assumption of flooding. Burnup credit analysis requirements for a beyond design basis accident should be less than that for criticality control for normal operation. It is proposed that burnup credit analysis to cover the beyond design basis accident of flooding should be consistent with the beyond design basis dilution event in PWR spent fuel pools. The US NRC precedence for this type of burnup credit allows for all isotopes, a 5% reduction in the delta k of burnup, and an allowable keff of less than 1.0 after biases and uncertainties. (author)

  1. Burnup credit methodology validation against WWER experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology for criticality safety analyses with burnup credit application has been developed for WWER spent fuel management facilities. This methodology is based on two worldwide used code systems: SCALE 4.4 for depletion and criticality calculations and NESSEL-NUKO - for depletion calculations. The methodology is in process of extensive validation for WWER applications. The depletion code systems NESSEL-NUKO and SCALE4.4 (control module SAS2H) have been validated on the basis of comparison with the calculated results obtained by other depletion codes for the CB2 Calculational Burnup Credit Benchmark. The validation of these code systems for WWER-440 and WWER-1000 spent fuel assembly depletion analysis based on comparisons with appropriate experimental data commenced last year. In this paper some results from burnup methodology validation against measured nuclide concentration given in the ISTC project 2670 for WWER-440 and from ORNL publication for WWER-1000 are presented. (authors)

  2. A survey of previous and current industry-wide efforts regarding burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandia has examined the matter of burnup credit from the perspective of physics, logistics, risk, and economics. A limited survey of the nuclear industry has been conducted to get a feeling for the actual application of burnup credit. Based on this survey, it can be concluded that the suppliers of spent fuel storage and transport casks are in general agreement that burnup credit offers the potential for improvements in cask efficiency without increasing the risk of accidental criticality. The actual improvement is design-specific but limited applications have demonstrated that capacity increases in the neighborhood of 20 percent are not unrealistic. A number of these vendors acknowledge that burnup credit has not been reduced to practice in cask applications and suggest that operational considerations may be more important to regulatory acceptance than to the physics. Nevertheless, the importance of burnup credit to the nuclear industry as a cask design and analysis tool has been confirmed by this survey

  3. Fission product margin in burnup credit analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently working toward the licensing of a methodology for using actinide-only burnup credit for the transportation of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Important margins are built into this methodology. By using comparisons with a representative experimental database to determine bias factors, the methodology ensures that actinide concentrations and worths are estimated conservatively; furthermore, the negative net reactivity of certain actinides and all fission products (FPs) is not taken into account, thus providing additional margin. A future step of DOE's effort might aim at establishing an actinide and FP burnup credit methodology. The objective of this work is to establish the uncertainty to be applied to the total FP worth in SNF. This will serve two ends. First, it will support the current actinide-only methodology by demonstrating the margin available from FPs. Second, it will identify the major contributions to the uncertainty and help set priorities for future work

  4. Burnup credit implementation plan and preparation work at JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of the burnup credit concept is considered to be very effective to the design of spent fuel transport and storage facilities. This technology is all the more important when considering construction of the intermediate spent fuel storage facility, which is to be commissioned by 2010 due to increasing amount of accumulated spent fuel in Japan. Until reprocessing and recycling all the spent fuel arising, they will be stored as an energy stockpile until such time as they can be reprocessed. On the other hand, the burnup credit has been partly taken into account for the spent fuel management at Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant, which is to be commissioned in 2005. They have just finished the calibration tests for their burnup monitor with initially accepted several spent fuel assemblies. Because this monitoring system is employed with highly conservative safety margin, it is considered necessary to develop the more rational and simplified method to confirm burnup of spent fuel. A research program has been instituted to improve the present method employed at the spent fuel management system for the Spent Fuel Receiving and Storage Pool of Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant. This program is jointly performed by Japan Nuclear Fuel Limited (JNFL) and JAERI.This presentation describes the current status of spent fuel accumulation discharged from PWR and BWR in Japan and the recent incentive to introduce burnup credit into design of spent fuel storage and transport facilities. This also includes the content of the joint research program initiated by JNFL and JAERI. The relevant study has been continued at JAERI. The results by these research programs will be included in the Burnup Credit Guide Original Version compiled by JAERI. (author)

  5. The US department of energy's transportation burnup credit program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspects of the U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) transportation burnup credit program, the Department's motivation for conducting the program, and the status of burnup credit activities are presented. The benefits, technical, and regulatory considerations associated with using burnup credit for transport of irradiated nuclear fuel are discussed. The methods used in the DOE's actinide-only topical report are described in terms of the technical and regulatory issues. (authors)

  6. First burnup credit application including actinides and fission products for transport and storage cask by using French experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burnup credit (BUC) methodology for a transport and storage cask application, including actinides and fission products, is implemented at AREVA TN using the French BUC calculation route for pressurized water reactor (PWR) UO2 used fuel. The methodology is based on the connection of the French depletion code DARWIN2 and the French criticality safety package CRISTAL V1. The BUC methodology includes the experimental validation of the computation codes dedicated to the calculation of the used fuel inventory calculations. Indeed, the results of the comparison calculation–experiment (C-E)/E allow to determine either a set of isotopic correction factors (ICFs) for the BUC nuclides considered in the criticality calculation or keff-penalty terms directly used for the definition of the keff-acceptance criterion for the criticality assessment of the transport and storage cask. These ICFs or keff-penalty terms are one of the key of the BUC method to guarantee the conservativeness of the fuel reactivity in safety-criticality calculations using BUC approach. A French BUC program has been developed at CEA/Cadarache in the framework of the CEA-AREVA collaboration in order to validate fuel inventory calculations. This program involves two kinds of experiments: chemical analyses and microprobe measurements of PWR irradiated fuel pins (French PIE program) on one hand, and reactivity worth measurements of the BUC nuclides in the MINERVE reactor on the other hand. This paper highlights, through a first industrial AREVA TN's application of the BUC method, including fission products, that the French PIE program and reactivity worth measurements in MINERVE reactor are suitable for the implementation of BUC in transport and storage cask applications loaded with PWR UO2 used fuels assemblies. (author)

  7. Review of Technical Studies in the United States in Support of Burnup Credit Regulatory Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking credit for the reduction in reactivity associated with fuel depletion can enable more cost-effective, higher-density storage, transport, disposal, and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) while maintaining sufficient subcritical margin to establish an adequate safety basis. Consequently, there continues to be considerable interest in the United States (U.S.), as well as internationally, in the increased use of burnup credit in SNF operations, particularly related to storage, transport, and disposal of commercial SNF. This interest has motivated numerous technical studies related to the application of burnup credit, both domestically and internationally, as well as the design of SNF storage, transport and disposal systems that rely on burnup credit for maintaining subcriticality. Responding to industry requests and needs, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) initiated a burnup credit research program in 1999, with support from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to develop regulatory guidance and the supporting technical bases for allowing and expanding the use of burnup credit in pressurized-water reactor SNF storage and transport applications. Although this NRC research program has not been continuous since its inception, considerable progress has been achieved in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues, availability of relevant information and data, and subsequently updated regulatory guidance for expanded use of burnup credit. This paper reviews technical studies performed by ORNL for the U.S. NRC burnup credit research program. Examples of topics include reactivity effects associated with reactor operating characteristics, fuel assembly characteristics, burnable absorbers, control rods, spatial burnup distributions, cooling time, and assembly misloading; methods and data for validation of isotopic composition predictions; methods and data for validation of criticality calculations; and

  8. Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems. Proceedings of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The criticality safety analysis of spent fuel systems has traditionally assumed that the fuel is fresh. This results in significant conservatism in the calculated value of the system's reactivity. Improved calculational methods allows one to take credit for the reactivity reduction associated with fuel burnup, hence reducing the analysis conservatism while maintaining an adequate criticality safety margin. Motivation for using burnup credit in criticality safety applications is generally based on economic considerations. Although economics may be a primary factor in deciding to use burnup credit, other benefits may be realized. Many of the additional benefits of burnup credit that are not strictly economic, may be considered to contribute to public health and safety, and resource conservation and environmental quality. Interest in the implementation of burnup credit has been shown by many countries. A summary of the information gathered by the IAEA about ongoing activities and regulatory status of burnup credit in different countries is included. Burnup credit implementation introduces new parameters and effects that should be addressed in the criticality analysis (e.g., axial and radial burnup shapes, fuel irradiation history, and others). Analysis of these parameters introduces new variations as well as the uncertainties, that should be considered in the safety assessment of the system. Also, the need arises to validate the isotopic composition that results from a depletion calculation, as well as to extend the current validation range of criticality codes to cover spent fuel. The use of burnup credit implies a verification of the fuel burnup before loading for transport, storage, disposal, or reprocessing each assembly, to make sure that the burnup level achieved complies with the criteria established. Methods and procedures used in different countries are described in this report

  9. Implementation of burnup credit in PWR spent fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel storage of LWR fuel at nuclear power plants is approved in Germany since the beginning of 2000. The burnup credit methods applied have to comply with the newly developed German criticality safety standard DIN 25471 passed in November 1999 and published in September 2000, cp. (orig.)

  10. OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the final result of the phase-1A of the Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark conducted by OECD/NEA. The phase-1A benchmark problem is an infinite array of a simple PWR spent fuel rod. The analysis has been performed for the PWR spent fuels of 30 and 40 GWd/t after 1 and 5 years of cooling time. In total, 25 results from 19 institutes of 11 countries have been submitted. For the nuclides in spent fuel, 7 major actinides and 15 major fission products (FP) are selected for the benchmark calculation. In the case of 30 GWd/t burnup, it is found that the major actinides and the major FPs contribute more than 50% and 30% of the total reactivity loss due to burnup, respectively. Therefore, more than 80% of the reactivity loss can be covered by 22 nuclides. However, the larger deviation among the reactivity losses by participants has been found for cases including EPs than the cases with only actinides, indicating the existence of relatively large uncertainties in FP cross sections. The large deviation seen also in the case of the fresh fuel has been found to reduce sufficiently by replacing the cross section library from ENDF-B/IV with that from ENDF-B/V and taking the known bias of MONK6 into account. (author)

  11. ISOTOPIC MODEL FOR COMMERCIAL SNF BURNUP CREDIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to demonstrate a process for selecting bounding depletion parameters, show that they are conservative for pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and establish the range of burnup for which the parameters are conservative. The general range of applicability is for commercial light water reactor (LWR) SNF with initial enrichments between 2.0 and 5.0 weight percent 235U and burnups between 10 and 50 gigawatt-day per metric ton of uranium (GWd/MTU)

  12. ISOTOPIC MODEL FOR COMMERCIAL SNF BURNUP CREDIT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.H. Wells

    2004-11-17

    The purpose of this report is to demonstrate a process for selecting bounding depletion parameters, show that they are conservative for pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and establish the range of burnup for which the parameters are conservative. The general range of applicability is for commercial light water reactor (LWR) SNF with initial enrichments between 2.0 and 5.0 weight percent {sup 235}U and burnups between 10 and 50 gigawatt-day per metric ton of uranium (GWd/MTU).

  13. Recommendations for Addressing Axial Burnup in the PWR Burnup Credit Analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2002-10-23

    This report presents studies performed to support the development of a technically justifiable approach for addressing the axial-burnup distribution in pressurized-water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety analyses. The effect of the axial-burnup distribution on reactivity and proposed approaches for addressing the axial-burnup distribution are briefly reviewed. A publicly available database of profiles is examined in detail to identify profiles that maximize the neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, assess its adequacy for PWR burnup credit analyses, and investigate the existence of trends with fuel type and/or reactor operations. A statistical evaluation of the k{sub eff} values associated with the profiles in the axial-burnup-profile database was performed, and the most reactive (bounding) profiles were identified as statistical outliers. The impact of these bounding profiles on k{sub eff} is quantified for a high-density burnup credit cask. Analyses are also presented to quantify the potential reactivity consequence of loading assemblies with axial-burnup profiles that are not bounded by the database. The report concludes with a discussion on the issues for consideration and recommendations for addressing axial burnup in criticality safety analyses using burnup credit for dry cask storage and transportation.

  14. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation systems (often referred to as casks) and spent fuel pools (SFPs). This work is divided into two main phases. The first phase investigated the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in SFPs to transportation and storage casks and the validation of reactivity calculations and spent fuel compositions within these methods. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the analysis of the effects of control blade insertion history, and moderator density and burnup axial profiles for extended BWR BUC.

  15. Addressing the Axial Burnup Distribution in PWR Burnup Credit Criticality Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes efforts related to developing a technically justifiable approach for addressing the axial burnup distribution in PWR burnup-credit criticality safety analyses. The paper reviews available data on the axial variation in burnup and the effect of axial burnup profiles on reactivity in a SNF cask. A publicly available database of profiles is examined to identify profiles that maximize the neutron multiplication factor, keff, assess its adequacy for general PWR burnup credit analyses, and investigate the existence of trends with fuel type and/or reactor operations. For this assessment, a statistical evaluation of the keff values associated with the profiles in the axial burnup profile database was performed that identifies the most reactive profiles as statistical outliers that are not representative of typical discharged SNF assemblies. The impact of these bounding profiles on the neutron multiplication factor for a high-density burnup credit cask is quantified. Finally, analyses are presented to quantify the potential reactivity consequence of assemblies with axial profiles that are not bounded by the existing database. The paper concludes with findings for addressing the axial burnup distribution in burnup credit analyses

  16. EPRI R and D perspective on burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Burnup credit' refers to taking credit for the burnup of nuclear fuel in the performance of criticality safety analyses. Historically, criticality safety analyses for transport of spent nuclear fuel have assumed the fuel to be unirradiated (i.e. 'fresh' fuel). In 1999, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office issued Interim Staff Guidance - 8 (ISG-8) with recommendations for the use of burnup credit in storage and transportation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel. The use of burnup credit offers an opportunity to reduce the number of spent nuclear fuel shipments by ∼30%. A simple analysis shows that the increased risk of a criticality event associated with properly using burnup credit is negligible. Comparing this negligible risk component with the reduction in common transport risks due to the reduced number of spent fuel shipments (higher capacity casks for transporting PWR spent fuel) leads to the conclusion that using 'burnup credit' is preferable to using the 'fresh fuel' assumption. A specific objective of the EPRI program is to support the Goals of the U.S. Industry. These goals are consistent with the original U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal defined in 1988: a burnup credit methodology that takes credit for the negative reactivity that is practical (all fissile actinides, most neutron absorbing actinides, and a subset of the fission products that account for the majority of the available credit from all fission products). The determination of the optimum number of fission products to consider in a practical burnup credit methodology validates the approach advocated by researchers from France to first focus on a handful of isotopes that include Sm-149; Rh-103; Nd-143; Gd-155; and Sm-152. (author)

  17. Implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Technical Committee Meeting was to explore the status of international activities related to the use of burnup credit for spent fuel applications. This was the second major meeting on the issues of burnup credit for spent fuel management systems held since the IAEA began to monitor the uses of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems in 1997. Burnup credit for wet and dry storage systems is needed in many Member States to allow for increased initial fuel enrichment, and to increase the storage capacity and thus to avoid the need for extensive modifications of the spent fuel management systems involved. This document contains 31 individual papers presented at the Meeting; each of the papers was indexed separately

  18. Investigation of Burnup Credit Issues in BWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations for long-term-disposal criticality safety of spent nuclear fuel requires the application of burnup credit because of the large mass of fissile material that will be present in the repository. Burnup credit calculations are based on depletion calculations that provide a conservative estimate of spent fuel contents, followed by criticality calculations to assess the value of keff for a spent fuel cask or a fuel configuration under a variety of probabilistically derived events. In order to ensure that the depletion calculation is conservative, it is necessary to both qualify and quantify assumptions that can be made in depletion models used to characterize spent fuel. Most effort in the United States this decade has focused on burnup issues related to pressurized-water reactors. However, requirements for the permanent disposal of fuel from boiling-water reactors has necessitated development of methods for prediction of spent fuel contents for such fuels. Concomitant with such analyses, validation is also necessary. This paper provides a summary of initial efforts at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to better understand and validate spent fuel analyses for boiling-water-reactor fuel

  19. Investigation of burnup credit implementation for BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnup Credit allows considering the reactivity decrease due to fuel irradiation in criticality studies for the nuclear fuel cycle. Its implementation requires to carefully analyze the validity of the assumptions made to define the axial profile of the burnup and void fraction (for BWR), to determine the composition of the irradiated fuel and to compute the criticality simulation. In the framework of Burnup Credit implementation for BWR fuel, this paper proposes to investigate part of these items. The studies presented in this paper concern: the influence of the burnup and of the void fraction on BWR spent fuel content and on the effective multiplication factor of an infinite array of BWR assemblies. A code-to-code comparison for BWR fuel depletion calculations relevant to Burnup Credit is also performed. (authors)

  20. Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this topical report is to present to the NRC for review and acceptance a methodology for using burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems for PWR spent fuel transportation packages, while maintaining the criticality safety margins and related requirements of 10 CFR Part 71 and 72. The proposed methodology consists of five major steps as summarized below: (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations in SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, keff, of a spent nuclear fuel package. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). and (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper fuel assembly selection prior to loading. (This step is required but the details are outside the scope of this topical report.) When reviewed and accepted by the NRC, this topical report will serve as a criterion document for criticality control analysts and will provide steps for the use of actinide-only burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems. The NRC-accepted burnup credit methodology will be used by commercial SNF storage and transportation package designers. Design-specific burnup credit criticality analyses will be defined, developed, and documented in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for each specific storage or transportation package that uses burnup credit. These SARs will then be submitted to the NRC for review and approval. This topical report is expected to be referenced in a number of storage and transportation cask applications to be submitted by commercial cask and canister designers to the NRC. Therefore, NRC acceptance of this topical report will result in increased efficiency of the

  1. Topical Report on Actinide-Only Burnup Credit for PWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Packages. Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1998-09-01

    The objective of this topical report is to present to the NRC for review and acceptance a methodology for using burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems for PWR spent fuel transportation packages, while maintaining the criticality safety margins and related requirements of 10 CFR Part 71 and 72. The proposed methodology consists of five major steps as summarized below: (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations in SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, keff, of a spent nuclear fuel package. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). and (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper fuel assembly selection prior to loading. (This step is required but the details are outside the scope of this topical report.) When reviewed and accepted by the NRC, this topical report will serve as a criterion document for criticality control analysts and will provide steps for the use of actinide-only burnup credit in the design of criticality control systems. The NRC-accepted burnup credit methodology will be used by commercial SNF storage and transportation package designers. Design-specific burnup credit criticality analyses will be defined, developed, and documented in the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for each specific storage or transportation package that uses burnup credit. These SARs will then be submitted to the NRC for review and approval. This topical report is expected to be referenced in a number of storage and transportation cask applications to be submitted by commercial cask and canister designers to the NRC. Therefore, NRC acceptance of this topical report will result in increased efficiency of the

  2. 2005 status and future of burnup credit in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the beginning of 2005 in the USA burnup credit is licensed for PWR and BWR spent fuel pools, is under license review for a transport cask, is under discussion for disposal criticality. Two basic approaches exist for burnup credit. The first approach, which is licensed for spent fuel pools, utilizes criticality experience with spent fuel that has not been chemically assayed. The second approach to burnup credit comes from utilizing chemical assay data to validate the depletion calculations and then clean critical experiments to validate the criticality calculation. A burnup credit standard (ANS/ANSI-8.27) is under development where the two approaches are actively discussed. Issues related to the two approaches are presented as well as possible ways of resolving the issues. (author)

  3. Burnup credit implementation in WWER spent fuel management systems: Status and future aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the motivation for possible burnup credit implementation in WWER spent fuel management systems in Bulgaria. The activities being done are described, namely: the development and verification of a 3D few-group diffusion burnup model; the application of the KORIGEN code for evaluation of WWER fuel nuclear inventory during reactor core lifetime and after spent fuel discharge; using the SCALE modular system (PC Version 4.1) for criticality safety analyses of spent fuel storage facilities. Future plans involving such important tasks as validation and verification of computer systems and libraries for WWER burnup credit analysis are shown. (author)

  4. A guide introducing burnup credit, preliminary version. Contract research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    It is examined to take burnup credit into account for criticality safety control of facility treating spent fuel. This work is a collection of current technical status of predicting isotopic composition and criticality of spent fuel, points to be specially considered for safety evaluation, and current status of legal affairs for the purpose of applying burnup credit to the criticality safety evaluation of the facility treating spent fuel in Japan. (author)

  5. A guide introducing burnup credit, preliminary version. Contract research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is examined to take burnup credit into account for criticality safety control of facility treating spent fuel. This work is a collection of current technical status of predicting isotopic composition and criticality of spent fuel, points to be specially considered for safety evaluation, and current status of legal affairs for the purpose of applying burnup credit to the criticality safety evaluation of the facility treating spent fuel in Japan. (author)

  6. Burnup credit considerations in dry spent-fuel storage licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnup credit has been allowed in reactor basin spent-fuel storage at pressurized water reactors for a number of years. However, such storage occurs under strict administrative, procedural, and design controls. In recent years, dry spent-fuel storage cask vendors have expressed interest in designing cask fuel baskets with allowance for burnup credit. At last year's American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting, an ad hoc session was organized and authorized on burnup credit for dry storage and transportation casks. It has become clear that some utilities are interested in burnup credit for dry storage designs. Given this, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff is examining the technical issues involved in allowing burnup credit. Analytical work focused on the development of branch technical positions for determination of burnup credit for dry spent-fuel storage technology designs has begun. Procedural and administrative issues will be examined, based on licensing experience, and will also be the subject of branch technical positions. At an appropriate time, preparation of regulatory guides will be considered

  7. Technical Data to Justify Full Burnup Credit in Criticality Safety Licensing Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enercon Services, Inc.

    2011-03-14

    ENERCON's understanding of the difficult issues related to obtaining and analyzing additional cross section test data to support Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table) analysis was performed by ENERCON to evaluate the costs and benefits of acquiring different types of nuclear data in support of Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT exercise is a formal expert elicitation process with the final output being the ranking tables. The PIRT analysis (Table 7-4: Results of PIRT Evaluation) showed that the acquisition of additional Actinide-Only experimental data, although beneficial, was associated with high cost and is not necessarily needed. The conclusion was that the existing Radiochemical Assay (RCA) data plus the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC)2 and handbook Laboratory Critical Experiment (LCE) data provide adequate benchmark validation for Actinide-Only Burnup Credit. The PIRT analysis indicated that the costs and schedule to obtain sufficient additional experimental data to support the addition of 16 fission products to Actinide-Only Burnup Credit to produce Full Burnup Credit are quite substantial. ENERCON estimates the cost to be $50M to $100M with a schedule of five or more years. The PIRT analysis highlights another option for fission product burnup credit, which is the application of computer-based uncertainty analyses (S/U - Sensitivity/Uncertainty methodologies), confirmed by the limited experimental data that is already available. S/U analyses essentially transform cross section uncertainty information contained in the cross section libraries into a reactivity bias and uncertainty. Recent work by ORNL and EPRI has shown that a methodology to support Full Burnup Credit is possible using a combination of traditional RCA and LCE validation plus S/U validation for fission product isotopics and cross sections. Further, the most recent cross section data (ENDF/B-VII) can be incorporated into the burnup credit codes at a reasonable cost

  8. Technical Data to Justify Full Burnup Credit in Criticality Safety Licensing Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ENERCON's understanding of the difficult issues related to obtaining and analyzing additional cross section test data to support Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table) analysis was performed by ENERCON to evaluate the costs and benefits of acquiring different types of nuclear data in support of Full Burnup Credit. A PIRT exercise is a formal expert elicitation process with the final output being the ranking tables. The PIRT analysis (Table 7-4: Results of PIRT Evaluation) showed that the acquisition of additional Actinide-Only experimental data, although beneficial, was associated with high cost and is not necessarily needed. The conclusion was that the existing Radiochemical Assay (RCA) data plus the French Haut Taux de Combustion (HTC)2 and handbook Laboratory Critical Experiment (LCE) data provide adequate benchmark validation for Actinide-Only Burnup Credit. The PIRT analysis indicated that the costs and schedule to obtain sufficient additional experimental data to support the addition of 16 fission products to Actinide-Only Burnup Credit to produce Full Burnup Credit are quite substantial. ENERCON estimates the cost to be $50M to $100M with a schedule of five or more years. The PIRT analysis highlights another option for fission product burnup credit, which is the application of computer-based uncertainty analyses (S/U - Sensitivity/Uncertainty methodologies), confirmed by the limited experimental data that is already available. S/U analyses essentially transform cross section uncertainty information contained in the cross section libraries into a reactivity bias and uncertainty. Recent work by ORNL and EPRI has shown that a methodology to support Full Burnup Credit is possible using a combination of traditional RCA and LCE validation plus S/U validation for fission product isotopics and cross sections. Further, the most recent cross section data (ENDF/B-VII) can be incorporated into the burnup credit codes at a reasonable cost

  9. Analysis of burnup credit on spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical analyses were carried out on high burnup UO2 (65 GWd/t) and MOX (45 GWd/t) spent fuel pins. Measured data of the composition of nuclides from 234U to 242Pu were used for evaluation of ORIGEN-2/82 code. Criticality calculations were executed for the casks which were being designed to store 52 BWR or 21 PWR spent fuel assemblies. The reactivity biases were evaluated for (1) axial and horizontal profiles of burnup, and void history (BWR), (2) operational histories such as control rod insertion history, BPR insertion history and others, and (3) calculational accuracy of ORIGEN-2/82 code on the composition of nuclides. Present evaluation shows that introduction of burnup credit has a substantial merit in criticality safety analysis of the cask, even if these reactivity biases are considered. The concept of equivalent uniform burnup was adapted for present reactivity bias evaluation and showed a possibility of simplifying the reactivity bias evaluation in burnup credit. Finally, adapting procedures of burnup credit such as the burnup meter were evaluated. (author)

  10. A Criticality Evaluation of the GBC-32 Dry Storage Cask in PWR Burnup Credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current criticality safety evaluation assumes the only unirradiated fresh fuels with the maximum enrichment in a dry storage cask (DSC) for conservatism without consideration of the depletion of fissile nuclides and the generation of neutron-absorbing fission products. However, the large conservatism leads to the significant increase of the storage casks required. Thus, the application of burnup credit which takes credit for the reduction of reactivity resulted from fuel depletion can increase the capacity in storage casks. On the other hand, the burnup credit application introduces lots of complexity into a criticality safety analysis such as the accurate estimation of the isotopic inventories and the burnup of UNFs and the validation of the criticality calculation. The criticality evaluation with an effect of burnup credit was performed for the DSC of GBC-32 by using SCALE 6.1/STARBUCS. keff values were calculated as a function of burnup and cooling time for four initial enrichments of 2, 3, 4, and 5 wt. % 235U. The values were calculated for the burnup range of 0 to 60,000 MWD/MTU, in increments of 10,000 MWD/MTU, and for five cooling times of 0, 5, 10, 20, and 40 years

  11. Transnucleaire's experience with burnup credit in transport operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facing a continued increase in fuel enrichment values, Transnucleaire has progressively implemented a burnup credit programme in order to maintain or, where possible, to improve the capacity of its transport packagings without physical modification. Many package design approvals, based on a notion of burnup credit, have been granted by the French competent authority for transport since the early eighties, and many of these approvals have been validated by foreign competent authorities. Up to now, these approvals are restricted to fuel assemblies made of enriched uranium and irradiated in pressurized water reactors (PWR). The characterization of the irradiated fuel and the reactivity of the package are evaluated by calculation, performed using qualified French codes developed by the CEA (Commisariat a l'Energie Atomique/French Atomic Energy Commission): CESAR as a depletion code and APOLO-MORET as a criticality code. The approvals are based on the hypothesis that the burnup considered is that applied on the least irradiated region of the fuel assemblies, the conservative approach being not to take credit for any axial profile of burnup along the fuel assembly. The most reactive configuration is calculated and the burnup credit is also restricted to major actinides only. On the operational side and in compliance with regulatory requirements, verification is made before transport, in order to meet safety objectives as required by the transport regulations. Besides a review of documentation related to the irradiation history of each fuel assembly, it consists of either a qualitative (go/no-go) verification or of a quantitative measurement, depending on the level of burnup credit. Thus the use of burnup credit is now a common practice with Transnucleaire's packages, particularly in France and Germany. New improvements are still in progress and qualifications of the calculation code are now well advanced, which will allow in the near future the use of six selected

  12. Parametric neutronic analyses related to burnup credit cask design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The consideration of spent fuel histories (burnup credit) in the design of spent fuel shipping casks will result in cost savings and public risk benefits in the overall fuel transportation system. The purpose of this paper is to describe the depletion and criticality analyses performed in conjunction with and supplemental to the referenced analysis. Specifically, the objectives are to indicate trends in spent fuel isotopic composition with burnup and decay time; provide spent fuel pin lattice values as a function of burnup, decay time, and initial enrichment; demonstrate the variation of keff for infinite arrays of spent fuel assemblies separated by generic cask basket designs (borated and unborated) of varying thicknesses; and verify the potential cask reactivity margin available with burnup credit via analysis with generic cask models

  13. Finnish contribution to the CB4 burnup credit benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CB4 phase of the WWER burnup credit benchmark series studies the effect of flat and realistic axial burnup profiles on the multiplication factor of a conceptual WWER cask loaded with spent fuel. The benchmark was calculated at VTT Energy with MCNP4C, using mainly ENDF/B-V1 cross sections. According to the calculation results the effect of the axial homogenization on the keff estimate is complex. At low burnups the use of a axial profile overestimates keff but at high burnups the reverse is the case. Ignoring fission products leads to conservative keff and the effect of axial homogenization on the multiplication factor is similar to a reduction of the burnup (Authors)

  14. Siemens PWR burnup credit criticality analysis methodology: Depletion code and verification methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of burnup credit requires knowledge of the reactivity state of the irradiated fuel for which burnup credit is taken. The isotopic inventory of the irradiated fuel has to be calculated, therefore, by means of depletion codes. Siemens performs depletion calculations for PWR fuel burnup credit applications with the aid of the code package SAV. This code package is based on the first principles approach, i.e., avoids cycle or reactor specific fitting or adjustment parameters. This approach requires a general and comprehensive qualification of SAV by comparing experimental with calculational results. In the paper on hand the attention is focused mainly on the evaluation of chemical assay data received from different experimental programmes. (author)

  15. Calculation study of TNPS spent fuel pool using burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exampled by the spent fuel pool of TNPS which is consist of 2 × 5 fuel storage racks, the spent fuel high-density storage based on burnup credit (BUC) and related criticality safety issues were studied. The MONK9A code was used to analyze keff, of different enrichment fuels at different burnups. A reference loading curve was proposed in accordance with the system keff's changing with the burnup of different initially enriched nuclear fuels. The capacity of the spent fuel pool increases by 31% compared with the one that does not consider BUC. (authors)

  16. Burnup credit in nuclear waste transport: An economic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US DOE is responsible for transporting nuclear spent fuel from commercial reactors to monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facilities and/or to repositories. Current plans call for approximately 110,000 metric tons uranium (MTU) to be transported over approximately 40 years beginning in 1998. Because of the large volume of spent fuel to be transported, new generations of spent fuel transportation casks are being planned. These casks will embody the latest technology and will be designated to accommodate the spent fuel in a way that maximizes the overall efficiency of the cask. In planning for the new generation of transport casks, the DOE is investigating the possibility of tailoring the cask design for the extent to which spent fuel has been used in the reactors, or, for spent fuel burnup. Granting design credit for burnup would allow one to fabricate casks with relatively larger capacities than would be possible otherwise. The remainder of the paper discusses the economic implications of using burnup credit in cask design, discusses the approach used in analyzing the economics of burnup credit, describes the results of the analysis, and offers some conclusions about the economic value of the burnup credit option

  17. An analysis of burnup reactivity credit for reactor RA spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for increasing the spent fuel storage capacity has led to the development of validated methods for assessing the reactivity effects associated with fuel burnup. This paper gives an overview of the criticality safety analysis methodology used to investigate the sensitivity of storage system reactivities to changes in fuel burnup. Results representing the validation of the methods are also discussed. As an example of the application of this methodology an analysis of the burnup reactivity credit for the three-dimensional model of the reactor RA spent fuel storage is described. (author)

  18. CB2 result evaluation (VVER-440 burnup credit benchmark)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second portion of the four-piece international calculational benchmark on the VVER burnup credit (CB2) prepared in the collaboration with the OECD/NEA/NSC Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmarks Working Group and proposed to the AER research community has been evaluated. The evaluated results of calculations performed by analysts from Cuba, the Czech Republic, Finland, Germany, Russia, Slovakia and the United Kingdom are presented. The goal of this study is to compare isotopic concentrations calculated by the participants using various codes and libraries for depletion of the VVER-440 fuel pin cell. No measured values were available for the comparison. (author)

  19. Actinide-only burnup credit for spent fuel transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conservative methodology is described that would allow taking credit for burn up in the criticality safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel packages. Requirements for its implementation include isotopic and criticality validation, generation of package loading criteria using limiting parameters, and assembly burn up verification by measurement. The method allows credit for the changes in the 234U, 235U, 236U, 238U, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, and 241Am concentrations with burnup. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. Analyses are included regarding the methodology's financial benefits and conservative margin. It is estimated that the proposed actinide-only burnup credit methodology would save 20% of the transport costs. Nevertheless, the methodology includes a substantial margin. Conservatism due to the isotopic correction factors, limiting modelling parameters, limiting axial profiles and exclusion of the fission products ranges from 10 to 25% k. (author)

  20. A burnup credit calculation methodology for PWR spent fuel transportation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A burnup credit calculation methodology for PWR spent fuel transportation has been developed and validated in CEA/Saclay. To perform the calculation, the spent fuel composition are first determined by the PEPIN-2 depletion analysis. Secondly the most important actinides and fission product poisons are automatically selected in PEPIN-2 according to the reactivity worth and the burnup for critically consideration. Then the 3D Monte Carlo critically code TRIMARAN-2 is used to examine the subcriticality. All the resonance self-shielded cross sections used in this calculation system are prepared with the APOLLO-2 lattice cell code. The burnup credit calculation methodology and related PWR spent fuel transportation benchmark results are reported and discussed. (authors)

  1. An economic evaluation of a storage system for casks with burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is generally recognized that casks designed with burnup credit are more economical than those without burnup credit. To estimate how much more economical they are, we made conceptual designs of transport/storage casks with and without burnup credit for PWR and BWR fuels of various uranium enrichment. The casks were designed to contain the maximum number of fuel assemblies under the necessary weight and dimensional limitations as well as the criticality and shielding criteria. The results showed that approximately 8 % to 44 % more fuel assemblies could be contained in casks with burnup credit. We then evaluated the economy of cask storage system incorporating the cask designs obtained above both with and without burnup credit. The results showed that the cost of storing casks with burnup credit is approximately 7 % to 30 % less expensive than storing casks without burnup credit. (J.P.N.)

  2. Burnup effects of MOX fuel pincells in PWR - OECD/NEA burnup credit benchmark analysis -

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burnup effects were analyzed for various cases of MOX fuel pincells of fresh and irradiated fuels by using the HELIOS, MCNP-4/B, CRX and CDP computer codes. The investigated parameters were burnup, cooling time and combinations of nuclides in the fuel region. The fuel compositions for each case were provided by BNFL (British Nuclear Fuel Limited) as a part of the problem specification so that the results could be focused on the calculation of the neutron multiplication factor. The results of the analysis show that the largest saving effect of the neutron multiplication factor due to burnup credit is 30 %. This is mainly due to the consideration of actinides and fission products in the criticality analysis

  3. The impact of burn-up credit in criticality studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays optimization goes with everything. So French engineering firms try to demonstrate that fuel transport casks and storage pools are able to receive assemblies with higher 235U initial enrichments. Fuel Burnup distribution contributes to demonstrate it. This instruction has to elaborate a way to take credit of burnup effects on criticality safety designs. The calculation codes used are CESAR 4.21-APOLLO 1-MORET III. The assembly studied (UO2) is irradiated in a French Pressurized Water Reactor like EDF nuclear power reactor: PWR 1300 MWe, 17 x 17 array. Its initial enrichment in 235U equals 4.5%. The studies exposed in this report have evaluated the effects of: i) the 15 fission products considered in Burnup Credit (95Mo, 99Tc, 101Ru, 103Rh, 109Ag, 133Cs, 143Nd, 145Nd, 147Sm, 149Sm, 150Sm, 151Sm, 152Sm, 153Eu, 155Gd), ii) the calculated abundances corrected or not by fixed factors, iii) the choice of one cross sections library used by CESAR 4.21, iu) the zone number elected in the axial burnup distribution zoning, u) the kind of cut applied on (regular/optimized). Two axial distribution profiles are studied: one with 44 GWd/t average burnup, the other with 20 GWd/t average burnup. The second one considers a shallow control rods insertion in the upper limit of the assembly. The results show a margin in reactivity about 0.045 with consideration of the 6 most absorbent fission products (103Rh, 133Cs, 143Nd, 149Sm, 152Sm, 155Gd), and about 0.06 for all Burnup Credit fission products whole. Those results have been calculated with an average burnup of 44 GWj/t. In a conservative approach, corrective factors must be apply on the abundance of some fission products. The cross sections library used by CESAR 4.21 (BBL 4) is sufficient and gives satisfactory results. The zoning of the assembly axial distribution burnup in 9 regular zones grants a satisfying calculation time/result precision compromise. (author)

  4. A validated methodology for evaluating burnup credit in spent fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of allowing reactivity credit for the transmuted state of spent fuel offers both economic and risk incentives. This paper presents a general overview of the technical work being performed in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program to resolve issues related to the implementation of burnup credit. An analysis methodology is presented along with information representing the validation of the method against available experimental data. The experimental data that are applicable to burnup credit include chemical assay data for the validation of the isotopic prediction models, fresh fuel critical experiments for the validation of criticality calculations for various cask geometries, and reactor restart critical data to validate criticality calculations with spent fuel. The methodology has been specifically developed to be simple and generally applicable, therefore giving rise to uncertainties or sensitivities which are identified and quantified in terms of a percent bias in keff. Implementation issues affecting licensing requirements and operational procedures are discussed briefly. (Author)

  5. A validated methodology for evaluating burnup credit in spent fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of allowing reactivity credit for the transmuted state of spent fuel offers both economic and risk incentives. This paper presents a general overview of the technical work being performed in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) program to resolve issues related to the implementation of burnup credit. An analysis methodology is presented along with information representing the validation of the method against available experimental data. The experimental data that are applicable to burnup credit include chemical assay data for the validation of the isotopic prediction models, fresh fuel critical experiments for the validation of criticality calculations for various cask geometries, and reactor restart critical data to validate criticality calculations with spent fuel. The methodology has been specifically developed to be simple and generally applicable, therefore giving rise to uncertainties or sensitivities which are identified and quantified in terms of a percent bias in keff. Implementation issues affecting licensing requirements and operational procedures are discussed briefly. 24 refs., 3 tabs

  6. Overview of the burnup credit activities at OECD/NEA/NSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article summarizes activities of the OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Expert Panel, a subordinate group to the Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety (WPNCS). The WPNCS of the OECD/NEA coordinates and carries out work in the domain of criticality safety at the international level. Particular attention is devoted to establishing sound databases required in this area and to addressing issues of high relevance such as burnup credit. The activities of the expert panel are aimed toward improving safety and identifying economic solutions to issues concerning the back-end of the fuel cycle. The main objective of the activities of the OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Expert Panel is to demonstrate that the available criticality safety calculational tools are appropriate for application to burned fuel systems and that a reasonable safety margin can be established. The method established by the expert panel for investigating the physics and predictability of burnup credit is based on the specification and comparison of calculational benchmark problems. A wide range of fuel types, including PWR, BWR, MOX, and VVER fuels, has been or are being addressed by the expert panel. The objective and status of each of these benchmark problems is reviewed in this article. It is important to note that the focus of the expert panel is the comparison of the results submitted by each participant to assess the capability of commonly used code systems, not to quantify the physical phenomena investigated in the comparisons or to make recommendations for licensing action. (author)

  7. Technical Basis for Peak Reactivity Burnup Credit for BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel in Storage and Transportation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Mertyurek, Ugur [ORNL; Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate application of burnup credit for boiling-water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase (1) investigates applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in spent fuel pools (SFPs) to storage and transportation systems and (2) evaluates validation of both reactivity (keff) calculations and burnup credit nuclide concentrations within these methods. The second phase will focus on extending burnup credit beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the first phase, including an analysis of lattice design parameters and depletion effects, as well as both validation components. Initial efforts related to extended burnup credit are discussed in a companion paper. Peak reactivity analyses have been used in criticality analyses for licensing of BWR fuel in SFPs over the last 20 years. These analyses typically combine credit for the gadolinium burnable absorber present in the fuel with a modest amount of burnup credit. Gadolinium burnable absorbers are used in BWR assemblies to control core reactivity. The burnable absorber significantly reduces assembly reactivity at beginning of life, potentially leading to significant increases in assembly reactivity for burnups less than 15–20 GWd/MTU. The reactivity of each fuel lattice is dependent on gadolinium loading. The number of gadolinium-bearing fuel pins lowers initial lattice reactivity, but it has a small impact on the burnup and reactivity of the peak. The gadolinium concentration in each pin has a small impact on initial lattice reactivity but a significant effect on the reactivity of the peak and the burnup at which the peak occurs. The importance of the lattice parameters and depletion conditions are primarily determined by their impact on the gadolinium depletion. Criticality code validation for BWR burnup

  8. Value of 236U to actinide-only burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) submitted a topical report to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1995 in order to gain approval of a method for criticality analysis of transport packages that takes account for the change in actinide isotopes with burnup [pressurized water reactors (PWRs) only]. Historically, the NRC has conservatively assumed that the fuel was in its initial conditions (without any burnable absorbers). In order to permit credit for the changes in actinide content, the NRC has required validation of the depletion and criticality codes for spent nuclear fuel, justification of conservative depletion modeling, and finally confirmation measurements before loading. The NRC requested additional information on March 22, 1996. The DOE responded by a revision of the topical report in May 1997. The NRC again responded with another set of requests of additional information in April 1998. In that set of questions, the NRC challenged the use of 236U in burnup credit. Uranium-236 is not found in any significant amount in any available critical experiments. The authors explore the value of 236U to actinide-only burnup credit

  9. Nuclear fuel burn-up credit for criticality safety justification of spent nuclear fuel storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn-up credit analysis of RBMK-1000 an WWER-1000 spent nuclear fuel accounting only for actinides is carried out and a method is proposed for actinide burn-up credit. Two burn-up credit approaches are analyzed, which consider a system without and with the distribution of isotopes along the height of the fuel assembly. Calculations are performed using SCALE and MCNP computer codes

  10. Classification of criticality calculations with correlation coefficient method and its application to OECD/NEA burnup credit benchmarks phase III-A and II-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for classifying benchmark results of criticality calculations according to similarity was proposed in this paper. After formulation of the method utilizing correlation coefficients, it was applied to burnup credit criticality benchmarks Phase III-A and II-A, which were conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). Phase III-A benchmark was a series of criticality calculations for irradiated Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies, whereas Phase II-A benchmark was a suite of criticality calculations for irradiated Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. These benchmark problems and their results were summarized. The correlation coefficients were calculated and sets of benchmark calculation results were classified according to the criterion that the values of the correlation coefficients were no less than 0.15 for Phase III-A and 0.10 for Phase II-A benchmarks. When a couple of benchmark calculation results belonged to the same group, one calculation result was found predictable from the other. An example was shown for each of the Benchmarks. While the evaluated nuclear data seemed the main factor for the classification, further investigations were required for finding other factors. (author)

  11. The implementation of burnup credit in VVER-440 spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The countries using Russian reactors VVER-440 cooperate in reactor physics in Atomic Energy Research (AER). One of topic areas is 'Physical Problems of Spent Fuel, Radwaste and Decommissioning' (Working Group E). In this article, in the first part is an overview about our activity for numerical and experimental verification of codes which participants use for calculation of criticality, isotopic concentration, activity, neutron and gamma sources and shielding is shown. The set of numerical benchmarks (CB1, CB2, CB3 and CB4) is very similar (the same idea, the VVER-440) to the OECD/NEA/NSC Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmarks, Phases 1 and 2. In the second part, verification of the SCALE 4.4 system (only criticality and nuclide concentrations) for VVER-440 fuel is shown. In the third part, dependence of criticality on burnup (only actinides and actinides + fission products) for transport cask C30 with VVER-440 fuel by optimal moderation is shown. In the last part, current status in implementation burnup credit in Slovakia is shown. (author)

  12. The REBUS experimental programme for burn-up credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international programme called REBUS for the investigation of the burn-up credit has been initiated by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK·CEN and Belgonucleaire with the support of EdF and IRSN from France and VGB, representing German nuclear utilities and NUPEC, representing the Japanese industry. Recently also ORNL from the U.S. jointed the programme. The programme aims to establish a neutronic benchmark for reactor physics codes in order to qualify the codes for calculations of the burn-up credit. The benchmark exercise investigate the following fuel types with associated burn-up: reference fresh 3.3% enriched UO2 fuel, fresh commercial PWR UO2 fuel and irradiated commercial PWR UO2 fuel (54 GWd/tM), fresh PWR MOX fuel and irradiated PWR MOX fuel (20 GWd/tM). The experiments on the three configurations with fresh fuel have been completed. The experiments show a good agreement between calculation and experiments for the different measured parameters: critical water level, reactivity effect of the water level and fission-rate and flux distributions. In 2003 the irradiated BR3 MOX fuel bundle was loaded into the VENUS reactor and the associated experimental programme was carried out. The reactivity measurements in this configuration with irradiated fuel show a good agreement between experimental and preliminary calculated values. (author)

  13. Results of the isotopic concentrations of VVER calculational burnup credit benchmark No. 2(CB2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the nuclide concentrations are presented of VVER Burnup Credit Benchmark No. 2(CB2) that were performed in The Nuclear Technology Center of Cuba with available codes and libraries. The CB2 benchmark specification as the second phase of the VVER burnup credit benchmark is summarized. The CB2 benchmark focused on VVER burnup credit study proposed on the 97' AER Symposium. The obtained results are isotopic concentrations of spent fuel as a function of the burnup and cooling time. The depletion point 'ORIGEN2' code and other codes were used for the calculation of the spent fuel concentration. (author)

  14. Evaluation of Fission Product Critical Experiments and Associated Biases for Burnup Credit Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the challenges associated with implementation of burnup credit is the validation of criticality calculations used in the safety evaluation; in particular the availability and use of applicable critical experiment data. The purpose of the validation is to quantify the relationship between reality and calculated results. Validation and determination of bias and bias uncertainty require the identification of sets of critical experiments that are similar to the criticality safety models. A principal challenge for crediting fission products (FP) in a burnup credit safety evaluation is the limited availability of relevant FP critical experiments for bias and bias uncertainty determination. This paper provides an evaluation of the available critical experiments that include FPs, along with bounding, burnup-dependent estimates of FP biases generated by combining energy dependent sensitivity data for a typical burnup credit application with the nuclear data uncertainty information distributed with SCALE 6. A method for determining separate bias and bias uncertainty values for individual FPs and illustrative results is presented. Finally, a FP bias calculation method based on data adjustment techniques and reactivity sensitivity coefficients calculated with the SCALE sensitivity/uncertainty tools and some typical results is presented. Using the methods described in this paper, the cross-section bias for a representative high-capacity spent fuel cask associated with the ENDF/B-VII nuclear data for 16 most important stable or near stable FPs is predicted to be no greater than 2% of the total worth of the 16 FPs, or less than 0.13% k/k.

  15. Analyses of PWR spent fuel composition using SCALE and SWAT code systems to find correction factors for criticality safety applications adopting burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic composition calculations were performed for 26 spent fuel samples from the Obrigheim PWR reactor and 55 spent fuel samples from 7 PWR reactors using the SAS2H module of the SCALE4.4 code system with 27, 44 and 238 group cross-section libraries and the SWAT code system with the 107 group cross-section library. For the analyses of samples from the Obrigheim PWR reactor, geometrical models were constructed for each of SCALE4.4/SAS2H and SWAT. For the analyses of samples from 7 PWR reactors, the geometrical model already adopted in the SCALE/SAS2H was directly converted to the model of SWAT. The four kinds of calculation results were compared with the measured data. For convenience, the ratio of the measured to calculated values was used as a parameter. When the ratio is less than unity, the calculation overestimates the measurement, and the ratio becomes closer to unity, they have a better agreement. For many important nuclides for burnup credit criticality safety evaluation, the four methods applied in this study showed good coincidence with measurements in general. More precise observations showed, however: (1) Less unity ratios were found for Pu-239 and -241 for selected 16 samples out of the 26 samples from the Obrigheim reactor (10 samples were deselected because their burnups were measured with Cs-137 non-destructive method, less reliable than Nd-148 method the rest 16 samples were measured with); (2) Larger than unity ratios were found for Am-241 and Cm-242 for both the 16 and 55 samples; (3) Larger than unity ratios were found for Sm-149 for the 55 samples; (4) SWAT was generally accompanied by larger ratios than those of SAS2H with some exceptions. Based on the measured-to-calculated ratios for 71 samples of a combined set in which 16 selected samples and 55 samples were included, the correction factors that should be multiplied to the calculated isotopic compositions were generated for a conservative estimate of the neutron multiplication factor

  16. Review and Prioritization of Technical Issues Related to Burnup Credit for LWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report has been prepared to review relevant background information and provide technical discussion that will help initiate a PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables) process for use of burnup credit in light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel storage and transport cask applications. The PIRT process will be used by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to help prioritize and guide a coordinated program of research and as a means to obtain input/feedback from industry and other interested parties. The review and discussion in this report are based on knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the United States and other countries. Current regulatory practice and perceived industry needs are also reviewed as a background for prioritizing technical needs that will facilitate safe practice in the use of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation is given. Finally, phenomena that need to be better understood for effective licensing, together with technical issues that require resolution, are presented and discussed in the form of a prioritization ranking and initial draft program plan

  17. Review and Prioritization of Technical Issues Related to Burnup Credit for LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C V; DeHart, M D [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wagner, John C [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2000-03-13

    This report has been prepared to review relevant background information and provide technical discussion that will help initiate a PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables) process for use of burnup credit in light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel storage and transport cask applications. The PIRT process will be used by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research to help prioritize and guide a coordinated program of research and as a means to obtain input/feedback from industry and other interested parties. The review and discussion in this report are based on knowledge and experience gained from work performed in the United States and other countries. Current regulatory practice and perceived industry needs are also reviewed as a background for prioritizing technical needs that will facilitate safe practice in the use of burnup credit. Relevant physics and analysis phenomenon are identified, and an assessment of their importance to burnup credit implementation is given. Finally, phenomena that need to be better understood for effective licensing, together with technical issues that require resolution, are presented and discussed in the form of a prioritization ranking and initial draft program plan.

  18. Quantification of the computational accuracy of code systems on the burn-up credit using experimental re-calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to account for the reactivity-reducing effect of burn-up in the criticality safety analysis for systems with irradiated nuclear fuel (''burnup credit''), numerical methods to determine the enrichment and burnup dependent nuclide inventory (''burnup code'') and its resulting multiplication factor keff (''criticality code'') are applied. To allow for reliable conclusions, for both calculation systems the systematic deviations of the calculation results from the respective true values, the bias and its uncertainty, are being quantified by calculation and analysis of a sufficient number of suitable experiments. This quantification is specific for the application case under scope and is also called validation. GRS has developed a methodology to validate a calculation system for the application of burnup credit in the criticality safety analysis for irradiated fuel assemblies from pressurized water reactors. This methodology was demonstrated by applying the GRS home-built KENOREST burnup code and the criticality calculation sequence CSAS5 from SCALE code package. It comprises a bounding approach and alternatively a stochastic, which both have been exemplarily demonstrated by use of a generic spent fuel pool rack and a generic dry storage cask, respectively. Based on publicly available post irradiation examination and criticality experiments, currently the isotopes of uranium and plutonium elements can be regarded for.

  19. Alternatives for implementing burnup credit in the design and operation of spent fuel transport casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is possible to develop an optimal strategy for implementing burnup credit in spent fuel transport casks. For transport, the relative risk is rapidly reduced if additional pre-transport controls such as a cavity dryness verifications are conducted prior to transport. Some other operational and design features that could be incorporated into a burnup credit cask strategy are listed. These examples represent many of the system features and alternatives already available for use in developing a broadly based criticality safety strategy for implementing burnup credit in the design and operation of spent fuel transport casks. 4 refs., 1 tab

  20. Impact of Integral Burnable Absorbers on PWR Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of taking credit for the reduction in reactivity of burned or spent nuclear fuel (SNF) due to fuel burnup is commonly referred to as burnup credit. The reduction in reactivity that occurs with fuel burnup is due to the net reduction of fissile nuclide concentrations and the production of actinide and fission-product neutron absorbers. The change in the inventory of these nuclides with fuel burnup, and the consequent reduction in reactivity, is dependent upon the depletion environment. Therefore, the use of burnup credit necessitates consideration of all possible fuel operating conditions, including the use of integral burnable absorbers (IBAs). The Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit [1] issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office recommends licensees restrict the use of burnup credit to assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers (e.g., IBAs or burnable poison rods, BPRs). This restriction eliminates a large portion of the currently discharged spent fuel assemblies from cask loading, and thus severely limits the practical usefulness of burnup credit. The reason for this restriction is that the presence of burnable absorbers during depletion hardens the neutron spectrum, resulting in lower 235U depletion and higher production of fissile plutonium isotopes. Enhanced plutonium production has the effect of increasing the reactivity of the fuel at discharge and beyond. Consequently, an assembly exposed to burnable absorbers may have a slightly higher reactivity for a given burnup than an assembly that has not been exposed to burnable absorbers. This paper examines the effect of IBAs on reactivity for various designs and enrichment/poison loading combinations as a function of burnup. The effect of BPRs, which are typically removed during operation, is addressed elsewhere [2

  1. Burnup credit calculations on long-term disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the considered options for handling of irradiated nuclear fuel is the final disposal in some kind of repository. This necessitates the long-term investigation of subcriticality, heat production, public dose etc. NEA WPNCS Burnup Credit Expert Group defined a new benchmark to test the codes and data used for such problems. The effect of cooling time should be investigated. This implies that the decay data and not the cross sections influence the results. Composition of 4.5 % UO2 fuel with 50 MWd/kgU is given at the assembly removal from the core. Change of composition should be evaluated for 30 values of cooling time up to 1 million years. Keff should be evaluated with these compositions for a container housing 21 fuel assemblies. Initial concentration of 115 isotopes is given. For criticality calculations the usual 'burnup credit set' is used (14 actinides and 15 fission products). Results for additional isotopes is not presented now. The investigated fuel is 17 x 17 PWR UO2 type, with 25 guide tubes. The selected cooling times covers the time intervals of the usual handling procedures around the reactors (few years storing in storage pool, transport), interim storage (hundred years), and the long time scale of disposal up to 1 million years. Results: 1) For major actinides, ORIGEN and MULTICELL based keff results are practically identical up to 1000 years, far beyond the cooling times it was intended. 2) For actinides and fission products, the agreement is excellent up to 100 years, which covers the interim storage. 3) The difference of keff results about 0.02 at 1000 years. The reason is mainly the presence of Np-237, not considered in the previous case. It is produced from Am-241 by α-decay (432 years). Compositions calculated by ORIGEN and TIBSO results the same keff values for cooling times up to 1 million years. Changes in keff with cooling time have clear physical explanation. Compositions calculated by ORIGEN and MULTICELL results the same keff

  2. Use of burnup credit in criticality safety design analysis of spent fuel storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: It is well known that the use of Burnup Credit (BUC) in criticality safety design analysis of spent fuel storage systems significantly impacts the design of the system. BUC is defined as the consideration of the change in the fuel's isotopic composition and hence in its reactivity due to the irradiation of the fuel. Using BUC means to identify that isotopic composition and hence that burnup which just results in the maximum neutron multiplication factor allowable for the system, including all mechanical and calculational uncertainties. This burnup is the minimum burnup necessary for fuel to be loaded in the system. Since the isotopic composition at given burnup depends on the initial enrichment of the fuel, the minimum burnup is usually given as a function of the initial enrichment. The graph of this function is commonly named as 'loading curve'. Thus, application of BUC to a spent fuel storage system consists in implementation of three key steps: Determination of the isotopic composition as a function of burnup and initial enrichment; Criticality calculation and evaluation of the loading curve; Quantification and verification of the actual burnup of the fuel to be loaded into the system. The main considerations of the first and the second step will be discussed. The isotopic composition is predicted by means of depletion calculations. To perform such calculations the parameters describing the fuel design characteristics and the fuel depletion conditions have to be defined. In addition the cooling time that may be credited (e.g., in BUC applications to spent fuel storage/transport cask systems) has to be specified. These parameters will be discussed with particular attention being given to the sensitivity of the neutron multiplication factor of the storage system to variations in the parameters and conditions characterizing the depletion conditions. These parameters and conditions are: Specific power and operating history, fuel temperature, moderator

  3. Study on burn-up credit and minor actinide in post-irradiation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accuracy of burnup calculation for actinide is very important as to the study of burn-up credit. For minor-actinides such as Am243 and Cm244, however, typical burnup calculation codes are not accurate enough. The accuracy for both nuclides was studied by using the SWAT code. The study showed that the C/E values of both nuclides could be improved at the same time by changing the cross section of Pu242. A study of burnup calculation related to the cross section of Pu242 should be performed to improve the accuracy for both nuclides. (author)

  4. Analysis of burnup credit on spent fuel transport / storage casks - estimation of reactivity bias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical analyses of high burnup UO2 (65 GWd/t) and MOX (45 GWd/t) spent fuel pins were carried out. Measured data of nuclides' composition from U234 to P 242 were used for evaluation of ORIGEN-2/82 code and a nuclear fuel design code (NULIF). Critically calculations were executed for transport and storage casks for 52 BWR or 21 PWR spent fuel assemblies. The reactivity biases were evaluated for axial and horizontal profiles of burnup, and historical void fraction (BWR), operational histories such as control rod insertion history, BPR insertion history and others, and calculational accuracy of ORIGEN-2/82 on nuclides' composition. This study shows that introduction of burnup credit has a large merit in criticality safety analysis of casks, even if these reactivity biases are considered. The concept of equivalent uniform burnup was adapted for the present reactivity bias evaluation and showed the possibility of simplifying the reactivity bias evaluation in burnup credit. (authors)

  5. Results of the isotopic concentrations of WWER calculation Burnup Credit Benchmark NO.2 (CB2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this document is to present the results of the nuclide concentrations of the WWER Burnup Credit Benchmark NO.2 (CB2) that were performed in The Nuclear Technology Center of Cuba with available codes and libraries. The CB2 benchmark specification as the second phase of the WWER burnup credit benchmark is summarized in [1]. The CB2 benchmark focused on WWER burnup credit study proposed on the 97' Atomic Energy Research symposium [2]. The obtained results are isotopic concentrations of spent fuel as a function of the burnup and cooling time. The depletion point 'ORIGEN2'[3] code was used for the calculation of the spent fuel concentration. This work also comprises the results obtained by other codes [4]. (Author)

  6. Criticality safety evaluation for the direct disposal of used nuclear fuel. Preparation of data for burnup credit evaluation (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the direct disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF), criticality safety evaluation is one of the important issues since UNF contains some amount of fissile material. In the conventional criticality safety evaluation of UNF where the fresh fuel composition is conservatively assumed, neutron multiplication factor is becoming overestimated as the fuel enrichment increases. The recent development of higher-enrichment fuel has therefore enhanced the benefit of the application of burnup credit. When applying the burnup credit to the criticality safety analysis of the disposed fuel system, the safe-side estimation of the reactivity is required taking into account the factors which affect the neutron multiplication factor of the burnt fuel system such as the nuclide composition uncertainties. In this report, the effects of the several parameters on the reactivity of disposal canister model were evaluated for used PWR fuel. The parameters are relevant to the uncertainties of depletion calculation code, irradiation history, and axial and horizontal burnup distribution, which are known to be important effect in the criticality safety evaluation adopting burnup credit. The latest data or methodology was adopted in this evaluation, based on the various latest studies. The appropriate margin of neutron multiplication factor in the criticality safety evaluation for UNF can be determined by adopting the methodology described in the present study. (author)

  7. An Approach for Validating Actinide and Fission Product Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses-Isotopic Composition Predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The expanded use of burnup credit in the United States (U.S.) for storage and transport casks, particularly in the acceptance of credit for fission products, has been constrained by the availability of experimental fission product data to support code validation. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has noted that the rationale for restricting the Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit for storage and transportation casks (ISG-8) to actinide-only is based largely on the lack of clear, definitive experiments that can be used to estimate the bias and uncertainty for computational analyses associated with using burnup credit. To address the issues of burnup credit criticality validation, the NRC initiated a project with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to (1) develop and establish a technically sound validation approach for commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) criticality safety evaluations based on best-available data and methods and (2) apply the approach for representative SNF storage and transport configurations/conditions to demonstrate its usage and applicability, as well as to provide reference bias results. The purpose of this paper is to describe the isotopic composition (depletion) validation approach and resulting observations and recommendations. Validation of the criticality calculations is addressed in a companion paper at this conference. For isotopic composition validation, the approach is to determine burnup-dependent bias and uncertainty in the effective neutron multiplication factor (keff) due to bias and uncertainty in isotopic predictions, via comparisons of isotopic composition predictions (calculated) and measured isotopic compositions from destructive radiochemical assay utilizing as much assay data as is available, and a best-estimate Monte Carlo based method. This paper (1) provides a detailed description of the burnup credit isotopic validation approach and its technical bases, (2) describes the application of the approach for

  8. Status of burnup credit for transport of SNF in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allowing credit for the reduction in reactivity associated with fuel depletion can enable more cost-effective, higher-density storage, transportation, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) while maintaining a subcritical margin sufficient to establish an adequate safety basis. This paper reviews the current status of burnup credit applied to the design and transport of SNF casks in the United States. The existing U.S. regulatory guidance on burnup credit is limited to pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) fuel and to allowing credit only for actinides in the SNF. By comparing loading curves against actual SNF discharge data for U.S. reactors, the potential benefits that can be realized using the current regulatory guidance with actinide-only burnup credit are illustrated in terms of the inventory allowed in high-capacity casks and the concurrent reduction in SNF shipments. The additional benefits that might be realized by extending burnup credit to credit for select fission products are also illustrated. The curves show that, although fission products in SNF provide a small decrease in reactivity compared with actinides, the additional negative reactivity causes the SNF inventory acceptable for transportation to increase from roughly 30% to approximately 90% when fission products are considered. A savings of approximately $150M in transport costs can potentially be realized for the planned inventory of the repository. Given appropriate experimental data to support code validation, a realistic best-estimate analysis of burnup credit that includes validated credit for fission products is the enhancement that will yield the most significant impact on future transportation plans

  9. Taking burnup credit for interim storage and transportation system for BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to establish a realistic burnup credit design system, a calculation system has been developed for determining isotope compositions, burnup, and criticality. The calculation system consists of several modules such as TGBLA, ORIGEN, CITATION, MCNP, and KENO. The TGBLA code is a fuel design code for LWR fuels developed in TOSHIBA Corporation. A compact measurement system for a fuel assembly has been being developed to meet requirements for the burnup determination, the neutron emission-rate evaluation, and the nuclear materials management. For a spent MOX fuel, a neutron emission rate measurement method has been being developed. The system consists of Cd-Te detectors and / or fission chambers. Some model calculations were carried out for the latest design BWR fuels. The effect of taking burnup credit for a transportation cask is shown. (authors)

  10. U.S. Regulatory Research Program for Implementation of Burnup Credit in Transport Casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1999 the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (U.S. NRC) initiated a research program to support the development of technical bases and guidance that would facilitate the implementation of burnup credit into licensing activities for transport and dry cask storage. This paper reviews the following major areas of investigation: (1) specification of axial burnup profiles, (2) assumption on cooling time, (3) allowance for assemblies with fixed and removable neutron absorbers, (4) the need for a burnup margin for fuel with initial enrichments over 4 wt %, and (5) evaluation of assay data and critical experiments. The capabilities of a new computational tool that facilitates the performance and coupling of the depletion and criticality analyses needed for burnup credit are also discussed

  11. A relative risk comparison of criticality control strategies based on fresh fuel and burnup credit design bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed use of burnup credit in spent fuel cask design and operation represents a departure from current regulatory practice, and creates technical issues that ultimately must be resolved for the concept to be implemented. Issues related to specific technical considerations can generally be resolved conclusively. However, an underlying perception may still exist that the use of burnup credit compromises criticality safety. In practice, individual casks are designed to satisfy regulatory requirements in a generally conservative manner. The designer's application of the regulatory requirements involves some engineering judgement, as does the regulator's implementation of them. This does not have an adverse effect on safety, but does make it difficult to objectively compare new or alternative designs and/or operating approaches. 5 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Feasibility assessment of burnup credit in the criticality analysis of shipping casks with boiling water reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerable interest in the allowance of reactivity credit for the exposure history of power reactor fuel currently exists. This ''burnup credit'' issue has the potential to greatly reduce risk and cost when applied to the design and certification of spent fuel casks used for transportation and storage. Recently, analyses have demonstrated the technical feasibility and estimated the risk and economic incentives for allowing burnup credit in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel shipping cask applications. This report summarizes the extension of the previous PWR technical feasibility assessment to boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel. This feasibility analysis aims to apply simple methods that adequately characterize the time-dependent isotopic compositions of typical BWR fuel. An initial analysis objective was to identify a simple and reliable method for characterizing BWR spent fuel. Two different aspects of fuel characterization were considered:l first, the generation of burn- up dependent material interaction probabilities; second, the prediction of material inventories over time (depletion). After characterizing the spent fuel at various stages of exposure and decay, three dimensional (3-D) models for an infinite array of assemblies and, in several cases, infinite arrays of assemblies in a typical shipping cask basket were analyzed. Results for assemblies without a basket provide reactivity control requirements as a function of burnup and decay, while results including the basket allow assessment of typical basket configurations to provide sufficient reactivity control for spent BWR fuel. Resulting basket worths and reactivity trends over time are then evaluated to determine whether burnup credit is needed and feasible in BWR applications

  13. The use of burnup credit in criticality control for the Korean spent fuel management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    More than 25% k-eff saving effect is observed in this burnup credit analysis. This mainly comes from the adoption of actinide nuclides and fission products in the criticality analysis. By taking burnup credit, the high capacity of the storage and transportation can be more fully utilized, reducing the space of storage and the number of shipments. Larger storage and fewer shipments for a given inventory of spent fuel result should in remarkable cost savings and more importantly reduce the risks to the public and occupational workers for the Korean Spent Fuel Management Program

  14. Burnup credit methodology in the NPP Krzko spent fuel pool reracking project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NPP Krzko is going to increase the capacity of the spent fuel storage pool by replacement of the existing racks with high-density racks. The design, rack manufacturing and installation has been awarded to the Framatome ANP GmbH. Burnup credit methodology, which has been already approved by the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration in previous licensing of existing racks, will be again implemented in the licensing process with the recent methodology improvements. Specific steps of the criticality analysis and representative results are presented in the paper showing also the current national practice of the burnup credit implementation. (author)

  15. Determination of axial profit performed burnup credit by SCALE 4.3-system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SCALE 4.3 is a modular code system designed for realizing standard computational analysis for licensing evaluation. Since now, spent fuel storage pools criticality analysis have been done considering this fuel as fresh, with its maximum enrichment. With burnup credit we can obtain cheaper and compact configurations. The procedure for calculating a spent fuel storage consists of a burnup calculation plus a criticality calculation. We can perform a conservative approximation for the burnup calculations using 1-D results, but, besides the geometry configurations for the 3-D criticality calculation. we need an appropriate approximation to model the burnup axial variation. We assume that for a burnup profile set, the most conservative profile is between the lower and the upper range of this profile, set. We consider only combinations of the maximum and minimum burnup in each axial region, for each burnup range. This gives an estimation of the different burnup shapes effect and the general characteristics of the most conservative shape. (Author) 6 refs

  16. TOPICAL REPORT ON ACTINIDE-ONLY BURNUP CREDIT FOR PWR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL PACKAGES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology for performing and applying nuclear criticality safety calculations, for PWR spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages with actinide-only burnup credit, is described. The changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup are used in burnup credit criticality analyses. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps. (1) Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of SNF created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. A set of chemical assay benchmarks is presented for this purpose as well as a method for assessing the calculational bias and uncertainty, and conservative correction factors for each isotope. (2) Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, keff, of a spent nuclear fuel package. Fifty-seven UO2, UO2/Gd2O3, and UO2/PuO2 critical experiments have been selected to cover anticipated conditions of SNF. The method uses an upper safety limit on keff (which can be a function of the trending parameters) such that the biased keff, when increased for the uncertainty is less than 0.95. (3) Establish bounding conditions for the isotopic concentration and criticality calculations. Three bounding axial profiles have been established to assure the ''end effect'' is accounted for conservatively. (4) Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). Burnup credit loading curves show the minimum burnup required for a given initial enrichment. The utility burnup record is compared to this requirement after the utility accounts for the uncertainty in its record. Separate curves may be generated for each assembly design, various minimum cooling times and burnable absorber histories. (5) Verify that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper assembly selection prior to loading

  17. Actinide-only burnup credit methodology for PWR spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conservative methodology is presented that would allow taking credit for burnup in the criticality safety analysis of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) packages. The method is based on the assumption that the isotopic concentration in the SNF and cross sections of each isotope for which credit is taken must be supported by validation experiments. The method allows credit for the changes in the U-234, U-235, U-236, U-238, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-241, Pu-242, and Am-241 concentration with burnup. No credit for fission product neutron absorbers is taken. The methodology consists of five major steps: 1. Validate a computer code system to calculate isotopic concentrations of spent nuclear fuel created during burnup in the reactor core and subsequent decay. 2. Validate a computer code system to predict the subcritical multiplication factor, keff, of a spent nuclear fuel package by use of UO2 and UO2/Puo2 critical experiments. 3. Establish conditions for the SNF (depletion analysis) and package (criticality analysis) which bounds keff. 4. Use the validated codes and bounding conditions to generate package loading criteria (burnup credit loading curves). 5. Verify by measurement that SNF assemblies meet the package loading criteria and confirm proper assembly selection prior to loading. (author)

  18. Results of the isotopic concentrations of VVER calculational burnup credit benchmark no. 2(cb2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characterization of the irradiated fuel materials is becoming more important with the Increasing use of nuclear energy in the world. The purpose of this document is to present the results of the nuclide concentrations calculated Using Calculation VVER Burnup Credit Benchmark No. 2(CB2). The calculations were Performed in The Nuclear Technology Center of Cuba. The CB2 benchmark specification as the second phase of the VVER burnup credit benchmark is Summarized in [1]. The CB2 benchmark focused on VVER burnup credit study proposed on the 97' AER Symposium [2]. It should provide a comparison of the ability of various code systems And data libraries to predict VVER-440 spent fuel isotopes (isotopic concentrations) using Depletion analysis. This phase of the benchmark calculations is still in progress. CB2 should be finished by summer 1999 and evaluated results could be presented on the next AER Symposium. The obtained results are isotopic concentrations of spent fuel as a function of the burnup and Cooling time. The depletion point ORIGEN2[3] code was used for the calculation of the spent Fuel concentration. The depletion analysis was performed using the VVER-440 irradiated fuel assemblies with in-core Irradiation time of 3 years, burnup of the 30000 mwd/TU, and an after discharge cooling Time of 0 and 1 year. This work also comprises the results obtained by other codes[4].

  19. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIB: Burnup calculations of BWR fuel assemblies for storage and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the final results of the Phase IIIB Benchmark conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The Benchmark was intended to compare the predictability of current computer code and data library combinations for the atomic number densities of an irradiated PWR fuel assembly model. The fuel assembly was irradiated under specific power of 25.6 MW/tHM up to 40 GWd/tHM and cooled for five years. The void fraction was assumed to be uniform throughout the channel box and constant, at 0, 40 and 70%, during burnup. In total, 16 results were submitted from 13 institutes of 7 countries. The calculated atomic number densities of 12 actinides and 20 fission product nuclides were found to be for the most part within a range of ±10% relative to the average, although some results, esp. 155Eu and gadolinium isotopes, exceeded the band, which will require further investigation. Pin-wise burnup results agreed well among the participants. The results in the infinite neutron multiplication factor k∞ also accorded well with each other for void fractions of 0 and 40%; however some results deviated from the averaged value noticeably for the void fraction of 70%. (author)

  20. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIB. Burnup calculations of BWR fuel assemblies for storage and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuno, Hiroshi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-02-01

    The report describes the final results of the Phase IIIB Benchmark conducted by the Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality Safety under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The Benchmark was intended to compare the predictability of current computer code and data library combinations for the atomic number densities of an irradiated PWR fuel assembly model. The fuel assembly was irradiated under specific power of 25.6 MW/tHM up to 40 GWd/tHM and cooled for five years. The void fraction was assumed to be uniform throughout the channel box and constant, at 0, 40 and 70%, during burnup. In total, 16 results were submitted from 13 institutes of 7 countries. The calculated atomic number densities of 12 actinides and 20 fission product nuclides were found to be for the most part within a range of {+-}10% relative to the average, although some results, esp. {sup 155}Eu and gadolinium isotopes, exceeded the band, which will require further investigation. Pin-wise burnup results agreed well among the participants. The results in the infinite neutron multiplication factor k{sub {infinity}} also accorded well with each other for void fractions of 0 and 40%; however some results deviated from the averaged value noticeably for the void fraction of 70%. (author)

  1. Technical Development on Burn-up Credit for Spent LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2001-12-26

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled ''Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels.'' Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burnup and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report.

  2. Technical Development on Burn-up Credit for Spent LWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled ''Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels.'' Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burnup and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report

  3. OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Calculational Criticality Benchmark Phase I-B Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnup credit is an ongoing technical concern for many countries that operate commercial nuclear power reactors. In a multinational cooperative effort to resolve burnup credit issues, a Burnup Credit Working Group has been formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. This working group has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide, and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods are in agreement to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods are within 11% agreement about the average for all fission products studied. Furthermore, most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are 149Sm, 151Sm, and 155Gd

  4. OECD/NEA burnup credit calculational criticality benchmark Phase I-B results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In most countries, criticality analysis of LWR fuel stored in racks and casks has assumed that the fuel is fresh with the maximum allowable initial enrichment. This assumption has led to the design of widely spaced and/or highly poisoned storage and transport arrays. If credit is assumed for fuel burnup, initial enrichment limitations can be raised in existing systems, and more compact and economical arrays can be designed. Such reliance on the reduced reactivity of spent fuel for criticality control is referred to as burnup credit. The Burnup Credit Working Group, formed under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, has established a set of well-defined calculational benchmarks designed to study significant aspects of burnup credit computational methods. These benchmarks are intended to provide a means for the intercomparison of computer codes, methods, and data applied in spent fuel analysis. The benchmarks have been divided into multiple phases, each phase focusing on a particular feature of burnup credit analysis. This report summarizes the results and findings of the Phase I-B benchmark, which was proposed to provide a comparison of the ability of different code systems and data libraries to perform depletion analysis for the prediction of spent fuel isotopic concentrations. Results included here represent 21 different sets of calculations submitted by 16 different organizations worldwide and are based on a limited set of nuclides determined to have the most important effect on the neutron multiplication factor of light-water-reactor spent fuel. A comparison of all sets of results demonstrates that most methods agree to within 10% in the ability to estimate the spent fuel concentrations of most actinides. All methods agree within 11% about the average for all fission products studied. Most deviations are less than 10%, and many are less than 5%. The exceptions are Sm 149, Sm 151, and Gd 155

  5. Assessment of Reactivity Margins and Loading Curves for PWR Burnup Credit Cask Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2002-12-17

    This report presents studies to assess reactivity margins and loading curves for pressurized water reactor (PWR) burnup-credit criticality safety evaluations. The studies are based on a generic high-density 32-assembly cask and systematically vary individual calculational (depletion and criticality) assumptions to demonstrate the impact on the predicted effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, and burnup-credit loading curves. The purpose of this report is to provide a greater understanding of the importance of input parameter variations and quantify the impact of calculational assumptions on the outcome of a burnup-credit evaluation. This study should provide guidance to regulators and industry on the technical areas where improved information will most enhance the estimation of accurate subcritical margins. Based on these studies, areas where future work may provide the most benefit are identified. The report also includes an evaluation of the degree of burnup credit needed for high-density casks to transport the current spent nuclear fuel inventory. By comparing PWR discharge data to actinide-only based loading curves and determining the number of assemblies that meet the loading criteria, this evaluation finds that additional negative reactivity (through either increased credit for fuel burnup or cask design/utilization modifications) is necessary to accommodate the majority of current spent fuel assemblies in high-capacity casks. Assemblies that are not acceptable for loading in the prototypic high-capacity cask may be stored or transported by other means (e.g., lower capacity casks that utilize flux traps and/or increased fixed poison concentrations or high-capacity casks with design/utilization modifications).

  6. Quantification of the computational accuracy of code systems on the burn-up credit using experimental re-calculations; Quantifizierung der Rechengenauigkeit von Codesystemen zum Abbrandkredit durch Experimentnachrechnungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, Matthias; Hannstein, Volker; Kilger, Robert; Moser, Franz-Eberhard; Pfeiffer, Arndt; Stuke, Maik

    2014-06-15

    In order to account for the reactivity-reducing effect of burn-up in the criticality safety analysis for systems with irradiated nuclear fuel (''burnup credit''), numerical methods to determine the enrichment and burnup dependent nuclide inventory (''burnup code'') and its resulting multiplication factor k{sub eff} (''criticality code'') are applied. To allow for reliable conclusions, for both calculation systems the systematic deviations of the calculation results from the respective true values, the bias and its uncertainty, are being quantified by calculation and analysis of a sufficient number of suitable experiments. This quantification is specific for the application case under scope and is also called validation. GRS has developed a methodology to validate a calculation system for the application of burnup credit in the criticality safety analysis for irradiated fuel assemblies from pressurized water reactors. This methodology was demonstrated by applying the GRS home-built KENOREST burnup code and the criticality calculation sequence CSAS5 from SCALE code package. It comprises a bounding approach and alternatively a stochastic, which both have been exemplarily demonstrated by use of a generic spent fuel pool rack and a generic dry storage cask, respectively. Based on publicly available post irradiation examination and criticality experiments, currently the isotopes of uranium and plutonium elements can be regarded for.

  7. Present status and future developments of the implementation of burnup credit in spent fuel management systems in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the experience gained in Germany in implementing burnup credit in wet storage and dry transport systems of spent PWR, BWR, and MOX fuel. It gives a survey of the levels of burnup credit presently used, the regulatory status and activities planned, the fuel depletion codes and criticality calculation codes employed, the verification methods used for validating these codes, the modeling assumptions made to ensure that the burnup credit criticality analysis is based on a fuel irradiation history which leads to bounding neutron multiplication factors, and the implementation of procedures used for fuel loading verification. (author)

  8. Criticality evaluation of high density spent fuel storge rack under normal condition using burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high density spent fuel storage rack Boraflex was known to experience changes of its physical property and to dissolve under exposure to radiation in an aqueous environment for long period of time. In this study, the criticality evaluation for spent fuel storage rack of Ulchin Unit 2 under normal condition was performed assuming complete loss of 10B from the Boraflex and applying burnup credit. Criticality evaluation code KENO-V.a. from SCALE4.4 system was benchmarked against critical experiments to obtain the calculation bias and bias uncertainties. The manufacturing tolerances of nuclear fuel and storage rack and their reactivity uncertainties were derived, as well. Considering those bias and uncertainties of calculation, the criticality of spent fuel storage under normal condition was conservatively evaluated. The criticality evaluation result using burnup credit can be presented as a spent fuel loading curve that indicates the acceptable burnup domain in spent fuel storage pool. The spent fuels with various initial enrichments and discharge fuel burnup can be safely accommodated in the storage without taking any boron credit from Boraflex, provided the combination falls within the acceptable domain in the loading curve. The spent fuel with initial enrichment of 5.0w/o was evaluated to meet the subcritical safety if its burnup is over 43.0GWD/MTU. The criticality evaluation result also showed that spent fuels with the initial enrichment less than 1.6w/o were able to be stored in the storage pool regardless of their burnup. Conclusively, in the Region 2 of the spent fuel storage pool, the maximum keff , considering all uncertainties, was calculated as 0.94818

  9. Taking burnup credit for interim storage and transportation system for BWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the back-end issues of nuclear fuel cycle, selection of reprocessing or one-through is a big issue. For both of the cases, a reasonable interim storage and transportation system is required. This study proposes an advanced practical monitoring and evaluation system. The system features the followings: (l) Storage racks and transportation casks taking credit for burnup. (2) A burnup estimation system using a compact monitor with Cd- Te detectors and fission chambers. (3) A neutron emission-rate evaluation methodology, especially important for high burnup MOX fuels. (4) A nuclear materials management system for safeguards. Current storage system and transport casks are designed on the basis of a fresh fuel assumption. The assumption is too conservative. Taking burnup credit gives a reasonable design while keeping conservatism. In order to establish a reasonable burnup credit design system, a calculation system has been developed for determining isotope compositions, burnup, and criticality. The calculation system consists of some modules such as TGBLA, ORIGEN, CITATION, MCNP and KENO. The TGBLA code is a fuel design code for LWR fuels developed in TOSHIBA Corporation. The code takes operational history such as, power density, void fraction into account. This code is applied to the back-end issues for a more accurate design of a storage and a transportation system. The ORIGEN code is well-known one-point isotope depletion code. In the calculation system, the code calculates isotope compositions using libraries generated from the TGBLA code. The CITATION code, the MCNP code, and the KENO code are three dimensional diffusion code, continuous energy Monte Carlo code, discrete energy Monte Carlo code, respectively. Those codes calculate k- effective of the storage and transportation systems using isotope compositions generated from the ORIGEN code. The CITATION code and the KENO code are usually used for practical designs. The MCNP code is used for reference

  10. Evaluation of burnup credit for accommodating PWR spent nuclear fuel in high-capacity cask designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an evaluation of the amount of burnup credit needed for high-density casks to transport the current U.S. inventory of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies. A prototypic 32-assembly cask and the current regulatory guidance were used as bases for this evaluation. By comparing actual pressurized-water-reactor (PWR) discharge data (i.e., fuel burnup and initial enrichment specifications for fuel assemblies discharged from U.S. PWRs) with actinide-only-based loading curves, this evaluation finds that additional negative reactivity (through either increased credit for fuel burnup or cask design/utilization modifications) is necessary to accommodate the majority of SNF assemblies in high-capacity storage and transportation casks. The impact of varying selected calculational assumptions is also investigated, and considerable improvement in effectiveness is shown with the inclusion of the principal fission products (FPs) and minor actinides and the use of a bounding best-estimate approach for isotopic validation. Given sufficient data for validation, the most significant component that would improve accuracy, and subsequently enhance the utilization of burnup credit, is the inclusion of FPs. (author)

  11. Parametric Study of the Effect of Burnable Poison Rods for PWR Burnup Credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) issued by the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office recommends restricting the use of burnup credit to assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers. This recommended restriction eliminates a large portion of the currently discharged spent fuel assemblies from cask loading, and thus severely limits the practical usefulness of burnup credit. In the absence of readily available information on burnable poison rod (BPR) design specifications and usage in U.S. pressurized water reactors (PWRs), and the subsequent reactivity effect of BPR exposure on discharged spent nuclear fuel (SNF), NRC staff has indicated a need for additional information in these areas. In response, this report presents a parametric study of the effect of BPR exposure on the reactivity of SNF for various BPR designs, fuel enrichments, and exposure conditions, and documents BPR design specifications. Trends in the reactivity effects of BPRs are established with infinite pin-cell and assembly array calculations with the SCALE and HELIOS code packages, respectively. Subsequently, the reactivity effects of BPRs for typical initial enrichment and burnup combinations are quantified based on three-dimensional (3-D) KENO V.a Monte Carlo calculations with a realistic rail-type cask designed for burnup credit. The calculations demonstrate that the positive reactivity effect due to BPR exposure increases nearly linearly with burnup and is dependent on the number, poison loading, and design of the BPRs and the initial fuel enrichment. Expected typical reactivity increases, based on one-cycle BPR exposure, were found to be less than 1% Δk. Based on the presented analysis, guidance is offered on an appropriate approach for calculating bounding SNF isotopic data for assemblies exposed to BPRs. Although the analyses do not address the issue of validation of depletion methods for assembly designs with BPRs, they

  12. Parametric Study of the Effect of Burnable Poison Rods for PWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2001-09-28

    The Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) issued by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (U.S. NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office recommends restricting the use of burnup credit to assemblies that have not used burnable absorbers. This recommended restriction eliminates a large portion of the currently discharged spent fuel assemblies from cask loading, and thus severely limits the practical usefulness of burnup credit. In the absence of readily available information on burnable poison rod (BPR) design specifications and usage in U.S. pressurized-water-reactors (PWRs), and the subsequent reactivity effect of BPR exposure on discharged spent nuclear fuel (SNF), NRC staff has indicated a need for additional information in these areas. In response, this report presents a parametric study of the effect of BPR exposure on the reactivity of SNF for various BPR designs, fuel enrichments, and exposure conditions, and documents BPR design specifications. Trends in the reactivity effects of BPRs are established with infinite pin-cell and assembly array calculations with the SCALE and HELIOS code packages, respectively. Subsequently, the reactivity effects of BPRs for typical initial enrichment and burnup combinations are quantified based on three-dimensional (3-D) KENO V.a Monte Carlo calculations with a realistic rail-type cask designed for burnup credit. The calculations demonstrate that the positive reactivity effect due to BPR exposure increases nearly linearly with burnup and is dependent on the number, poison loading, and design of the BPRs and the initial fuel enrichment. Expected typical reactivity increases, based on one-cycle BPR exposure, were found to be less than 1% {Delta}k. Based on the presented analysis, guidance is offered on an appropriate approach for calculating bounding SNF isotopic data for assemblies exposed to BPRs. Although the analyses do not address the issue of validation of depletion methods for assembly designs with BPRs

  13. Automated generation of burnup chain for reactor analysis applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the development of an automated generation of a new burnup chain for reactor analysis applications. The JENDL FP Decay Data File 2011 and Fission Yields Data File 2011 were used as the data sources. The nuclides in the new chain are determined by restrictions of the half-life and cumulative yield of fission products or from a given list. Then, decay modes, branching ratios and fission yields are recalculated taking into account intermediate reactions. The new burnup chain is output according to the format for the SRAC code system. Verification was performed to evaluate the accuracy of the new burnup chain. The results show that the new burnup chain reproduces well the results of a reference one with 193 fission products used in SRAC. Further development and applications are being planned with the burnup chain code. (author)

  14. Sensitivity and parametric evaluations of significant aspects of burnup credit for PWR spent fuel packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeHart, M.D.

    1996-05-01

    Spent fuel transportation and storage cask designs based on a burnup credit approach must consider issues that are not relevant in casks designed under a fresh-fuel loading assumption. For example, the spent fuel composition must be adequately characterized and the criticality analysis model can be complicated by the need to consider axial burnup variations. Parametric analyses are needed to characterize the importance of fuel assembly and fuel cycle parameters on spent fuel composition and reactivity. Numerical models must be evaluated to determine the sensitivity of criticality safety calculations to modeling assumptions. The purpose of this report is to describe analyses and evaluations performed in order to demonstrate the effect physical parameters and modeling assumptions have on the criticality analysis of spent fuel. The analyses in this report include determination and ranking of the most important actinides and fission products; study of the effect of various depletion scenarios on subsequent criticality calculations; establishment of trends in neutron multiplication as a function of fuel enrichment, burnup, cooling time- and a parametric and modeling evaluation of three-dimensional effects (e.g., axially varying burnup and temperature/density effects) in a conceptual cask design. The sensitivity and parametric evaluations were performed with the consideration of two different burnup credit approaches: (1) only actinides in the fuel are considered in the criticality analysis, and (2) both actinides and fission products are considered. Calculations described in this report were performed using the criticality and depletion sequences available in the SCALE code system and the SCALE 27-group burnup library. Although the results described herein do not constitute a validation of SCALE for use in spent fuel analysis, independent validation efforts have been completed and are described in other reports.

  15. Sensitivity and parametric evaluations of significant aspects of burnup credit for PWR spent fuel packages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent fuel transportation and storage cask designs based on a burnup credit approach must consider issues that are not relevant in casks designed under a fresh-fuel loading assumption. For example, the spent fuel composition must be adequately characterized and the criticality analysis model can be complicated by the need to consider axial burnup variations. Parametric analyses are needed to characterize the importance of fuel assembly and fuel cycle parameters on spent fuel composition and reactivity. Numerical models must be evaluated to determine the sensitivity of criticality safety calculations to modeling assumptions. The purpose of this report is to describe analyses and evaluations performed in order to demonstrate the effect physical parameters and modeling assumptions have on the criticality analysis of spent fuel. The analyses in this report include determination and ranking of the most important actinides and fission products; study of the effect of various depletion scenarios on subsequent criticality calculations; establishment of trends in neutron multiplication as a function of fuel enrichment, burnup, cooling time- and a parametric and modeling evaluation of three-dimensional effects (e.g., axially varying burnup and temperature/density effects) in a conceptual cask design. The sensitivity and parametric evaluations were performed with the consideration of two different burnup credit approaches: (1) only actinides in the fuel are considered in the criticality analysis, and (2) both actinides and fission products are considered. Calculations described in this report were performed using the criticality and depletion sequences available in the SCALE code system and the SCALE 27-group burnup library. Although the results described herein do not constitute a validation of SCALE for use in spent fuel analysis, independent validation efforts have been completed and are described in other reports

  16. A relative risk comparison of criticality control strategies based on fresh fuel and burnup credit design bases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fresh fuel design basis provides some margin of safety, i.e., criticality safety is almost independent of loading operations if fuel designs do not change significantly over the next 40 years. However, the design basis enrichment for future nuclear fuel will most likely vary with time. As a result, it cannot be guaranteed that the perceived passivity of the concept will be maintained over the life cycle of a future cask system. Several options are available to ensure that the reliability of a burnup credit system is comparable to or greater than that of a system based on a fresh fuel assumption. Criticality safety and control reliability could increase with burnup credit implementation. The safety of a burnup credit system could be comparable to that for a system based on the fresh fuel assumption. A burnup credit philosophy could be implemented without any cost-benefit tradeoff. A burnup credit design basis could result in a significant reduction in total system risk as well as economic benefits. These reductions occur primarily as a result of increased cask capacities and, thus, fewer shipments. Fewer shipments also result in fewer operations over the useful life of a cask, and opportunities for error decrease. The system concept can be designed such that only benefits occur. These benefits could include enhanced criticality safety and the overall reliability of cask operations, as well as system risk and economic benefits. Thus, burnup credit should be available as an alternative for the criticality design of spent fuel shipping casks

  17. Spent fuel pool storage calculations using the ISOCRIT burnup credit tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Depletion isotopics are needed for burnup credit in spent fuel pool analyses. ► We developed ISOCRIT to generate the isotopics using conservative depletion assumptions. ► ISOCRIT works in an automated fashion passing data between lattice physics and 3D Monte Carlo codes. ► Analyses to assess the impact of different depletion parameters on the reactivity of the spent fuel in pool conditions. - Abstract: In order to conservatively apply burnup credit in spent fuel pool criticality safety analyses, Westinghouse has developed a software tool, ISOCRIT, for generating depletion isotopics. This tool is used to create isotopics data based on specific reactor input parameters, such as design basis assembly type; bounding power/burnup profiles; reactor specific moderator temperature profiles; pellet percent theoretical density; burnable absorbers, axial blanket regions, and bounding ppm boron concentration. ISOCRIT generates burnup dependent isotopics using PARAGON; Westinghouse’s state-of-the-art and licensed lattice physics code. Generation of isotopics and passing the data to the subsequent 3D KENO calculations are performed in an automated fashion, thus reducing the chance for human error. Furthermore, ISOCRIT provides the means for responding to any customer request regarding re-analysis due to changed parameters (e.g., power uprate, exit temperature changes, etc.) with a quick turnaround.

  18. Study on the criticality safety evaluation method for burnup credit in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In relation to burnup credit, three tasks have been carried out at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) for establishing the evaluation method of criticality safety for a spent-fuel system, such as storage age ponds and transport casks. The first task is to prepare a benchmark database of criticality experiments and nuclide compositions of spent fuels. The database of nuclide composition is formed by data treasured at JAERI and data collected from the literature. For the database of criticality experiments, the effective multiplication factor of a spent-fuel assembly has been measured at JAERI and data collected from the literature. For the database of criticality experiments, the effective multiplication factor of a spent-fuel assembly has been measured at JAERI. The next task is to develop computer codes. The burnup and criticality codes have been developed and validated by analyzing a large number of benchmarks stored in the aforementioned database. The last task needed to establish the methodology in order to confirm the subcriticality of a spent-fuel system applying burnup credit is described. A reference fuel assembly is introduced so that the criticality of a system can be evaluated by using it, instead of modeling all fuel assemblies explicitly. To determine the nuclide composition of a spent fuel, a simple method is studied utilizing a large number of nuclide composition data stored in the database. Further, the effects of the axial burnup profile and calculation errors are discussed, and the remaining tasks are identified

  19. Feasibility and incentives for burnup credit in spent-fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent-fuel carrying capacities of previous-generation spent-fuel shipping casks have been primarily thermal and/or shielding limited. Shielding and heat transfer requirements for casks designed to transport older spent fuel with longer decay times are reduced considerably and cask capacities become criticality limited. Using burnup credit in the design of future casks can result in increased cask capacities as well as reduced environmental impacts and savings in time and money

  20. Needs of reliable nuclear data and covariance matrices for Burnup Credit in JEFF-3 library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnup Credit (BUC) is the concept which consists in taking into account credit for the reduction of nuclear spent fuel reactivity due to its burnup. In the case of PWR-MOx spent fuel, studies pointed out that the contribution of the 15 most absorbing, stable and non-volatile fission products selected to the credit is as important as the one of the actinides. In order to get a 'best estimate' value of the keff, biases of their inventory calculation and individual reactivity worth should be considered in criticality safety studies. This paper enhances the most penalizing bias towards criticality and highlights possible improvements of nuclear data for the 15 fission products (FPs) of PWR-MOx BUC. Concerning the fuel inventory, trends in function of the burnup can be derived from experimental validation of the DARWIN-2.3 package (using the JEFF- 3.1.1/SHEM library). Thanks to the BUC oscillation programme of separated FPs in the MINERVE reactor and fully validated scheme PIMS, calculation over experiment ratios can be accurately transposed to tendencies on the FPs integral cross sections. (authors)

  1. Needs of reliable nuclear data and covariance matrices for Burnup Credit in JEFF-3 library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecarpentier D.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Burnup Credit (BUC is the concept which consists in taking into account credit for the reduction of nuclear spent fuel reactivity due to its burnup. In the case of PWR-MOx spent fuel, studies pointed out that the contribution of the 15 most absorbing, stable and non-volatile fission products selected to the credit is as important as the one of the actinides. In order to get a “best estimate” value of the keff, biases of their inventory calculation and individual reactivity worth should be considered in criticality safety studies. This paper enhances the most penalizing bias towards criticality and highlights possible improvements of nuclear data for the 15 FPs of PWRMOx BUC. Concerning the fuel inventory, trends in function of the burnup can be derived from experimental validation of the DARWIN-2.3 package (using the JEFF-3.1.1/SHEM library. Thanks to the BUC oscillation programme of separated FPs in the MINERVE reactor and fully validated scheme PIMS, calculation over experiment ratios can be accurately transposed to tendencies on the FPs integral cross sections.

  2. Monte Carlo calculations of the REBUS critical experiment for validation of burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of burnup credit (BUC) to criticality safety analysis for Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) configurations requires the implementation of both estimation of the SNF composition with the aid of depletion calculation tools and estimation of the SNF reactivity with the aid of criticality calculation tools. Amongst the several experimental programs dedicated to the validation of both calculation tools, REBUS is distinguished by a combination of chemical analysis and critical experiment. In addition to detailed assays of irradiated fuel, the reactivity worth of the fuel rods under investigation is measured both before and after irradiation. Since a whole bundle of fuel rods is used in the experiment, the change in reactivity is significant enough to be observable by Monte Carlo calculations. Thus, the calculation tools which see the most widespread use in SNF critical safety applications can be validated directly. Apart from the effective neutron multiplication factor keff, REBUS also provides measurements of the flux and fission rate distributions. While the program comprises investigation of commercial UO2 fuel rods and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel from a research reactor, the presentation will focus on the commercial UO2 fuel with an overview of the experimental setup and first results from the analysis. (author)

  3. Benefits of the delta K of depletion benchmarks for burnup credit validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) burnup credit validation is demonstrated using the benchmarks for quantifying fuel reactivity decrements, published as 'Benchmarks for Quantifying Fuel Reactivity Depletion Uncertainty,' EPRI Report 1022909 (August 2011). This demonstration uses the depletion module TRITON available in the SCALE 6.1 code system followed by criticality calculations using KENO-Va. The difference between the predicted depletion reactivity and the benchmark's depletion reactivity is a bias for the criticality calculations. The uncertainty in the benchmarks is the depletion reactivity uncertainty. This depletion bias and uncertainty is used with the bias and uncertainty from fresh UO2 critical experiments to determine the criticality safety limits on the neutron multiplication factor, keff. The analysis shows that SCALE 6.1 with the ENDF/B-VII 238-group cross section library supports the use of a depletion bias of only 0.0015 in delta k if cooling is ignored and 0.0025 if cooling is credited. The uncertainty in the depletion bias is 0.0064. Reliance on the ENDF/B V cross section library produces much larger disagreement with the benchmarks. The analysis covers numerous combinations of depletion and criticality options. In all cases, the historical uncertainty of 5% of the delta k of depletion ('Kopp memo') was shown to be conservative for fuel with more than 30 GWD/MTU burnup. Since this historically assumed burnup uncertainty is not a function of burnup, the Kopp memo's recommended bias and uncertainty may be exceeded at low burnups, but its absolute magnitude is small. (authors)

  4. Coolant Density and Control Blade History Effects in Extended BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Bowman, Stephen M [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation casks. This project includes two phases. The first phase investigates the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used for spent fuel pools to spent fuel storage and transportation casks and the validation of reactivity (keff) calculations and predicted spent fuel compositions. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents work performed to date investigating some aspects of extended BUC. (The technical basis for application of peak reactivity methods to BWR fuel in storage and transportation systems is presented in a companion paper.) Two reactor operating parameters are being evaluated to establish an adequate basis for extended BWR BUC: (1) the effect of axial void profile and (2) the effect of control blade utilization during operation. A detailed analysis of core simulator data for one cycle of a modern operating BWR plant was performed to determine the range of void profiles and the variability of the profile experienced during irradiation. Although a single cycle does not provide complete data, the data obtained are sufficient to determine the primary effects and to identify conservative modeling approaches. These data were used in a study of the effect of axial void profile. The first stage of the study was determination of the necessary moderator density temporal fidelity in depletion modeling. After the required temporal fidelity was established, multiple void profiles were used to examine the effect on cask reactivity. The results of these studies are being used to develop recommendations for conservatively modeling the void profile effects for BWR depletion calculations. The second operational parameter studied was control blade history. Control blades are inserted in

  5. The burn-up credit physics and the 40. Minerve anniversary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical meeting organized by the SFEN on the burn-up credit (CBU) physics, took place the 23 november 1999 at Cadarache. the first presentation dealt with the economic interest and the neutronic problems of the CBU. Then two papers presented how taking into account the CBU in the industry in matter of transport, storage in pool, reprocessing and criticality calculation (MCNP4/Apollo2-F benchmark). An experimental method for the reactivity measurement through oscillations in the Minerve reactor, has been presented with an analysis of the possible errors. The future research program OSMOSE, taking into account the minor actinides in the CBU, was also developed. The last paper presented the national and international research programs in the CBU domain, in particular experiments realized in CEA/Valduc and the OECD Burn-up Criticality Benchmark Group activities. (A.L.B.)

  6. Burn-up credit in criticality safety of PWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Designing spent fuel wet storage using WIMS-5D and MCNP-5 code. • Studying fresh and burned fuel with/out absorber like “B4C and Ag–In–Cd” in racks. • Sub-criticality was confirmed for fresh and burned fuel under specific cases. • Studies for BU credit recommend increasing fuel burn-up to 60.0 GWD/MTU. • Those studies require new core structure materials, fuel composition and cladding. - Abstract: The criticality safety calculations were performed for a proposed design of a wet spent fuel storage pool. This pool will be used for the storage of spent fuel discharged from a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR). The mathematical model based on the international validated codes, WIMS-5 and MCNP-5 were used for calculating the effective multiplication factor, keff, for the spent fuel stored in the pool. The data library for the multi-group neutron microscopic cross-sections was used for the cell calculations. The keff was calculated for several changes in water density, water level, assembly pitch and burn-up with different initial fuel enrichment and new types and amounts of fixed absorbers. Also, keff was calculated for the conservative fresh fuel case. The results of the calculations confirmed that the effective multiplication factor for the spent fuel storage is sub-critical for all normal and abnormal states. The future strategy for the burn-up credit recommends increasing the fuel burn-up to a value >60.0 GWD/MTU, which requires new fuel composition and new fuel cladding material with the assessment of the effects of negative reactivity build up

  7. Parametric Study of Control Rod Exposure for PWR Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Interim Staff Guidance on burnup credit (ISG-8) for pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF), issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Spent Fuel Project Office, recommends the use of analyses that provide an ''adequate representation of the physics'' and notes particular concern with the ''need to consider the more reactive actinide compositions of fuels burned with fixed absorbers or with control rods fully or partly inserted.'' In the absence of readily available information on the extent of control rod (CR) usage in U.S. PWRs and the subsequent reactivity effect of CR exposure on discharged SNF, NRC staff have indicated a need for greater understanding in these areas. In response, this paper presents results of a parametric study of the effect of CR exposure on the reactivity of discharged SNF for various CR designs (including Axial Power Shaping Rods), fuel enrichments, and exposure conditions (i.e., burnup and axial insertion). The study is performed in two parts. In the first part, two-dimensional calculations are performed, effectively assuming full axial CR insertion. These calculations are intended to bound the effect of CR exposure and facilitate comparisons of the various CR designs. In the second part, three-dimensional calculations are performed to determine the effect of various axial insertion conditions and gain a better understanding of reality. The results from the study demonstrate that the reactivity effect increases with increasing CR exposure (e.g., burnup) and decreasing initial fuel enrichment (for a fixed burnup). Additionally, the results show that even for significant burnup exposures, minor axial CR insertions (e.g., eff of a spent fuel cask

  8. Use of burnup credit in criticality evaluation for spent fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boraflex is a polymer based material which is used as matrix to contain a neutron absorber material, boron carbide. In a typical spent fuel pool the irradiated Boraflex has been known as a significant source of silica. Since 1996, it was reported that elevated silica levels were measured in the Ulchin Unit 2 spent fuel pool water. Therefore, the Ulchin Unit 2 spent fuel storage racks were needed to be reanalyzed to allow storage of fuel assemblies with normal enrichments up to 5.0w/o U-235 in all storage cell locations using credit for burnup. The analysis does not take any credit for the presence of the spent fuel rack Boraflex neutron absorber panels. In region 2, the calculations were performed by assuming in an infinite radial array of storage cells. No credit is taken for axial or radial neutron leakage. The water in the spent fuel storage pool was assumed to be pure. In the evaluation of the Ulchin Unit 2 spent fuel storage pool, criticality analyses were performed with the CASMO-3 code. A reactivity uncertainty in the fuel depletion calculations was combined with other calculational uncertainty. The manufacturing tolerances were considered, as well. From the calculation, the acceptable burnup domain in region 2 of the spent fuel storage pool. where the curve identifies conditions of equal reactivity for various initial enrichments between 1.6w/o and 5.0w/o, was evaluated. In region 2, the maximum keff including all uncertainties, is 0.94648 for the enrichment-burnup combination from loading curve. (author)

  9. Calculation of the CB1 burnup credit benchmark reaction rates with MCNP4B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first calculational VVER-440 burnup credit benchmark CB1 in 1996. VTT Energy participated in the calculation of the CB1 benchmark with three different codes: CASMO-4, KENO-VI and MCNP4B. However, the reaction rates and the fission ν were calculated only with CASMO-4. Now, the neutron absorption and production reaction rates and the fission ν values have been calculated at VTT Energy with the MCNP4B Monte Carlo code using the ENDF60 neutron data library. (author)

  10. Parametric studies of the effect of MOx environment and control rods for PWR-UOx burnup credit implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase of PWR-UOX fuel initial enrichment and the extensive needs for spent fuel storage or cask capacities reinforce the interest in taking burnup credit into account in criticality calculations. However, this utilization of credit for fuel burnup requires the definition of a methodology that ensures the conservatism of calculations. In order to guarantee the conservatism of the spent fuel inventory calculation, a depletion calculation scheme for burnup credit is under development. This paper presents the studies on the main parameters which have an effect on nuclides concentration: the presence of control rods during depletion and the fuel assembly environment, particularly the presence of MOx fuels around the UO2 assembly. Reactivity effects which are relevant to these parameters are then presented, and physics phenomena are identified. (author)

  11. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmark. Result of phase IIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the final result of the Phase IIA of the Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark conducted by OECD/NEA. In the Phase IIA benchmark problems, the effect of an axial burnup profile of PWR spent fuels on criticality (end effect) has been studied. The axial profiles at 10, 30 and 50 GWd/t burnup have been considered. In total, 22 results from 18 institutes of 10 countries have been submitted. The calculated multiplication factors from the participants have lain within the band of ± 1% Δk. For the irradiation up to 30 GWd/t, the end effect has been found to be less than 1.0% Δk. But, for the 50 GWd/t case, the effect is more than 4.0% Δk when both actinides and FPs are taken into account, whereas it remains less than 1.0% Δk when only actinides are considered. The fission density data have indicated the importance end regions have in the criticality safety analysis of spent fuel systems. (author)

  12. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmark. Result of phase IIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takano, Makoto; Okuno, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-02-01

    The report describes the final result of the Phase IIA of the Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark conducted by OECD/NEA. In the Phase IIA benchmark problems, the effect of an axial burnup profile of PWR spent fuels on criticality (end effect) has been studied. The axial profiles at 10, 30 and 50 GWd/t burnup have been considered. In total, 22 results from 18 institutes of 10 countries have been submitted. The calculated multiplication factors from the participants have lain within the band of {+-} 1% {Delta}k. For the irradiation up to 30 GWd/t, the end effect has been found to be less than 1.0% {Delta}k. But, for the 50 GWd/t case, the effect is more than 4.0% {Delta}k when both actinides and FPs are taken into account, whereas it remains less than 1.0% {Delta}k when only actinides are considered. The fission density data have indicated the importance end regions have in the criticality safety analysis of spent fuel systems. (author).

  13. Evaluation and Selection of Boundary Isotopic Composition for Burnup Credit Criticality Safety Analysis of RBMK Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The on-site wet-type spent fuel storage facility ISF-1 is currently used for interim storage of spent nuclear fuel removed from Chernobyl NPP power units. The results of ISF-1 preliminary criticality analyses demonstrated the need for using the burnup credit principle in nuclear safety analysis. This paper provides results from the selection and testing of computer codes for determining the isotopic composition of RBMK spent fuel. Assessment is carried out and conclusions are made on conservative approaches to fuel burnup credit in subsequent ISF-1 safety assessment. (author)

  14. Overview of the burnup credit activities of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article summarises activities of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality, a subordinate group to the Working Part on Nuclear Criticality Safety (WPNCS). The WPNCS of the OECD/NEA coordinates and carries out work in the domain of criticality safety at the international level. Particular attention is devoted to establishing sound databases required in this area and to addressing issues of high relevance such as burnup credit. The activities of the expert group are aimed toward improving safety and identifying economic solutions to issues concerning the back-end of the fuel cycle. The main objective of the activities of the OECD/NEA Expert Group on Burnup Credit Criticality is to demonstrate that the available criticality safety calculational tools are appropriate for application to irradiated (burned) nuclear fuel systems and that a reasonable safety margin can be established. The method established by the expert group for investigating the physics and predictability of burnup credit is based on the specification and comparison of calculational benchmark problems. A wide range of fuel types, including PWR, BWR, MOX, and VVER fuels, has been or is being addressed by the expert group. The objective and status of each of these benchmark problems is reviewed in this article. It is important to note that the focus of the expert group is the comparison of the results submitted by each participant to assess the capability of commonly used code systems, not to quantify the physical phenomena investigated in the comparisons or to make recommendations for licensing action. (author)

  15. Criticality Analysis of Assembly Misload in a PWR Burnup Credit Cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J. C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2008-01-31

    The Interim Staff Guidance on bumup credit (ISG-8) for spent fuel in storage and transportation casks, issued by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Spent Fuel Project Office, recommends a bumup measurement for each assembly to confirm the reactor record and compliance with the assembly bumup value used for loading acceptance. This recommendation is intended to prevent unauthorized loading (misloading) of assemblies due to inaccuracies in reactor burnup records and/or improper assembly identification, thereby ensuring that the appropriate subcritical margin is maintained. This report presents a computational criticality safety analysis of the consequences of misloading fuel assemblies in a highcapacity cask that relies on burnup credit for criticality safety. The purpose of this report is to provide a quantitative understanding of the effects of fuel misloading events on safety margins. A wide variety of fuel-misloading configurations are investigated and results are provided for informational purposes. This report does not address the likelihood of occurrence for any of the misload configurations considered. For representative, qualified bumup-enrichment combinations, with and without fission products included, misloading two assemblies that are underburned by 75% results in an increase in keff of 0.025-0.045, while misloading four assemblies that are underburned by 50% also results in an increase in keff of 0.025-0.045. For the cask and conditions considered, a reduction in bumup of 20% in all assemblies results in an increase in kff of less than 0.035. Misloading a single fresh assembly with 3, 4, or 5 wt% 235U enrichment results in an increase in keffof--0.02, 0.04, or 0.06, respectively. The report concludes with a summary of these and other important findings, as well as a discussion of relevant issues that should be considered when assessing the appropriate role of burnup measurements.

  16. Computational Benchmark for Estimation of Reactivity Margin from Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes and documents a computational benchmark problem for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from fission products and minor actinides in a burnup-credit storage/transport environment, relative to SNF compositions containing only the major actinides. The benchmark problem/configuration is a generic burnup credit cask designed to hold 32 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies. The purpose of this computational benchmark is to provide a reference configuration for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin, which is encouraged in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidance for partial burnup credit (ISG8), and document reference estimations of the additional reactivity margin as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Consequently, the geometry and material specifications are provided in sufficient detail to enable independent evaluations. Estimates of additional reactivity margin for this reference configuration may be compared to those of similar burnup-credit casks to provide an indication of the validity of design-specific estimates of fission-product margin. The reference solutions were generated with the SAS2H-depletion and CSAS25-criticality sequences of the SCALE 4.4a package. Although the SAS2H and CSAS25 sequences have been extensively validated elsewhere, the reference solutions are not directly or indirectly based on experimental results. Consequently, this computational benchmark cannot be used to satisfy the ANS 8.1 requirements for validation of calculational methods and is not intended to be used to establish biases for burnup credit analyses

  17. Computational Benchmark for Estimation of Reactivity Margin from Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, J.C.

    2001-08-02

    This report proposes and documents a computational benchmark problem for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from fission products and minor actinides in a burnup-credit storage/transport environment, relative to SNF compositions containing only the major actinides. The benchmark problem/configuration is a generic burnup credit cask designed to hold 32 pressurized water reactor (PWR) assemblies. The purpose of this computational benchmark is to provide a reference configuration for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin, which is encouraged in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) guidance for partial burnup credit (ISG8), and document reference estimations of the additional reactivity margin as a function of initial enrichment, burnup, and cooling time. Consequently, the geometry and material specifications are provided in sufficient detail to enable independent evaluations. Estimates of additional reactivity margin for this reference configuration may be compared to those of similar burnup-credit casks to provide an indication of the validity of design-specific estimates of fission-product margin. The reference solutions were generated with the SAS2H-depletion and CSAS25-criticality sequences of the SCALE 4.4a package. Although the SAS2H and CSAS25 sequences have been extensively validated elsewhere, the reference solutions are not directly or indirectly based on experimental results. Consequently, this computational benchmark cannot be used to satisfy the ANS 8.1 requirements for validation of calculational methods and is not intended to be used to establish biases for burnup credit analyses.

  18. Validation of SWAT for burnup credit problems by analysis of post irradiation examination of 17*17 PWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For adopting burnup credit in transport or storage of spent fuel (SF), development of a reliable burnup calculation code is crucial. For this purpose, data of Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) have been extensively analyzed to evaluate accuracy of burnup calculation codes for a 14*14 or 15*15 PWR fuel assembly. This study shows results of analysis of this latest PIE with SWAT and ORIGEN2.1. SWAT is an integrated burnup code system for a 17*17 PWR fuel assembly that has been developed by Tohoku University and JAERI. The results show that SWAT can more precisely predict nuclide composition of latest PWR assembly than ORIGEN2.1. (O.M.)

  19. Analysis of the burnup credit benchmark with an updated WIMS-D Library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD/NEA Burnup Credit Benchmark was analyzed with the WIMSD5B code using a fully updated library based on ENDF/B-VI Revision 5 data. Parts-1A and 1B were considered. The criticality prediction tested in Part-1A was in very good agreement with the reference result. A slight trend to overestimate the absorption rate by the fission products was noted, which can be explained by spectral effects resulting from the coarseness of the WIMS-D 69-group energy grid. The isotopic composition prediction tested in Part-1B was within the uncertainty interval of the reference results, except for 109 Ag at lower burnup and 155 Gd in all the cases. For 109 Ag the cause of the discrepancy was the use of old fission yield data in generating the reference solution. Similarly for 155 Gd the difference was due to old 155 Eu capture cross sections. Compared to the measurements, a serious underprediction of Sm isotopes is observed. This could be due to problems in the measured values or in the nuclear data of Sm precursors. We conclude that our processing methods do not introduce significant errors to the basic nuclear data. Care should be taken in the interpretation of the reference average benchmark solution due to a possible bias towards the ENDF/B-V evaluated nuclear data files

  20. Computational fluid dynamics analysis for K24B cask design with burnup credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea Nuclear Engineering Service Corp. (KONES) has designed K24B cask for the storage and the transportation of 24 (CE-type 16x16) PWR assemblies. K24B cask is designed with considering burnup credit of spent fuel. In order to remove heat from the fuel assemblies effectively, the flow channels in the upper and the lower part of fuel assemblies are set up to promote the natural convection. Computational fluid dynamics analysis is carried out to estimate and assure the thermal integrity of K24B cask. Conduction and radiation heat transfer through the cask components and the natural convective heat transfer in the cask are simulated. As a result of the analysis, the maximum temperatures of the cask components are maintained below the operating temperature for the safety. Therefore, the design of K24B cask can satisfy the safety limit. (author)

  1. Incentives for the allowance of ''burnup credit'' in the design of spent nuclear fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis has been completed which indicates that the consideration of spent fuel histories ('burnup credit') in the criticality design of spent fuel shipping casks could result in significant public risk benefits and cost savings in the transport of spent nuclear fuel. Capacities of casks could be increased considerably in some cases. These capacity increases result in lower public and occupational exposures to ionizing radiation due to the reduced number of shipments necessary to transport a given amount of fuel. Additional safety benefits result from reduced non-radiological risks to both public and occupational sectors. In addition, economic benefits result from lower in-transit shipping costs, reduced transportation fleet capital costs, and fewer cask handling requirements at both shipping and receiving facilities

  2. Incentives for the allowance of burnup credit in the design of spent nuclear fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis has been completed which indicates that the consideration of spent fuel histories ('burnup credit') in the criticality design of spent fuel shipping casks could result in considerable public risk benefits and cost savings in the transport of spent nuclear fuel. Capacities of casks could be increased considerably in some cases. These capacity increases result in lower public and occupational exposures to ionizing radiation due to the reduced number of shipments necessary to transport a given amount of fuel. Additional safety benefits result from reduced non-radiological risks to both public and occupational sectors. In addition, economic benefits result from lower in-transit shipping costs, reduced transportation fleet capital costs, and fewer cask handling requirements at both shipping and receiving facilities

  3. OECD-NEA criticality working group - a status report and the burnup credit challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Working Group established by the organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), Paris, has examined the validity of computational methods used for calculations that evaluate the nuclear criticality safety issues involved in the storage, handling and transportation of fissile materials. The basic goal of this Working Group is to attempt to define and implement a procedure that can be shown to demonstrate the validity of the various computational methods used to make criticality safety calculations. The current activities of the Working Group involve an effort to establish the validity of computational methods used to evaluate the criticality safety of the storage, handling, and transportation of spent light-water-reactor fuel elements in which one seeks to take credit for the fissile material burnup and/or buildup of fission products. (J.P.N.)

  4. Alternatives for implementing burnup credit in the design and operation of spent fuel transport casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The traditional assumption used in evaluating criticality safety of spent fuel cask is that the spent fuel is as reactive as when it was fresh (new). This is known as the fresh fuel assumption. It avoids a number of calculational and verification difficulties, but could take a heavy toll in decreased efficiency. The alternative to the fresh fuel assumption is called burnup credit. That is, the reduced reactivity of spent fuel that comes about from depletion of fissile radionuclides and net increase in neutron absorbers (poisons) is taken into account. It is recognizable that the use of burnup credit will in fact increase the percentage of unacceptable or non-specification fuel available for misloading. This could reduce individual cask safety margins if current practices with respect to loading procedures are maintained. As such, additional operational, design, analysis, and validation requirements should be established that, as a minimum, compensate for any potential reduction in fuel loading safety margin. This method is based on a probabilistic (PRA) approach and is called a relative risk comparison. The method assumes a linear risk model, and uses a selected probability function to compare the system of interest and an acceptable reference system by varying the features of each to assess effects on system safety. While risk is the product of an event probability and its consequence, the consequences of criticality in a cask are considered to be both unacceptable and the same, regardless of the initiating sequence. Therefore, only the probability of the event is considered in a relative risk evaluation

  5. Evaluation of fission product worth margins in PWR spent nuclear fuel burnup credit calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current criticality safety calculations for the transportation of irradiated LWR fuel make the very conservative assumption that the fuel is fresh. This results in a very substantial overprediction of the actual keff of the transportation casks; in certain cases, this decreases the amount of spent fuel which can be loaded in a cask, and increases the cost of transporting the spent fuel to the repository. Accounting for the change of reactivity due to fuel depletion is usually referred to as ''burnup credit.'' The US DOE is currently funding a program aimed at establishing an actinide only burnup credit methodology (in this case, the calculated reactivity takes into account the buildup or depletion of a limited number of actinides). This work is undergoing NRC review. While this methodology is being validated on a significant experimental basis, it implicitly relies on additional margins: in particular, the absorption of neutrons by certain actinides and by all fission products is not taken into account. This provides an important additional margin and helps guarantee that the methodology is conservative provided these neglected absorption are known with reasonable accuracy. This report establishes the accuracy of fission product absorption rate calculations: (1) the analysis of European fission product worth experiments demonstrates that fission product cross-sections available in the US provide very good predictions of fission product worth; (2) this is confirmed by a direct comparison of European and US cross section evaluations; (3) accuracy of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) fission product content predictions is established in a recent ORNL report where several SNF isotopic assays are analyzed; and (4) these data are then combined to establish in a conservative manner the fraction of the predicted total fission product absorption which can be guaranteed based on available experimental data

  6. Application of depletion perturbation theory to fuel cycle burnup analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past several years static perturbation theory methods have been increasingly used for reactor analysis in lieu of more detailed and costly direct computations. Recently, perturbation methods incorporating time dependence have also received attention, and several authors have demonstrated their applicability to fuel burnup analysis. The objective of the work described here is to demonstrate that a time-dependent perturbation method can be easily and accurately applied to realistic depletion problems

  7. The impact of burn-up credit in criticality studies; Prise en compte du Credit Burn Up dans les calculs de criticite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reverdy, L

    1999-07-01

    Nowadays optimization goes with everything. So French engineering firms try to demonstrate that fuel transport casks and storage pools are able to receive assemblies with higher {sup 235}U initial enrichments. Fuel Burnup distribution contributes to demonstrate it. This instruction has to elaborate a way to take credit of burnup effects on criticality safety designs. The calculation codes used are CESAR 4.21-APOLLO 1-MORET III. The assembly studied (UO{sub 2}) is irradiated in a French Pressurized Water Reactor like EDF nuclear power reactor: PWR 1300 MWe, 17 x 17 array. Its initial enrichment in {sup 235}U equals 4.5%. The studies exposed in this report have evaluated the effects of: (i) the 15 fission products considered in Burnup Credit ({sup 95}Mo, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 101}Ru, {sup 103}Rh, {sup 109}Ag, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 143}Nd, {sup 145}Nd, {sup 147}Sm, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 150}Sm, {sup 151}Sm, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 153}Eu, {sup 155}Gd), (ii) the calculated abundances corrected or not by fixed factors, (iii) the choice of one cross sections library used by CESAR 4.21, (iv) the zone number elected in the axial burnup distribution zoning, (v) the kind of cut applied on (regular/optimized). Two axial distribution profiles are studied: one with 44 GWd/t average burnup, the other with 20 GWd/t average burnup. The second one considers a shallow control rods insertion in the upper limit of the assembly. The results show a margin in reactivity about 0.045 with consideration of the 6 most absorbent fission products ({sup 103}Rh, {sup 133}Cs, {sup 143}Nd, {sup 149}Sm, {sup 152}Sm, {sup 155}Gd), and about 0.06 for all Burnup Credit fission products whole. Those results have been calculated with an average burnup of 44 GWj/t. In a conservative approach, corrective factors must be apply on the abundance of some fission products. The cross sections library used by CESAR 4.21 (BBL 4) is sufficient and gives satisfactory results. The zoning of the assembly axial distribution burnup in 9

  8. Comparison of Computational Estimations of Reactivity Margin From Fission Products and Minor Actinides in PWR Burnup Credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper has presented the results of a computational benchmark and independent calculations to verify the benchmark calculations for the estimation of the additional reactivity margin available from fission products and minor actinides in a PWR burnup credit storage/transport environment. The calculations were based on a generic 32 PWR-assembly cask. The differences between the independent calculations and the benchmark lie within 1% for the uniform axial burnup distribution, which is acceptable. The Δk for KENO - MCNP results are generally lower than the other Δk values, due to the fact that HELIOS performed the depletion part of the calculation for both the KENO and MCNP results. The differences between the independent calculations and the benchmark for the non-uniform axial burnup distribution were within 1.1%

  9. Study on burnup credit evaluation method at JAERI towards securing criticality safety rationale for management of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A higher initial 235U enrichment is currently required in the nuclear fuel fabrication specification to realize higher fuel burnup. Traditionally, in the criticality safety design of spent fuel (SF) storage and transportation (S/T) casks or facilities, the fuel is usually assumed to be at its full initial enrichment (so called fresh fuel assumption) to provide a large safety allowance, which is sometimes excessively given, for example requiring unnecessarily large space between fuel assemblies. The burnup credit taken for criticality safety design is firstly implemented to the SF Storage Rack of Rokkasho Reprocessing Facility, which is completed and expected for operation soon. Except for that, no burnup credit has been taken in criticality safety design for SF S/T casks or intermediate storage facilities in Japan. Since in the near future it is considered inevitable to handle spent fuel massively, it is desired to implement the rational S/T design saving safety and economy by taking into account the fuel burnup in the criticality safety control. Computer codes and data which are vital to assess criticality safety in the design stage of nuclear fuel cycle facility have been developed and prepared to constitute a Japanese criticality safety handbook at JAERI

  10. Burn-up credit criticality benchmark. Phase 4-B: results and analysis of MOX fuel depletion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DECD/NEA Expert Group on Burn-up Credit was established in 1991 to address scientific and technical issues connected with the use of burn-up credit in nuclear fuel cycle operations. Following the completion of six benchmark exercises with uranium oxide (UOX) fuels irradiated in pressurised water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs), the present report concerns mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) fuels irradiated in PWRs. The exercises consisted of inventory calculations of MOX fuels for two initial plutonium compositions. The depletion calculations were carried out using three representations of the MOX assemblies and their interface with UOX assemblies. This enabled the investigation of the spatial and spectral effects during the irradiation of the MOX fuels. (author)

  11. 燃耗信任制临界计算中保守性因素研究%Study on the conservative factors for burnup credit criticality calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘驰; 蒋校丰; 张少泓

    2012-01-01

    When applies the burnup credit technology to perform criticality safety analysis for spent fuel storage or transportation problems, it is important for one to confirm that all the conditions adopted are adequate to cover the severest conditions that may encounter in the engineering applications. Taking the OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks as sample problems, we study the effect of some important factors that may affect the conservatism of the results for spent fuel system criticality safety analysis. Effects caused by different nuclides credit strategy, different cooling time and axial burnup profile are studied by use of the STARBUCS module of SCALE5. 1 software package, and related conclusions about the conservatism of these factors are%在运用燃耗信任制技术进行乏燃料储存、运输等环节的临界安全分析时,临界计算所采用的条件是否具有足够的包络性十分关键.本文借助于OECD/NEA发布的若干燃耗信任制临界安全基准题,使用SCALE5.1软件中的STARBUCS模块进行分析,对信任核素选取、乏燃料冷却时间以及端末效应等因素对乏燃料系统临界安全性的影响进行了研究,得出了各参数保守性的有关结论.

  12. Taking burnup credit into account in criticality studies: the situation as it is now and the prospect for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As enrichment of the fuel has become higher than the limits used at the designing stages, it seemed necessary to consider fuel depletion during irradiation to guarantee the criticality safety for relatively high enriched fuels transportation, storage or reprocessing. This burnup credit will make it possible to use the devices for spent fuels which are initially relatively high enriched. For that purpose, a method was developed considering: (i) partial Uranium-and-Plutonium burnup credit in the criticality studies, and (ii) a conservative assumption concerning the axial profile; this actinides-only method was supported by an experimental program called HTC. The method was accepted by the French Safety Authority. Moreover, in order to reduce again the calculated values of the reactivity for irradiated fuels, a French working group was set up in 1997 to define a conservative method which enables industrial companies to take burnup credit into account with some of the fission products and using a more precise profile. The work of this group has been divided into four tasks related to: the determination of (i) the composition of the fuel, (ii) a conservative profile, (iii) a conservative irradiation history, and (iv) the calculation scheme. This work is also supported by experimental programs related to the validation of the fission products effects, in terms of reactivity

  13. Continuation of the VVER burnup credit benchmark. Evaluation of CB1 results, overview of CB2 results to date, and specification of CB3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calculational benchmark focused on VVER-440 burnup credit, similar to that of the OECD/NEA/NSC Burnup Credit Benchmark Working Group, was proposed on the 96'AER Symposium. Its first part, CB1, was specified there whereas the second part, CB2, was specified a year later, on 97'AER Symposium in Zittau. A final statistical evaluation is presented of CB1 results and summarizes the CB2 results obtained to date. Further, the effect of an axial burnup profile of VVER-440 spent fuel on criticality ('end effect') is proposed to be studied in the CB3 benchmark problem of an infinite array of VVER-440 spent fuel rods. (author)

  14. A criticality analysis of the GBC-32 dry storage cask with Hanbit nuclear power plant unit 3 fuel assemblies from the viewpoint of burnup credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yun, Hyung Ju; Kim, Do Yeon; Park, Kwang Heon; Hong, Ser Gi [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Nuclear criticality safety analyses (NCSAs) considering burnup credit were performed for the GBC-32 cask. The used nuclear fuel assemblies (UNFAs) discharged from Hanbit Nuclear Power Plant Unit 3 Cycle 6 were loaded into the cask. Their axial burnup distributions and average discharge burnups were evaluated using the DeCART and Multi-purpose Analyzer for Static and Transient Effects of Reactors (MASTER) codes, and NCSAs were performed using SCALE 6.1/STandardized Analysis of Reactivity for Burnup Credit using SCALE (STARBUCS) and Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code, version 6 (MCNP 6). The axial burnup distributions were determined for 20 UNFAs with various initial enrichments and burnups, which were applied to the criticality analysis for the cask system. The UNFAs for 20- and 30-year cooling times were assumed to be stored in the cask. The criticality analyses indicated that keff values for UNFAs with nonuniform axial burnup distributions were larger than those with a uniform distribution, that is, the end effects were positive but much smaller than those with the reference distribution. The axial burnup distributions for 20 UNFAs had shapes that were more symmetrical with a less steep gradient in the upper region than the reference ones of the United States Department of Energy. These differences in the axial burnup distributions resulted in a significant reduction in end effects compared with the reference.

  15. ANS/ENS tutorial session: Burnup credit issues in spent fuel transportation: Overview and objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of opportunities exist to increase the efficiency of the next generation of spent fuel shipping casks. Improving cask efficiency will not only reduce life cycle transportation costs, but also is consistent with maintaining public and occupational radiological risks and, more importantly, total risks (radiological and nonradiological) within the guidelines of the ''as low as reasonably achievable'' (ALARA) philosophy. Increases in cask capacities will reduce both the total number of shipments required to transport a given amount of fuel and the number of handling operations at both shipping and receiving facilities. Additional capacity increases can be achieved by implementing various design strategies based on new concepts and/or the actual characteristics of the majority of the spent fuel to be shipped in the future. For example, it has been determined that additional capacity increases can be achieved by taking credit for burnup, the reduced reactivity that results when fuel has been used to produce power in a nuclear reactor. That is, as the fuel is used the atoms of fissile material decrease, and neutron absorbers (or ''poisons'') that tend to retard the fission process are produced. 7 refs., 1 fig

  16. The role of ORIGEN-S in the design of burnup credit spent fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current licensing practices for spent fuel pools, storage facilities, and transportation casks require a conservative fresh fuel assumption be used in the criticality analysis. The U.S. Department of Energy is currently sponsoring a program to develop analysis methodologies and establish a new generation of spent fuel casks using the principle of burnup credit. The key difference in this new approach is the necessity to accurately predict the isotopic composition of the spent fuel. ORIGEN-S was selected to satisfy this requirement because of the flexibility and user-friendly input offered via its usage in the Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing and Evaluation (SCALE) code system. This paper describes the fundamental role fulfilled by ORIGEN-S in the development of the analysis methodology, validation of the methods, definition of criticality safety margins and other licensing considerations in the design of a new generation of spent fuel casks. Particular emphasis is given to the performance of ORIGEN-S in comparisons with measurements of irradiated fuel compositions and in predicting isotopics for use in the calculation of reactor restart critical configurations that are performed as a part of the validation process

  17. Burnup Credit of French PWR-MOx fuels: methodology and associated conservatisms with the JEFF-3.1.1 evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering spent fuel management (storage, transport and reprocessing), the approach using 'fresh fuel assumption' in criticality-safety studies results in a significant conservatism in the calculated value of the system reactivity. The concept of Burnup Credit (BUC) consists in considering the reduction of the spent fuel reactivity due to its burnup. A careful BUC methodology, developed by CEA in association with AREVA-NC was recently validated and written up for PWR-UOx fuels. However, 22 of 58 French reactors use MOx fuel, so more and more irradiated MOx fuels have to be stored and transported. As a result, why industrial partners are interested in this concept is because taking into account this BUC concept would enable for example a load increase in several fuel cycle devices. Recent publications and discussions within the French BUC Working Group highlight the current interest of the BUC concept in PWR-MOx spent fuel industrial applications. In this case of PWR-MOx fuel, studies show in particular that the 15 FPs selected thanks to their properties (absorbing, stable, non-gaseous) are responsible for more than a half of the total reactivity credit and 80% of the FPs credit. That is why, in order to get a conservative and physically realistic value of the application keff and meet the Upper Safety Limit constraint, calculation biases on these 15 FPs inventory and individual reactivity worth should be considered in a criticality-safety approach. In this context, thanks to an exhaustive literature study, PWR-MOx fuels particularities have been identified and by following a rigorous approach, a validated and physically representative BUC methodology, adapted to this type of fuel has been proposed, allowing to take fission products into account and to determine the biases related to considered isotopes inventory and to reactivity worth. This approach consists of the following studies: - isotopic correction factors determination to guarantee the criticality

  18. The SMOPY system: Quantitative burn-up measurement monitor combining gamma spectrometry and neutron measurement for safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: IAEA uses today FORK Detector in attended and unattended mode for the verification of spent fuels. This system uses a neutron fission chamber and an ionisation chamber to combine total neutron counting and total gamma counting. CANBERRA now proposes the new SMOPY system, which enhances performance as it combines a fission chamber and a CZT gamma spectrometer. This new measurement capability associated with a depletion code embedded in the interpretation software of the system allows a complete identification of the burn-up of any type of fuel (also MOX for example). A first prototype of the SMOPY system was developed in collaboration between AREVA NC CEA and CANBERRA for safeguards but also burn-up credit applications. This prototype has been already used by the IAEA. CANBERRA has now completed the industrialization of this system adding new functionalities. The system allows also axial scanning of the fuel assembly instead of a single point measurement. Two types of interpretation of the measurement have been developed. The first one requires the irradiation history to determine very precisely the burn-up of the fuel assembly, thus allow to verify the operator's declaration. The second method is less precise but doesn't require any data of the fuel to determine the cooling time, burn-up, and the fuel type (MOX or LEU). The new CANBERRA industrialized SMOPY system will allow new possibilities of IAEA verifications and will also permit to address new scenarios of IAEA safeguards activities. (author)

  19. Impacts of the use of spent nuclear fuel burnup credit on DOE advanced technology legal weight truck cask GA-4 fleet size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this paper is to study the impact of full and partial spent fuel burnup credit on the capacity of the Legal Weight Truck Spent Fuel Shipping Cask (GA-4) and to determine the numbers of additional spent fuel assemblies which could be accommodated as a result. The scope of the study comprised performing nuclear criticality safety scoping calculations using the SCALE-PC software package and the 1993 spent fuel database to determine logistics for number of spent fuel assemblies to be shipped. The results of the study indicate that more capacity than 2 or 3 pressurized water reactor assemblies could be gained for GA-4 casks when burnup credit is considered. Reduction in GA-4 fleet size and number of shipments are expected to result from the acceptance of spent fuel burnup credit

  20. OECD/NEA burnup credit criticality benchmarks phase IIIA: Criticality calculations of BWR spent fuel assemblies in storage and transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes the final results of Phase IIIA Benchmarks conducted by the Burnup Credit Criticality Calculation Working Group under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD/NEA). The benchmarks are intended to confirm the predictive capability of the current computer code and data library combinations for the neutron multiplication factor (keff) of a layer of irradiated BWR fuel assembly array model. In total 22 benchmark problems are proposed for calculations of keff. The effects of following parameters are investigated: cooling time, inclusion/exclusion of FP nuclides and axial burnup profile, and inclusion of axial profile of void fraction or constant void fractions during burnup. Axial profiles of fractional fission rates are further requested for five cases out of the 22 problems. Twenty-one sets of results are presented, contributed by 17 institutes from 9 countries. The relative dispersion of keff values calculated by the participants from the mean value is almost within the band of ±1%Δk/k. The deviations from the averaged calculated fission rate profiles are found to be within ±5% for most cases. (author)

  1. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B andW 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001)

  2. PWR AXIAL BURNUP PROFILE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.M. Acaglione

    2003-09-17

    The purpose of this activity is to develop a representative ''limiting'' axial burnup profile for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), which would encompass the isotopic axial variations caused by different assembly irradiation histories, and produce conservative isotopics with respect to criticality. The effect that the low burnup regions near the ends of spent fuel have on system reactivity is termed the ''end-effect''. This calculation will quantify the end-effects associated with Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies emplaced in a hypothetical 21 PWR waste package. The scope of this calculation covers an initial enrichment range of 3.0 through 5.0 wt% U-235 and a burnup range of 10 through 50 GWd/MTU. This activity supports the validation of the process for ensuring conservative generation of spent fuel isotopics with respect to criticality safety applications, and the use of burnup credit for commercial spent nuclear fuel. The intended use of these results will be in the development of PWR waste package loading curves, and applications involving burnup credit. Limitations of this evaluation are that the limiting profiles are only confirmed for use with the B&W 15 x 15 fuel assembly design. However, this assembly design is considered bounding of all other typical commercial PWR fuel assembly designs. This calculation is subject to the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (QARD) because this activity supports investigations of items or barriers on the Q-list (YMP 2001).

  3. Application of Candle burnup to small fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new reactor burnup strategy CANDLE (Constant Axial shape of Neutron flux, nuclide densities and power shape During Life of Energy producing reactor) was proposed, where shapes of neutron flux, nuclide densities and power density distributions remain constant but move to an axial direction. An equilibrium state was obtained for a large fast reactor (core radius is 2 m and reflector thickness is 0.5 m) successfully by using a newly developed direct analysis code. However, it is difficult to apply this burnup strategy to small reactors, since its neutron leakage becomes large and neutron economy becomes worse. Fuel enrichment should be increased in order to sustain the criticality. However, higher enrichment of fresh fuel makes the CANDLE burnup difficult. We try to find some small reactor designs, which can realize the CANDLE burnup. We have successfully find a design, which is not the CANDLE burnup in the strict meaning, but satisfies qualitatively its characteristics mentioned at the top of this abstract. In the final paper, the general description of CANDLE burnup and some results on the obtained small fast reactor design are presented.(author)

  4. Burn-up credit criticality benchmark. Phase 4-A: reactivity prediction calculations for infinite arrays of PWR MOX fuel pin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD/NEA Expert Group on Burn-up Credit was established in 1991 to address scientific and technical issues connected with the use of burn-up credit in nuclear fuel cycle operations. Following the completion of six benchmark exercises with uranium oxide fuels irradiated in pressurised water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs), the present report concerns mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) fuels irradiated in PWRs. The report summarises and analyses the solutions to the specified exercises provided by 37 contributors from 10 countries. The exercises were based upon the calculation of infinite PWR fuel pin cell reactivity for fresh and irradiated MOX fuels with various MOX compositions, burn-ups and cooling times. In addition, several representations of the MOX fuel assembly were tested in order to check various levels of approximations commonly used in reactor physics calculations. (authors)

  5. Continuation of the WWER burnup credit benchmark: evaluation of CB1 results, overview of CB2 results to date, and specification of CB3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calculational benchmark focused on WWER-440 burnup credit, simular to that of the OECD/NEA/NSC Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark Working Group, was proposed on the 96'AER Symposium. Its first part, CB1, was specified there whereas the second part, CB2, was specified a year later, on 97'AER Symposium in Zittau. This paper brings a final statistical evaluation of CB1 results and summarizes the CB2 results obtained to date. Further, the effect of an axial burnup profile of WWER-440 spent fuel on criticality ('end effect') is proposed to be studied in the CB3 benchmark problem of an infinite array of WWER-440 spent fuel rods as specified in the paper. (Authors)

  6. Burn-up measurements coupling gamma spectrometry and neutron measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need to apply for burn-up credit arises with the increase of the initial enrichment of nuclear fuel. When burn-up credit is used in criticality safety studies, it is often necessary to confirm it by measurement. For the last 10 years, CANBERRA has manufactured the PYTHON system for such measurements. However, the method used in the PYTHON itself uses certain reactor data to arrive at burn-up estimates. Based on R and D led by CEA and COGEMA in the framework of burn-up measurement for burn-up credit and safeguards applications, CANBERRA is developing the next generation of burn-up measurement device. This new product, named SMOPY, is able to measure burn-up of any kind of irradiated fuel assembly with a combination of gamma spectrometry and passive neutron measurements. The measurement data is used as input to the CESAR depletion code, which has been developed and qualified by CEA and COGEMA for burn-up credit determinations. In this paper, we explain the complementary nature of the gamma and neutron measurements. In addition, we draw on our previous experience from PYTHON system and from COGEMA La Hague to show what types of evaluations are required to qualify the SMOPY system, to estimate its uncertainties, and to detect discrepancies in the fuel data given by the reactor plant to characterize the irradiated fuel assembly. (authors)

  7. Applications of ''candle'' burn-up strategy to several reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new burn-up strategy CANDLE is proposed, and the calculation procedure for its equilibrium state is presented. Using this strategy, the power shape does not change as time passes, and the excess reactivity and reactivity coefficient are constant during burn-up. No control mechanism for the burn-up reactivity is required, and power control is very easy. The reactor lifetime can be prolonged by elongating the core height. This burn-up strategy can be applied to several kinds of reactors whose maximum neutron multiplication factor changes from less than unity to more than unity, and then to less than unity. In the present paper it is applied to some fast reactors, thus requiring some fissile material such as plutonium for the nuclear ignition region of the core, but only natural uranium is required for the other region of the initial reactor and for succeeding reactors. The drift speed of the burning region for this reactor is about 4 cm/year, which is a preferable value for designing a long-life reactor. The average burn-up of the spent fuel is about 40%; that is, equivalent to 40% utilisation of the natural uranium without the reprocessing and enrichment. (author)

  8. Activity ratio measurement and burnup analysis for high burnup PWR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applying burnup credit to spent fuel transportation and storage system is beneficial. To take burnup credit to criticality safety design for a spent fuel transportation cask and storage rack, the burnup of target fuel assembly based on core management data must be confirmed by experimental methods. Activity ratio method, in which measured the ratio of the activity of a nuclide to that of another, is one of the ways to confirm burnup history. However, there is no public data of gamma-ray spectrum from high burnup fuels and validation of depletion calculation codes is not sufficient in the evaluation of the burnup or nuclide inventories. In this study, applicability evaluation of activity ratio method was carried out for high burnup fuel samples taken from PWR lead use assembly. In the gamma-ray measurement experiments, energy spectrum was taken in the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), and 134Cs/137Cs and 154Eu/137Cs activity ratio were obtained. With the MVP-BURN code, the activity ratios were calculated by depletion calculation tracing the operation history. As a result, 134Cs/137Cs and 154Eu/137Cs activity ratios for UO2 fuel samples show good agreements and the activity ratio method has good applicability to high burnup fuels. 154Eu/134Cs activity ratio for Gd2O3+UO2 fuels also shows good agreements between calculation results and experimental results as well as the activity ratio for UO2 fuels. It also becomes clear that it is necessary to pay attention to not only burnup but also axial burnup distribution history when confirming the burnup of UO2+Gd2O3 fuel with 134Cs/137Cs activity ratios. (author)

  9. Investigation of burnup credit allowance in the criticality safety evaluation of spent fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation discusses work in progress on criticality analysis verification for designs which take account of the burnup and age of transported fuel. The work includes verification of cross section data, correlation with experiments, proper extension of the methods into regimes not covered by experiments, establishing adequate reactivity margins, and complete documentation of the project. Recommendations for safe operational procedures are included, as well as a discussion of the economic and safety benefits of such designs

  10. Extended calculations of OECD/NEA phase II-C burnup credit criticality benchmark problem for PWR spent fuel transport cask by using MCNP-4B2 code and JENDL-3.2 library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactivity effect of the asymmetry of axial burnup profile in burnup credit criticality safety is studied for a realistic PWR spent fuel transport cask proposed in the current OECD/NEA Phase II-C benchmark problem. The axial burnup profiles are simulated in 21 material zones based on in-core flux measurements varying from strong asymmetry to more or less no asymmetry. Criticality calculations in a 3-D model have been performed using the continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B2 and the nuclear data library JENDL-3.2. Calculation conditions are determined with consideration of the axial fission source convergence. Calculations are carried out not only for cases proposed in the benchmark but also for additional cases assuming symmetric burnup profile. The actinide-only approach supposed for first domestic introduction of burnup credit into criticality evaluation is also considered in addition to the actinide plus fission product approach adopted in the benchmark. The calculated results show that keff and the end effect increase almost linearly with increasing burnup axial offset that is defined as one of typical parameters showing the intensity of axial burnup asymmetry. The end effect is more sensitive to the asymmetry of burnup profile for the higher burnup. For an axially distributed burnup, the axial fission source distribution becomes strongly asymmetric as its peak shifts toward the top end of the fuel's active zone where the local burnup is less than that of the bottom end. The peak of fission source distribution becomes higher with the increase of either the asymmetry of burnup profile or the assembly-averaged burnup. The conservatism of the assumption of uniform axial burnup based on the actinide-only approach is estimated quantitatively in comparison with the keff result calculated with experiment-based strongest asymmetric axial burnup profile with the actinide plus fission product approach. (author)

  11. Evolution of the ELESTRES code for application to extended burnups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer code ELESTRES is frequently used at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited to assess the integrity of CANDU fuel under normal operating conditions. The code also provides initial conditions for evaluating fuel behaviour during high-temperature transients. This paper describes recent improvements in the code in the areas of pellet expansion and of fission gas release. Both of these are very important considerations in ensuring fuel integrity at extended burnups. Firstly, in calculations of pellet expansion, the code now accounts for the effect of thermal stresses on the volume of gas bubbles at the boundaries of UO2 grains. This has a major influence on the expansion of the pellet during power-ramps. Secondly, comparisons with data showed that the previous fission gas package significantly underpredicted the fission gas release at high burnups. This package has now been improved via modifications to the following modules: distance between neighbouring bubbles on grain boundaries; diffusivity; and thermal conductivity. The predictions of the revised version of the code show reasonable agreement with measurements of ridge strains and of fission gas release. An illustrative example demonstrates that the code can be used to identify a fuel design that would: reduce the sheath stresses at circumferential ridges by a factor of 2-10; and keep the gas pressure at very high burnups to below the coolant pressure

  12. Bias estimates used in lieu of validation of fission products and minor actinides in MCNP Keff calculations for PWR burnup credit casks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Don E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Marshall, William J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wagner, John C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bowen, Douglas G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation recently issued Interim Staff Guidance (ISG) 8, Revision 3. This ISG provides guidance for burnup credit (BUC) analyses supporting transport and storage of PWR pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel in casks. Revision 3 includes guidance for addressing validation of criticality (keff) calculations crediting the presence of a limited set of fission products and minor actinides (FP&MA). Based on previous work documented in NUREG/CR-7109, recommendation 4 of ISG-8, Rev. 3, includes a recommendation to use 1.5 or 3% of the FP&MA worth to conservatively cover the bias due to the specified FP&MAs. This bias is supplementary to the bias and bias uncertainty resulting from validation of keff calculations for the major actinides in SNF and does not address extension to actinides and fission products beyond those identified herein. The work described in this report involves comparison of FP&MA worths calculated using SCALE and MCNP with ENDF/B-V, -VI, and -VII based nuclear data and supports use of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias when either SCALE or MCNP codes are used for criticality calculations, provided the other conditions of the recommendation 4 are met. The method used in this report may also be applied to demonstrate the applicability of the 1.5% FP&MA worth bias to other codes using ENDF/B V, VI or VII based nuclear data. The method involves use of the applicant s computational method to generate FP&MA worths for a reference SNF cask model using specified spent fuel compositions. The applicant s FP&MA worths are then compared to reference values provided in this report. The applicants FP&MA worths should not exceed the reference results by more than 1.5% of the reference FP&MA worths.

  13. Mechanical Fatigue Testing of High Burnup Fuel for Transportation Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes testing designed to determine the ability of high burnup (HBU) (>45 GWd/MTU) spent fuel to maintain its integrity under normal conditions of transportation. An innovative system, Cyclic Integrated Reversible-bending Fatigue Tester (CIRFT), has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to test and evaluate the mechanical behavior of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) under conditions relevant to storage and transportation. The CIRFT system is composed of a U-frame equipped with load cells for imposing the pure bending loads on the SNF rod test specimen and measuring the in-situ curvature of the fuel rod during bending using a set up with three linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs).

  14. Applicability of the cross section adjustment method based on random sampling technique for burnup calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applicability of the cross section adjustment method based on random sampling (RS) technique to burnup calculations is investigated. The cross section adjustment method is a technique for reduction of prediction uncertainties in reactor core analysis and has been widely applied to fast reactors. As a practical method, the cross section adjustment method based on RS technique is newly developed for application to light water reactors (LWRs). In this method, covariance among cross sections and neutronics parameters are statistically estimated by the RS technique and cross sections are adjusted without calculation of sensitivity coefficients of neutronics parameters, which are necessary in the conventional cross section adjustment method. Since sensitivity coefficients are not used, the RS-based method is expected to be practically applied to LWR core analysis, in which considerable computational costs are required for estimation of sensitivity coefficients. Through a simple pin-cell burnup calculation, applicability of the present method to burnup calculations is investigated. The calculation results indicate that the present method can adequately adjust cross sections including burnup characteristics. (author)

  15. Physical mechanism analysis of burnup actinide composition in light water reactor MOX fuel and its application to uncertainty evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We discuss physical mechanisms for burnup actinide compositions in LWR’s MOX fuel. • Mechanisms of 244Cm and 238Pu productions are analyzed in detail with sensitivity. • We can evaluate the indirect effect on actinide productions by nuclear reactions. • Burnup sensitivity is applied to uncertainty evaluation of nuclide production. • Actinides can be categorized into patterns according to a burnup sensitivity trend. - Abstract: In designing radioactive waste management and decommissioning facilities, understanding the physical mechanisms for burnup actinide composition is indispensable to satisfy requirements for its validity and reliability. Therefore, the uncertainty associated with physical quantities, such as nuclear data, needs to be quantitatively analyzed. The present paper illustrates an analysis methodology to investigate the physical mechanisms of burnup actinide composition with nuclear-data sensitivity based on the generalized depletion perturbation theory. The target in this paper is the MOX fuel of the light water reactor. We start with the discussion of the basic physical mechanisms for burnup actinide compositions using the reaction-rate flow chart on the burnup chain. After that, the physical mechanisms of the productions of Cm-244 and Pu-238 are analyzed in detail with burnup sensitivity calculation. Conclusively, we can identify the source of actinide productions and evaluate the indirect influence of the nuclear reactions if the physical mechanisms of burnup actinide composition are analyzed using the reaction-rate flow chart on the burnup chain and burnup sensitivity calculation. Finally, we demonstrate the usefulness of the burnup sensitivity coefficients in an application to determine the priority of accuracy improvement in nuclear data in combination with the covariance of the nuclear data. In addition, the target actinides and reactions are categorized into patterns according to a sensitivity trend

  16. Application of Genetic Algorithm methodologies in fuel bundle burnup optimization of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayalal, M.L., E-mail: jayalal@igcar.gov.in [Electronics, Instrumentation and Radiological Safety Group (EIRSG), Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Ramachandran, Suja [Electronics, Instrumentation and Radiological Safety Group (EIRSG), Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Rathakrishnan, S. [Reactor Physics Section, Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS), Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Satya Murty, S.A.V. [Electronics, Instrumentation and Radiological Safety Group (EIRSG), Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India); Sai Baba, M. [Resources Management Group (RMG), Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • We study and compare Genetic Algorithms (GA) in the fuel bundle burnup optimization of an Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) of 220 MWe. • Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are considered. • For the selected problem, Multi Objective GA performs better than Penalty Functions based GA. • In the present study, Multi Objective GA outperforms Penalty Functions based GA in convergence speed and better diversity in solutions. - Abstract: The work carried out as a part of application and comparison of GA techniques in nuclear reactor environment is presented in the study. The nuclear fuel management optimization problem selected for the study aims at arriving appropriate reference discharge burnup values for the two burnup zones of 220 MWe Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) core. Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are applied in this study. The study reveals, for the selected problem of PHWR fuel bundle burnup optimization, Multi Objective GA is more suitable than Penalty Functions based GA in the two aspects considered: by way of producing diverse feasible solutions and the convergence speed being better, i.e. it is capable of generating more number of feasible solutions, from earlier generations. It is observed that for the selected problem, the Multi Objective GA is 25.0% faster than Penalty Functions based GA with respect to CPU time, for generating 80% of the population with feasible solutions. When average computational time of fixed generations are considered, Penalty Functions based GA is 44.5% faster than Multi Objective GA. In the overall performance, the convergence speed of Multi Objective GA surpasses the computational time advantage of Penalty Functions based GA. The ability of Multi Objective GA in producing more diverse feasible solutions is a desired feature of the problem selected, that helps the

  17. Application of Genetic Algorithm methodologies in fuel bundle burnup optimization of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We study and compare Genetic Algorithms (GA) in the fuel bundle burnup optimization of an Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) of 220 MWe. • Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are considered. • For the selected problem, Multi Objective GA performs better than Penalty Functions based GA. • In the present study, Multi Objective GA outperforms Penalty Functions based GA in convergence speed and better diversity in solutions. - Abstract: The work carried out as a part of application and comparison of GA techniques in nuclear reactor environment is presented in the study. The nuclear fuel management optimization problem selected for the study aims at arriving appropriate reference discharge burnup values for the two burnup zones of 220 MWe Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) core. Two Genetic Algorithm methodologies namely, Penalty Functions based GA and Multi Objective GA are applied in this study. The study reveals, for the selected problem of PHWR fuel bundle burnup optimization, Multi Objective GA is more suitable than Penalty Functions based GA in the two aspects considered: by way of producing diverse feasible solutions and the convergence speed being better, i.e. it is capable of generating more number of feasible solutions, from earlier generations. It is observed that for the selected problem, the Multi Objective GA is 25.0% faster than Penalty Functions based GA with respect to CPU time, for generating 80% of the population with feasible solutions. When average computational time of fixed generations are considered, Penalty Functions based GA is 44.5% faster than Multi Objective GA. In the overall performance, the convergence speed of Multi Objective GA surpasses the computational time advantage of Penalty Functions based GA. The ability of Multi Objective GA in producing more diverse feasible solutions is a desired feature of the problem selected, that helps the

  18. Increment of capacity of casks for PWR spent fuel transport. (1) Analysis taking into account pin-wised distribution of nuclides for introduction of burn-up credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subcriticality of a fuel assembly immersed in light water is studied to take burn-up credit for spent fuel transport. For the purpose, pin-wised nuclide density distribution in a typical PWR spent fuel assembly is evaluated with a code used for designing of fuel loading patterns in commercial PWRs. Taking the heterogeneous distribution into account, multiplication and radiation of neutrons inside / outside the assembly is analyzed with MCNP-5 and SOURCES-4C. As the results, neutron leakage ratio to water surrounding the assembly is found to vary little with burn-up of the assembly so that total neutron yield can be estimated by measuring neutron absorption in the water. Provided 252Cf of known intensity is inserted to the assembly, the subcritical multiplication factor ksub is evaluated by the number of neutron absorption. If not 252Cf but Sb-Be is only available, it is recommended to measure spatial decay constant in middle height of the assembly with it by the exponential method. The axial buckling which is the square of the constant is found to be a good indicator for burn-up of the assembly. (author)

  19. Development of a Mobile CZT Detector System for Burnup Measurement of Spent Fuel Assembly and On-Site Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of mobile CdZnTe (CZT) detector for nuclear safeguard applications of spent fuel burnup inspection in assembly storage pond are compactness, low cost and ease of operations. In this work, a mobile detection system shield with tungsten alloy was designed and then performed on-site. Net count rate of the 662 keV line of 137Cs was produced linearly with burnup as experimental data simulations shows, in which the deviation from linearity is smaller than 9%. As a result, the feasibility of the method using CZT detector to monitor spent nuclear fuel assembly burnup in a fuel pond was validated. The results calculated with Monte Carlo procedure Geant4 can provide a theoretical guide for the further burnup measurement. (author)

  20. 12 CFR 327.35 - Application of credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application of credits. 327.35 Section 327.35... ASSESSMENTS Implementation of One-Time Assessment Credit § 327.35 Application of credits. (a) Subject to the...-time credit shall be applied to the maximum extent allowable by law against that...

  1. The calculational VVER burnup Credit Benchmark No.3 results with the ENDF/B-VI rev.5 (1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Gual, Maritza [Centro de Tecnologia Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba). E-mail: mrgual@ctn.isctn.edu.cu

    2000-07-01

    The purpose of this papers to present the results of CB3 phase of the VVER calculational benchmark with the recent evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VI Rev.5 (1999). This results are compared with the obtained from the other participants in the calculations (Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary, Slovaquia, Spain and the United Kingdom). The phase (CB3) of the VVER calculation benchmark is similar to the Phase II-A of the OECD/NEA/INSC BUC Working Group benchmark for PWR. The cases without burnup profile (BP) were performed with the WIMS/D-4 code. The rest of the cases have been carried with DOTIII discrete ordinates code. The neutron library used was the ENDF/B-VI rev. 5 (1999). The WIMS/D-4 (69 groups) is used to collapse cross sections from the ENDF/B-VI Rev. 5 (1999) to 36 groups working library for 2-D calculations. This work also comprises the results of CB1 (obtained with ENDF/B-VI rev. 5 (1999), too) and CB3 for cases with Burnup of 30 MWd/TU and cooling time of 1 and 5 years and for case with Burnup of 40 MWd/TU and cooling time of 1 year. (author)

  2. Study on the application of CANDLE burnup strategy to several nuclear reactors. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H13-002 (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDLE burnup strategy is a new reactor burnup concept, where the distributions of fuel nuclide densities, neutron flux, and power density move with the same constant speed from bottom to top (or from top to bottom) of the core and without any change in their shapes. Therefore, any burnup control mechanisms are not required, and reactor characteristics do not change along burnup. The reactor is simple and safe. When this burnup scheme is applied to some neutron rich fast reactors, either natural or depleted uranium can be utilized as fresh fuel after second core and the burnup of discharged fuel is about 40%. It means that the nuclear energy can be utilized for many hundreds years without new mining, enrichment and reprocessing, and the amount of spent fuel can be reduced considerably. However, in order to perform such a high fuel burnup some innovative technologies should be developed. Though development of innovative fuel will take a lot of time, intermediate re-cladding may be easy to be employed. Compared to fast reactors, application of CANDLE burnup to prismatic fuel high-temperature gas cooled reactors is very easy. In this report the application of CANDLE burnup to both these types of reactors are studied. (author)

  3. Calculation of isotope composition of WWER- 440 spent fuel assembly by the NESSEL-NUKO code system on the basis of the ISTS burn-up credit project data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiming at validation of depletion codes against WWER-440 spent fuel data some calculations of isotope composition of WWER-440 spent fuel assembly have been carried out by the NESSEL-NUKO code system. The initial data and data for the comparisons were taken from the ISTS burn up credit project data, recently published in the ISTC report 'Radiochemical Assays of Irradiated WWER-440 Fuel for Use in Spent Fuel Burnup Credit Activities. The specific work scope included the destructive assay (DA) of spent fuel assembly rod segments with an - -38.5 MWd/KgU burn up from a single WWER-440 fuel assembly from the Novovorenezh reactor in Russia (Authors)

  4. A Study on the Radiation Source Effect to the Radiation Shielding Analysis for a Spent-Fuel Cask Design with Burnup-Credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation shielding analysis for a Burnup-credit (BUC) cask designed under the management of Korea Radioactive Waste Management Corporation (KRMC) was performed to examine the contribution of each radiation source affecting dose rate distribution around the cask. Various radiation sources, which contain neutron and gamma-ray sources placed in active fuel region and the activation source, and imaginary nuclear fuel were all considered in the MCNP calculation model to realistically simulate the actual situations. It was found that the maximum external and surface dose rates of the spent fuel cask were satisfied with the domestic standards both in normal and accident conditions. In normal condition, the radiation dose rate distribution around the cask was mainly influenced by activation source (60 Co radioisotope); in another case, the neutron emitted in active fuel region contributed about 90% to external dose rate at 1m distance from side surface of the cask. Besides, the contribution level of activation source was dramatically increased to the dose rates in top and bottom regions of the cask. From this study, it was recognized that the detailed investigation on the radiation sources should be performed conservatively and accurately in the process of radiation shielding analysis for a BUC cask.

  5. Nonconventional fuel tax credit application deadline approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has established Dec. 31, 1992, as the deadline for producers to file Natural Gas Policy Act applications for gas produced from nonconventional fuel sources. Qualifying wells may receive tax credits ranging from 52 cents/MMBTU to 92 cents/MMBTU depending on the category and year of production. The most commonly eligible wells include tight formations, coalbed methanes, and gas from Devonian shales. FERC Order 539 allows producers to make application with the state jurisdictional agencies through Dec. 31, 1992. Many state jurisdictional agencies are willing to accept partial applications to be completed shortly thereafter

  6. Applicability of the MCNP-ACAB system to inventory prediction in high-burnup fuels: sensitivity/uncertainty estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Herranz, N.; Cabellos, O. [Madrid Polytechnic Univ., Dept. of Nuclear Engineering (Spain); Cabellos, O.; Sanz, J. [Madrid Polytechnic Univ., 2 Instituto de Fusion Nuclear (Spain); Sanz, J. [Univ. Nacional Educacion a Distancia, Dept. of Power Engineering, Madrid (Spain)

    2005-07-01

    We present a new code system which combines the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C and the inventory code ACAB as a suitable tool for high burnup calculations. Our main goal is to show that the system, by means of ACAB capabilities, enables us to assess the impact of neutron cross section uncertainties on the inventory and other inventory-related responses in high burnup applications. The potential impact of nuclear data uncertainties on some response parameters may be large, but only very few codes exist which can treat this effect. In fact, some of the most reported effective code systems in dealing with high burnup problems, such as CASMO-4, MCODE and MONTEBURNS, lack this capability. As first step, the potential of our system, ruling out the uncertainty capability, has been compared with that of those code systems, using a well referenced high burnup pin-cell benchmark exercise. It is proved that the inclusion of ACAB in the system allows to obtain results at least as reliable as those obtained using other inventory codes, such as ORIGEN2. Later on, the uncertainty analysis methodology implemented in ACAB, including both the sensitivity-uncertainty method and the uncertainty analysis by the Monte Carlo technique, is applied to this benchmark problem. We estimate the errors due to activation cross section uncertainties in the prediction of the isotopic content up to the high-burnup spent fuel regime. The most relevant uncertainties are remarked, and some of the most contributing cross sections to those uncertainties are identified. For instance, the most critical reaction for Am{sup 242m} is Am{sup 241}(n,{gamma}-m). At 100 MWd/kg, the cross-section uncertainty of this reaction induces an error of 6.63% on the Am{sup 242m} concentration.The uncertainties in the inventory of fission products reach up to 30%.

  7. Applicability of the MCNP-ACAB system to inventory prediction in high-burnup fuels: sensitivity/uncertainty estimates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new code system which combines the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP-4C and the inventory code ACAB as a suitable tool for high burnup calculations. Our main goal is to show that the system, by means of ACAB capabilities, enables us to assess the impact of neutron cross section uncertainties on the inventory and other inventory-related responses in high burnup applications. The potential impact of nuclear data uncertainties on some response parameters may be large, but only very few codes exist which can treat this effect. In fact, some of the most reported effective code systems in dealing with high burnup problems, such as CASMO-4, MCODE and MONTEBURNS, lack this capability. As first step, the potential of our system, ruling out the uncertainty capability, has been compared with that of those code systems, using a well referenced high burnup pin-cell benchmark exercise. It is proved that the inclusion of ACAB in the system allows to obtain results at least as reliable as those obtained using other inventory codes, such as ORIGEN2. Later on, the uncertainty analysis methodology implemented in ACAB, including both the sensitivity-uncertainty method and the uncertainty analysis by the Monte Carlo technique, is applied to this benchmark problem. We estimate the errors due to activation cross section uncertainties in the prediction of the isotopic content up to the high-burnup spent fuel regime. The most relevant uncertainties are remarked, and some of the most contributing cross sections to those uncertainties are identified. For instance, the most critical reaction for Am242m is Am241(n,γ-m). At 100 MWd/kg, the cross-section uncertainty of this reaction induces an error of 6.63% on the Am242m concentration.The uncertainties in the inventory of fission products reach up to 30%

  8. Reactivity effects of nonuniform axial burnup distributions on spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When conducting future criticality safety analyses on spent fuel shipping casks, burnup credit may play a significant role in determining the number of fuel assemblies that can be safely loaded into each cask. An important area in burnup credit analysis is the burnup variation along the length of the fuel assembly, which is determined by the location of the assembly in the reactor core and its residence time. A study of the effects of axial burnup distributions on reactivity has been conducted, using data from existing power plant fuel. Utilizing a one-dimensional, two-group diffusion code, named REALAX, the reactivity effects of axial burnup profiles have been calculated for various PWR fuel assemblies. The reactivity effects calculated by the code are defined in terms of k for the axially dependent burnup distribution minus k for a uniform axial burnup distribution at the assembly average burnup divided by k for a uniform axial burnup distribution at the assembly average burnup. Criticality safety specialists can take advantage of the quick-running code to determine axial effects of different assembly burnup profiles. In general, the positive reactivity effects of axial burnup distributions increase as burnup increases, though they do not increase faster than the overall decrease in reactivity due to burnup

  9. Reactivity effects of nonuniform axial burnup distributions on spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, R.W. II; Parish, T.A. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-12-01

    When conducting future criticality safety analyses on spent fuel shipping casks, burnup credit may play a significant role in determining the number of fuel assemblies that can be safely loaded into each cask. An important area in burnup credit analysis is the burnup variation along the length of the fuel assembly, which is determined by the location of the assembly in the reactor core and its residence time. A study of the effects of axial burnup distributions on reactivity has been conducted, using data from existing power plant fuel. Utilizing a one-dimensional, two-group diffusion code, named REALAX, the reactivity effects of axial burnup profiles have been calculated for various PWR fuel assemblies. The reactivity effects calculated by the code are defined in terms of k for the axially dependent burnup distribution minus k for a uniform axial burnup distribution at the assembly average burnup divided by k for a uniform axial burnup distribution at the assembly average burnup. Criticality safety specialists can take advantage of the quick-running code to determine axial effects of different assembly burnup profiles. In general, the positive reactivity effects of axial burnup distributions increase as burnup increases, though they do not increase faster than the overall decrease in reactivity due to burnup.

  10. 10 CFR 455.103 - Requirements for applications for credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for applications for credit. 455.103 Section 455.103 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND BUILDINGS OWNED BY UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS Cost Sharing § 455.103 Requirements for applications for credit. (a) If...

  11. Size Design of CdZnTe Detector Shield for Measuring Burnup of Spent Fuel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>It is important to measure the burnup of spent fuel for nuclear safeguards, burnup credit and critical safety in spent-fuel reprocessing process. The purpose of this work is designing a portable device to

  12. Calculation Study of TNPS Spent Fuel Pool Using Burnup Credit%田湾核电站乏燃料水池采用燃耗信任制的计算研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏兆东; 周小平; 李晓波; 吕牛; 郑继业

    2013-01-01

    Exampled by the spent fuel pool of TNPS which is consist of 2 × 5 fuel storage racks ,the spent fuel high-density storage based on burnup credit (BUC) and related criticality safety issues were studied .The MONK9A code was used to analyze kef of dif-ferent enrichment fuels at different burnups .A reference loading curve was proposed in accordance with the system kef ’s changing with the burnup of different initially enriched nuclear fuels .The capacity of the spent fuel pool increases by 31% compared with the one that does not consider BUC .%以田湾核电站(TNPS)2×5排列的贮存格架构成的乏燃料水池为例,研究采用燃耗信任制技术的密集贮存和临界安全问题。采用M ONK9A程序计算分析不同富集度、不同燃耗的乏燃料装载情况下系统的 ke f 。根据系统 ke f随不同初始富集度燃料的燃耗变化情况给出了水池的参考装载曲线。采用燃耗信任制技术的密集贮存方案能提高贮存能力31%。

  13. FRAPCON-3: Modifications to fuel rod material properties and performance models for high-burnup application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanning, D.D.; Beyer, C.E.; Painter, C.L.

    1997-12-01

    This volume describes the fuel rod material and performance models that were updated for the FRAPCON-3 steady-state fuel rod performance code. The property and performance models were changed to account for behavior at extended burnup levels up to 65 Gwd/MTU. The property and performance models updated were the fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, solid-solid contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion and hydriding, cladding mechanical properties, and cladding axial growth. Each updated property and model was compared to well characterized data up to high burnup levels. The installation of these properties and models in the FRAPCON-3 code along with input instructions are provided in Volume 2 of this report and Volume 3 provides a code assessment based on comparison to integral performance data. The updated FRAPCON-3 code is intended to replace the earlier codes FRAPCON-2 and GAPCON-THERMAL-2. 94 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs.

  14. FRAPCON-3: Modifications to fuel rod material properties and performance models for high-burnup application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume describes the fuel rod material and performance models that were updated for the FRAPCON-3 steady-state fuel rod performance code. The property and performance models were changed to account for behavior at extended burnup levels up to 65 Gwd/MTU. The property and performance models updated were the fission gas release, fuel thermal conductivity, fuel swelling, fuel relocation, radial power distribution, solid-solid contact gap conductance, cladding corrosion and hydriding, cladding mechanical properties, and cladding axial growth. Each updated property and model was compared to well characterized data up to high burnup levels. The installation of these properties and models in the FRAPCON-3 code along with input instructions are provided in Volume 2 of this report and Volume 3 provides a code assessment based on comparison to integral performance data. The updated FRAPCON-3 code is intended to replace the earlier codes FRAPCON-2 and GAPCON-THERMAL-2. 94 refs., 61 figs., 9 tabs

  15. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arthur Motta; Yong Hwan Jeong; R.J. Comstock; G.S. Was; Y.S. Kim

    2006-10-31

    The objective of this collaboration between four institutions in the US and Korea is to demonstrate a technical basis for the improvement of the corrosion resistance of zirconium-based alloys in more extreme operating environments (such as those present in severe fuel duty,cycles (high burnup, boiling, aggressive chemistry) andto investigate the feasibility (from the point of view of corrosion rate) of using advanced zirconium-based alloys in a supercritical water environment.

  16. Monte Carlo burnup analysis code development and application to an incore thermionic space nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the design of the incore thermionic reactor system developed under the Advanced Thermionic Initiative (ATI), the fuel is highly enriched uranium dioxide and the moderating medium is zirconium hydride. The traditional burnup and fuel depletion analysis codes have been found to be inadequate for these calculations, largely because of the material and geometry modeled and because the neutron spectra assumed for the codes such as LEOPARD and ORIGEN do not even closely fit that for a small, thermal reactor using ZrH as moderator. More sophisticated codes such as the transport lattice type code WIMS often lack some materials, such as ZrH. Thus a new method which could accurately calculate the neutron spectrum and the appropriate reaction rates within the fuel element is needed. The method developed utilizes and interconnects the accuracy of the Monte Carlo Neutron/Photon (MCNP) method to calculate reaction rates for the important isotopes, and a time dependent depletion routine to calculate the temporal effects on isotope concentrations. This effort required the modification of MCNP itself to perform the additional task of accomplishing burnup calculations. The modified version called, MCNPBURN, evolved to be a general dual purpose code which can be used for standard calculations as well as for burn-up

  17. A technique of melting temperature measurement and its application for irradiated high-burnup MOX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A melting temperature measurement technique for irradiated oxide fuels is described. In this technique, the melting temperature was determined from a thermal arrest on a heating curve of the specimen which was enclosed in a tungsten capsule to maintain constant chemical composition of the specimen during measurement. The measurement apparatus was installed in an alpha-tight steel box within a gamma-shielding cell and operated by remote handling. The temperature of the specimen was measured with a two-color pyrometer sighted on a black-body well at the bottom of the tungsten capsule. The diameter of the black-body well was optimized so that the uncertainties of measurement were reduced. To calibrate the measured temperature, two reference melting temperature materials, tantalum and molybdenum, were encapsulated and run before and after every oxide fuel test. The melting temperature data on fast reactor mixed oxide fuels irradiated up to 124 GWd/t were obtained. In addition, simulated high-burnup mixed oxide fuel up to 250 GWd/t by adding non-radioactive soluble fission products was examined. These data shows that the melting temperature decrease with increasing burnup and saturated at high burnup region. (author)

  18. Fast reactor 3D core and burnup analysis using VESTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luciano, N.; Shamblin, J.; Maldonado, I. [Nuclear Engineering Dept., Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Burnup analyses using the VESTA code have been performed on a MOX-fuelled fast reactor model as specified by an IAEA computational benchmark. VESTA is a relatively new code that has been used for burnup credit calculations and thermal reactor models, but not typically for fast reactor applications. The detailed input and results of the IAEA benchmark provides an opportunity to gauge the use of VESTA in a fast reactor application. VESTA employs an ultra-fine multi-group binning approach that accelerates Monte Carlo burnup calculations. Using VESTA to compute the end of cycle (EOC) power fractions by enrichment zone showed agreement with the published values within 5%. When comparing the ultra-fine multi-group binning approach to the tally-based approach, EOC isotopic masses also agree within 5%. Using the ultra-fine multi-group binning approach, we obtain a wall-time speedup factor of 35 when compared to the tally-based approach for computing a k{sub eff} eigenvalue with burnup problem. The authors conclude the use of VESTA's ultra-fine multi-group binning approach with Monte Carlo transport performs accurate depletion calculations for this fast reactor benchmark. (authors)

  19. Economics of VVER Fuel Cycles Leading to High Discharge Burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Economic characteristics of equilibrium VVER fuel cycles leading to high discharge burnup are investigated by supposing two scenarios named optimistic and pessimistic. The optimistic and pessimistic terms are used in the sense whether the high burnup fuel cycles are economically advantageous or the increasing enrichment cost can increase the specific fuel cycle cost above a certain discharge burnup value. Therefore in case of the optimistic scenario, maximum fabrication and back end costs and minimum enrichment and raw uranium costs were applied, while in case of the pessimistic scenario vice-versa. The applied costs are detailed in Table 1. Table1 Cost data of the two different scenarios. Concerning the transport and storage during the front end fuel cycle, it was assumed that application of burnable poison solves the criticality problems caused by the increased enrichment. By using the advantage of the burnup credit, the subcriticality of the spent fuel storage and transport devices can also be proved. Large reserve in the biological shielding is supposed. According to the above argumentation, fixed cost of the front and back end fuel cycle was used in the calculations, except the enrichment, but a 700 $/pin extra fabrication cost of the burnable poison was taken into account. Instead of fixed batch fraction, fixed cycle length was assumed which is advantageous for maximizing the discharge burnup and for minimizing the burnable poison extra cost but disadvantageous concerning the availability factor, which is constant in the given calculations. Beside the economic characteristics, the feasibility of the cycles are investigated from the point of view of the most important safety related parameters like reactivity coefficients and shut down margin. The figure below shows the burnup dependent fuel cycle cost for the above two scenarios. (author)

  20. Application of Artificial Intelligence (Artificial Neural Network) to Assess Credit Risk : A Predictive Model For Credit Card Scoring

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Md. Samsul; Zhou, Lin; LI Fei

    2009-01-01

    Credit Decisions are extremely vital for any type of financial institution because it can stimulate huge financial losses generated from defaulters. A number of banks use judgmental decisions, means credit analysts go through every application separately and other banks use credit scoring system or combination of both. Credit scoring system uses many types of statistical models. But recently, professionals started looking for alternative algorithms that can provide better accuracy regarding c...

  1. Source convergence problems in the application of burnup credit for WWER-440 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems in Monte Carlo criticality calculations caused by the slow convergence of the fission source are examined on an example. A spent fuel storage cask designed for WWER-440 fuel used a sample case. The influence of the main parameters of the calculations is investigated including the initial fission source. A possible strategy is proposed to overcome the difficulties associated by the slow source convergence. The advantage of the proposed strategy that it can be implemented using the standard MCNP features. (author)

  2. Revised SWAT. The integrated burnup calculation code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SWAT is an integrated burnup code system developed for analysis of post irradiation examination, transmutation of radioactive waste, and burnup credit problem. This report shows an outline and a user's manual of revised SWAT. This revised SWAT includes expansion of functions, increasing supported machines, and correction of several bugs reported from users of previous SWAT. (author)

  3. Revised SWAT. The integrated burnup calculation code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Kenya; Mochizuki, Hiroki [Department of Fuel Cycle Safety Research, Nuclear Safety Research Center, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Kiyosumi, Takehide [The Japan Research Institute, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    SWAT is an integrated burnup code system developed for analysis of post irradiation examination, transmutation of radioactive waste, and burnup credit problem. This report shows an outline and a user's manual of revised SWAT. This revised SWAT includes expansion of functions, increasing supported machines, and correction of several bugs reported from users of previous SWAT. (author)

  4. Application of penalized splines method in the credit market

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Zhilin

    2008-01-01

    "Mortgage-related hit worse than expected" has been a frequently cited phrase in recent months, and is usually followed by a list of victims consisting of banks and hedge funds. Although the current mortgage mess was caused by the subprime mortgage or bad credit mortgage, the broad impact of this subprime crisis promotes more concern in the loan lenders, the borrowers and mortgage-related products like mortgage backed securities. Since credit market is one of the successful application areas ...

  5. Benchmark calculation with MOSRA-SRAC for burnup of a BWR fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has developed the Modular Reactor Analysis Code System MOSRA to improve the applicability of neutronic characteristics modeling. The cell calculation module MOSRA-SRAC is based on the collision probability method and is one of the core modules of the MOSRA system. To test the module on a real-world problem, it was combined with the benchmark program 'Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark Phase IIIC.' In this program participants are requested to submit the neutronic characteristics of burnup calculations for a BWR fuel assembly containing fuel rods poisoned with gadolinium (Gd2O3), which is similar to the fuel assembly at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. Because of certain restrictions of the MOSRA-SRAC burnup calculations part of the geometry model was homogenized. In order to verify the validity of MOSRA-SRAC, including the effects of the homogenization, the calculated burnup dependent infinite multiplication factor and the nuclide compositions were compared with those obtained with the burnup calculation code MVP-BURN which had already been validated for many benchmark problems. As a result of the comparisons, the applicability of MOSRA-SRAC module for the BWR assembly has been verified. Furthermore, it can be shown that the effects of the homogenization are smaller than the effects due to the calculation method for both multiplication factor and compositions. (author)

  6. The Fork+ burnup measurement system: Design and first measurement campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous work with the original Fork detector showed that burnup as determined by reactor records could be accurately allocated to spent nuclear fuel assemblies. The original Fork detector, designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, used an ion chamber to measure gross gamma count and a fission chamber to measure neutrons from an activation source, 244Cm. In its review of the draft Topical Report on Burnup Credit, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission indicated it felt uncomfortable with a measurement system that depended on reactor records for calibration. The Fork+ system was developed at Sandia National Laboratories under the sponsorship of the Electric Power Research Institute with the aim of providing this independent measurement capability. The initial Fork+ prototype was used in a measurement campaign at the Maine Yankee reactor. The campaign confirmed the applicability of the sensor approach in the Fork+ system and the efficiency of the hand-portable Fork+ prototype in making fuel assembly measurements. It also indicated potential design modifications that will be necessary before the Fork+ can be used effectively on high-burnup spent fuel

  7. Development of fission source acceleration method for slow convergence in criticality analyses by using matrix eigenvector applicable to spent fuel transport cask with axial burnup profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective fission source acceleration method in criticality safety analysis for a realistic spent fuel transport cask. Various axial burnup profiles from almost symmetry to strong asymmetry based on in-core flux measurements are proposed in the OECD/NEA Phase II-C burnup credit benchmark problem. In some cases, calculations by ordinary Monte Carlo method show very slow convergence of fission source distribution, and unacceptably large skipped cycles are needed to obtain a reliable fission source distribution for statistic criticality estimation. The matrix eigenvector calculation developed and incorporated in the ordinary Monte Carlo calculation to accelerate the slow fission source convergence is applied to the benchmark. The efficiency of acceleration by the matrix eigenvector calculation depends on the precision of fission matrix elements. In a certain stage of source iteration with acceleration repetition of fission source distribution, especially for this benchmark problem of very slow convergence, more acceleration repetitions cause anomalous results because of large statistic fluctuations of the estimation of fission matrix elements for regions with very low source levels. Here, we propose a new source acceleration method to detail with the slow convergence with less calculation time by modeling the division of fissile fuel region. (author)

  8. 12 CFR 226.5a - Credit and charge card applications and solicitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Credit and charge card applications and... required under this section on or with a solicitation or an application to open a credit or charge card... offer by the card issuer to open a credit or charge card account that does not require the consumer...

  9. Methodologies for an improved prediction of the isotopic content in high burnup samples. Application to Vandellós-II reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The isotopic prediction of high burnup samples has been addressed through the use of MONTEBURNS 2.0 and SCALE 6.0. ► It is implemented a power normalization capability in MONTEBURNS 2.0 so the user can specify precise experimental powers. ► MONTEBURNS 2.0 has been modified to handle the complete list of isotopes managed by ORIGEN 2.1. ► An external capability is developed to follow irradiations involving geometrical and positional changes automatically. - Abstract: Fuel cycles are designed with the aim of obtaining the highest amount of energy possible. Since higher burnup values are reached, it is necessary to improve our disposal designs, traditionally based on the conservative assumption that they contain fresh fuel. The criticality calculations involved must consider burnup by making the most of the experimental and computational capabilities developed, respectively, to measure and predict the isotopic content of the spent nuclear fuel. These high burnup scenarios encourage a review of the computational tools to find out possible weaknesses in the nuclear data libraries, in the methodologies applied and their applicability range. Experimental measurements of the spent nuclear fuel provide the perfect framework to benchmark the most well-known and established codes, both in the industry and academic research activity. For the present paper, SCALE 6.0/TRITON and MONTEBURNS 2.0 have been chosen to follow the isotopic content of four samples irradiated in the Spanish Vandellós-II pressurized water reactor up to burnup values ranging from 40 GWd/MTU to 75 GWd/MTU. By comparison with the experimental data reported for these samples, we can probe the applicability of these codes to deal with high burnup problems. We have developed new computational tools within MONTENBURNS 2.0. They make possible to handle an irradiation history that includes geometrical and positional changes of the samples within the reactor core. This paper describes the

  10. Development of destructive methods of burn-up determination and their application on WWER type nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are described of a cooperation between the Central Institute of Nuclear Research Rossendorf and the Radium Institute 'V.G. Chlopin' Leningrad in the field of destructive burn-up determination. Laboratory methods of burn-up determination using the classical monitors 137Cs, 106Ru, 148Nd and isotopes of heavy metals (U, Pu) as well as the usefulness of 90Sr, stable isotopes of Ru and Mo as monitors are dealt with. The analysis of the fuel components uranium (spectrophotometry, potentiometric titration, mass-spectrometric isotope dilution) and plutonium (spectrophotometry, coulometric titration, mass- and alpha-spectrometric isotope dilution) is fully described. Possibilities of increasing the reproducibility (automatic adjusting of measurement conditions) and the sensibility (ion impuls counting) of mass-spectrometric measurements are proposed and applied to a precise determination of Am and Cm isotopic composition. The methods have been used for burn-up analysis of spent WWER (especially WWER-440) fuel. (author)

  11. Application of two-dimensional burnup computer codes to the operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The needs for three-dimensional computer calculations of the power density distribution in WWER type reactors are outlined. In most cases, however, two-dimensional calculations provide sufficiently exact results and result in a decrease in computer costs. The application, performance and computer codes of two-dimensional calculations are dealt with. (author)

  12. Investigation of several methods to set burnup for criticality safety assessment of spent fuel transport casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several currently available methods to set burnup for depletion calculation are reviewed and discussed about its adequacy for criticality safety assessment of spent fuel (SF) transport casks by taking burnup credit (BC) into accounts. Various errors associated with BC criticality analyses are evaluated and converted to equivalent burnup to compare each other. Methods are proposed to use some reduced burnups equivalent to compensation of these associated errors. Effects of assumption of axial burnup distribution on criticality calculation and irradiation history parameter variation on depletion calculation are evaluated with OECD/NEA BC international benchmark data. (author)

  13. Design of an application for credit scoring and client suggestion

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Fábio; Analide, César

    2010-01-01

    Risk assessment on loan application is vital for many financial institutions. Most financial institutions have already applied methods of credit scoring and risk assessment in order to evaluate their clients in terms. These systems are often based on deterministic or statistical algorithms. In this context, techniques from artificial intelligence and data mining present themselves as valid alternatives to build such classification systems. In this paper some studies are conducted to evaluate ...

  14. Integrated burnup calculation code system SWAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SWAT is an integrated burnup code system developed for analysis of post irradiation examination, transmutation of radioactive waste, and burnup credit problem. It enables us to analyze the burnup problem using neutron spectrum depending on environment of irradiation, combining SRAC which is Japanese standard thermal reactor analysis code system and ORIGEN2 which is burnup code widely used all over the world. SWAT makes effective cross section library based on results by SRAC, and performs the burnup analysis with ORIGEN2 using that library. SRAC and ORIGEN2 can be called as external module. SWAT has original cross section library on based JENDL-3.2 and libraries of fission yield and decay data prepared from JNDC FP Library second version. Using these libraries, user can use latest data in the calculation of SWAT besides the effective cross section prepared by SRAC. Also, User can make original ORIGEN2 library using the output file of SWAT. This report presents concept and user's manual of SWAT. (author)

  15. Effects of high burnup on spent-fuel casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utility fuel managers have become very interested in higher burnup fuels as a means to reduce the impact of refueling outages. High-burnup fuels have significant effects on spent-fuel storage or transportation casks because additional heat rejection and shielding capabilities are required. Some existing transportation casks have useful margins that allow shipment of high-burnup fuel, especially the NLI-1/2 truck cask, which has been relicensed to carry pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel with 56,000 MWd/ton U burnup at 450 days of cooling time. New cask designs should consider the effects of high burnup for future use, even though it is not commercially desirable to include currently unneeded capability. In conclusion, the increased heat and gamma radiation of high-burnup fuels can be accommodated by additional cooling time, but the increased neutron radiation source cannot be accommodated unless the balance of neutron and gamma contributions to the overall dose rate is properly chosen in the initial cask design. Criticality control of high-burnup fuels is possible with heavily poisoned baskets, but burnup credit in licensing is a much more direct means of demonstrating criticality safety

  16. FTR tag burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas tag burnup changes investigated were limited to the three tags (Kr-78/Kr-80, Xe-126/Xe-129 and Kr-82/Kr-80) currently accepted as being the most desirable. Control rod tag burnup was significantly greater than fuel rod tag burnup. This occurs because control rods stay in the reactor longer and occupy positions of greater low-energy flux. Thus, minimum tag spacings were set by the control rods as 1.079 for Kr-78/Kr-80, 1.189 for Xe-126/Xe-129 and 1.134 for Kr-82/Kr-80

  17. The dynamic model of grain boundary processes in high burnup LWR fuel and its application in analysis by the START-3 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is focused on the description and validation of the new dynamic model aimed at the processes taking place on grain boundaries in polycrystalline Light Water Reactor fuel based on the use of UO2, which has been recently developed for the START-3 code. The analysis embraces such processes as formation of fine surface clusters and larger intergranular pores, equi-axial grain growth, direct release and percolation of fission gas to the open surfaces. This model is also closely linked to intragranular behaviour of fission gas and essentially overlaps modelling of High Burnup Structure, as well as high temperature- and power transient-assisted processes. The model embodies some of the state-of-the-art approaches to numerical description of the processes taking place on grain boundaries, incorporating considerations of diffusion theory with respect to analysis of the dynamics of grain boundary pore growth/shrinkage caused by self-diffusion of the fuel material around them. Besides, it widely uses the elements of probability theory thereby accounting for stochastic nature of the analyzed phenomena. The several examples of model validation, illustrating credibility of pertinent results as applied to a wide enough range of application, including high-temperature out-of-pile annealing, High Burnup Structure Effects and transient behaviour of Light Water Reactor fuel, are also presented. As the validation shows, the developed model can be accepted as an important element of overall dynamic modelling with a view to justification of reliability of high burnup Light Water Reactor fuel, and safety analysis, as well

  18. Effects of axial burnup distributions on the reactivity of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criticality safety analyses for spent fuel shipping casks will eventually need to take credit for the decreased reactivity of spent fuel assemblies resulting from burnup. In order to do so, it will be necessary to assess the reactivity effects of the multitude of burnup shapes that can characterize spent fuel. A computer program, CASAX, has been written that allows the analyst to quickly evaluate the reactivity effects of actual and simplified axial burnup distributions on a group of PWR fuel assemblies. CASAX employs one dimensional, two group diffusion calculations to determine the k-effective of a cluster of assemblies. Assembly average, burnup dependent, two group cross sections for CASAX were obtained from CASMO3 using physical properties representative of Westinghouse 17 x 17 assemblies. Reactivity results are presented in terms of (k for the axially dependent burnup distribution minus k for a uniform axial burnup distribution at the assembly average burnup)/(k for a uniform axial burnup distribution at the assembly average burnup). Axial burnup distributions can have both positive and negative effects on the calculated k-effective. Positive reactivity effects generally result at high assembly average burnups and for axial distributions with low burnups in the assembly's tips

  19. CREDIT ANALYSIS USING DATA MINING: APPLICATION IN THE CASE OF A CREDIT UNION

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos de Moraes Sousa; Reginaldo Santana Figueiredo

    2014-01-01

    The search for efficiency in the cooperative credit sector has led cooperatives to adopt new technology and managerial knowhow. Among the tools that facilitate efficiency, data mining has stood out in recent years as a sophisticated methodology to search for knowledge that is “hidden” in organizations' databases. The process of granting credit is one of the central functions of a credit union; therefore, the use of instruments that support that process is desirable and may become a key factor...

  20. Research on burnup physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the validity of the equivalent material buckling definition, measurements were performed on experimental heavy water zero power reactor RB in Vinca, for three lattice pitches and lattice mixed of two kinds of fuel elements. The application of quasilinear programming for solving the control rod distribution problem to achieve maximum average fuel burnup resulted in a flexible optimization procedure (author)

  1. Application of radiochemical-and direct gamma ray spectrometry methods for the determination of the burnup of irradiated uranium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burn-up of U3O8 (natural uranium) samples was determined by using both destructive and non-destructive methods, and comparing the results obtained. The radioisotopes 144Ce, 103Ru, 106Ru, 137Cs and 95Zr were chosen as monitors. In order to isolate the radioisotopes chosen as monitors, a separation scheme has been established in which the solvent extraction technic is used to separate cerium, cesium, and ruthenium one from the other and from uranium. The separation between zirconium and niobium and of both from the others was accomplished by means of adsorption on a silica-gel column. When the non-destructive method was used, the radioactivity of each nuclide of interest was measured in the presence of all others. For this purpose, use was made of gamma-ray spectrometry and a Ge-Li detector. The comparison of burn-up values obtained by both destructive and non-destructive methods was made by means of Student's 't' test, and it has shown that the averages of results obtained in each case are equal. (Author)

  2. 34 CFR 225.11 - What selection criteria does the Secretary use in evaluating an application for a Credit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... evaluating an application for a Credit Enhancement for Charter School Facilities grant? 225.11 Section 225.11... application for a Credit Enhancement for Charter School Facilities grant? The Secretary uses the following criteria to evaluate an application for a Credit Enhancement for Charter School Facilities grant:...

  3. Evaluation technology for burnup and generated amount of plutonium by measurement of Xenon isotopic ratio in dissolver off-gas at reprocessing facility (Joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amount of Pu in the spent fuel was evaluated from Xe isotopic ratio in off-gas in reprocessing facility, is related to burnup. Six batches of dissolver off-gas (DOG) at spent fuel dissolution process were sampled from the main stack in Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) during BWR fuel (approx. 30GWD/MTU) reprocessing campaign. Xenon isotopic ratio was determined with Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. Burnup and generated amount of Pu were evaluated with Noble Gas Environmental Monitoring Application code (NOVA), developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory. Inferred burnup evaluated by Xe isotopic measurements and NOVA were in good agreement with those of the declared burnup in the range from -3.8% to 7.1%. Also, the inferred amount of Pu in spent fuel was in good agreed with those of the declared amount of Pu calculated by ORIGEN code in the range from -0.9% to 4.7%. The evaluation technique is applicable for both burnup credit to achieve efficient criticality safety control and a new measurement method for safeguards inspection. (author)

  4. An application of locally linear model tree algorithm with combination of feature selection in credit scoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siami, Mohammad; Gholamian, Mohammad Reza; Basiri, Javad

    2014-10-01

    Nowadays, credit scoring is one of the most important topics in the banking sector. Credit scoring models have been widely used to facilitate the process of credit assessing. In this paper, an application of the locally linear model tree algorithm (LOLIMOT) was experimented to evaluate the superiority of its performance to predict the customer's credit status. The algorithm is improved with an aim of adjustment by credit scoring domain by means of data fusion and feature selection techniques. Two real world credit data sets - Australian and German - from UCI machine learning database were selected to demonstrate the performance of our new classifier. The analytical results indicate that the improved LOLIMOT significantly increase the prediction accuracy.

  5. SWAT, Step-Wise Burnup Analysis Code System to Combine SRAC-95 Cell Calculation Code and ORIGEN2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: SWAT evaluates isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel, especially for burnup credit issues by driving codes SRAC95 and ORIGEN2.1 or ORIGEN2. SWAT is an automated driver code system. At the initial development phase, it was constructed by combining source programs of SRAC and ORIGEN2. To overcome the problem associated with code updates, SWAT chose to use system function of UNIX operating system to execute SRAC95 and ORIGEN2. So that, SWAT is independent of development and modification of SRAC95 and ORIGEN2.1. In SWAT, ORIGEN2(82) or ORIGEN2.1 is used for burnup calculations using the matrix exponential method. An updated decay library is included in the distribution. SWAT uses SRAC95 for neutron spectrum and effective cross section calculation in 107 groups, using the collision probability method for given geometry and isotopic composition. One or two dimensional cell geometries are supported in SRAC95. NEA-1698/02: The main purpose of new package is to run SWAT on several machines not supported in previous package (IA64 under Linux, Windows with cygwin and Sun,...) and several commercial FORTRAN compiler (Intel, PGI, Fujitsu). 2 - Methods: In calculating the problem-dependent cross section in SWAT, the total burnup history is divided into 'burnup steps'. Power, boric acid concentration, temperature of each region, and void ratio of coolant are given as history data. For each burnup step, the neutron spectrum and effective cross section are evaluated by SRAC95 using the information given in previous burnup calculation and cell geometry information. The user can select geometry options for the collision probability method in SRAC95. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Resonance absorption calculation with ultra-fine group cross section can not be directly applicable for 2D geometry

  6. 78 FR 2453 - Credit Suisse Opportunity Funds, et al.; Notice of Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-11

    ... (``Opportunity Funds''), Credit Suisse Commodity Strategy Funds (``Commodity Strategy Funds''), Credit Suisse... Strategy Funds are organized as Delaware statutory trusts. Each is an open-end management investment... investment company. The Applicant Investing Funds invest or will invest in a variety of debt and/or...

  7. Determination of the accuracy of utility spent fuel burnup records. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop a NRC-licensable burnup credit methodology, the pedigree and uncertainty of commercial spent nuclear fuel assembly burnup records needs to be established. Typically the assembly average burnup for each assembly is maintained in the plant records. It is anticipated that the repository for the disposal of spent fuel will utilize burnup credit and will require knowledge of the uncertainty of reactor burnup records. The uncertainty of the assembly average burnup record depends on the uncertainty of the method used to develop the record. Such records are generally based on core neutronic analysis coupled with analysis of in-core power detector data. This report evaluates the uncertainties in the burnup of fuel assemblies utilizing in-core measurements and core neutronic calculations for a Westinghouse PWR. To quantify the uncertainty, three cycles of in-core movable detector data were used. The data represents a first cycle of operation, a transition cycle and a low leakage cycle. These three cycles of data provide a true test of the uncertainty methodology. Three separate sets of results were used to characterize the burnup uncertainty of the fuel assemblies. The first set of results compared the measured and calculated reaction rates in instrumented assemblies and determined the uncertainty in the reaction rates. The second set of results determined the uncertainty in relative assembly power for both the instrumented and un-instrumented assemblies. The third set of results determined the burnup uncertainty of the discharged fuel in each cycle

  8. A Model of Money and Credit, with Application to the Credit Card Debt Puzzle

    OpenAIRE

    Telyukova, Irina A.; Randall Wright

    2006-01-01

    Many individuals simultaneously have significant credit card debt and money in the bank. The credit card debt puzzle is: given high interest rates on credit cards and low rates on bank accounts, why not pay down debt? While some economists go to elaborate lengths to explain this, we argue it is a special case of the rate-of-return-dominance puzzle from monetary economics. We extend standard monetary theory to incorporate consumer debt, which is interesting in its own right since developing mo...

  9. Detailed Burnup Calculations for Testing Nuclear Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leszczynski, F.

    2005-05-01

    -section data for burnup calculations, using some of the main available evaluated nuclear data files (ENDF-B-VI-Rel.8, JEFF-3.0, JENDL-3.3), on an isotope-by-isotope basis as much as possible. The selected experimental burnup benchmarks are reference cases for LWR and HWR reactors, with analysis of isotopic composition as a function of burnup. For LWR (H2O-moderated uranium oxide lattices) four benchmarks are included: ATM-104 NEA Burnup credit criticality benchmark; Yankee-Rowe Core V; H.B.Robinson Unit 2 and Turkey Point Unit 3. For HWR (D2O-moderated uranium oxide cluster lattices), three benchmarks were selected: NPD-19-rod Fuel Clusters; Pickering-28-rod Fuel Clusters; and Bruce-37-rod Fuel Clusters. The isotopes with experimental concentration data included in these benchmarks are: Se-79, Sr90, Tc99, Ru106, Sn126, Sb125,1129, Cs133-137, Nd143, 145, Sm149-150, 152, Eul53-155, U234-235, 238, Np237, Pu238-242, Am241-243, and Cm242-248. Results and analysis of differences between calculated and measured absolute and/or relative concentrations of these isotopes for the seven benchmarks are included in this work.

  10. Analysis of Experimental Data for High Burnup PWR Spent Fuel Isotopic Validation - Vandellos II Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Gauld, Ian C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This report is one of the several recent NUREG/CR reports documenting benchmark-quality radiochemical assay data and the use of the data to validate computer code predictions of isotopic composition for spent nuclear fuel, to establish the uncertainty and bias associated with code predictions. The experimental data analyzed in the current report were acquired from a high-burnup fuel program coordinated by Spanish organizations. The measurements included extensive actinide and fission product data of importance to spent fuel safety applications, including burnup credit, decay heat, and radiation source terms. Six unique spent fuel samples from three uranium oxide fuel rods were analyzed. The fuel rods had a 4.5 wt % {sup 235}U initial enrichment and were irradiated in the Vandellos II pressurized water reactor operated in Spain. The burnups of the fuel samples range from 42 to 78 GWd/MTU. The measurements were used to validate the two-dimensional depletion sequence TRITON in the SCALE computer code system.

  11. CREDIT ANALYSIS USING DATA MINING: APPLICATION IN THE CASE OF A CREDIT UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos de Moraes Sousa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for efficiency in the cooperative credit sector has led cooperatives to adopt new technology and managerial knowhow. Among the tools that facilitate efficiency, data mining has stood out in recent years as a sophisticated methodology to search for knowledge that is “hidden” in organizations' databases. The process of granting credit is one of the central functions of a credit union; therefore, the use of instruments that support that process is desirable and may become a key factor in credit management. The steps undertaken by the present case study to perform the knowledge discovery process were data selection, data pre-processing and cleanup, data transformation, data mining, and the interpretation and evaluation of results. The results were evaluated through cross-validation of ten sets, repeated in ten simulations. The goal of this study is to develop models to analyze the capacity of a credit union's members to settle their commitments, using a decision tree—C4.5 algorithm and an artificial neural network—multilayer perceptron algorithm. It is concluded that for the problem at hand, the models have statistically similar results and may aid in a cooperative's decision-making process.

  12. Would You Sell Your Mother's Data? Personal Data Disclosure in a Simulated Credit Card Application.

    OpenAIRE

    Malheiros, M.; Brostoff, S; Jennett, C.; Sasse, A.

    2012-01-01

    To assess the risk of a loan applicant defaulting, lenders feed applicants‟ data into credit scoring algorithms. They are always looking to improve the effectiveness of their predictions, which means improving the algorithms and/or collecting different data. Research on financial behavior found that elements of a person‟s family history and social ties can be good predictors of financial responsibility and control. Our study investigated how loan applicants applying for a credit card would re...

  13. A neural network approach for burn-up calculation and its application to the dynamic fuel cycle code CLASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Development of a neural network model to predict the requiered plutonium content. • The accuracy of this model is very good (0.37% of error). • Development of a neural network model to predict evolution of average cross sections. • Predictions allow calculating fuel depletion quickly and with a very good accuracy. • This approach has been applied to the PWR MOX case in a dynamic fuel cycle code. - Abstract: Dynamic fuel cycle simulation tools calculate nuclei inventories and mass flows evolution in an entire fuel cycle, from the mine to the final disposal. Usually, the fuel depletion in reactor is handled by a fuel loading model and a mean cross section predictor. In the case of a PWR–MOX, a fuel loading model provides from a plutonium stock the plutonium fraction in the fresh fuel needed to reach a specific burnup. A mean cross section predictor aims to assess isotopic cross sections required for building Bateman equations for any fresh fuel composition with a sufficient accuracy and a reasonable computing time. This paper presents a methodology based on neural networks for building a fuel loading model and a cross section predictor for a PWR reactor loaded with MOX fuel. The mean error of the plutonium content prediction from the fuel loading model is 0.37%. Furthermore, the mean cross section predictor allows completion of the fuel depletion calculation in less than one minute with excellent accuracy. A maximum deviation of 3% on main nuclei is obtained at the end of cycle between inventories calculated from neural networks and from the reference coupled neutron transport/fuel depletion calculation

  14. Credit Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Credit Management System. Outsourced Internet-based application. CMS stores and processes data related to USAID credit programs. The system provides information...

  15. An Empirical Analysis on Credit Risk Models and its Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joocheol Kim

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to focus on introducing credit default risk with widely used credit risk models in an effort to empirically test whether the models hold their validity, apply to financial institutions which usually are highly levered with various types of debts, and finally reinterpret the results in computing adequate collateral level in the over-the-counter derivatives market. By calculating the distance-to-default values using historical market data for South Korean banks and brokerage firms as suggested in Merton model and KMV’s EDF model, we find that the performance of the introduced models well reflect the credit quality of the sampled financial institutions. Moreover, we suggest that in addition to the given credit ratings of different financial institutions, their distance-to-default values can be utilized in determining the sufficient level of credit support. Our suggested “smoothened” collateral level allows both contractual parties to minimize their costs caused from provision of collateral without undertaking additional credit risk and achieve efficient collateral management.

  16. High burnup in DIONISIO code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    with high precision the neutron flux, burnup and concentration of every isotope, fissile, fissionable or fertile, gaseous or solid, all of them as functions of radius and time. But this formidable task is not suitable to be included in a fuel performance code, which must attend the great number of thermomechanical and thermochemical processes within the fuel rod. To accommodate both requirements, a simplified treatment is adopted consisting of restricting the balance equations to more relevant nuclides and reducing the energy spectrum to a single group. The purpose is to obtain empirical expressions to represent, with the higher possible approximation degree, the absorption, capture and fission cross sections of these isotopes as functions of the initial enrichment in 235U, the average burnup and the radial coordinate. The curves obtained with a so drastic simplification demand a careful testing before incorporation in the general fuel behaviour code. This testing is performed via comparison with the reliable reactor codes. The first antecedent in this type of analysis is found in the RADAR model [4] which was validated against the WIMS [5,6] code. The TUBRNP model, included in the TRANSURANUS code [7] and the RAPID model [8] are also based on the same concept. In this work curves fitted for the cross sections of 235U, 236U, 238U, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu and 242Pu are obtained from the predictions of the reactor cell codes HUEMUL [9] and CONDOR [10] for an average burnup ranging from fresh fuel to 120 MWd/kgHM and for an initial enrichment ranging from natural uranium to 12%. The final purpose is to extend the application range of the DIONISIO code [11,12,13] (originally designed to predict the fuel behavior in normal operation conditions) to the high burnup domain. The predictions of DIONISIO were compared with a large number of experimental data, obtaining an excellent agreement

  17. Light a CANDLE. An innovative burnup strategy of nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDLE is a new burnup strategy for nuclear reactors, which stands for Constant Axial Shape of Neutron Flux, Nuclide Densities and Power Shape During Life of Energy Production. When this candle-like burnup strategy is adopted, although the fuel is fixed in a reactor core, the burning region moves, at a speed proportionate to the power output, along the direction of the core axis without changing the spatial distribution of the number density of the nuclides, neutron flux, and power density. Excess reactivity is not necessary for burnup and the shape of the power distribution and core characteristics do not change with the progress of burnup. It is not necessary to use control rods for the control of the burnup. This booklet described the concept of the CANDLE burnup strategy with basic explanations of excess neutrons and its specific application to a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor and a fast reactor with excellent neutron economy. Supplementary issues concerning the initial core and high burnup were also referred. (T. Tanaka)

  18. Assessment of the uncertainties of MULTICELL calculations by the OECD NEA UAM PWR pin cell burnup benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defining precisely the burnup of the nuclear fuel is important from the point of view of core design calculations, safety analyses, criticality calculations (e.g. burnup credit calculations), etc. This paper deals with the uncertainties of MULTICELL calculations obtained by the solution of the OECD NEA UAM PWR pin cell burnup benchmark. In this assessment Monte-Carlo type statistical analyses are applied and the energy dependent covariance matrices of the cross-sections are taken into account. Additionally, the impact of the uncertainties of the fission yields is also considered. The target quantities are the burnup dependent uncertainties of the infinite multiplication factor, the two-group cross-sections, the reaction rates and the number densities of some isotopes up to the burnup of 60 MWd/kgU. In the paper the burnup dependent tendencies of the corresponding uncertainties and their sources are analyzed.

  19. Assessment of the uncertainties of MULTICELL calculations by the OECD NEA UAM PWR pin cell burnup benchmark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kereszturi, Andras [Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary). Centre for Energy Research; Panka, Istvan

    2015-09-15

    Defining precisely the burnup of the nuclear fuel is important from the point of view of core design calculations, safety analyses, criticality calculations (e.g. burnup credit calculations), etc. This paper deals with the uncertainties of MULTICELL calculations obtained by the solution of the OECD NEA UAM PWR pin cell burnup benchmark. In this assessment Monte-Carlo type statistical analyses are applied and the energy dependent covariance matrices of the cross-sections are taken into account. Additionally, the impact of the uncertainties of the fission yields is also considered. The target quantities are the burnup dependent uncertainties of the infinite multiplication factor, the two-group cross-sections, the reaction rates and the number densities of some isotopes up to the burnup of 60 MWd/kgU. In the paper the burnup dependent tendencies of the corresponding uncertainties and their sources are analyzed.

  20. Creation and Application of Expert System Framework in Granting the Credit Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaye Hoseini

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the development of a knowledge base for expert system for credit risk assessment of bank’s legal customers. It analyzed the customers’ credit risk based on experts’ financial ratio analysis. Financial ratios were derived from financial statements of customers; however, the knowledge that helps banking experts to determine the relationship between customers’ credit risk and financial situation has been derived from these laws. In this study, expert system considered customer financial ratios as input and prediction of credit risk level as the output. This study was a descriptive-case study research. The population consisted of credit experts of Tejarat bank who were the member of bank’s credit Committee and had the right to vote for facilities approval and the individuals whose main task was providing reports for granting facilities and monitoring the use of facilities. After an initial interview and determining the evaluation criteria for facilities and determining the items for each of the criteria, a questionnaire was designed using Likert scale. Data normality test was conducted to ensure the accuracy of the collected data. T-test was performed to realize the selected criteria are important. Then, experts were asked to determine the minimum score for providing the facility to the applicant in each section of the questionnaire. The laws of expert system were provided based on determined minimum scores.

  1. Application of Hidden Markov Model in Credit Card Fraud Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bhusari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In modern retail market environment, electronic commerce has rapidly gained a lot of attention and alsoprovides instantaneous transactions. In electronic commerce, credit card has become the most importantmeans of payment due to fast development in information technology around the world. As the usage ofcredit card increases in the last decade, rate of fraudulent practices is also increasing every year.Existing fraud detection system may not be so much capable to reduce fraud transaction rate.Improvement in fraud detection practices has become essential to maintain existence of payment system.In this paper, we show how Hidden Markov Model (HMM is used to detect credit card fraud transactionwith low false alarm. An HMM based system is initially studied spending profile of the card holder andfollowed by checking an incoming transaction against spending behavior of the card holder, if it is notaccepted by our proposed HMM with sufficient probability, then it would be a fraudulent transaction.

  2. Increased burnup of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The specialists' group for fuel elements of the Kerntechnische Gesellschaft e.V. held a meeting on ''Increased Burnup of Fuel Elements'' on 9th and 10th of November 1982 at the GKSS Research Center Geesthacht. Most papers dealt with the problems of burnup increase of fuel elements for light water reactors with respect to fuel manufacturing, power plant operation and reprocessing. Review papers were given on the burnup limits for high temperature gas cooled reactors and sodium fast breeder reactors. The meeting ended with a presentation of the technical equipment of the hot laboratory of the GKSS and the programs which are in progress there. (orig.)

  3. Application of Hidden Markov Model in Credit Card Fraud Detection

    OpenAIRE

    V. Bhusari; Patil, S

    2011-01-01

    In modern retail market environment, electronic commerce has rapidly gained a lot of attention and alsoprovides instantaneous transactions. In electronic commerce, credit card has become the most importantmeans of payment due to fast development in information technology around the world. As the usage ofcredit card increases in the last decade, rate of fraudulent practices is also increasing every year.Existing fraud detection system may not be so much capable to reduce fraud transaction rate...

  4. Application of integral ex-core and differential in-core neutron measurements for adjustment of fuel burn-up distributions in VVER-1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodkin, P. G.; Borodkin, G. I.; Khrennikov, N. N. [SEC NRS, Moscow, (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    The paper deals with calculational and semi-analytical evaluations of VVER-1000 reactor core neutron source distributions and their influence on measurements and calculations of the integral through-vessel neutron leakage. Time-integrated neutron source distributions used for DORT calculations were prepared by two different approaches based on a) calculated fuel burn-up (standard routine procedure) and b) in-core measurements by means of SPD (self-powered detectors) and TC (thermocouples) in a new approach. Taking into account that fuel burn-up distributions in operating VVER may be evaluated now by analytical methods (calculations) it is only needed to develop new approaches for testing and correcting calculational evaluations. Results presented in this paper allow to consider a reverse task of alternative estimation of fuel burn-up distributions. The approach proposed is based on adjustment (fitting) of time-integrated neutron source distributions, and hence fuel burn-up patterns in some part of reactor core, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurement, neutron-physical calculation and in-core SPD and TC measurement data. (authors)

  5. Burnup span sensitivity analysis of different burnup coupling schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The objective of this work is the burnup span sensitivity analysis of different coupling schemes. ► Three kinds of schemes have been implemented in a new MCNP–ORIGEN linkage program. ► Two kinds of schemes are based predictor–corrector technique and the third is based on Euler explicit method. ► The analysis showed that the predictor–corrector approach better accounts for nonlinear behavior of burnup. ► It is sufficiently good to use the Euler method at small spans but for large spans use of second order scheme is mandatory. - Abstract: The analysis of core composition changes is complicated by the fact that the time and spatial variations in isotopic composition depend on the neutron flux distribution and vice versa. Fortunately, changes in core composition occur relatively slowly and hence the burnup analysis can be performed by dividing the burnup period into some burnup spans and assuming that the averaged flux and cross sections are constant during each burn up span. The burnup span sensitivity analysis attempts to find how much the burnup spans could be increased without any significant change in results. This goal has been achieved by developing a new MCNP–ORIGEN linkage program named MOBC (MCNP–ORIGEN Burnup Calculation). Three kinds of coupling scheme have been implemented in MOBC. Two of these are based on second order predictor–corrector technique and enable us to choose larger time steps, whilst the third one is based on Euler explicit first order method and is faster than the other two. The validity of the developed program has been evaluated by the code vs. code comparison technique. Two different types of codes are employed. The first one is based on deterministic two dimensional transport method, like CASMO-4 and HELIOS codes, and the second one is based on Monte Carlo method, like MCODE code. Only one coupling technique is employed in each of these state of the art codes, while the MOBC excels in its ability to

  6. A study on metallurgical properties of two zirconium alloys for high burn-up fuel tube applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructure development and mechanical properties after different thermomechanical processing treatment of two types of zirconium alloys, namely, the quaternary Zr-1 Nb-1 Sn-0.1 Fe and the binary Zr-1Nb has been studied. These alloys and their derivatives are finding increasing applications as fuel tube materials and have the potential for meeting the requirement of high burn up fuel. The different phase constituents and their morphological features such as shape, size distribution and the nature of precipitate phases and the extent of recrystallization which are expected to have strong effects on both short term mechanical behavior and long term performance during service have been found to be strongly dependent on thermomechanical processing parameters and annealing parameters. The extent of recrystallization has been found to be an important parameter in deciding the mechanical properties. Hot processing maps have identified optimum processing parameters for quaternary alloy and the strain rate-temperature domains corresponding to the occurrence of dynamic recovery and recrystallization processes. Microstructural features of hydrides formed in these alloys and the tensile properties of these alloys in different temperatures are also discussed. (author)

  7. High burnup experience in PWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to summarize the high burnup experience of Westinghouse PWR fuel. The emphasis is on two regions of commercial PWR fuel that attained region average burnups greater than 36,000 MWD/MTU. One region operated under load follow conditions. The other region operated at base load conditions with a high average linear heat rating. Coolant activity data and post irradiation data were obtained. The post-irradiation data consisted of visual examinations, crud sampling, rod-to-rod dimensional changes, fuel column length changes, rod and assembly growth, assembly bow, fuel rod profilometry, grid spring relaxation, and fuel assembly sipping tests. The data showed that the fuel operated reliably to this burnup. Plans for irradiation to higher burnups are also discussed

  8. DATA MINING APPLICATION IN CREDIT CARD FRAUD DETECTION SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    FRANCISCA NONYELUM OGWUELEKA

    2011-01-01

    Data mining is popularly used to combat frauds because of its effectiveness. It is a well-defined procedure that takes data as input and produces models or patterns as output. Neural network, a data mining technique was used in this study. The design of the neural network (NN) architecture for the credit card detection system was based on unsupervised method, which was applied to the transactions data to generate four clusters of low, high, risky and high-risk clusters. The self-organizing ma...

  9. An application of data mining classification and bi-level programming for optimal credit allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mahdi Sadatrasou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates credit allocation policy making and its effect on economic development using bi-level programming. There are two challenging problems in bi-level credit allocation; at the first level government/public related institutes must allocate the credit strategically concerning sustainable development to regions and industrial sectors. At the second level, there are agent banks, which should allocate the credit tactically to individual applicants based on their own profitability and risk using their credit scoring models. There is a conflict of interest between these two stakeholders but the cooperation is inevitable. In this paper, a new bi-level programming formulation of the leader-follower game in association with sustainable development theory in the first level and data mining classifier at the second level is used to mathematically model the problem. The model is applied to a national development fund (NDF as a government related organization and one of its agent banks. A new algorithm called Bi-level Genetic fuzzy apriori Algorithm (BGFAA is introduced to solve the bilateral model. Experimental results are presented and compared with a unilateral policy making scenario by the leader. Findings show that although the objective functions of the leader are worse in the bilateral scenario but agent banks collaboration is attracted and guaranteed.

  10. Sophistication of burnup analysis system for fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvement on prediction accuracy for neutronics property of fast reactor cores is one of the most important study domains in terms of both achievement of high economical plant efficiency based on reasonably advanced designs and increased reliability and safety margins. In former study, considerable improvement on prediction accuracy in neutronics design has been achieved in the development of the unified constants library as a fruit of a series of critical experiments such as JUPITER in application of the reactor constant adjustments. For design of fast reactor cores, however, improvement of not only static properties but also burnup properties is very important. For such purpose, it is necessary to improve the prediction accuracy on burnup properties using actual burnup data of 'JOYO' and 'MONJU', experimental and prototype fast reactors. Recently, study on effective burnup method for minor actinides becomes important theme. However, there is a problem that analysis work tends to become inefficient for lack of functionality suitable for analysis of composition change due to burnup since the conventional analysis system is targeted to critical assembly systems. Therefore development of burnup analysis system for fast reactors with modularity and flexibility is being done that would contribute to actual core design work and improvement of prediction accuracy. In the previous research, we have developed a prototype system which has functions of performing core and burnup calculations using given constant files (PDS files) and information based on simple and easy user input data. It has also functions of fuel shuffling which is indispensable for production systems. In the present study, we implemented functions for cell calculations and burnup calculations. With this, whole steps in analysis can be carried out with only this system. In addition, we modified the specification of user input to improve the convenience of this system. Since implementations being done so

  11. Instrumentation for measuring the burnup of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many different methods or procedures have been developed to measure reactivity of fissil materials. Few of these, however, have been designed specifically for light water reactor fuel or have actually been used to measure the reactivity of spent fuel. The methods that have been used to make measurements of related systems are the 252Cf source-driven noise analysis method, a noise analysis method using natural neutron sources, subcritical assembly measurements, and pulsed neutron techniques. Several different approaches to directly measuring burnup have been developed by various organizations. The experimental work on actual spent nuclear fuel utilizing reactivity measurement techniques is insufficient to provide conclusive evidence of the applicability of these techniques for verifying fuel burnup. The work with burnup meters indicates, however, that good correlations can be obtained with any of the systems. A burnup meter's primary function would be a secondary assurance that the administrative records are not grossly in error. Reactivity measurements provide information relating to the reactivity of the fuel only under the conditions measured. Criticality prevention design requirements will necessitate that casks accommodate a minimum burnup level for a given initial enrichment (i.e., a maximum reactivity). Direct measurement of the burnup will enable an easy determination of whether a particular fuel assembly can be shipped in a specific cask with a minimum number of additional correlations

  12. DATA MINING APPLICATION IN CREDIT CARD FRAUD DETECTION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FRANCISCA NONYELUM OGWUELEKA

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Data mining is popularly used to combat frauds because of its effectiveness. It is a well-defined procedure that takes data as input and produces models or patterns as output. Neural network, a data mining technique was used in this study. The design of the neural network (NN architecture for the credit card detection system was based on unsupervised method, which was applied to the transactions data to generate four clusters of low, high, risky and high-risk clusters. The self-organizing map neural network (SOMNN technique was used for solving the problem of carrying out optimal classification of each transaction into its associated group, since a prior output is unknown. The receiver-operating curve (ROC for credit card fraud (CCF detection watch detected over 95% of fraud cases without causing false alarms unlike other statistical models and the two-stage clusters. This shows that the performance of CCF detection watch is in agreement with other detection software, but performs better.

  13. Application of the RTOP-CA code for analysis of MIR-reactor high burnup experiments and activity release from WWER fuel of new generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the RTOP-CA code calculations for experiments in the research MIR reactor are presented. The MIR-reactor tests were made to study the activity release from defective WWER fuel at high burnup (∼60 MWd/kgU). The RTOP-CA calculations are compared to experimental data on radial distributions of burnup as well as radial profiles of Pu and Xe concentrations in fuel pellets. The RTOP-CA predictions are also compared to the data on activity release (radionuclides of I, Cs, Xe and Kr) from the test fuel rod with an artificial defect in cladding. Additional calculations were performed for WWER-1000 fuel of an advanced design. In these calculation series the effect of design innovations on activity release from defective fuel rods was estimated. It is demonstrated that in case of a failure the new generation of WWER fuel shows lower levels of activity release into primary coolant. (authors)

  14. Credit supply - Identifying balance-sheet channels with loan applications and granted loans

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, Gabriel; Ongena, Steven; Peydró, José-Luis; Saurina, Jesús

    2010-01-01

    To identify credit availability we analyze the extensive and intensive margins of lending with loan applications and all loans granted in Spain. We find that during the period analyzed both worse economic and tighter monetary conditions reduce loan granting, especially to firms or from banks with lower capital or liquidity ratios. Moreover, responding to applications for the same loan, weak banks are less likely to grant the loan. Our results suggest that firms cannot offset the resultant cre...

  15. CANDU lattice uncertainties during burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uncertainties associated with fundamental nuclear data accompany evaluated nuclear data libraries in the form of covariance matrices. As nuclear data are important parameters in reactor physics calculations, any associated uncertainty causes a loss of confidence in the calculation results. The quantification of output uncertainties is necessary to adequately establish safety margins of nuclear facilities. In this work, microscopic cross-section has been propagated through lattice burnup calculations applied to a generic CANDU® model. It was found that substantial uncertainty emerges during burnup even when fission yield fraction and decay rate uncertainties are neglected. (author)

  16. Burnup instabilities in the full-core HTR model simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We performed full-core burnup calculation coupled with Monte Carlo code. • Depletion instabilities have been detected for HTR system at high burnup. • We assess the stability of time step models in application to core calculation. • Discussion of the modeling factors related to burnup core simulation is presented. - Abstract: The phenomenon of numerical instabilities present in the Monte Carlo burnup calculations has been shown and explained by many authors using models of LWR, often simplified. Some theoretical considerations about origins of oscillations are very general, however it may be difficult to apply it easily to other models as a prediction of stability. Physics of HTR core differs significantly from the properties of light water system and the reliable extrapolation of the current numerical results is not possible. Moreover, most of the works concerning HTR burnup calculations put no emphasis on the spatial stability of the simulation and apply very long time steps. The awareness in this field of research seems to be not sufficient. In this paper, we focus on the demonstration of depletion instabilities in the simulations of HTR core dedicated for deep burnup of plutonium and minor actinides. We apply various methodology of time step implemented in advanced Continuous Energy Monte Carlo burnup code MCB version 5. Stability analysis is very rare for the full core calculations and the awareness of the oscillation’s problem is obligatory for the reliable modeling of a fuel cycle. In the summary of this work we systematize and discuss factors related to the stability of depletion and review available solutions

  17. Credit Supply and Monetary Policy: Identifying the Bank Balance-Sheet Channel with Loan Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Jimenez; Steven Ongena; Jose-Luis Peydro; Jesus Saurina

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the impact of monetary policy on the supply of bank credit. Monetary policy affects both loan supply and demand, thus making identification a steep challenge. We therefore analyze a novel, supervisory dataset with loan applications from Spain. Accounting for time-varying firm heterogeneity in loan demand, we find that tighter monetary and worse economic conditions substantially reduce loan granting, especially from banks with lower capital or liquidity ratios; responding to applica...

  18. Impact of the fission yield nuclear data uncertainties in the pin-cell burn-up OECD/NEA UAM Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prediction of fission products and the impact of their uncertainties to different safety-related spent fuel applications (burn-up credit, decay heat generation, radiological safety, waste management, burn-up prediction) are required for the evaluation of spent fuel system designs and safety analysis options. One of the nuclear data needs to this prediction is the independent fission yields. The mostly used general-purpose evaluated nuclear data libraries provide these data including their uncertainties as standard deviation, with no-correlation between fission yields. However, new developments in the theory and measurements of fission product yields are expected to result in new evaluated files in the next coming years. These files will include considerably more accurate yields including neutron energy dependence combined with new covariance information allowing realistic uncertainty estimates. In this paper, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on criticality and depletion calculations. A LWR pin-cell burn-up benchmark, proposed in the general framework of the OECD/UAM Benchmark is analyzed to address the impact of independent fission yield uncertainties. Calculations were performed with the SCALE6 system and the ENDF/B-VII.1 fission yield data library, adding covariance data obtained from including covariance info of mass yields. Results are compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by ENDF/B-VII.1. The uncertainty quantification is performed with a Monte Carlo sampling and then compared with linear perturbation. (author)

  19. Perturbation and sensitivity theory for reactor burnup analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perturbation theory is developed for the nonlinear burnup equations describing the time-dependent behavior of the neutron and nuclide fields in a reactor core. General aspects of adjoint equations for nonlinear systems are first discussed and then various approximations to the burnup equations are rigorously derived and their areas for application presented. In particular, the concept of coupled neutron/nuclide fields (in which perturbations in either the neutron or nuclide field are allowed to influence the behavior of the other field) is contrasted to the uncoupled approximation

  20. Cost-sensitive classification for rare events: an application to the credit rating model validation for SMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Raffaella Calabrese

    2011-01-01

    Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve is used to assess the discriminatory power of credit rating models. To identify the optimal threshold on the ROC curve, the iso-performance lines are used. The ROC curve and the iso-performance line assume equal classification error costs and that the two classification groups are relatively balanced. These assumptions are unrealistic in the application to credit risk. In order to remove these hypotheses, the curve of Classification Error Costs is...

  1. Measurement techniques for verifying burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewing, R.I. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (US)); Bierman, S.R. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US))

    1992-05-01

    Measurements of the nuclear radiation from spent reactor fuel are being considered to qualify assemblies for loading into casks that will be used to transport spent fuel from utility sites to a federal storage facility. To ensure nuclear criticality safety, the casks are being designed to accept assemblies that meet restrictions as to burnup, initial enrichment and cooling time. This paper reports that measurements could be used to ensure that only fuel assemblies that meet the restrictions are selected for loading.

  2. Measurement techniques for verifying burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of the nuclear radiation from spent reactor fuel are being considered to qualify assemblies for loading into casks that will be used to transport spent fuel from utility sites to a federal storage facility. To ensure nuclear criticality safety, the casks are being designed to accept assemblies that meet restrictions as to burnup, initial enrichment and cooling time. This paper reports that measurements could be used to ensure that only fuel assemblies that meet the restrictions are selected for loading

  3. Criticality safety analysis of WWER-440 spent fuel cask with radial and axial burnup profile implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of radial and axial burnup profile on the criticality of WWER-440 spent fuel cask is presented in the paper. The calculations are performed based on two AER Benchmark problems for WWER-440 irradiated fuel assembly. The radial zonewise dependent spent fuel inventory has been calculated by the NESSEL - NUKO code system. The axial dependent isotope concentrations have been determined by the modular code system SCALE4.4. For criticality calculations the SCALE4.4 has been applied. Calculations have been carried out for cask with 30 WWER-440 fuel assemblies with initial enrichment 3.6% of 235U and burnup up to 40 MWd/kgU. The influence of radial and axial burnup credit on the cask criticality has been evaluated

  4. Revised Burnup Code System SWAT: Description and Validation Using Postirradiation Examination Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burnup code system Step-Wise Burnup Analysis Code System (SWAT) is revised for use in a burnup credit analysis. An important feature of the revised SWAT is that its functions are achieved by calling validated neutronics codes without any changes to the original codes. This feature is realized with a system function of the operating system, which allows the revised SWAT to be independent of the development status of each code.A package of the revised SWAT contains the latest libraries based on JENDL-3.2 and the second version of the JNDC FP library. These libraries allow us to analyze burnup problems, such as an analysis of postirradiation examination (PIE), using the latest evaluated data of not only cross sections but also fission yield and decay constants.Another function of the revised SWAT is a library generator for the ORIGEN2 code, which is one of the most reliable burnup codes. ORIGEN2 users can obtain almost the same results with the revised SWAT using the library prepared by this function.The validation of the revised SWAT is conducted by calculation of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency burnup credit criticality safety benchmark Phase I-B and analyses of PIE data for spent fuel from Takahama Unit 3. The analysis of PIE data shows that the revised SWAT can predict the isotopic composition of main uranium and plutonium with a deviation of 5% from experimental results taken from UO2 fuels of 17 x 17 fuel assemblies. Many results of fission products including samarium are within a deviation of 10%. This means that the revised SWAT has high reliability to predict the isotopic composition for pressurized water reactor spent fuel

  5. Burn-up measurement of irradiated rock-like fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain burn-up data of plutonium rock-like (ROX) fuels irradiated at JRR-3M in JAERI, destructive chemical analysis of zirconia or thoria system ROX fuels was performed after development of a new dissolution method. The dissolution method and procedure have been established using simulated ROX fuel, which is applicable to the hot-cell handling. Specimens for destructive chemical analysis were obtained by applying the present method to irradiated ROX fuels in a hot-cell. Isotopic ratios of neodymium and plutonium were determined by mass-spectrometry using the isotope dilution procedure. Burn-up of the irradiated ROX fuels was calculated by the 148Nd procedure using measured data. The burn-ups of thoria and zirconia system fuels that irradiated same location in the capsule showed almost same values. For the ROX fuel containing thorium, 233U was also determined by the same techniques in order to evaluate the effect of burn-up of thorium. As the result, it was found that the fission of 233U was below 1% of total fission number and could be negligible. In addition, americium and curium were determined by alpha-spectrometry. These data, together with isotopic ratio of plutonium, are important data to analyze the irradiation behavior of plutonium. (author)

  6. Prediction of fission gas pressure from high burnup oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ELESIM fuel performance code incorporates a fundamentally based treatment of the relevant physical processes affecting fission gas release. The fission gas release model treats fission gas diffusion, formation and subsequent interlinkage of intergranular bubbles, grain boundary storage of gas, grain growth and fuel swelling. The latter case considers the contributions of thermal expansion, densification, solid fission products, and gas bubbles. The effect of porosity on fuel thermal conductivity is taken into account. Previously we showed predictions of the gas release model agreed well with measured values for oxide fuel with burnups to about 300 MW.h/kg U. The applicability of the model to high burnup fuel is examined using examples from the literature. The fission gas release range considered is about 1-100% for burnups to 1000 MW.h/kg U in thermal reactor fuel and 2400 MW.h/kg U in fast reactor fuel. Predicted and measured releases are shown to be in good agreement, suggesting that the fundamental model is correct. In some models, empirical correction factors are required at high burnup to achieve agreement between predicted and measured release values; no such factor is required in ELESIM. (auth)

  7. Automated system for determining the burnup of spent nuclear fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokritskii V. A.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors analyze their experience in application of semi-conductor detectors and development of a breadboard model of the monitoring system for spent nuclear fuel (SNF. Such system should use CdZnTe-detectors in which one-charging gathering conditions are realized. The proposed technique of real time SNF control during reloading technological operations is based on the obtained research results. Methods for determining the burnup of spent nuclear fuel based on measuring the characteristics of intrinsic radiation are covered in many papers, but those metods do not usually take into account that the nuclear fuel used during the operation has varying degrees of initial enrichment, or a new kind of fuel may be used. Besides, the known methods often do not fit well into the existing technology of fuel loading operations and are not suitable for operational control. Nuclear fuel monitoring (including burnup determination system in this research is based on the measurement of the spectrum of natural gamma-radiation of irradiated fuel assemblies (IFA, as from the point of view of minimizing the time spent, the measurement of IFA gamma spectra directly during fuel loading is optimal. It is the overload time that is regulated rather strictly, and burnup control operations should be coordinated with the schedule of the fuel loading. Therefore, the real time working capacity of the system should be chosen as the basic criterion when constructing the structure of such burnup control systems.

  8. 26 CFR 20.2014-4 - Application of credit in cases involving a death tax convention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) ESTATE AND GIFT TAXES ESTATE TAX; ESTATES OF DECEDENTS DYING AFTER AUGUST... the amount of the credit for tax on prior transfers may differ depending upon whether the credit...

  9. Sophistication of burnup analysis system for fast reactor (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvement on prediction accuracy for neutronics characteristics of fast reactor cores is one of the most important study domains in terms of both achievement of high economical plant efficiency based on reasonably advanced designs and increased reliability and safety margins. In former study, considerable improvement on prediction accuracy in neutronics design has been achieved in the development of the unified cross-section set as a fruit of a series of critical experiments such as JUPITER in application of the reactor constant adjustments. For design of fast reactor cores improvement of not only static characteristics but also burnup characteristics is very important. For such purpose, it is necessary to improve the prediction accuracy on burnup characteristics using actual burnup data of 'JOYO' and 'MONJU', experimental and prototype fast reactors. Recently, study on effective burnup method for minor actinides becomes important theme. However, there is a problem that analysis work tends to become inefficient for lack of functionality suitable for analysis of composition change due to burnup since the conventional analysis system is targeted to critical assembly systems. Therefore development of burnup analysis system for fast reactors with modularity and flexibility is being done that would contribute to actual core design work and improvement of prediction accuracy. In the previous study, we have developed a prototype system which has functions of performing core and burnup calculations using given constant files (PDS files) and information based on simple and easy user input data. It has also functions of fuel shuffling which is indispensable for power reactor analysis systems. In the present study, by extending the prototype system, features for handling of control rods and energy collapse of group constants have been designed and implemented. Computational results from the present analysis system are stored into restart files which can be accessible by

  10. High burnup fuel development program in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A step wise burnup extension program has been progressing in Japan to reduce the LWR fuel cycle cost. At present, the maximum assembly burnup limit of BWR 8 Χ 8 type fuel (B. Step II fuel) is 50GWd/t and a limited numbers of 9 Χ 9 type fuel (B. Step III fuel) with 55GWd/t maximum assembly burnup has been licensed by regulatory agencies recently. Though present maximum assembly burnup limit for PWR fuel is 48GWd/t (P. Step I fuel), the licensing work has been progressing for irradiation testing on a limited number of fuel assemblies with extended burnup of up to 55GWd/t (p. Step II fuel) Design of high burnup fuel and fabrication test are carried out by vendors, and subsequent irradiation test of fuel rods is conducted jointly by utilities and vendors to prepare for licensing. It is usual to make an irradiation test for vectarion, using lead use assemblies by government to confirm fuel integrity and reliability and win the public confidence. Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPE C) is responsible for verification test. The fuel are subjected to post irradiation examination (PIE) and no unfavorable indications of fuel behavior have found both in NUPE C verification test and joint irradiation test by utilities and vendors. Burnup extension is an urgent task for LWR fuel in Japan in order to establish the domestic fuel cycle. It is conducted in joint efforts of industries, government and institutes. However, watching a situation of burnup extension in the world, we are not going ahead of other countries in the achievement of burnup extension. It is due to a conservative policy in the nuclear safety of the country. This is the reason why the burnup extension program in Japan is progressing 'slow and steady' As for the data obtained, no unfavorable indications of fuel behavior have found both in NUPE C verification test and joint irradiation test by utilities and vendors until now

  11. Analysis of high burnup fuel safety issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Kim, D. H.; Bang, J. G.; Kim, Y. M.; Yang, Y. S.; Jung, Y. H.; Jeong, Y. H.; Nam, C.; Baik, J. H.; Song, K. W.; Kim, K. S

    2000-12-01

    Safety issues in steady state and transient behavior of high burnup LWR fuel above 50 - 60 MWD/kgU were analyzed. Effects of burnup extension upon fuel performance parameters was reviewed, and validity of both the fuel safety criteria and the performance analysis models which were based upon the lower burnup fuel test results was analyzed. It was found that further tests would be necessary in such areas as fuel failure and dispersion for RIA, and high temperature cladding corrosion and mechanical deformation for LOCA. Since domestic fuels have been irradiated in PWR up to burnup higher than 55 MWD/kgU-rod. avg., it can be said that Korea is in the same situation as the other countries in the high burnup fuel safety issues. Therefore, necessary research areas to be performed in Korea were derived. Considering that post-irradiation examination(PIE) for the domestic fuel of burnup higher than 30 MWD/kgU has not been done so far at all, it is primarily necessary to perform PIE for high burnup fuel, and then simulation tests for RIA and LOCA could be performed by using high burnup fuel specimens. For the areas which can not be performed in Korea, international cooperation will be helpful to obtain the test results. With those data base, safety of high burnup domestic fuels will be confirmed, current fuel safety criteria will be re-evaluated, and finally transient high burnup fuel behavior analysis technology will be developed through the fuel performance analysis code development.

  12. Analysis of high burnup fuel safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safety issues in steady state and transient behavior of high burnup LWR fuel above 50 - 60 MWD/kgU were analyzed. Effects of burnup extension upon fuel performance parameters was reviewed, and validity of both the fuel safety criteria and the performance analysis models which were based upon the lower burnup fuel test results was analyzed. It was found that further tests would be necessary in such areas as fuel failure and dispersion for RIA, and high temperature cladding corrosion and mechanical deformation for LOCA. Since domestic fuels have been irradiated in PWR up to burnup higher than 55 MWD/kgU-rod. avg., it can be said that Korea is in the same situation as the other countries in the high burnup fuel safety issues. Therefore, necessary research areas to be performed in Korea were derived. Considering that post-irradiation examination(PIE) for the domestic fuel of burnup higher than 30 MWD/kgU has not been done so far at all, it is primarily necessary to perform PIE for high burnup fuel, and then simulation tests for RIA and LOCA could be performed by using high burnup fuel specimens. For the areas which can not be performed in Korea, international cooperation will be helpful to obtain the test results. With those data base, safety of high burnup domestic fuels will be confirmed, current fuel safety criteria will be re-evaluated, and finally transient high burnup fuel behavior analysis technology will be developed through the fuel performance analysis code development

  13. The Application of Genetic Algorithms and Multidimensional Distinguishing Model in Forecasting and Evaluating Credits for Mobile Clients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zhan; Xu Ji-sheng

    2003-01-01

    To solve the arrearage problem that puzzled most of the mobile corporations, we propose an approach to forecast and evaluate the credits for mobile clients, devising a method that is of the coalescence of genetic algorithm and multidimensional distinguishing model. In the end of this pa-per, a result of a testing application in Zhuhai Branch, GMCC was provided. The precision of the forecasting and evaluation of the client's credit is near 90%. This study is very signifi-cant to the mobile communication corporation at all levels.The popularization of the techniques and the result would pro-duce great benefits of both society and economy.

  14. The Application of Genetic Algorithms and Multidimensional Distinguishing Model in Forecasting and Evaluating Credits for Mobile Clients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiZhan; XuJi-sheng

    2003-01-01

    To solve the arrearage problem that puzzled most of the mobile corporations, we propose an approach to forecast and evaluate the credits for mobile clients, devising a method that is of the coalescence of genetic algorithm and multidimensional distinguishing model. In the end of this paper, a result of a testing application in Zhuhai Branch, GMCC was provided. The precision of the forecasting and evaluation of the client's credit is near 90%. This study is very significant to the mobile communication corporation at all levels.The popularization o{ the techniques and the result would produce great benefits of both society and economy.

  15. 75 FR 17976 - WNC Tax Credits 38, LLC, WNC Tax Credits 39, LLC, WNC Housing Tax Credits Manager, LLC and WNC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-08

    ... COMMISSION WNC Tax Credits 38, LLC, WNC Tax Credits 39, LLC, WNC Housing Tax Credits Manager, LLC and WNC... Act. Applicants: WNC Tax Credits 38, LLC (``Fund 38'') and WNC Tax Credits 39, LLC (``Fund 39'') (each a ``Fund,'' and collectively, the ``Funds''), WNC Housing Tax Credits Manager, LLC (the...

  16. Development of burnup analysis system for fast reactor (3) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvement of the prediction accuracy for neutronics property of fast reactor cores is one of the most important study domains in terms of both achievement of high economical plant efficiency based on reasonably advanced designs and increased reliability and safety margins. In the previous study, considerable improvement of the prediction accuracy in neutronics design has been achieved in the development of the unified constants library as a fruit of a series of critical experiments such as JUPITER in application of the reactor constant adjustments. For design of fast reactor cores, however, improvement of not only static properties but also burnup properties is very important. For such purposes, it is necessary to improve the prediction accuracy of burnup properties using actual burnup data of 'JOYO' and 'MONJU', experimental and prototype fast reactors. Recently, study on effective burnup method for minor actinides becomes important theme. However, there is a problem that analysis work tends to become inefficient for lack of functionality suitable for analysis of composition change due to burnup since the conventional analysis system is targeted to critical assembly systems. Therefore development of burnup analysis system for fast reactors with modularity and flexibility is being done that would contribute to actual core design work and improvement of the prediction accuracy. In the previous study on 'Development of Burnup Analysis System for Fast Reactors (2)' in FY2006, design and implementation of models for detailed geometry of assembly, fuel loading pattern and so on, accompanied with specification and implementation of input file handling to construct data models. In the present study, a prototype system has been implemented in which functionalities are embedded for calculation of macroscopic cross section, core calculation and burnup calculation applying the fruits of the study 'Development of a Framework for the Neutronics Analysis System for Next

  17. Creation and Application of Expert System Framework in Granting the Credit Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Somaye Hoseini; Ali Kermanshah; Abdol Hossein Saraf Zadeh

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the development of a knowledge base for expert system for credit risk assessment of bank’s legal customers. It analyzed the customers’ credit risk based on experts’ financial ratio analysis. Financial ratios were derived from financial statements of customers; however, the knowledge that helps banking experts to determine the relationship between customers’ credit risk and financial situation has been derived from these laws. In this study, expert system considered cus...

  18. COREBN: A core burn-up calculation module for SRAC2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COREBN is an auxiliary code of the SRAC system for multi-dimensional core burn-up calculation based on the diffusion theory and interpolation of macroscopic cross-sections tabulated to local parameters such as burn-up degree, moderator temperature and so on. The macroscopic cross-sections are prepared by cell burn-up calculations with the collision probability method of SRAC. SRAC and COREBN have wide applicability for various types of cell and core geometries. They have been used mainly for the purpose of core burn-up management of research reactors in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The report is a revision of the users manual for the latest version of COREBN served with the SRAC released in 2006. (author)

  19. THE APPLICABILITY OF THE EDMISTER MODEL FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF CREDIT RISK IN CROATIAN SMEs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijela Milos Sprcic

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the applicability of the Edmister model for the assessment of credit risk in small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs was examined by testing the hypothesis that the Edmister model is applicable for predicting financial difficulties of SMEs in Croatia. Data from a data base of financial reports of SMEs in Croatia managed by FINA, as well as internal data and records of one of the major banks in Croatia were used. Data of 822 enterprises were collected and analysed. The Edmister Z-score was calculated for all 822 SMEs and finally only enterprises with the Edmister Z-score lower than 0.47 or higher than 0.53 (a total of 760 enterprises were selected to the final research sample. A method of classification analysis and compliance measurement Cohen’s Kappa were used for testing the research hypothesis. On the basis of the research results, it can be concluded that the Edmister model is not applicable for predicting financial difficulties of SMEs in Croatia.

  20. Extended burnup: fuel development and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel Performance for the B and W 15 x 15 (Mark B) and 17 x 17 (Mark C) fuel assembly designs is examined on a plant by plant basis. An extensive data base of fuel assembly and rod bow measurements and tests which demonstrate that these phenomena should not limit the high burnup capability of B and W fuel is presented. Post-irradiation measurements to date for fuel rod and assembly growth show that these phenomena are behaving as predicted and can be adequately evaluated and designed for in high burnup fuel assemblies. Clad creep and ductility data as a function of burnup for B and W fuel is presented with emphasis on their effects on our high burnup targets. Finally, fission gas release and waterside corrosion measurements results are presented

  1. Burnup calculation code system COMRAD96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMRAD was one of the burnup code system developed by JAERI. COMRAD96 is a transfered version of COMRAD to Engineering Work Station. It is divided to several functional modules, 'Cross Section Treatment', 'Generation and Depletion Calculation', and 'Post Process'. It enables us to analyze a burnup problem considering a change of neutron spectrum using UNITBURN. Also it can display the γ Spectrum on a terminal. This report is the general description and user's manual of COMRAD96. (author)

  2. Validation of a new continuous Monte Carlo burnup code using a Mox fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactivity of nuclear fuel decreases with irradiation (or burnup) due to the transformation of heavy nuclides and the formation of fission products. Burnup credit studies aim at accounting for fuel irradiation in criticality studies of the nuclear fuel cycle (transport, storage, etc...). The principal objective of this study is to evaluate the potential capabilities of a newly developed burnup code called 'BUCAL1'. BUCAL1 differs in comparison with other burnup codes as it does not use the calculated neutron flux as input to other computer codes to generate the nuclide inventory for the next time step. Instead, BUCAL1 directly uses the neutron reaction tally information generated by MCNP for each nuclide of interest to determine the new nuclides inventory. This allows the full capabilities of MCNP to be incorporated into the calculation and a more accurate and robust analysis to be performed. Validation of BUCAL1 was processed by code-to-code comparisons using predictions of several codes from the NEA/OCED. Infinite multiplication factors (k∞) and important fission product and actinide concentrations were compared for a MOX core benchmark exercise. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  3. 26 CFR 1.42-4 - Application of not-for-profit rules of section 183 to low-income housing credit activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... is allowable may be limited or disallowed under other provisions of the Code or principles of tax law... SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INCOME TAX INCOME TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.42-4 Application...

  4. Observations on the CANDLE burn-up in various geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have looked at all geometrical conditions under which an auto catalytically propagating burnup wave (CANDLE burn-up) is possible. Thereby, the Sine Gordon equation finds a new place in the burn-up theory of nuclear fission reactors. For a practical reactor design the axially burning 'spaghetti' reactor and the azimuthally burning 'pancake' reactor, respectively, seem to be the most promising geometries for a practical reactor design. Radial and spherical burn-waves in cylindrical and spherical geometry, respectively, are principally impossible. Also, the possible applicability of such fission burn-waves on the OKLO-phenomenon and the GEOREACTOR in the center of Earth, postulated by Herndon, is discussed. A fast CANDLE-reactor can work with only depleted uranium. Therefore, uranium mining and uranium-enrichment are not necessary anymore. Furthermore, it is also possible to dispense with reprocessing because the uranium utilization factor is as high as about 40%. Thus, this completely new reactor type can open a new era of reactor technology

  5. Systemization of burnup sensitivity analysis code. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towards the practical use of fast reactors, it is a very important subject to improve prediction accuracy for neutronic properties in LMFBR cores from the viewpoint of improvements on plant efficiency with rationally high performance cores and that on reliability and safety margins. A distinct improvement on accuracy in nuclear core design has been accomplished by the development of adjusted nuclear library using the cross-section adjustment method, in which the results of criticality experiments of JUPITER and so on are reflected. In the design of large LMFBR cores, however, it is important to accurately estimate not only neutronic characteristics, for example, reaction rate distribution and control rod worth but also burnup characteristics, for example, burnup reactivity loss, breeding ratio and so on. For this purpose, it is desired to improve prediction accuracy of burnup characteristics using the data widely obtained in actual core such as the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. The analysis of burnup characteristics is needed to effectively use burnup characteristics data in the actual cores based on the cross-section adjustment method. So far, a burnup sensitivity analysis code, SAGEP-BURN, has been developed and confirmed its effectiveness. However, there is a problem that analysis sequence become inefficient because of a big burden to users due to complexity of the theory of burnup sensitivity and limitation of the system. It is also desired to rearrange the system for future revision since it is becoming difficult to implement new functions in the existing large system. It is not sufficient to unify each computational component for the following reasons; the computational sequence may be changed for each item being analyzed or for purpose such as interpretation of physical meaning. Therefore, it is needed to systemize the current code for burnup sensitivity analysis with component blocks of functionality that can be divided or constructed on occasion. For

  6. Anatomy of Credit Scoring Models

    OpenAIRE

    Matías Alfredo Gutiérrez Girault

    2008-01-01

    Introduced in the 70´s, the use of credit scoring techniques became widespread in the 90´s thanks to the development of better statistical and computational resources. Nowadays almost all the financial intermediaries use these techniques, at least to originate the credits they grant. Credit scoring models are algorithms that in a mechanical way assess the credit risk of a loan applicant or an existing bank client, by means of statistical, mathematic, econometric or artificial intelligence dev...

  7. The development of credit report information system

    OpenAIRE

    Pristavec, Jošt

    2011-01-01

    Credit Report Information System is a unified, complex web application designed to work with the data of Slovenian companies. A credit system is for the analyst to view and edit either general information about companies, such as name, address, tax identification number, agents, etc. or financial data, balances, credit reports, etc. The main functionality of applications is the possibility of creating a credit rating for each company and the possibility to export a credit rating as a report. ...

  8. Systemization of burnup sensitivity analysis code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To practical use of fact reactors, it is a very important subject to improve prediction accuracy for neutronic properties in LMFBR cores from the viewpoints of improvements on plant efficiency with rationally high performance cores and that on reliability and safety margins. A distinct improvement on accuracy in nuclear core design has been accomplished by development of adjusted nuclear library using the cross-section adjustment method, in which the results of critical experiments of JUPITER and so on are reflected. In the design of large LMFBR cores, however, it is important to accurately estimate not only neutronic characteristics, for example, reaction rate distribution and control rod worth but also burnup characteristics, for example, burnup reactivity loss, breeding ratio and so on. For this purpose, it is desired to improve prediction accuracy of burnup characteristics using the data widely obtained in actual core such as the experimental fast reactor core 'JOYO'. The analysis of burnup characteristics is needed to effectively use burnup characteristics data in the actual cores based on the cross-section adjustment method. So far, development of a analysis code for burnup sensitivity, SAGEP-BURN, has been done and confirmed its effectiveness. However, there is a problem that analysis sequence become inefficient because of a big burden to user due to complexity of the theory of burnup sensitivity and limitation of the system. It is also desired to rearrange the system for future revision since it is becoming difficult to implement new functionalities in the existing large system. It is not sufficient to unify each computational component for some reasons; computational sequence may be changed for each item being analyzed or for purpose such as interpretation of physical meaning. Therefore it is needed to systemize the current code for burnup sensitivity analysis with component blocks of functionality that can be divided or constructed on occasion. For this

  9. Le Crédit Burnup des combustibles REP-MOx français : méthodologie et conservatismes associés à l'évaluation JEFF-3.1.1.

    OpenAIRE

    Chambon, Amalia

    2013-01-01

    Considering spent fuel management (storage, transport and reprocessing), the approach using « fresh fuel assump-tion » in criticality-safety studies results in a significant conservatism in the calculated value of the system reactivity.The concept of Burnup Credit (BUC) consists in considering the reduction of the spent fuel reactivity due to its burnup.A careful BUC methodology, developed by CEA in association with AREVA-NC was recently validated and writtenup for PWR-UOx fuels. However, 22 ...

  10. 76 FR 40946 - WNC Tax Credits 40, LLC, WNC Tax Credits 41, LLC, WNC Housing Tax Credits Manager 2, LLC, WNC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-12

    ... COMMISSION WNC Tax Credits 40, LLC, WNC Tax Credits 41, LLC, WNC Housing Tax Credits Manager 2, LLC, WNC... sections other than rule 38a-1 under the Act. Applicants: WNC Tax Credits 40, LLC (``Fund 40'') and WNC Tax Credits 41, LLC (``Fund 41'') (each a ``Fund,'' and collectively, the ``Funds''), WNC Housing Tax...

  11. Burnup analysis of the power reactor, 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atomic number densities of uranium and transuranium were measured for JPDR-1. For the purpose of the study, the program has been prepared. It solves the burnup equation by the exponential matrix method. The void fraction and exposure distribution of the required data were calculated by three-dimensional nuclear-thermal-hydro-dynamic program FLORA under the operating conditions. The distribution of each atomic number density was obtained. The results agree with the measured values. The programs calculating nuclear constants in the cell were evaluated by obtaining the effective cross sections from the atomic number densities and the burnup. (auth.)

  12. Fission gas release modelling at high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large quantity of experimental data on fission gas release is now available in the public domain. It covers a wide variety of fuel types and burnups of up to more than 70 GWd/tU. This data, together with gas release measurements from British Energy's AGRs, has been used to build a comprehensive validation database for the fuel performance code ENIGMA. Validation of ENIGMA version 5.11 against this database has identified a requirement for model development to improve predictions at high burnup. A modified gas release model has been produced and tested. (author)

  13. Nuclear fuel burn-up economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the period 1981-1985, for the needs of Utility Organization, Beograd, and with the support of the Scientific Council of SR Srbija, work has been performed on the study entitled 'Nuclear Fuel Burn-up Economy'. The forst [phase, completed during the year 1983 comprised: comparative analysis of commercial NPP from the standpoint of nuclear fuel requirements; development of methods for fuel burn-up analysis; specification of elements concerning the nuclear fuel for the tender documentation. The present paper gives the short description of the purpose, content and results achieved in the up-to-now work on the study. (author)

  14. CREDIT SYSTEM AND CREDIT GUARANTEE PROGRAMS

    OpenAIRE

    Turgay GECER

    2012-01-01

    Credit system is an integrated architecture consisted of financial information, credit rating, credit risk management, receivables and credit insurance systems, credit derivative markets and credit guarantee programs. The main purpose of the credit system is to provide the functioning of all credit channels and to make it easy to access of credit sources demanded by all of real and legal persons in any economic system. Credit guarantee program, the one of prominent elements of the credit syst...

  15. Development of burnup analysis system for fast reactors (2) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvement on prediction accuracy for neutronics property of fast reactor cores is one of the most important study domains in terms of both achievement of high economical plant efficiency based on reasonably advanced designs and increased reliability and safety margins. In former study, considerable improvement on prediction accuracy in neutronics design has been achieved in the development of the unified constants library as a fruit of a series of critical experiments such as JUPITER in application of the reactor constant adjustments. For design of fast reactor cores, however, improvement of not only static properties but also burnup properties is very important. For such purpose, it is necessary to improve the prediction accuracy on burnup properties using actual burnup data of 'JOYO' and 'MONJU', experimental and prototype fast reactors. Recently, study on effective burnup method for minor actinides becomes an important theme. However, there is a problem that analysis work tends to become inefficient for lack of functionality suitable for analysis of composition change due to burnup since the conventional analysis system is targeted to critical assembly systems. Therefore development of burnup analysis system for fast reactors with modularity and flexibility can contribute actual core design work and improvement of prediction accuracy. In the previous study on 'Development of Burnup Analysis System (for Fast Reactors)' in FY2005, basic design was conducted to define each component in the system (input, solver, edit) and how to drive them. In this study, detailed design of the system and implementation of the I/O component were conducted according to the results in the basic design followed by proto-typing implementation. (author)

  16. Application of Systematic Approach to the Study of Financial and Credit Infrastructure of Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr Vladimirovich Dorzhdeev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The increasing value of development of financial and credit infrastructure of agriculture in reproduction activity of agricultural producers is caused by the need of continuous receipt of funds for financing the requirements of agriculture and limited opportunities of selffinancing as a result of rather high capital intensity at rather low level of profitability. The systematic approach to research of financial and credit infrastructure of agriculture assumes its consideration as a set of the interconnected and interdependent subsystems and their elements focused on performance of certain functions. The use of systematic approach deepens complete theoretical ideas about the financial and credit infrastructure of agriculture. In the present article the essence of financial and credit infrastructure of agriculture in the points of view of functional and institutional aspects is opened, its subsystems are characterized, their functions and elements are defined by the authors. The study of the systemic features of market infrastructure allowed the authors to reveal the signs peculiar to financial and credit infrastructure of agricultural sector.

  17. The application of data envelopment analysis method in managing companies' credit risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ferus

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the present article is a new procedure forecasting credit risk of companies in Polish economic environment. What favors the suggested approach is the fact that in Poland, unlike in western countries, DEA method has not yet been implemented in order to assess credit risk that companies face. The research described in the article has been conducted on the basis of comparison of suggested DEA method with currently used procedures, namely point method, discriminative analysis and linear regression. In order to verify and compare the efficiency of various methods of company credit risk estimation the efficiency of classification of companies has also been examined. The study has involved an analyzed sample (a teaching sample as well as a test sample which was not taken in model building. Considering the research, it can be concluded that DEA method facilitates forecasting financial problems, including bankruptcy of companies in Polish economic conditions, and its efficiency is comparable or even greater than approaches implemented so far. The DEA methodology was found to be successful within the credit evaluation process, however it might not be used as a stand alone tool for this purpose, but it can offer valuable insight to the loan officer or the analyst facing the credit approval decision.

  18. Transient behaviour of high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main subjects of the meeting were the discussion of regulatory background, integral tests and analysis, plant calculations, separate-effect test and analysis, concerning high burnup phenomena during RIA accidents in reactors, especially LWR, BWR and PWR type reactors. 32 papers were abstracted and indexed individually for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  19. Optimum burnup of BAEC TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Optimum loading scheme for BAEC TRIGA core is out-to-in loading with 10 fuels/cycle starting with 5 for the first reload. ► The discharge burnup ranges from 17% to 24% of U235 per fuel element for full power (3 MW) operation. ► Optimum extension of operating core life is 100 MWD per reload cycle. - Abstract: The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of BAEC (Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission) has been operating since 1986 without any reshuffling or reloading yet. Optimum fuel burnup strategy has been investigated for the present BAEC TRIGA core, where three out-to-in loading schemes have been inspected in terms of core life extension, burnup economy and safety. In considering different schemes of fuel loading, optimization has been searched by only varying the number of fuels discharged and loaded. A cost function has been defined and evaluated based on the calculated core life and fuel load and discharge. The optimum loading scheme has been identified for the TRIGA core, the outside-to-inside fuel loading with ten fuels for each cycle starting with five fuels for the first reload. The discharge burnup has been found ranging from 17% to 24% of U235 per fuel element and optimum extension of core operating life is 100 MWD for each loading cycle. This study will contribute to the in-core fuel management of TRIGA reactor

  20. CREDIT Performance Indicator Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anne Kathrine; Bertelsen, Niels Haldor; Haugbølle, Kim;

    2010-01-01

    During the past two years the Nordic Baltic research project CREDIT (Construction and Real Estate – Developing Indicators for Transparency) has worked with the aim to improve transparency of value creation in building and real estate. One of the central deliverables of the CREDIT project was a...... framework of indicators relevant in building and real estate and applicable in the Nordic and Baltic countries as well as a proposal for a set of key indicators. The study resulting in CREDIT Performance Indicator Framework has been based on 28 case studies of evaluation practises in the building and real...... regulations in the countries participating in CREDIT. The Performance Indicator Framework encompassed 187 indicators grouped in 7 main groups of indicators and 42 sub-groups. Based on the CREDIT case studies it was concluded that there neither is link between certain indicators and specific building types...

  1. Credit Hours with No Set Time: A Study of Credit Policies in Asynchronous Online Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasuhn, Frederick Carl

    2014-01-01

    U.S. public university system policies were examined to learn how credit hours were determined for asynchronous online education. Findings indicated that (a) credit hour meaning and use are not consistent, (b) primary responsibility for credit hour decisions was at the local level, and (c) no policies exist to guide credit hour application for…

  2. Burnup dependent core neutronic analysis for PBMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The strategy for core neutronics modeling is based on SCALE4.4 code KENOV.a module that uses Monte Carlo calculational methods. The calculations are based on detailed unit cell and detailed core modeling. The fuel pebble is thoroughly modeled by introducing unit cell modeling for the graphite matrix and the fuel kernels in the pebble. The core is then modeled by placing these pebbles randomly throughout the core, yet not loosing track of any one of them. For the burnup model, a cyclic manner is adopted by coupling the KENOV.a and ORIGEN-S modules. Shifting down one slice at each discrete time step, and inserting fresh fuel from the top, this cyclic calculation model continues until equilibrium burnup cycle is achieved. (author)

  3. Program package for 2D burnup calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The program package for 2 dimension burnup calculation was developed for TRIGA Mark III reactor. The package consists of 3 modules: PRESIX, SIXTUS-2, and BURN; 1 library, and 2 input files. PRESIX module prepared cross sections for diffusion calculation. SIXTUS-2 module, a two dimensional diffusion code in hexagonal geometry, calculates keff, neutron fluxes and power distributions. BURN module performs the burnup of fuel elements and stored the result in the ELEM.DAT file. PRESIX.LIB is two group cross section library for major reactor core components prepared using WIMS-D4 code. PRES.INP, the first input file, reads information on reactor power and core loading pattern. ELEM.DAT, the second input file, is prepared for specific TRIGA reactor and dependent on operation history. To verify the reactor model and computational methods, the calculated excess reactivities were compared to the measurement. The results are in good agreement. (author)

  4. Study of nuclear fuel burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors approach theoretical treatment of isotopic composition changement for nuclear fuel in nuclear reactors. They show the difficulty of exhaustive treatment of burn-up problems and introduce the principal simplifying principles. Due to these principles they write and solve analytically the evolution equations of the concentration for the principal nuclides both in the case of fast and thermal reactors. Finally, they expose and comment the results obtained in the case of a power fast reactor. (author)

  5. Compressive creep of simulated burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to study the nitride fuel mechanical properties, we measured the compressive steady state creep rates of uranium mononitride (UN) and UN containing neodymium which was simulated burnup fuel. The stress exponent n'' and the apparent activation energy ''Q'' of the creep rate were determined in the range of 27.5 ≤ σ ≤ 200.0 MPa and 950 ≤ T ≤ 1500 degC. (author)

  6. Burnup and plutonium distribution of WWER-440 fuel pin at extended burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of rim region in LWR UO2 based nuclear fuel at high burnup is a common observation. This region has very high porosity due to excessive gas release. Such a region is also characterized by a significantly high plutonium concentration and high local burnup compared to the internal fuel region. Spatial distribution of these parameters has been incorporated with fuel behavior and performance analysis codes by using mostly empirical relations. Variation of these parameters depends on the neutron flux as well as neutron energy spectrum. Detailed neutronics analysis is necessary for the accurate prediction of these parameters. This study is performed by MCNP4B Monte Carlo code for the calculation of local neutron flux, ORIGEN2 for burnup and depletion calculations, and MONTEBURNS for coupling these codes. For the analysis, a typical WWER-440 fuel pin and surrounding water moderator are considered in a hexagonal pin cell. Fuel pin is divided into a number of radial segments. A relatively small mesh size is used at the region near the surface to reveal the rim effect. The variation of plutonium and local burnup are obtained for high burnup. Results are compared with existing experimental observations for WWER-440 fuel and other theoretical predictions

  7. The Application of DEA Method in Evaluating Credit Risk of Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Feruś

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the present article is a new procedure forecasting credit risk of companies in Polish economy environment. What favors the suggested approach is the fact that in Poland, unlike in western countries, DEA method has not yet been implemented in order to assess credit risk that companies face. The research described in the article has been conducted on the basis of comparison of suggested DEA method with currently used procedures, namely point method, discriminative analysis and linear regression. Considering the research, it can be concluded that DEA method facilitates forecasting financial problems, including bankruptcy of companies in Polish economic conditions, and its effectiveness is comparable or even greater than approaches implemented so far.  

  8. High burnup effects in WWER fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smirnov, V.; Smirnov, A. [RRC Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, Dimitrovqrad (Russian Federation)

    1996-03-01

    Since 1987 at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors, the examinations of the WWER spent fuel assemblies has been carried out. These investigations are aimed to gain information on WWER spent fuel conditions in order to validate the fuel assemblies use during the 3 and 4 year fuel cycle in the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 units. At present time, the aim is to reach an average fuel burnup of 55 MWd/kgU. According to this aim, a new investigation program on the WWER spent fuel elements is started. The main objectives of this program are to study the high burnup effects and their influence on the WWER fuel properties. This paper presented the main statistical values of the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors` fuel assemblies and their fragment parameters. Average burnup of fuel in the investigated fuel assemblies was in the range of 13 to 49.7 MWd/kgU. In this case, the numer of fuel cycles was from 1 to 4 during operation of the fuel assemblies.

  9. Application of wind generation capacity credits in the Great Britain and Irish systems

    OpenAIRE

    Dent, Chris; Bialek, Janusz W.; Hasche, Bernhard; Keane, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    The concept of capacity credit is widely used to quantify the contribution of renewable technologies to securing demand. This may be quantified in a number of ways; this paper recommends the use of Effective Load Carrying Capability (ELCC, the additional demand which the new generation can support without increasing system risk), with system risk being measured using Loss of Load Expectation (LOLE, this is calculated through direct use of historic time series for demand and wind l...

  10. Burn-up and cycle length optimization project of the robust fuel programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spanish electric sector (UNESA) takes part in the Robust Fuel programme in the different work groups set up by EPRI. Iberinco, with the collaboration of Iberdrola Generacion (TECNO and Cofrentes NPP) and Soluziona Ingenieria, has created a stable multidisciplinary group to assimilate and follow up this program, analyzing in detail the technology generated and evaluating the conclusions to provide the most suitable recommendations for application. Along these lines, one of the most promising projects within technical group 3 (High burn properties) has been the one called Burn-up and cycle Length Optimization. In January 2000 Duke Power published a study on the plants it owns (PWR type) and 18-month cycles, to establish the optimum unloading burn-up of fuel. The conclusion it reached is that the fuel cost drops t a minimum for average unload burn-ups of between 60 and 70 GWd/MTU. As an extension to this study and covering a wider base of considerations, Exelon, with the support of Westinghouse and the University of Pennsylvania, released a study in December 2001 on different reference cores with different cycle lengths. In this study, the optimum burn-up without exceeding current maximum enrichment limits (5%) is determined. Publication of the results of the second phase, considering higher enrichments, was due in the summer of 2002. The design of the core to be refueled and economic analyzes show that both pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR) can obtain significant benefits by increasing the fuel unloading burn-up above currently licensed limits. However, the optimum unload burn-up level is not reached without exceeding the current enrichment limit of 5% . (Author)

  11. Preliminary neutronic design of high burnup OTTO cycle pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pebble bed type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) is among the interesting nuclear reactor designs in terms of safety and flexibility for co-generation applications. In addition, the strong inherent safety characteristics of the pebble bed reactor (PBR) which is based on natural mechanisms improve the simplicity of the PBR design, in particular for the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO) cycle PBR design. One of the important challenges of the OTTO cycle PBR design, and nuclear reactor design in general, is improving the nuclear fuel utilization which is shown by attaining a higher burnup value. This study performed a preliminary neutronic design study of a 200 MWt OTTO cycle PBR with high burnup while fulfilling the safety criteria of the PBR design.The safety criteria of the design was represented by the per-fuel-pebble maximum power generation of 4.5 kW/pebble. The maximum burnup value was also limited by the tested maximum burnup value which maintained the integrity of the pebble fuel. Parametric surveys were performed to obtain the optimized parameters used in this study, which are the fuel enrichment, per-pebble heavy metal (HM) loading, and the average axial speed of the fuel. An optimum design with burnup value of 131.1 MWd/Kg-HM was achieved in this study which is much higher compare to the burnup of the reference design HTR-MODUL and a previously proposed OTTO-cycle PBR design. This optimum design uses 17% U-235 enrichment with 4 g HM-loading per fuel pebble. (author)

  12. Preliminary Neutronic Design of High Burnup OTTO Cycle Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Setiadipura

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The pebble bed type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR is among the interesting nuclear reactor designs in terms of safety and flexibility for co-generation applications. In addition, the strong inherent safety characteristics of the pebble bed reactor (PBR which is based on natural mechanisms improve the simplicity of the PBR design, in particular for the Once-Through-Then-Out (OTTO cycle PBR design. One of the important challenges of the OTTO cycle PBR design, and nuclear reactor design in general, is improving the nuclear fuel utilization which is shown by attaining a higher burnup value. This study performed a preliminary neutronic design study of a 200 MWt OTTO cycle PBR with high burnup while fulfilling the safety criteria of the PBR design.The safety criteria of the design was represented by the per-fuel-pebble maximum power generation of 4.5 kW/pebble. The maximum burnup value was also limited by the tested maximum burnup value which maintained the integrity of the pebble fuel. Parametric surveys were performed to obtain the optimized parameters used in this study, which are the fuel enrichment, per-pebble heavy metal (HM loading, and the average axial speed of the fuel. An optimum design with burnup value of 131.1 MWd/Kg-HM was achieved in this study which is much higher compare to the burnup of the reference design HTR-MODUL and a previously proposed OTTO-cycle PBR design. This optimum design uses 17% U-235 enrichment with 4 g HM-loading per fuel pebble

  13. An Application Relating To Credit Risk and Credit Risk Management in Tu rkish Banking System: The Case of Turkey Garanti Bank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyhan Çil Koçyiğit

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Within the globalization process of the world, at the competitive area arised as a result of the rapid increase in the number of banks and their branches in developing countries, the vigorously existance of banks depend on the management of the risks faced successfully. Banks must establish their credit strategies onto a good risk managment. Indeed, it is the inevitable fact that the success of financial institutions depends on having a powerful risk management system. In this study, by using the banking ratios, it is aimed to investigate the credit-risk changes of Turkish Garanti Bank (S.C. by three-month periods of 2007–2012 and give information about the risk management of Turkish Garanti Bank (S.C.. In conclusion, it is seen that, at Turkish Garanti Bank (S.C., credit risk is measured and evaluated in accordance with international standards, and all risk management is executing in parallel with Basel II regulations.

  14. An Analysis of Credit Scoring for Agricultural Loans in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Visit Limsombunchai; Christopher Gan; Minsoo Lee

    2005-01-01

    Loan contract performance determines the profitability and stability of the financial institutions and screening the loan applications is a key process in minimizing credit risk. Before making any credit decisions, credit analysis (the assessment of the financial history and financial backgrounds of the borrowers) should be completed as part of the screening process. A good credit risk assessment assists financial institutions on loan pricing, determining amount of credit, credit risk managem...

  15. Theory analysis and simple calculation of travelling wave burnup scheme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Travelling wave burnup scheme is a new burnup scheme that breeds fuel locally just before it burns. Based on the preliminary theory analysis, the physical imagine was found. Through the calculation of a R-z cylinder travelling wave reactor core with ERANOS code system, the basic physical characteristics of this new burnup scheme were concluded. The results show that travelling wave reactor is feasible in physics, and there are some good features in the reactor physics. (authors)

  16. Core burnup characteristics of high conversion light water reactor, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate core burnup characteristics of a high conversion light water reactor (HCLWR) with tight pitched lattice, core burnup calculation was made using two dimensional diffusion method. The volume ratio of moderator to fuel is about 0.8 in the reactor (HCLWR-J1) under study. The burnup calculations were carried out under the assumption of three batch and out-in fuel loading from the first cycle to the equilibrium cycle. A detailed evaluation was made for discharge burnup, conversion ratio, power distribution, and reactivity coefficients and so on. (author)

  17. Burnup measurements of leader fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some time ago the CCHEN authorities decided to produce a set of 50 low enrichment fuel elements. These elements were produced in the PEC (Fuel Elements Plant), located at CCHEN offices in Lo Aguirre. These new fuel elements have basically the same geometrical characteristics of previous ones, which were British and made with raw material from the U.S. The principal differences between our fuel elements and the British ones is the density of fissile material, U-235, which was increased to compensate the reduction in enrichment. Last year, the Fuel Elements Plant (PEC) delivered the shipment's first four (4) fuel elements, called leaders, to the RECH1. A test element was delivered too, and the complete set was introduced into the reactor's nucleus, following the normal routine, but performing a special follow-up on their behavior inside the nucleus. This experimental element has only one outside fuel plate, and the remaining (15) structural plates are aluminum. In order to study the burnup, the test element was taken out of the nucleus, in mid- November 1999, and left to decay until June 2000, when it was moved to the laboratory (High Activity Cell), to start the burnup measurements, with a gamma spectroscopy system. This work aims to show the results of these measurements and in addition to meet the following objectives: (a) Visual test of the plate's general condition; (b) Sipping test of fission products; (c) Study of burn-up distribution in the plate; (d) Check and improve the calculus algorithm; (e) Comparison of the results obtained from the spectroscopy with the ones from neutron calculus

  18. 78 FR 33445 - Office of Small Credit Unions (OSCUI) Grant Program Access For Credit Unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-04

    ... ADMINISTRATION Office of Small Credit Unions (OSCUI) Grant Program Access For Credit Unions AGENCY: National..., 2011. 76 FR 67583. Additional requirements are found at 12 CFR Parts 701 and 741. Applicants should... Qualifying Credit Union that submits a complete Application to NCUA under the OSCUI Grant Program. B....

  19. A nonparametric urn-based approach to interacting failing systems with an application to credit risk modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Cirillo, Pasquale; Muliere, Pietro

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose a new nonparametric approach to interacting failing systems (FS), that is systems whose probability of failure is not negligible in a fixed time horizon, a typical example being firms and financial bonds. The main purpose when studying a FS is to calculate the probability of default and the distribution of the number of failures that may occur during the observation period. A model used to study a failing system is defined default model. In particular, we present a general recursive model constructed by the means of inter- acting urns. After introducing the theoretical model and its properties we show a first application to credit risk modeling, showing how to assess the idiosyncratic probability of default of an obligor and the joint probability of failure of a set of obligors in a portfolio of risks, that are divided into reliability classes.

  20. Fuel burnup monitor for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An in-service detector is designed using the principle of comparing temperatures in the fuel element and in the detector material. The detector consists of 3 metallic heat conductors insulated with ceramic insulators, two of them with uranium fuel spheres at the end. One sphere is coated with zirconium, the other with zirconium and gold. The precision of measurement of the degree of fuel burnup depends on the precision of the measurement of temperature and is determined from the difference in temperature gradients of the two uranium fuel spheres in the detector. (M.D.)

  1. High Burnup Fuel Performance and Safety Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Je Keun; Lee, Chan Bok; Kim, Dae Ho (and others)

    2007-03-15

    The worldwide trend of nuclear fuel development is to develop a high burnup and high performance nuclear fuel with high economies and safety. Because the fuel performance evaluation code, INFRA, has a patent, and the superiority for prediction of fuel performance was proven through the IAEA CRP FUMEX-II program, the INFRA code can be utilized with commercial purpose in the industry. The INFRA code was provided and utilized usefully in the universities and relevant institutes domesticallly and it has been used as a reference code in the industry for the development of the intrinsic fuel rod design code.

  2. 48 CFR 2132.607 - Tax credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Tax credit. 2132.607... Contract Debts 2132.607 Tax credit. FAR 32.607 has no practical application to FEGLI Program contracts. The... Government, contractors may not offset debts to the Fund by a tax credit that is solely a...

  3. 48 CFR 1632.607 - Tax credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Tax credit. 1632.607... 1632.607 Tax credit. FAR 32.607 has no practical application to FEHBP contracts. The statutory... may not offset debts to the Fund by a tax credit which is solely a Government obligation....

  4. 48 CFR 31.201-5 - Credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Credits. 31.201-5 Section... REQUIREMENTS CONTRACT COST PRINCIPLES AND PROCEDURES Contracts With Commercial Organizations 31.201-5 Credits. The applicable portion of any income, rebate, allowance, or other credit relating to any...

  5. Consuming credit.

    OpenAIRE

    P Langley

    2014-01-01

    This article provides an editorial introduction to the special issue of Consumption Markets & Culture devoted to the consolidated mass markets and cultures of contemporary consumer credit. It identifies a strange irony that arises from the extant social scientific literatures on consumption and retail finance: for all the analysis that they offer of consumerism and credit, the consumption of consumer credit itself is rarely considered. An overview is provided of how the articles in the specia...

  6. Global credit and domestic credit booms

    OpenAIRE

    Claudio Borio; Robert McCauley; Patrick McGuire

    2011-01-01

    US dollar credit is growing quickly outside the United States, especially in Asia, and in some economies it has outpaced overall credit growth. Cross-border sources of credit bear watching in view of their record of outgrowing overall credit in credit booms. Foreign currency and cross-border sources of credit raise policy issues.

  7. Impact of High Burnup Uranium Oxide and Mixed Uranium-Plutonium Oxide Water Reactor Fuel on Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    switch was beyond the scope of this report. Political and strategic considerations were also not taken into account. Furthermore, the relative importance of the technical, economic, and other considerations will vary from country to country. Analysis was limited in some evaluations due to the amount of available data. Because wet storage is associated with low temperatures, cladding degradation is expected to be low. High burnup UOX and MOX storage will increase the heat load, and potentially radioactive releases. This may require an upgrade of the pool facility with respect to heat removal and pool cleanup systems, and additional neutron poison material in the pool water or in storage racks. Re-evaluation of criticality and regulatory aspects may also be required. In dry storage and transportation, the cask has to provide safe confinement/containment. In parallel, the decay heat has to be removed to limit temperature induced material alterations. Thus, dry storage is more sensitive to increased UOX burnup and MOX use than wet storage because of higher temperatures resulting in higher stresses on the cladding. The ability to meet applicable regulatory limits will need to be re-evaluated for higher burnup UOX and MOX on a case by case basis. Sub-criticality during transportation has to be ensured even under accident conditions, such as, for example, cask drop. Higher burnup fuel may have significantly more hydrogen in the cladding and structure and, thus, reduced ductility. Since MOX fuel has a similar design to UOX fuel, its mechanical behaviour should not be different. The result of these evaluations for storage and transportation may require a redesign of the cask heat removal and shielding systems, redesign of the structural support for the spent fuel assemblies, a decrease in the number of spent fuel assemblies that can be placed into a single storage cask, and an increased decay time in the pool prior to placement in dry storage. Reprocessing plants are designed and

  8. Study of the acceleration of nuclide burnup calculation using GPU with CUDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computation costs of neutronics calculation code become higher as physics models and methods are complicated. The degree of them in neutronics calculation tends to be limited due to available computing power. In order to open a door to the new world, use of GPU for general purpose computing, called GPGPU, has been studied [1]. GPU has multi-threads computing mechanism enabled with multi-processors which realize mush higher performance than CPUs. NVIDIA recently released the CUDA language for general purpose computation which is a C-like programming language. It is relatively easy to learn compared to the conventional ones used for GPGPU, such as OpenGL or CG. Therefore application of GPU to the numerical calculation became much easier. In this paper, we tried to accelerate nuclide burnup calculation, which is important to predict nuclides time dependence in the core, using GPU with CUDA. We chose the 4.-order Runge-Kutta method to solve the nuclide burnup equation. The nuclide burnup calculation and the 4.-order Runge-Kutta method were suitable to the first step of introduction CUDA into numerical calculation because these consist of simple operations of matrices and vectors of single precision where actual codes were written in the C++ language. Our experimental results showed that nuclide burnup calculations with GPU have possibility of speedup by factor of 100 compared to that with CPU. (authors)

  9. Review of Technical Issues Related to Predicting Isotopic Compositions and Source Terms for High-Burnup LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I. C.; Parks, C. V.

    2000-12-11

    This report has been prepared to review the technical issues important to the prediction of isotopic compositions and source terms for high-burnup, light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel as utilized in the licensing of spent fuel transport and storage systems. The current trend towards higher initial 235U enrichments, more complex assembly designs, and more efficient fuel management schemes has resulted in higher spent fuel burnups than seen in the past. This trend has led to a situation where high-burnup assemblies from operating LWRs now extend beyond the area where available experimental data can be used to validate the computational methods employed to calculate spent fuel inventories and source terms. This report provides a brief review of currently available validation data, including isotopic assays, decay heat measurements, and shielded dose-rate measurements. Potential new sources of experimental data available in the near term are identified. A review of the background issues important to isotopic predictions and some of the perceived technical challenges that high-burnup fuel presents to the current computational methods are discussed. Based on the review, the phenomena that need to be investigated further and the technical issues that require resolution are presented. The methods and data development that may be required to address the possible shortcomings of physics and depletion methods in the high-burnup and high-enrichment regime are also discussed. Finally, a sensitivity analysis methodology is presented. This methodology is currently being investigated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as a computational tool to better understand the changing relative significance of the underlying nuclear data in the different enrichment and burnup regimes and to identify the processes that are dominant in the high-burnup regime. The potential application of the sensitivity analysis methodology to help establish a range of applicability for experimental

  10. Burnup determination of water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present meeting was scheduled by the International Atomic Energy Agency in consultation with the Members of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. The meeting was hosted by the Commission of the European Communities, at the Transuranium Research Laboratory, Joint Research Centre Karlsruhe, in the Federal Republic of Germany. This subject was dealt with for the first time by the IAEA. It was found to correspond adequately to this type of Specialist Meeting and to be suitable at a moment when the extension of burnup constitutes a major technical and economical issue in fuel technology. It was stressed that analysis of highly burnt fuels, mixed oxides and burnable absorber bearing fuels required extension of the experimental data base, to comply with the increasing demand for an improved fuel management, including better qualification of reactor physics codes. Twenty-seven participants from eleven countries plus two international organizations attended the Meeting. Twelve papers were given during three technical sessions, followed by a panel discussion which allowed to formulate the conclusions of the meeting and recommendations to the Agency. In addition, participants were invited to give an outline of their national programmes, related to Burnup Determination of Water Reactor Fuel. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 12 papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Power excursion analysis for high burnup cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was undertaken of power excursions in high burnup cores. There were three objectives in this study. One was to identify boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) transients in which there is significant energy deposition in the fuel. Another was to analyze the response of BWRs to the rod drop accident (RDA) and other transients in which there is a power excursion. The last objective was to investigate the sources of uncertainty in the RDA analysis. In a boiling water reactor, the events identified as having significant energy deposition in the fuel were a rod drop accident, a recirculation flow control failure, and the overpressure events; in a pressurized water reactor, they were a rod ejection accident and boron dilution events. The RDA analysis was done with RAMONA-4B, a computer code that models the space- dependent neutron kinetics throughout the core along with the thermal hydraulics in the core, vessel, and steamline. The results showed that the calculated maximum fuel enthalpy in high burnup fuel will be affected by core design, initial conditions, and modeling assumptions. The important uncertainties in each of these categories are discussed in the report

  12. Determination of research reactor fuel burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared by a Consultants Group which met during 12-15 June 1989 at the Jozef Stefan Institute, Yugoslavia, and during 11-13 July 1990 at the IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, Austria, with subsequent contributions from the Consultants. The report is intended to provide information to research reactor operators and managers on the different, most commonly used methods of determining research reactor fuel burnup: 1) reactor physics calculations, 2) measurement of reactivity effects, and 3) gamma ray spectrometry. The advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed. References are provided to assist the reactor operator planning to establish a programme for burnup determination of fuel. Destructive techniques are not included since such techniques are expensive, time consuming, and not normally performed by the reactor operators. In this report, TRIGA fuel elements are used in most examples to describe the methods. The same techniques however can be used for research reactors which use different types of fuel elements. 22 refs, 13 figs, 2 tabs

  13. Establishing a PWR burn-up library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting out from data file ENDF/B IV /1/, a cross-section library has been established for the calculation of operating conditions in pressurized water reactors of the type used in BIBLIS B. The library includes macroscopic, homogenized 2-group cross-sections for all types of fuel elements used in this reactor, including those equipped with boron glass rods. For their calculation the previous irradiation of the fuel has been taken into consideration by approximation. Information on fuel consumption from cell burn-up calculations has been stored in a separate data file. It was designed as a base for the determination of cross sections to be used in the calculation of the incident ''main-steam pipe fracture''. For this library the description of cross sections as a function of the moderator status chose the water densities at 3000C/155 bar, 1900C/140 bar and 1000C/100 bar as fixed values. The burn-up library has been tested by a three-dimensional calculation for the 1sup(st) cycle of the BIBLIS B-reactor using program QUABOX /2/. This showed variances with the anticipated course concerning critically, which can be explained almost quantitatively by known deficiencies of the ENDF/b-IV library. (orig.)

  14. The Financial Indicators' Application in the Evaluation of Credit Risk%财务指标评价银行信贷风险的实例运用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    伍宇冰

    2011-01-01

    纵观古今,对于全球银行业来说,信贷风险管理的好坏决定了银行的生死存亡。近年来,随着我国银行业体制改革深入,各家银行信贷业务发展迅速,但是我国银行业信贷风险管理观念薄弱,管理水平仍较低,信贷业务快速发展和风险管理相对滞后的矛盾日益凸显,国内关于银行信贷风险管理手段和技术的研究也比较落后,本文将着重从财务报表分析角度探讨财务指标在信贷风险评价中的运用,探讨财务指标在信贷风险评价中的有效性。%Historically,it is the performance of credit risk management that determines the survival of banks for the global banking.In recent years,with the further structural reforms in the banking of our country,the credit risk management of banks develop rapidly.However,owing to the weakness of the conception of credit risk management,the low level of the management and the debasing ability to withstand risks in our country's banking,the contradiction between the rapid development of credit and relatively lag of the risk management is becoming increasingly conspicuous.Domestic research on the methods and technology of bank credit risk management is relatively backward.From the perspective of financial statements analysis,this paper arms at discussing the financial indicators' application and effectiveness in the evaluation of credit risk.

  15. Method of compensating distribution of reactor burnup degree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An object of the present invention is to attain an appropriate power distribution and a burnup degree distribution during an operation cycle, thereby improving the succeeding operation cycle in a BWR type reactor. That is, a deviation between a distribution of an actual axial burnup degree and that of an aimed axial burnup degree in a reactor core is measured upon completion of the operation cycle by using a burnup degree distribution measuring device. Then, the content of burnable poisons in fresh fuels to be charged to the reactor core is controlled in accordance with the deviation, to compensate the distribution of the axial burnup degree in the reactor core in the next operation cycle. Accordingly, the distribution of the axial burnup degree in the reactor core can be made closer to the aimed distribution of the burnup degree in the next operation cycle. Further, appropriate power distribution and a burnup degree distribution can be obtained by improving the axial power distribution in the reactor core with the characteristics of the fresh fuels themselves to be loaded, without depending only on changes of a control rod pattern. Accordingly, fuel economy and operation performance can be improved. (I.S.)

  16. 12 CFR 202.8 - Special purpose credit programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special purpose credit programs. 202.8 Section... CREDIT OPPORTUNITY ACT (REGULATION B) § 202.8 Special purpose credit programs. (a) Standards for programs... to extend special purpose credit to applicants who meet eligibility requirements under the...

  17. 24 CFR 201.22 - Credit requirements for borrowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Credit requirements for borrowers... § 201.22 Credit requirements for borrowers. (a) Credit application and review. (1) Before making a loan... borrower and any co-maker or co-signer is solvent and an acceptable credit risk, with a reasonable...

  18. Coarse time-step integration method for burnup calculation of LWR lattice containing gadolinium-poisoned rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of enhancing the efficiency of the burnup calculation of LWR lattice, two coarse time-step integration methods have been developed, both of which are to be used in combination with the ordinary Runge-Kutta-Gill method. It has been ensured through the numerical results of model problems simulating the depletion of 157Gd in a gadolinium-poisoned rod that the maximum time-step size allowed by the proposed methods is roughly 4 or 5 times larger than that achieved by the Predictor-Corrector method known as an effective coarse time-step method, and consequently that the proposed methods would reduce the computation time to a half or less when applied to an LWR lattice burnup calculation. The factor of reduction of computation time is still more significant if compared with other conventional methods such as the Runge-Kutta-Gill method etc. In addition, it has been demonstrated through their application to the LWR lattice physics code TGBLA that no appreciable error is observed over the range of time-step size up to 1GWd/t in the burnup calculation for a typical BWR lattice containing gadolinium-poisoned rods. Although the method development and verification presented here place emphasis on the cases of LWR lattice burnup, it is expected that the proposed methods would be applicable equally well to general problems dealing with the nuclide transmutation due to burnup. (author)

  19. Thermonuclear burn-up in deuterated methane $CD_4$

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, Alexei M

    2010-01-01

    The thermonuclear burn-up of highly compressed deuterated methane CD$_4$ is considered in the spherical geometry. The minimal required values of the burn-up parameter $x = \\rho_0 \\cdot r_f$ are determined for various temperatures $T$ and densities $\\rho_0$. It is shown that thermonuclear burn-up in $CD_4$ becomes possible in practice if its initial density $\\rho_0$ exceeds $\\approx 5 \\cdot 10^3$ $g \\cdot cm^{-3}$. Burn-up in CD$_2$T$_2$ methane requires significantly ($\\approx$ 100 times) lower compressions. The developed approach can be used in order to compute the critical burn-up parameters in an arbitrary deuterium containing fuel.

  20. Propagation of statistical and nuclear data uncertainties in Monte Carlo burn-up calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Herranz, Nuria [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain)], E-mail: nuria@din.upm.es; Cabellos, Oscar [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain); Sanz, Javier [Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, UNED (Spain); Juan, Jesus [Laboratorio de Estadistica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain); Kuijper, Jim C. [NRG - Fuels, Actinides and Isotopes Group, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-04-15

    Two methodologies to propagate the uncertainties on the nuclide inventory in combined Monte Carlo-spectrum and burn-up calculations are presented, based on sensitivity/uncertainty and random sampling techniques (uncertainty Monte Carlo method). Both enable the assessment of the impact of uncertainties in the nuclear data as well as uncertainties due to the statistical nature of the Monte Carlo neutron transport calculation. The methodologies are implemented in our MCNP-ACAB system, which combines the neutron transport code MCNP-4C and the inventory code ACAB. A high burn-up benchmark problem is used to test the MCNP-ACAB performance in inventory predictions, with no uncertainties. A good agreement is found with the results of other participants. This benchmark problem is also used to assess the impact of nuclear data uncertainties and statistical flux errors in high burn-up applications. A detailed calculation is performed to evaluate the effect of cross-section uncertainties in the inventory prediction, taking into account the temporal evolution of the neutron flux level and spectrum. Very large uncertainties are found at the unusually high burn-up of this exercise (800 MWd/kgHM). To compare the impact of the statistical errors in the calculated flux with respect to the cross uncertainties, a simplified problem is considered, taking a constant neutron flux level and spectrum. It is shown that, provided that the flux statistical deviations in the Monte Carlo transport calculation do not exceed a given value, the effect of the flux errors in the calculated isotopic inventory are negligible (even at very high burn-up) compared to the effect of the large cross-section uncertainties available at present in the data files.

  1. IAEA Consultancy on Technical Influence of High Burnup UOX and MOX LWR Fuel on Spent Fuel Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the results of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project investigating the influence of high burnup and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels, from water power reactors, on SFM. These data will provide information on the impacts, regarding SFM, for those countries operating light-water reactors (LWR) and heavy-water reactors (HWR)s with zirconium alloy-clad uranium dioxide (UOX) fuels, that are considering the use of higher burnup UOX or the introduction of reprocessing and MOX fuels. The mechanical designs of lower burnup UOX and higher burnup UOX or MOX fuel are very similar, but some of the properties (e.g., higher fuel rod internal pressures; higher decay heat; higher specific activity; and degraded cladding mechanical properties of higher burnup UOX and MOX spent fuels) may potentially significantly affect the behavior of the fuel after irradiation. The effects of these property changes on wet and dry storage, transportation, reprocessing, refabrication of fuel, and final disposal were evaluated, based on regulatory, safety, and operational considerations. Political and strategic considerations were not taken into account since relative importance of technical, economic and strategic considerations vary from country to country. There will also be an impact of these fuels on issues like non-proliferation, safeguards, and sustainability, but because of the complexity of factors affecting those issues, they are only briefly discussed. The advantages and drawbacks of using high burnup UOX or MOX, for each applicable issue in each stage of the back end of the fuel cycle, were evaluated and are discussed. Although, in theory, higher burnup fuel and MOX fuels mean a smaller quantity of spent fuel, the potential need for some changes in design of spent fuel storage, transportation, handling, reprocessing, refabrication, and disposal will have to be balanced with the benefits of their use. (author)

  2. Burnup-dependent cross section data for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies currently in progress consider research and test reactors which commonly have burnups of 50 atom percent in 235-U and may reach as high a 70 atom percent. At these levels of burnup changes in cross-section data with burnup become significant. Some preliminary studies of these effects lead to the development of a modified version of REBUS-2 which supports changes in cross-section data with burnup. This version of REBUS-2 allows for changes in the cross-section data only at each time sub-interval in the problem, and these cross-section changes for capture and fission are based on a least squares polynomial fit as a function of burnup. In this paper an attempt is made to evaluate the importance of burnup dependent data for the various isotopes and/or groups, and to assess the accuracy of this method by comparing the REBUS-2 results with results obtained from PDQ-7. The 10 MW IAEA benchmark problem has been selected for this study. A description of the reactor and the XY model can be found in the IAEA Guidebook. The EPRI-CELL4 code was used to generate burnup dependent cross section data for use with both REBUS-2 and PDQ-7. Cross-section data were generated at 10 time steps to a burnup of approximately 50 atom percent in 235-U. The agreement between the PDQ-7 results and the REBUS-2 results with fitted burnup dependent cross-section data are quite good. Burnup dependent cross sections are essential for accurate estimates of cycle lengths and reactivities, and low order polynomial fits of capture and fission data for selected isotopes and energy groups can provide this capability

  3. ZZ ECN-BUBEBO, ECN-Petten Burnup Benchmark Book, Inventories, Afterheat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of program or function: Contains experimental benchmarks which can be used for the validation of burnup code systems and accompanied data libraries. Although the benchmarks presented here are thoroughly described in literature, it is in many cases not straightforward to retrieve unambiguously the correct input data and corresponding results from the benchmark Descriptions. Furthermore, results which can easily be measured, are sometimes difficult to calculate because of conversions to be made. Therefore, emphasis has been put to clarify the input of the benchmarks and to present the benchmark results in such a way that they can easily be calculated and compared. For more thorough Descriptions of the benchmarks themselves, the literature referred to here should be consulted. This benchmark book is divided in 11 chapters/files containing the following in text and tabular form: chapter 1: Introduction; chapter 2: Burnup Credit Criticality Benchmark Phase 1-B; chapter 3: Yankee-Rowe Core V Fuel Inventory Study; chapter 4: H.B. Robinson Unit 2 Fuel Inventory Study; chapter 5: Turkey Point Unit 3 Fuel Inventory Study; chapter 6: Turkey Point Unit 3 Afterheat Power Study; chapter 7: Dickens Benchmark on Fission Product Energy Release of U-235; chapter 8: Dickens Benchmark on Fission Product Energy Release of Pu-239; chapter 9: Yarnell Benchmark on Decay Heat Measurements of U-233; chapter 10: Yarnell Benchmark on Decay Heat Measurements of U-235; chapter 11: Yarnell Benchmark on Decay Heat Measurements of Pu-239

  4. HAMCIND, Cell Burnup with Fission Products Poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: HAMCIND is a cell burnup code based in a coupling between HAMMER-TECHNION and CINDER. The fission product poisoning is taken into account in an explicit fashion. 2 - Method of solution: The nonlinear coupled set of equations for the neutron transport and nuclide transmutation equations and nuclide transmutation equations in a unit cell is solved by HAMCIND in a quasi-static approach. The spectral transport equation is solved by HAMMER-TECHNION at the beginning of each time-step while the nuclide transmutation equations are solved by CINDER for every time-step. The HAMMER-TECHNION spectral calculations are performed taking into account the fission product contribution to the macroscopic cross sections (fast and thermal), in the inelastic scattering matrix and even in the thermal scattering matrices. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Restrictions and/or limitations for HAMCIND depend upon the local operating system

  5. The commercial impact of burnup increase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deregulation has a dramatic effect on competition in the electricity markets. This will lead to a continued pressure on the prices in virtually all areas of the nuclear fuel cycle and will encourage further optimization, technical and technological progress and innovations with respect to further cost reductions of power production. The permission of direct disposal, in Germany legally granted in 1994 as an alternative to the reprocessing path, made possible cost savings and has consequently resulted in a decline of reprocessing prices. In addition, suppliers as well as operators are making considerable efforts to reduce the disposal costs fraction by optimizing disposal technologies and concepts. The increase of discharge has essentially contributed to the reduction the disposal cost fraction. Compared to former scenarios, the economic potential of burn-up increase is decreasing

  6. Evaluation of safety criteria on LOCA and RIA for high burnup nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comprehensive researches in many countries and some international research programs to investigate the applicability to high burnup nuclear fuels have been performing as the existing safety criteria of DBA such as LOCA and RIA was established several decades ago. In this report, main research programs for the safety criteria of DBA such as LOCA and RIA are introduced, and also the current status on the modification of the safety criteria are also introduced

  7. Evaluation of safety criteria on LOCA and RIA for high burnup nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Dae Ho; Yang, Yong Sik; Song, Keun Woo

    2007-12-15

    Comprehensive researches in many countries and some international research programs to investigate the applicability to high burnup nuclear fuels have been performing as the existing safety criteria of DBA such as LOCA and RIA was established several decades ago. In this report, main research programs for the safety criteria of DBA such as LOCA and RIA are introduced, and also the current status on the modification of the safety criteria are also introduced.

  8. High burnup models in computer code fair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced fuel analysis code FAIR has been developed for analyzing the behavior of fuel rods of water cooled reactors under severe power transients and high burnups. The code is capable of analyzing fuel pins of both collapsible clad, as in PHWR and free standing clad as in LWR. The main emphasis in the development of this code is on evaluating the fuel performance at extended burnups and modelling of the fuel rods for advanced fuel cycles. For this purpose, a number of suitable models have been incorporated in FAIR. For modelling the fission gas release, three different models are implemented, namely Physically based mechanistic model, the standard ANS 5.4 model and the Halden model. Similarly the pellet thermal conductivity can be modelled by the MATPRO equation, the SIMFUEL relation or the Halden equation. The flux distribution across the pellet is modelled by using the model RADAR. For modelling pellet clad interaction (PCMI)/ stress corrosion cracking (SCC) induced failure of sheath, necessary routines are provided in FAIR. The validation of the code FAIR is based on the analysis of fuel rods of EPRI project ''Light water reactor fuel rod modelling code evaluation'' and also the analytical simulation of threshold power ramp criteria of fuel rods of pressurized heavy water reactors. In the present work, a study is carried out by analysing three CRP-FUMEX rods to show the effect of various combinations of fission gas release models and pellet conductivity models, on the fuel analysis parameters. The satisfactory performance of FAIR may be concluded through these case studies. (author). 12 refs, 5 figs

  9. Experimental programmes related to high burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental programmes undertaken at IGCAR with regard to high burn-up fuels fall under the following categories: a) studies on fuel behaviour, b) development of extractants for aqueous reprocessing and c) development of non-aqueous reprocessing techniques. An experimental programme to measure the carbon potential in U/Pu-FP-C systems by methane-hydrogen gas equilibration technique has been initiated at IGCAR in order to understand the evolution of fuel and fission product phases in carbide fuel at high burn-up. The carbon potentials in U-Mo-C system have been measured by this technique. The free energies and enthalpies of formation of LaC2, NdC2 and SmC2 have been measured by measuring the vapor pressures of CO over the region Ln2O3-LnC2-C during the carbothermic reduction of Ln2O3 by C. The decontamination from fission products achieved in fuel reprocessing depends strongly on the actinide loading of the extractant phase. Tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP), presently used as the extractant, does not allow high loadings due to its propensity for third phase formation in the extraction of Pu(IV). A detailed study of the allowable Pu loadings in TBP and other extractants has been undertaken in IGCAR, the results of which are presented in this paper. The paper also describes the status of our programme to develop a non-aqueous route for the reprocessing of fast reactor fuels. (author)

  10. SOURCE OF BURNUP VALUES FOR COMMERCIAL SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste packages are loaded with commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) that satisfies the minimum burnup requirements of a criticality loading curve. The burnup value assigned by the originating nuclear utility to each SNF assembly (assigned burnup) is used to load waste packages in compliance with a criticality loading curve. The burnup provided by a nuclear utility has uncertainties, so conservative calculation methods are used to characterize those uncertainties for incorporation into the criticality loading curves. Procedural safety controls ensure that the correct assembly is loaded into each waste package to prevent a misload that could create a condition affecting the safety margins. Probabilistic analyses show that procedural safety controls can minimize the chance of a misload but can not completely eliminate the possibility. Physical measurements of burnup with instrumentation in the surface facility are not necessary due to the conservative calculation methods used to produce the criticality loading curves. The reactor records assigned burnup of a commercial SNF assembly contains about two percent uncertainty, which is increased to five-percent to ensure conservatism. This five-percent uncertainty is accommodated by adjusting the criticality loading curve. Also, the record keeping methods of nuclear utilities are not uniform and the level of detail required by the NRC has varied over the last several decades. Thus, some SNF assemblies may have assigned burnups that are averages for a batch of assemblies with similar characteristics. Utilities typically have access to more detailed core-follow records that allow the batch average burnup to be changed to an assembly specific burnup. Alternatively, an additional safety margin is incorporated into the criticality loading curve to accommodate SNF assemblies with batch average burnups or greater uncertainties due to the methodology used by the nuclear utility. The utility records provide the assembly identifier

  11. Current Status of Burnup Evaluation for Test Fuel at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seong Woo; Park, Seung Jae; Shin, Yoon Taeg; Choo, Kee Nam; Cho, Man Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    For the research reactor, 8 mini plate fuels were irradiation-tested during 4 irradiation cycles. 2 more irradiation capsules were fabricated for additional test of plate type fuel. Also fission Mo target for the performance verification and the demonstration of Mo-99 extraction process will be irradiated at HANARO. It is important to evaluate the burnup history of test fuel. The burnup of test fuel has been calculated using HANARO Fuel Management System (HANAFMS). Although it is proper to evaluate the burnup of HANARO fuel, it is difficult to accurately calculate the burnup of test fuel due to the limitation of HANAFMS model. Therefore, the improvement of burnup evaluation for the recent irradiated test fuel is conducted and reported in this paper. To evaluate the burnup of test fuel, HANAFMS has been used; however, HANAFMS model is not proper to apply plate type fuel. Therefore, MCNP burned core model was developed for HAMP-1 burnup calculation. Throughout the comparison of fuel assembly power, MCNP burned core model showed the good agreement with HANAFMS.

  12. 26 CFR 1.45D-1 - New markets tax credit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true New markets tax credit. 1.45D-1 Section 1.45D-1... Computing Credit for Investment in Certain Depreciable Property § 1.45D-1 New markets tax credit. (a) Table...) Allowance of credit (1) In general (2) Credit allowance date (3) Applicable percentage (4) Amount paid...

  13. Fuel burnup characteristics for the NRU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The driver fuel of the NRU research reactor at AECL, Chalk River is a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel alloy of Al-61 wt% U3Si, consisting of particles of U3Si dispersed in a continuous aluminum matrix, with 19.8% U235 in uranium. This paper describes the burnup characteristics for this type of fuel in NRU, including the determination of fuel depletion using the neutronic simulation code TRIAD, comparisons between simulated and measured burnup values, and the regulatory licensing operational average fuel burnup limit. (author)

  14. Fuel burnup characteristics for the NRU research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, T.C., E-mail: leungt@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The driver fuel of the NRU research reactor at AECL, Chalk River is a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel alloy of Al-61 wt% U{sub 3}Si, consisting of particles of U{sub 3}Si dispersed in a continuous aluminum matrix, with 19.8% U235 in uranium. This paper describes the burnup characteristics for this type of fuel in NRU, including the determination of fuel depletion using the neutronic simulation code TRIAD, comparisons between simulated and measured burnup values, and the regulatory licensing operational average fuel burnup limit. (author)

  15. Burnup calculation methodology in the serpent 2 Monte Carlo code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents two topics related to the burnup calculation capabilities in the Serpent 2 Monte Carlo code: advanced time-integration methods and improved memory management, accomplished by the use of different optimization modes. The development of the introduced methods is an important part of re-writing the Serpent source code, carried out for the purpose of extending the burnup calculation capabilities from 2D assembly-level calculations to large 3D reactor-scale problems. The progress is demonstrated by repeating a PWR test case, originally carried out in 2009 for the validation of the newly-implemented burnup calculation routines in Serpent 1. (authors)

  16. BNFL assessment of methods of attaining high burnup MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is clear that in order to maintain competitiveness with UO2 fuel, the burnups achievable in MOX fuel must be enhanced beyond the levels attainable today. There are two aspects which require attention when studying methods of increased burnups - cladding integrity and fuel performance. Current irradiation experience indicates that one of the main performance issues for MOX fuel is fission gas retention. MOX, with its lower thermal conductivity, runs at higher temperatures than UO2 fuel; this can result in enhanced fission gas release. This paper explores methods of effectively reducing gas release and thereby improving MOX burnup potential. (author)

  17. Applications of Burnup Credit Analysis Methods on Spent Fuel Handling and Storage%燃耗信任制分析方法在乏燃料装卸与贮存系统中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    攸国顺; 张春明

    2011-01-01

    介绍了在乏燃料系统中应用燃耗信任制分析方法的一般过程.提出了对验证所使用计算程序的要求.阐述了燃耗信任制分析过程中的包络性原则与保守性原则.

  18. Credit process of a particular credit union

    OpenAIRE

    Čučová, Magdaléna

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with methodics of credit process of a particular credit union present on the Czech market. Because of confidentiality, the name of the credit union is not mentioned. The thesis is divided into four parts. The first part deals with characteristics of credit unions, their specifications and differences from banks. You can find in this part comparison of development of particular values of the analyzed credit union with the whole sector of Czech credit unions and bank sector as...

  19. Prediction of fission gas release at high burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable design of LWR fuel rods requires the fission gas release to be predicted as accurately as possible. Indeed that physical phenomenon governs both the fuel temperatures and the inner gas pressure. Fission gas release data have been reviewed by the NRC and it has been concluded that a fission gas release enhancement occurs at burn-up above 20 GWd/tM. To correct deficient fission gas release models which do not include burn-up dependence, the NRC developed an empirical correction method to describe burn-up enhancement effect. BELGONUCLEAIRE has developed its own fission gas release model which is utilized in licensing calculation through the COMETHE code. Fission gas release predictions at high burn-up are confronted to the experimental data as well as to the predictions of the NRC correlation. The physics of the fission gas release phenomenon is discussed

  20. Impact of extended burnup on the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advisory Group Meeting was held in Vienna from 2 to 5 December 1991, to review, analyse, and discuss the effects of burnup extension in both light and heavy water reactors on all aspects of the fuel cycle. Twenty experts from thirteen countries participated in this meeting. There was consensus that both economic and environmental benefits are driving forces toward the achievement of higher burnups and that the present trend of burnup extension may be expected to continue. The extended burnup has been considered for the three main stages of the fuel cycle: the front end, in-reactor issues and the back end. Thirteen papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Features of fuel performance at high fuel burnups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some features of fuel behavior at high fuel burnups, in particular, initiation and development of rim-layer, increase in the rate of fission gas release from the fuel and increase in the inner gas pressure in the fuel rod are briefly described. Basing on the analysis of the data of post-irradiation examinations of fuel rods of WWER-440 working FA and CR fuel followers, that have been operated for five fuel cycles and got the average fuel burnup or varies as 50MW-day/kgU, a conclusion is made that the WWER-440 fuel burnup can be increased at least to average burnups of 55-58 MW-day/kgU per fuel assembly (Authors)

  2. TRIGA criticality experiment for testing burn-up calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persic, Andreja; Ravnik, Matjaz; Zagar, Tomaz [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Physics Division, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1999-07-01

    A criticality experiment with partly burned TRIGA fuel is described. 20 wt % enriched standard TRIGA fuel elements initially containing 12 wt % U are used. Their average burn-up is 1.4 MWd. Fuel element burn-up is calculated in 2-D four group diffusion approximation using TRIGLAV code. The burn-up of several fuel elements is also measured by reactivity method. The excess reactivity of several critical and subcritical core configurations is measured. Two core configurations contain the same fuel elements in the same arrangement as were used in the fresh TRIGA fuel criticality experiment performed in 1991. The results of the experiment may be applied for testing the computer codes used for fuel burn-up calculations. (author)

  3. Credit Where Credit Is Due

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Consumer finance companies will boost national consumption and allow Chinese citizens to broaden their purchasing horizons Buying refrigerators, washing machines or computers, in addition to paying for a variety of other expenses, will be made easier after consumer credit

  4. A burn-up module coupling to an AMPX system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactors and Neutrons Division of the Bariloche Atomic Center uses the AMPX system for the study of high conversion reactors (HCR). Such system allows to make neutronic calculations from the nuclear data library (ENDF/B-IV). The Nuclear Engineering career of the Balseiro Institute developed and implemented a burn-up module at a μ-cell level (BUM: Burn-up Module) which agrees with the requirement to be coupled to the AMPX system. (Author)

  5. A Burnup Analysis of PBMR-400MWth Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the burnup characteristics of 400MWth PBMR using Monte Carlo method. In the world, the deterministic method is widely used to model such that system but it still has a disadvantage which is not flexible in simulating the burnup cycle. Although this method applies some techniques to increase the accuracy of calculation results but it is necessary to model this system by a suitable computer code that can verify and validate the results of the deterministic method. A method which uses a Monte Carlo technique for simulating the burnup cycle was performed. A reactor physics computer code uses in this method is MONTEBURN 2.0 which accurately and efficiently computes the neutronic and material properties of the fuel cycle. MONTEBURN is a fully automated tool that links the MCNP Monte Carlo transport code with a radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN. In this model, the calculations are based on a detailed core modeling using MCNP. The fuel pebble is thoroughly modeled by introducing unit cell modeling for the graphite matrix and fuel kernels in the pebble. For the burnup model, a start-up core was studied with considering the movement of pebbles. By shifting down one layer at each discrete time step and inserting fresh fuel from the top, this cyclic calculation is continued until equilibrium burnup cycle is achieved. In this study, the time dependence of multiplication factor keff, the spatial dependence of flux profile, power distribution, burnup, and inventory of isotopes in the start up process are analyzed. The results will provide the basis data of the burnup process and be also utilized as the verified data to validate a compute code for PBMR core analysis which will be developed in near future

  6. Advanced Burnup Method using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilton, Bruce A. [Idaho Natonal Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Glagolenko, Irina; Giglio, Jeffrey J.; Cummings, Daniel G

    2009-06-15

    Nuclear fuel burnup is a key parameter used to assess irradiated fuel performance, to characterize the dependence of property changes due to irradiation, and to perform nuclear materials accountability. For advanced transmutation fuels and high burnup LWR fuels that have multiple fission sources, the existing Nd-148 ASTM burnup determination practice requires input of calculated fission fractions (identifying the specific fission source isotope and neutron energy that yielded fission, e.g., U-235 from thermal neutron, U-238 from fast neutron) from computational neutronics analysis in addition to the measured concentration of a single fission product isotope. We report a novel methodology of nuclear fuel burnup determination, which is completely independent of model predictions and reactor types. The proposed method leverages the capability of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) to quantify multiple fission products and actinides and uses these data to develop a system of burnup equations whose solution is the fission fractions. The fission fractions are substituted back in the equations to determine burnup. This technique requires high fidelity fission yield data, which is not uniformly available for all fission products. We discuss different means that can potentially assist in indirect determination, verification and improvement (refinement) of the ambiguously known fission yields. A variety of irradiated fuel samples are characterized by ICP-MS and the results used to test the advanced burnup method. The samples include metallic alloy fuel irradiated in fast spectrum reactor (EBRII) and metallic alloy in a tailored spectrum and dispersion fuel in the thermal spectrum of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The derived fission fractions and measured burnups are compared with calculated values predicted by neutronics models. (authors)

  7. Advanced Burnup Method using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel burnup is a key parameter used to assess irradiated fuel performance, to characterize the dependence of property changes due to irradiation, and to perform nuclear materials accountability. For advanced transmutation fuels and high burnup LWR fuels that have multiple fission sources, the existing Nd-148 ASTM burnup determination practice requires input of calculated fission fractions (identifying the specific fission source isotope and neutron energy that yielded fission, e.g., U-235 from thermal neutron, U-238 from fast neutron) from computational neutronics analysis in addition to the measured concentration of a single fission product isotope. We report a novel methodology of nuclear fuel burnup determination, which is completely independent of model predictions and reactor types. The proposed method leverages the capability of Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) to quantify multiple fission products and actinides and uses these data to develop a system of burnup equations whose solution is the fission fractions. The fission fractions are substituted back in the equations to determine burnup. This technique requires high fidelity fission yield data, which is not uniformly available for all fission products. We discuss different means that can potentially assist in indirect determination, verification and improvement (refinement) of the ambiguously known fission yields. A variety of irradiated fuel samples are characterized by ICP-MS and the results used to test the advanced burnup method. The samples include metallic alloy fuel irradiated in fast spectrum reactor (EBRII) and metallic alloy in a tailored spectrum and dispersion fuel in the thermal spectrum of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The derived fission fractions and measured burnups are compared with calculated values predicted by neutronics models. (authors)

  8. Research on irradiation behavior of superhigh burnup fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the special team for LWR future technology development project was organized in Tokai Research Establishment from October, 1991 to the end of fiscal year 1993. Due to the delay of the introduction of fast reactors, LWRs are expected to be used for considerably long period also in 21st century, therefore, it aimed at the further advancement of LWRs, and as one of its embodiments, the concept of superhigh burnup fuel was investigated. The superhigh burnup fuel aims at the attainment of 100 GWd/t burnup, and it succeeded the achievement of the conceptual design study on 'superlong life LWRs'. It is generally recognized that the development of the new material that substitutes for zircaloy is indispensable for superhigh burnup fuel. The concept of superhigh burnup core and the specification of fuel, the research and development of superhigh burnup fuel, the research on the irradiation behavior and irradiation damage of fuel and the damage by ion irradiation, and the method and the results of the irradiation experiment using a tandem accelerator are reported. (K.I.)

  9. Research on irradiation behavior of superhigh burnup fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, Kimio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1995-03-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the special team for LWR future technology development project was organized in Tokai Research Establishment from October, 1991 to the end of fiscal year 1993. Due to the delay of the introduction of fast reactors, LWRs are expected to be used for considerably long period also in 21st century, therefore, it aimed at the further advancement of LWRs, and as one of its embodiments, the concept of superhigh burnup fuel was investigated. The superhigh burnup fuel aims at the attainment of 100 GWd/t burnup, and it succeeded the achievement of the conceptual design study on `superlong life LWRs`. It is generally recognized that the development of the new material that substitutes for zircaloy is indispensable for superhigh burnup fuel. The concept of superhigh burnup core and the specification of fuel, the research and development of superhigh burnup fuel, the research on the irradiation behavior and irradiation damage of fuel and the damage by ion irradiation, and the method and the results of the irradiation experiment using a tandem accelerator are reported. (K.I.).

  10. Triton burnup study in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of 1 MeV tritons produced in the d(d,p)t reaction is important to predict the properties of D-T produced 3.5 MeV alphas because 1 MeV tritons and 3.5 MeV alphas have similar kinematic properties, such as Larmor radius and precession frequency. The confinement and slowing down of the fast tritons were investigated by measuring the 14 MeV and the 2.5 MeV neutron production rates. Here the time resolved triton burnup measurements have been performed using a new type 14 MeV neutron detector based on scintillating fibers, as part of a US-Japan tokamak collaboration. Loss of alpha particles due to toroidal ripple is one of the most important issues to be solved for a fusion reactor such as ITER. The authors investigated the toroidal ripple effect on the fast triton by analyzing the time history of the 14 MeV emission after NB turn-off

  11. Credit Access, the Costs of Credit and Credit Market Discrimination

    OpenAIRE

    Christian E. Weller

    2008-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, credit expanded relative to income, especially after 2001. It is hypothesized that traditionally uneven credit access and gaps in the costs of credit by demographic characteristics shrank during this period. Relying on data from the Federal Reserve’s Survey of Consumer Finance, this study looks at financial constraints, the costs of credit and a number of contributions to the costs of credit, including sources and types of loans. The results indicate that taste-based di...

  12. Analysis of Burnup and Economic Potential of Alternative Fuel Materials in Thermal Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A strategy is proposed for the assessment of nuclear fuel material economic potential use in future light water reactors (LWRs). In this methodology, both the required enrichment and the fuel performance limits are considered. In order to select the best fuel candidate, the optimal burnup that produces the lowest annual fuel cost within the burnup potential for a given fuel material and smear density ratio is determined.Several nuclear materials are presented as examples of the application of the methodology proposed in this paper. The alternative fuels considered include uranium dioxide (UO2), uranium carbide (UC), uranium nitride (UN), metallic uranium (U-Zr alloy), combined thorium and uranium oxides (ThO2/UO2), and combined thorium and uranium metals (U/Th). For these examples, a typical LWR lattice geometry in a zirconium-based cladding was assumed. The uncertainties in the results presented are large due to the scarcity of experimental data regarding the behavior of the considered materials at high burnups. Also, chemical compatibility issues are to be considered separately.The same methodology can be applied in the future to evaluate the economic potential of other nuclear fuel materials including different cladding designs, dispersions of ceramics into ceramics, dispersions of ceramics into metals, and also for geometries other than the traditional circular fuel pin

  13. Systemization of burnup sensitivity analysis code (2) (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towards the practical use of fast reactors, it is a very important subject to improve prediction accuracy for neutronic properties in LMFBR cores from the viewpoint of improvements on plant economic efficiency with rationally high performance cores and that on reliability and safety margins. A distinct improvement on accuracy in nuclear core design has been accomplished by the development of adjusted nuclear library using the cross-section adjustment method, in which the results of critical experiments of JUPITER and so on are reflected. In the design of large LMFBR cores, however, it is important to accurately estimate not only neutronic characteristics, for example, reaction rate distribution and control rod worth but also burnup characteristics, for example, burnup reactivity loss, breeding ratio and so on. For this purpose, it is desired to improve prediction accuracy of burnup characteristics using the data widely obtained in actual core such as the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. The analysis of burnup characteristic is needed to effectively use burnup characteristics data in the actual cores based on the cross-section adjustment method. So far, a burnup sensitivity analysis code, SAGEP-BURN, has been developed and confirmed its effectiveness. However, there is a problem that analysis sequence become inefficient because of a big burden to users due to complexity of the theory of burnup sensitivity and limitation of the system. It is also desired to rearrange the system for future revision since it is becoming difficult to implement new functions in the existing large system. It is not sufficient to unify each computational component for the following reasons: the computational sequence may be changed for each item being analyzed or for purpose such as interpretation of physical meaning. Therefore, it is needed to systemize the current code for burnup sensitivity analysis with component blocks of functionality that can be divided or constructed on occasion

  14. 76 FR 3190 - Notice of Funding Availability for Applications for Credit Assistance Under the Transportation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-19

    ... specific guidance on the program requirements.\\1\\ On January 5, 2001, at 65 FR 2827, the Secretary of... Under the Transportation Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act (TIFIA) Program AGENCY: Federal... outlines the process that applicants must follow. DATES: For consideration, Letters of Interest must...

  15. 学分制下MOOC应用于计算机专业的研究%On the Application of MOOC in Computer Specialty under Credit System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡安明; 陈惠娥

    2016-01-01

    MOOC已成为”互联网+”时代下教育信息化的产物,促进了网络技术在信息化教学中的应用,文中通过阐述MOOC相关内容,分析了学分制下MOOC资源应用于计算机专业教学的可行性,并进一步阐述了MOOC与学分制下计算机专业冷热取向、国际MOOC与“中国MOOC”的计算机课程取向、MOOC计入学分制的实践取向等一系列问题与建议。%MOOC has become the product of education informationization in the era of "Internet +", it promotes the application of network technology in the information teaching. Through expounding the related content of MOOC, this paper analyzes the feasibility of applying MOOC resources in the computer specialty teaching under credit system, further expounds the cold and hot orientation of computer specialty under MOOC and credit system, computer course orientation of international MOOC and "China MOOC", the practice orientation of taking MOOC in the credit system and a series of problems and suggestions.

  16. A Multicriteria Hierarchical Discrimination Approach for Credit Risk Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Kosmidou K.; Doumpos M.; Zopounidis C.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, banks and credit institutions have shown an increased interest in developing and implementing credit-scoring systems for taking corporate and consumer credit granting decisions. The objective of such systems is to analyze the characteristics of each applicant (firm or individual) and support the decision making process regarding the acceptance or the rejection of the credit application. This paper addresses this problem through the use of a multicriteria classification technique, th...

  17. Credit scoring

    OpenAIRE

    Sánchez Bilbao, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    RESUMEN: El credit scoring es un sistema de modelos de decisión a través del cual se calcula la probabilidad de que un sujeto sea capaz de devolver o no un crédito comercial. Este trabajo realiza una simulación de este modelo con la intención de familiarizarse con el funcionamiento del mismo, así como con el marco teórico que este conlleva. El uso del credit scoring da respuesta a un problema generalizado en las entidades financieras como es la correcta estimación y valoración del riesg...

  18. Radionuclide Release from High Burnup Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we investigate the production, evolution and release of radioactive fission products in a light water reactor. The production of the nuclides is determined by the neutronics, their evolution in the fuel by local temperature and by the fuel microstructure and the rate of release is governed by the scenario and the properties of the microstructure where the nuclides reside. The problem combines fields of reactor physics, fuel behaviour analysis and accident analysis. Radionuclide evolution during fuel reactor life is also important for determination of instant release fraction of final repository analysis. The source term problem is investigated by literature study and simulations with reactor physics code Serpent as well as fuel performance code ENIGMA. The capabilities of severe accident management codes MELCOR and ASTEC for describing high burnup structure effects are reviewed. As the problem is multidisciplinary in nature the transfer of information between the codes is studied. While the combining of the different fields as they currently are is challenging, there are some possibilities to synergy. Using reactor physics tools capable of spatial discretization is necessary for determining the HBS inventory. Fuel performance studies can provide insight how the HBS should be modelled in severe accident codes, however the end effect is probably very small considering the energetic nature of the postulated accidents in these scenarios. Nuclide release in severe accidents is affected by fuel oxidation, which is not taken into account by ANSI/ANS-5.4 but could be important in some cases, and as such, following the example of severe accident models would benefit the development of fuel performance code models. (author)

  19. ALEPH 1.1.2: A Monte Carlo burn-up code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last 40 years, Monte Carlo particle transport has been applied to a multitude of problems such as shielding and medical applications, to various types of nuclear reactors, . . . The success of the Monte Carlo method is mainly based on its broad application area, on its ability to handle nuclear data not only in its most basic but also most complex form (namely continuous energy cross sections, complex interaction laws, detailed energy-angle correlations, multi-particle physics, . . . ), on its capability of modeling geometries from simple 1D to complex 3D, . . . There is also a current trend in Monte Carlo applications toward high detail 3D calculations (for instance voxel-based medical applications), something for which deterministic codes are neither suited nor performant as to computational time and precision. Apart from all these fields where Monte Carlo particle transport has been applied successfully, there is at least one area where Monte Carlo has had limited success, namely burn-up and activation calculations where the time parameter is added to the problem. The concept of Monte Carlo burn-up consists of coupling a Monte Carlo code to a burn-up module to improve the accuracy of depletion and activation calculations. For every time step the Monte Carlo code will provide reaction rates to the burn-up module which will return new material compositions to the Monte Carlo code. So if static Monte Carlo particle transport is slow, then Monte Carlo particle transport with burn-up will be even slower as calculations have to be performed for every time step in the problem. The computational issues to perform accurate Monte Carlo calculations are however continuously reduced due to improvements made in the basic Monte Carlo algorithms, due to the development of variance reduction techniques and due to developments in computer architecture (more powerful processors, the so-called brute force approach through parallel processors and networked systems

  20. Characterisation of high-burnup LWR fuel rods through gamma tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current fuel management strategies for light water reactors (LWRs), in countries with high back-end costs, progressively extend the discharge burnup at the expense of increasing the 235U enrichment of the fresh UO2 fuel loaded. In this perspective, standard non-destructive assay techniques, which are very attractive because they are fast, cheap, and preserve the fuel integrity, in contrast to destructive approaches, require further validation when burnup values become higher than 50 GWd/t. This doctoral work has been devoted to the development and optimisation of non-destructive assay techniques based on gamma-ray emissions from irradiated fuel. It represents an important extension of the unique, high-burnup related database, generated in the framework of the LWR PROTEUS Phase II experiments. A novel tomographic measurement station has been designed and developed for the investigation of irradiated fuel rod segments. A unique feature of the station is that it allows both gamma-ray transmission and emission computerised tomography to be performed on single fuel rods. Four burnt UO2 fuel rod segments of 400 mm length have been investigated, two with very high (52 GWd/t and 71 GWd/t) and two with ultra-high (91 GWd/t and 126 GWd/t) burnup. Several research areas have been addressed, as described below. The application of transmission tomography to spent fuel rods has been a major task, because of difficulties of implementation and the uniqueness of the experiments. The main achievements, in this context, have been the determination of fuel rod average material density (a linear relationship between density and burnup was established), fuel rod linear attenuation coefficient distribution (for use in emission tomography), and fuel rod material density distribution. The non-destructive technique of emission computerised tomography (CT) has been applied to the very high and ultra-high burnup fuel rod samples for determining their within-rod distributions of caesium and

  1. MODELING CREDIT RISK THROUGH CREDIT SCORING

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Cantemir CALIN; Oana Cristina POPOVICI

    2014-01-01

    Credit risk governs all financial transactions and it is defined as the risk of suffering a loss due to certain shifts in the credit quality of a counterpart. Credit risk literature gravitates around two main modeling approaches: the structural approach and the reduced form approach. In addition to these perspectives, credit risk assessment has been conducted through a series of techniques such as credit scoring models, which form the traditional approach. This paper examines the evolution of...

  2. Consumer Education Resources: Credit, Credit Problems, Home Mortgages & Equity Loans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastern Michigan Univ., Ypsilanti. National Inst. for Consumer Education.

    This document contains five lists of consumer resources pertaining to credit, credit problems, and home mortgages and equity loans. The first list, targeted at adults, provides information on general credit, applying for credit and contracts, seniors and women and credit, credit options and costs, credit protection, credit reports and bureaus, and…

  3. Discussion on the Basic Principles of Credit Information Collection and Application%信用信息收集和使用的基本原则探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙志伟

    2015-01-01

    The basic principle for credit information collection and application is not only for the need of protecting the rights and interests of information subjects, but also for the need of standardizing related agencies’ business in credit industry.The principles for protecting personal privacy and guaranteeing fairness are the most fundamental;these require that the information referring to individual privacy and affecting fair credit-granting cannot be collected at random, and further more cannot be used as a variable for personal credit evaluation models.The principle of evi-dence will normalize the behavior of agencies that collect and preserve personal credit information, and prevent the arbitrary collection of personal information.The principle of right-to-know is the guarantee for the information sub-jects to know which credit information is collected.The principle of negative-behavior-noticing is aimed at more neg-ative sensitive information.The principle of right-to-objection is the necessity to maintain the accuracy of credit in-formation.The implementation of the principles needs the cooperation of institutions that collect and preserve infor-mation with credit-granting institutions, and should be their legal obligations.%信用信息收集和使用的基本原则既是保护信息主体权益的需要,也是规范信用行业相关机构业务的需要。保护个人隐私和保障公平的原则最为根本,该原则要求那些纳入个人隐私和影响公平授信的信息不能随意被搜集,更不能作为个人信用评估模型的变量。证据原则能规范搜集与保存个人信用信息的机构行为,防止任意搜集个人信息。知情权原则是对信息主体了解那些信用信息被搜集的保障。不利行为通知原则针对的是更为敏感的负面信息。异议权原则是维护信用信息准确性之必需。这些原则的贯彻更需要搜集和保存信用信息专业机构、授信

  4. Fuel burnup analysis for the Moroccan TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A fuel burnup analysis of the 2 MW TRIGA MARK II Moroccan research reactor was established. ► Burnup calculations were done by means of the in-house developed burnup code BUCAL1. ► BUCAL1 uses the MCNP tallies directly in the calculation of the isotopic inventories. ► The reactor life time was found to be 3360 MW h considering full power operating conditions. ► Power factors and fluxes of the in-core irradiation positions are strongly affected by burnup. -- Abstract: The fundamental advantage and main reason to use Monte Carlo methods for burnup calculations is the possibility to generate extremely accurate burnup dependent one group cross-sections and neutron fluxes for arbitrary core and fuel geometries. Yet, a set of values determined for a material at a given position and time remains accurate only in a local region, in which neutron spectrum and flux vary weakly — and only for a limited period of time, during which changes of the local isotopic composition are minor. This paper presents the approach of fuel burnup evaluation used at the Moroccan TRIGA MARK II research reactor. The approach is essentially based upon the utilization of BUCAL1, an in-house developed burnup code. BUCAL1 is a FORTRAN computer code designed to aid in analysis, prediction, and optimization of fuel burnup performance in nuclear reactors. The code was developed to incorporate the neutron absorption reaction tally information generated directly by MCNP5 code in the calculation of fissioned or neutron-transmuted isotopes for multi-fueled regions. The fuel cycle length and changes in several core parameters such as: core excess reactivity, control rods position, fluxes at the irradiation positions, axial and radial power factors and other parameters are estimated. Besides, this study gives valuable insight into the behavior of the reactor and will ensure better utilization and operation of the reactor during its life-time and it will allow the establishment of

  5. Triton burnup measurements by neutron activation at JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes measurements on triton burnup in a deuterium plasma by the detection of the 2.5 MeV neutrons (from DD fusion) and the 14 MeV neutrons (from DT fusion). The 2.5 MeV neutrons have been measured by fission chambers and activation of indium foils while the 14 MeV neutrons have been detected by activation of silicon, aluminum, and copper foils. The measured yields of the 2.5 MeV neutrons utilizing In foils are similar 20-40% higher than the yields obtained from fission chambers depending on what calibration factors are used. The deviation decreases with the plasma major radius (or increasing plasma volume). When the triton burnup is measured by utilizing neutron threshold reactions (En>2.5 MeV) and In foils, then systematic errors in the calibration factors cancel and the maximum deviation between the measured triton burnup for different calibration factors is reduced to similar 5%. The measurements indicate that triton burnup increases with the 14 MeV neutron yield, indicating that the relative yield of 14 MeV neutrons increases depending on the time duration of the deuterium neutral beam injection (NBI). Furthermore, the triton burnup decreases with an increased plasma major radius, indicating increased triton ripple losses, and increases with plasma current, indicating reduced banana orbit losses. (orig.)

  6. The commercial and technological impact of high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deregulation of electricity markets is driving prices downward. Consequently utilities continue to demand the minimization of electrical production costs. Fuel cycle cost savings are valued as a strong contributor, although directly representing only about one third of electricity generating costs. Burnups consistent with the current enrichment limit of 5 w/0 will be required. Significant progress has already been achieved by Siemens in meeting the demands of utilities for increased fuel burnup. The technological challenges imposed are mainly related to corrosion and hydrogen pickup of the clad, the properties of the fuel and the dimensional changes of the structure. Clad materials with increased corrosion resistance have been developed. The high burnup behaviour of the fuel has been extensively investigated and the decrease of thermal conductivity, the rim effect and the increase of fission gas release can be described, with good accuracy, in fuel rod computer codes. Advanced statistical design methods have been developed and introduced. In summary, most of the questions about the fuel operational behaviour and reliability in the high burnup range have been solved or the solutions are visible. The main licensing challenges for high burnup fuel are currently seen for accident condition analyses, especially for RIA and LOCA. (author)

  7. Burnup monitoring of VVER-440 spent fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the results of the experiments performed on spent VVER-440 fuel assemblies at the Paks Nuclear Power Plant (NPP), Hungary. The fuel assemblies submerged in the service pit were examined by high-resolution gamma spectrometry (HRGS). The assemblies were moved to the front of a collimator tube built in the concrete wall of the pit in the reactor block at the NPP, and lifted down and up under water for scanning by the refueling machine. The HPGe detector was placed behind the collimator in an outside staircase. The measurements involved scanning of the assemblies along their length of all the 6 sides, at 5-12 measurement positions side by side. Axial and azimuthal burnup profiles were taken in this way. Assembly groups for measurements were selected according to their burnup (10–50 GWd/tU) and special positions (e. g. control assembly, neighbour of control assembly). Burnup differences were well observable between assembly sides looking towards the center of the core and opposite directions. Also, burnup profiles were different for control assemblies and normal (working) fuel assemblies. The ratio of the measured activities of Cs-134 and Cs-137 was evaluated by relative efficiency (intrinsic) calibration. Measurement uncertainty is around 3 %. Taking into account irradiation history and cooling time (i. e.the time elapsed since the discharge of the assembly out of the core), the activity ratio Cs-134/Cs-137 shows good correlation with the declared burnup.

  8. Fuel cycle economical improvement by reaching high fuel burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvements of fuel utilization in the light water reactors, burnup increase have led to a necessity to revise strategic approaches of the fuel cycle development. Different trends of the fuel cycle development are necessary to consider in accordance with the type of reactors used, the uranium market and other features that correspond to the nuclear and economic aspects of the fuel cycle. The fuel burnup step-by-step extension Program that successfully are being realized by the leading, firms - fuel manufacturers and the research centres allow to say that there are no serious technical obstacles for licensing in the near future of water cooling reactors fuel rod burnup (average) limit to 65-70 MWd/kgU and fuel assembly (average) limit to (60-65) MWd/kgU. The operating experience of Ukrainian NPPs with WWER-1000 is 130 reactor * years. At the beginning of 1999, a total quantity of the fuel FA discharged during all time of operation of 11 reactors was 5819 (110 fuel cycles). Economical improvement is reached by increase of fuel burn-up by using of some FA of 3 fuel cycles design in 4th fuel loading cycle. Fuel reliability is satisfactory. The further improvement of FA is necessary, that will allow to reduce the front-end fuel cycle cost (specific natural uranium expenditure), to reduce spent fuel amount and, respectively, the fuel cycle back end costs, and to increase burn-up of the fuel. (author)

  9. Achieving High Burnup Targets With Mox Fuels: Techno Economic Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a typical MOX fuelled SFR of power reactor size, Implications due to higher burnup have been quantified. Advantages: – Improvement in the economy is seen upto 200 GWd/ t; Disadvantages: – Design changes > 150 GWd/ t bu; – Need for 8/ 16 more fuel SA at 150/ 200 GWd/ t bu; – Higher enrichment of B4C in CSR/ DSR at higher bu; – Reduction in LHR may be required at higher bu; – Structural material changes beyond 150 GWd/ t bu; – Reprocessing point of view-Sp Activity & Decay heat increase. Need for R & D is a must before increasing burnup. bu- refers burnup. Efforts to increase MOX fuel burnup beyond 200 GWd/ t may not be highly lucrative; • MOX fuelled FBR would be restricted to two or four further reactors; • Imported MOX fuelled FBRs may be considered; • India looks towards launching metal fuel FBRs in the future. – Due to high Breeding Ratio; – High burnup capability

  10. Anticipatory Adaptive Credit Granting Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelchonok, Vladimir F.; Nechval, Konstantin N.; Nechval, Nicholas A.; Vasermanis, Edgars K.; Rozevskis, Uldis; Rozite, Kristine; Moldovan, Max

    2004-08-01

    Probabilistic models are formulated for the credit granting policy of a firm. First, a single-period analysis is presented for the credit-granting problem. Then a multi-period analysis for the same problem is presented, showing that the single-period analysis ignores important future benefits. The multi-period analysis contains a Bayesian approach to revisions of the probability of collection as collection experience is gained. The performance index, which has to be maximized with respect to the decision on how much credit to offer to credit applicants of different risk categories, contains some information of the future observations through the statistics of the observations given the present information. Dynamic programming is used to take into account the future effects of presents actions. A specific algorithm is derived which seems to be appropriate in terms of computational feasibility for this class of problems.

  11. Influence of high burnup on the decay heat power of spent fuel at long-term storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development and application of advanced fuel with higher burnup is now in practice of NPP with light water reactors in an increasing number of countries. High burnup allows to decrease significantly consumption of uranium. However, spent fuel of this type contains increased amount of high active actinides and fission products in comparison with spent fuel of common-type burnup. Therefore extended time of storage, improved cooling system of the storage facility will be required along with more strong radiation protection during storage, transportation and processing. Calculated data on decay heat power of spent uranium fuel of light water VVER-1000 type reactor are discussed in the paper. Long-term storage of discharged fuel during 100000 years is considered. Calculations were made for burnups of 40-70 MW d/kg. In the initial 50-year period of storage, power of fission products is much higher than that of actinides. Power of gamma-radiation is mainly due to fission products. During subsequent storage power of fission products quickly decreases, the main contribution to the power is given by actinides rather than by fission products. (author)

  12. An empirical formulation to describe the evolution of the high burnup structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the behavior of fuel pellets for LWR power reactors in the high burnup range (average burnup higher than about 45 MWd/kgU) is analyzed. For extended irradiation periods, a considerable Pu concentration is reached in the pellet periphery (rim zone), that contributes to local burnup. Gradually, a new microstructure develops in that ring, characterized by small grains and large pores as compared with those of the original material. In this region Xe is absent from the solid lattice (although it continues to be dissolved in the rest of the pellet). The porous microstructure in the pellet edge causes local changes in the mechanical and thermal properties, thus affecting the overall fuel behavior. It is generally accepted that the evolution of porosity in the high burnup structure (HBS) is determinant of the retention capacity of the fission gases rejected from the fuel matrix. This is the reason why, during the latest years a considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the parameters that influence porosity. Although the mechanisms governing the microstructural transformation have not been completely elucidated yet, some empirical expressions can be given, and this is the intention of the present work, for representing the main physical parameters. Starting from several works published in the open literature, some mathematical expressions were developed to describe the behavior and progress of porosity at local burnup values ranging from 60 to 300 MWd/kgU. The analysis includes the interactions of different orders between pores, the growth of the pore radius by capturing vacancies, the evolution of porosity, pore number density and overpressure within the closed pores, the inventory of fission gas dissolved in the matrix and retained in the pores. The model is mathematically expressed by a system of non-linear differential equations. In the present work, results of this calculation scheme are compared with experimental data available in

  13. An empirical formulation to describe the evolution of the high burnup structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemes, Martín; Soba, Alejandro; Denis, Alicia

    2015-01-15

    In the present work the behavior of fuel pellets for LWR power reactors in the high burnup range (average burnup higher than about 45 MWd/kgU) is analyzed. For extended irradiation periods, a considerable Pu concentration is reached in the pellet periphery (rim zone), that contributes to local burnup. Gradually, a new microstructure develops in that ring, characterized by small grains and large pores as compared with those of the original material. In this region Xe is absent from the solid lattice (although it continues to be dissolved in the rest of the pellet). The porous microstructure in the pellet edge causes local changes in the mechanical and thermal properties, thus affecting the overall fuel behavior. It is generally accepted that the evolution of porosity in the high burnup structure (HBS) is determinant of the retention capacity of the fission gases rejected from the fuel matrix. This is the reason why, during the latest years a considerable effort has been devoted to characterizing the parameters that influence porosity. Although the mechanisms governing the microstructural transformation have not been completely elucidated yet, some empirical expressions can be given, and this is the intention of the present work, for representing the main physical parameters. Starting from several works published in the open literature, some mathematical expressions were developed to describe the behavior and progress of porosity at local burnup values ranging from 60 to 300 MWd/kgU. The analysis includes the interactions of different orders between pores, the growth of the pore radius by capturing vacancies, the evolution of porosity, pore number density and overpressure within the closed pores, the inventory of fission gas dissolved in the matrix and retained in the pores. The model is mathematically expressed by a system of non-linear differential equations. In the present work, results of this calculation scheme are compared with experimental data available in

  14. Fuel cycle cost considerations of increased discharge burnups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluations are presented that indicate the attainment of increased discharge burnups in light water reactors will depend on economic factors particular to individual operators. In addition to pure resource conserving effects and assuming continued reliable fuel performance, a substantial economic incentive must exist to justify the longer operating times necessary to achieve higher burnups. Whether such incentive will exist or not will depend on relative price levels of all fuel cycle cost components, utility operating practices, and resolution of uncertainties associated with the back-end of the fuel cycle. It is concluded that implementation of increased burnups will continue at a graduated pace similar to past experience, rather than finding universal acceptance of particular increased levels at any particular time

  15. Mechanical Property Evaluation of High Burnup PHWR Fuel Clads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assurance of clad integrity is of vital importance for the safe and reliable extension of fuel burnup. In order to study the effect of extended burnup of 15,000 MW∙d/tU on the performance of Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) fuel bundles of 19-element design, a couple of bundles were irradiated in Indian PHWR. The tensile property of irradiated cladding from one such bundle was evaluated using the ring tension test method. Using a similar method, claddings of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel elements irradiated in the pressurized water loop (PWL) of CIRUS to a burnup of 10,000 MW∙d/THM were tested. The tests were carried out both at ambient temperature and at 300°C. The paper will describe the test procedure, results generated and discuss the findings. (author)

  16. High-burnup fuel and the impact on fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Competition in the electric utility industry has forced utilities to reduce cost. For a nuclear utility, this means a reduction of both the nuclear fuel cost and the operating and maintenance cost. To this extent, utilities are pursuing longer cycles. To reduce the nuclear fuel cost, utilities are trying to reduce batch size while increasing cycle length. Yankee Atomic Electric Company has performed a number of fuel cycle studies to optimize both batch size and cycle length; however, certain burnup-related constraints are encountered. As a result of these circumstances, longer fuel cycles make it increasingly difficult to simultaneously meet the burnup-related fuel design constraints and the technical specification limits. Longer cycles require fuel assemblies to operate for longer times at relatively high power. If utilities continue to pursue longer cycles to help reduce nuclear fuel cost, changes may need to be made to existing fuel burnup limits

  17. Helping clients build credit

    OpenAIRE

    Vikki Frank

    2007-01-01

    Until now people who repaid loans from community groups had not been on credit bureaus’ radar. Now Credit Builders Alliance is partnering with Experian to help clients of community lenders build strong credit histories.

  18. Consumer Credit: Evidence from Italian Micro Data

    OpenAIRE

    Alessie, Rob; Hochguertel, Stefan; Weber, Guglielmo

    2001-01-01

    In this Paper we analyse unique data on credit applications received by the leading provider of consumer credit in Italy (Findomestic). The data set covers a five year period (1995-99) during which the consumer credit market rapidly expanded in Italy and a new law came into force that set a limit to interest rates charged to consumers (the usury law). We investigate ways in which the law may have affected the consumer credit market and show how the applicants’ pool has changed over time in co...

  19. TRIGA fuel burn-up calculations and its confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cesium (Cs-137) isotopic concentration due to irradiation of TRIGA Fuel Elements FE(s) is calculated and measured at the Atominstitute (ATI) of Vienna University of Technology (VUT). The Cs-137 isotope, as proved burn-up indicator, was applied to determine the burn-up of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor FE. This article presents the calculations and measurements of the Cs-137 isotope and its relevant burn-up of six selected Spent Fuel Elements SPE(s). High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy based non-destructive method is employed to measure spent fuel parameters. By the employment of this method, the axial distribution of Cesium-137 for six SPE(s) is measured, resulting in the axial burn-up profiles. Knowing the exact irradiation history and material isotopic inventory of an irradiated FE, six SPE(s) are selected for on-site gamma scanning using a special shielded scanning device developed at the ATI. This unique fuel inspection unit allows to scan each millimeter of the FE. For this purpose, each selected FE was transferred to the fuel inspection unit using the standard fuel transfer cask. Each FE was scanned at a scale of 1 cm of its active length and the Cs-137 activity was determined as proved burn-up indicator. The measuring system consists of a high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) together with suitable fast electronics and on-line PC data acquisition module. The absolute activity of each centimeter of the FE was measured and compared with reactor physics calculations. The ORIGEN2, a one-group depletion and radioactive decay computer code, was applied to calculate the activity of the Cs-137 and the burn-up of selected SPE. The deviation between calculations and measurements was in range from 0.82% to 12.64%.

  20. Development of high burnup fuel data-base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of high burnup fuel data base (HBDB) was studied, which stores various performance data of high burnup fuels using a personal computer. Data items of the data base and storing and display methods of time-depending data such as power history were studied. It was shown that compound systems of a personal computer and an engineering work station have capacity for constructing the data base with much efficiency and small cost. And comparison of data items between the data base and the EPRI fuel base FPDB was discussed. (author)

  1. WWER fuel behaviour and characteristics at high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increase of fuel burnup in fuel rods is a task that provides a considerable cost reduction of WWER fuel cycle in case of its solution. Investigations on fuel and cladding behaviour and change in fuel characteristics under irradiation are carried out in the Russian Federation for standard and as well as for experimental fuel rods to validate the reliable and safe operation of the fuel rods at high burnups. The paper presents the results of examinations on cracking, dimensional, structural and density changes of fuel pellets as well as the results of examination on corrosion and mechanical properties of WWER-440 and WWER-1000 fuel rod claddings. (author)

  2. Burnup measurements with the Los Alamos fork detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fork detector system can determine the burnup of spent-fuel assemblies. It is a transportable instrument that can be mounted permanently in a spent-fuel pond near a loading area for shipping casks, or be attached to the storage pond bridge for measurements on partially raised spent-fuel assemblies. The accuracy of the predicted burnup has been demonstrated to be as good as 2% from measurements on assemblies in the United States and other countries. Instruments have also been developed at other facilities throughout the world using the same or different techniques, but with similar accuracies. 14 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Consequences of the increase of burnup on the fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The examinations carried out on the FRAGEMA fuel of EDF reactors show its good behavior in service. The results of research and development programs developed by EDF, FGA and the CEA show that this fuel can be irradiated up to a high burnup, and allow to point out the axies of research to improve still the performance of the product in a more and more soliciting environment (increase of power and burnup coupled with load following). Among the solutions considered, there are the design and fabrication adjustments (geometry, initial pressurization), more fundamental changes concerning fuel cans and fuel pellets, which need still research and development programs

  4. Performance of fast reactor irradiated fueled emitters at goal burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UO2-fueled W emitters were examined that had been irradiated to goal burnups of approximately 4 at.% at emitter surface temperatures to 1820 K in a fast reactor to establish their performance for use in thermionic reactors with power levels from tens of kilowatts to multimegawatts. The examinations provided first-time data on structural integrity, dimensional stability, component compatibility, and fuel and fission product behavior. The data are consistent with similar measurements at approximately 2 at.% burnup with the exception of one emitter which breached the W during irradiation

  5. Power excursion analysis for BWR`s at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D.J.; Neymoith, L.; Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-03-01

    A study has been undertaken to determine the fuel enthalpy during a rod drop accident and during two thermal-hydraulic transients. The objective was to understand the consequences to high burnup fuel and the sources of uncertainty in the calculations. The analysis was done with RAMONA-4B, a computer code that models the neutron kinetics throughout the core along with the thermal-hydraulics in the core, vessel, and steamline. The results showed that the maximum fuel enthalpy in high burnup fuel will be affected by core design, initial conditions, and modeling assumptions. The important parameters in each of these categories are discussed in the paper.

  6. 26 CFR 1.1464-1 - Refunds or credits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 12 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Refunds or credits. 1.1464-1 Section 1.1464-1...) INCOME TAXES Application of Withholding Provisions § 1.1464-1 Refunds or credits. (a) In general. The refund or credit under chapter 65 of the Code of an overpayment of tax which has actually been...

  7. 26 CFR 48.6416(f)-1 - Credit on returns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Credit on returns. 48.6416(f)-1 Section 48.6416... Special Application to Retailers and Manufacturers Taxes § 48.6416(f)-1 Credit on returns. Any person..., in lieu of claiming refund of the overpayment, claim credit for the overpayment on any return of...

  8. 26 CFR 44.6419-1 - Credit or refund generally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Credit or refund generally. 44.6419-1 Section 44... Application to the Taxes on Wagering § 44.6419-1 Credit or refund generally. (a) Overpayment of wagering tax... refund on Form 843 or take credit for such overpayment against the tax due on a subsequent monthly...

  9. 49 CFR 22.19 - Credit criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Credit criteria. 22.19 Section 22.19... STLP Loans § 22.19 Credit criteria. An applicant for a STLP loan must be creditworthy and demonstrate... debts. The Participating Lender and DOT OSDBU shall consider: (a) Character, reputation, and...

  10. Avaliação da aplicabilidade de um modelo de credit scoring com varíaveis sistêmicas e não-sistêmicas em carteiras de crédito bancário rotativo de pessoas físicas An evaluation on the applicability of a credit scoring model, with systemic and non-systemic variables in revolving bank credit portfolio for individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Odálio dos Santos

    2007-08-01

    capability. Likewise, a more significant historical exposition of the banks to insolvency risk is being observed, such as the risk of not getting paid (partially or totally and the revolving credit borrowed by consumers. Considering the size and the importance of this market to the great commercial banks and to the economy as a whole, the scope of this research comprises the following points: 1. detailing the processes of subjective and objective credit analysis carried out by the main domestic private banks; 2. approaching the selective function of interest rates in revolving credits; 3. highlighting the main characteristics of credit scoring models; and 4. proposing a model of credit scoring for revolving credits. This model is based on systemic and non-systemic variables and directed to the reduction of insolvency risk. The applicability of the credit scoring model proposed in a sample, extracted from the consumers credit portfolio which belongs to an important medium size Brazilian private commercial bank (Bank X - fictitious name, presented a satisfactory accuracy level in the identification of prospective (96% and non-prospective (92% clients, which led to the conclusion that it included and considered adequately the representative variables of borrowers’ payment capability.

  11. Evaluation of a high burnup spent fuel regarding the regulations for a spent fuel dry storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Ik Sung; Yang, Young Sik; Bang, Je Geon; Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Sun Ki; Song, Keun Woo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    All nuclear plants have storage pools for spent fuel. These pools are typically 40 or more feet deep. In many countries, the spent fuels are stored under water. The water serves 2 purposes: 1) It serves as a shield to reduce the radiation levels. 2) It cools the fuel assemblies that continue to produce heat (called decay heat). But Korean nuclear plant expects the storage capacity to reach its limit by the year 2016. So, the research for the spent fuel dry storage facilities is necessary. The purpose of this study was to overview the regulatory basis for spent fuel dry storage and to evaluate its applicability for high burnup spent fuel.

  12. Using ORIGEN and MCNP to calculate reactor criticals and burnup effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this modeling effort was to verify the applicability of using ORIGEN-S and MCNP to the analysis of spent fuel of various enrichments and burnups. By comparing the results of criticality studies using MCNP and ORIGEN-S with the measured keff of 1.0, the suitability of the coupled ORIGEN-S/ MCNP package was determined. This study presents the results of the benchmark modeling of five pressurized water reactor (PWR) critical configurations. For these analyses, a combination of ORIGEN-S and MCNP was used to analyze the fuel depletion and criticality of five power reactor core configuration

  13. Comparison of the Commercial and Standby Letter of Credits

    OpenAIRE

    Homayoun Mafi; Ahmad Ali Mohsenzadeh

    2015-01-01

    The Letter of credit as a method of smoothing international payment is a conditional security and obligation to pay the customer bank (issuing bank) to seller (applicant). For this purpose, the letters of credit may be considered as the most usual method of payment of goods price in international trade. The classic form of letters of credit is the commercial letters of credit whose financial obligation is rooted in the documents that demonstrates the making of transaction by the beneficiary a...

  14. Experimental validation of the DARWIN2.3 package for fuel cycle applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DARWIN package, developed by the CEA and its French partners (AREVA and EDF), provides the parameters required for fuel cycle applications: fuel inventory; decay heat; activity; neutron, gamma, alpha, and beta sources and spectra; and radiotoxicity. This paper presents the DARWIN2.3 experimental validation for fuel inventory and decay heat calculations on pressurized water reactors (PWRs). To validate this code system for spent fuel inventory, a large program has been undertaken, based on spent fuel chemical assays. This paper deals with the experimental validation of DARWIN2.3 for PWR uranium oxide and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel inventory calculation, focused on the isotopes involved in burnup credit applications and decay heat computations. The calculation to experiment ratio [(C E)/1] discrepancies are calculated with the latest European evaluation file JEFF-3.1.1 associated with the Santamarina-Hfaiedh energy mesh. An overview of the tendencies is obtained on a complete range of burnup from 10 to 85 GWd/tonne (10 to 60 GWd/tonne for MOX fuel). The experimental validation of the DARWIN2.3 package for decay heat calculation is performed using calorimetric measurements carried out at the Swedish interim spent fuel storage facility, Clab, for PWR assemblies, covering large burnup (20 to 50 GWd/tonne) and cooling time (10 to 30 year) ranges. (authors)

  15. 26 CFR 1.1374-6 - Credits and credit carryforwards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 11 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Credits and credit carryforwards. 1.1374-6... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Small Business Corporations and Their Shareholders § 1.1374-6 Credits and credit carryforwards. (a) In general. The credits and credit carryforwards allowed as credits against...

  16. Maximum Marginal Likelihood Estimation of a Monotonic Polynomial Generalized Partial Credit Model with Applications to Multiple Group Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Carl F; Cai, Li

    2016-06-01

    We present a semi-parametric approach to estimating item response functions (IRF) useful when the true IRF does not strictly follow commonly used functions. Our approach replaces the linear predictor of the generalized partial credit model with a monotonic polynomial. The model includes the regular generalized partial credit model at the lowest order polynomial. Our approach extends Liang's (A semi-parametric approach to estimate IRFs, Unpublished doctoral dissertation, 2007) method for dichotomous item responses to the case of polytomous data. Furthermore, item parameter estimation is implemented with maximum marginal likelihood using the Bock-Aitkin EM algorithm, thereby facilitating multiple group analyses useful in operational settings. Our approach is demonstrated on both educational and psychological data. We present simulation results comparing our approach to more standard IRF estimation approaches and other non-parametric and semi-parametric alternatives. PMID:25487423

  17. Dynamic communities in multichannel data: An application to the foreign exchange market during the 2007-2008 credit crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenn, Daniel J.; Porter, Mason A.; McDonald, Mark; Williams, Stacy; Johnson, Neil F.; Jones, Nick S.

    2009-09-01

    We study the cluster dynamics of multichannel (multivariate) time series by representing their correlations as time-dependent networks and investigating the evolution of network communities. We employ a node-centric approach that allows us to track the effects of the community evolution on the functional roles of individual nodes without having to track entire communities. As an example, we consider a foreign exchange market network in which each node represents an exchange rate and each edge represents a time-dependent correlation between the rates. We study the period 2005-2008, which includes the recent credit and liquidity crisis. Using community detection, we find that exchange rates that are strongly attached to their community are persistently grouped with the same set of rates, whereas exchange rates that are important for the transfer of information tend to be positioned on the edges of communities. Our analysis successfully uncovers major trading changes that occurred in the market during the credit crisis.

  18. Credit report accuracy and access to credit

    OpenAIRE

    Avery, Robert B.; Paul S. Calem; Glenn B. Canner

    2004-01-01

    Data that credit-reporting agencies maintain on consumers' credit-related experiences play a central role in U.S. credit markets. Analysts widely agree that the data enable these markets to function more efficiently and at lower cost than would otherwise be possible. Despite the great benefits of the current system, however, some analysts have raised concerns about the accuracy, timeliness, completeness, and consistency of consumer credit records and about the effects of data problems on the ...

  19. Validation of IRBURN calculation code system through burnup benchmark analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of the reactor fuel composition during the irradiation time, fuel management and criticality safety analysis require the utilization of a validated burnup calculation code system. In this work a newly developed burnup calculation code system, IRBURN, is introduced for the estimation and analysis of the fuel burnup in LWR reactors. IRBURN provides the full capabilities of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code MCNP4C as well as the versatile code for calculating the buildup and decay of nuclides in nuclear materials, ORIGEN2.1, along with other data processing and linking subroutines. This code has the capability of using different depletion calculation schemes. The accuracy and precision of the implemented algorithms to estimate the eigenvalue and spent fuel isotope concentrations are demonstrated by validation against reliable benchmark problem analyses. A comparison of IRBURN results with experimental data demonstrates that the code predicts the spent fuel concentrations within 10% accuracy. Furthermore, standard deviations of the average values for isotopic concentrations including IRBURN data decreases considerably in comparison with the same parameter excluding IRBURN results, except for a few sets of isotopes. The eigenvalue comparison between our results and the benchmark problems shows a good prediction of the k-inf values during the entire burnup history with the maximum difference of 1% at 100 MWd/kgU.

  20. PWR fuel performance and burnup extension programme in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the first PWR nuclear power plant Mihama Unit 1 initiated commercial operation in 1970, Japanese utilities and manufacturers have expended much of their resources and efforts on improving the technology of PWRs. The results can already be seen by the significantly improved performance of the PWR plants now in operation. Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd supplied the nuclear fuel assemblies, which now amount to almost 5000. Although some trouble with fuel was experienced in the beginning, the progressive efforts made to improve the fuel design and manufacturing technology have resulted in the superior performance of Mitsubishi fuels. Since fuel of current design should comply with the limitation set in Japan for a maximum discharged fuel assembly average burnup of less than 39,000 MW·d/t, the maximum burnup is now around 37,000 MW·d/t. However, an increase in this burnup limitation has been strongly requested by Japanese utilities in order to make nuclear power more economic and thus more competitive with other power generation methods. A summary is given of the design improvements made on Mitsubishi fuel, as well as demonstration programmes of current design fuel to prove its superior reliability and to prepare the database for a future extension of burnup. (author)

  1. Extension of the TRANSURANUS burn-up model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The validation range of the model in the TRANSURANUS fuel performance code for calculating the radial power density and burn-up in UO2 fuel has been extended from 64 MWd/kgHM up to 102 MWd/kgHM, thereby improving also its precision. In addition, the first verification of calculations with post-irradiation examination data is reported for LWR-MOX fuel with a rod average burn-up up to 45 MWd/kgHM. The extension covers the inclusion of new isotopes in order to account for the production of 238Pu. The corresponding one-group cross-sections used in the equations rely on results obtained with ALEPH, a new Monte Carlo burn-up code. The experimental verification is based on electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and on secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) as well as radiochemical data of fuel irradiated in commercial power plants. The deviations are quantified in terms of frequency distributions of the relative errors. The relative errors on the burn-up distributions in both fuel types remain below 12%, corresponding to the experimental scatter

  2. Ultrasonic measurement of high burn-up fuel elastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrasonic method developed for the evaluation of high burn-up fuel elastic properties is presented hereafter. The objective of the method is to provide data for fuel thermo-mechanical calculation codes in order to improve industrial nuclear fuel and materials or to design new reactor components. The need for data is especially crucial for high burn-up fuel modelling for which the fuel mechanical properties are essential and for which a wide range of experiments in MTR reactors and high burn-up commercial reactor fuel examinations have been included in programmes worldwide. To contribute to the acquisition of this knowledge the LAIN activity is developing in two directions. First one is development of an ultrasonic focused technique adapted to active materials study. This technique was used few years ago in the EdF laboratory in Chinon to assess the ageing of materials under irradiation. It is now used in a hot cell at ITU Karlsruhe to determine the elastic moduli of high burnup fuels from 0 to 110 GWd/tU. Some of this work is presented here. The second on going programme is related to the qualification of acoustic sensors in nuclear environments, which is of a great interest for all the methods, which work, in a hostile nuclear environment

  3. Quantitative burnup determination: A comparison of different experimental methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burn-up of nuclear fuel is defined as the energy produced per mass of fuel and, hence, is related to the inventory of fission products formed in the matrix of the fuel. It affects both neutron-physical and material properties. Therefore, it is essential to have methods available that allow a reliable determination of this important parameter. The burn-up is usually determined by measuring the content of an element that results from the fission process. The isotope 148Nd has proven to be an ideal monitor due to its chemical and neutron physical properties. On the other hand, 148Nd can only be determined by wet-chemistry methods, which means a rather costly and time consuming chemistry process. Another method using the sum of 145Nd and 146Nd is proposed. In case of very high burn-ups of U02 fuel and, especially, MOX fuel this method needs weighed yields for U and Pu to obtain a sufficient accuracy. Among the non-destructive spectrometric methods, the burn-up determination with 137Cs provides adequate results provided the gamma radiation detector is calibrated and self-attenuation effects of Cs together with measurement geometries are considered. (Author)

  4. Need for higher fuel burnup at the Hatch Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch is a BWR 4 and has been in operation for some time. The first unit became commercial about 1975. Obtaining higher burnups, or higher average discharge exposures, is nothing new at Hatch. Since we have started, the discharge exposure of the plant has increased. Now, of course, we are not approaching the numbers currently being discussed but, the average discharge exposure has increased from around 20,000 MWD/MTU in the early to mid-1980s to 34,000 MWD/MTU in 1994, I am talking about batch average values. There are also peak bundle and peak rod values. You will have to make the conversions if you think in one way or the other because I am talking in batch averages. During Hatch's operating history we have had some problems with fuel failure. Higher burnup fuel raises a concern about how much fuel failure you are going to have. Fuel failure is, of course, an economic issue with us. Back in the early 1980s, we had a problem with crud-induced localized corrosion, known as CILC. We have gotten over that, but we had some times when it was up around 27 fuel failures a year. That is not a pleasant time to live through because it is not what you want from an economic viewpoint or any other. We have gotten that down. We have had some fuel failures recently, but they have not been related to fuel burnup or to corrosion. In fact, the number of failures has decreased from the early 1980s to the 90s even though burnup increased during that time. The fuel failures are more debris-related-type failures. In addition to increasing burnups, utilities are actively evaluating or have already incorporated power uprate and longer fuel cycles (e.g., 2-year cycles). The goal is to balance out the higher power density, longer cycles, higher burnup, and to have no leakers. Why do we as an industry want to have higher burnup fuel? That is what I want to tell you a little bit about

  5. Need for higher fuel burnup at the Hatch Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckhman, J.T. [Georgia Power Co., Birmingham, AL (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Hatch is a BWR 4 and has been in operation for some time. The first unit became commercial about 1975. Obtaining higher burnups, or higher average discharge exposures, is nothing new at Hatch. Since we have started, the discharge exposure of the plant has increased. Now, of course, we are not approaching the numbers currently being discussed but, the average discharge exposure has increased from around 20,000 MWD/MTU in the early to mid-1980s to 34,000 MWD/MTU in 1994, I am talking about batch average values. There are also peak bundle and peak rod values. You will have to make the conversions if you think in one way or the other because I am talking in batch averages. During Hatch`s operating history we have had some problems with fuel failure. Higher burnup fuel raises a concern about how much fuel failure you are going to have. Fuel failure is, of course, an economic issue with us. Back in the early 1980s, we had a problem with crud-induced localized corrosion, known as CILC. We have gotten over that, but we had some times when it was up around 27 fuel failures a year. That is not a pleasant time to live through because it is not what you want from an economic viewpoint or any other. We have gotten that down. We have had some fuel failures recently, but they have not been related to fuel burnup or to corrosion. In fact, the number of failures has decreased from the early 1980s to the 90s even though burnup increased during that time. The fuel failures are more debris-related-type failures. In addition to increasing burnups, utilities are actively evaluating or have already incorporated power uprate and longer fuel cycles (e.g., 2-year cycles). The goal is to balance out the higher power density, longer cycles, higher burnup, and to have no leakers. Why do we as an industry want to have higher burnup fuel? That is what I want to tell you a little bit about.

  6. Small business credit scoring and credit availability

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Allen N.; Frame, W. Scott

    2005-01-01

    U.S. commercial banks are increasingly using credit scoring models to underwrite small business credits. This paper discusses this technology, evaluates the research findings on the effects of this technology on small business credit availability, and links these findings to a number of research and public policy issues.

  7. The measurement of burn-up level in HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Without shutting down the HTR-10, each fuel ball unloaded from the core must be measured. Judgment is made whether the desired burn-up level is reached. A fuel ball should be reloaded into the core when its burn-up level is less than 72,000 Mwd/tu. Since the measurement of burn-up level for a ball containing 0.9g 235U at most must be nondestructive, a γ spectroscopy method with high-resolution for the fission product 137Cs is typically chosen. However, because the HTR-10 is not provided with any kind of external calibrating source, it is impossible to achieve the goal that the accuracy of measurement is up to 2% by the above method. The method measuring burn-up levels without external source uses the ratio of 134Cs to 137Cs and gets bogged down in something unusual that both successful and failed examples have alternated in publications. The inner calibrating method is proposed in the paper. It is necessary to solve the following problems: a) The simple relationship between 134Cs/137Cs and burn-up level is held only in a specified range, but not for a spent ball. b) The migration must be ignored. c) How to deal with the neutron spectrum within HTR-10? The paper also introduces such useful method as neutron spectrum correction, picking out the graphite balls and extraction of 137Cs from γ spectra of reactor. The appropriate instrumentation that discriminates out the spent fuel balls and picks out the graphite balls is described. (author)

  8. Considerations on burn-up dependent RIA and LOCA criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For RIA transients, a fuel failure threshold has been derived and compared with recent experimental data relevant for BWR and PWR fuel. The threshold can be applied to HZP and CZP transients, account taken for the different initial enthalpy and for the lower ductility at cold conditions. It can also be used for non-zero power transients, provided that a term accounting for the initial power is incorporated. The proposed threshold predicts reasonably well the results obtained in the CABRI and NSRR tests when the different state of the cladding, i.e. ductile or brittle, is taken into account. Apart from some exceptions discussed in the paper, such as the effect of oxide spalling, one should consider ductile state for HZP conditions and brittle state for CZP conditions. The threshold applies equally well to UO2 and MOX fuel, but the database on MOX is limited. For LOCA transients, the cladding limit may decrease with burn-up due to cladding corrosion and hydrogen pick-up. A provisional criterion shows that the predicted burn-up effect is moderate or negligible if one uses the results obtained with actual high burn-up cladding. On the other hand, a large effect is predicted based on the results obtained with non-irradiated, pre-hydrided cladding specimens. There is a question however on as to whether these specimens can be representative for high burn-up material. The experimental evidence is still scarce and more data on high burn-up cladding is needed in order to arrive to firm conclusions. Most of the data currently available relates to Zr-4 cladding. The experiments made on ZIRLO and M5 cladding show that these alloys have a RIA and LOCA behaviour similar to or better than Zr-4. However, the data is limited, especially for LOCA conditions, where only un-irradiated specimens have been tested so far. (author)

  9. Dependence of control rod worth on fuel burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savva, P., E-mail: savvapan@ipta.demokritos.g [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Varvayanni, M., E-mail: melina@ipta.demokritos.g [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Catsaros, N., E-mail: nicos@ipta.demokritos.g [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece)

    2011-02-15

    Research highlights: Diffusion and MC calculations for rod worth dependence on burnup and Xe in reactors. One-step rod withdrawal/insertion are used for rod worth estimation. The study showed that when Xe is present the rods worth is significantly reduced. Rod worth variation with burnup depends on rod position in core. Rod worth obtained with MC code is higher than that obtained from deterministic. - Abstract: One important parameter in the design and the analysis of a nuclear reactor core is the reactivity worth of the control rods, i.e. their efficiency to absorb excess reactivity. The control rod worth is affected by parameters such as the fuel burnup in the rod vicinity, the Xe concentration in the core, the operational time of the rod and its position in the core. In the present work, two different computational approaches, a deterministic and a stochastic one, were used for the determination of the rods worth dependence on the fuel burnup level and the Xe concentration level in a conceptual, symmetric reactor core, based on the MTR fuel assemblies used in the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1). For the deterministic approach the neutronics code system composed by the SCALE modules NITAWL and XSDRN and the diffusion code CITATION was used, while for the stochastic one the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI was applied. The study showed that when Xe is present in the core, the rods worth is significantly reduced, while the rod worth variation with increasing burnup depends on the rods position in the core grid. The rod worth obtained with the use of the Monte Carlo code is higher than the one obtained from the deterministic code.

  10. Nuclide Importance to Criticality Safety, Decay Heating, and Source Terms Related to Transport and Interim Storage of High-Burnup LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I. C.; Ryman, J. C.

    2000-12-11

    This report investigates trends in the radiological decay properties and changes in relative nuclide importance associated with increasing enrichments and burnup for spent LWR fuel as they affect the areas of criticality safety, thermal analysis (decay heat), and shielding analysis of spent fuel transport and storage casks. To facilitate identifying the changes in the spent fuel compositions that most directly impact these application areas, the dominant nuclides in each area have been identified and ranked by importance. The importance is investigated as a function of increasing burnup to assist in identifying the key changes in spent fuel characteristics between conventional- and extended-burnup regimes. Studies involving both pressurized water-reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies and boiling-water-reactor (BWR) assemblies are included. This study is seen to be a necessary first step in identifying the high-burnup spent fuel characteristics that may adversely affect the accuracy of current computational methods and data, assess the potential impact on previous guidance on isotopic source terms and decay-heat values, and thus help identify areas for methods and data improvement. Finally, several recommendations on the direction of possible future code validation efforts for high-burnup spent fuel predictions are presented.

  11. Behaviour of fuel rods of the second generation at high burnup WWER-440 fuel cycles. Aspects for attainment of burnup 70 MWd/kgU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report an analysis of WWER-440 fuel of the second generation supplied by Russian JSC TVEL for high burnup fuel cycle is presented. The certificated code START-3 is applied to modeling of fuel rod operation parameters. Reliability of high-burnup fuel on the base of 5-6 year operation is demonstrated. Special attention is paid to aspects for attainment of burnup 70 MWd/kgU, including experimental and fuel modeling support and fuel operation experience

  12. The Economics of Credit Information

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, John-ren

    1999-01-01

    The credit sale has been a widely used form of transaction. Credit sale can reduce transaction cost but induce credit risk because of default credit. To avoid credit risk a firm needs information about the payment behaviour and solvency situation of his debtor. A credit information agency is a professional supplier of credit information. In this paper an outline of economics of credit information such as market for credit information, production, its cost and welfare effects are discussed.

  13. Credit Reporting Knowledge Guide

    OpenAIRE

    International Finance Corporation

    2012-01-01

    This second edition of the Credit Reporting Knowledge Guide aims to support the dissemination of knowledge on best practices in credit reporting development, based on IFC s experience. The original Credit Bureau Knowledge Guide (2006) elaborated on the knowledge gained over several years of running the Global Credit Reporting Progra

  14. Impact of axial burnup profile on criticality safety of ANPP spent fuel cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criticality safety assessment for WWER-440 NUHOMS cask with spent nuclear fuel from Armenian NPP has been performed. The cask was designed in such way that the neutron multiplication factor keff must be below 0,95 for all operational modes and accident conditions. Usually for criticality analysis, fresh fuel approach with the highest enrichment is taken as conservative assumption as it was done for ANPP. NRSC ANRA in order to improve future fuel storage efficiency initiated research with taking into account burn up credit in the criticality safety assessment. Axial burn up profile (end effect) has essential impact on criticality safety justification analysis. However this phenomenon was not taken into account in the Safety Analysis Report of NUHOMS spent fuel storage constructed on the site of ANPP. Although ANRA does not yet accept burn up credit approach for ANPP spent fuel storage, assessment of impact of axial burnup profile on criticality of spent fuel assemblies has important value for future activities of ANRA. This paper presents results of criticality calculations of spent fuel assemblies with axial burn up profile. Horizontal burn up profile isn't taken account since influence of the horizontal variation of the burn up is much less than the axial variation. The actinides and actinides + fission products approach are discussed. The calculations were carried out with STARBUCS module of SCALE 5.0 code package developed at Oak Ridge National laboratory. SCALE5.0 sequence CSAS26 (KENO-VI) was used for evaluation the keff for 3-D problems. Obtained results showed that criticality of ANPP spent fuel cask is very sensitive to the end effect

  15. Effect of Self-Shielding on Burn-Up Calculation of ETRR-2 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There exist two approaches for burn-up calculation. The first on is to use cell parameters generated using cell calculation code at different degrees of burn-up. The other is to use microscopic cross sections with self-shielding in order to compensate for the variation of spectrum at different degree of burn-up. The effect of using different forms of self-shielding factors on burn-up calculation for ETRR-2 reactor has been determined. The results of the two approaches are inter-compared up to 50% burn-up

  16. Revaluation on measured burnup values of fuel assemblies by post-irradiation experiments at BWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel composition data for 8x8 UO2, Tsuruga MOX and 9x9-A type UO2 fuel assemblies irradiated in BWR plants were measured. Burnup values for measured fuels based on Nd-148 method were revaluated. In this report, Nd-148 fission yield and energy per fission obtained by burnup analyses for measured fuels were applied and fuel composition data for the measured fuel assemblies were revised. Furthermore, the adequacies of revaluated burnup values were verified through the comparison with burnup values calculated by the burnup analyses for the measured fuel assemblies. (author)

  17. CREDIT CARD FRAUD

    OpenAIRE

    Lăcrămioara BALAN; POPESCU, MIHAI

    2011-01-01

    Credit card fraud is the misuse of a credit card to make purchases without authorization or counterfeiting a credit card. Credit cards are the most often used electronic payment instrument. Types of credit card fraud are: online credit card fraud, advance payments, stolen card numbers, shave and paste, de-emboss/re-emboss etc. If current growth rates continue, credit cards and debit cards will each exceed the number of paid checks before the end of the decade. As the industry continues to exp...

  18. Development of a MCNP–ORIGEN burn-up calculation code system and its accuracy assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MCNP and ORIGEN are coupled to perform nuclides depletion and decay calculation. • Coupled system MCORE uses “modified predictor corrector” approach. • MCORE can use different depletion schemes and simulate fuel shuffling. • MCORE is assessed by a “VVER-1000 LEU Assembly Computational Benchmark”. • MCORE is also assessed by a fast reactor benchmark problem. - Abstract: An MCNP–ORIGEN burn-up calculation code system, named MCORE (MCNP and ORIGEN burn-up Evaluation code), is developed in this work. MCORE makes use of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code MCNP4C and nuclides depletion and decay calculation code ORIGEN2.1. MCNP and ORIGEN are coupled by data processing and linking subroutines. In MCORE, a so called “modified predictor corrector” approach is used. MCORE provides the capability of using different depletion calculation schemes and simulating fuel shuffling. Total nuclide density changes in active cells are considered in MCORE. The validity and applicability of the developed code are tested by investigating and predicting the neutronic and isotopic behavior of a “VVER-1000 LEU Assembly Computational Benchmark” at lattice level and a “Physics of Plutonium Recycling” fast reactor at core level (OECD-NEA). The comparison results show that the MCORE code predicts the nuclide composition within 5% accuracy and k∞ within 800 pcm at the end of the burn-up for LEU assembly (40 MWD/kg HM). For a fast reactor, the results obtained by MCORE are in the range of reported results except for 243Am. In general, MCORE results show a good agreement with the benchmark values

  19. Modernization of credit relations.

    OpenAIRE

    S.V. Volosovich

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays it is essential to modernize credit relations in the conditions of global economy transformations. This is due to the influence of integration processes on credit relations and transformation of the risks inherent in the credit field. The purpose of this article is to develop measures that help to improve the efficiency of interaction of credit relations’ participants. Modernization of credit relations is based on the interaction of its main and indirect subjects who belong to t...

  20. Experimental Investigation of Burnup Credit for Safe Transport, Storage, and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes criticality benchmark experiments containing rhodium that were conducted as part of a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project. Rhodium is an important fission product absorber. A capability to perform critical experiments with low-enriched uranium fuel was established as part of the project. Ten critical experiments, some containing rhodium and others without, were conducted. The experiments were performed in such a way that the effects of the rhodium could be accurately isolated. The use of the experimental results to test neutronics codes is demonstrated by example for two Monte Carlo codes. These comparisons indicate that the codes predict the behavior of the rhodium in the critical systems within the experimental uncertainties. The results from this project, coupled with the results of follow-on experiments that investigate other fission products, can be used to quantify and reduce the conservatism of spent nuclear fuel safety analyses while still providing the necessary level of safety

  1. Implementation of burnup and control rod credit for storage of spent nuclear fuel in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary analysis of the regulations in force in Ukraine concerning nuclear safety of spent nuclear fuel management systems shows that some regulatory requirements in force are too conservative in view of current international practice. The extent of conservatism can be determined and reduced, if necessary, only using calculated studies for analyzing the criticality of spent nuclear fuel management systems. Such activity is consistent with the requirements posed by state-of-the-art production requirements. However, this can be only based on improving our level of understanding the processes occurring in nuclear dangerous systems and improving our capabilities as regards accuracy, correctness, and reliability in numerical modeling these processes. This work was intended to demonstrate that the excessive conservatism laid previously into the requirements on nuclear safety in Ukraine due to insufficient development of means for modeling processes in nuclear fuel can be considerably decreased through using more real modeling fuel systems. If such modeling is performed with the use of state-of-the-art software and computers, based on more complete understanding the processes in fuel systems, then removal of the excessive conservatism does will not reduce the safety of nuclear dangerous systems. (author)

  2. Experimental investigation of burnup credit for safe transport, storage, and disposal of spent nuclear fuel.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, Donald T.; Harms, Gary A.; Ford, John T.; Walker, Sharon Ann; Helmick, Paul H.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2004-04-01

    This report describes criticality benchmark experiments containing rhodium that were conducted as part of a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project. Rhodium is an important fission product absorber. A capability to perform critical experiments with low-enriched uranium fuel was established as part of the project. Ten critical experiments, some containing rhodium and others without, were conducted. The experiments were performed in such a way that the effects of the rhodium could be accurately isolated. The use of the experimental results to test neutronics codes is demonstrated by example for two Monte Carlo codes. These comparisons indicate that the codes predict the behavior of the rhodium in the critical systems within the experimental uncertainties. The results from this project, coupled with the results of follow-on experiments that investigate other fission products, can be used to quantify and reduce the conservatism of spent nuclear fuel safety analyses while still providing the necessary level of safety.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Burnup Credit for Safe Transport, Storage, and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harms, Gary A.; Helmick, Paul H.; Ford, John T.; Walker, Sharon A.; Berry, Donald T.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2004-04-01

    This report describes criticality benchmark experiments containing rhodium that were conducted as part of a Department of Energy Nuclear Energy Research Initiative project. Rhodium is an important fission product absorber. A capability to perform critical experiments with low-enriched uranium fuel was established as part of the project. Ten critical experiments, some containing rhodium and others without, were conducted. The experiments were performed in such a way that the effects of the rhodium could be accurately isolated. The use of the experimental results to test neutronics codes is demonstrated by example for two Monte Carlo codes. These comparisons indicate that the codes predict the behavior of the rhodium in the critical systems within the experimental uncertainties. The results from this project, coupled with the results of follow-on experiments that investigate other fission products, can be used to quantify and reduce the conservatism of spent nuclear fuel safety analyses while still providing the necessary level of safety.

  4. Burnup credit issues in spent fuel transportation workshop - Overview and objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act (NWPAA) of 1987 the US DOE will ship spent fuels from commercial sites (reactors and storage facilities) to a federal repository using shipping casks certified by the US NRC. Requirements for shipping commercially generated, spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel to receiving facilities at the turn of the century will differ considerably from those existing in the US at present. The number of future shipments to repositories will represent a substantial increase over current experience as evidenced by comparison of the projected minimum transport rate of 3000 MTU/yr (metric tons uranium per year) with a total movement of 6000 MTU over the last 25 years in the US. Also, future casks will be required to only accommodate much older spent fuel. Since current casks are predominately designed for much shorter-cooled spent fuels (180 days out of the reactor), the development of more efficient, new generation casks is warranted because of the potential for large increases in payload capacity. As new casks are developed, private industry is being encouraged to be innovative in designing features to enhance both safety and operational efficiency

  5. Design and construction of a prototype advanced on-line fuel burn-up monitoring system for the modular pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Bingjing; Hawari, Ayman, I.

    2004-03-30

    Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) is a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear power reactor currently under study as a next generation reactor system. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multi-pass fuel circulation in which the fuel pebbles are randomly loaded and continuously cycled through the core until they reach their prescribed End-of-Life burn-up limit. Unlike the situation with a conventional light water reactor, depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management for MPBR will be highly inaccurate. An on-line measurement system is needed to accurately assess whether a given pebble has reached its End-of-Life burn-up limit and thereby provide an on-line, automated go/no-go decision on fuel disposition on a pebble-by-pebble basis. This project investigated approaches to analyzing fuel pebbles in real time using gamma spectroscopy and possibly using passive neutron counting of spontaneous fission neutrons to provide the speed, accuracy, and burn-up range required for burnup determination of MPBR. It involved all phases necessary to develop and construct a burn-up monitor, including a review of the design requirements of the system, identification of detection methodologies, modeling and development of potential designs, and finally, the construction and testing of an operational detector system. Based upon the research work performed in this project, the following conclusions are made. In terms of using gamma spectrometry, two possible approaches were identified for burnup assay. The first approach is based on the measurement of the absolute activity of Cs-137. However, due to spectral interference and the need for absolute calibration of the spectrometer, the uncertainty in burnup determination using this approach was found to range from {approx} {+-}40% at beginning of life to {approx} {+-}10% at the discharge burnup. An alternative approach is to use a relative burnup indicator. In this

  6. Design and construction of a prototype advanced on-line fuel burn-up monitoring system for the modular pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    -calibration method was developed to obtain the spectrometer's relative efficiency curve based upon gamma lines emitted from 140La. It was found that the ratio of 239Np/132I can be used in burnup measurement with an uncertainty of ∼ ±3% throughout the pebble's lifetime. In addition, by doping the fuel with 60Co, the use of the 60Co/134Cs and 239Np/132I ratios can simultaneously yield the enrichment and burnup of each pebble. A functional gamma-ray spectrometry measurement system was constructed and tested with light water reactor fuels. Experimental results were observed to be consistent with the predictions. On using the passive neutron counting method for the on-line burnup measurement, it was found that neutron emission rate of an irradiated pebble is sensitive to its burnup history and the spectral-averaged cross sections used in the depletion calculations; thus a large uncertainty exists in the correlation between neutron emission and burnup. At low burnup levels, the uncertainty in the neutron emission/burnup correlation is too high and neutron emission rate is too low so that it is impossible to determine a pebble's burnup by on-line neutron counting. At high burnup levels, due to the decreasing of the uncertainty in neutron emission rate and the super-linear feature of the correlation, the uncertainty in burnup determination was found to be ∼7% at the discharge burnup, which is acceptable for determining whether a pebble should be discharged or not. In terms of neutron detection, because an irradiated pebble is a weak neutron source and a much stronger gamma source, neutron detector system should have high neutron detection efficiency and strong gamma discrimination capability. Of all the commonly used neutron detectors, the He-3 and BF3 detector systems were found to be able to satisfy the requirement on detection efficiency; but their gamma discrimination capability is only marginal for this on-line application. Even with thick gamma shielding, these two types of

  7. Burnup calculations using serpent code in accelerator driven thorium reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, burnup calculations have been performed for a sodium cooled Accelerator Driven Thorium Reactor (ADTR) using the Serpent 1.1.16 Monte Carlo code. The ADTR has been designed for burning minor actinides, mixed 232Th and mixed 233U fuels. A solid Pb-Bi spallation target in the center of the core is used and sodium as coolant. The system is designed for a heating power of 2 000 MW and for an operation time of 600 days. For burnup calculations the Advanced Matrix Exponential Method CRAM (Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method) and different nuclear data libraries (ENDF7, JEF2.2, JEFF3.1.1) were used. The effective multiplication factor change from 0.93 to 0.97 for different nuclear data libraries during the reactor operation period. (orig.)

  8. Burnup calculations using serpent code in accelerator driven thorium reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korkmaz, M.E.; Agar, O. [Karamanoglu Mehmetbey Univ., Karaman (Turkey). Physics Dept.; Yigit, M. [Aksaray Univ. (Turkey). Physics Dept.

    2013-07-15

    In this study, burnup calculations have been performed for a sodium cooled Accelerator Driven Thorium Reactor (ADTR) using the Serpent 1.1.16 Monte Carlo code. The ADTR has been designed for burning minor actinides, mixed {sup 232}Th and mixed {sup 233}U fuels. A solid Pb-Bi spallation target in the center of the core is used and sodium as coolant. The system is designed for a heating power of 2 000 MW and for an operation time of 600 days. For burnup calculations the Advanced Matrix Exponential Method CRAM (Chebyshev Rational Approximation Method) and different nuclear data libraries (ENDF7, JEF2.2, JEFF3.1.1) were used. The effective multiplication factor change from 0.93 to 0.97 for different nuclear data libraries during the reactor operation period. (orig.)

  9. Testing of a burnup measuring prototype. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analyses of gamma spectroscopy measurements of spherical fuel elements are reported, which have been performed in order to prove the feasibility of burnup measurement by way of Cs-137 spectroscopy. The detailed analysis and evaluation of the FRJ2-KA2) irradiation experiment carried out in the DIDO reactor supplied clear evidence that it is possible to measure an HTR-Modul fuel pebble with a target burnup ob 80,000 MWd/t after a decay time of 55 h, within a period of 10 seconds and with an accuracy of <5%, with 1 σ confidence, and that there is no need for developing measuring instruments with a higher counting rate. There are commercial peak unfolding programs available. (orig./HP)

  10. Transient behaviour of high burnup fuel. Status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Status Report is a follow-on to the CSNI Specialist Meeting on Transient Behaviour of High Burnup Fuel which was held in Cadarache, France, from September 12. to 14., 1995. The Status Report identifies the needs and rationale for any further work to better understand the transient behaviour of high burnup fuel. The different options to perform that work, from analytical to experimental activities, and discussion on the potential benefits of performing new integral tests are also addressed. A brief description of the major on-going and short-term planned activities in this field is included as additional information. The main conclusions from this effort are highlighted. (K.A.)

  11. OREST, LWR Burnup Simulation Using Program HAMMER and ORIGEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: In OREST, the 1-dimensional lattice code HAMMER and the isotope generation and depletion code ORIGEN are directly coupled for burnup simulation in light-water reactor fuels (GRS recommended). Additionally heavy water and graphite moderated systems can be calculated. New version differs from the previous version in the following features: An 84-group-library LIB84 for up to 200 isotopes is used to update the 3-group -POISON-XS. LIB84 uses the same energy boundaries as THERMOS and HAMLET in . In this way, high flexibility is achieved in very different reactor models. The coupling factor between THERMOS and HAMLET is now directly transferred from HAMMER to THERES and omits the equation 4 (see page 6 of the manual). Sandwich-reactor fuel reactivity and burnup calculations can be started with NGEOM = 1. Thorium graphite reactivity and burnup calculations can be started with NLIBE = 1. High enriched U-235 heavy water moderated reactivity and burnup calculations can be started. HAMLET libraries in for U-235, U-236, U-238, Np-237, Pu-238, Pu-239, Pu-240, Pu-242, Am-241, Am-243 and Zirconium are updated using resonance parameters. NEA-1324/04: A new version of the module hamme97.f has replaced the old one. 2 - Method of solution: For the user-defined irradiation history, an input data processor generates program loops over small burnup steps for the main codes HAMMER and ORIGEN. The user defined assembly description is transformed to an equivalent HAMMER fuel cell. HAMMER solves the integral neutron transport equation in a four-region cylindrical or sandwiched model with reflecting boundaries and runs with fuel power calculated rod temperatures. ORIGEN runs with HAMMER-calculated cross sections and neutron spectra and calculates isotope concentrations during burnup by solving the buildup-, depletion- and decay-chain equations. An output data processor samples the outputs of the program modules and generates tabular works for the

  12. OREST - The hammer-origen burnup program system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable prediction of the characteristics of irradiated light water reactor fuels (e.g., afterheat power, neutron and gamma radiation sources, final uranium and plutonium contents) is needed for many aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle. Two main problems must be solved: the simulation of all isotopic nuclear reactions and the simulation of neutron fluxes setting the reactions in motion. In state-of-the-art computer techniques, a combination of specialized codes for lattice cell and burnup calculations is preferred to solve these cross-linked problems in time or burnup step approximation. In the program system OREST, developed for official and commercial tasks in the Federal Republic of Germany nuclear fuel cycle, the well-known codes HAMMER and ORIGEN and directly coupled with a fuel rod temperature module

  13. New burnup calculation of TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IPR-R1 TRIGA Mark I research reactor, located at the Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, operates since 1960.The reactor is operating for more than fifty years and has a long history of operation. Determining the current composition of the fuel is very important to calculate various parameters. The reactor burnup calculation has been performed before, however, new techniques, methods, software and increase of the processing capacity of the new computers motivates new investigations to be performed. This work presents the evolution of effective multiplication constant and the results of burnup. This new model has a more detailed geometry with the introduction of the new devices, like the control rods and the samarium discs. This increase of materials in the simulation in burnup calculation was very important for results. For these series of simulations a more recently cross section library, ENDF/B-VII, was used. To perform the calculations two Monte Carlo particle transport code were used: Serpent and MCNPX. The results obtained from two codes are presented and compared with previous studies in the literature. (author)

  14. CEA contribution to power plant operation with high burnup level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High level burnup in PWR leads to investigate again the choices carried out in the field of fuel management. French CEA has studied the economic importance of reshuffling technique, cycle length, discharge burnup, and non-operation period between two cycles. Power plants operators wish to work with increased length cycles of 18 months instead of 12. That leads to control problems because the core reactivity cannot be controlled with the only soluble boron: moderator temperature coefficient must be negative. With such cycles, it is necessary to use burnable poisons and for economic reasons with a low penalty in end of cycle. CEA has studied the use of Gd2O3 mixed with fuel or with inert element like Al2O3. Parametric studies of specific weights, efficacities relatively to the fuel burnup and the fuel enrichment have been carried out. Particular studies of 1 month cycles with Gd2O3 have shown the possibility to control power distribution with a very low reactivity penalty in EOC. In the same time, in the 100 MW PWR-CAP, control reactivity has been made with large use of gadolinia in parallel with soluble boron for the two first cycles

  15. Fuel rod behaviour at high burnup WWER fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modernisation of WWER fuel cycles is carried out on the base of complete modelling and experimental justification of fuel rods up to 70 MWd/kgU. The modelling justification of the reliability of fuel rod and fuel rod with gadolinium is carried out with the use of certified START-3 code. START-3 code has a continuous experimental support. The thermophysical and strength reliability of WWER-440 fuel is justified for fuel rod and pellet burnups 65 MWd/kgU and 74 MWd/U, accordingly. Results of analysis are demonstrated by the example of uranium-gadolinium fuel assemblies of second generation under 5-year cycle with a portion of 6-year assemblies and by the example of successfully completed pilot operation of 5-year cycle fuel assemblies during 6 years at unit 3 of Kolskaja NPP. The thermophysical and strength reliability of WWER-1000 fuel is justified for a fuel rod burnup 66 MWd/kgU by the example of fuel operation under 4-year cycles and 6-year test operation of fuel assemblies at unit 1 of Kalininskaya NPP. By the example of 5-year cycle at Dukovany NPP Unit 2 it was demonstrated that WWER fuel rod of a burnup 58 MWd/kgU ensure reliable operation under load following conditions. The analysis has confirmed sufficient reserves of Russian fuel to implement program of JSC 'TVEL' in order to improve technical and economical parameters of WWER fuel cycles

  16. Pore pressure calculation of the UO2 high burnup structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pore pressure is calculated based on local burnup, density and porosity. • Ronchi's equations of state are used instead of van der Waals’ equation. • Pore pressure increases as HBS transformation begins and then stays constant. • A best approximated parameter used for pore pressure calculation is recommended. -- Abstract: UO2 high burnup structure has an important impact on fuel behavior, especially in case of reactivity initiated accident (RIA). Pore relaxation enhances local fuel swelling and puts additional load to the fuel cladding, which makes fuel more susceptible to pellet–cladding mechanical interaction induced failure. Therefore, pore pressure calculation becomes vital when evaluating the fuel failure. In this paper pore pressure is calculated as a function of pellet radial local burnup based on the basic characteristics of HBS using Ronchi's correlation. The results indicate that pore pressure will approach a stable value as HBS is developing. A best approximated C value of 55 N/m is recommended for pore pressure calculation

  17. Burnup performances of boron nitride and boron coated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuels of urania (UOV) and 5% and 10% gadolinia (Gd2O3) containing UO2 previously produced by sol-gel technique were coated with first boron nitride (BN) then boron (B) thin layer by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and also by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) techniques to increase the fuel cycle length and to improve the physical properties. From the cross-sectional view of BN and B layers taken from scanning electron microscope (SEM), the excellent adherence of BN onto fuel and B onto BN layer was observed in both cases. The behavior of fuel burnup, depletion of BN and B, the effect of coating thickness and also Gd2O3 content on the burnup performances of the fuels were identified by using the code WIMS-D/4 for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) cores. The optimum thickness ratio of B to BN was found as 4 and their thicknesses were chosen as 40 mm and 10 mm respectively in both reactor types to get extended cycle length. The assemblies consisting of fuels with 5% Gd2O3 and also coated with 10 mm BN and 40 mm B layers were determined as candidates for getting higher burnup in both types of reactors

  18. Advanced fuel cycles and burnup increase of WWER-440 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyses of operational experience of 4.4% enriched fuel in the 5-year fuel cycle at Kola NPP Unit 3 and fuel assemblies with Uranium-Gadolinium fuel at Kola NPP Unit 4 are made. The operability of WWER-440 fuel under high burnup is studied. The obtained results indicate that the fuel rods of WWER-440 assemblies intended for operation within six years of the reviewed fuel cycle totally preserve their operability. Performed analyses have demonstrated the possibility of the fuel rod operability during the fuel cycle. 12 assemblies were loaded into the reactor unit of Kola 3 in 2001. The predicted burnup in six assemblies was 59.2 MWd/kgU. Calculated values of the burnup after operation for working fuel assemblies were ∼57 MWd/kgU, for fuel rods - up to ∼61 MWd/kgU. Data on the coolant activity, specific activity of the benchmark iodine radionuclides of the reactor primary circuit, control of the integrity of fuel rods of the assemblies that were operated for six years indicate that not a single assembly has reached the criterion for the early discharge

  19. New burnup calculation of TRIGA IPR-R1 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, Sincler P. de; Campolina, Daniel de A.M.; Santos, Andre A. Campagnole dos; Menezes, Maria A.B.C.; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: sinclercdtn@hotmail.com.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The IPR-R1 TRIGA Mark I research reactor, located at the Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, operates since 1960.The reactor is operating for more than fifty years and has a long history of operation. Determining the current composition of the fuel is very important to calculate various parameters. The reactor burnup calculation has been performed before, however, new techniques, methods, software and increase of the processing capacity of the new computers motivates new investigations to be performed. This work presents the evolution of effective multiplication constant and the results of burnup. This new model has a more detailed geometry with the introduction of the new devices, like the control rods and the samarium discs. This increase of materials in the simulation in burnup calculation was very important for results. For these series of simulations a more recently cross section library, ENDF/B-VII, was used. To perform the calculations two Monte Carlo particle transport code were used: Serpent and MCNPX. The results obtained from two codes are presented and compared with previous studies in the literature. (author)

  20. Rural Credit in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barslund, Mikkel Christoffer; Tarp, Finn

    This paper uses a survey of 932 rural households to uncover how the rural credit market operates in four provinces of Vietnam. Households obtain credit through formal and informal lenders, but formal loans are almost entirely for production and asset accumulation. Interest rates fell from 1997 to...... 2002, reflecting increased market integration; but the determinants of formal and informal credit demand are distinct. Credit rationing depends on education and credit history, but we find no evidence of a bias against women. Regional differences are striking, and a ‘one size fits all’ approach to...... credit policy is clearly inappropriate....

  1. Credit for comments, comments for credit

    OpenAIRE

    Sommer, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A survey in 2 undergraduate psychology classes (N = 93) found ambivalent attitudes toward credit for classroom participation. Although students viewed credit as a way to increase interaction and improve attendance, they also believed it could stimulate irrelevant comments and penalize shy students. The following year, in a class of 49 students, halfway through the course, the instructor offered a small amount of credit for office visits and for participation, but only on alternate days. The i...

  2. Consumer credit counseling: credit card issuers' perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Mark Furletti

    2003-01-01

    On Friday, May 23, 2003, the Payment Cards Center hosted a workshop led by collections managers from J.P. Morgan Chase and Juniper Bank. The managers provided the credit card issuers' perspective on the consumer credit counseling industry. The day's discussion complemented an earlier workshop at which representatives from local consumer credit counseling services (CCCS) discussed their business model. After describing the ways in which new market entrants have affected the counseling industry...

  3. Evaluation of the elastic constants of the high burnup nuclear fuel (U1-y,Gdy)O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuels with burnable poisons are applications in the scope of the nuclear energy for electricity generation. The discharge burnups of this type of fuel are higher than the discharge burnups of pure UO2 fuels with same enrichment of the fissile element. In conditions of high burnups and moderate transients, the fuel rods can be subject to the pellet/cladding mechanical interactions (PCMI). Elastic constants of the fuel and cladding are used in the thermo-mechanical evaluation of the PCMI. The fuel elastic constants are usually expressed as a function of temperature, composition and porosity. Data survey and modeling of elastic constants for the (U1-y,Gdy)O2 fuel are developed in this paper. Due to small amount of the available measurements for the (U1-y,Gdy)O2, the modeling taken into account the data from UO2 and Gd2O3 measurements. Available measurements of the Al2O3 were also used in the model validation. The elastic constants of these materials have been fitted by an analytic equation, which depicts the whole range the dependences. (author)

  4. Credit Card Quiz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Jeff

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity in which students design credit cards and discover for themselves the mathematical realities of buying on credit. Employs multiple-intelligence theory to increase the chance that all students will be reached. (YDS)

  5. Credit Union Headquarters

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The National Credit Union Administration (NCUA) is the independent federal agency that charters and supervises federal credit unions. NCUA, backed of the full faith...

  6. Credit Valuation Adjustment

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Frederick

    2011-01-01

    Credit risk has become a topical issue since the 2007 Credit Crisis, particularly for its impact on the valuation of OTC derivatives. This becomes critical when the credit risk of entities involved in a contract either as underlying or counterparty become highly correlated as is the case during macroeconomic shocks. It impacts the valuation of such contracts through an additional term, the credit valuation adjustment (CVA). This can become large with such correlation. This thesis outlines the...

  7. Credit Card Security

    OpenAIRE

    G.C., Anup

    2013-01-01

    Author: Anup G.C. Year: 2013 Subject of thesis: Credit Card Security Number of pages: 36+2 Credit Card is a widely used electronic chip for easy transactions. The main purpose of the report was to show the security measures of transaction by credit cards. The purpose was to give information about credit cards and how they were introduced. The thesis reportcontained the types of card theft with examples and sited the various protocols used for online ...

  8. Credit risk measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Sobotka, Jan

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with problematics of credit risk measurement and modeling. The thesis defines the term and concept of credit risk, accents the specifics of the credit risk and frames it in the context of other financial risks, as well as risk management of current financial institutions. It outlines incentives leading to development of regulation, modeling and measuring of the credit risk, as well as presents current situation of the mentioned field. The thesis presents and describ...

  9. Research on Integrity of High Burnup Spent Fuel Under the Long Term Dry Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives were to acquire the following behaviour data by dynamic load impact tests on high burnup spent fuel rods of BWR and PWR and to improve the guidance of regulation of spent fuel storage and transportation. (1) The limit of load and strain for high burnup fuel in the cask drop accident. (2) The amount of deformation of high burnup fuel rods under dynamic load impact. (3) The amount of fuel pellet material released from fuel rods under dynamic load impact

  10. Consumer credit contracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe, C. A.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In compliance with European Directives, Romanian authorities have established some principles for consumer credit, minimum standards for authorizing, regulating and monitoring credit institutions. These measures were required by the increase in imports due to consumer credit, while the national bank tempered this increase. Therefore, banks, together with the big shops, perfect their techniques to attract customers.

  11. Trust and Credit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harste, Gorm

    The present paper is an answer to the question, how did trust and credit emerge. The systems of trust and credit reduce the environmental and contextual complexities in which trust and credit are embedded. The paper analyses the forms of this reduction in a number of stages in the evolution of...

  12. Cracking the Credit Hour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laitinen, Amy

    2012-01-01

    The basic currency of higher education--the credit hour--represents the root of many problems plaguing America's higher education system: the practice of measuring time rather than learning. "Cracking the Credit Hour" traces the history of this time-based unit, from the days of Andrew Carnegie to recent federal efforts to define a credit hour. If…

  13. Modernization of credit relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Volosovich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays it is essential to modernize credit relations in the conditions of global economy transformations. This is due to the influence of integration processes on credit relations and transformation of the risks inherent in the credit field. The purpose of this article is to develop measures that help to improve the efficiency of interaction of credit relations’ participants. Modernization of credit relations is based on the interaction of its main and indirect subjects who belong to the subsystems of loans granting, deposits attraction and provision of related services. Its goal is to pass from extensive to intensive model of interaction between the subjects of credit relations. Components of the credit relations modernization are the following: institutional modernization, which is based on the interaction of credit relations’ subjects, and ensures the development of competition in all credit market’s segments, the creation of its corresponding infrastructure, qualitative change in the approaches of regulation and supervision; technological modernization, which involves the formation of joint products on the credit market and the formation of an integrated informational and analytical system. In the result of the credit relations’ modernization it is expected to achieve synergies between the subjects of credit relations, that will lead to changes in the business architecture of the financial market.

  14. Boundedly rational credit cycles

    OpenAIRE

    S??ez, Mar??a

    1996-01-01

    We propose an evolutionary model of a credit market. We show that the economy exhibits credit cycles. The model predicts dynamics which are consistent with some evidence about the Great Depression. Real shocks trigger episodes of credit--crunch which are observed in the process of adjustment towards the post shock equilibrium.

  15. Effect of fuel burnup history on neutronic characteristics of WWER-1000 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper analyzes fuel burnup history effect on neutronic characteristics of WWER-1000 core with use of the DYN3D codes. The DYN3D code employs the local Pu-239 concentration as an indicator of burnup spectral history. The calculations have been performed for the first four fuel loadings of Khmelnitsky NPP unit 2 and stationary fuel loading with TVSA. The effect of fuel burnup history is shown both on macro-characteristics on the reactor core and on local values of burnup and power

  16. Credit for Comments, Comments for Credit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Robert; Sommer, Barbara A.

    2007-01-01

    A survey in 2 undergraduate psychology classes (N = 93) found ambivalent attitudes toward credit for classroom participation. Although students viewed credit as a way to increase interaction and improve attendance, they also believed it could stimulate irrelevant comments and penalize shy students. The following year, in a class of 49 students,…

  17. Lessons learned in obtaining efficient and sufficient applications of the PIRT process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US NRC and its contractors developed the PIRT (Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables) process in 1989 as part of the CSAU (Code Scaling, Applicability and Uncertainty) effort. As originally conceived and applied to a PWR LBLOCA the process proved highly successful. However, the process application was somewhat complex and labor intensive. As a first-of-a-kind product the process did not necessarily recognize future applications in which more limited objectives would be sufficient. In the intervening fourteen years the process has been applied and refined in more than fifteen projects, for example Light water reactor accident scenarios: Large break LOCA, Small break LOCA, Main steam-line break, Steam generator tube rupture, Debris transport in wet and dry containments, Containment coatings, High burnup fuel under accident conditions, Burnup credit, TRISO fuel (manufacturing, operation, and accident life-cycle phases). These subsequent applications have demonstrated the original process can be made more efficient in execution and yet retain the desired sufficiency in results. The objective of this paper is to summarize the significant lessons learned in efficient application of the process

  18. Improved Credit Scoring with Multilevel Statistical Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Khudnitskaya, Alesia S.

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation introduces a new type of credit scoring model which assesses credit worthiness of applicants for a loan by forecasting their probability of default. The multilevel scorecard is an improved alternative to the conventional scoring techniques which are regularly applied in retail banking such as discriminant analysis, decision trees and logistic regression scorecards. In addition, this thesis proposes a new way of data clustering for a multilevel structure which ...

  19. Credit Assessment Processes and Basel II Accord

    OpenAIRE

    Cihangir, Nuran

    2007-01-01

    106 pages This study analyses the credit assessment processes of a specific financialinstitution in Turkey and compares the main drivers of corporate credit approvaldecisions with the parameters of Moody’s rating model for private companies,RiskCalc. The new “International Convergence of Capital Measurement and CapitalStandards” or Basel II is expected to bring new applications in terms of creditassessment processes to the banking sector. The latest Banking SectorDevelopment Report by the ...

  20. Destructive radiochemical analysis of uraniumsilicide fuel for burnup determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gysemans, M.; Bocxstaele, M. van; Bree, P. van; Vandevelde, L.; Koonen, E.; Sannen, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium); Guigon, B. [CEA, Centre de Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    During the design phase of the French research reactor Jules Horowitz (RJH) several types of low enriched uranium fuels (LEU), i.e. <20% {sup 235}U enrichment, are studied as possible candidate fuel elements for the reactor core. One of the LEU fuels that is taken into consideration is an uraniumsilicide based fuel with U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed in an aluminium matrix. The development and evaluation of such a new fuel for a research reactor requires an extensive testing and qualification program, which includes destructive radiochemical analysis to determine the burnup of irradiated fuel with a high accuracy. In radiochemistry burnup is expressed as atom percent burnup and is a measure for the number of fissions that have occurred per initial 100 heavy element atoms (%FIMA). It is determined by measuring the number of heavy element atoms in the fuel and the number of atoms of selected key fission products that are proportional to the number of fissions that occurred during irradiation. From the few fission products that are suitable as fission product monitor, the stable Nd-isotopes {sup 143}Nd, {sup 144}Nd, {sup 145}Nd, {sup 146}Nd, {sup 148Nd}, {sup 150}Nd and the gamma-emitters {sup 137}Cs and {sup 144}Ce are selected for analysis. Samples form two curved U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} plates, with a fuel core density of 5.1 and 6.1 g U/cm{sup 3} (35% {sup 235}U) and being irradiated in the BR2 reactor of SCK x CEN{sup [1]}, were analyzed. (orig.)