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Sample records for burnable poisons

  1. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. L. Grossbeck J-P.A. Renier Tim Bigelow

    2003-09-30

    Burnable poisons are used in nuclear reactors to produce a more level distribution of power in the reactor core and to reduce to necessity for a large control system. An ideal burnable poison would burn at the same rate as the fuel. In this study, separation of neutron-absorbing isotopes was investigated in order to eliminate isotopes that remain as absorbers at the end of fuel life, thus reducing useful fuel life. The isotopes Gd-157, Dy-164, and Er-167 were found to have desirable properties. These isotopes were separated from naturally occurring elements by means of plasma separation to evaluate feasibility and cost. It was found that pure Gd-157 could save approximately $6 million at the end of four years. However, the cost of separation, using the existing facility, made separation cost- ineffective. Using a magnet with three times the field strength is expected to reduce the cost by a factor of ten, making isotopically separated burnable poisons a favorable method of increasing fuel life in commercial reactors, in particular Generation-IV reactors. The project also investigated various burnable poison configurations, and studied incorporation of metallic burnable poisons into fuel cladding.

  2. Development of Improved Burnable Poisons for Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors

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    Renier, J.A.

    2002-04-17

    Burnable poisons are used in all modern nuclear reactors to permit higher loading of fuel without the necessity of an overly large control rod system. This not only permits a longer core life but can also be used to level the power distribution. Commercial nuclear reactors commonly use B{sub 4}C in separate non-fueled rods and more recently, zirconium boride coatings on the fuel pellets or gadolinium oxide mixed with the fuel. Although the advantages are great, there are problems with using these materials. Boron, which is an effective neutron absorber, transmutes to lithium and helium upon absorption of a neutron. Helium is insoluble and is eventually released to the interior of the fuel rod, where it produces an internal pressure. When sufficiently high, this pressure stress could cause separation of the cladding from the fuel, causing overly high centerline temperatures. Gadolinium has several very strongly absorbing isotopes, but not all have large cross sections and result in residual burnable poison reactivity worth at the end of the fuel life. Even if the amount of this residual absorber is small and the penalty in operation small, the cost of this penalty, even if only several days, can be very high. The objective of this investigation was to study the performance of single isotopes in order to reduce the residual negative reactivity left over at the end of the fuel cycle. Since the behavior of burnable poisons can be strongly influenced by their configuration, four forms for the absorbers were studied: homogeneously mixed with the fuel, mixed with only the outer one-third of the fuel pellet, coated on the perimeter of the fuel pellets, and alloyed with the cladding. In addition, the numbers of fuel rods containing burnable poison were chosen as 8, 16, 64, and 104. Other configurations were chosen for a few special cases. An enrichment of 4.5 wt% {sup 235}U was chosen for most cases for study in order to achieve a 4-year fuel cycle. A standard pressurized

  3. Burnable poison calculations for Mk.III gas-cooled reactor systems

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    Gubbins, M.E.

    1971-02-15

    A method of calculating the reactivity and burn-up hisotry of a Mk.III GCR system containing burnable poisons has been described. The method allows for poison-fuel interaction. Using the method it has been shown that burn-up of the poison under a constant incident flux can give errors of the order of 1-2 niles. A calculation using the method described will take about 50% longer than a straightforward fuel burn-up calculation in the same number of groups. The multi-cell approach has a potential for handling greater geometrical complexity. It is intended to compare the method against experiment as soon as suitable experimental results become available.

  4. Reactor physics analysis for the design of nuclear fuel lattices with burnable poisons

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    Espinosa-Paredes, G. [Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Guzman, Juan R., E-mail: maestro_juan_rafael@hotmail.com [Departamento de Fisica y Matematicas, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Adolfo Lopez Mateos, San Pedro Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A fuel rod optimization for the coupled bundle-core design in a BWR is developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An algorithm to minimize the rod power peaking factor is used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fissile content is divided in two factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A reactor physics analysis of these factors is performed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The algorithm is applied to a typical BWR fuel lattice. - Abstract: The main goals in nuclear fuel lattice design are: (1) minimizing the rod power peaking factor (PPF) in order that the power level distribution is the most uniform; (2) obtaining a prescribed target value for the multiplication factor (k) at the end of the irradiation in order that the fuel lattice reaches the desired reactivity; and (3) obtaining a prescribed target value for the k at the beginning of the irradiation in order that the reactivity excess is neither a high value (to ease the maneuvering of the control systems) nor a low value (to avoid the penalization of the high cost of the burnable poison content). In this work a simple algorithm to design the burnable poison bearing nuclear fuel lattice is presented. This algorithm is based on a reactor physics analysis. The algorithm is focused on finding the radial distribution of the fuel rods having different fissile and burnable poison contents in order to obtain: (1) an adequate minimum PPF; (2) a prescribed target value of the k at the end of the irradiation; and (3) a prescribed target value of the k at the beginning of the irradiation. This algorithm is based on the factorization of the fissile and burnable poison contents of each fuel rod and on the application of the first-order perturbation theory. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated with the design of a fuel lattice composed of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) and gadolinium dioxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) for boiling water reactors (BWR). This algorithm has been accomplished

  5. Development of a highly efficient burnable poison matrix material for cycle lifetime extension

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    Tulenko, J.S. [Florida Univ., 202 Nuclear Science Center, Gainesville, FL (United States); Baney, R.H.; Pressley, L. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The University of Florida (UF) is carrying out basic research on a new class of thermally stable boron containing materials that from early indications appear to have special properties that will greatly enhance the performance of Burnable Poison Rod Assemblies (BPRA(tm)s) and address one of the major disadvantages of the use of boron shims. The new class of polymer materials, poly-acetylenic carbonyl-siloxane, termed ''Carborane'', were developed by Dr. T. Keller of the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Dr. T. Keller is cooperating in this research effort. Other classes of boron containing polymer materials are also under review. Displacement of water by the boron shims incurs an ''end of cycle reactivity penalty'' since at the end of cycle the moderator coefficient is strongly negative. ''Carborane'' has the property of being able to contain a tailored amount of boron while maintaining an extremely high hydrogen content, and at the same time being extremely stable to high temperatures and to neutron irradiation. Tests run by the NRL have shown that ''Carborane'' is stable to about 1000 C. The high hydrogen and carbon content contained in the ''Carborane'' Polymer offsets the large fuel cycle reactivity penalty which occurs with current generation BPRA(tm)s, as a result of the reactivity loss resulting from the BPRA(tm)s displacement of moderator water in the guide tubes of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) assemblies. Current generation BPRA utilize B{sub 4}C in an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} matrix. In an attempt to minimize the reactivity penalty from water displacement, Westinghouse has developed a costly annular BPRA, called the Wet Annular Burnable Absorber (WABA) assembly. This burnable poison rod design reduces the moderator displacement by 22% by the use of a central annular water hole. The ''Carborane'' matrix proposed by the University of Florida

  6. THE CALCULATION OF BURNABLE POISON CORRECTION FACTORS FOR PWR FRESH FUEL ACTIVE COLLAR MEASUREMENTS

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    Croft, Stephen [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Favalli, Andrea [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-19

    Verification of commercial low enriched uranium light water reactor fuel takes place at the fuel fabrication facility as part of the overall international nuclear safeguards solution to the civilian use of nuclear technology. The fissile mass per unit length is determined nondestructively by active neutron coincidence counting using a neutron collar. A collar comprises four slabs of high density polyethylene that surround the assembly. Three of the slabs contain {sup 3}He filled proportional counters to detect time correlated fission neutrons induced by an AmLi source placed in the fourth slab. Historically, the response of a particular collar design to a particular fuel assembly type has been established by careful cross-calibration to experimental absolute calibrations. Traceability exists to sources and materials held at Los Alamos National Laboratory for over 35 years. This simple yet powerful approach has ensured consistency of application. Since the 1980's there has been a steady improvement in fuel performance. The trend has been to higher burn up. This requires the use of both higher initial enrichment and greater concentrations of burnable poisons. The original analytical relationships to correct for varying fuel composition are consequently being challenged because the experimental basis for them made use of fuels of lower enrichment and lower poison content than is in use today and is envisioned for use in the near term. Thus a reassessment of the correction factors is needed. Experimental reassessment is expensive and time consuming given the great variation between fuel assemblies in circulation. Fortunately current modeling methods enable relative response functions to be calculated with high accuracy. Hence modeling provides a more convenient and cost effective means to derive correction factors which are fit for purpose with confidence. In this work we use the Monte Carlo code MCNPX with neutron coincidence tallies to calculate the influence of

  7. New long-cycle small modular PWR cores using particle type burnable poisons for low boron operation

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    Yoo, Hoseong; Hwang, Dae Hee [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ser Gi, E-mail: sergihong@khu.ac.kr [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Deogyeong-daero, GiHeung-gu, Yongin, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ho Choel [Core and Fuel Analysis Group, Korea Hydro & Nuclear Power Central Research Institute (KHNP-CRI), Daejon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • New advanced burnable poison rods (BPR) are suggested for low boron operation in PWR. • The new SMR cores have long cycle length of ∼4.5 EFPYs with low boron concentration. • The SMR core satisfies all the design targets and constraints. - Abstract: In this paper, new small long-cycle PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) cores for low boron concentration operation are designed by employing advanced burnable poison rods (BPRs) in which the BISO (Bi-Isotropic) particles of burnable poison are distributed in a SiC matrix. The BPRs are designed by adjusting the kernel diameter, the kernel material and the packing fraction to effectively reduce the excess reactivity in order to reduce the boron concentration in the coolant and achieve a flat change in excess reactivity over a long operational cycle. In addition, axial zoning of the BPRs was suggested to improve the core performances, and it was shown that the suggested axial zoning of BPRs considerably extends the cycle length compared to a core with no BPR axial zoning. The results of the core physics analyses showed that the cores using BPRs with a B{sub 4}C kernel have long cycle lengths of ∼4.5 EFPYs (Effective Full Power Years), small maximum CBCs (Critical Boron Concentration) lower than 370 ppm, low power peaking factors, and large shutdown margins of control element assemblies.

  8. Nodal Green’s Function Method Singular Source Term and Burnable Poison Treatment in Hexagonal Geometry

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    A.A. Bingham; R.M. Ferrer; A.M. ougouag

    2009-09-01

    An accurate and computationally efficient two or three-dimensional neutron diffusion model will be necessary for the development, safety parameters computation, and fuel cycle analysis of a prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design under Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project (NGNP). For this purpose, an analytical nodal Green’s function solution for the transverse integrated neutron diffusion equation is developed in two and three-dimensional hexagonal geometry. This scheme is incorporated into HEXPEDITE, a code first developed by Fitzpatrick and Ougouag. HEXPEDITE neglects non-physical discontinuity terms that arise in the transverse leakage due to the transverse integration procedure application to hexagonal geometry and cannot account for the effects of burnable poisons across nodal boundaries. The test code being developed for this document accounts for these terms by maintaining an inventory of neutrons by using the nodal balance equation as a constraint of the neutron flux equation. The method developed in this report is intended to restore neutron conservation and increase the accuracy of the code by adding these terms to the transverse integrated flux solution and applying the nodal Green’s function solution to the resulting equation to derive a semi-analytical solution.

  9. Depletion of gadolinium burnable poison in a PWR assembly with high burnup fuel

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    Refeat, Riham Mahmoud [Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA), Cairo (Egypt). Safety Engineering Dept.

    2015-12-15

    A tendency to increase the discharge burnup of nuclear fuel for Advanced Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) has been a characteristic of its operation for many years. It will be able to burn at very high burnup of about 70 GWd/t with UO{sub 2} fuels. The U-235 enrichment must be higher than 5 %, which leads to the necessity of using an extremely efficient burnable poison like Gadolinium oxide. Using gadolinium isotope is significant due to its particular depletion behavior (''Onion-Skin'' effect). In this paper, the MCNPX2.7 code is used to calculate the important neutronic parameters of the next generation fuels of PWR. K-infinity, local peaking factor and fission rate distributions are calculated for a PWR assembly which burn at very high burnup reaching 70 GWd/t. The calculations are performed using the recently released evaluated Gadolinium cross section data. The results obtained are close to those of a LWR next generation fuel benchmark problem. This demonstrates that the calculation scheme used is able to accurately model a PWR assembly that operates at high burnup values.

  10. Thermal–hydraulic characteristics for CANFLEX fuel channel using burnable poison in CANDU reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ho Bae

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermal–hydraulic characteristics for the CANadian Deuterium Uranium Flexible (CANFLEX-burnable poison (BP fuel channel, which is loaded with a BP at the center ring based on the CANFLEX-RU (recycled uranium fuel channel, are evaluated and compared with that of standard 37-element and CANFLEX-NU (natural uranium fuel channels. The distributions of fuel temperature and critical channel power for the CANFLEX-BP fuel channel are calculated using the NUclear Heat Transport CIRcuit Thermohydraulics Analysis Code (NUCIRC code for various creep rate and burnup. CANFLEX-BP fuel channel has been revealed to have a lower fuel temperature compared with that of a standard 37-element fuel channel, especially for high power channels. The critical channel power of CANFLEX-BP fuel channel has increased by about 10%, relative to that of a standard 37-element fuel channel for 380 channels in a core, and has higher value relative to that of the CANFLEX-NU fuel channel except the channels in the outer core. This study has shown that the use of a BP is feasible to enhance the thermal performance by the axial heat flux distribution, as well as the improvement of the reactor physical safety characteristics, and thus the reactor safety can be improved by the use of BP in a CANDU reactor.

  11. New Small LWR Core Designs using Particle Burnable Poisons for Low Boron Concentration

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    Yoo, Ho Seong; Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The soluble boron has two major important roles in commercial PWR operations : 1) the control of the long-term reactivity to maintain criticality under normal operation, and 2) the shutdown of the reactor under accidents. However, the removal of the soluble boron gives several advantages in SMRs (Small Modular Reactor). These advantages resulted from the elimination of soluble boron include the significant simplification of nuclear power plant through the removal of pipes, pumps, and purification systems. Also, the use of soluble boron mitigates corrosion problems on the primary coolant loop. Furthermore, the soluble boron-free operation can remove an inadvertent boron dilution accident (BDA) which can lead to a significant insertion of positive reactivity. From the viewpoint of core physics, the removal of soluble boron or reduction of soluble boron concentration makes the moderator temperature coefficient (MTC) more negative. From the core design studies using new fuel assemblies, it is shown that the cores have very low critical soluble boron concentrations less than 500ppm, low peaking factors within the design targets, strong negative MTCs over cycles, and large enough shutdown margins both at BOC and EOC. However, the present cores have relatively low average discharge burnups of ∼ 30MWD/kg leading to low fuel economy because the cores use lots of non-fuel burnable poison rods to achieve very low critical boron concentrations. So, in the future, we will perform the trade-off study between the fuel discharge burnup and the boron concentrations by changing fuel assembly design and the core loading pattern.

  12. Managing the reactivity excess of the gas turbine-modular helium reactor by burnable poison and control rods

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    Talamo, Alberto [Department of Nuclear and Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Roslagstullsbacken 21, S-10691, Stockholm (Sweden)]. E-mail: alby@neutron.kth.se

    2006-01-15

    The gas turbine-modular helium reactor coupled to the deep burn in-core fuel management strategy offers the extraordinary capability to incinerate over 50% of the initial inventory of fissile material. This extraordinary feature, coming from an advanced and well tested fuel element design, which takes advantage of the TRISO particles technology, is maintained while the reactor is loaded with the most different types of fuels. In the present work, we assumed the reactor operating at the equilibrium of the fuel composition, obtained by a 6 years irradiation of light water reactor waste, and we investigated the effects of the introduction of the burnable poison and the control rods; we equipped the core with all the three types of control rods: operational, startup and shutdown ones. We employed as burnable poison natural erbium, due to the {sup 167}Er increasing neutron capture microscopic cross-section in the energy range where the neutron spectrum exhibits the thermal peak; in addition, we utilized boron carbide, with 90% enrichment in {sup 1}B, as the absorption material of the control rods. Concerning the burnable poison studies, we focused on the k {sub eff} value, the {sup 167}Er mass during burnup, the influence of modifying the radius of the BISO particles kernel and the fuel and moderator coefficients of temperature. Concerning the control rods studies, we investigated the reactivity worth, the changes in the neutron flux profile due to a partial insertion, the influence of modifying the radius of the BISO particles kernel and the {beta} {sub eff}, at the beginning of the operation.

  13. Implementation of strength pareto evolutionary algorithm II in the multiobjective burnable poison placement optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor

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    Gharari, Rahman [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poursalehi, Navid; Abbasi, Mohmmadreza; Aghale, Mahdi [Nuclear Engineering Dept, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    In this research, for the first time, a new optimization method, i.e., strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm II (SPEA-II), is developed for the burnable poison placement (BPP) optimization of a nuclear reactor core. In the BPP problem, an optimized placement map of fuel assemblies with burnable poison is searched for a given core loading pattern according to defined objectives. In this work, SPEA-II coupled with a nodal expansion code is used for solving the BPP problem of Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU) pressurized water reactor. Our optimization goal for the BPP is to achieve a greater multiplication factor (K-e-f-f) for gaining possible longer operation cycles along with more flattening of fuel assembly relative power distribution, considering a safety constraint on the radial power peaking factor. For appraising the proposed methodology, the basic approach, i.e., SPEA, is also developed in order to compare obtained results. In general, results reveal the acceptance performance and high strength of SPEA, particularly its new version, i.e., SPEA-II, in achieving a semioptimized loading pattern for the BPP optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor.

  14. Implementation of Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm II in the Multiobjective Burnable Poison Placement Optimization of KWU Pressurized Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Gharari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this research, for the first time, a new optimization method, i.e., strength Pareto evolutionary algorithm II (SPEA-II, is developed for the burnable poison placement (BPP optimization of a nuclear reactor core. In the BPP problem, an optimized placement map of fuel assemblies with burnable poison is searched for a given core loading pattern according to defined objectives. In this work, SPEA-II coupled with a nodal expansion code is used for solving the BPP problem of Kraftwerk Union AG (KWU pressurized water reactor. Our optimization goal for the BPP is to achieve a greater multiplication factor (Keff for gaining possible longer operation cycles along with more flattening of fuel assembly relative power distribution, considering a safety constraint on the radial power peaking factor. For appraising the proposed methodology, the basic approach, i.e., SPEA, is also developed in order to compare obtained results. In general, results reveal the acceptance performance and high strength of SPEA, particularly its new version, i.e., SPEA-II, in achieving a semioptimized loading pattern for the BPP optimization of KWU pressurized water reactor.

  15. A new fast neutron collar for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low enriched uranium fuel assemblies containing burnable poison rods

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    Evans, Louise G., E-mail: evanslg@ornl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Schwalbach, Peter; Baere, Paul De [European Commission, Euratom Safeguards Office (Luxembourg); Browne, Michael C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-11-21

    Safeguards inspection measurements must be performed in a timely manner in order to detect the diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. A shorter measurement time can increase the number of items that a nuclear safeguards inspector can reliably measure during a period of access to a nuclear facility. In turn, this improves the reliability of the acquired statistical sample, which is used to inform decisions regarding compliance. Safeguards inspection measurements should also maintain independence from facility operator declarations. Existing neutron collars employ thermal neutron interrogation for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh fuel assemblies. A new fast neutron collar has been developed for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies containing gadolinia (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) burnable poison rods. The Euratom Fast Collar (EFC) was designed with high neutron detection efficiency to make a fast (Cd) mode measurement viable whilst meeting the high counting precision and short assay time requirements of the Euratom safeguards inspectorate. A fast mode measurement reduces the instrument sensitivity to burnable poison rod content and therefore reduces the applied poison correction, consequently reducing the dependence on the operator declaration of the poison content within an assembly. The EFC non-destructive assay (NDA) of typical modern European pressurized water reactor (PWR) fresh fuel assembly designs have been simulated using Monte Carlo N-particle extended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. Simulations predict that the EFC can achieve 2% relative statistical uncertainty on the doubles neutron counting rate for a fast mode measurement in an assay time of 600 s (10 min) with the available {sup 241}AmLi (α,n) interrogation source strength of 5.7×10{sup 4} s{sup −1}. Furthermore, the calibration range of the new collar has been extended to verify {sup 235}U content in variable PWR fuel

  16. A new fast neutron collar for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low enriched uranium fuel assemblies containing burnable poison rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Louise G.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Menlove, Howard O.; Schwalbach, Peter; Baere, Paul De; Browne, Michael C.

    2013-11-01

    Safeguards inspection measurements must be performed in a timely manner in order to detect the diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material. A shorter measurement time can increase the number of items that a nuclear safeguards inspector can reliably measure during a period of access to a nuclear facility. In turn, this improves the reliability of the acquired statistical sample, which is used to inform decisions regarding compliance. Safeguards inspection measurements should also maintain independence from facility operator declarations. Existing neutron collars employ thermal neutron interrogation for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh fuel assemblies. A new fast neutron collar has been developed for safeguards inspection measurements of fresh low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies containing gadolinia (Gd2O3) burnable poison rods. The Euratom Fast Collar (EFC) was designed with high neutron detection efficiency to make a fast (Cd) mode measurement viable whilst meeting the high counting precision and short assay time requirements of the Euratom safeguards inspectorate. A fast mode measurement reduces the instrument sensitivity to burnable poison rod content and therefore reduces the applied poison correction, consequently reducing the dependence on the operator declaration of the poison content within an assembly. The EFC non-destructive assay (NDA) of typical modern European pressurized water reactor (PWR) fresh fuel assembly designs have been simulated using Monte Carlo N-particle extended transport code (MCNPX) simulations. Simulations predict that the EFC can achieve 2% relative statistical uncertainty on the doubles neutron counting rate for a fast mode measurement in an assay time of 600 s (10 min) with the available 241AmLi (α,n) interrogation source strength of 5.7×104 s-1. Furthermore, the calibration range of the new collar has been extended to verify 235U content in variable PWR fuel designs in the presence of up to 32

  17. Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ up to 9 weight percent, an established burnable poison for advanced fuel management in pressurized water reactors

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    Boehm, W.; Kiehlmann, H.D.; Neufert, A.; Peehs, M.

    1987-07-01

    High weight percent Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has given excellent results when applied as burnable poison in pressurized water reactors for advanced fuel management tasks. Poisoning of up to 9 weight% Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ has been implemented in commercial reload cores to match the requirements of full low leakage loading and cycle extension strategies. Operational performance has confirmed that the high degree of accuracy achieved for calculational methods for standard loading applications also applies for highly Gd poisoned cores. The UO/sub 2/-Gd/sub 2/O/sub 3/ fabrication process has been rationalized by the use of direct pelletizing.

  18. Rare earths as burnable poison for extended cycles control in electricity generation reactors; Etude des terres rares en tant que poison consommable pour le controle des cycles allonges pour les reacteurs electrogenes

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    Asou, M.

    1995-05-12

    The search of an optimization of the French electronuclear network operations leads to a necessary optimization of the core performances. All the economic studies performed by the utilities had shown that there is a real gain to minimize shut down periods for refueling. So, increasing the cycle length from 12 to 18 months will present a gain of shut down for a three years operation period. The theoretical burnable absorber will be a fuel admixed material bringing the required initial negative reactivity with a burn-up kinetic well suited to the fuel and allowing the lowest residual penalty as possible. The residual penalty us defined in this case by the non complete burn up of the poison, by the low of fissile material and by the accumulate of residual isotopes or nuclides. Because of the well known use of gadolinium as burnable absorber for BWR`s and PWR`s operations, the search for the best compromise to optimize all the above stress is pointed towards the rare earths. In the nuclides family, considering criteria such as cross sections, natural abundance and availability only five nuclides can play the role as burnable absorbers, namely: gadolinium, samarium, dysprosium, europium and erbium. The study presented here will show that only gadolinium and erbium will be considered to control the reactivity of the PWR`s. (author). 58 refs., 65 figs., 47 tabs.

  19. Burnable Absorbers with Enriched Er-167 in PWR Fuel Assembly

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    Choe, Jiwon; Kong, Chidong; Lee, Deokjung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Ho Cheol [KHNP-CRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Many advanced PWRs are required to have a 24-month operating cycle to improve plant economy, and to keep the boron concentration low to allow an adequately negative moderator feedback during any ATWS event through 100% core life. Unfortunately, longer cycles require higher uranium-235 enrichment and initial boron concentration in the reactor coolant. The amount of soluble boron is limited due to the requirement that the MTC must remain negative over the fuel cycle. Too much boron, typically greater than 1,300 ppm at full power, will make the MTC positive. The optimal design of burnable absorbers is key to the feasibility of this extended cycle and low boron core below the design limit of peak pin power. New concepts for burnable absorbers include changing the materials and geometry in the burnable absorber. k{sub inf}, peaking factor, MTC, and control rod worth of new BAs were compared with those of the conventional BA. A new enriched Er-167 based BA has been proposed and, from three test cases, it was shown that the Erbium burnable absorber is favorable to counterbalance the power peak and Gadolinium burnable absorber is favorable to flattening k{sub inf} trends over burnup.

  20. Food Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Food Poisoning KidsHealth / For Kids / Food Poisoning What's in ... find out how to avoid it. What Is Food Poisoning? Food poisoning comes from eating foods that ...

  1. Thermal–hydraulic characteristics for CANFLEX fuel channel using burnable poison in CANDU reactor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bae, Jun Ho; Jeong, Jong Yeob

    2015-01-01

    ... (natural uranium) fuel channels. The distributions of fuel temperature and critical channel power for the CANFLEX-BP fuel channel are calculated using the NUclear Heat Transport CIRcuit Thermohydraulics Analysis Code (NUCIRC...

  2. Food poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, David T; Dobmeier, Stephen G; Bechtel, Laura K; Holstege, Christopher P

    2007-05-01

    Food poisoning is encountered throughout the world. Many of the toxins responsible for specific food poisoning syndromes are no longer limited to isolated geographic locations. With increased travel and the ease of transporting food products, it is likely that a patient may present to any emergency department with the clinical effects of food poisoning. Recognizing specific food poisoning syndromes allows emergency health care providers not only to initiate appropriate treatment rapidly but also to notify health departments early and thereby prevent further poisoning cases. This article reviews several potential food-borne poisons and describes each agent's mechanism of toxicity, expected clinical presentation, and currently accepted treatment.

  3. Ethanol poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002644.htm Ethanol poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Ethanol poisoning is caused by drinking too much alcohol. ...

  4. Alcohol Poisoning

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    ... unconscious or can't be awakened is at risk of dying. Alcohol poisoning is an emergency If you suspect that ... a short period of time, the greater your risk of alcohol poisoning. One drink is defined as: 12 ounces ( ...

  5. Poison Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Word Shop AAP Find a Pediatrician Safety & Prevention Immunizations All Around At Home At Play On ... Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Poison Prevention Page Content Article Body Post the Poison Help ...

  6. Poisonous Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH POISONOUS PLANTS Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Photo courtesy ... U.S. Department of Agriculture Many native and exotic plants are poisonous to humans when ingested or if ...

  7. Starch poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooking starch poisoning; Laundry starch poisoning ... Cooking and laundry starch are both made from vegetable products, most commonly: Corn Potatoes Rice Wheat Both are usually considered nonpoisonous (nontoxic), but ...

  8. Cologne poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ingredients in cologne can be poisonous: Ethyl alcohol (ethanol) Isopropyl alcohol (isopropanol) There may be other poisonous ... D, Hovda KE. Methanol, ethylene glycol, and other toxic alcohols. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, ...

  9. Methanol poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reverse the effect of the poison (fomepizole or ethanol) Tube through the nose to remove remaining poison, ... Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2015:chap 29. White SR. Toxic alcohols. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, ...

  10. Copper poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 75. Holland MG. Pulmonary toxicology. ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 9. Jones AL, Dargan PI. ...

  11. Insecticide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 76. Borron SW. Pyrethins, repellants, ... Poisoning and Drug Overdose . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2007:chap 77. Cannon RD, Ruha A- ...

  12. Food Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-05-16

    enterotoxemia and other bacterial enterotoxemias due to contamination of food by preformed toxins, botulism, mushroom poisoning and "other poisons of...Preformed Toxins of Bacterial Origin Enterotoxemia Protein toxins produced during the growth of Staphylococcal aureus in food cause the most common...NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subttl*e) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Food Poisoning AD A 1 2 A- S

  13. A reduced-boron OPR1000 core based on the BigT burnable absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Hwan Yeal; Yahya, Mohd-Syukri; Kim, Yong Hee [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Reducing critical boron concentration in a commercial pressurized water reactor core offers many advantages in view of safety and economics. This paper presents a preliminary investigation of a reduced-boron pressurized water reactor core to achieve a clearly negative moderator temperature coefficient at hot zero power using the newly-proposed 'Burnable absorber-Integrated Guide Thimble' (BigT) absorbers. The reference core is based on a commercial OPR1000 equilibrium configuration. The reduced-boron ORP1000 configuration was determined by simply replacing commercial gadolinia-based burnable absorbers with the optimized BigT-loaded design. The equilibrium cores in this study were directly searched via repetitive Monte Carlo depletion calculations until convergence. The results demonstrate that, with the same fuel management scheme as in the reference core, application of the BigT absorbers can effectively reduce the critical boron concentration at the beginning of cycle by about 65 ppm. More crucially, the analyses indicate promising potential of the reduced-boron OPR1000 core with the BigT absorbers, as its moderator temperature coefficient at the beginning of cycle is clearly more negative and all other vital neutronic parameters are within practical safety limits. All simulations were completed using the Monte Carlo Serpent code with the ENDF/B-VII.0 library.

  14. A Reduced-Boron OPR1000 Core Based on the BigT Burnable Absorber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwanyeal Yu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Reducing critical boron concentration in a commercial pressurized water reactor core offers many advantages in view of safety and economics. This paper presents a preliminary investigation of a reduced-boron pressurized water reactor core to achieve a clearly negative moderator temperature coefficient at hot zero power using the newly-proposed “Burnable absorber-Integrated Guide Thimble” (BigT absorbers. The reference core is based on a commercial OPR1000 equilibrium configuration. The reduced-boron ORP1000 configuration was determined by simply replacing commercial gadolinia-based burnable absorbers with the optimized BigT-loaded design. The equilibrium cores in this study were directly searched via repetitive Monte Carlo depletion calculations until convergence. The results demonstrate that, with the same fuel management scheme as in the reference core, application of the BigT absorbers can effectively reduce the critical boron concentration at the beginning of cycle by about 65 ppm. More crucially, the analyses indicate promising potential of the reduced-boron OPR1000 core with the BigT absorbers, as its moderator temperature coefficient at the beginning of cycle is clearly more negative and all other vital neutronic parameters are within practical safety limits. All simulations were completed using the Monte Carlo Serpent code with the ENDF/B-VII.0 library.

  15. Mushroom poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erguven, M; Yilmaz, O; Deveci, M; Aksu, N; Dursun, F; Pelit, M; Cebeci, N

    2007-09-01

    We aimed to review characteristics of mushrooms and mushroom poisoning and compare clinical picture, laboratory data, treatment modalities and prognostic factors in children with amanita intoxication and non-amanita mushroom poisoning. We analyzed 39 pediatric patients through 1994-2004, retrospectively from the patient files and evaluated the patients in two groups as patients with amanita intoxication and patients with non-amanita mushroom poisoning. All of the cases were admitted to the hospital in autumn. Twenty three (59%) of the patients were female and 16 (41%) were male. Mean age of the patients was 8.05 +/- 2.10 years. Amanita phalloides toxin was detected in the serum in 8 patients. Eleven (28%) of the cases were strongly suggestive of amanita poisoning but alpha amanitin level could not be studied. The average time of appearance of symptoms after mushroom consumption, duration of symptoms, hospital stay, serum AST, ALT, PT and creatinine levels were significantly higher in patients with amanita poisoning (pamanita poisoning (30%), totally 7 patients died of hepatic coma. The average time of admission to hospital, mean AST, ALT, creatinine and PT values at 3rd day were significantly higher in patients who died of hepatic coma. Prognosis was better in case of early admittance to hospital in patients with amanita poisoning. Early diagnosis and treatment in mushroom poisoning can be life saving. Public awareness is very important in prevention of intoxication as well as encouraging early admission to hospitals.

  16. Surface Modification of Fuel Cladding Materials with Integral Fuel BUrnable Absorber Boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Kumar Sridharan; Dr. Todd Allen; Jesse Gudmundson; Benjamin Maier

    2008-11-03

    Integral fuel burnable absorgers (IFBA) are added to some rods in the fuel assembly to counteract excessive reactivity. These IFBA elements (usually boron or gadolinium) are presently incorporated in the U)2 pellets either by mixing in the pellets or as coatings on the pellet surface. In either case, the incorporation of ifba into the fuel has to be performed in a nuclear-regulated facility that is physically separated from the main plant. These operations tend to be costly and can add from 20 to 30% to the manufacturing cost of the fuel. The goal of this NEER research project was to develop an alternative approach that involves incorporation of IFBA element boron at the surface of the fuel cladding material.

  17. Menthol poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menthol is used to add peppermint flavor to candy and other products. It is also used in certain skin lotions and ointments. This article discusses menthol poisoning from swallowing pure menthol. This article is ...

  18. Chlorine poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorine is a chemical that prevents bacteria from growing. Chlorine poisoning occurs when someone swallows or breathes in (inhales) chlorine. This article is for information only. Do NOT use it to ...

  19. Acetone poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002480.htm Acetone poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetone is a chemical used in many household products. ...

  20. Paradichlorobenzene poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amounts are usually swallowed. References Holland MG. Occupational toxicology. In: Shannon MW, Borron SW, Burns MJ, eds. ... and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Pesticides Read more Poisoning Read more NIH MedlinePlus Magazine ...

  1. Gasoline poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002806.htm Gasoline poisoning To use the sharing features on this ... This article discusses the harmful effects from swallowing gasoline or breathing in its fumes. This article is ...

  2. Detergent poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acids, including benzalkonium chloride Simple soap Symptoms Detergent poisoning can cause symptoms in many parts of the body. BLOOD Severe change in acid level of blood (pH balance), which leads to damage in all of the body organs ...

  3. Refrigerant poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Severe abdominal pain Vomiting Burns of the food pipe (esophagus) Vomiting blood Blood in the stool HEART ... effect of the poison Washing of the skin (irrigation), perhaps every few hours for several days Skin ...

  4. Yew poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poison is in most parts of the yew plant, but the highest amount is in the seeds. ... or irregular or fast heartbeat Blue-colored lips Breathing difficulty ... Muscle weakness Nausea and vomiting Stomach pain Diarrhea

  5. Transient performance and design aspects of low boron PWR cores with increased utilization of burnable absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papukchiev, Angel [GRS mbH Forschungsinstitute, Garching (Germany); Schaefer, Anselm [ISaR GmbH, Garching (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    In conventional pressurized water reactor (PWR) designs, soluble boron is used for reactivity control over core fuel cycle. As high boron concentrations have significant impact on reactivity feedback properties and core transient behaviour, design changes to reduce boron concentration in the reactor coolant are of general interest in view of improving PWR inherent safety. In order to assess the potential advantages of such strategies in current PWRs, two low boron core configurations based on fuel with increased utilization of gadolinium and erbium burnable absorbers have been developed. The new PWR designs permit to reduce the natural boron concentration in reactor coolant at begin of cycle to 518 (Gd) and 805 (Er) ppm. An innovative low boron core design methodology was implemented combining a simplified reactivity balance search procedure with a core design approach based on detailed 3D diffusion calculations. Fuel cross sections needed for nuclear libraries were generated using the 2D lattice code HELIOS [2] and full core configurations were modelled with the 3D diffusion code QUABOX/CUBBOX [3]. For dynamic 3D calculations, the coupled code system ATHLET - QUABOX/CUBBOX was used [4]. The new cores meet German acceptance criteria regarding stuck rod, departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR), shutdown margin, and maximal linear power. For the assessment of potential safety advantages of the new cores, comparative analyses were performed for three PWR core designs: the already mentioned two low boron designs and a standard design. The improved safety performance of the low boron cores in anticipated transients without scram (ATWS), boron dilution scenarios and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA) has already been reported in [1, 2 and 3]. This paper gives a short reminder on the results obtained. Moreover, it deals not only with the potential advantages, but also addresses the drawbacks of the new PWR configurations - complex core design, increased power

  6. Burnable Absorber-Filled Annular UO{sub 2} Fuels for PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahya, Mohd-Syukri; Kim, Yonghee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, ChangKyu [KEPCO EnC, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Its central annulus hole also provides an additional plenum for the fission gas release. In fact, annular UO{sub 2} fuels have successfully been used in commercial Russian's nuclear reactors for decades. It was upon this notion that a study was recently performed to re-investigate neutronic characteristics of the annular fuel in a rod-cell lattice. The said study also proposed an innovative integral burnable absorber (BA) concept by loading of a porous BA rod inside central hole of the annular fuel. This current work aims to extend the said investigation by characterizing neutronic performances of the BA-filled annular fuels in standard PWR 17x17 and 16x16 fuel assembly lattices. Preliminary results suggested promising potentials of the novel BA concept in managing the assembly lattice reactivity and power peaking. All calculations were performed using the Monte Carlo Serpent code with ENDF/B7.0 library. This paper demonstrates neutronic feasibilities of the BA-filled annular fuels in standard PWR 17x17 and 16x16 fuel assembly lattices. One notes that the BA-filled annular fuel-loaded lattice display comparable neutronic characteristics to the benchmarked commercial BA designs, especially in terms of reactivity and peaking factor management.

  7. Gas emission from the UO2 samples, containing fission products and burnable absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytin, V. P.; Baranov, V. G.; Burlakova, M. A.; Tenishev, A. V.; Kuzmin, R. S.; Pokrovskiy, S. A.; Mikhalchik, V. V.

    2016-04-01

    The process gas released from the fuel pellets of uranium fuel during fuel burn-up reduces the thermal conductivity of the rod-shell gap, enhances hydrogen embrittlement of the cladding material, causes it's carbonization, as well as transport processes in the fuel. In this study a technique of investigating the thermal desorption of gases from the UO2 fuel material were perfected in the temperature range 300-2000 K for uniform sample heating rate of 15 K/min in vacuum. The characteristic kinetic dependences are acquired for the gas emission from UO2 samples, containing simulators of fission products (SFP) and the burnable neutron absorber (BNA). Depending on the amount of SFP and BNA contained in the sample thermal desorption gas spectra (TDGS) vary. The composition of emitted gas varies, as well as the number of peaks in the TDGS and the peaks shift to higher temperatures. This indicates that introduction of SFPs and BNA alters the sample material structure and cause the creation of so- called traps which have different bonding energies to the gases. The traps can be a grid of dislocations, voids, and contained in the UO2 matrix SFP and BNA. Similar processes will occur in the fuel pellets in the real conditions of the Nuclear Power Plant as well.

  8. A study on the nuclear characteristics of enriched gadolinia burnable absorber rods; the final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chung Chan; Zee, Quun; Song, J. S.; Cho, B. O.; Joo, H. G.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, H. Y.; Cho, J. Y.; Kim, K. S

    2001-12-01

    An analysis model using MICBURN-3/CASMO-3 is established for the enriched gadolinia burnable absorber rods. A homogenized cross section editing code, PROLOG, is modified so that it can handle such a fuel assembly that includes two different types of gadolinia rods. Study shows that Gd-155 and Gd-157 are almost same characteristics in suppressing the excess reactivity and it is recommended to enrich both odd number isotopes, Gd-155 and Gd-157. To minimize power peakings, various placements of gadolinia rods are tested. Also initial reactivity holddown and gadolinia burnout time are parametrized with respect to the number of gadolinia rods and gadolinia weight fractions. Cycle length increases by 8 days if enriched gadolinia rods are used in the commercial nuclear power plant such as YGN-3 with 2 year-cycle-length. The nuclear characteristics such as soluble boron concentrations and power distributions are almost same. The maximum power of the gadolinia rods are slightly increased but gadolinia contents are reduced. For SMART with ultra longer cycle length and soluble boron-free operation concept cycle length can be extended by maximum 90 days due to increased fuel loading.

  9. Plastic casting resin poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epoxy poisoning; Resin poisoning ... Epoxy and resin can be poisonous if they are swallowed or their fumes are breathed in. ... Plastic casting resins are found in various plastic casting resin products.

  10. Poison Control Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1222 immediately. Name State American Association of Poison Control Centers Address AAPCC Central Office NOT A POISON ... not for emergency use. Arkansas ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center Address 1717 S. Philo Road, Suite 36 Urbana, ...

  11. Protecting Yourself from Poisonous Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NIOSH NIOSH Fast Facts: Protecting Yourself from Poisonous Plants Language: English Español (Spanish) Kreyol Haitien (Hatian Creole) ... outdoors is at risk of exposure to poisonous plants, such as poison ivy, poison oak, and poison ...

  12. [Mercury poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensefa-Colas, L; Andujar, P; Descatha, A

    2011-07-01

    Mercury is a widespread heavy metal with potential severe impacts on human health. Exposure conditions to mercury and profile of toxicity among humans depend on the chemical forms of the mercury: elemental or metallic mercury, inorganic or organic mercury compounds. This article aims to reviewing and synthesizing the main knowledge of the mercury toxicity and its organic compounds that clinicians should know. Acute inhalation of metallic or inorganic mercury vapours mainly induces pulmonary diseases, whereas chronic inhalation rather induces neurological or renal disorders (encephalopathy and interstitial or glomerular nephritis). Methylmercury poisonings from intoxicated food occurred among some populations resulting in neurological disorders and developmental troubles for children exposed in utero. Treatment using chelating agents is recommended in case of symptomatic acute mercury intoxication; sometimes it improves the clinical effects of chronic mercury poisoning. Although it is currently rare to encounter situations of severe intoxication, efforts remain necessary to decrease the mercury concentration in the environment and to reduce risk on human health due to low level exposure (dental amalgam, fish contamination by organic mercury compounds…). In case of occupational exposure to mercury and its compounds, some disorders could be compensated in France. Clinicians should work with toxicologists for the diagnosis and treatment of mercury intoxication. Copyright © 2010 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Aconite poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2009-04-01

    Aconitine and related alkaloids found in the Aconitum species are highly toxic cardiotoxins and neurotoxins. The wild plant (especially the roots and root tubers) is extremely toxic. Severe aconite poisoning can occur after accidental ingestion of the wild plant or consumption of an herbal decoction made from aconite roots. In traditional Chinese medicine, aconite roots are used only after processing to reduce the toxic alkaloid content. Soaking and boiling during processing or decoction preparation will hydrolyze aconite alkaloids into less toxic and non-toxic derivatives. However, the use of a larger than recommended dose and inadequate processing increases the risk of poisoning. A Medline search (1963-February 2009) was conducted. Key articles with information on the use of aconite roots in traditional medicine, active (toxic) ingredients, mechanisms of toxicity, toxicokinetics of Aconitum alkaloids, and clinical features and management of aconite poisoning were reviewed. The cardiotoxicity and neurotoxicity of aconitine and related alkaloids are due to their actions on the voltage-sensitive sodium channels of the cell membranes of excitable tissues, including the myocardium, nerves, and muscles. Aconitine and mesaconitine bind with high affinity to the open state of the voltage-sensitive sodium channels at site 2, thereby causing a persistent activation of the sodium channels, which become refractory to excitation. The electrophysiological mechanism of arrhythmia induction is triggered activity due to delayed after-depolarization and early after-depolarization. The arrhythmogenic properties of aconitine are in part due to its cholinolytic (anticholinergic) effects mediated by the vagus nerve. Aconitine has a positive inotropic effect by prolonging sodium influx during the action potential. It has hypotensive and bradycardic actions due to activation of the ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus. Through its action on voltage-sensitive sodium channels in the

  14. Use of gadolinium burnable absorbers in VVER Type Reactors. Validation of WIMS-D/4 code; Empleo del gadolinio como absorbente quemable en los reactores nucleares VVER. Validacion del codigo WIMS-D/4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Cardona, Caridad M.; Guerra Valdes, Ramiro; Lopez Aldama, Daniel [Centro de Tecnologia Nuclear, La Habana (Cuba)

    1996-07-01

    Burnable absorbers are not used in current operating WWERs, but in order to optimize the fuel cycle and enhance operational safety, one should also introduce gadolinium or a similar burnable absorber in these reactors. For this purpose adequate tools for properly calculating local effects in hexagonal geometries should be developed and validated. The present gives main results in validating the WIMS-D/4 lattice code for Gd burnable absorber bearing WWER lattices. To validate the code experimental and calculational benchmarks proposed in a IAEA Coordinated Research Program were solved. A code system for the optimization of the Gd axial distribution in a WWER reactor was developed and it also presented here. (author)

  15. Rhubarb leaves poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002876.htm Rhubarb leaves poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rhubarb leaves poisoning occurs when someone eats pieces of leaves ...

  16. Bubble bath soap poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002762.htm Bubble bath soap poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bubble bath soap poisoning occurs when someone swallows bubble bath soap. ...

  17. Poisoning - fish and shellfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... poisonings are heat stable, so no amount of cooking will prevent you from becoming poisoned if you ... R. Blaser MJ, eds. Mandell, Douglas and Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Disease, Updated Edition . 8th ...

  18. Poisoning first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... containers, even if they are labeled. Most nonfood substances are poisonous if taken in large doses. If you are concerned that industrial poisons might be polluting nearby land or water, report your concerns to ...

  19. Hair dye poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002703.htm Hair dye poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair dye poisoning occurs when someone swallows dye or tint ...

  20. Plant fertilizer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant fertilizers and household plant foods are used to improve plant growth. Poisoning can occur if someone swallows these products. Plant fertilizers are mildly poisonous if small amounts are swallowed. ...

  1. Bug spray poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that mosquitos spread. Some of these are malaria, dengue fever, and West Nile virus. Other less effective ... you have any questions about poisoning or poison prevention. It does NOT need to be an emergency. ...

  2. EDITORIAL POISONING PATTERN Human poisoning with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharm-chem

    Bioaccumulation of methylmercury then occurred in fish which were eventually eaten by humans. Thallium poisoning is characterized by alopecia often seen one to two weeks later when the patient is about to be discharged from hospital. Thus, in chronic poisoning, it is difficult to establish definitive cause-effect relationship.

  3. Lead Poisoning (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Lead Poisoning KidsHealth > For Parents > Lead Poisoning Print A ... Family en español La intoxicación por plomo About Lead Poisoning If you have young kids, it's important ...

  4. Poison Ivy Rash

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... leaves and can grow as a bush or tree. Unlike poison ivy and poison oak, it doesn't grow in a three-leaf-per-stem pattern. Poison ivy rash is a type of allergic contact dermatitis caused by an oily resin called urushiol. It's found in the leaves, stems ...

  5. Lead Poisoning in Childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueschel, Siegfried M., Ed.; Linakis, James G., Ed.; Anderson, Angela C., Ed.

    The magnitude of childhood lead poisoning has been inexplicably neglected by modern medicine and by legislators. However, since the 1970s, increased attention has been focused on lead poisoning, and advances have been made in several areas, including understanding of the neurodevelopmental and behavioral ramifications of lead poisoning, and…

  6. Lead poisoning: An overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendel, Neil

    1993-01-01

    A problem that should be of great concern to all of us is the lead poisoning of children. First, I would like to present a short overview concerning the reasons everyone should care about lead poisoning, then discuss the history of lead poisoning, what is happening today across the country, and the future.

  7. Lead Poisoning in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, A. H., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Early symptoms of lead poisoning in children are often overlooked. Lead poisoning has its greatest effects on the brain and nervous system. The obvious long-term solution to the lead poisoning problem is removal of harmful forms of the metal from the environment. (JN)

  8. EDITORIAL POISONING PATTERN Human poisoning with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pharm-chem

    Thus, in chronic poisoning, it is difficult to establish definitive cause-effect ... This is the most stressful period when young people are trying to come into terms ... Typical examples of "Police cases" include suicide, suspected homicide, death.

  9. [Seafood poisonings. Part II. Fish poisonings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszowski, Krzysztof; Mietka-Ciszowska, Aneta

    2012-01-01

    Fish plays a significant role in human life, mainly as part of a balanced healthy diet and a good source of many of nutrients. However, contact with fish may be harmful or even life-threatening to man. Toxic effects, that fish exerts toward men (ichthyotoxism), result from envenomations by poison. ous fish equipped in venom apparatus (ichthyoacanthotoxism), direct contact with venom produced by skin glandules (ichthyocrinotoxism), or consuming fish containing toxins for nutritional purposes (ichthyosarcotoxism). In the present review, different fish-borne food poisonings are presented including their etiology, pathogenesis, symptomatology and treatment. In fact, the majority of fish poisonings are intoxications with toxins primary produced by bacteria, cyanobacteria and algae. These are consumed and accumulated in the food chain by herbivorous and predatory fish, that in turn may be a cause of poisonings in humans.

  10. Aconite poisoning in camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, W T; Lai, C K; Ching, C K; Tse, K Y; So, Y C; Chan, Y C; Hau, L M; Mak, T W L; Chan, A Y W

    2006-12-01

    The Toxicology Reference Laboratory has confirmed 10 cases of aconite poisoning from March 2004 to May 2006. In four of these 10 cases, the aconite herb was not listed in the written prescription. We report these four cases to highlight the problem of 'hidden' aconite poisoning.

  11. DRUG POISONING IN SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2008-01-01

    Poisoning by drugs for the nervous system, particularly benzodiazepines, is the most commonform of poisoning by drugs in Slovenia. It would be necessary to report all acutelypoisoned patients to the Register of Intoxications, since we need data about all poisoningin Slovenia to improve their prophylaxis and treatment

  12. Poison ivy - oak - sumac

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Poison ivy, oak, or sumac poisoning is an allergic reaction that results from touching the sap of these plants. The sap may be on the plant, in the ashes of burned plants, on an animal, or on other objects that came in contact ...

  13. Outsmarting Poison Ivy and Other Poisonous Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and cannot further spread the rash. Tips for Prevention Learn what poison ivy, oak, and sumac plants ... View FDA photos on Flickr FDA Archive Combination Products Advisory ... Popular Content Home Latest Recalls Report an Adverse Event MedWatch Safety Alerts News ...

  14. Histamine fish poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nosić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Histamine fish poisoning is a chemical intoxication associated with intake of fishes with high histamine content. Histamine is developed in fish tissue post mortem due to bacterial decarboxilation of free amino-acid histidine. This paper deals with causes of histamine development in fish meat and with histamine influence on human health. Prevention of histamine fish poisoning would also be discussed. The case histories of histamine food poisoning in our country and in the world would be described. Histamine levels used in Regulation would be presented.

  15. Application of B{sub 4}C/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} Burnable Absorber Rod to Control Excess Reactivity of SMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muth, Boravy; Hah, C. J. [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Soluble boron in a nuclear reactor coolant is one of the methods to control excess reactivity of the reactor. However, the use of soluble boron also causes some negative effects such as corrosion, more-positive tendency of Moderator Temperature Coefficient (MTC) and the requirement of Chemical Volume Control System (CVCS). One of the conceptual design features of SMR having been developed in Korea is soluble boron- free reactor to eliminate those drawbacks. Control rods and Burnable Absorber (BA) rods can be other methods than soluble to control excess reactivity. WABA (Wet Annular Burnable Absorber) and PYREX are such type. The other type is IFBA (Integral Fuel Burnable Absorber) in which fuel pellet surface is coated with BA. This paper compares nuclear characteristics of three types of BA as well as SLOBA in terms of k-infinite vs. burnup and explain design basis of SLOBA. This paper also presents the application of SLOBA rods to control long-term excess reactivity of SMR. The SMR loaded with SLOBA rods has been developed for the past few years in Korean. It is named as Bandi-50 with design features of 180 MWth, 37 FAs, fuel assembly height of 200 cm. Soluble-boron-free is one of nuclear design requirements of Bandi-50 and is achieved by controlling excess reactivity of the SMR using BAs and control rods only. To achieve this design requirement, LP is carefully determined in such way that CBC should be as low as possible. Fuel assembly cross-sections are generated by CASMO-3, and core depletion calculations are performed by MASTER.

  16. The influence of petrography, mineralogy and chemistry on burnability and reactivity of quicklime produced in Twin Shaft Regenerative (TSR) kilns from Neoarchean limestone (Transvaal Supergroup, South Africa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vola, Gabriele; Sarandrea, Luca; Della Porta, Giovanna; Cavallo, Alessandro; Jadoul, Flavio; Cruciani, Giuseppe

    2017-12-01

    This study evaluates the influence of chemical, mineralogical and petrographic features of the Neoarchean limestone from the Ouplaas Mine (Griqualand West, South Africa) on its burnability and quicklime reactivity, considering the main use as raw material for high-grade lime production in twin shaft regenerative (TSR) kilns. This limestone consists of laminated clotted peloidal micrite and fenestrate microbial boundstone with herringbone calcite and organic carbon (kerogen) within stylolites. Diagenetic modifications include hypidiotopic dolomite, micrite to microsparite recrystallization, stylolites, poikilotopic calcite, chert and saddle dolomite replacements. Burning and technical tests widely attest that the Neoarchean limestone is sensitive to high temperature, showing an unusual and drastically pronounced sintering or overburning tendency. The slaking reactivity, according to EN 459-2 is high for lime burnt at 1050 °C, but rapidly decreases for lime burnt at 1150 °C. The predominant micritic microbial textures, coupled with the organic carbon, are key-factors influencing the low burnability and the high sintering tendency. The presence of burial cementation, especially poikilotopic calcite, seems to promote higher burnability, either in terms of starting calcination temperature, or in terms of higher carbonate dissociation rate. In fact, the highest calcination velocity determined by thermal analysis is consistent with the highest slaking reactivity of the lower stratum of the quarry, enriched in poikilotopic calcite. Secondly, locally concentered dolomitic marly limestones, and sporadic back shales negatively affects the quicklime reactivity, as well. This study confirms that a multidisciplinary analytical approach is essential for selecting the best raw mix for achieving the highest lime reactivity in TSR kilns.

  17. Evaluation of the presence of a burnable absorber in an assembly 3x3 type PWR; Evaluacion de la presencia de un absorbedor quemable en un ensamble 3x3 tipo PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez F, M. A.; Del Valle G, E.; Alonso V, G. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. IPN s/n, Col. Lindavista, Mexico D. F. 07738 (Mexico)]. e-mail: mike_ipn_esfm@hotmail.com

    2008-07-01

    In the present work the effect is evaluated that causes the presence of a burnable absorber in an adjustment of rods of 3x3 of a fuel assembly type PWR using CASMO-4 code, when comparing the infinite multiplication factor and some average cross sections by means of codes MCNP-4A, CASMO-3 and HELIOS. For this evaluation two cases are evaluated: first consists of an adjustment of rods of 3x3 full completely of fuel and the second consists of a central rod full with a burnable absorber type wet annular burnable absorber (WABA) and the remaining full fuel rods. In both cases the enrichment of the fissile isotopes is varied, for two types of fuel, MOX degree armament and UO{sub 2}. (Author)

  18. Photographic fixative poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photographic fixatives are chemicals used to develop photographs. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing such chemicals. This article is for information only. DO NOT use it to treat or manage an ...

  19. Asphalt cement poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... petroleum material that hardens when it cools. Asphalt cement poisoning occurs when someone swallows asphalt. If hot ... found in: Road paving materials Roofing materials Tile cements Asphalt may also be used for other purposes.

  20. Overview of Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newspaper Paint (water color or water-based) Perfumes Petroleum jelly Plant food (household) Polyethylene glycols, such as ... reduces the severity of poisonings, particularly with acetaminophen , aspirin , or ibuprofen . The identifying marks printed on pills ...

  1. Cold wave lotion poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002693.htm Cold wave lotion poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cold wave lotion is a hair care product used ...

  2. Cedar leaf oil poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedar leaf oil is made from some types of cedar trees. Cedar leaf oil poisoning occurs when someone swallows this substance. ... The substance in cedar leaf oil that can be harmful is thujone (a hydrocarbon).

  3. Nail polish poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002722.htm Nail polish poisoning To use the sharing features on this ... is from swallowing or breathing in (inhaling) nail polish. This article is for information only. DO NOT ...

  4. Metal cleaner poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metal cleaners are very strong chemical products that contain acids. This article discusses poisoning from swallowing or ... Metal cleaners contain organic compounds called hydrocarbons, including: 1,2-butylene oxide Boric acid Cocoyl sarcosine Dicarboxylic ...

  5. Bracken fern poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracken fern (Pteridium aquilinum) has worldwide distribution and in some areas dominated plant communities replacing desirable forages. Poisoning is identified as enzootic hematuria, bright blindness, and bracken staggers. This chapter reviews updates new information on the plant, the various poi...

  6. Pine oil poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. General approach to the poisoned patient. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ... Saunders; 2014:chap 147. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ...

  7. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Dolan, Michael C.

    1985-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is a significant cause of illness and death. Its protean symptoms probably lead to a gross underestimation of its true incidence. Low levels of carbon monoxide aggravate chronic cardiopulmonary problems, and high levels are associated with cardiac arrhythmias and cerebral edema. Patients who survive acute poisoning are at risk of delayed neurologic sequelae. The measurement of carboxyhemoglobin levels does not reveal the tissue levels of carbon monoxide but is useful...

  8. Hydroxocobalamin in cyanide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John P; Marrs, Timothy C

    2012-12-01

    On theoretical grounds, hydroxocobalamin is an attractive antidote for cyanide poisoning as cobalt compounds have the ability to bind and detoxify cyanide. This paper reviews the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects of hydroxocobalamin, its efficacy in human cyanide poisoning and its adverse effects. PubMed was searched for the period 1952 to April 2012. A total of 71 papers were identified in this way; and none was excluded. PHARMACOKINETICS AND PHARMACODYNAMICS: Pharmacokinetic studies in dogs and humans suggest a two-compartment model, with first order elimination kinetics. Pharmacodynamic studies in animals suggest that hydroxocobalamin would be a satisfactory antidote for human cyanide poisoning. EFFICACY IN HUMAN POISONING: There is limited evidence that hydroxocobalamin alone is effective in severe poisoning by cyanide salts. The evidence for the efficacy of hydroxocobalamin in smoke inhalation is complicated by lack of evidence for the importance of cyanide exposure in fires and the effects of other chemicals as well as confounding effects of other therapeutic measures, including hyperbaric oxygen. Evidence that hydroxocobalamin is effective in poisoning due to hydrogen cyanide alone is lacking; extrapolation of efficacy from poisoning by ingested cyanide salts may not be valid. The rate of absorption may be greater with inhaled hydrogen cyanide and the recommended slow intravenous administration of hydroxocobalamin may severely limit its clinical effectiveness in these circumstances. Both animal and human data suggest that hydroxocobalamin is lacking in clinically significant adverse effects. However, in one human volunteer study, delayed but prolonged rashes were observed in one-sixth of subjects, appearing 7 to 25 days after administration of 5 g or more of hydroxocobalamin. Rare adverse effects have included dyspnoea, facial oedema, and urticaria. Limited data on human poisonings with cyanide salts suggest that hydroxocobalamin is an effective

  9. Carbon monoxide poisoning (acute)

    OpenAIRE

    Olson, Kent; Smollin, Craig

    2008-01-01

    The main symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are non-specific in nature and relate to effects on the brain and heart. The symptoms correlate poorly with serum carboxyhaemoglobin levels. People with comorbidity, the elderly or very young, and pregnant women are most susceptible.Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon fuels, including inadequately ventilated heaters and car exhausts, or from chemicals such as methylene chloride paint stripper.Poisoning is conside...

  10. Carbon monoxide poisoning (acute)

    OpenAIRE

    Smollin, Craig; Olson, Kent

    2010-01-01

    The main symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are non-specific in nature and relate to effects on the brain and heart. The symptoms correlate poorly with serum carboxyhaemoglobin levels. People with comorbidity, elderly or very young people, and pregnant women are most susceptible.Carbon monoxide is produced by the incomplete combustion of carbon fuels, including inadequately ventilated heaters and car exhausts, or from chemicals such as methylene chloride paint stripper.Poisoning is cons...

  11. Human Melia azedarach poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Dong Haur; Tsai, Wei-Jen; Ger, Jiin; Deng, Jou-Fang; Yang, Chen-Chang

    2008-12-01

    In traditional Chinese medicine, Melia azedarach (Ku-lian) is used orally and topically as an antiparasitic and antifungal agent. Although toxicity of this plant has been widely described in veterinary literature, human poisoning is rarely reported. We describe five patients with M. azedarach poisoning who recovered with supportive care. Five patients were identified retrospectively from the database of the Taiwan National Poison Center at the Taipei Veterans General Hospital. Three cases were on-site patients, and two were telephone consultations from outside hospitals. Neurological symptoms were the major manifestation in four cases: weakness, myalgia, numbness, and ptosis. Treatment was symptomatic and supportive; all patients recovered without sequelae. It is not known which limonoids are responsible for human toxicity. In the Chinese medical literature, human M. azedarach poisoning is said to occur if six to nine fruits, 30 to 40 seeds, or 400 g of the bark is consumed. Onset of symptoms typically occurs within 4-6 h, but as short as 0.5 h had been documented. In our patients, the onset of M. azedarach poisoning was variable, ranging from a few hours to up to 3 weeks after consumption of the herb. M. azedarach poisoning may result in gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, respiratory, or neurological effects, and death in severe cases.

  12. POISONS AND POISONING IN THE REPUBLIC OF DUBROVNIK

    OpenAIRE

    Šundrica, Zdravko

    2000-01-01

    Dubrovnik authorities occasionally resorted to poisoning as a means of resolving state affairs. A number of the Republic’s enemies and undesirable prisoners were removed or suspected to have been eliminated by poisoning. Poison was used as a protective measure in times of war, when the Ragusans contaminated the water tanks in the area. Dubrovnik archives reveal a variety of poisoning cases among Ragusan citizens over the centuries, only to prove that, if uncommon, this method was not looked u...

  13. Benzodiazepine poisoning in elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukcević, Natasa Perković; Ercegović, Gordana Vuković; Segrt, Zoran; Djordjević, Snezana; Stosić, Jasmina Jović

    2016-03-01

    Benzodiazepines are among the most frequently ingested drugs in self-poisonings. Elderly may be at greater risk compared with younger individuals due to impaired metabolism and increased sensitivity to benzodiazepines. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity of benzodiazepines in elderly attempted suicide. A retrospective study of consecutive presentations to hospital after self-poisoning with benzodiazepines was done. Collected data consisted of patient's characteristics (age, gender), benzodiazepine ingested with its blood concentrations at admission, clinical findings including vital signs and Glasgow coma score, routine blood chemistry, complications of poisoning, details of management, length of hospital stay and outcome. According the age, patients are classified as young (15-40-year old), middle aged (41-65-year old) and elderly (older than 65). During a 2-year observational period 387 patients were admitted because of pure benzodiazepine poisoning. The most frequently ingested drug was bromazepam, the second was diazepam. The incidence of coma was significantly higher, and the length of hospital stay significantly longer in elderly. Respiratory failure and aspiration pneumonia occurred more frequently in old age. Also, flumazenil was more frequently required in the group of elderly patients. Massive benzodiazepines overdose in elderly may be associated with a significant morbidity, including deep coma with aspiration pneumonia, respiratory failure, and even death. Flumazenil is indicated more often to reduce CNS depression and prevent complications of prolonged unconsciousness, but supportive treatment and proper airway management of comatose patients is the mainstay of the treatment of acute benzodiazepine poisoning.

  14. [Poisonings with Amanita phalloides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferenc, Tomasz; Lukasiewicz, Beata; Ciećwierz, Julita; Kowalczyk, Edward

    2009-01-01

    Amanita phalloides is the most dangerous, poisonous mushroom species in our climatic conditions. It is the cause of 90-95% of all deaths due to mushroom poisoning, a-Amanitin, a polymerase RNA II inhibitor, is mainly responsible for the Amanita phalloides toxic property. Inhibition of polymerase RNA II functioning in a transcription process is connected with inhibition biosynthesis of structural and enzymatic proteins in cells. A lethal dose of a-amanitin is 0.1 mg/kg b.w. for humans. One of the medical problems in Amanita phalloides poisonings is a relatively prolonged latency period (8-24 h) from mushroom ingestion, at the same time the cytotropic action of absorbed toxins is revealed. In severe cases, multi organ failure, renal and hepatitis failure can occur. Deaths in a-amanitin poising cases follows between 6-16 days after intoxication. Mortality in this group of patients is still high and amounts to approximately 20-30% in adults and exceeds 50% in children. If mushroom poisoning occurs, it is best treated with pharmacological agents, extracorporeal methods for toxin removal and liver transplantation. Recent high expectations concerning liver albumin dialysis (based on MARS) should support liver regeneration and will also help with possible liver transplantation. In a medical community it is generally believed that every suspected Amanita phalloides poisoning should be referred to a specialized health center.

  15. Extracorporeal treatment for thallium poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghannoum, Marc; Nolin, Thomas D; Goldfarb, David S

    2012-01-01

    The EXtracorporeal TReatments In Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup was formed to provide recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) in poisoning. To test and validate its methods, the workgroup reviewed data for thallium (Tl)....

  16. [Electronic poison information management system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabata, Piotr; Waldman, Wojciech; Kaletha, Krystian; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    We describe deployment of electronic toxicological information database in poison control center of Pomeranian Center of Toxicology. System was based on Google Apps technology, by Google Inc., using electronic, web-based forms and data tables. During first 6 months from system deployment, we used it to archive 1471 poisoning cases, prepare monthly poisoning reports and facilitate statistical analysis of data. Electronic database usage made Poison Center work much easier.

  17. Amitraz poisoning: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Alexander Molina-Bolaños

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Amitraz is an insecticide compound used worldwide for controlling pests, especially in agricultural and livestock areas. However, amitraz poisoning in Colombia is rare. This article reports the case of an 18-year-old female patient who was admitted in the emergency service 3 hours after the intake of an unknown amount of Triatox® (amitraz. The patient presented with a depressed level of consciousness, respiratory distress, hypotension, bradycardia, myosis and metabolic acidosis compensated with respiratory alkalosis. Initial treatment was provided using life support measures in the emergency ward, and subsequent transfer and support in the intensive care unit. She was discharged 24 hours after admission. This case considers the clinical similarity between amitraz poisoning and poisoning caused by other more frequent toxic compounds such as carbamates, organophosphates and opioids, which require different management.

  18. [Acute pesticide poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Nah, J J; Collí-Quintal, J

    2000-01-01

    To describe the epidemiologic pattern of acute pesticide poisoning (APP) in a general hospital in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. From 1994 to 1998, 33 patients 13 years of age or older with diagnosis of APP were studied. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze information. Males were frequently affected (82%), specially those coming from rural areas (60%). The mean age of the group was 34 +/- 15.8 years. In 79% of the cases, pesticides were used to commit suicide and 33% of poisoning cases were due to organophospate pesticides. The mortality rate was 12%. In this small sample, acute poisoning from pesticides in the agricultural setting may be underestimated, since it was less frequent than in the general population. APP was more commonly used by indigent people to commit suicide.

  19. Black-spot poison ivy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schram, Sarah E; Willey, Andrea; Lee, Peter K; Bohjanen, Kimberly A; Warshaw, Erin M

    2008-01-01

    In black-spot poison ivy dermatitis, a black lacquerlike substance forms on the skin when poison ivy resin is exposed to air. Although the Toxicodendron group of plants is estimated to be the most common cause of allergic contact dermatitis in the United States, black-spot poison ivy dermatitis is relatively rare.

  20. Chelation Therapy for Mercury Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Guan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chelation therapy has been the major treatment for heavy metal poisoning. Various chelating agents have been developed and tested for treatment of heavy metal intoxications, including mercury poisoning. It has been clearly shown that chelating agents could rescue the toxicity caused by heavy metal intoxication, but the potential preventive role of chelating agents against heavy metal poisoning has not been explored much. Recent paper by Siddiqi and colleagues has suggested a protective role of chelating agents against mercury poisoning, which provides a promising research direction for broader application of chelation therapy in prevention and treatment of mercury poisoning.

  1. Puffer fish poisoning.

    OpenAIRE

    Field, J

    1998-01-01

    Regarded by many as a delicacy, puffer fish (Lagocephalus scleratus) is a lethal source of food poisoning with a high mortality. It contains tetrodotoxin which can cause death by muscular paralysis, respiratory depression, and circulatory failure. A case of mild intoxication is reported and the literature reviewed.

  2. Drain opener poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drain opener poisoning can cause symptoms in many parts of the body. BLOOD Severe change in acid level of blood (pH balance), which leads to damage in all of the body organs EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Burns to the eyes, which ...

  3. Chlorinated lime poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlorinated lime poisoning can cause symptoms in many parts of the body. BLOOD Severe change in the acid level in the blood (pH balance), which leads to damage in all of the body organs EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Loss of vision Severe pain ...

  4. Poisoning with organophosphates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with alcohol: 42.4% of patients were poisoned with “agrochemicals”. The overall mortality was low at 1.4%. ... and respiratory tracts and significantly through the skin. Their key action is to inhibit acetylcholinesterase which .... and so would make the situation worse. A careful watch of respiratory function is essential when any ...

  5. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animals can also be poisoned by carbon monoxide. People who have pets at home may notice that their animals become ... or unresponsive from carbon monoxide exposure. Often the pets will ... these conditions. This can lead to a delay in getting help.

  6. [Acute arsenic poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montelescaut, Etienne; Vermeersch, Véronique; Commandeur, Diane; Huynh, Sophie; Danguy des Deserts, Marc; Sapin, Jeanne; Ould-Ahmed, Mehdi; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2014-01-01

    Acute arsenic poisoning is a rare cause of suicide attempt. It causes a multiple organs failure caused by cardiogenic shock. We report the case of a patient admitted twelve hours after an ingestion of trioxide arsenic having survived thanks to a premature treatment.

  7. Benzodiazepine poisoning in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perković-Vukčević Nataša

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Benzodiazepines are among the most frequently ingested drugs in self-poisonings. Elderly may be at greater risk compared with younger individuals due to impaired metabolism and increased sensitivity to benzodiazepines. The aim of this study was to assess toxicity of benzodiazepines in elderly attempted suicide. Methods. A retrospective study of consecutive presentations to hospital after self-poisoning with benzodiazepines was done. Collected data consisted of patient's characteristics (age, gender, benzodiazepine ingested with its blood concentrations at admission, clinical findings including vital signs and Glasgow coma score, routine blood chemistry, complications of poisoning, details of management, length of hospital stay and outcome. According the age, patients are classified as young (15-40-year old, middle aged (41-65-year old and elderly (older than 65. Results. During a 2-year observational period 387 patients were admitted because of pure benzodiazepine poisoning. The most frequently ingested drug was bromazepam, the second was diazepam. The incidence of coma was significantly higher, and the length of hospital stay significantly longer in elderly. Respiratory failure and aspiration pneumonia occurred more frequently in old age. Also, flumazenil was more frequently required in the group of elderly patients. Conclusion. Massive benzodiazepines overdose in elderly may be associated with a significant morbidity, including deep coma with aspiration pneumonia, respiratory failure, and even death. Flumazenil is indicated more often to reduce CNS depression and prevent complications of prolonged unconsciousness, but supportive treatment and proper airway management of comatose patients is the mainstay of the treatment of acute benzodiazepine poisoning.

  8. Application of an enhanced cross-section interpolation model for highly poisoned LWR core calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palau, J.M.; Cathalau, S.; Hudelot, J.P.; Barran, F.; Bellanger, V., E-mail: jean-marc.palau@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, Departement d' Etudes des Reacteurs, Service de Physique des Reacteurs et du Cycle Laboratoire de Projets Nucleaires, Cadarache, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Magnaud, C.; Moreau, F., E-mail: Christine.magnaud@cea.fr [Departement de Modelisation des Systemes et des Structures Service d' Etudes de Reacteurs et Mathematiques Appliquees, Saclay (France)

    2011-07-01

    Burnable poisons are extensively used by Light Water Reactor designers in order to preserve the fuel reactivity potential and increase the cycle length (without increasing the uranium enrichment). In the industrial two-steps (assembly 2D transport-core 3D diffusion) calculation schemes these heterogeneities yield to strong flux and cross-sections perturbations that have to be taken into account in the final 3D burn-up calculations. This paper presents the application of an enhanced cross-section interpolation model (implemented in the French CRONOS2 code) to LWR (highly poisoned) depleted core calculations. The principle is to use the absorbers (or actinide) concentrations as the new interpolation parameters instead of the standard local burnup/fluence parameters. It is shown by comparing the standard (burnup/fluence) and new (concentration) interpolation models and using the lattice transport code APOLLO2 as a numerical reference that reactivity and local reaction rate prediction of a 2x2 LWR assembly configuration (slab geometry) is significantly improved with the concentration interpolation model. Gains on reactivity and local power predictions (resp. more than 1000 pcm and 20 % discrepancy reduction compared to the reference APOLLO2 scheme) are obtained by using this model. In particular, when epithermal absorbers are inserted close to thermal poison the 'shadowing' ('screening') spectral effects occurring during control operations are much more correctly modeled by concentration parameters. Through this outstanding example it is highlighted that attention has to be paid to the choice of cross-section interpolation parameters (burnup 'indicator') in core calculations with few energy groups and variable geometries all along the irradiation cycle. Actually, this new model could be advantageously applied to steady-state and transient LWR heterogeneous core computational analysis dealing with strong spectral-history variations under

  9. Xuebijing for paraquat poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jin; Huo, Dongmei; Wu, Qiaoyuan; Zhu, Lin; Liao, Yunhua

    2013-07-29

    At present, there is a lack of effective treatments for paraquat poisoning. Xuebijing injection is a complex traditional Chinese prescription consisting of Flos Carthami, Radix Paeoniae Rubra, Rhizoma Chuanxiong, Radix Salviae Miltiorrhizae and Radix Angelicae Sinensis. Although clinical experience suggests that Xuebijing injection might have potential in the management of paraquat poisoning, there is no conclusion on the effectiveness of this treatment. To assess the effects of Xuebijing injection in patients with paraquat poisoning. We searched the Cochrane Injuries Group's Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), CINAHL (EBSCO), ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded, ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science, Chinese bio-medical literature and retrieval system (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure Database (CNKI), and the Traditional Chinese Medicine Database. The search was run on the 29th May 2013. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing Xuebijing injection combined with conventional care against conventional care alone. Two or three authors independently selected studies, assessed study quality and extracted data. We calculated the mortality risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI). Data on all-cause mortality at the end of follow-up were summarised in a meta-analysis. We identified two trials including 84 people. Although there were fewer deaths in people treated with Xuebijing injection, meta-analysis showed that it did not provide a statistically significant benefit in reducing all-cause mortality in people with paraquat poisoning as compared to control (RR 0.71; 95% CI 0.48 to 1.04; P = 0.08). Based on the findings of two small RCTs, Xuebijing injection did not have a statistically significant benefit on reducing all-cause mortality in people with paraquat poisoning. However, both

  10. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  11. Small dose... big poison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitberg, George; Oakley, Ed

    2010-11-01

    It is not possible to identify all toxic substances in a single journal article. However, there are some exposures that in small doses are potentially fatal. Many of these exposures are particularly toxic to children. Using data from poison control centres, it is possible to recognise this group of exposures. This article provides information to assist the general practitioner to identify potential toxic substance exposures in children. In this article the authors report the signs and symptoms of toxic exposures and identify the time of onset. Where clear recommendations on the period of observation and known fatal dose are available, these are provided. We do not discuss management or disposition, and advise readers to contact the Poison Information Service or a toxicologist for this advice.

  12. [Poisoning with oleander leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, G A; Mombelli, G

    1990-04-21

    After ingestion of seven leaves of oleander (Nerium oleander) in a suicide attempt, a 37-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with symptoms of digitalis intoxication. The serum digoxin level on arrival was 5.69 nmol/l. The course was uneventful. The usefulness of digoxin radioimmunoassay to demonstrate poisoning with oleander (but not to predict the degree of toxicity) and the potential use of digoxin-specific Fab-antibody fragments in this situation are discussed.

  13. [Toxic alcohol poisonings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulicki, Paweł; Głogowski, Tomasz

    Accidental or intentional poisonings with ethylene glycol or methanol constitute a serious toxicological problem in many countries. Both alcohols are quickly metabolized by alcohol dehydrogenase to toxic metabolites responsible for high anion gap severe metabolic acidosis and profound neurological, cardiopulmonary, renal disturbances and death. In the early period, the competing inhibition the alcohol dehydrogenase with ethanol or fomepizol may successfully prevent the formation of the toxic metabolites. Once severe acidosis develops an emergency hemodialysis is required.

  14. The prognosis following amphetamine poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horwitz, Henrik; Dalhoff, Kim P.; Klemp, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Aims: This study investigated the long-term mortality following poisoning by amphetamine or substituted amphetamines. Furthermore, we examined the social problems and somatic and psychiatric co-morbidity related to amphetamine poisoning, and their impact on the long-term survival. Methods: We...... identified amphetamine poisoned patients from the Danish Poison Information Centre database and correlated their personal identification numbers with seven Danish national registries related to different social and health aspects. For each case, we sampled 100 age and gender matched controls from...... the background population. Results: From August 2006 to December 2013 we identified 1444 patients (70% males) who experienced amphetamine poisoning; 52% of the cases were classified as mixed poisonings and the average age at first contact was 24.8 years (SD 8.6). The prevalence of psychiatric disorders, HIV...

  15. Methanol poisoning: characteristic MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nirdesh; Himanshu, Dandu; Verma, Shailendra Prasad; Parihar, Anit

    2013-01-01

    Acute methanol intoxication is not an unusual poisoning. It can have serious neurological sequelae. We emphasize how neuroimaging can help in distinguishing methanol poisoning from other causes of acute unconsciousness in alcoholic patients such as hypoglycemic brain damage and carbon monoxide poisoning or head injury, which are frequently observed in alcoholic patients and are also responsible for altered sensorium. The most important findings in MR brain imaging in methanol poisoning have been bilateral putaminal hemorrhagic necrosis. Other less common findings are subcortical and deep white matter lesions, cerebral and cerebellar cortical lesions, and midbrain lesions, cerebral and intraventricular hemorrhage, and even enhancement of necrotic lesions, we found almost the entire spectrum of MRI findings in this patient with methanol poisoning. Neurological sequelae can entail the course and prognosis in methanol poisoning. The patient died because of ventilator-associated pneumonia that developed in the course of prolonged hospitalization.

  16. Chelation Therapy for Mercury Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Rong Guan; Han Dai

    2009-01-01

    Chelation therapy has been the major treatment for heavy metal poisoning. Various chelating agents have been developed and tested for treatment of heavy metal intoxications, including mercury poisoning. It has been clearly shown that chelating agents could rescue the toxicity caused by heavy metal intoxication, but the potential preventive role of chelating agents against heavy metal poisoning has not been explored much. Recent paper by Siddiqi and colleagues has suggested a protective role o...

  17. Prallethrin poisoning: A diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alka Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pyrethroid insecticides are very widely used in agriculture and household due to their high effectiveness and low toxicity in humans. Despite their extensive worldwide use, there are a few reports of human pyrethroid poisoning. The poisoning has a varied presentation and its symptoms overlap with those of other compounds, which can lead to misdiagnosis. We present a case of poisoning with prallethrin, a pyrethroid compound, commonly available as All-Out.

  18. Prallethrin poisoning: A diagnostic dilemma

    OpenAIRE

    Alka Chandra; Dixit, Madhu B.; Banavaliker, Jayant N

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are very widely used in agriculture and household due to their high effectiveness and low toxicity in humans. Despite their extensive worldwide use, there are a few reports of human pyrethroid poisoning. The poisoning has a varied presentation and its symptoms overlap with those of other compounds, which can lead to misdiagnosis. We present a case of poisoning with prallethrin, a pyrethroid compound, commonly available as All-Out.

  19. An interesting case of suicidal poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Mohit Sharma; Satish Kumar; Aditi Prashar; Ashok Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Aconite is one of the most poisonous known herbs. It has been known to be used as a homicidal poison from long time in history. However this is rarely known to be used as suicidal poison. Poisoning with aconite is usually fatal and death commonly occurs due to arrhythmias and cardiotoxicity. We report a case of attempted suicidal poisoning by aconite where patient survived in spite of documented cardiotoxic effects of the poison.

  20. An interesting case of suicidal poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Sharma

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Aconite is one of the most poisonous known herbs. It has been known to be used as a homicidal poison from long time in history. However this is rarely known to be used as suicidal poison. Poisoning with aconite is usually fatal and death commonly occurs due to arrhythmias and cardiotoxicity. We report a case of attempted suicidal poisoning by aconite where patient survived in spite of documented cardiotoxic effects of the poison.

  1. The power of poison: pesticide poisoning of Africa's wildlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogada, Darcy L

    2014-08-01

    Poisons have long been used to kill wildlife throughout the world. An evolution has occurred from the use of plant- and animal-based toxins to synthetic pesticides to kill wildlife, a method that is silent, cheap, easy, and effective. The use of pesticides to poison wildlife began in southern Africa, and predator populations were widely targeted and eliminated. A steep increase has recently been observed in the intensity of wildlife poisonings, with corresponding population declines. However, the majority of poisonings go unreported. Under national laws, it is illegal to hunt wildlife using poisons in 83% of African countries. Pesticide regulations are inadequate, and enforcement of existing legislation is poor. Few countries have forensic field protocols, and most lack storage and testing facilities. Methods used to poison wildlife include baiting carcasses, soaking grains in pesticide solution, mixing pesticides to form salt licks, and tainting waterholes. Carbofuran is the most widely abused pesticide in Africa. Common reasons for poisoning are control of damage-causing animals, harvesting fish and bushmeat, harvesting animals for traditional medicine, poaching for wildlife products, and killing wildlife sentinels (e.g., vultures because their aerial circling alerts authorities to poachers' activities). Populations of scavengers, particularly vultures, have been decimated by poisoning. Recommendations include banning pesticides, improving pesticide regulations and controlling distribution, better enforcement and stiffer penalties for offenders, increasing international support and awareness, and developing regional pesticide centers. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  2. OCCUPATIONAL CARBAMATE POISONING IN THAILAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongpoo, Achara; Sriapha, Charuwan; Wongvisawakorn, Sunun; Rittilert, Panee; Trakulsrichai, Satariya; Wananukul, Winai

    2015-07-01

    Carbamate insecticide is a leading cause of poisoning in Thailand. The objective of this study was to characterize the clinical manifestations and modes of occupational exposure in carbamate poisoning cases. We retrospectively studied all the cases of carbamate poisoning due to occupational exposure recorded in the Ramathibodi Poison Center Toxic Exposure Surveillance system during 2005 to 2010. Demographic data, clinical manifestations and severity were analyzed statistically. During the study period, 3,183 cases were identified, of which 170 (5.3%) were deemed to be due to occupational exposure. Ninety-six cases (56.5%) and 35 cases (20.6%) were poisoned by carbofuran and methomyl, respectively. Carbofuran is sold as a 3% grain and applied by sowing; methomyl is sold as a liquid and is applied by spraying. The majority of poisoned patients did not wear personal protective equipment (PPE) while applying the carbamates. The clinical manifestations of occupational carbofuran poisoning recorded were nausea and vomiting (82.3%), headaches (56.3%) and miosis (19.8%). The clinical manifestations of methomyl poisoning were nausea and vomiting (74.3%), headaches (57.1%) and palpitations (11.4%). Most patients in both groups had mild symptoms. Only one case in each group required endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation support. There were no deaths and the lengths of hospitalization ranged from 2 hours to 2 days. Occupational carbamate poisoning cases in our series were mostly mild and the patients recovered quickly. There were only rare cases of serious symptoms. Lack of knowledge and inadequate PPE were the major factors contributing to occupational poisoning. Educating agricultural workers about correct precautions and pesticide use could minimize this type of poisoning.

  3. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Hsiun Cho

    2008-08-01

    Conclusion: Children with CO poisoning had good outcomes in this series. Although improperly vented exhaust from water heaters and house fires were the most common causes, intentional poisoning by parents through charcoal burning was also an important factor. Early identification of DNS risk factors might help to provide better care.

  4. Extracorporeal treatment for acetaminophen poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosselin, S; Juurlink, D N; Kielstein, J T

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup was created to provide evidence-based recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatments (ECTR) in poisoning and the results are presented here for acetaminophen (APAP). METHODS: After a systematic review of the litera...

  5. Homicidal arsenic poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Andrew; Taylor, Andrew; Leese, Elizabeth; Allen, Sam; Morton, Jackie; McAdam, Julie

    2015-07-01

    The case of a 50-year-old man who died mysteriously after being admitted to hospital is reported. He had raised the possibility of being poisoned prior to his death. A Coroner's post-mortem did not reveal the cause of death but this was subsequently established by post-mortem trace element analysis of liver, urine, blood and hair all of which revealed very high arsenic concentrations. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  6. Cleistanthus collinus poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anugrah Chrispal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cleistanthus collinus, a toxic shrub, is used for deliberate self-harm in rural South India. MEDLINE (PUBMED and Google were searched for published papers using the search/ MeSH terms "Cleistanthus collinus," "Euphorbiaceae," "Diphyllin," "Cleistanthin A," Cleistanthin B" and "Oduvanthalai." Non-indexed journals and abstracts were searched by tracing citations in published papers. The toxic principles in the leaf include arylnaphthalene lignan lactones - Diphyllin and its glycoside derivatives Cleistanthin A and B. Toxin effect in animal models demonstrate neuromuscular blockade with muscle weakness, distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA and type 2 respiratory failure with conflicting evidence of cardiac involvement. Studies suggest a likely inhibition of thiol/thiol enzymes by the lignan-lactones, depletion of glutathione and ATPases in tissues. V-type H+ ATPase inhibition in the renal tubule has been demonstrated. Mortality occurs in up to 40% of C. collinus poisonings. Human toxicity results in renal tubular dysfunction, commonly dRTA, with resultant hypokalemia and normal anion gap metabolic acidosis. Aggressive management of these metabolic derangements is crucial. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is seen in severe cases. Cardiac rhythm abnormalities have been demonstrated in a number of clinical studies, though the role of temporary cardiac pacemakers in reducing mortality is uncertain. Consumption of decoctions of C. collinus leaves, hypokalemia, renal failure, severe metabolic acidosis, ARDS and cardiac arrhythmias occur in severe poisonings and predict mortality. Further study is essential to delineate mechanisms of organ injury and interventions, including antidotes, which will reduce mortality.

  7. The use of MOX caramel fuel mixed with241Am,242mAm and243Am as burnable absorber actinides for the MTR research reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Ismail; Albarhoum, Mohamad

    2017-07-01

    The MOX (UO 2 &PuO 2 ) caramel fuel mixed with 241 Am, 242m Am and 243 Am as burnable absorber actinides was proposed as a fuel of the MTR-22MW reactor. The MCNP4C code was used to simulate the MTR-22MW reactor and estimate the criticality and the neutronic parameters, and the power peaking factors before and after replacing its original fuel (U 3 O 8 -Al) by the MOX caramel fuel mixed with 241 Am, 242m Am and 243 Am actinides. The obtained results of the criticality, the neutronic parameters, and the power peaking factors for the MOX caramel fuel mixed with 241 Am, 242m Am and 243 Am actinides were compared with the same parameters of the U 3 O 8 -Al original fuel and a maximum difference is -6.18% was found. Additionally, by recycling 2.65% and 2.71% plutonium and 241 Am, 242m Am and 243 Am actinides in the MTR-22MW reactor, the level of 235 U enrichment is reduced from 4.48% to 3% and 2.8%, respectively. This also results in the reduction of the 235 U loading by 32.75% and 37.22% for the 2.65%, the 2.71% plutonium and 241 Am, 242m Am and 243 Am actinides, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Mushroom poisoning in Portugal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, José Luís; Pinheiro, J; Pinho, D; Correia da Silva, D; Fernandes, E; Fragoso, G; Costa, M I; Silva, A

    2011-12-01

    The renewed interest in mycology has been reflected in growing use of wild mushrooms in culinary, driven by its nutritional, organoleptic and commercial value. However, the international scientific literature describes several syndromes of poisoning by mushrooms. We live, therefore, a paradigm conducive to an increase of mycetism, whose diagnosis requires a high level of suspicion and knowledge of clinical profiles. In Portugal, the real dimension of this problem is unknown. Although some mycetisms, such as the hepatotoxic syndrome, have high morbidity and mortality, their relative incidences are unknown. Add up to the shortage of international scientific literature, often outdated and inappropriate to clinical practice. In this context, this article provides an updated epidemiological and clinical perspective emphasizing a narrative and descriptive information on the forms of presentation, differential diagnosis and therapeutic approach, with the ultimate goal of the elaboration of a national diagram-oriented approach to decision-making diagnosis. We analyzed all the clinical records of patients admitted into ten hospitals between 1990 and 2008, notified with the code 988.1 of GDH (acute poisoning by mushrooms). There were registered demographic data, way of presentation, time between ingestion and onset of symptoms, the annual distribution, clinical profile, clinical and analytical treatment performed and complications. We identified 93 cases of acute poisoning by mushrooms, with equal gender distribution and inclusion of individuals of all age groups (from 1 to 85 years), but with greater representation from 21 to 50 years. There was a bimodal seasonal pattern, with a higher peak between September and December and a second in the spring. The hepatotoxic profile presentation corresponded to 63.4% and 31.7% of the cases to gastroenteritis syndrome. The mortality in cases of hepatotoxicity was 11.8%. The developmental profile of the rate of prothrombin time (PT

  9. Alcohol Withdrawal Mimicking Organophosphate Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezihat Rana Disel

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphates, which can cause occupational poisoning due to inappropriate personal protective measures, are widely used insecticides in agricultural regions of southern Turkey. Therefore, the classical clinical findings of this cholinergic poisoning are myosis, excessive secretions, bradicardia and fasciculations are easy to be recognized by local medical stuff. Diseases and conditions related to alcoholism such as mental and social impairments, coma, toxicity, withdrawal, and delirium are frequent causes of emergency visits of chronic alcoholic patients. Here we present a case diagnosed and treated as organophosphate poisoning although it was an alcohol withdrawal in the beginning and became delirium tremens, due to similar symptoms.

  10. [Ciguatera fish poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Erwan; Bouchut, Jérémie

    2014-09-01

    Ciguatera, an ichtyosarcotoxism linked to the consumption of usually healthy coral fish is a common poisoning in the Pacific, Caribbean and Indian Ocean where it is endemic. However, increased tourism and commercial transportation of tropical fish for consumption make it an unexceptional intoxication in countries away from its endemic area. Environmental stresses such as climate changes also contribute to the expansion of its geographical area. The non-specific clinical symptomatology is characterized by the occurrence of gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, nervous and general signs few hours after eating a ciguatoxic fish. The diagnosis is clinical and relatively easy in endemic areas but much less for physicians who are rarely confronted with, which is a source of prolonged diagnostic delays and a significant increase in spending. Treatment of ciguatera is symptomatic but new treatments, still experimental, give a real hope for the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Using poison center exposure calls to predict methadone poisoning deaths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabarun Dasgupta

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There are more drug overdose deaths in the Untied States than motor vehicle fatalities. Yet the US vital statistics reporting system is of limited value because the data are delayed by four years. Poison centers report data within an hour of the event, but previous studies suggested a small proportion of poisoning deaths are reported to poison centers (PC. In an era of improved electronic surveillance capabilities, exposure calls to PCs may be an alternate indicator of trends in overdose mortality. METHODS: We used PC call counts for methadone that were reported to the Researched Abuse, Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS® System in 2006 and 2007. US death certificate data were used to identify deaths due to methadone. Linear regression was used to quantify the relationship of deaths and poison center calls. RESULTS: Compared to decedents, poison center callers tended to be younger, more often female, at home and less likely to require medical attention. A strong association was found with PC calls and methadone mortality (b=0.88, se=0.42, t=9.5, df=1, p<0.0001, R(2 =0.77. These findings were robust to large changes in a sensitivity analysis assessing the impact of underreporting of methadone overdose deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that calls to poison centers for methadone are correlated with poisoning mortality as identified on death certificates. Calls received by poison centers may be used for timely surveillance of mortality due to methadone. In the midst of the prescription opioid overdose epidemic, electronic surveillance tools that report in real-time are powerful public health tools.

  12. Lead poisoning from Ayurvedic medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsui, Rayji S; Van Schalkwyk, Johan; Spriggs, David

    2013-05-10

    A case of lead poisoning with established exposure to Ayurvedic medicines is presented. This patient migrated from India to New Zealand 8 years previously. He regularly visits India where he purchases "herbal remedies" for his wellbeing.

  13. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Past Emails Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) ... tornadoes), using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a home and ...

  14. Oil-based paint poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. General approach to the poisoned patient. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ... Saunders; 2014:chap 147. Lee DC. Hydrocarbons. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. ...

  15. Grass and weed killer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002838.htm Grass and weed killer poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Many weed killers contain dangerous chemicals that are harmful if ...

  16. Alcohol Poisoning Deaths PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-06

    This 60 second Public Service Announcement is based on the January 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. In the United States, an average of six people die every day from alcohol poisoning. Learn what you can do to prevent binge drinking and alcohol poisoning.  Created: 1/6/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/6/2015.

  17. Methemoglobinemia in aluminum phosphide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadnia, Shahin; Soltaninejad, Kambiz; Hassanian-Moghadam, Hossein; Sadeghi, Anahaita; Rahimzadeh, Hormat; Zamani, Nasim; Ghasemi-Toussi, Alireza; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2011-03-01

    Acute aluminum phosphide (AlP) poisoning is one of the most common causes of acute pesticide poisoning in Iran. Hydrogen phosphide or phosphine gas is produced following reaction of AlP with water even at ambient humidity. Methemoglobinemia is a rare finding following phosphine poisoning. In this paper, two cases of fatal AlP poisoning complicated by methemoglobinemia are reported. Two patients presented following suicidal ingestion of AlP tablets. In the Emergency Department (ED), they received gastric lavage with sodium bicarbonate and potassium permanganate. Both of them received supportive care. In each case, hematuria and hemolysis were significant events. The patients also showed a decrease in O(2) saturation in spite of high FIO(2). Methemoglobin levels of 40% and 30% were detected by co-oximetry. Neither patient responded to treatment (ascorbic acid in one case, methylene blue in the other). Both patients died due to systemic effects of phosphine poisoning. Hemolysis and methemoglobinemia may complicate the course of phosphine poisoning that seems resistant to methylene blue and ascorbic acid. Therefore, other treatments including hyperbaric oxygen therapy and exchange blood transfusion should be considered.

  18. [Mortality by poisoning in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Híjar, M; Blanco, J; Carrillo, C; Rascón, A

    1998-01-01

    To determine the standing of mortality by poisoning in children in the Mexican Republic, in the years from 1979-1994. Secondary sources were employed. Analyzed variables were: age, sex, year, external cause of trauma and poisoning according to the 9th International Classification of Diseases: E850-E858, E860-E869 and E905. Tendencies by specific causes were analyzed with a Poisson regression model and relative risk by age, sex and district were obtained. A total of 11,272 children under 15 years of age were recorded. The main causes were poisoning and toxic reactions caused by venomous plants or animals (E905); accidental poisoning by household gas or carbon monoxide (E868); and accidental poisoning by other drugs (E858). The relative risk was highest in age group Aguascalientes consistently presented the highest risk values and the state of Nuevo Leon, the lowest. Poisoning is an important cause of child mortality. Considering that most of these deaths can potentially be prevented since they occur at home it is recommended that responsible adults can build protection into their environment and into the way society operates. Prevention should involve a multidisciplinary approach since the phenomenon has multiple causes and possible solutions.

  19. Poisoning due to pyrethroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradberry, Sally M; Cage, Sarah A; Proudfoot, Alex T; Vale, J Allister

    2005-01-01

    current') ensues which, if it is sufficiently large and/or long, lowers the action potential threshold and causes repetitive firing; this may be the mechanism causing paraesthesiae. At high pyrethroid concentrations, the sodium tail current may be sufficiently great to prevent further action potential generation and 'conduction block' ensues. Only low pyrethroid concentrations are necessary to modify sensory neurone function. Type II pyrethroids also decrease chloride currents through voltage-dependent chloride channels and this action probably contributes the most to the features of poisoning with type II pyrethroids. At relatively high concentrations, pyrethroids can also act on GABA-gated chloride channels, which may be responsible for the seizures seen with severe type II poisoning. Despite their extensive world-wide use, there are relatively few reports of human pyrethroid poisoning. Less than ten deaths have been reported from ingestion or following occupational exposure. Occupationally, the main route of pyrethroid absorption is through the skin. Inhalation is much less important but increases when pyrethroids are used in confined spaces. The main adverse effect of dermal exposure is paraesthesiae, presumably due to hyperactivity of cutaneous sensory nerve fibres. The face is affected most commonly and the paraesthesiae are exacerbated by sensory stimulation such as heat, sunlight, scratching, sweating or the application of water. Pyrethroid ingestion gives rise within minutes to a sore throat, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain. There may be mouth ulceration, increased secretions and/or dysphagia. Systemic effects occur 4-48 hours after exposure. Dizziness, headache and fatigue are common, and palpitations, chest tightness and blurred vision less frequent. Coma and convulsions are the principal life-threatening features. Most patients recover within 6 days, although there were seven fatalities among 573 cases in one series and one among 48 cases in another

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF CaO AND P2O5 OF BONE ASH UPON THE REACTIVITY AND THE BURNABILITY OF CEMENT RAW MIXTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOMÁŠ IFKA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of CaO and P2O5 upon the reactivity of cement raw meal was investigated in this paper. Ash of bone meal containing Ca3(PO42 - 3CaO·P2O5 was used as the source of P2O5. Two series of samples with different content of the ash of bone meal were prepared. In the first series, the ash of bone was added into cement raw meal. The second series of samples were prepared by considering ash as one of CaO sources. Therefore, the total content of CaO in cement raw meal was kept constant, while the amount of P2O5 increased. These different series of samples were investigated by analyzing free lime content in the clinkers. The XRD analysis and Electron Micro Probe Analyzer analysis of the clinkers were also carried out. Two parameters were used to characterize the reactivity of cement raw meal: content of free lime and Burnability Index (BI calculated from free lime content in both series of samples burnt at 1350 ºC, 1400 ºC, 1450 ºC and 1500 ºC. According to the first parameter, P2O5 content that drastically makes worse the reactivity of cement raw meal was found at 1.11 wt.% in the first series, while this limit has reached 1.52 wt.% in the second one. According to the BI, the limit of P2O5 was found at 1.42 wt. % in the first series and 1, 61 wt.% in the second one. Furthermore, EPMA has demonstrated the presence of P2O5 in both calcium silicate phases forming thus solid solutions.

  1. Histamine Food Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schirone, Maria; Visciano, Pierina; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2017-01-01

    The consumption of food containing high amounts of histamine and other biogenic amines can cause food poisoning with different symptoms linked to the individual sensitivity and the detoxification activity. Histamine is the only biogenic amine with regulatory limits set by the European Commission in fish and fishery products, because it can lead to a fatal outcome. However, also fermented foods can be involved in outbreaks and sporadic cases of intoxication. The factors affecting the presence of histamine in food are variable and product specific including the availability of the precursor amino acid, the presence of microorganisms producing decarboxylases, and the conditions allowing their growth and enzyme production. Generally, the good quality of raw material and hygienic practices during food processing as well as the use of histidine decarboxylase-negative starter cultures can minimize the occurrence of histamine. Further studies are necessary to estimate the human exposure and the relationship between the total amount of the biogenic amines ingested with food and health effects.

  2. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  3. Neurotoxic Shellfish Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Hammond

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Neurotoxic shellfish poisoning (NSP is caused by consumption of molluscan shellfish contaminated with brevetoxins primarily produced by the dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis. Blooms of K. brevis, called Florida red tide, occur frequently along the Gulf of Mexico. Many shellfish beds in the US (and other nations are routinely monitored for presence of K. brevis and other brevetoxin-producing organisms. As a result, few NSP cases are reported annually from the US. However, infrequent larger outbreaks do occur. Cases are usually associated with recreationally-harvested shellfish collected during or post red tide blooms. Brevetoxins are neurotoxins which activate voltage-sensitive sodium channels causing sodium influx and nerve membrane depolarization. No fatalities have been reported, but hospitalizations occur. NSP involves a cluster of gastrointestinal and neurological symptoms: nausea and vomiting, paresthesias of the mouth, lips and tongue as well as distal paresthesias, ataxia, slurred speech and dizziness. Neurological symptoms can progress to partial paralysis; respiratory distress has been recorded. Recent research has implicated new species of harmful algal bloom organisms which produce brevetoxins, identified additional marine species which accumulate brevetoxins, and has provided additional information on the toxicity and analysis of brevetoxins. A review of the known epidemiology and recommendations for improved NSP prevention are presented.

  4. Medicine poisoning in suicidal pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljušic Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Investigations shows that on every realized suicide comes 8 to 25 non realized attempts. Individuals which tried suicide with medicine poisoning mostly quote that they have been overwhelmed with feelings and thoughts which was unbearable in that moment. They wished to escape from that unbearable situation or they lost self control. Between individuals whom tried suicide with medicine poisoning, desire to really die, to disappear was very rare. Mostly it was wish 'just to sleep a little, to take a rest, make pause'. Aim of work: to identified most frequently method for suicidal attempt in both sex and resources which was used in these purposes. Results: most frequently method for suicidal attempt for both sex in our investigation was medicine poisoning - 91,1%, veins cutting - 5,4% and jump from height - 3,6%. Mostly used medicines were anxiolytics - 55,4%, combination of different drugs - 25,0%, antidepressants - 8,9%, neuroleptics - 7,1%, drugs and alcohol - 3,6%. Most frequent method for suicidal attempt in both sex was medicine poisoning. From drugs most frequently used drugs were anxiolytics and in minimum percent combination of drugs and alcohol. After suicidal attempt 90% of individuals experienced relief because their suicidal attempt was unsuccessful. In 3% individuals there was new suicidal attempt on same way, medicine poisoning.

  5. Temperature moments vs poison moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staebler, U.M.

    1947-05-19

    The excess reactivity available in an operating pile is absorbed in poison columns and horizontal rods. The temperature distribution of the pile is determined by the relative strengths and locations of the poison columns and the configuration of control rods used. A method for adjusting poison columns and rods to improve upon the pile`s temperature distribution is given in Document {number_sign}7-2654, ``Procedure for Improving Temperature Distribution via Rods and Columns,`` Wheeler and Menegus to Jordan, September 9, 1945. A relationship between poison moment (inhour lattice units) and temperature moments (per coat) was theoretically derived in the above document and has since been measured on several occasions on the basis of operating experience. A survey of recent operating data for the F Pile has been made by H. A. Gauper, Jr. with the intent of improving the method for obtaining the temperature and poison moments and relating changes in the two. This study was concerned with only the horizontal and vertical dipole moments. The results of Mr. Gauper`s investigation are summarized in this memorandum.

  6. [Seafood poisonings. Part I. Shellfish and crustacean poisonings].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciszowski, Krzysztof; Mietka-Ciszowska, Aneta

    2012-01-01

    Seafood is a valuable source of nutrients, therefore, it constitutes an important part of diet in some geographical regions. The consumption of some shellfish and crustacean species may be a cause of food poisonings in humans, mainly due to simultaneous ingestion of biotoxins produced by algae, cyanobacteria, and bacteria. These toxins are accumulated in higher links of a food chain, i.e. mollusks and crustaceans, that consume toxins filtering phytoplankton. In the present paper the etiology, pathogenesis, symptomatology and treatment of some shellfish poisonings are presented.

  7. Some Lead Poisoning Tests May Be Faulty

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165668.html Some Lead Poisoning Tests May Be Faulty But the majority of ... More Health News on Children's Health Laboratory Tests Lead Poisoning Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Children's ...

  8. Organophosphorus pesticide poisoning : cases and developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aardema, H.; Ligtenberg, J. J. M.; Peters-Polman, O. M.; Tulleken, J. E.; Zijlstra, J. G.; Meertens, John H. J. M.

    Self-poisoning with organophosphate pesticides is a major health problem world-wide. Through the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, organophosphorus poisoning is characterised by the clinical picture of acute cholinergic crisis. Other manifestations are the intermediate neurotoxic syndrome and

  9. Chronic Arsenic Poisoning Following Ayurvedic Medication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pinto, Benzeeta; Goyal, Palvi; Flora, S J. S; Gill, K D; Singh, Surjit

    2014-01-01

    ... common. Chronic arsenic poisoning following the use of ayurvedic medication, though reported, is rare.We describe three patients who presented with features of chronic arsenic poisoning following prolonged ayurvedic medication use...

  10. Extracorporeal Treatment in Phenytoin Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anseeuw, Kurt; Mowry, James B; Burdmann, Emmanuel A

    2016-01-01

    The Extracorporeal Treatments in Poisoning (EXTRIP) Workgroup conducted a systematic literature review using a standardized process to develop evidence-based recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) in patients with phenytoin poisoning. The authors reviewed all articles...... criteria. Only case reports, case series, and pharmacokinetic studies were identified, yielding a very low quality of evidence. Clinical data from 31 patients and toxicokinetic grading from 46 patients were abstracted. The workgroup concluded that phenytoin is moderately dialyzable (level of evidence = C......) despite its high protein binding and made the following recommendations. ECTR would be reasonable in select cases of severe phenytoin poisoning (neutral recommendation, 3D). ECTR is suggested if prolonged coma is present or expected (graded 2D) and it would be reasonable if prolonged incapacitating ataxia...

  11. 76 FR 9585 - Poison Control Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Poison Control Program AGENCY: Health... professionals. The centers also offer programs to help clinicians better manage poisoning and overdose cases.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Poison Control Program, Director, Elisa Gladstone via e-mail at...

  12. Is Your Child Safe from Lead Poisoning?

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-10-02

    In this podcast, Dr. Mary Jean Brown, chief of CDC's Lead Poisoning and Prevention Program, discusses the importance of testing children for lead poisoning, who should be tested, and what parents can do to prevent lead poisoning.  Created: 10/2/2008 by National Center for Environmental Health (NCEH).   Date Released: 10/2/2008.

  13. Is poisoning a problem in South Sudan?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-11-04

    Nov 4, 2011 ... (e.g. mesothelioma caused by contact with asbestos). Criminal act of poisoning: e.g. “spiking” of a drink at a party. Poisoning in uganda. When I was working in Uganda I saw several cases of poisoning with organophosphates and was horrified by the mortality. Almost ten years ago, we carried out a simple.

  14. Helping Parents Prevent Lead Poisoning. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binns, Helen J.; Ricks, Omar Benton

    Children are at greater risk than adults for lead poisoning because children absorb lead more readily than adults, and a small amount of lead in children's bodies can do a great deal of harm. Some of the causes and effects of childhood lead poisoning and suggests some lead poisoning prevention strategies that parent educators can share with…

  15. Lead Poisoning: A Need for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipnickey, Susan Cross

    1981-01-01

    Each year approximately 200 children die of lead poisoning. Especially vulnerable to the toxic effects of lead poisoning are the nervous system, kidneys, and the bones. Physiological effects of lead on the school-age child, screening processes, and roles of school personnel in dealing with suspected victims of lead poisoning are discussed. (JN)

  16. Childhood Lead Poisoning: Blueprint for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochow, K. W. James; Rapuano, Maria

    Current programs to deal with childhood lead poisoning, the primary environmental disease of U.S. children, screen individual children, treat those with serious cases of lead poisoning, and subsequently return children to hazardous environments. This approach has led to repeated diagnoses of lead poisoning. This handbook is designed to convince…

  17. Accidental Datura stramonium poisoning in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tostes, Raimundo A

    2002-02-01

    Datura stramonium is potentially poisonous to humans and livestock; however, there's little description of clinical and pathological findings in dogs naturally intoxicated. We report an accidental Datura stramonium poisoning in a dog emphasizing the importance of recognizing the classical signs of anticholinergic poisoning.

  18. A Rare but Potentially Fatal Poisoning; Aluminum Phosphide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orkun Tolunay

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Phosphide, a very toxic gas, is used in our country as aluminium phosphide tablets impregnated in clay. It is widely used since it has a very high diffusion capacity, whereby it can eradicate all living creatures in any form of their life cycle and does not leave any remnants in agricultural products. Aluminum phosphide poisoning is among intoxications for which there are still no true antidotes. Mortality rate varies between 30% and 100%. This paper presents a case of aluminum phosphide poisoning caused by the uncompleted suicide attempt. A 14-year-old girl, who swallowed aluminum phosphate tablets, was brought to the emergency department with the complaints of nausea and vomiting. The patient was treated with gastric lavage and activated charcoal. Since the patient ingested a lethal amount of aluminum phosphide, she was referred to the pediatric intensive care unit. The patient was discharged in stable condition after supportive care and monitoring. Specific antidotes are life-saving in poisonings. However, this case was presented to show how general treatment principles and quick access to health services affect the result of treatment. Also, we aimed to highlight the uncontrolled selling of aluminum phosphate, which results in high mortality rates in case of poisoning.

  19. Article Commentary: Chelation Therapy for Mercury Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Guan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Chelation therapy has been the major treatment for heavy metal poisoning. Various chelating agents have been developed and tested for treatment of heavy metal intoxications, including mercury poisoning. It has been clearly shown that chelating agents could rescue the toxicity caused by heavy metal intoxication, but the potential preventive role of chelating agents against heavy metal poisoning has not been explored much. Recent paper by Siddiqi and colleagues has suggested a protective role of chelating agents against mercury poisoning, which provides a promising research direction for broader application of chelation therapy in prevention and treatment of mercury poisoning.

  20. Extracorporeal Treatment for Salicylate Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juurlink, David N; Gosselin, Sophie; Kielstein, Jan T

    2015-01-01

    in poisoning. We conducted a systematic literature review followed by data extraction and summarized findings, following a predetermined format. The entire work group voted by a 2-round modified Delphi method to reach consensus on voting statements, using a RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method to quantify...

  1. Hemodialysis in the Poisoned Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Boysen-Osborn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This classic team based learning (cTBL didactic is aimed for emergency medicine residents and fourth year medical students entering emergency medicine. Introduction: Over one million visits per year to United States (US emergency departments (ED are related to poisonings.1 Extracorporeal treatment (ECTR, specifically hemodialysis (HD, is one potential method to enhance elimination of certain drugs and their toxic metabolites.2-12 While HD may be life-saving in certain poisonings, it may have no effect on others and it carries associated risks and costs. It is essential that emergency physicians know the indications for HD in the poisoned patient. This cTBL reviews many poisonings which may be managed by HD. Objectives: By the end of this cTBL, the learner will: 1 recognize laboratory abnormalities related to toxic alcohol ingestion; 2 calculate an anion gap and osmolal gap; 3 know the characteristics of drugs that are good candidates for HD; 4 discuss the management of patients with toxic alcohol ingestions; 5 discuss the management of patients with salicylate overdose; 6 know the indications for HD in patients with overdoses of antiepileptic drugs; 7 discuss the management of patients with lithium toxicity. Method: This didactic session is a cTBL (classic team based learning.

  2. Lead poisoning from souvenir earthenware.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Björklund, Andreas; Karlson-Stiber, Christine; Harper, Pauline; Seldén, Anders I

    2006-02-01

    A case of massive lead poisoning from juice contained in a Greek earthenware jug as well as six satellite cases of high lead exposure of similar origin is reported. The intoxicated patient was successfully treated with dimercaptosuccinic acid. Ceramic producers should adhere to the longstanding European legislation.

  3. Germination Conditions For Poison Ivy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan M. Schiff; Kristina F. Connor; Margaret S. Devall

    2004-01-01

    Several scarification and stratification treatments were tested to optimize germination conditions for poison ivy [Toxicodendron radicans (L.) Kunst]. Fall-collected seeds soaked for 1 hour in water showed increasing germination with increasing stratification. Scarification with concentrated sulphuric acid for 30 minutes resulted in approximately 65...

  4. Acute arsenic poisoning diagnosed late.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumy, Farzana; Anam, Ahmad Mursel; Kamruzzaman, A K M; Amin, Md Robed; Chowdhury, M A Jalil

    2016-04-01

    Acute arsenicosis, although having a 'historical' background, is not common in our times. This report describes a case of acute arsenic poisoning, missed initially due to its gastroenteritis-like presentation, but suspected and confirmed much later, when the patient sought medical help for delayed complications after about 2 months. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. [Arsenic poisoning: a special gastroenteritis...].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganster, F; Kuteifan, K; Mootien, Y; Harry, P; Guiot, P

    2009-06-01

    Arsenic (As) intoxication is nowadays extremely rare. Two cases of acute and chronic As criminal poisoning leading to death of a couple of retired people, are reported. Clinical presentation was simulating a gastro-enteritidis with fast evolution to refractory shock. Toxicological analysis confirmed this diagnostic, with respectively blood As concentrations at 579 and 21 765 microg/l for our two patients.

  6. Lithium: poisonings and suicide prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagnon, F; Saïd, S; Lepine, J P

    2002-04-01

    This study concerns 81 cases of lithium poisoning and shows that deliberate intoxications are prevalent during the first 3 years of lithium treatment as well as in cases with a previous history of suicide attempt. Therapeutic intoxications could generally be avoided by education concerning hygiene and diet and careful monitoring in cases of intercurrent diseases.

  7. Extracorporeal Treatment for Lithium Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Decker, Brian S; Goldfarb, David S; Dargan, Paul I

    2015-01-01

    treatment (1D), but continuous RRT is an acceptable alternative (1D). The workgroup supported the use of extracorporeal treatment in severe lithium poisoning. Clinical decisions on when to use extracorporeal treatment should take into account the [Li(+)], kidney function, pattern of lithium toxicity...

  8. Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or throat complains of chest tightness or difficulty breathing develops widespread redness or swelling was given a shot of epinephrine (EpiPen) Think Prevention! Teach kids what poison ivy/oak/sumac plants look like and how important they are to ...

  9. Amitraz: a mimicker of organophosphate poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhooria, Sahajal; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-10-01

    Amitraz is used as an ectoparasiticide for dogs and cattle. Human poisoning due to amitraz may be misdiagnosed as organophosphate/carbamate (OPC) toxicity, since amitraz poisoning shares several clinical features (miosis, bradycardia and hypotension) encountered with OPC poisoning. A 19-year-old man with an alleged history of suicidal ingestion of a pesticide presented with drowsiness and was found to have constricted pupils, hypotension and bradycardia. He was diagnosed as a case of OPC poisoning and was treated with atropine and pralidoxime prior to presentation to our centre. Absence of a hypersecretory state, and the presence of hyperglycaemia and hypothermia along with a normal serum cholinesterase level suggested an alternate possibility. Retrieval of the poison container confirmed the diagnosis of amitraz poisoning. The patient made a rapid recovery with supportive management. Clinician awareness is key to successful management of this poisoning, which carries a good prognosis. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  10. The poisoning women of Tiszazug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodó, B

    2002-01-01

    This article examines the social causes of the infamous Tiszazug murders (i.e., the poisoning of more than forty people, mainly men, by their female relatives) in interwar Hungary. First, it looks at those elements in peasant culture, such as the traditional neglect of the sick elderly and the disabled, which proved conducive to a violent solution of family problems. Then, the essay analyzes the changes in family structures and inheritance patterns and discusses the impact of political events such as the end of overseas migration, the dissolution of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the autarchic policies of the "successor states" and the failure of land reform on peasants' lives. Finally, the article looks at the discovery of the murders and the peasants' interpretations of the poisonings.

  11. Datura stramonium poisoning in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adegoke, S A; Alo, L A

    2013-01-01

    Although substance abuse is fairly common among adolescents, poisoning from Datura stramonium (a broadleaf annual erect herb with spine-covered seed capsule) is uncommon in children and has not been reported in our locality. We present the case of two children admitted at the Children Emergency Room of a teaching hospital following ingestion of extract of Datura stramonium. They developed neurotoxicity (confusion, agitation, mydriasis, and hallucination) and were managed symptomatically with good outcome. A high index of suspicion and early management of poison in children is imperative if a favorable outcome is expected. Early presentation and the presence of an eyewitness contributed to the very good outcome in these index cases. In this report, we discussed the symptomatology and management of Datura toxicity in children.

  12. Haemoperfusion in Amanita phalloides poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, D Y; Calişkan, S; Nayir, A; Mat, A; Can, B; Yaşar, Z; Ozşahin, H; Cullu, F; Sever, L

    1995-12-01

    Amanita phalloides is responsible for about 90 per cent of all fatal cases of mushroom intoxication. The amatoxins, the main toxic component of these fungi, are responsible for gastro-intestinal symptoms as well as hepatic and renal failure. Three brothers with Amanita phalloides poisoning were admitted with gastro-intestinal symptoms beginning 12 h after ingestion. Jaundice, hepatomegaly and neurological symptoms were not present, but liver enzymes were moderately increased. Alfa-amanitin was detected in sera of all patients. All patients underwent charcoal hemoperfusion and two of them had additional hemodialysis along with conservative therapy. Liver enzymes that showed a marked increase on the second day of therapy decreased to normal levels on the 28th day. All of our patients survived. This life saving role of early haemoperfusion in Amanita phalloides poisoning is emphasized.

  13. Extracorporeal treatment for carbamazepine poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghannoum, Marc; Yates, Christopher; Galvao, Tais F

    2014-01-01

    in carbamazepine poisoning. METHODS: After a systematic literature search, the subgroup extracted the data and summarized the findings following a pre-determined format. The entire workgroup voted via a two-round modified Delphi method to reach a consensus on voting statements, using a RAND/UCLA Appropriateness......-vitro studies; two poor-quality observational studies were identified, yielding a very low quality of evidence for all recommendations. Data on 173 patients, including 6 fatalities, were reviewed. The workgroup concluded that carbamazepine is moderately dialyzable and made the following recommendations: ECTR...... is suggested in severe carbamazepine poisoning (2D). ECTR is recommended if multiple seizures occur and are refractory to treatment (1D), or if life-threatening dysrhythmias occur (1D). ECTR is suggested if prolonged coma or respiratory depression requiring mechanical ventilation are present (2D...

  14. [Recent trends of mushroom poisoning in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaura, Yoshio

    2013-03-01

    The incidence of mushroom poisoning was studied statistically from 2001 to 2010 in Japan. The total incident of mushroom poisoning was 569 cases, which involved 1,920 patients and 10 deaths. The average incident was 56.9 cases per year, involving 192 patients and 1 death. On regional differences, the mushroom poisoning was more frequent in the northeastern part of Japan. The rate of total incidents for each type of poisoning, which were classified according to symptoms caused, 54.6% in the type of gastro-intestinal disorder, 11.6% in the type of neurological symptoms, and 2.4% in the type of intracellular disorder (violent vomiting, diarrhea and dehydration and hepato-nephrosis, or rhabdomyolysis, or erroneous perception, etc.), respectively. Two species of poisonous mushrooms with gastro-intestinal disorder, Lampteromyces japonicus and Rhodophyllus rhodopolius caused the majority (52%) of all poisonings in Japan.

  15. Childhood lead poisoning: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hon, K L; Fung, C K; Leung, A Kc

    2017-12-01

    Childhood lead poisoning is a major public health concern in many countries. In 2015, the Hong Kong SAR Government and its citizens faced a major public health crisis due to the presence of lead in the drinking water of a number of public housing estates. Fortunately, no child was diagnosed with lead poisoning that required treatment with chelation. Lead is a ubiquitous, naturally occurring material that exists in air, dust, soil, and water. It is also widely present in industrial products including petrol, paints, ceramics, food cans, candies, cosmetics, traditional remedies, batteries, solder, stained glass, crystal vessels, ammunition, ceramic glazes, jewellry, and toys. It can also be found in human milk. There is no safe blood lead level and it may be impossible to completely eliminate lead from any city. Hence routine measurement of blood lead levels is not considered useful. Acute poisoning, especially with encephalopathy, deserves immediate medical treatment in hospital. Chelation therapy is recommended if blood lead level is 45 μg/dL or higher. For blood levels between 20 and 45 μg/dL, treatment is indicated if the child is symptomatic. For blood levels below 20 μg/dL in otherwise asymptomatic children, the principle of treatment is to provide long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up and counselling. In all cases, immediate removal of the source of lead exposure is vital. Even low levels of lead exposure can significantly impair learning, educational attainment, and neurodevelopment.

  16. Pesticide Poisoning of Honeybees: A Review of Symptoms, Incident Classification, and Causes of Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Kiljanek Tomasz; Niewiadowska Alicja; Posyniak Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    During the 2000s, the problem of pesticide poisoning of honeybees seemed to be almost solved. The number of cases has decreased in comparison to the 1970s. The problem of acute honeybee poisoning, however, has not disappeared, but instead has transformed into a problem of poisoning from ‘traditional’ pesticides like organophosphorus pesticides or pyrethroids, to poisoning from additional sources of ‘modern’ systemic neonicotinoids and fipronil. In this article, the biological activity of pest...

  17. Personality traits in persons with manganese poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platonov, A.A.

    1976-10-01

    Results of studies with the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) in 3 groups of arc welders with various degrees of manganese poisoning (22 symptom-free, 23 with functional disturbances, 55 with organic symptoms) and 50 controls were discussed. There was a close relation between the severity of the poisoning and quantitative and qualitative personality changes. Personality tests are considered a useful addition to the clinical diagnosis of chronic manganese poisoning.

  18. Hemlock (Conium Maculatum) Poisoning In A Child

    OpenAIRE

    KONCA, Capan; Kahramaner, Zelal; Bosnak, Mehmet; Kocamaz, Halil

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) is a plant that is poisonous for humans and animals. Accidental ingestion of the plant may result in central nervous system depression, respiratory failure, acute rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure and even death. The main treatment of hemlock poisoning is supportive care. The case of a 6-year-old girl who was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of burning sensation in mouth, hypersalivation, tremor in hands and ataxia after ingestio...

  19. Hemlock (Conium Maculatum) Poisoning In A Child

    OpenAIRE

    KONCA, Capan; Kahramaner, Zelal; Bosnak, Mehmet; Kocamaz, Halil

    2014-01-01

    Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) is a plant that is poisonous for humans and animals. Accidental ingestion of the plant may result in central nervous system depression, respiratory failure, acute rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure and even death. The main treatment of hemlock poisoning is supportive care. The case of a 6-year-old girl who was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of burning sensation in mouth, hypersalivation, tremor in hands and ataxia after ingestion of poi...

  20. Childhood poisoning: a community hospital experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlbach, S H; Wall, J B

    1977-06-01

    We reviewed medical records of 53 children who ingested poison and were treated as inpatients and 107 who were treated as outpatients in a Southeastern community hospital. Findings included a much higher incidence of petroleum distillate poisoning than is found nationally, and a low frequency of aspirin ingestions. Data on packaging of the poisons indicate that one third was stored in food containers. Of the products encountered, 33% currently require safety packaging but were found in obsolete containers.

  1. Paraphenylenediamine Poisoning in Tunisia: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Dorra Amira; Ines Gana; Anouar Nouioui; Fathia Khlifi; Dorra Ben Salah; Wafa Masri; Ines Belwaer; Hayet Ghorbel; Abderrazzek Hedili

    2015-01-01

    Paraphenylenediamine (PPD) represents the main active substance in the color of hair dyes. In Tunisia, PPD poisoning is very common, especially in rural areas where the consequences linked to this toxic substance are still unknown. In this paper, we report a case of PPD poisoning and confirm the diagnosis by a qualitative method of analysis. We discuss the clinical manifestations and study the kinetics of biological parameters during the monitoring of the poisoning. The main complication was ...

  2. Hypotension in Severe Dimethoate Self-Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, James; Roberts, Darren; Eyer, Peter; Buckley, Nick; Eddleston, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Acute self-poisoning with the organophosphorus (OP) pesticide dimethoate has a human case fatality three-fold higher than poisoning with chlorpyrifos despite similar animal toxicity. The typical clinical presentation of severe dimethoate poisoning is quite distinct from that of chlorpyrifos and other OP pesticides: many patients present with hypotension that progresses to shock and death within 12?48 h post-ingestion. The pathophysiology of this syndrome is not clear. Case report...

  3. Hemlock (Conium Maculatum) Poisoning In A Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konca, Capan; Kahramaner, Zelal; Bosnak, Mehmet; Kocamaz, Halil

    2014-03-01

    Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum) is a plant that is poisonous for humans and animals. Accidental ingestion of the plant may result in central nervous system depression, respiratory failure, acute rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure and even death. The main treatment of hemlock poisoning is supportive care. The case of a 6-year-old girl who was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of burning sensation in mouth, hypersalivation, tremor in hands and ataxia after ingestion of poison hemlock is presented here with clinical and laboratory features. In this case, we aim to report that accidental ingestion of plants resembling vegetables that are consumed daily can lead to serious complications and even death.

  4. Homicidal methanol poisoning in filicide-suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikary, Asit K; Behera, C

    2017-12-01

    Most methanol poisonings are accidental. We present a rare case of filicide-suicide, where a youth was killed by methanol poisoning and his parents then committed suicide by jumping in front of a running train. The father's suicide note explains the crime.

  5. Poison centre network saves lives | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-27

    Oct 27, 2010 ... Snakebites, food poisoning, exposure to toxic chemicals: all are potentially fatal if the correct antidote isn't identified and applied — fast. Since 1988, INTOX, a computer-based program involving a global network of poison centres, has been providing those life-saving capabilities in minutes.

  6. Mercury poisoning | Shamley | South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The diagnosis of mercury poisoning requires a high index of suspicion. Mercury poisoning in a patient involved in illicit gold extraction is reported and 6 other cases considered. Some of the clinical features and treatment of this condition are discussed. S Afr Med J 1989; 76: 114-116 ...

  7. Childhood Lead Poisoning: Resources for Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance to End Childhood Lead Poisoning, Washington, DC.

    The current approach to dealing with childhood lead poisoning has led to repeated diagnoses of poisoning because such children are treated and then returned to their hazardous environments. This handbook, the third in a three-volume set, provides examples of specific materials currently or recently used in ongoing state and local childhood lead…

  8. Diagnosis & Treatment of Poisoning by Pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Pesticide Programs.

    This report succinctly discusses the steps necessary to diagnose and treat poisoning from pesticides, especially organophosphates, carbamates and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Immediate and continuing steps in the care of poisoning victims are outlined with supportive information on where to locate emergency assistance. (CS)

  9. Tropane alkaloids in food: poisoning incidents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adamse, P.; Egmond, van H.P.; Noordam, M.Y.; Mulder, P.P.J.; Nijs, de W.C.M.

    2014-01-01

    A large number of wild and cultured plants produce secondary metabolites that can be toxic to humans and animals. The present study aims to provide insight into the routes of (un)intentional poisonings of humans by tropane alkaloids. Poisonings of humans by tropane alkaloids occur as unintended

  10. Argument Strategies: Antidote to Tylenol's Poisoned Image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, William L.; Lindsey, James J.

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes how the manufacturer dealt with the Tylenol poisonings: the link between Tylenol and the poisoning was denied, its image as a safe product was bolstered, capsules were differentiated from other products, and as a result, sales recovered. Extends the applicability of apologia as a way to analyze other media campaigns. (SKC)

  11. A retrospective analysis of acute organophosphorus poisoning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: We have herein reported our experience with the pattern of presentation of cases of acute organophosphorus (OP) poisoning cases in a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods:This retrospective study evaluated the hospital records of patients with acute OP poisoning. In a pre-structured proforma, data ...

  12. [Fatal poisoning due to Indigofera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labib, S; Berdai, M-A; Bendadi, A; Achour, S; Harandou, M

    2012-01-01

    Indigo, also known in Morocco as Nila, is a dye widely used in the coloring of Moroccan handicrafts. It is obtained from fermentation reactions on the leaves and branches of true indigo, Indigofera tinctoria, which is a widespread plant in tropical Africa and Asia. We report a case of fatal poisoning in a 3-year-old child after administration of indigo for therapeutic purposes. Death resulted from multiple organ failure. The toxicity of this compound is little known in the literature and deserves to be explored through toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic studies, in order to better determine the toxic constituents of the dye. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Extracorporeal treatment for theophylline poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghannoum, Marc; Wiegand, Timothy J; Liu, Kathleen D

    2015-01-01

    pharmacokinetic studies, yielding a low-to-very-low quality of evidence for all recommendations. Data on 143 patients were reviewed, including 10 deaths. The workgroup concluded that theophylline is dialyzable (level of evidence = A) and made the following recommendations: ECTR is recommended in severe...... theophylline poisoning (1C). Specific recommendations for ECTR include a theophylline concentration [theophylline] > 100 mg/L (555 μmol/L) in acute exposure (1C), the presence of seizures (1D), life-threatening dysrhythmias (1D) or shock (1D), a rising [theophylline] despite optimal therapy (1D), and clinical...

  14. Management of the critically poisoned patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Jennifer S; Bechtel, Laura K; Holstege, Christopher P

    2009-06-29

    Clinicians are often challenged to manage critically ill poison patients. The clinical effects encountered in poisoned patients are dependent on numerous variables, such as the dose, the length of exposure time, and the pre-existing health of the patient. The goal of this article is to introduce the basic concepts for evaluation of poisoned patients and review the appropriate management of such patients based on the currently available literature. An unsystematic review of the medical literature was performed and articles pertaining to human poisoning were obtained. The literature selected was based on the preference and clinical expertise of authors. If a poisoning is recognized early and appropriate testing and supportive care is initiated rapidly, the majority of patient outcomes will be good. Judicious use of antidotes should be practiced and clinicians should clearly understand the indications and contraindications of antidotes prior to administration.

  15. Management of the critically poisoned patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holstege Christopher P

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinicians are often challenged to manage critically ill poison patients. The clinical effects encountered in poisoned patients are dependent on numerous variables, such as the dose, the length of exposure time, and the pre-existing health of the patient. The goal of this article is to introduce the basic concepts for evaluation of poisoned patients and review the appropriate management of such patients based on the currently available literature. Methods An unsystematic review of the medical literature was performed and articles pertaining to human poisoning were obtained. The literature selected was based on the preference and clinical expertise of authors. Discussion If a poisoning is recognized early and appropriate testing and supportive care is initiated rapidly, the majority of patient outcomes will be good. Judicious use of antidotes should be practiced and clinicians should clearly understand the indications and contraindications of antidotes prior to administration.

  16. Deadly Poisonous Turkish Mushrooms Containing Alpha Amanitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilgaz Akata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Mushroom poisoning is still a serious health problem for Turkey. The mushroom species which cause fatal mushroom poisoning have been reported to contain at least 98% alpha-amanitin. The knowledge of the poisonous mushroom species including alpha- amanitin is important for the treatment and prevention of these poisonings. In this review, the mushrooms containig alpha-amanitin and causing deadly mushroom poisinings were listed and given information about their poisonus effects. According to literature, nine poisonous mushroom species which include alpha-amanitin have so far been reported from Turkey. These are Lepiota brunneoincarnata; Lepiota castanea; Lepiota helveola; Lepiota subincarnata; Amanita phalloides; Amanita verna; Amanita virosa; Conocybe filaris and Galerina marginata.

  17. [New causes of animal poisoning in Switzerland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schediwy, M; Mevissen, M; Demuth, D; Kupper, J; Naegeli, H

    2015-03-01

    This retrospective study evaluated the frequency, etiology, therapy and prognosis of animal poisoning registered from 2003 to 2012. The relevant cases reported to the Swiss Toxicological Information Center (STIC) were compared with those from previously examined periods. Human medicines not approved for animals and pesticides represented the most common causes of poisoning in dogs. Novel cases occurred as a consequence of the exposure of dogs to ricinus fertilizers, grape residues from wineries, pepper lachrymatory spray and dry bouillon. Cats are still freequently poisoned by pyrethroid drugs that should be administered only to dogs. Agrochmical products are the main source of toxicities in farm animals. Most poisonings in horses and exotic animals took place due to toxic plants. In addition, two tigers died of a secondary poisoning after ingestion of meat from euthanized calves.

  18. Lead poisoning in six captive avian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, W. Nelson; Spann, James W.; Sileo, Louis; Franson, J. Christian

    1988-01-01

    Red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater), common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), mallards (Anas platyrhynchos), northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus), and eastern screech-owls (Otus asio) were poisoned with a concentration of lead (Pb) acetate in the diet which was increased by 60% each week until half of the birds in each treatment group died; surviving birds and all control birds except screech-owis were then killed by euthanasia. An additional group of mallards was poisoned with Pb shot. The gizzards of mallards poisoned either way usually were stained with bile; some of these birds also had proventricular impaction. Most poisoned birds of the other species were emaciated but lacked other gross lesions caused by Pb poisoning. In birds other than mallards, Pb poisoning could not be diagnosed without histological or hematological examinations or analysis of tissues. Poisoned birds of all six species could be reliably separated from control birds by an increase in the protoporphyrin concentrations in the blood and by a decrease in the activity of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) in red blood cells. Hepatic iron (Fe) concentrations varied so much among individual birds that even though median hepatic Fe concentrations increased in poisoned birds, hepatic Fe concentrations were not useful in identifying poisoned birds. Renal intranuclear inclusion bodies occurred in 83% of all birds dying from Pb poisoning. Nephrosis, myocardial necrosis, and arterial fibrinoid necrosis were occasionally present. Median hepatic Pb concentrations varied from 20 ppm (wet wt) in male red-winged blackbirds to 111 ppm in female northern bobwhites. Median renal Pb concentrations varied from 22 ppm in redwinged blackbirds to 190 ppm in female northern bobwhites. Hepatic and renal Pb concentrations varied substantially among birds within each species. Median hepatic and renal Pb concentrations of birds that died were not statistically

  19. Chronic lead poisoning in horses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, H.D.; Burau, R.G.

    1973-05-01

    Chronic lead poisoning in horses was manifested as anorexia, loss of body weight, muscular weakness, anemia, laryngeal hemiplegia, and, terminally, inhalation pneumonia. Some deaths were sudden and unexplained. The lead content in liver specimens from 10 horses was greater than that considered indicative of lead intoxication; however, the lead content of blood was equivocal. The most conclusive laboratory finding was increased urine lead concentration after chelation therapy. The concentration of lead in a sample of vegetation considered to be representative of what a horse would eat if he was grazing in the area sampled was 325 ppM (oven-dry basis). It was determined that a 450-kg horse grazing grass of this lead content would consume 2.9 Gm of lead daily (6.4 mg/kg of body weight), an amount considered toxic for horses. Leaching lowered the calcium content of the forage but failed to reduce the lead concentration of the plants significantly, thus opening the possibility that winter rains might have influenced the onset of poisoning. Airborne fallout from a nearby lead smelter was proposed as the primary mode of pasture contamination.

  20. Open air carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumbelic, M I

    1998-01-01

    An unusual manner of carbon monoxide poisoning claimed the lives of two adults in two separate incidents. In the first case, a young man was four wheeling in a swampy area when his jeep became stuck in the mud as he continued to floor the accelerator. Carbon monoxide fumes entered the vehicle through the rusted floorboards, killing the driver. In the second case, two teens were skinny dipping behind a motor boat when they became affected by the boat exhaust. One of the youths was overcome and submerged into the lake. Both incidents were initially attributed to incorrect causes--a car accident and a drowning--because of the false notion that carbon monoxide is not a hazard in a ventilated area. The carboxyhemoglobin levels in these victims were 78 and 62% respectively. It was only through laboratory testing that carbon monoxide poisoning was identified as the cause of their demise. Physicians as well as the public need to be aware of the potential for this life threatening hazard to occur so that there can be proper emergency treatment and the prevention of fatalities.

  1. Mercury poisoning through intravenous administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiuying; Liu, Zilong; Chen, Xiaorui

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Metallic mercury poisoning through intravenous injection is rare, especially for a homicide attempt. Diagnosis and treatment of the disease are challenging. Patient concerns: A 34-year-old male presented with pyrexia, chill, fatigue, body aches, and pain of the dorsal aspect of right foot. Another case is that of a 29-year-old male who committed suicide by injecting himself metallic mercury 15 g intravenously and presented with dizzy, dyspnea, fatigue, sweatiness, and waist soreness. Diagnosis: The patient's condition in case 1 was deteriorated after initial treatment. Imaging studies revealed multiple high-density spots throughout the body especially in the lungs. On further questioning, the patient's girlfriend acknowledged that she injected him about 40 g mercury intravenously 11 days ago. The diagnosis was then confirmed with a urinary mercury concentration of 4828 mg/L. Interventions: Surgical excision, continuous blood purification, plasma exchange, alveolar lavage, and chelation were performed successively in case 1. Blood irrigation and chelation therapy were performed in case 2. Outcomes: The laboratory test results and organ function of the patient in case 1 gradually returned to normal. However, in case 2, the patient's dyspnea was getting worse and he finally died due to toxic encephalopathy and respiratory failure. Lessons: Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are critical for intravenous mercury poisoning. It should be concerned about the combined use of chelation agents and other treatments, such as surgical excision, hemodialysis and plasma exchange in clinical settings. PMID:29145289

  2. 76 FR 16521 - National Poison Prevention Week, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Americans to identify possible dangers in the home, take action to address poisoning hazards, and learn how to respond if a poison emergency should occur. Children are particularly susceptible to unintentional poisoning. More than half of all reported poison exposures involve children under the age of six, and many...

  3. Profile of hospital Admissions of childhood poisoning at a North ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the common agents of poison in this environment. Objectives: To determine the pattern of childhood poisoning and to bridge the existing knowledge gap on childhood poisoning in North-Central Nigeria. Patients and methods: A retrospective study of case records of children admitted and treated for childhood poisoning at ...

  4. Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enghorm B, Flerlage J, eds. Johns Hopkins: The Harriet Lane Handbook . 20th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; 2015:chap ... by: Jacob L. Heller, MD, MHA, Emergency Medicine, Virginia Mason ...

  5. Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... household products and personal care products, like nail polish remover and mouthwash, which is harmful to childrencleaning ... can cause brain damage, a coma, or death. Questions to ask your doctor If my child swallows ...

  6. Acute plant poisoning and antitoxin antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleston, Michael; Persson, Hans

    2003-01-01

    Plant poisoning is normally a problem of young children who unintentionally ingest small quantities of toxic plants with little resulting morbidity and few deaths. In some regions of the world, however, plant poisonings are important clinical problems causing much morbidity and mortality. While deaths do occur after unintentional poisoning with plants such as Atractylis gummifera (bird-lime or blue thistle) and Blighia sapida (ackee tree), the majority of deaths globally occur following intentional self-poisoning with plants such as Thevetia peruviana (yellow oleander) and Cerbera manghas (pink-eyed cerbera or sea mango). Antitoxins developed against colchicine and cardiac glycosides would be useful for plant poisonings--anti-digoxin Fab fragments have been shown to be highly effective in T. peruviana poisoning. Unfortunately, their great cost limits their use in the developing world where they would make a major difference in patient management. Therapy for some other plant poisonings might also benefit from the development of antitoxins. However, until issues of cost and supply are worked out, plant antitoxins are going to remain a dream in many of the areas where they are now urgently required.

  7. Clinical observation on parathion poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Heung Il; Kwun, Chung Sik [Chonnam University Medical School, Kwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    1972-09-15

    A total of 158 cases of parathion poisoning were clinically observed in Chonnam University Hospital from January, 1968 to June, 1972 with the following results. 1. The males were 133 and the females, 25 (radio, about 5:1) with 93 patients (58.9%) in the age group of 21 to 40 years old and the majority of the patients were farmers. 2. 158 cases could be divided into 38 cases of inhalation group (group I) and 120 cases of ingestion group (group II). The group I entirely occurred by accident during spraying the parathion, whereas the group II mostly developed by ingestion of the parathion for the suicide purpose. 3. During the period from 1968 to 1972, more frequent incidence of parathion poisoning showed up in 1971 and 1972. Inhalation group mostly occurred on July, August, and September, but several cases appeared sporadically in the rest of the months. 4. Most patients came to our Hospital within 4 hours after parathion poisoning and were discharged from the Hospital within one or two days after admission. Mortality was 2 cases (5.3%) out of 38 cases in inhalation group and was 26 cases (21.7%) out of 120 cases in ingestion group. 5. Clinical signs and symptoms showing high incidence were bronchorrhoea (incidence of 38.6%), dyspnea (57.6%), vomiting (62.0%), abdominal cramps (20.0%), sialorrhoea (53.8%), tachycardia (32.2%), miosis (67.7%), fasciculation (19.0%), hypertension (27.9%), drowsiness and confusion (50.0%), leukocytosis (58.3%), elevation of SGOT (23.0%), whereas mydriasis (5.7%), and proteinuria (4.0%) were low in incidence. All the ten cases (6.3%) showing involuntary defecation expired. 6. Roentgenographs of the chest were taken to 39 cases out of a total of 158 cases and revealed 21 cases (54.0%) of normal chest, 11 cases (28.0%) of bilateral pulmonary congestion, 7 cases (18.0%) of pulmonary edema or pneumonic consolidation.

  8. Carbon monoxide: An old poison with a new way of poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hsiu Chou

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We present two events of carbon monoxide (CO poisoning, which spread out through ventilation pipes to kill or injure neighbors. This is a previously undocumented poisoning process. In the first event, three people died and eight others suffered CO poisoning from a gas-powered water heater in an apartment building. Similar to the first event, three people expired and three others were injured by CO poisoning in the second event. We subsequently determined the cause of these tragedies were due to obstructions at the openings of ventilation pipes. CO is one of the most common causes of poisoning worldwide and these cases often result in tragedy. Early recognition of CO poisoning resulting from obstructed ventilation pipes will facilitate proper management and prevent possible lethal disasters. Additionally, all clinicians and other paramedical personnel ought to raise the suspicion of chemical-related casualties when encountering clusters of patients from a single locale.

  9. Lead poisoning in children: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouhadi, Zineb; Bensabbahia, Dalal; Chafiq, Fouad; Oukkache, Bouchra; Guebessi, Nisrine Bennani; Abdellah, El Abidi; Najib, Jilali

    2016-01-01

    Lead colic is a rare cause of abdominal pain. The diagnosis of lead poisoning is most often mentioned in at risk populations (children, psychotic). We report the case of a 2 year old child that was presented for acute abdomen. Abdominal plain radiograph showed multiple intra-colonic metallic particles and suggested lead poisoning diagnosis. Anamnesis found a notion of pica and consumption of peeling paint. Elevated blood lead levels (BLL) confirmed the diagnosis. The lead poisoning is a public health problem especially in children, but its manifestation by a lead colic is rare and could simulate an acute abdomen table.

  10. Paraphenylenediamine Poisoning in Tunisia: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorra Amira

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Paraphenylenediamine (PPD represents the main active substance in the color of hair dyes. In Tunisia, PPD poisoning is very common, especially in rural areas where the consequences linked to this toxic substance are still unknown. In this paper, we report a case of PPD poisoning and confirm the diagnosis by a qualitative method of analysis. We discuss the clinical manifestations and study the kinetics of biological parameters during the monitoring of the poisoning. The main complication was renal failure and the treatment was basically symptomatic.

  11. [Management of poisoning with Amanita phalloides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudbæk, Torsten R; Kofoed, Pernille; Bove, Jeppe; Haastrup, Peter; Ebbehøj, Niels

    2014-03-31

    Death cap (Amanita phalloides) is commonly found and is one of the five most toxic fungi in Denmark. Toxicity is due to amatoxin, and poisoning is a serious medical condition, causing organ failure with potential fatal outcome. Acknowledgement and clarification of exposure, symptomatic and focused treatment is of primary importance. No data from randomised, controlled trials on management exists, and there is not international consensus on treatment regime. We present amatoxin-case contacts to the Danish Poison Centre from 2006-2012 and summarize current knowledge and Danish recommendations in amatoxin poisoning management.

  12. Patients With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and Subsequent Dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Ching-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study evaluated the dementia risk after carbon monoxide poisoning (CO poisoning). Using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, a total of 9041 adults newly diagnosed with CO poisoning from 2000 to 2011 were identified as the CO poisoning cohort. Four-fold (N?=?36,160) of non-CO poisoning insured people were randomly selected as controls, frequency-matched by age, sex, and hospitalization year. Incidence and hazard ratio (HR) of dementia were measured b...

  13. Arsenical poisoning of fruit trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Headden, W.P.

    1910-01-01

    Corrosive arsenical poisoning attacks the tree at the crown, below the surface of the soil and usually involves the large roots also. Pear and apple trees are affected; the pear tree is, at least, as susceptible to the action of the arsenic as the apple tree. Some varieties of pears, as well as apples, seem more susceptible than others, but this is true only in a general way. The age of the tree at the time the first applications were made seems to have some effect upon the resisting power of the bark. The variety of soil may have some influence but it is not pronounced enough to be recognized with certainty. The first sign of trouble in the apple tree is an early ripening of the leaves, at least, one year before the death of the tree; in pear trees the foilage ripens early and assumes a deep purple color. The amount of arsenic present in the destroyed bark and in the woody tissues of such trees is as great as in cases in which it is known that arsenic was the cause of death. The trouble is very general throughout the state and occurs in all kinds of soils which fact eliminates the question of seepage and, to a large extent, that of alkalis. In the case of trees which have not been sprayed but which have been grown as fillers in sprayed orchards, the wood contained arsenic. This is true, too, of young trees grown in soil which contains arsenic. This shows that the arsenic may be taken up with the nitrient solutions. The fruit grown on such trees, apples and pears, contain arsenic and also the leaves. The fruit and leaves grow and are shed each season; this is not the case with the woody portions of the tree. Systemic poisoning is produced by this arsenic distributed throughout the tree, interfering with nutrition and growth of the three and in some cases causing its death.

  14. Pesticide Poisoning of Honeybees: A Review of Symptoms, Incident Classification, and Causes of Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiljanek Tomasz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available During the 2000s, the problem of pesticide poisoning of honeybees seemed to be almost solved. The number of cases has decreased in comparison to the 1970s. The problem of acute honeybee poisoning, however, has not disappeared, but instead has transformed into a problem of poisoning from ‘traditional’ pesticides like organophosphorus pesticides or pyrethroids, to poisoning from additional sources of ‘modern’ systemic neonicotinoids and fipronil. In this article, the biological activity of pesticides was reviewed. The poisoning symptoms, incident definitions, and monitoring systems, as well as the interpretation of the analytical results, were also reviewed. The range of pesticides, and the detected concentrations of pesticides in poisoned honeybee samples, were reviewed. And, for the first time, cases of poisoning related to neonicotinoids were reviewed. The latter especially is of practical importance and could be helpful to analysts and investigators of honeybee poisoning incidents. It is assumed that secondary poisoning induced by plant collected materials contaminated with systemic pesticides occurs. Food stored in a hive and contaminated with systemic pesticides consumed continuously by the same generation of winter bees, may result in sub-lethal intoxication. This leads to abnormal behaviour identified during acute intoxication. The final result is that the bees discontinue their social role in the honeybee colony super organism, and colony collapse disorder (CCD takes place. The process described above refers primarily to robust and strong colonies that were able to collect plenty of food due to effective plant protection.

  15. Poisoned food, poisoned uniforms, and anthrax: or, how guerillas die in war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Luise

    2004-01-01

    Many people believe that Rhodesia, struggling to maintain minority rule in Africa, used chemical and biological weapons against African guerilla armies in the liberation war. Clothes and food were routinely poisoned, and Rhodesian agents, perhaps in concert with global forces of reaction, caused the largest single outbreak of anthrax in modern times. Oral interviews with traditional healers and Rhodesians' confessional memoirs of the war suggest that deaths by poisoning or disease were not so straightforward, that guerillas and healers and doctors struggled to understand not only what caused death but also what kind of death a poisoned uniform or poisoned boot was.

  16. [The reporting system of acute pesticides poisoning and general situation of pesticides poisoning in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-yang; Wang, Hong-fei; Yin, Yu

    2005-10-01

    To introduce the reporting system of acute pesticides poisoning and analyze epidemiologic characteristics of pesticides poisoning from reported cases in China. Case reports in the data base of reporting system for occupational diseases were computed by Excel for windows and statistical significance by SAS 6.12. A total of 108 372 cases were reported from 1997 to 2003. Among them, the incidence of occupational poisoning, and non-occupational poisoning accounted for 25.39%, and 74.61% respectively. The fatality rate was 6.86%. The average age was 36.83 years for all pesticides poisoning patients, and 15-59 years old patients accounted for 84.11%. Among 0-14 years old non-occupational poisoning patients, 0-4 years children accounted for 33.51%. Male patients were in the majority in occupational pesticides poisoning, female in non-occupational. Insecticides especially organophosphorus insecticides such as methamidophos, parathion, and omethoate comprised a higher proportion, accounting for 86.02% of the pesticides poisoning. More attention should be paid to pesticides poisoning by the government and medical workers engaged in public health.

  17. Lead poisoning in captive wild animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zook, B.C.; Sauer, R.M.; Garner, F.M.

    1972-07-01

    Lead poisoning was diagnosed post-mortem in 34 simian primates, 11 parrots, and 3 Australian fruit bats at the National Zoological Park. Diagnoses were made by the finding of acid-fast intranuclear inclusion bodies in renal epithelia or hepatocytes and, in most cases, by finding excess lead in samples of liver. The estimated prevalence of lead intoxication among autopsied primates and parrots was 44% and 50% respectively. Leaded paint was found in many animal enclosures at this zoo and it was available to all the lead-poisoned animals in this study. The finding of renal intranuclear inclusion bodies in animals at several zoos, scattered reports of lead intoxication of animals dwelling in various zoos, the occurrence of leaded paint in many zoos and the high incidence of lead poisoning at this zoo, indicated that lead poisoning of zoo animals is much more common than was previously thought.

  18. Hemlock (Conium Maculatum Poisoning In A Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capan KONCA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Poison hemlock (Conium maculatum is a plant that is poisonous for humans and animals. Accidental ingestion of the plant may result in central nervous system depression, respiratory failure, acute rhabdomyolysis, acute renal failure and even death. The main treatment of hemlock poisoning is supportive care. The case of a 6-year-old girl who was admitted to the emergency department with complaints of burning sensation in mouth, hypersalivation, tremor in hands and ataxia after ingestion of poison hemlock is presented here with clinical and laboratory features. In this case, we aim to report that accidental ingestion of plants resembling vegetables that are consumed daily can lead to serious complications and even death.

  19. severe organophosphate poisoning with delayed cholinergic crisis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abrham

    2011-01-06

    Jan 6, 2011 ... CASE REPORT. SEVERE ORGANOPHOSPHATE POISONING WITH DELAYED. CHOLINERGIC CRISIS, INTERMEDIATE SYNDROME AND. ORGANOPHOSPHATE. INDUCED. DELAYED. POLYNEUROPATHY ON SUCCESSION. Aklilu Azazh. ABSTRACT. Organophosphate compounds are the organic ...

  20. Drug Poisoning Mortality by State: United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset describes drug poisoning deaths at the U.S. and state level by selected demographic characteristics, and includes age-adjusted death rates for drug...

  1. Extracorporeal treatment for valproic acid poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghannoum, Marc; Laliberté, Martin; Nolin, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The EXtracorporeal TReatments In Poisoning (EXTRIP) workgroup presents its systematic review and clinical recommendations on the use of extracorporeal treatment (ECTR) in valproic acid (VPA) poisoning. METHODS: The lead authors reviewed all of the articles from a systematic literature....... The workgroup concluded that VPA is moderately dialyzable (level of evidence = B) and made the following recommendations: ECTR is recommended in severe VPA poisoning (1D); recommendations for ECTR include a VPA concentration > 1300 mg/L (9000 μmol/L)(1D), the presence of cerebral edema (1D) or shock (1D...... 50 and 100 mg/L (350-700 μmol/L)(2D). Intermittent hemodialysis is the preferred ECTR in VPA poisoning (1D). If hemodialysis is not available, then intermittent hemoperfusion (1D) or continuous renal replacement therapy (2D) is an acceptable alternative. CONCLUSIONS: VPA is moderately dialyzable...

  2. Lead Poisoning in Remodeling of Old Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Bart

    1973-01-01

    An article based on Dr. Muriel D. Wolf's study of elevated blood lead levels in children and adults present during the remodeling of old homes. Lead poisoning examples, symptoms, and precautions are given. (ST)

  3. Carbon monoxide poisoning: Medical students' knowledge towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , and poisonous gas produced by incomplete combustion of organic materials. It is particularly dangerous as it cannot be detected by man's natural sense organs. There is hardly a month without one or two newspaper reports of death ...

  4. Red Tide and Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Barrie; Yentsch, Clarice M.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the nature and cause of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). Includes toxic dinoflagellate ecology, taxonomy and life history, and chemistry of the toxins. Recent work with trace metals and directions of future research are also given. (MA)

  5. Accidental Poisoning with Otapiapia: a Local Organophasphate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otapiapia': a local rodenticide to highlight the dangers inherent in un-regulated production, home use and storage of this substance. Preventive measures are discussed. Keywords: Childhood, Organophosphate, Otapiapia, Pesticide, Poisoning.

  6. Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings: 6th Edition manual gives healthcare providers a quick reference resource for the best toxicology and treatment information for patients with pesticide exposures.

  7. Efficacious Oxime for Organophosphorus Poisoning: A Minireview ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    27 oxime is a promising candidate to replace therapeutically available oximes with respect to insecticide/pesticide organophosphorus poisoning. K27 and K48 may be candidates to replace the only approved pretreatment drug, pyridostigmine, ...

  8. Poisoned after Dinner: Dolma with Datura Stramonium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezihat Rana DISEL

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Datura stramonium, which is also known as Thorn Apple or Jimson Weed, is an alkaloid containing plant that is entirely toxic. The active toxic constituents of the plant are atropine, scopolamine and hyoscyamine. It has been abused worldwide for hundreds of years because of its hallucinogenic properties. Previous reports have shown that herbal medication overdose and accidental food contamination are ways it can cause poisoning. Herein we present a family that had three of its members poisoned after eating a traditional meal “dolma” made of datura flowers. None had fatal complications and all were discharged healthy. Datura stromonium may be used accidentally as a food ingredient. Since its poisonous effects are not known, people should be informed and warned about the effects of this plant. Key words: Anticholinergic effects, Datura stramonium, plant poisoning, rhabdomyolysis

  9. Amanita phalloides-Type Mushroom Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healey, Kathy; Woo, Olga F.; Olson, Kent R.; Pond, Susan M.; Seward, James; Becker, Charles E.

    1982-01-01

    In the fall of 1981 the San Francisco Bay Area Regional Poison Control Center received more than 100 calls regarding wild mushroom ingestion. Ten cases, including three fatalities, had all the features of Amanita phalloides poisoning. Encephalopathy, coma and renal insufficiency occurred in all three patients who died, but did not occur in those who survived. Two of the three patients who died arrived at the hospital late in the course of their illness, and severe gastroenteritis with accompanying dehydration probably contributed to their deaths. The poison control center promoted public awareness of the mushroom hazard through newspaper and television stories and by notifying local health departments. It also has devised a simple form to improve the quality of data collection and to assist in later verification of suspected A phalloides poisoning. PMID:7179945

  10. Drug Poisoning Mortality by County: United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset describes drug poisoning deaths at the U.S. and state level by selected demographic characteristics, and includes age-adjusted death rates for drug...

  11. Serious complications associated with Dettol poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, T Y; Lau, M S; Critchley, J A

    1993-11-01

    Dettol is involved in 10% of self-poisoning-related hospital admissions in Hong Kong. Although serious poisonings and even deaths after ingesting this common household disinfectant have been reported, the frequency with which these complications may occur is not known. In a retrospective study of 67 cases of Dettol poisoning, we found that serious complications were relatively common (8%) and these included aspiration of Dettol with gastric contents resulting in pneumonia, cardiopulmonary arrest, bronchospasm, adult respiratory distress syndrome, and severe laryngeal oedema with upper airways obstruction. It is particularly important that the airways are adequately protected before the patient is lavaged following Dettol poisoning, and the immediate recognition of any upper airway obstruction requiring intubation will then be life-saving.

  12. Amitraz, an underrecognized poison: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahajal Dhooria

    2016-01-01

    Results: The original search yielded 239 articles, of which 52 articles described human cases. After following the inclusion and exclusion criteria, 32 studies describing 310 cases (151 females, 175 children of human poisoning with amitraz were included in this systematic review. The most commonly reported clinical features of amitraz poisoning were altered sensorium, miosis, hyperglycaemia, bradycardia, vomiting, respiratory failure, hypotension and hypothermia. Amitraz poisoning carried a good prognosis with only six reported deaths (case fatality rate, 1.9%. Nearly 20 and 11.9 per cent of the patients required mechanical ventilation and inotropic support, respectively. The role of decontamination methods, namely, gastric lavage and activated charcoal was unclear. Interpretation & conclusions: Our review shows that amitraz is an important agent for accidental or suicidal poisoning in both adults and children. It has a good prognosis with supportive management.

  13. Causes of rhabdomyolysis in acute poisonings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janković Snežana R.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Rhabdomyolysis (RM is potentially lethal syndrome, but there are no enough published data on its frequency and characteristics in acute poisonings. The aim of this study was to determine the causes and severity of RM in acute poisonings. Methods. Patients hospital charts were retrospectively screened during a one-year period in order to identify patients with RM among 656 patients treated due to acute poisonings with different agents. All the patients with RM were selected. Entrance criterion was the value of creatine kinase (CK over 250 U/L. The severity of RM was assessed according to the Poison Severity Score. The patients were divided into three groups: the first one with mild RM (CK from 250 to 1,500 U/L, the second with moderate RM (CK from 1,500 to 10,000 U/L and the third with severe RM (CK greater than 10,000 U/L. Results. RM occurred in 125 (19% of the patients with acute poisonings. It was mainly mild (61%, or moderate (36%, and only in 3% of the patients was severe RM. The incidence of RM was the highest in poisonings with opiates (41%, pesticides (38%, neuroleptics (26%, anticonvulsants (26%, ethyl alcohol (20%, and gases (19%. Psychotropic agents were the most common causes of poisoning, and consequently of RM. Fatal outcomes were registered in 32 (25.60% of all RM patients. The incidence of fatal outcomes in poisonings with mild, moderate and severe RM was 19.73%, 31.11% and 75%, respectively. Conclusion. RM syndrome occurs at a relatively high rate in acute poisonings. Although agent’s toxicity is crucial for the outcome, severe RM and its complications may significantly influence the clinical course and prognosis of poisoning. Routine analysis of CK, as a relevant marker for RM may indicate the development of RM in acute poisoning and initiate prompt therapeutic measures in preventing acute renal failure as the most frequent consequence of extensive rhabdomyolysis.

  14. Poison prevention: engineering in primary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Steven Matthew

    2012-03-01

    Over the past 50 years we have seen improvements in outcomes of poisonings in the United States. I intend to discuss the approaches to prevention. I review various primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention strategies in relationship to poison prevention. We have made strong efforts in some ways, but our efforts in primary prevention have often been less than maximal. We propose requiring lockable medicine cabinets and lockable storage cabinets for dangerous substances.

  15. Cyanide poisoning after bitter almond ingestion

    OpenAIRE

    Y Mouaffak; F Zegzouti; Boutbaoucht, M; Najib, M.; A G El Adib; M. Sbihi; S. Younous

    2013-01-01

    Plants are responsible for 5% poisoning recorded by Poison Control Centers. Among all known toxic plants, some present a real danger if ingested. We report the case of a five years old child, who presented, after ten bitter almonds ingestion, consciousness disorders progressing to coma with generalized tonic-clonic seizures, miosis and metabolic acidosis. Bitter almonds and nuclei of stone fruits or other rosaceae (apricot, peach, plum) contain cyanogenic glycosides, amygdalin, that yields hy...

  16. Carbon monoxide poisoning in a diver.

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, H

    1992-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is a well recognized, but uncommon hazard of sport and inshore diving, which occurs either as a result of a faulty air compressor or from air contamination by the exhaust of nearby petrol engines. The incidence of carbon monoxide poisoning may be under-reported as it may mimic decompression sickness, and respond to the same treatment i.e. hyperbaric oxygen.

  17. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning from Portable Electrical Generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B; Dunn, Susan L

    2015-08-01

    Portable electrical generators have been responsible for over 800 accidental carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning deaths in the United States from 1999-2012. Because mortality figures are typically the only data reported with regard to the adverse effects of generators, we describe a nonfatal segment of the poisoned population to further emphasize the significance of the problem. Unidentifiable information about patients treated in the United States with hyperbaric oxygen for acute CO poisoning was prospectively reported by participating centers. Those patients poisoned by portable generators were selected for analysis. Of 1604 patients reported from August 1, 2008 to July 31, 2011, there were 264 accidentally poisoned by portable generators. Exposures occurred in 151 incidents in 33 states. In 99 incidents, poisoning occurred in a residence. Average patient age was 37 ± 20 years (range 1 to 90+ years). Of those poisoned, 146 (55%) were non-Hispanic white, 57 (22%) were black, 52 (20%) were Hispanic white, 4 (2%) were Asian, and 4 (2%) were Native American. English was spoken by 96%. The most common symptoms included headache (62%), dizziness (52%), and loss of consciousness (50%). Blood carboxyhemoglobin levels averaged 22.7 ± 9.0% (range 2.3-48.3%). Thirty-six patients demonstrated evidence of cardiac ischemia. Acute, severe CO poisoning from portable electric generators is common in the United States, likely affecting an estimated 4000 individuals annually, occurring predominantly in residential settings, and affecting English language-speaking individuals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute Cyanide Poisoning from Jewelry Cleaning Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Bel Waer

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide is one of the most lethal and devastating poisons. It causes acute toxicity through smoke inhalation simultaneously with carbon monoxide, or by ingestion of cyanide salts that are commonly used in metallurgy and in jewelry or textile industries. Cyanide intoxication is an extremely rare event; in the present study, we report a case of cyanide poisoning involving a 25-year-old jeweler, who ingested a jewelry cleaning solution containing potassium cyanide in a suicide attempt.

  19. Acute Cyanide Poisoning from Jewelry Cleaning Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Ines Bel Waer; Wafa Masri; Nedia Chaouali; Fathia Khlifi; Ines Gana; Anouar Nouioui; Dorra Ben Salah; Dorra Amira; Hayet Ghorbel; Abderrazzek Hedhili

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is one of the most lethal and devastating poisons. It causes acute toxicity through smoke inhalation simultaneously with carbon monoxide, or by ingestion of cyanide salts that are commonly used in metallurgy and in jewelry or textile industries. Cyanide intoxication is an extremely rare event; in the present study, we report a case of cyanide poisoning involving a 25-year-old jeweler, who ingested a jewelry cleaning solution containing potassium cyanide in a suicide attempt.

  20. Gastric lavage in patients with acute poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Montserrat Amigó Tadín

    2012-01-01

    Acute poisonings are a frequent complaint in emergency departments and therapy which prevents the absorption of toxic products taken orally is often indicated: one such option is gastric lavage. Gastric lavage is a digestive decontamination technique whose goal is to remove the maximum amount of poison from the stomach and prevent its absorption. The procedure involves inserting a gastric tube into the stomach through the mouth or nose; firstly to aspirate all the stomach contents and then to...

  1. Methiocarb poisoning of a horse in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, B M; Elliott, C R B; Jalim, S L

    2012-06-01

    Snail bait poisoning is rare in horses. Cases have been reported, but clinical signs and subsequent prognostic indicators have been poorly documented and must be extrapolated from cases in companion animals. We describe in detail the poisoning of a horse that consumed a lethal dose of the carbamate, methiocarb. There are currently no guidelines for treating equine methiocarb toxicoses, but the principles of management are based on supportive therapy. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2012 Australian Veterinary Association.

  2. Vital Signs-Alcohol Poisoning Deaths

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-01-06

    This podcast is based on the January 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. In the United States, an average of six people die every day from alcohol poisoning. Learn what you can do to prevent binge drinking and alcohol poisoning.  Created: 1/6/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 1/6/2015.

  3. [Mushroom poisonings: syndromic diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The major syndromes of mushroom poisoning can be divided by presentation timing: Early syndromes (symptom onset 6 hrs after ingestion) are life-threatening due to liver- and renal failure. Patients who are jaundiced after an acute gastrointestinal episode, are suspected to be poisoned with Amatoxins. Patients with flank pain, hematuria, polyuria or oliguria in the absence of jaundice are suspected to have an intoxication with Cortinarius mushrooms. In both cases an intensive care management is indicated.

  4. Residential carbon monoxide poisoning from motor vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B

    2011-01-01

    Although morbidity and mortality from accidental carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning are high in the United States, identification of common but poorly recognized sources should help prevention efforts. The study aimed to describe CO poisoning of home occupants due to a vehicle left running in an attached garage. News stories reporting incidents of US CO poisoning were collected daily from March 2007 to September 2009 via a news.Google.com search and data extracted. Patients were individuals reported in the media to have been poisoned with CO in their home by a vehicle running in the attached garage. Main outcome measures were frequency of occurrence, geographic distribution, patient demographics, and mortality. Of 837 CO poisoning incidents reported in US news media over 2 and a half years, 59 (8%) were the result of a vehicle left running in the garage. The elderly were disproportionately affected, with incidents most common in states with larger elderly populations and 29% of cases with age specified occurring in individuals older than 80 years. Among those older than 80 years, 15 of 17 were found dead at the scene. Residential CO poisoning from a vehicle running in the garage is common, disproportionately affects the elderly, has a high mortality rate, and should be preventable with a residential CO alarm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Toad poisoning in three dogs: case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CM Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Toad poisoning is frequent in dogs, but has been infrequently addressed in published case reports and review articles. Dogs can be poisoned when they bite a toad or otherwise ingest the venom. The venom effects manifest soon after the accident, since the toxin is rapidly absorbed by the mucous membrane of the digestive system. Hospital records of three dogs, diagnosed with toad poisoning, were retrospectively reviewed from January 2005 to July 2007. Poisoned dogs may present only local irritation or systemic signs in the gastrointestinal, cardiac and neurological systems. All three cases presented herein had clinical signs of gastrointestinal alterations including vomiting, sialorrhea and diarrhea. Two dogs developed abnormal cardiac rhythm and two exhibited neurological signs. A poisoned animal requires emergency care and symptomatic therapy with intense monitoring of its clinical parameters. Although there have been reports on the low mortality of dogs poisoned by toads, one animal died even after appropriate therapy. The severity of clinical signs and the risk of death must be considered by the veterinarian.

  6. Rhabdomyolysis in 114 patients with acute poisonings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Reza Mousavi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical and biochemical syndrome, which is observed in some patients with acute chemical and/or pharmaceutical poisonings. We aimed to investigate rhabdomyolysis in patients with acute poisonings due to different chemicals, natural toxins or drug overdose. Materials and Methods: Following approval of the University medical research committee and obtaining informed consents from the patients or their relatives, all patients with acute poisonings who were treated between March 2009 and February 2010 in the Toxicologic Ward of Imam Reza Hospital and had serum creatine phosphokinase (CPK above 975 IU/L (as a definition for rhabdomyolysis were studied. Results: Of 3555 hospitalized poisoned patients, 114 patients had rhabdomyolysis with CPK of 5996 ± 892 IU/L (mean ± standard error. The most common intoxication to induce the rhabdomyolysis was opioid overdose (28%. Acute renal failure (ARF was diagnosed in 11 (8.7% patients. There was a linear correlation between CPK and creatinine (P < 0.001, which in turn had a significant correlation with death (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Patients with acute poisoning were at risk of rhabdomyolysis. Acute opioid poisoning was the most common cause of toxic rhabdomyolysis in the intoxicated patients, and ARF was the main complication.

  7. Chronic arsenic poisoning following ayurvedic medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Benzeeta; Goyal, Palvi; Flora, S J S; Gill, K D; Singh, Surjit

    2014-12-01

    Ayurveda, Indian traditional system of medicine, is practiced commonly in South East Asia and in many parts of the world. Many ayurvedic drugs contain heavy metals and may lead to metal toxicity. Of these, chronic lead poisoning is the most common. Chronic arsenic poisoning following the use of ayurvedic medication, though reported, is rare. We describe three patients who presented with features of chronic arsenic poisoning following prolonged ayurvedic medication use. The diagnosis of chronic arsenic poisoning was confirmed by high arsenic levels in the blood, urine, hair, and nails in all the three patients and in ayurvedic drug in two patients. The ayurvedic medication was discontinued and treatment with D-penicillamine started. At 6 months after treatment, blood arsenic levels returned to normal with clinical recovery in all of them. Arsenic poisoning following ayurvedic medication is much less common than lead poisoning, though mineral ayurvedic medicines may lead to it. We used D-penicillamine as chelator and all of them recovered. Whether withdrawal of medication alone or D-penicillamine also played a role in recovery is unclear and needs to be assessed.

  8. Acute methanol poisonings reported to the Drug and Poison Information Center in Izmir, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Sule; Cevik, Arif Alper; Cavdar, Caner; Aygoren, Oguz; Akgun, Aylin; Ergun, Nurdan; Tuncok, Yesim

    2003-12-01

    The demographics, sources and outcomes of methanol poisoning have not been described in Turkey. Our study identified the profile of acute methanol exposures reported to Drug and Poison Information Center (DPIC) in Izmir, Turkey, from 1993 to 2002. Data analysis included patient demographics, sources of methanol, reason for the exposure, clinical effects and outcomes of methanol poisoning. The DPIC recorded 30,485 calls concerning poisoning; 996 (3.3%) alcohol poisonings were recorded and 113 (11.3%) of them were methanol poisonings. There were 91 (80.5%) males and 22 (19.5%) females with a mean age of 34.7+/-1.3 y (range 19-65) and 4.8+/-0.9 y (range 1-18) in adults and children, respectively. The sources of methanol were eu de cologne (72.6%), spirits (10.6%) and antifreeze (2.7%). Accidental poisoning occurred in all children between 0 and 12 y old, abuse (55.7%) and intentional poisoning (27.3%) were predominant in adults. Clinical signs in all cases were central nervous system symptoms (45.1%), metabolic acidosis (23.0%), visual symptoms (21.2%) and gastrointestinal symptoms (10.6%). Sixteen patients (14.1%) died, 63 (55.8%) had complete recovery and 1 (0.9%) had irreversible visual problems. Most patients with methanol poisoning may die or present serious morbidity without appropriate treatment in a health care facility. Methanol for producing cheap "eu de colognes" in Turkey is the principal reason for severe poisoning and deaths. Public education about colognes and legislative control of cologne production are important in preventing methanol poisoning.

  9. [Development and application of poison databank and poisonous animal and plants sample databank].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yu; Jiang, Shao-Feng; Cai, Jun; Luo, Tao; Xie, Li-Jing; Zhou, Jing; Sun, Cheng-Ye

    2008-03-01

    To establish a comprehensive,easily approached, operated, and searched internet poison databank as to providing professional poison data and knowledge of effective treatment for those consented such as medical staff, and emergency response team in the shortest time. We established a computer poison databank, by adopting B/S structure, using SQL Server databank, and explore technology, in which all information may easily be explored and obtained by users. The database integrated the information in relating to the substances identifiers, physical and chemical properties, toxicology data, clinical manifestation while intoxication, emergency response guides, effective treatment, anything related to the special antidotes, preventive measures, poison analysis, and manufacturers of chemicals, pharmaceuticals, herbs, pesticides, animal, plant, bacteria, fungi, productions and toxins. Otherwise some information about poison control organizations and experts, literatures about poison case reports, poison incidents, were also involved in the system, which can also provide a shortcut, convenient, and exact search. The databank might be easily used on several fields, providing important information with acute poison incidents disposal and clinic treatment.

  10. Poisoning cases and their management in emergency centres of government hospitals in northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getnet Mequanint Adinew

    2017-06-01

    Discussion: Young females comprise a group at increased risk for suicidal poisonings. As a developing nation, pesticide and bleaching agents remain a significant cause of acute poisonings in Ethiopia. Intentional poisoning remains the most significant identified cause of poisoning overall.

  11. Poisoning in Israel: annual report of the Israel Poison Information Center, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentur, Yedidia; Lurie, Yael; Cahana, Alfred; Kovler, Nona; Bloom-Krasik, Anna; Gurevych, Bella; Klein-Schwartz, Wendy

    2014-11-01

    The Israel National Poison Information Center (IPIC), Rambam Health Care Campus, provides 24 hour telephone consultations in clinical toxicology as well as drug and teratogen information. It participates in research, teaching and regulatory activities, and also provides laboratory services. To report data on the epidemiology of poisonings and poison exposures in Israel. We made computerized queries and descriptive analyses of the medical records database of the IPIC during 2012. A total of 31,519 poison exposure cases were recorded, a 157.6% increase compared with 1995. Children Israel. The IPIC database is a valuable national resource for the collection and monitoring of poisoning exposure cases. It can be used as a real-time surveillance system for the benefit of public health. It is recommended that reporting to the IPIC become mandatory and its activities be adequately supported by national resources.

  12. Lead Poisoning in Wild Birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahner, Lesanna L.; Franson, J. Christian

    2009-01-01

    Lead in its various forms has been used for thousands of years, originally in cooking utensils and glazes and more recently in many industrial and commercial applications. However, lead is a potent, potentially deadly toxin that damages many organs in the body and can affect all animals, including humans. By the mid 1990s, lead had been removed from many products in the United States, such as paint and fuel, but it is still commonly used in ammunition for hunting upland game birds, small mammals, and large game animals, as well as in fishing tackle. Wild birds, such as mourning doves, bald eagles, California condors, and loons, can die from the ingestion of one lead shot, bullet fragment, or sinker. According to a recent study on loon mortality, nearly half of adult loons found sick or dead during the breeding season in New England were diagnosed with confirmed or suspected lead poisoning from ingestion of lead fishing weights. Recent regulations in some states have restricted the use of lead ammunition on certain upland game hunting areas, as well as lead fishing tackle in areas frequented by common loons and trumpeter swans. A variety of alternatives to lead are available for use in hunting, shooting sports, and fishing activities.

  13. Neurotoxic Syndromes in Marine Poisonings a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholam Hossein Mohebbi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Marine neurotoxins as of Marine biotoxins are natural toxins that produced mainly by dinoflagellates, diatoms and several species of invertebrates and fish. Marine poisoning results from the ingestion of marine animals contain these toxins and causes considerable adverse effects. Materials and methods: This review provides some facts about the structures of marine neurotoxins, their molecular target and pharmacology, analytical methods for their detection and quantitation, diagnosis and laboratory testing, clinical manifestations, as well as prevention and treatment, if were obtainable. Furthermore, we focus on marine poisoning and various associated neurological syndromes like ciguatera, tetrodotoxin poisoning, and paralytic shellfish poisoning, after ingestion of the common marine toxins. Results: A number of neurotoxins that prescribed according to their potency (LD50 are: Maitotoxin, Ciguatoxins and Palytoxin, Tetrodotoxin and Saxitoxin, Brevetoxins, Azaspiracid, Yessotoxin, Cooliatoxin, Domoic acid and Conotoxins, Respectively. The primary target of most marine neurotoxins is voltage gated sodium channels and the resulting block of ion conductance through these channels. Moreover, these compounds interact with voltage-gated potassium and calcium channels and modulate the flux of stated ions into many cell types. As well, the target recognized for palytoxin is the Na+- K+ /ATPase. Conclusion: Results of reviewed studies revealed that, the Ciguatera is the commonest syndrome of marine poisoning, but is rarely lethal. Puffer fish poisoning results from the ingestion of fish containing tetrodotoxin and paralytic shellfish poisoning are less common, but have a higher fatality rate than ciguatera. Despite their high toxicity, no much research has been done on some of the toxins, like maitotoxin. In addition, there have remained unknown the pharmacological effects, mechanism of action and molecular target of some toxins such as

  14. Plant Poisoning among Children in Rural Sri Lanka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Kavinda Chandimal Dayasiri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant poisoning is a common presentation in paediatric practice and an important cause of preventable mortality and morbidity in Sri Lanka. The burden of plant poisoning is largely underexplored. The current multicenter study based in rural Sri Lanka assessed clinical profiles, poison related factors, clinical management, complications, outcomes, and risk factors associated with plant poisoning in the paediatric age group. Among 325 children, 57% were male with 64% being below five years of age. 99.4% had ingested the poison. Transfer rate was 66.4%. Most had unintentional poisoning. Commonest poison plant was Jatropha circus and poisoning event happened mostly in home garden. 29% of parents practiced harmful first-aid practices. 32% of children had delayed presentations to which the commonest reason was lack of parental concern regarding urgency of seeking medical care. Presence of poisonous plants in home garden was the strongest risk factor for plant poisoning. Mortality rate was 1.2% and all cases had Oleander poisoning. The study revealed the value of community awareness regarding risk factors and awareness among healthcare workers regarding the mostly benign nature of plant poisoning in children in view of limiting incidence of plant poisoning and reducing expenditure on patient management.

  15. Suspected poisoning of domestic animals by pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloni, Francesca; Cortinovis, Cristina; Rivolta, Marina; Davanzo, Franca

    2016-01-01

    A retrospective study was carried out by reviewing all suspected cases of domestic animal poisoning attributed to pesticides, reported to the Milan Poison Control Centre (MPCC) between January 2011 and December 2013. During this period, pesticides were found to be responsible for 37.3% of all suspected poisoning enquiries received (815). The most commonly species involved was the dog (71.1% of calls) followed by the cat (15.8%), while a limited number of cases involved horses, goats and sheep. Most cases of exposure (47.1%) resulted in mild to moderate clinical signs. The outcome was reported in 59.9% of these cases, with death occurring in 10.4% of them. Insecticides (40.8%) proved to be the most common group of pesticides involved and exposure to pyrethrins-pyrethroids accounted for the majority of calls. According to the MPCC data, there has been a decrease in the number of suspected poisonings cases attributed to pesticides that have been banned by the EU, including aldicarb, carbofuran, endosulfan and paraquat. In contrast, there has been an increase of suspected poisoning cases attributed to the neonicotinoids, imidacloprid and acetamiprid, probably due to their widespread use in recent years. Cases of suspected poisoning that involved exposure to rodenticides accounted for 27.6% of calls received by the MPCC and anticoagulant rodenticides were the primary cause of calls, with many cases involving brodifacoum and bromadiolone. Herbicides were involved in 14.2% of calls related to pesticides and glyphosate was the main culprit in cases involving dogs, cats, horses, goats and sheep. As far as exposure to molluscicides (11.5%) and fungicides (5.9%), most of the cases involved dogs and the suspected poisoning agents were metaldehyde and copper compounds respectively. The data collected are useful in determining trends in poisoning episodes and identifying newly emerging toxicants, thus demonstrating the prevalence of pesticides as causative agents in animal

  16. Pancreatitis in wild zinc-poisoned waterfowl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sileo, Louis; Beyer, W. Nelson; Mateo, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    Four waterfowl were collected in the TriState Mining District (Oklahoma, Kansas and Missouri, USA), an area known to be contaminated with lead, cadmium and zinc (Zn). They were part of a larger group of 20 waterfowl collected to determine the exposure of birds to metal contamination at the site. The four waterfowl (three Branta canadensis, one Anas platyrhynchos) had mild to severe degenerative abnormalities of the exocrine pancreas, as well as tissue (pancreas, liver) concentrations of Zn that were considered toxic. The mildest condition was characterized by generalized atrophy of exocrine cells that exhibited cytoplasmic vacuoles and a relative lack of zymogen. The most severe condition was characterized by acini with distended lumens and hyperplastic exocrine tissue that completely lacked zymogen; these acini were widely separated by immature fibrous tissue. Because the lesions were nearly identical to the lesions reported in chickens and captive waterfowl that had been poisoned with ingested Zn, and because the concentrations of Zn in the pancreas and liver of the four birds were consistent with the concentrations measured in Zn-poisoned birds, we concluded that these waterfowl were poisoned by Zn. This may be the first reported case of zinc poisoning in free-ranging wild birds poisoned by environmental Zn.

  17. Hypogonadism in chronically lead-poisoned men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, G D; Dahlgren, J; Loriaux, D L

    1978-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis was evaluated in 10 men with occupational lead exposure, 9 of whom had noted a decrease in libido and frequency of intercourse following this exposure. 6 of these men had clinically apparent lead poisoning while 4 were classified as being only lead-exposed. Results of the endocrine evaluation of these patients were compared to those obtained on 9 age and socioeconomically matched control patients. Both lead poisoned and lead-exposed patients had reduced basal serum testosterone levels and normal basal serum testosterone-estradiol-binding globulin capacity, estradiol, LH, FSH, and prolactin levels. Both groups demonstrated an appropriate rise in serum testosterone following hCG stimulation and a normal increment in serum FSH in response to clomiphene citrate and gonadotropin-releasing hormone in comparison to the control group. The lead poisoned patients demonstrated a significantly reduced increment in serum LH after clomiphene citrate and gonadotropin-releasing hormone administration while the lead-exposed patients had normal LH dynamics. Testicular biopsies carried out on the 2 most severely lead-poisoned men showed peritubular fibrosis, oligospermia, and vacuolization of the Sertoli cells. These results suggest that lead poisoning may lead to a pituitary-hypothalamic defect in LH secretion and may also result in direct testicular seminiferous tubular injury.

  18. An Outbreak of Foxglove Leaf Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chi Lin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Comfrey (Symphytum officinale leaves resemble those of foxglove (Digitalis purpurea when the plant is not in bloom and, therefore, cardiac glycoside poisoning may occur when people confuse foxglove with comfrey. We report an outbreak of foxglove leaf poisoning following the use of alleged “comfrey” herbal tea. Nine patients were involved and initially presented with nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and dizziness. Significant cardiotoxicity developed later among the 3 patients who also had mild hyperkalemia. Peak serum digoxin concentration measured by immunoassay was elevated in all patients and ranged from 4.4 ng/mL to 139.5 ng/mL. Patients with severe cardiotoxicity were treated with temporary cardiac pacing. Moreover, 40–80 mg of digoxin-specific antibody therapy was given without any effect. All patients recovered uneventfully. Our report highlights the potential risk of misidentification of herbs; in this case, D. purpurea was mistaken for S. officinale. Physicians should be aware that cardiac glycoside poisoning could arise from such misidentification. Public education about the toxicity of D. purpurea poisoning may reduce the risk of misidentification and subsequent poisoning.

  19. Recent Advances in the Clinical Management of Lead Poisoning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kianoush, Sina; Sadeghi, Mahmood; Balali-Mood, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    .... This review deals mainly with recent developments in the management of lead poisoning. Sources of lead exposure are introduced, and methods for the primary prevention of lead poisoning are discussed...

  20. NCHS - Drug Poisoning Mortality by County: United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset describes drug poisoning deaths at the county level by selected demographic characteristics and includes age-adjusted death rates for drug poisoning...

  1. [The most popular poisons from Graeco-Roman world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siek, Bartlomiej; Rys, Anna; Sein Anand, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Article presents the most popular antique poisons. Information from encyclopaedic literature and literary texts of the Roman Empire period has been compared with the etymology of the names of some poisons of plant and animal origin.

  2. [Poisonous plants: An ongoing problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez Monseny, A; Martínez Sánchez, L; Margarit Soler, A; Trenchs Sainz de la Maza, V; Luaces Cubells, C

    2015-05-01

    A medical visit for plant ingestion is rare in the pediatric emergency services but may involve a high toxicity. The botanical toxicology training of health staff is often very limited, and it can be difficult to make a diagnosis or decide on the appropriate treatment. To study the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of poisoning due to plant ingestion in order to increase the knowledge of the health professional. A descriptive retrospective study was conducted on patients seen in a pediatric emergency department after the ingestion of plant substances from January 2008 to December 2012. During the period of study, 18 patients had ingested possible toxic plants. In 14 cases, it was considered to be potentially toxic: broom, oleander, mistletoe, butcher's-broom, and vulgar bean (2), Jerusalem tomato, castor (2), Jimson weed, potus, marijuana, and mushrooms with digestive toxicity (2). Among the potentially toxic cases, the ingestion was accidental in 10 patients, 2 cases were classed as infantile mistreatment, 1 case had recreational intention, and another one suicidal intentions. The ingestion of oleander, castor and Jimson weed had major toxicity. The potential gravity of the ingestion of plant substances and the variety of the exposure mechanism requires the pediatrician to bear in mind this possibility, and to be prepared for its diagnosis and management. Specific preventive information measures need to be designed for the families and for the regulation of toxic plants in playgrounds. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. An accidental poisoning with mitragynine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karinen, Ritva; Fosen, Jan Toralf; Rogde, Sidsel; Vindenes, Vigdis

    2014-12-01

    An increasing number of drugs of abuse are sold word wide over the internet. Names like "legal highs", "herbal highs" etc. give the impression that these are safe products, although the risk of fatal reactions might be substantial. Leaves from the plant Mitragyna speciosa, contain active compounds like mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. It has been reported that the potency of 7-hydroxymitragynine at the μ-opioid receptor is 30 times higher than that of mitragynine and 17 times higher than that of morphine. Case reports regarding poisoning with Kratom are reported, but the toxic or lethal ranges for the concentrations of the active substances have not been established, and concentrations of 7-hydroxymitragynine have not been reported previously. We present a case report where a middle aged man was found dead at home. The deceased had a history of drug abuse and mental illness for several years. At autopsy, there were no significant pathological findings. Post-mortem analysis of peripheral blood revealed: zopiclone 0.043mg/L, citalopram 0.36mg/L and lamotrigine 5.4mg/L, i.e. concentrations regularly seen after therapeutic ingestion of these drugs. Additionally mitragynine 1.06mg/L and 7-hydroxymitragynine 0.15mg/L were detected in blood and both also in urine. The high concentrations of mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine indicate that the cause of death is intoxication by these substances; and the circumstances point toward the manner of death being accidental. We recommend that both mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine are analyzed for in cases with suspected Kratom intoxication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Appendectomy due to lead poisoning: a case-report

    OpenAIRE

    Aghilinejad M; AH Mehrparvar; Mohammadi S

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Lead poisoning is a common occupational health hazard in developing countries and many misdiagnoses and malpractices may occur due to unawareness of lead poisoning symptoms. Case presentation We report a case of occupational lead poisoning in an adult battery worker with abdominal colic who initially underwent appendectomy with removal of normal appendix. Later on he was diagnosed with lead poisoning and was treated appropriately with lead chelator (CaNa2EDTA). Conclusion ...

  5. Animal poisonings in Belgium: a review of the past decade

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenbroucke, Virginie; Van Pelt, Henk; De Backer, Patrick; Croubels, Siska

    2010-01-01

    This review focuses on poisonings in companion animals, including horses, farm animals and wildlife, investigated and recorded during the past ten years at the Laboratory of Toxicology of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine (Ghent University) and the National Poison Centre in Belgium. The causative agents of poisoning incidents vary among the different species. The Laboratory of Toxicology of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine reports that the majority of poisoning incidents in companion anima...

  6. Zebrafish Models for Human Acute Organophosphorus Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Melissa; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Padrós, Francesc; Babin, Patrick J; Sebastián, David; Cachot, Jérôme; Prats, Eva; Arick Ii, Mark; Rial, Eduardo; Knoll-Gellida, Anja; Mathieu, Guilaine; Le Bihanic, Florane; Escalon, B Lynn; Zorzano, Antonio; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Raldúa, Demetrio

    2015-10-22

    Terrorist use of organophosphorus-based nerve agents and toxic industrial chemicals against civilian populations constitutes a real threat, as demonstrated by the terrorist attacks in Japan in the 1990 s or, even more recently, in the Syrian civil war. Thus, development of more effective countermeasures against acute organophosphorus poisoning is urgently needed. Here, we have generated and validated zebrafish models for mild, moderate and severe acute organophosphorus poisoning by exposing zebrafish larvae to different concentrations of the prototypic organophosphorus compound chlorpyrifos-oxon. Our results show that zebrafish models mimic most of the pathophysiological mechanisms behind this toxidrome in humans, including acetylcholinesterase inhibition, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and calcium dysregulation as well as inflammatory and immune responses. The suitability of the zebrafish larvae to in vivo high-throughput screenings of small molecule libraries makes these models a valuable tool for identifying new drugs for multifunctional drug therapy against acute organophosphorus poisoning.

  7. Thallium poisoning from maliciously contaminated food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meggs, W J; Hoffman, R S; Shih, R D; Weisman, R S; Goldfrank, L R

    1994-01-01

    Four young adults presented two days after one of them had received marzipan balls packaged in a box from an expensive candy manufacturer. Two ate one candy ball, while two others shared a third. The next day, variable gastrointestinal symptoms developed. On the third day, two patients developed painful paresthesiae of the hands and feet, an early but nonspecific clinical marker of thallium poisoning. A tentative diagnosis of thallium poisoning was made based on symptoms, and treatment was initiated. The remaining candies were radiographed. Metallic densities in the candies supported the diagnosis, and atomic absorption spectroscopy was used to quantitate thallium content. Each candy contained a potentially fatal dose. Five to seven days later, hypertension and tachycardia developed in the two patients who had ingested an entire candy. All patients developed alopecia but recovered without overt neurologic or other sequelae. While the diagnosis of thallium poisoning is often delayed until alopecia develops, an early diagnosis favors an effective treatment strategy.

  8. Fatal poisoning among patients with drug addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Kirsten Wiese; Christoffersen, Dorte J; Banner, Jytte

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Fatal poisonings among drug addicts in Denmark in 2012 were examined. Cause of death, abuse pattern and geographic differences are discussed and data are compared with previous studies. METHODS: All fatal poisonings examined at the three institutes of forensic medicine in Denmark...... in 2012 were included in the study. RESULTS: A total of 188 fatal intoxications were recorded. The median age increased from 37.5 in 2007 to 41.5 in 2012. The majority were men (77%). Methadone (59%) was the main intoxicant. The decrease in the frequency of heroin/morphine deaths since 1997 (71...... on Funen and in South Jutland. Cocaine was most frequently detected in East Denmark, while amphetamine was more frequent in West Denmark. CONCLUSIONS: The number of fatal poisonings among drug addicts has stabilised around 200. The increase in methadone deaths continued and, as in 2007, methadone...

  9. Fatal poisoning among patients with drug addiction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, K. W.; Christoffersen, D. J.; Banner, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Fatal poisonings among drug addicts in Denmark in 2012 were examined. Cause of death, abuse pattern and geographic differences are discussed and data are compared with previous studies. Methods: All fatal poisonings examined at the three institutes of forensic medicine in Denmark...... in 2012 were included in the study. Results: A total of 188 fatal intoxications were recorded. The median age increased from 37.5 in 2007 to 41.5 in 2012. The majority were men (77%). Methadone (59%) was the main intoxicant. The decrease in the frequency of heroin/morphine deaths since 1997 (71...... on Funen and in South Jutland. Cocaine was most frequently detected in East Denmark, while amphetamine was more frequent in West Denmark. ConclusionS: The number of fatal poisonings among drug addicts has stabilised around 200. The increase in methadone deaths continued and, as in 2007, methadone...

  10. Hyperamylasaemia and acute pancreatitis in paracetamol poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, L E; Dalhoff, K

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperamylasaemia and even acute pancreatitis have been reported in patients with paracetamol poisoning. AIMS: To describe the incidence, clinical characteristics, and prognostic implications of hyperamylasaemia in paracetamol poisoning. PATIENTS: Six hundred and two patients transferred...... to a specialized unit with severe paracetamol poisoning and 212 unselected patients admitted from the local region. METHODS: Retrospective study based on hospital charts. The optimum threshold of serum amylase to discriminate non-survivors was identified. RESULTS: An elevated serum amylase (>100 U/L) occurred...... in 28 of the unselected patients (13%), in 218 of the transferred patients (36%), and in 118 of 148 patients (80%) with fulminant hepatic failure. Only 33 cases of paracetamol-associated acute pancreatitis were diagnosed. A threshold serum amylase of 150 U/L to discriminate non-survivors had sensitivity...

  11. Poisoned after Dinner: Dolma with Datura Stramonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Disel, Nezihat Rana; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Kekec, Zeynep; Karanlik, Meryem

    2015-03-01

    Datura stramonium, which is also known as Thorn Apple or Jimson Weed, is an alkaloid containing plant that is entirely toxic. The active toxic constituents of the plant are atropine, scopolamine and hyoscyamine. It has been abused worldwide for hundreds of years because of its hallucinogenic properties. Previous reports have shown that herbal medication overdose and accidental food contamination are ways it can cause poisoning. Herein we present a family that had three of its members poisoned after eating a traditional meal "dolma" made of datura flowers. None had fatal complications and all were discharged healthy. Datura stromonium may be used accidentally as a food ingredient. Since its poisonous effects are not known, people should be informed and warned about the effects of this plant.

  12. Teenagers with Jimson weed (Datura stramonium) poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Sean P; Taddei, Anthony

    2007-11-01

    We report 2 cases of teenagers who were poisoned with Jimson weed (Datura stramonium) and presented to the emergency department with a severe acute anticholinergic toxidrome after ingestion of several hundred seeds. The patients presented with visual hallucinations, disorientation, incomprehensible and nonsensical speech, and dilated sluggish pupils. Both patients required restraints for combativeness until adequate sedation with lorazepam and haloperidol was achieved. Jimson weed is found in southern Canada and the United States and can cause acute anticholinergic poisoning and death in humans and animals. The treatment of choice for anticholinergic poisoning is mainly supportive care and gastrointestinal decontamination with activated charcoal. Jimson weed intoxication should be considered in cases of patients presenting with unexplained peripheral and central anticholinergic symptoms including delirium, agitation and seizures, especially among younger patients and partygoers. It is important that health care professionals recognize that Jimson weed is a toxic, indigenous, "wild" growing plant, subject to misuse and potentially serious intoxication requiring hospitalization.

  13. Management of acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddleston, Michael; Buckley, Nick A; Eyer, Peter; Dawson, Andrew H

    2008-01-01

    Summary Organophosphorus pesticide self-poisoning is an important clinical problem in rural regions of the developing world, and kills an estimated 200 000 people every year. Unintentional poisoning kills far fewer people but is a problem in places where highly toxic organophosphorus pesticides are available. Medical management is difficult, with case fatality generally more than 15%. We describe the limited evidence that can guide therapy and the factors that should be considered when designing further clinical studies. 50 years after first use, we still do not know how the core treatments—atropine, oximes, and diazepam—should best be given. Important constraints in the collection of useful data have included the late recognition of great variability in activity and action of the individual pesticides, and the care needed cholinesterase assays for results to be comparable between studies. However, consensus suggests that early resuscitation with atropine, oxygen, respiratory support, and fluids is needed to improve oxygen delivery to tissues. The role of oximes is not completely clear; they might benefit only patients poisoned by specific pesticides or patients with moderate poisoning. Small studies suggest benefit from new treatments such as magnesium sulphate, but much larger trials are needed. Gastric lavage could have a role but should only be undertaken once the patient is stable. Randomised controlled trials are underway in rural Asia to assess the effectiveness of these therapies. However, some organophosphorus pesticides might prove very difficult to treat with current therapies, such that bans on particular pesticides could be the only method to substantially reduce the case fatality after poisoning. Improved medical management of organophosphorus poisoning should result in a reduction in worldwide deaths from suicide. PMID:17706760

  14. Evaluation of poison information services provided by a new poison information center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churi, Shobha; Abraham, Lovin; Ramesh, M; Narahari, M G

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the nature and quality of services provided by poison information center established at a tertiary-care teaching hospital, Mysore. This was a prospective observational study. The poison information center was officially established in September 2010 and began its functioning thereafter. The center is equipped with required resources and facility (e.g., text books, Poisindex, Drugdex, toll free telephone service, internet and online services) to provide poison information services. The poison information services provided by the center were recorded in documentation forms. The documentation form consists of numerous sections to collect information on: (a) Type of population (children, adult, elderly or pregnant) (b) poisoning agents (c) route of exposure (d) type of poisoning (intentional, accidental or environmental) (e) demographic details of patient (age, gender and bodyweight) (f) enquirer details (background, place of call and mode of request) (g) category and purpose of query and (h) details of provided service (information provided, mode of provision, time taken to provide information and references consulted). The nature and quality of poison information services provided was assessed using a quality assessment checklist developed in accordance with DSE/World Health Organization guidelines. Chi-Square test (χ(2)). A total of 419 queries were received by the center. A majority (n = 333; 79.5%) of the queries were asked by the doctors to provide optimal care (n = 400; 95.5%). Most of the queries were received during ward rounds (n = 201; 48.0%), followed by direct access (n = 147; 35.1%). The poison information services were predominantly provided through verbal communication (n = 352; 84.0%). Upon receipt of queries, the required service was provided immediately (n = 103; 24.6%) or within 10-20 min (n = 296; 70.6%). The queries were mainly related to intentional poisoning (n = 258; 64.5%), followed by accidental poisoning

  15. Statistics and Epidemiology of Lead Poisoning (FY 72-L1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, John H., Jr.; And Others

    This report is the first in a quarterly series which will contain statistics and epidemiologic notes on lead poisoning at both the national and local levels. This report contains (a) statistics on childhood lead poisoning; (b) a status report on the Community Lead Poisoning Data System, which was designed to assist local lead control programs and…

  16. Childhood Lead Poisoning: Developing Prevention Programs and Mobilizing Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochow, K. W. James

    The current approach to dealing with childhood lead poisoning has led to repeated diagnoses of poisoning because such children are treated and then returned to their hazardous environments. This handbook describes in detail the program requirements for effective childhood lead poisoning prevention programs at the local level based on the…

  17. Characteristics of Acute Poisoning at Two Referral Hospitals in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Poisoning by household chemicals, particularly paraffin, affected mainly children under 12, while poisoning by pharmaceuticals involved mainly teenagers. With regard to outcomes, three of the female victims died, representing a case fatality rate of 2.6%. One death was due to paraffin poisoning and two to traditional ...

  18. Gastrolobium spp. poisoning in sheep: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the history and investigation of a suspected plant poisoning event in Western Australia where fifteen sheep died. One of the poisoned sheep was necropsied and gross and microscopic pathology of the poisoned sheep is described. Monofluoroacetate was detected in rumen contents ...

  19. Fight Homemade Poisons: Home Food Care and Preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Rosanne

    One of a series of instructional materials produced by the Literacy Council of Alaska, this booklet provides information about food poisoning. Using a simplified vocabulary and shorter sentences, it explains the various kinds of food poisoning, how people get food poisoning, and how to prevent it. (FL)

  20. Acute Lead Poisoning In an Infant

    OpenAIRE

    Madhusudhanan, M.; Lall, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    A case of acute lead poisoning in an infant without overt clinical manifestations of encephalopathy is reported for the first time in Oman. The case was diagnosed at Rustaq Hospital on the basis of (i) history by the mother of giving the child a traditional remedy for treating constipation (ii) X-ray of abdomen showing radio-opaque speckles and (iii) detection of high blood lead levels (83.3 µg/dL) at the toxicology laboratory of the poison control centre. The source of lead was confirmed by ...

  1. Important Poisonous Plants in Tibetan Ethnomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tibetan ethnomedicine is famous worldwide, both for its high effectiveness and unique cultural background. Many poisonous plants have been widely used to treat disorders in the Tibetan medicinal system. In the present review article, some representative poisonous plant species are introduced in terms of their significance in traditional Tibetan medicinal practices. They are Aconitum pendulum, Strychnos nux-vomica, Datura stramonium and Anisodus tanguticus, for which the toxic chemical constituents, bioactivities and pharmacological functions are reviewed herein. The most important toxins include aconitine, strychnine, scopolamine, and anisodamine. These toxic plants are still currently in use for pain-reduction and other purposes by Tibetan healers after processing.

  2. Paralytic Shellfish Poisoning: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Hurley

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case series of seven patients presenting to an emergency department with symptoms of paralytic shellfish poisoning. They developed varying degrees of nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, weakness, ataxia and paresthesias after eating mussels harvested from a beach near their resort. Four patients were admitted to the hospital, one due to increasing respiratory failure requiring endotracheal intubation and the remainder for respiratory monitoring. All patients made a full recovery, most within 24 hours. The ability to recognize and identify paralytic shellfish poisoning and manage its complications are important to providers of emergency medicine. [West J Emerg Med. 2014;15(4:378-381.

  3. [The viper--Finland's only poisonous snake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuori, Arno

    2011-01-01

    The viper (Vipera berus) is the most common poisonous snake in Europe, and the only one in Finland. In viper bites, highly varying amounts of venom end up into the victim, whereby prediction of the progression of symptoms of poisoning is very difficult. A severe clinical picture must always be anticipated. The size of the victim has also an effect on the outcome. Adequate monitoring and when necessary, massive fluid therapy are essential in the treatment. Due to possible kidney damage, anti-inflammatory drugs are not recommended. Severe or rapidly progressing symptoms require the use of an antidote.

  4. Important Poisonous Plants in Tibetan Ethnomedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lijuan; Gu, Ronghui; Tang, Li; Chen, Ze-E; Di, Rong; Long, Chunlin

    2015-01-01

    Tibetan ethnomedicine is famous worldwide, both for its high effectiveness and unique cultural background. Many poisonous plants have been widely used to treat disorders in the Tibetan medicinal system. In the present review article, some representative poisonous plant species are introduced in terms of their significance in traditional Tibetan medicinal practices. They are Aconitum pendulum, Strychnos nux-vomica, Datura stramonium and Anisodus tanguticus, for which the toxic chemical constituents, bioactivities and pharmacological functions are reviewed herein. The most important toxins include aconitine, strychnine, scopolamine, and anisodamine. These toxic plants are still currently in use for pain-reduction and other purposes by Tibetan healers after processing. PMID:25594733

  5. Acute Cardiac Toxicity of Nerium Oleander/Indicum Poisoning (Kaner) Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, Ibraheem; Kant, Chandra; Sanwaria, Anil; Meena, Lokesh

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of oleander leaf extract poisoning manifested by vomiting, lightheadedness, and heart block. Practicing physicians should understand the potential lethal properties of oleander and its availability throughout the world.

  6. Acute cardiac toxicity of nerium oleander/indicum poisoning (kaner) poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ibraheem; Kant, Chandra; Sanwaria, Anil; Meena, Lokesh

    2010-10-01

    We present a case of oleander leaf extract poisoning manifested by vomiting, lightheadedness, and heart block. Practicing physicians should understand the potential lethal properties of oleander and its availability throughout the world.

  7. Transdermal carbamate poisoning – a case of misuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalit Kumar Rajbanshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute pesticide poisoning is a common mode of intentional self harm. Oral ingestion is the usual mode of poisoning. However, inhalation, accidental or occupational transdermal exposure leading to acute or chronic poisoning can be the other route of poisoning. It has been seen that the purpose of poising is suicidal intensity in most of the cases. We report an unusual case where the victim had acute pesticide poisoning through transdermal route that was intended for non suicidal purpose. The patient was managed successfully with immediate decontamination and adequate antidote.

  8. Black Coloured Urine following Organophosphorus Poisoning: Report of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneesh Basheer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorus poisoning is common in rural Asia. Clinical features result from overactivity of acetylcholine receptors. Blackish discoloration of urine is not a feature of organophosphorus poisoning. Only one case of black colored urine following quinalphos poisoning has been reported in literature. We report two cases of organophosphorus poisoning from two different compounds, following which patients passed black colored urine, in the absence of haemolysis or rhabdomyolysis. These cases indicate that blackish discoloration of urine in organophosphorus poisoning might not be as uncommon as it was believed to be. Besides, urinary excretion of metabolites might be an underlying mechanism, rather than hemolysis.

  9. Acute poisoning: understanding 90% of cases in a nutshell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S L; Dargan, P I; Jones, A L

    2005-04-01

    The acutely poisoned patient remains a common problem facing doctors working in acute medicine in the United Kingdom and worldwide. This review examines the initial management of the acutely poisoned patient. Aspects of general management are reviewed including immediate interventions, investigations, gastrointestinal decontamination techniques, use of antidotes, methods to increase poison elimination, and psychological assessment. More common and serious poisonings caused by paracetamol, salicylates, opioids, tricyclic antidepressants, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, benzodiazepines, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and cocaine are discussed in detail. Specific aspects of common paediatric poisonings are reviewed.

  10. Evaluation of poison information services provided by a new poison information center

    OpenAIRE

    Churi, Shobha; Abraham, Lovin; Ramesh, M.; Narahari, M. G.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study is to assess the nature and quality of services provided by poison information center established at a tertiary-care teaching hospital, Mysore. Settings and Design: This was a prospective observational study. Materials and Methods: The poison information center was officially established in September 2010 and began its functioning thereafter. The center is equipped with required resources and facility (e.g., text books, Poisindex, Drugdex, toll free telephon...

  11. Protect the Ones You Love From Poisoning

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-12-10

    This podcast, developed as part of the Protect the Ones You Love initiative, discusses steps parents can take to help protect their children from poisoning, one of the leading causes of child injury.  Created: 12/10/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 12/10/2008.

  12. Scombroid Poisoning from Canned Tuna Ingestion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanjira Jiranantakan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fish allergy is well recognized, however scombroid poisoning or histamine fish poisoning, which exhibits identical clinical manifestations, is rarely diagnosed. We report the case of a 28-year-old female who, after eating tuna spaghetti, experienced a flushed face, generalized erythema, angioedema, shock and tachypnea requiring adrenaline, chlorpheniramine, ranitidine, and hydrocortisone injections. Her symptoms completely resolved within 3 hours. Her condition was diagnosed as scombroid poisoning based on temporality, normal serum tryptase levels (2.7 ng/mL at 2.5 hours and at her baseline (2.5 ng/mL, 60 hours, as well as negative results on skin-prick test and re-challenging one can of the same branded-tuna orally. The revelant public health authorities were notified and a restaurant-visit was made, although the tuna can from which the patient’s dish was prepared had been discarded, hence a histamine analysis of the tuna was unavailable. This case underscores the need for awareness of scombroid poisoning and public interventions regarding food safety.

  13. Tension Pneumothorax following an Accidental Kerosene Poisoning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tension pneumothorax is a rare complication following an accidental kerosene poisoning. In such situation, a bed-side needle thoracocentesis is performed because of its potential of becoming fatal; hence its clinical importance. A case of 15 month old boy with tension pneumothorax following accidental kerosene ...

  14. Intensive Care Management of Organophosphate Poisoned Patient ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The management of organophosphate poisoning is challenging, more so in the setting of poor critical care facilities. The management requires the administration of atropine, an antidote (oxime) and supportive care often provided in the ICU. We report a 35year old male who presented with a history of ingestion of an ...

  15. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker a...

  16. Toxidrome-based Approach to Common Poisonings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Mégarbane

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Poisoning remains a major cause of hospital admission into the emergency department and intensive care unit. Proper diagnosis is the cornerstone for optimal management of poisoned patients. Since the definitive analytical confirmation of the nature of the toxicant involved in the poisoning cannot be rapidly obtained in the majority of healthcare facilities, diagnosis relies on the medical history and the rigorous clinical examination of the patients well as results of the routine biological tests and the electrocardiogram. Identification of the toxidromes addresses not only the correct diagnosis but also rules out other differential diagnoses. Despite no definitive predictive value, this clinical approach facilitates making decision on empirical treatments and emergent antidotes. Pharmacodynamic tests using specific antidotes including naloxone for opioids and flumazenil for benzodiazepines and its analogues are also helpful to assess the final diagnosis in comatose patients. The objective of this article is to review the toxidrome-based approach to common poisonings before toxicological analysis enables the confirmation of the initially suspected toxic etiology.

  17. Acute Poisoning with Methadone (Dolphin (Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgy A. Livanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Most publications report on the use of methadone as a medication, however an increase of the illegal use of methadone has been demonstrated worldwide over the recent years, thus increasing the number of hospitalizations due to acute poisoning with this synthetic opioid. The aim of the present review was to summarize current data on the mechanisms of toxicity, selective toxicity, toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics of methadone (Dolphin. The involvement of CNS, respiratory, cardiovascular and urinary systems in acute poisoning with methadone was dis- cussed. The practice of use of methadone in many countries as a medicine for the replacement therapy for opiate addicts was analyzed. In addition, it was suggested that the results of the use of naloxone antidote therapy in acute opioid poisoning do not always clearly demonstrate its sufficient efficacy. Ways to improve of the intensive therapy of severe acute poisoning by methadone were substantiated; in addition to general critical care methods, treatment with a complex metabolic antihypoxant cytoflavin should be considered. 

  18. Efficacious Oxime for Organophosphorus Poisoning: A Minireview

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    either gave null effect or possible harm [19]. According to Jokanovic [27], .... brain barrier. Literature shows that only about. 5 – 10 % of oximes reach the brain [45]. The negative value of logP indicates the hydrophilicity of the oximes. The toxicity data, .... Organophosphate poisoning due to a wheat bagel. Inter Med 2009; 48: ...

  19. Three fatal cases of herbal aconite poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    But, P P; Tai, Y T; Young, K

    1994-06-01

    In 3 fatal cases of tachyarrhythmia caused by herbal poisoning, the only common denominator was the presence of aconites derived from the rootstocks and lateral root-tubers of Aconitum carmichaeli and the rootstocks of A kusnexoffii. The contain aconitine alkaloids which are notorious for the arrhythmogenic properties. Symptoms of these cases and management suggestions are presented.

  20. organophosphate poisoning or herbal medicine intoxication?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-11-04

    Nov 4, 2008 ... We wish to extend a warning against use of traditional medicine of which the content is not known, to alert clinicians to the possibility of poisoning of neonates, and to stress the importance of a good history. References. 1. Horn A. Neonatal Drug Doses and Normal. Values. 2nd edition. Cape Town: Imago.

  1. Case Report: Ethylene glycol poisoning | Borkum | Continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 30, No 2 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Case Report: Ethylene glycol poisoning. M Borkum, A Kropman. Abstract.

  2. Poisonous plants of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisonous plants cause significant economic losses to the livestock industry throughout the world from death losses, abortions, birth defects, increased veterinary care, and other related factors. This chapter is not intended to be all-inclusive, but provides current research information on importan...

  3. Diarrhetic Shellfish Poisoning, Washington, USA, 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Lloyd, Jennifer K.; Duchin, Jeffrey S.; Borchert, Jerry; Quintana, Harold Flores; Robertson, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Diarrhetic shellfish poisoning is a gastrointestinal illness caused by consumption of bivalves contaminated with dinophysistoxins. We report an illness cluster in the United States in which toxins were confirmed in shellfish from a commercial harvest area, leading to product recall. Ongoing surveillance is needed to prevent similar illness outbreaks.

  4. Brachiaria spp. poisoning of ruminants in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Riet-Correa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Brachiaria species are the most important grasses for cattle production in Brazil. However, a limiting factor for the use of Brachiaria spp. is their toxicity. Most outbreaks of hepatogenous photosensitization are caused by B. decumbens; however B. brizantha, B. humidicola and B. ruziziensis can also cause poisoning. The poisoning affects cattle, sheep, goats and buffalo. Sheep are more susceptible than other animal species and the young are more susceptible than adults. There are differences in susceptibility among animals of the same species and it has been suggested that this resistance is genetic. Also has been suggested that buffalo and probably some sheep are resilient, i.e. when poisoned these animals have histologic lesions and high GGT serum concentrations, but do not show clinical signs. In general, saponin concentrations are higher in growing plants, but outbreaks occur all over the year, probably due to unexplained rise in saponin concentration in the plant. A clinical syndrome of progressive weight loss and death, without photosensitization, has been reported in cattle poisoned by B. decumbens. Main preventive measures are based on the selection of resistant or resilient animals and on the development of Brachiaria species or varieties with low saponin concentration.

  5. Selected Bibliography on Lead Poisoning in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin-Fu, Jane S., Comp.

    This comprehensive bibliography was prepared in response to the growing interest in the problem of childhood lead poisoning. Most of the papers noted are from the pediatric literature and include only those published in English. A limited number of papers on experiments in laboratory animals are cited. Documents are grouped under several general…

  6. Lead poisoning of a marbled godwit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, L.N.; Smith, M.R.; Windingstad, R.M.; Martin, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    A thin adult female marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa) found dead at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Montana, was found to have 17 ingested lead shot in its gizzard. Its liver contained 51.7 ppm lead (wet weight). Based on these necropsy findings a diagnosis of lead poisoning was made.

  7. Toilet bowl cleaners and deodorizers poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Below are symptoms of this type of poisoning in different parts of the body. BLOOD Severe change in blood acid level (can lead to organ damage) EYES, EARS, NOSE, AND THROAT Loss of vision Severe pain in the throat Severe pain ...

  8. The EXTRIP (EXtracorporeal TReatments In Poisoning) workgroup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavergne, Valéry; Nolin, Thomas D; Hoffman, Robert S

    2012-01-01

    to retrieve all original publications regardless of language. Data were extracted on a standardized instrument. Quality of the evidence was assessed by GRADE as: High = A, Moderate = B, Low = C, Very Low = D. For every poison, dialyzability was assessed and clinical effect of ECTR summarized. All pertinent...... of recommendation. This approach will permit the production of the first important practice guidelines on this topic....

  9. Datura stramonium poisoning in children | Adegoke | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although substance abuse is fairly common among adolescents, poisoning from Datura stramonium (a broadleaf annual erect herb with spine.covered seed capsule) is uncommon in children and has not been reported in our locality. We present the case of two children admitted at the Children Emergency Room of a ...

  10. Parathion poisoning of Mississippi kites in Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J. Christian

    1994-01-01

    Parathion(phosphorothioic acid O, O-diethyl O-[4-nitrophenyl] ester) is a broad spectrum organophosphorus insecticide, used on a variety of crops and occasionally for mosquito control, and is highly toxic to birds (Smith 1987). Intentional poisoning with parathion is reported to have killed more than 8000 red-winged blackbirds (Agelaius phoeniceus), common grackles (Quiscalus quiscula), brown-headed cowbirds (Molothrus ater) and European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in two separate instances (Stone et al. 1984). Use of parathion on wheat fields has resulted in the mortality of about 1600 Canada geese (Branta canadensis) and other waterfowl in one instance (White et al. 1982) and about 200 Canada geese in another (Flickinger et al. 1991). More than 200 laughing gulls (Larus atricilla) died near cotton fields treated with parathion (White et al. 1979). Secondary poisoning of raptors resulting from the consumption of prey exposed to parathion, has been reported experimentally and in the field. Stone et al. (1984) found two dead red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis), a Cooper's hawk (Accipiter cooperii) and an American kestrel (Falco sparverius) that had fed on blackbirds killed by parathion. One of four American kestrels died after being fed cricket frogs (Acris crepitans) that had been exposed to 10ppm parathion for 96 hr (Fleming et al. 1982). The Mississippi kite (Ictinia mississippensis) is highly insectivorous (Brown and Amadon 1968) and is thus subject to secondary poisoning resulting from consumption of insects exposed to pesticides. I report here an instance of secondary parathion poisoning in wild Mississippi kites.

  11. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Paediatric organophosphate poisoning - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    organophosphate poisoning (OPP) in children and to record the frequency of atropine ... additional support for respiratory muscle paralysis/weakness and convulsions, etc.' Atropine's biochemical structure allows it to pass through the blood-brain barrier, potentially reversing some of the CNS effects of the OPP; however it ...

  12. Cyanide poisoning from metal cleaning solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, A; Saxena, K

    1987-05-01

    We report two cases of cyanide poisoning from accidental ingestion of an imported metal cleaning solution used by some Southeast Asians for shining coins. Both patients received specific therapy and recovered completely after a dramatic sequence of sudden collapse and severe cardiovascular compromise.

  13. Poisonous Plants. LC Science Tracer Bullet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Constance, Comp.

    There are a number of sources of information on the more than 700 species of plants, ferns, horsetails, and fungi that can cause toxic, though rarely fatal, reactions in humans and animals. This guide is intended for those who wish to review published materials on poisonous plants in the collections of the Library of Congress. It is not intended…

  14. Ulcerating Ileocolitis in Severe Amatoxin Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Peter Hilty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Amatoxin poisoning is still associated with a great potential for complications and a high mortality. While the occurrence of acute gastroenteritis within the first 24 hours after amatoxin ingestion is well described, only very few descriptions of late gastrointestinal complications of amatoxin poisoning exist worldwide. We present the case of a 57-year-old female patient with severe amatoxin poisoning causing fulminant but reversible hepatic failure that on day 8 after mushroom ingestion developed severe abdominal pain and watery diarrhea. Ulcerating ileocolitis was identified by computed tomography identifying a thickening of the bowel wall of the entire ileum and biopsies taken from the ileum and large bowel revealing distinct ileitis and proximally accentuated colitis. The absence of discernible alternative etiologies such as infectious agents makes a causal relationship between the ulcerating ileocolitis and the amatoxin poisoning likely. Diarrhea and varying abdominal pain persisted over several weeks and clinical follow-up after six months showed a completely symptom-free patient. The case presented highlights the importance to consider the possibility of rare complications of Amanita intoxication in order to be able to respond to them early and adequately.

  15. Cardiovascular Effects of Acute Organophosphate Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Laudari

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion:Cardiac effects of OP poisoning can be life-threatening. Prompt diagnosis, early supportive and definitive therapies with atropine and oximes along with vigilant monitoring of the patients for prominent cardiac effects such as QT prolongation, VT or VF during hospital stay can definitely save lives of the victims.

  16. A retrospective analysis of acute organophosphorus poisoning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mortality that poses public health problem in developing countries, including India.[1-21] World .... patients, the paucity of health care, and the lack of facilities and antidotes.[13,14,42,48] The mortality .... poisoning: A Malaysian intensive care experience of one hundred cases. Med J Malaysia 1984;39:229-33. 26.

  17. Acute Poisoning in Children in Bahia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dilton Rodrigues Mendonça MSc

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Acute poisoning is a frequent accident in childhood, particularly in children under 4 years of age. This was a descriptive study with data collected from standardized forms of the Poison Control Center and patient record charts. All the cases of acute poisoning in children aged 0 to 14 years during the period 2008 to 2012 were selected. The variables studied comprised characteristics of the events and toxic agents, clinical development, and outcome. A total of 657 cases of acute poisoning, with higher frequency in the age-group from 1 to 4 years (48.7% and male sex (53.4%, were recorded. The occurrences were accidental in 92% of the cases, and 5.8% were due to suicide attempts. Among the toxic agents, medications (28.5%, venomous animals (19.3%, nonvenomous animals (10%, household cleaning products (9.0%, and raticide agents (8.7% predominated. The majority of cases were characterized as light (73.5% and around 18% required hospitalization, and there was low lethality (0.5%.

  18. Herbal cure for poisons and poisonous bites from Western Uttar Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Viqar Khan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To conduct ethnopharmacobotanical field explorations in rural areas of five districts of Uttar Pradesh, India with regard to the folk herbal formulations associated with the management of poisons and poisonous bites. Methods: Local traditional healers known as “Vaidya ” and “Hakeems ” in the study area were interviewed to gather ethnopharmacobotanical information using a questionnaire attending various medical practices. Results: Information on 49 herbal formulations prepared from 39 plant species belonging to 28 plant families in the treatment of poisons and poisonous bites is presented in this scientific communication. Conclusion: Present communication revealed that study area is rich in its ethnopharmacobotanical knowledge. The plant species discussed here also encompasses new reports on Chenopodium album, Solanum xanthocarpum, Solanum melongena, Sesamum indicum, Calotropis procera, Coriandrum sativum, Cynodon dactylon, Brassica campestris, Triticum aestivum, Vitis vinifera, Sorgum vulgare and Nerium indicum. This study further concludes that there lies a lot of potential in the Indian herbal repository which should be explored systematically and later subjected to thorough study under the light of latest available scientific research methodologies for the drug standardization and pharmaco-toxicological studies with a view to making cheaper and safer drugs for the benefit of humanity periodically encountered with poisons and poisonous bites.

  19. Arrow poisons in south Asia. Part 1. Arrow poisons in ancient India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisset, N G; Mazars, G

    1984-10-01

    The use of arrow poisons in ancient India is discussed. While it is possible that Mesolithic hunting communities may have applied poison to their arrows, passages in the Rg Veda and Atharva Veda indicate its use in warfare. The meaning of the word -ala, used in the Rg Veda to denote the poison smeared on the arrowheads, is examined; but the available evidence, while almost certainly excluding a mineral (arsenical) source, does not allow a conclusion to be drawn between an animal and/or plant origin. Certain hymns in the Atharva Veda point to aconite tubers as one source. Later Sanskrit (and Buddhist) literature shows that poisoned arrows continued to be used and that a second source of poison was (putrefying) snakes--a source confirmed by an account in the classical literature of Alexander the Great's campaign in western India. Detailed descriptions of the symptoms and methods of treatment of wounds caused by poisoned arrows are to be found in the Sanskrit medical literature.

  20. Recent Advances in the Clinical Management of Lead Poisoning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Kianoush

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lead poisoning is a historic universal disease. Acute or chronic lead exposure may cause reversible or even permanent damages in human beings. Environmental lead exposure is a global health concern in children. Occupational lead poisoning is still a health issue, particularly in developing countries. During the last decades, new methods and medications have been advocated for the prevention and treatment of lead poisoning. This review deals mainly with recent developments in the management of lead poisoning. Sources of lead exposure are introduced, and methods for the primary prevention of lead poisoning are discussed. Details for the screening of adults and children are also explained to serve as a practical guideline for the secondary prevention. Standard chelation therapy in different groups and up-to-date less toxic new medications for the treatment of lead poisoning are finally discussed. Our published clinical research on the therapeutic effects of garlic tablets in mild to moderate occupational lead poisoning will also be discussed.

  1. Recent Advances in the Clinical Management of Lead Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianoush, Sina; Sadeghi, Mahmood; Balali-Mood, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Lead poisoning is a historic universal disease. Acute or chronic lead exposure may cause reversible or even permanent damages in human beings. Environmental lead exposure is a global health concern in children. Occupational lead poisoning is still a health issue, particularly in developing countries. During the last decades, new methods and medications have been advocated for the prevention and treatment of lead poisoning. This review deals mainly with recent developments in the management of lead poisoning. Sources of lead exposure are introduced, and methods for the primary prevention of lead poisoning are discussed. Details for the screening of adults and children are also explained to serve as a practical guideline for the secondary prevention. Standard chelation therapy in different groups and up-to-date less toxic new medications for the treatment of lead poisoning are finally discussed. Our published clinical research on the therapeutic effects of garlic tablets in mild to moderate occupational lead poisoning will also be discussed.

  2. Carbon monoxide poisoning during camping in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youn-Jung; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Oh, Bum Jin; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Kim, Won Young

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology and characteristics of unintentional carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning during camping in Korea. We performed a retrospective observational study on patients with unintentional camping-related CO poisoning who were admitted to the emergency department (ED) from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2014. News reports about incidents of camping-related CO poisoning were collected using news search engines. A total of 72 patients (29 patients involved in 12 incidents, who were admitted to our ED, and 43 victims involved in 17 incidents reported in the media) were identified. Accidental camping-related CO poisoning occurred most frequently in May, late spring in Korea. Gas stove use and the burning of charcoal for tent heating were responsible for camping-related CO exposure. Seventeen victims (39.5%) were found dead when an ambulance arrived at the scene, in the cases reported in the media. In contrast, all the victims at our hospital were alive on hospital discharge. Twelve of the 17 incidents (70.6%) reported in the media were accidental fatalities. The majority of our patients (83.4%) were not aware of the potential danger of charcoal as a source of CO. Accidental camping-related CO poisoning occurred because of an ongoing lack of awareness about the potential danger of charcoal grills and stoves, and this caused prehospital mortality. Such accidents could be prevented by increasing the awareness of the potential danger of using charcoal grills and stoves during camping, as well as by establishing appropriate safety regulations.

  3. Poison exposures in young Israeli military personnel: a National Poison Center Data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavon, Ophir; Bentur, Yedidia

    2017-06-01

    To characterize poison exposures in young Israeli military personnel as reported to the national poison center. Retrospective poison center chart review over a 14-year period. Cases included were Israeli soldiers aged 18-21 years, the compulsory military service age required by the Israeli law. 1770 records of poison exposures in young military personnel were identified. Most exposed individuals involved males (n = 1268, 71.6%). Main routes of exposure were ingestion (n = 854, 48.3%), inhalation (n = 328, 18.6%) and ocular (n = 211, 11.9%). Accidents or misuse (n = 712, 40.2%) were the most frequently reported circumstances, followed by suicide attempts (370, 20.9%), and bites and stings (161, 9.1%). More than half of the cases involved chemicals (n = 939, 53.1%); hydrocarbons, gases and corrosives were the main causative agents. Pharmaceuticals (mainly analgesics) were involved in 519 (29.3%) cases, venomous animals (mainly scorpions, centipedes, and snakes) in 79 (4.5%). Clinical manifestations were reported in 666 (37.6%) cases, mostly gastrointestinal, neurologic, and respiratory. The vast majority of cases (1634, 92.3%) were asymptomatic or mildly affected; no fatalities were recorded. In 831 (46.9%) cases the clinical toxicologist recommended referral to an emergency department; ambulatory observation was recommended in 563 (31.8%) cases, and hospitalization in 86 (4.9%). Our data show that poison exposures among young soldiers involve mainly males, accidents, misuse and suicides, oral route and chemicals; most exposures were asymptomatic or with mild severity. Repeated evaluations of poison center data pertaining to military personnel is advised for identifying trends in poison exposure and characteristics in this particular population.

  4. [Histamine food poisonings in Japan and other countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Miou; Yamamoto, Miyako; Uneyama, Chikako; Morikawa, Kaoru

    2009-01-01

    Histamine food poisonings are allergy-like food poisonings caused by the ingestion of spoiled fish containing markedly elevated histamine levels. We examined histamine food poisonings in Japan from 1998 to 2008. In average 8 food poisonings and 150 cases were reported annually and there was no fatality case. In more than 80% of remaining food samples, histamine content exceeded 20 mg/100 g. These poisonings were caused by tuna, billfish (marlin) and mackerel, which contained higher level of histamine than other fishes in histamine food poisonings in Japan. Cooking methods of these fishes were mainly "broiled". We also studied histamine food poisonings in other countries. Tuna was the main fish in histamine food poisonings reported to Centers for the Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in the US and Ozfoodnet in Australia from 2000 to 2006. In the US, histamine food poisonings were also caused by mahimahi and escolar fish. Our review will be useful for in taking measures to reduce risk of histamine food poisonings.

  5. Carbon monoxide poisoning in Utah: 1996-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Lindell K; Deru, Kayla; Churchill, Susan; Legler, Joshua; Snow, Greg; Grey, Todd

    2016-01-01

    The true incidence of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is not clearly known, but a description of possible trends could aid in prevention. Investigators searched Utah state databases for emergency department (ED) visits and admissions for CO poisoning and medical examiner records for CO-related fatalities. From 1996-2013, 7,590 individuals were diagnosed with CO poisoning: 6,469 were treated/ released from EDs; 596 were admitted; 525 died. Of 7,065 non-fatal poisonings, 5,950 (84%) were accidental and 498 (7%) were suicide attempts. Few patients (9.7%) were treated with hyperbaric oxygen. For accidental poisonings, internal combustion engines accounted for 43%, smoke inhalation, 34%, and heating sources, 22%. Internal combustion engines were implicated in 97% of suicide attempts. Non-fatal poisonings declined following a 2008 legislative change requiring CO alarms in residences, but we do not know if legislation caused the decline. One hundred forty-one (27%) fatal poisonings were accidental, 361 (70%) suicides and two (0.4%) homicides. Victims with cardiovascular autopsy findings/past cardiovascular history had lower carboxyhemoglobin levels (mean 51.2%, n=53) compared to those without (70.8%, n=472). Mean postmortem carboxyhemoglobin was highest in ages 20-29 years (72.5%). The incidence of CO poisoning in Utah is declining, but CO poisoning is still common. Alarm legislation may aid prevention efforts. An educational campaign addressing the many causes and circumstances of CO poisoning is required for prevention.

  6. [Mortality due to pesticide poisoning in Colombia, 1998-2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro-Narváez, Pablo; Castañeda-Orjuela, Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Poisoning due to pesticides is an important public health problem worldwide due its morbidity and mortality. In Colombia, there are no exact data on mortality due to pesticide poisoning. To estimate the trend of mortality rate due to pesticide poisoning in Colombia between 1998 and 2011. We carried out a descriptive analysis with the database reports of death as unintentional poisoning, self-inflicted intentional poisoning, aggression with pesticides, and poisoning with non-identified intentionality, population projections between 1998 and 2011, and rurality indexes. Crude and age-adjusted mortality rates were estimated and trends and Spearman coefficients were evaluated. A total of 4,835 deaths were registered (age-adjusted mortality rate of 2.38 deaths per 100,000 people). Mortality rates were higher in rural areas, for self-inflicted intentional poisoning, in men and in age groups between 15 and 39 years old. The trend has been decreasing since 2002. Municipality mortality rates due to unintentional poisoning and aggression correlated significantly with the rurality index in less rural municipalities. Mortality rates due to pesticide poisoning presented a mild decrease between 1998 and 2011. It is necessary to adjust and reinforce the measures conducive to reducing pesticide exposure in order to avoid poisoning and reduce mortality.

  7. CIGUATERA POISONING: PACIFIC DISEASE, FOODBORNE POISONING FROM FISH IN WARM SEAS AND OCEANS. Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snezha Zlateva

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The review is provoked because of lack of awareness of the medical practitioners in Bulgaria concerning of the ethnology, pathogenesis, clinical symptoms and treatment of the ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP. This can be a source of prolonged diagnostic delays, as some cases reporting in another country in Europe, for example Germany, Spain and UK. Varna is the sea town with many sailor crews returning from tropical and subtropical regions, or CFP can affect people who travel to the Pacific and Caribbean or ate exotic fish from supermarket. The information of this fish food-borne poisoning is part of student’s education in discipline “Marine medicine” in Medical University, Varna. Materials and methods: To present better information from different authors and last scientific data, we made review of published materials of 58 issues to construct definition, history, etiology, pathogenesis (toxins and mechanisms of action, clinical symptoms, treatment and prevention of the Ciguatera or ichtyosarcotoxicosis, a wide spread food-born poisoning. Results: Ciguatera poisoning is ichtyosarcotoxicosis, a wide-spread foodborne poisoning in people after consumption of flesh of different kinds of fishes in which toxins produced by poisonous microorganisms (Dinoflagellates have accumulated. The poisoning develops by accumulating toxins higher up the food chain starting with toxin producing dinoflagellates (species: Gambierdiscus toxicus, Prorocentrum concavum, Pr. lima, Ostreoposis lenticularis, Ostr. Siamensis and others, continuing with the poisoned algae (species: Portieria, Halymenia, Turbinaria, Sargassum, and after that involving small crustacea and small fishes to greater fishes (vector fishes, genus Herbivores and Carnivores, in which the toxins have been stored in amount, great enough to cause foodborne poisoning in humans. This poisoning is widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, but because of its delayed toxic effects, lasting

  8. The poison center as a reservoir for antidotes for veterinary poisoning emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krenzelok, E P; Drake, T; Dean, B S

    1992-04-01

    Animal poisonings account for a significant number of the cases responded to by poison centers. The majority of consultations involve small animals and do not necessitate the use of large amounts of pharmacologic antagonists, such as atropine to treat anticholinesterase pesticide poisonings. However, large animals such as cattle present unique management problems, since phenomenal amounts of antidotes may be needed to treat a herd of cattle, creating a significant economic impact. The most challenging dilemma is providing 24-h availability and a means of acquisition of sufficient quantities of antidotes to reduce the economic impact of large-animal poisonings. In conjunction with a state veterinary medical association, a RPIC serves as a depot for the storage and distribution of emergency veterinary antidotes. Sufficient quantities of atropine, methylene blue, calcium EDTA, sodium nitrite and thiosulfate, and activated charcoal are available via the RPIC to treat a herd of 200 cattle. The antidotes are available only for emergency treatment and with a veterinary prescription. The 24-h nature of the poison center makes it an ideal location to serve the needs of veterinarians.

  9. Animal poisoning in Italy: 10 years of epidemiological data from the Poison Control Centre of Milan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caloni, F; Cortinovis, C; Rivolta, M; Davanzo, F

    2012-04-21

    From 2000 to 2010, the Poison Control Centre of Milan (CAV), in collaboration with the University of Milan, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Veterinary Sciences and Technologies for Food Safety, Toxicology Section, collected epidemiological information related to animal poisoning and classified it in an organised and computerised data bank. Data recorded were predominantly related to small animals and to some extent to horses, ruminants and other food-production animals. Few calls were registered involving exotics and no information was recorded on wildlife. The dog was reported to be the most common species involved in animal poisoning, and pesticides constituted the primary group of toxicants. In the case of pets, 'drugs' including veterinary parasiticide and drugs for human use constituted the second class of toxicants responsible for poisoning followed by household products, plants, zootoxins and metals. With regard to horses and farm animals, the second group consisted of phytotoxins, even if only episodically. In Italy, published data on this subject are scarce but this information is crucial for better management of the poisoning of domestic animals in an effort to reduce mortality.

  10. Asymptomatic congenital lead poisoning - case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnakaruppan, Nachammai R; Marcus, Steven Matthew

    2010-07-01

    Congenital lead poisoning is uncommon and there is no consensus on the management of the newborn. A female infant was born to a lead-burdened woman identified by screening just prior to delivery. Maternal blood lead level (BLL) was 58 μg/dL. The infant's BLL on the second day of life was 72 μg/dL with a free erythrocyte protoporphyrin level of 175 μg/dL. The child was managed by an exchange transfusion followed by chelation. The BLL 6 h after exchange transfusion was 11.4 μg/dL. Follow-up 2 years later showed a BLL of 9 μg/dL and normal development. We present the details of a case of congenital lead poisoning treated aggressively which appears to have resulted in a favorable outcome.

  11. A fatal case of menthol poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Akshay; Baitha, Upendra; Aggarwal, Praveen; Jamshed, Nayer

    2016-01-01

    Menthol is a monocyclic terpene alcohol, which is present naturally in peppermint and can be synthesized artificially as well. Generally, it is considered as very safe and has wide usage in medicine and food. There are case reports of toxicity due to excessive consumption of menthol, but a fatal intoxication has never been reported in the medical literature. We present a case of fatal menthol intoxication in a worker, who accidently got exposed when he was working in a peppermint factory. Emergency physicians must keep in mind this extremely rare manifestation of menthol poisoning. All necessary precaution should be taken to reduce its intake or exposure, as it has no specific antidote. Early recognition and supportive treatment of this poisoning is the key for a successful outcome.

  12. Clinical studies on mercury poisoning in cattle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonoda, M.; Nakamura, R.; Too, K.; Matsuhashi, A.; Ishimoto, H.; Sasaki, R.; Ishida, K.; Takahashi, M.

    1956-01-01

    A sporadic outbreak of an unknown disease occurred among dairy cattle, from early February to late May 1955, in Japan. The characteristic symptoms of this disease were dyspnea and depilation; out of 29 cases, 8 died while 2 were slaughtered. Clinical studies have disclosed that the symptoms were similar to those found in cases of mercury poisoning as described by others. So the animals' feed was suspected of being the cause of the sickness. It was confirmed that the incident was due to poisoning resulting from ingestion of linseed meal treated with a mercurial fungicide. From the results of the testing anamnesis, it was found that 171 cattle were fed with the meal and 29 cases were affected. In veiw of the wide use of mercurial preparations for treating seed grains against fungi infection, a further experimental study was made on the effects of the feed and fungicide upon calves.

  13. Arsenic poisoning of magnetism in bcc cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, David J.

    1992-04-01

    Highly converged local spin-density approximation calculations are used to determine the effectiveness of As as a poisoning agent for the magnetism of bcc Co films grown on GaAs. To do this, supercell calculations of the magnetization were performed using an extension of the general potential linearized augmented plane-wave method for Co7As, Co15As, and Co31As. The effect of the nearest-neighbor relaxation around As impurities, calculated using total energy techniques, was included. It is found that substitutional As is moderately effective as a poisoning agent, each As atom contributes a moment of -3.8μB, and this may be important in explaining the discrepancy of 0.2-0.3μB between the calculated magnetization of bcc Co and the measured magnetization of bcc Co films on GaAs.

  14. [Recommendations for the prevention of poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintegi, S; Esparza, M J; González, J C; Rubio, B; Sánchez, F; Vila, J J; Yagüe, F; Benítez, M T

    2015-12-01

    Poisoning is the fifth leading cause of death from unintentional injury in the WHO European region, while Spain is in the group with a lower rate. Most involuntary poisonings occur in young children while they are at the home, due to unintentional ingestion of therapeutic drugs or household products. Of these, a large percentage is stored in non-original containers and/or within reach of children. In this article, the Committee on Safety and Non-Intentional Injury Prevention in Childhood of the Spanish Association of Pediatrics provides a series of recommendations, educational as well as legal, to prevent such cases. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Allium species poisoning in dogs and cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BS Salgado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dogs and cats are the animals that owners most frequently seek assistance for potential poisonings, and these species are frequently involved with toxicoses due to ingestion of poisonous food. Feeding human foodstuff to pets may prove itself dangerous for their health, similarly to what is observed in Allium species toxicosis. Allium species toxicosis is reported worldwide in several animal species, and the toxic principles present in them causes the transformation of hemoglobin into methemoglobin, consequently resulting in hemolytic anemia with Heinz body formation. The aim of this review is to analyze the clinicopathologic aspects and therapeutic approach of this serious toxicosis of dogs and cats in order to give knowledge to veterinarians about Allium species toxicosis, and subsequently allow them to correctly diagnose this disease when facing it; and to educate pet owners to not feed their animals with Allium-containg food in order to better control this particular life-threatening toxicosis.

  16. Ciguatera Fish Poisoning: Treatment, Prevention and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Reich

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Ciguatera Fish Poisoning (CFP is the most frequently reported seafood-toxin illness in the world, and it causes substantial physical and functional impact. It produces a myriad of gastrointestinal, neurologic and/or cardiovascular symptoms which last days to weeks, or even months. Although there are reports of symptom amelioration with some interventions (e.g. IV mannitol, the appropriate treatment for CFP remains unclear to many physicians. We review the literature on the treatments for CFP, including randomized controlled studies and anecdotal reports. The article is intended to clarify treatment options, and provide information about management and prevention of CFP, for emergency room physicians, poison control information providers, other health care providers, and patients.

  17. [Acute poisoning by pesticides in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leveau, P

    2016-07-01

    Acute pesticide poisoning in children is rare but potentially serious. Some clinical patterns (toxidromes) are suggestive of the drug class: cholinergic crisis for organophosphate or carbamate insecticides; neurological syndrome for rodenticides; digestive and respiratory syndrome for herbicides. Treatment is symptomatic and only a few patients are treated with an antidote: atropine and pralidoxime for organophosphate insecticides, vitamin K for anticoagulant rodenticides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Poisoned after Dinner: Dolma with Datura Stramonium

    OpenAIRE

    Disel, Nezihat Rana; Yilmaz, Mustafa; Kekec, Zeynep; KARANLIK, Meryem

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY: Datura stramonium, which is also known as Thorn Apple or Jimson Weed, is an alkaloid containing plant that is entirely toxic. The active toxic constituents of the plant are atropine, scopolamine and hyoscyamine. It has been abused worldwide for hundreds of years because of its hallucinogenic properties. Previous reports have shown that herbal medication overdose and accidental food contamination are ways it can cause poisoning. Herein we present a family that had three of its members...

  19. Accidental death from acute selenium poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Katharine A; Lavercombe, Peter S; Dillon, Jasmine; Ginsberg, Riesa

    2006-10-02

    We report a fatal case of acute selenium poisoning in a 75-year-old man. After reading on the Internet about a possible role of selenium in prostate cancer, the patient ingested 10 g of sodium selenite. Despite intensive care treatment, he suffered a cardiac arrest and died 6 hours after ingestion. This case illustrates the risks of failing to critically evaluate Internet information and exposes the myth that natural therapies are inherently safe.

  20. Pathology of selenium poisoning in fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Dennis Lemly

    1998-01-01

    Selenium presents an interesting paradox in the field of aquatic toxicology because it is both a nutrient and a poison. As a nutrient, it is required in the diet of fish at concentrations of about 0. 1 to 0. 5 Fg/g dry weight. Selenium is necessary for proper formation and functioning of glutathione peroxidase, which is a major cellular antioxidant enzyme. This enzyme...

  1. [An investigation on a family tetramine poisoning accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W J; Jian, X D; Wu, Y Z; Wang, K; Jia, J E; Zhang, Z C

    2017-11-20

    Objective: To investigate and analyze the clinical data of tetramine poisoning in a family and prevent similar incidents from happening again. Methods: The study was conducted in July 2016 in a fami-ly with thiamine poisoning in shandong province, and the clinical data were analyzed. Results: In this case, there are six cases of poisoning caused by the tetramine poisoning, and the convulsions are the main clinical manifestations, and the blood perfusion can have a good effect on the severe patients. After positive treatment, all 6 patients were cured. Conclusions: The tetramine poisoning can cause severe convulsion, although the country has banned the production and use of it, the tetramine poisoning case still exist and cannot be ignored.

  2. Appendectomy due to lead poisoning: a case-report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghilinejad M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lead poisoning is a common occupational health hazard in developing countries and many misdiagnoses and malpractices may occur due to unawareness of lead poisoning symptoms. Case presentation We report a case of occupational lead poisoning in an adult battery worker with abdominal colic who initially underwent appendectomy with removal of normal appendix. Later on he was diagnosed with lead poisoning and was treated appropriately with lead chelator (CaNa2EDTA. Conclusion Lead poisoning is frequently overlooked as the differential diagnosis of acute abdomen which may result in unnecessary surgery. Appropriate occupational history taking is helpful in making a correct diagnosis. Occupational lead poisoning is a preventable disorder and a serious challenge for the health and labor authorities in developing countries.

  3. Improving poisoning diagnosis and surveillance of street pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Hanna-Andrea

    2012-03-23

    An effective surveillance system is required to reduce pesticide exposures and poisonings, especially from street pesticides (illegal, unlabelled, and decanted agricultural pesticides used predominately for urban household purposes). Poisoning from any pesticide class, not only organophosphates, constitutes a medically notifiable condition in South Africa. Current practice, however, is to report only organophosphate cases, resulting in severe under-reporting. The lack of data concerning the link between poisonings and street pesticides has led to the mistaken assumption that urban populations are not at risk from significant pesticide exposures and poisonings. Without accurate statistics, healthcare professionals and policy makers are unaware of the contribution of street pesticide poisonings to the overall health burden. Accurate diagnosis is a prerequisite for notification and subsequent surveillance. An algorithm has been developed to enable healthcare professionals to improve the diagnosis and notification of pesticide poisonings.

  4. Risk factors for acute pesticide poisoning in Sri Lanka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Hoek, Wim; Konradsen, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the characteristics of patients with acute pesticide poisoning in a rural area of Sri Lanka and, for intentional self-poisoning cases, explores the relative importance of the different determinants. Data were collected for 239 acute pesticide-poisoning cases, which were...... admitted to two rural hospitals in Sri Lanka. Sociodemographic characteristics, negative life events and agricultural practices of the intentional self-poisoning cases were compared with a control group. Most cases occurred among young adults and the large majority (84%) was because of intentional self...... shows that acute pesticide poisoning in Sri Lanka is determined by a combination of sociodemographic and psychological factors. Suggestions are given for interventions that could control the morbidity and mortality due to acute pesticide poisoning in developing countries....

  5. Neurological Complications Resulting from Non-Oral Occupational Methanol Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Hyun; Lee, Seung Keun; Gil, Young Eun; Ryu, Jia; Jung-Choi, Kyunghee; Kim, Hyunjoo; Choi, Jun Young; Park, Sun Ah; Lee, Hyang Woon; Yun, Ji Young

    2017-02-01

    Methanol poisoning results in neurological complications including visual disturbances, bilateral putaminal hemorrhagic necrosis, parkinsonism, cerebral edema, coma, or seizures. Almost all reported cases of methanol poisoning are caused by oral ingestion of methanol. However, recently there was an outbreak of methanol poisoning via non-oral exposure that resulted in severe neurological complications to a few workers at industrial sites in Korea. We present 3 patients who had severe neurological complications resulting from non-oral occupational methanol poisoning. Even though initial metabolic acidosis and mental changes were improved with hemodialysis, all of the 3 patients presented optic atrophy and ataxia or parkinsonism as neurological complications resulting from methanol poisoning. In order to manage it adequately, as well as to prevent it, physicians should recognize that methanol poisoning by non-oral exposure can cause neurologic complications.

  6. Redotex ingestions reported to Texas poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2010-09-01

    Although the multi-component weight loss supplement Redotex is banned in the United States, the supplement can be obtained in Mexico. The intent of this report was to describe the pattern of Redotex calls received by a statewide poison center system. Cases were all Redotex calls received by Texas poison centers during 2000-2008. The distribution of total calls and those involving ingestion of the supplement were determined for selected demographic and clinical factors. Of 34 total Redotex calls received, 55.9% came from the 14 Texas counties that border Mexico. Of the 22 reported Redotex ingestions, 77.3% of the patients were female and 45.5% 20 years or more. Of the 17 ingestions involving no co-ingestants, 52.9% were already at or en route to a health care facility, 41.2% were managed on site, and 5.9% was referred to a health care facility. The final medical outcome was no effect in 23.5% cases, minor effect in 5.9%, moderate effect in 11.8%, not followed but minimal clinical effects possible in 47.1%, and unable to follow but judged to be potentially toxic in 11.8%. Most Redotex calls to the Texas poison center system originated from counties bordering Mexico.

  7. Acute lead poisoning in an infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhanan, M; Lall, S B

    2007-10-01

    A case of acute lead poisoning in an infant without overt clinical manifestations of encephalopathy is reported for the first time in Oman. The case was diagnosed at Rustaq Hospital on the basis of (i) history by the mother of giving the child a traditional remedy for treating constipation (ii) X-ray of abdomen showing radio-opaque speckles and (iii) detection of high blood lead levels (83.3 µg/dL) at the toxicology laboratory of the poison control centre. The source of lead was confirmed by high content of inorganic lead (20.2%) found in the sample of the traditional remedy (bint al dahab). The blood lead levels significantly decreased, after the intravenous calcium edetate (EDTA) therapy was given to the baby. The case highlights that early detection and treatment of acute lead poisoning in children can prevent morbidity and sequelae associated with encephalopathy. It also indicated the need for awareness and prevention programme for parents on this issue.

  8. Copeptin levels in carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irem, Güler; Çevik, Yunsur; Keskin, Ahmet Turgut; Emektar, Emine; Demirci, Osman Lütfi; Şafak, Tuba; Çikrikçi Işik, Gülşah; Akin, Kadir Okhan

    2017-04-18

    The aim of this study is to identify the copeptin levels in patients presenting with carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to the emergency department and to investigate its correlation with the neurological effects. The study group consisted of patients presenting with CO poisoning and carboxyhemoglobin levels >10%. Blood samples for copeptin levels were obtained twice, first at presentation then at the fourth hour of observation. The data were analyzed using SPSS 16 for Windows. The median copeptin levels of the patient group were identified as 0.63 (0.39-1.06) ng/mL at hour 0 and 0.41 (0.31-0.49) at hour 4. The copeptin levels of the control group were 0.34 (0.25-0.42) ng/mL and were significantly lower than those of the patient group (P copeptin level as the best cut-off level may be used with sensitivity of 94.0% and specificity of 60%. The copeptin levels at hour 0 were statistically significantly higher in the neurologically affected patients than those not affected (P copeptin levels increase in patients presenting to the emergency department with CO poisoning.

  9. Myth busting in carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B

    2016-02-01

    The evidence supporting many beliefs in medicine is based upon opinion, personal experience, hearsay, or "common knowledge." When one searches for the data supporting oft-quoted facts in medicine, they are sometimes found to be old, incorrect, or nonexistent. Such unsupported facts or beliefs can be termed myths. This minireview will summarize 4 examples of "myth busting" by the author when he has discovered widely held beliefs regarding carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to be untrue during a 25-year career of research in the field. These include the mistaken beliefs that (1) symptoms correlate with presenting blood carboxyhemoglobin levels, (2) residents are safe from CO poisoning if their home does not contain fuel-burning appliances, (3) carboxyhemoglobin levels must be measured rapidly and on arterial blood, and (4) CO poisoning predisposes to premature long-term death from cardiac disease. In addition to providing the evidence disproving these myths, the importance of going back to the original reference when citing prior work is emphasized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Poisoning of domestic animals with heavy metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velev Romel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The term heavy metal refers to a metal that has a relatively high density and is toxic for animal and human organism at low concentrations. Heavy metals are natural components of the Earth's crust. They cannot be degraded or destroyed. To a small extent they enter animal organism via food, drinking water and air. Some heavy metals (e.g cooper, iron, chromium, zinc are essential in very low concentrations for the survival of all forms of life. These are described as essential trace elements. However, when they are present in greater quantities, like the heavy metals lead, cadmium and mercury which are already toxic in very low concentrations, they can cause metabolic anomalies or poisoning. Heavy metal poisoning of domestic animals could result, for instance, from drinking-water contamination, high ambient air concentrations near emission sources, or intake via the food chain. Heavy metals are dangerous because they tend to bioaccumulate in a biological organism over time. Manifestation of toxicity of individual heavy metals varies considerably, depending on dose and time of exposure, species, gender and environmental and nutritional factors. Large differences exist between the effects of a single exposure to a high concentration, and chronic exposures to lower doses. The aim of this work is to present the source of poisoning and toxicity of some heavy metals (lead, mercury, cadmium, thallium, arsenic, as well as new data about effects of those heavy metals on the health of domestic animals. .

  11. [Cholinergic syndrome with unconsciousness in amanita poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohn, H; Schoenemann, J

    2000-11-10

    A 41-year-old patient was found in his flat in a state of coma. After emergency treatment his vital signs were stable and he was transferred to an acute hospital with possible cannabis intoxication. The patient, a hobby gardener, was previously well and had an adversion to the use of any chemical substances. The main symptom showed a cholinergic syndrome with deep coma. We assumed plant ingestion because of the clinical picture and history. The laboratory results were within normal limits apart from a slight rise of the serum creatinine kinase level. The electrocardiogram showed a bradycardia. A drug-screening could not be performed. The differential diagnosis of plant alkaloids or mushroom toxins were considered due to possible plant ingestion and a cholinergic syndrome. Later the toadstool (Amanita muscaria) was found. After treatment oft the cholinergic syndrome with high doses of atropine primary poison elimination was performed. 24 hours later the patient awoke from his coma. Visual hallucinations persisted for a few days. No organic damage due to the intoxication was found. Toxic mushroom ingestion can produce a variety of clinical pictures. Most commonly an anticholinergic syndrome is found, but this was not the case in this patient. The effect of the poison depends on the amount and the preparation, so that no reliable outcome prediction can be made. The drug "poisonous mushroom" is legal and hallucinogenic substances are trendy. As a result clinical signs like those described here will have to be expected in the future.

  12. Rhabdomyolysis as a manifestation of clomipramine poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Nathalie Oliveira de; Góis, Aécio Flávio Teixeira de

    2013-01-01

    Tricyclic antidepressive agents are widely used in suicide attempts and present a variety of deleterious effects. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of such poisoning. A 55-year-old woman ingested 120 pills of 25 mg clomipramine in a suicide attempt two days before admission. After gastric lavage in another emergency department on the day of intake, 80 pills were removed. On admission to our department, she was disoriented, complaining of a dry mouth and tremors at the extremities. An electrocardiogram showed a sinus rhythm with narrow QRS complexes. Laboratory results showed high creatine phosphokinase (CK = 15,094 U/l on admission; normal range = 26 to 140 U/l), hypocalcemia, slightly increased serum transaminases and mild metabolic acidosis. The patient's medical history included depression with previous suicide attempts, obsessive-compulsive disorder, hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. She presented cardiac arrest with pulseless electric activity for seven minutes and afterwards, without sedation, showed continuous side-to-side eye movement. She developed refractory hypotension, with need for vasopressors. Ceftriaxone and clindamycin administration was started because of a hypothesis of bronchoaspiration. The patient remained unresponsive even without sedation, with continuous side-to-side eye movement and a decerebrate posture. She died two months later. Rhabdomyolysis is a very rare complication of poisoning due to tricyclic drugs. It had only previously been described after an overdose of cyclobenzaprine, which has a toxicity profile similar to tricyclic drugs. Although arrhythmia is the most important complication, rhabdomyolysis should be investigated in cases of clomipramine poisoning.

  13. Hemlock alkaloids from Socrates to poison aloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Tom

    2005-06-01

    Hemlock (Conium maculatum L. Umbelliferae) has long been known as a poisonous plant. Toxicity is due to a group of piperidine alkaloids of which the representative members are coniine and gamma-coniceine. The latter is the more toxic and is the first formed biosynthetically. Its levels in relation to coniine vary widely according to environmental conditions and to provenance of the plants. Surprisingly, these piperidine alkaloids have turned up in quite unrelated species in the monocotyledons as well as the dicotyledons. Aloes, for instance, important medicinal plants, are not regarded as poisonous although some species are very bitter. Nevertheless a small number of mostly local species contain the alkaloids, especially gamma-coniceine and there have been records of human poisoning. The compounds are recognized by their characteristic mousy smell. Both acute and chronic symptoms have been described. The compounds are neurotoxins and death results from respiratory failure, recalling the effects of curare. Chronic non-lethal ingestion by pregnant livestock leads to foetal malformation. Both acute and chronic toxicity are seen with stock in damp meadows and have been recorded as problems especially in North America. The alkaloids derive biosynthetically from acetate units via the polyketide pathway in contrast to other piperidine alkaloids which derive from lysine.

  14. Understanding lactic acidosis in paracetamol (acetaminophen) poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anoop D; Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I

    2011-01-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is one of the most commonly taken drugs in overdose in many areas of the world, and the most common cause of acute liver failure in both the UK and USA. Paracetamol poisoning can result in lactic acidosis in two different scenarios. First, early in the course of poisoning and before the onset of hepatotoxicity in patients with massive ingestion; a lactic acidosis is usually associated with coma. Experimental evidence from studies in whole animals, perfused liver slices and cell cultures has shown that the toxic metabolite of paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-benzo-quinone imine, inhibits electron transfer in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and thus inhibits aerobic respiration. This occurs only at very high concentrations of paracetamol, and precedes cellular injury by several hours. The second scenario in which lactic acidosis can occur is later in the course of paracetamol poisoning as a consequence of established liver failure. In these patients lactate is elevated primarily because of reduced hepatic clearance, but in shocked patients there may also be a contribution of peripheral anaerobic respiration because of tissue hypoperfusion. In patients admitted to a liver unit with paracetamol hepatotoxicity, the post-resuscitation arterial lactate concentration has been shown to be a strong predictor of mortality, and is included in the modified King's College criteria for consideration of liver transplantation. We would therefore recommend that post-resuscitation lactate is measured in all patients with a severe paracetamol overdose resulting in either reduced conscious level or hepatic failure. PMID:21143497

  15. Lead Poisoning at an Indoor Firing Range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung Wook; Park, Won Ju

    2017-10-01

    In March 2014, a 39-year-old Korean male presented with a 6-month history of various nonspecific symptoms including dizziness, fatigue, asthenia, irritability, elevated blood pressure, palpitation, eyestrain, and tinnitus. His occupational history revealed that he had been working as an indoor firing range manager for 13 months; therefore, he was subjected to a blood lead level (BLL) test. The test results showed a BLL of 64 μg/dL; hence, he was diagnosed with lead poisoning and immediately withdrawn from work. As evident from the workplace environmental monitoring, the level of lead exposure in the air exceeded its limit (0.015-0.387 mg/m³). He received chelation treatment with calcium-disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (1 g/day) for 5 days without any adverse effects. In the follow-up results after 2 months, the BLL had decreased to 9.7 μg/dL and the symptoms resolved. This report represents the first occupational case of lead poisoning in firing ranges in Korea, and this necessitates institutional management to prevent the recurrence of poisoning through this route. Workplace environmental monitoring should be implemented for indoor firing ranges, and the workers should undergo regularly scheduled special health examinations. In clinical practice, it is essential to question the patient about his occupational history. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  16. Gastric lavage in patients with acute poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Amigó Tadín

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute poisonings are a frequent complaint in emergency departments and therapy which prevents the absorption of toxic products taken orally is often indicated: one such option is gastric lavage. Gastric lavage is a digestive decontamination technique whose goal is to remove the maximum amount of poison from the stomach and prevent its absorption. The procedure involves inserting a gastric tube into the stomach through the mouth or nose; firstly to aspirate all the stomach contents and then to perform gastric washing manoeuvres. The effectiveness of gastric lavage is limited and involves a risk of iatrogenesis, and therefore the indications and contraindications should be carefully considered and the technique carried out meticulously to increase its effectiveness and reduce complications, primarily bronchoaspiration. Gastric lavage may be used in conjunction with other digestive decontamination techniques such as administration of activated charcoal. This gastric lavage protocol is based on a review of the literature on this procedure and is supported by the expertise of our research group in gastrointestinal decontamination techniques in patients with acute poisoning.

  17. [Acute renal failure due to Cortinarius poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhbouh, Souad; Haverkamp, Leonie; Kuyper, Thomas W; de Wolff, Frederik A; Barendregt, Jos N M

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of certain Cortinarius species may lead to renal failure. In the Netherlands, this type of poisoning has not been previously described. A 58-year-old female presented with headache, vomiting and oliguria, preceded by a few days of burning, painful thirst and malaise. She had acute and irreversible renal failure of unknown cause. History revealed that two days before the onset of her symptoms, she had eaten a ragout prepared with mushrooms that were picked in a forest. A renal biopsy demonstrated interstitial nephritis with proximal tubular necrosis. In the leftovers of the ragout two fragments of Cortinarius mushroom, probably belonging to the complex of Cortinarius cinnamomeus (cinnamon webcap), were found. First signs and symptoms, and the course are compatible with those described in the literature on Cortinarius poisoning. Despite haemodialysis and administration of acetylcysteine and glucocorticoids, her renal function did not recover. This case is the first description of mushroom poisoning by a species of the genus Cortinarius in the Netherlands.

  18. Carbon monoxide poisoning in Northeast of Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadem-Rezaiyan, M; Afshari, R

    2016-07-01

    CO poisoning is still a public health concern especially in developing countries. We aimed to focus on CO poisoning secular trends based on registry data for the recent 7 years in Northeast of Iran. Registry database of Imam Reza Hospital in Mashhad, Iran was analyzed. All admitted cases with CO exposure during 2004-2011 were included. Data from two national censuses were used for calculating rates. Data analyses was performed by SPSS 11.5. P prevalence rate of 1.9 per 100,000) during the 7-year period. Mean age was 32.3 ± 18.2 years and 60% of subjects were male. CO prevalence rate was not changed during this period. Case fatality rate was higher in men (5.4% vs. 4.4%). Self-employment and manual or office workers were at greatest risk. Age specific prevalence and mortality rates were highest in >60 age group. (2.9 and 3.1 per 100,000, respectively). As it seems that current health prevention studies are not effectively working, these secular trends can enlighten health policy makers to implement proper population based interventions like education or regulations for CO detectors. We believe that almost all cases of accidental CO poisoning can be prevented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  19. The growing impact of pediatric pharmaceutical poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, G Randall; Woodward, Randall W; Ho, Mona

    2012-02-01

    To understand which medications, under which circumstances, are responsible for the noted increase in pediatric medication poisonings, resource use, and morbidity. Patient records from 2001-2008 were obtained from the National Poison Data System of the American Association of Poison Control Centers for children aged ≤5 years evaluated in a health care facility following exposure to a potentially toxic dose of a pharmaceutical agent. Pharmaceutical agents were classified as over-the-counter or prescription and by functional category. Exposures were classified as child self-ingested the medication or as therapeutic error. For the 8-year period, emergency visits, admissions, significant injuries, and trends in these events were calculated for each substance category. We evaluated 453 559 children for ingestion of a single pharmaceutical product. Child self-exposure was responsible for 95% of visits. Child self-exposure to prescription products dominated the health care impact with 248 023 of the visits (55%), 41 847 admissions (76%), and 18 191 significant injuries (71%). The greatest resource use and morbidity followed self-ingestion of prescription products, particularly opioids, sedative-hypnotics, and cardiovascular agents. Prevention efforts have proved to be inadequate in the face of rising availability of prescription medications, particularly more dangerous medications. Copyright © 2012 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mass ethion poisoning with high mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Aruna; Patel, Ashwin B; Pal, Ramavati R; Jani, Umesh J; Singel, Vinu C; Panchal, Maulik D

    2008-01-01

    Fifteen people who consumed a meal during a social ceremony at a remote farm developed symptoms and signs of organophosphate poisoning. Information was gathered from villagers and doctors at the primary health center and district hospital. Serial measurements of plasma and red blood cell cholinesterase activity levels were carried out and the organophosphate compound was identified in blood samples. Clinical toxicity included abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, excessive secretions, and respiratory distress. The victims were taken to a community health center about 30 km away where three people died. The others were taken to the district level hospital at Palanpur where five died. Of the seven remaining victims who were transferred to a tertiary care hospital at Ahmedabad, one died during transport and another succumbed within a few hours. The remaining five people were hospitalized. Three recovered within a week but two developed complications: one had a lung infection and the other had cerebral anoxia following cardiorespiratory arrest. The person with cerebral anoxia died after eight and a half months. Red blood cell cholinesterase levels on the day of admission correlated well with clinical severity and outcome of the patients. The pesticide was identified as ethion. Pesticide poisonings in developing countries have high morbidity and mortality rates, as facilities for immediate treatment are not readily available. Such incidents should sensitize clinical toxicologists, health authorities, and policy makers to the problems of pesticide poisoning in third world countries.

  1. Status and trends in poisonings in Denmark 2007-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalhoff, Kim Peder; Bøgevig, Søren; Høgberg, Lotte Christine Groth

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Danish Poison Information Centre (DPIC) provides information to the public and health care professionals on acute poisonings. The DPIC received 41,000 enquiries during the first three years of its existence as an open 24h telephone service. The aim of this data register study...... national poison centres, we predict a doubling in enquiries during the next ten years, mainly from the public....

  2. Status and trends in poisonings in Denmark 2007-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgevig, Søren; Høgberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Dalhoff, Kim Peder

    2011-01-01

    The Danish Poison Information Centre (DPIC) provides information to the public and health care professionals on acute poisonings. The DPIC received 41,000 enquiries during the first three years of its existence as an open 24h telephone service. The aim of this data register study was to classify ...... all substance exposures, to gain knowledge of the status and trends in poisonings (toxico-surveillance) and to evaluate the development in the number of contacts....

  3. Evaluation Of Methadone Poisoning in Hospitalized Children: A Short Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamali Maamouri

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Upload poisoning is one of the most dangerous and common poisoning in Iranian children. Depression of the respiratory and central nervous systems may lead to significant toxicity. Even low doses of uploads are dangerous in pediatrics under 6 years old. Methadone is the most toxic of the uploads; small doses as low as a single tablet can lead to death. According to this information we decided to evaluate methadone poisoning in Hospitalized Children

  4. A Case Report of Puffer Fish Poisoning in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Yong, Y. S.; Quek, L. S.; Lim, E. K.; Ngo, A.

    2013-01-01

    Although many Asians regard puffer fish as a delicacy since ancient times, puffer fish (Lageocephalus scitalleratus) is also a well-known source of possibly lethal food poisoning. The fish is gaining popularity in Singapore and can be found in quite a few restaurants now. Puffer fish contains tetrodotoxin (TTX), a potent poison affecting the neural pathway. Puffer fish poisoning may cause a constellation of symptoms, such as giddiness, numbness and tingling sensation of the mouth, paresthesia...

  5. 78 FR 40743 - Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention (ACCLPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... childhood lead poisoning prevention efforts. The committee also reviews and reports regularly on childhood lead poisoning prevention practices and recommends improvements in national childhood lead poisoning... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead...

  6. 76 FR 62071 - Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention(ACCLPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning... developments and their practical implications for childhood lead poisoning prevention efforts. The committee also reviews and reports regularly on childhood lead poisoning prevention practices and recommends...

  7. 75 FR 22401 - Petition from Pesticide Poisoning Victims United; Notice of Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-28

    ... AGENCY Petition from Pesticide Poisoning Victims United; Notice of Availability AGENCY: Environmental... petition from Pesticide Poisoning Victims United, a division of the Pitchfork Rebellion. The petitioners... the Agency Taking? EPA is announcing availability of a petition from Pesticide Poisoning Victims...

  8. Amanita muscaria and Amanita pantherina poisoning: two syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendramin, Andreja; Brvar, Miran

    2014-11-01

    Amanita muscaria contains more excitatory ibotenic acid and less depressant muscimol compared to Amanita pantherina. In this study A. muscaria poisoned patients were more often confused (26/32, p = 0.01) and agitated (20/32, p = 0.03) compared to those poisoned with A. pantherina (8/17 and 5/17). Patients poisoned with A. pantherina were more commonly comatose (5/17) compared to those poisoned with A. muscaria (2/32) (p = 0.03). In conclusion, the so-called ibotenic or pantherina-muscaria syndrome might be divided into two subtypes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Delay among the general public in telephoning a poison center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, R H; Dawson, S K; Westneat, S C; Rodgers, G C; Ross, M P

    1996-04-01

    Delay in seeking treatment for poisonings can hinder patient recovery. Our study examined delay in notifying a poison center about green tobacco sickness (GTS), a form of nicotine poisoning resulting from dermal contact with tobacco leaves. We conducted a follow-up survey of 55 cases of GTS reported by telephone to the kentucky Regional Poison Center in 1993. The "delay" group (38.2% of the cases) was defined as those callers who stated in the follow-up report that they should have phoned the poison center sooner than they did. Characteristics of the callers who delayed and the GTS patients they reported were compared with characteristics of the "non-delay" group. Delay was associated with callers' awareness of the poison center's expertise in agricultural poisonings and with age and sex of the patient. Our findings point to the need to target groups such as farmers with an educational campaign to make them more aware of the extent of the poison center's services and to encourage timely reporting of occupational poisonings.

  10. A Narrative Review of Acute Adult Poisoning in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Alinejad

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Poisoning is a frequent cause of referral to medical emergencies and a major health problem around the world, especially in developing countries. We aimed to review the epidemiology and pattern of adult poisoning in Iran in order to facilitate the early diagnosis and management of poisoning. The pattern of poisoning is different in various parts of Iran. Pharmaceutical compounds were the most common cause of poisoning in most parts of Iran. Pesticide-related toxicities were more common in northern agricultural regions, whereas bites and stings were seen more commonly in southern Iran. Carbon monoxide poisoning was common in cities with many motor vehicles such as Tehran and in colder climates such as in northern and western regions due to inadequately vented gas appliances such as stoves and heaters. Majoon Birjandi (containing cannabis is a unique substance used in eastern Iran. Poisoning by opioids, tramadol, and pesticides (organophosphate and aluminum phosphide has remained a common hazard in Iran. Poisoning-associated morbidity and mortality rates vary by region and have changed over time due to the introduction of new drugs and chemicals. Early diagnosis and proper treatment may be lifesaving; thus, understanding the general pattern of poisoning in different regions is important.

  11. Intermittent hemodialysis, irreplaceable in specific cases of severe poisoning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ventresca, M; Teta, D; Burnier, M; Kissling, S

    2015-01-01

    .... Apart from the traditional indications for renal replacement therapy, there are some cases such as metfomin and ethylene glycol poisoning, lithium intoxication severe hypercalcemia and tumor lysis...

  12. Hyperbaric oxygen for carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Nick A; Juurlink, David N; Isbister, Geoff; Bennett, Michael H; Lavonas, Eric J

    2011-04-13

    Poisoning with carbon monoxide (CO) remains an important cause of accidental and intentional injury worldwide. Several unblinded non-randomized trials have suggested that the use of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) prevents the development of neurological sequelae. This has led to the widespread use of HBO in the management of patients with carbon monoxide poisoning. To examine randomised trials of the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) compared to normobaric oxygen (NBO) for the prevention of neurologic sequelae in patients with acute carbon monoxide poisoning. We searched the following electronic databases; Cochrane Injuries Group Specialised Register (searched June 2010), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 2), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) 1950 to June 2010, EMBASE (Ovid SP) 1980 to June 2010, ISI Web of Science: Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED) 1970 to June 2010, ISI Web of Science: Conference Proceedings Citation Index-Science (CPCI-S) 1990 to June 2010. All randomised controlled trials of HBO compared to NBO, involving non-pregnant adults who are acutely poisoned with carbon monoxide (regardless of severity). Two authors independently extracted from each trial information on: the number of randomised patients, types of participants, the dose and duration of the intervention, and the prevalence of neurologic symptoms at follow-up. Seven randomised controlled trials of varying quality were identified; one was excluded because it did not evaluate clinical outcomes. Of the six remaining trials involving 1361 participants, two found a beneficial effect of HBO for the reduction of neurologic sequelae at one month, while four others did not. One of these is an incomplete publication (an abstract of an interim analysis). Although pooled random effects meta-analysis does not suggest a significant benefit from HBOT (OR for neurological deficits 0.78, 95%CI 0.54 to 1.12), significant methodologic and statistical heterogeneity was

  13. [Epidemiological analysis for Quzhou pesticide poisoning of year 2008 to 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shi-guang; Liu, Si-feng

    2012-09-01

    To provide scientific evidence of making measures for prevention of pesticide poisoning, the investigation on the condition of pesticide poisoning was carried out in Quzhou. Registration data of pesticide poisoning from 2008 to 2010 in Quzhou were collected and statistically analyzed by SPSS 12.0. During the three years, there were 1222 cases reported for pesticide poisoning. Among them, the number of occupational poisoning was 225 (1 case died), with fatality rate of 0.44%. The number of non-occupational poisoning was 997 (77 cases died), and its fatality rate was 7.72% . The incidence of occupational poisoning and non-occupational poisoning accounted for 18.4% and 81.6% respectively. Male patients were in the majority in occupational pesticides poisoning (accounting for 76.4%), female patients in non-occupational poisoning (accounting for 52.1%). The pesticide poisoning mainly occurred from July to September. Occupational poisoning and non-occupational poisoning cases mainly concentrated in over 65 age group, accounting for 36.0% (81 cases) and 26.3% (262 cases) respectively. Insecticide ranks the first in the terms of total poisoning cases caused by pesticide, and organophosphate poisoning ranks the first in all insecticides. Pesticides poisoning has badly threatened the public health in Quzhou, attention should be paid to non-occupational poisoning. The pesticides poisoning was mainly caused by organophosphate insecticides.

  14. An updated checklist of poisonous fishes of Turkish Aegean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahar Bayhan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The current status of marine poisonous fish species ranging in the Aegean Sea coastline in Turkey were introduced. Turkey is a peninsula surrounded by seas with different ecological features on three sides. The total length of shoreline is 8 333 km including the islands. The total number of fish species in Turkish seas is 512, of which 449 live in the Aegean Sea followed by the Mediterranean Sea (441 species, the Marmara Sea (257 species and the Black Sea (154species. On the Aegean Sea coasts, the richest sea regarding fish diversity, the number of poisonous fish species is also high. This mini-review revealed 51 poisonous fish species belonging to 14 families in the Turkish Aegean Sea. On the Aegean Sea coasts poisonous fish species can be categorized into three groups: (i Fish that contain venomous spines on the tail or on the operculum (ii Fish that carry poisonous bite and (iii Fish having poisonous flesh or liver. Poisoning fish that contain venomous spines on the tail or on the operculum mostly are dangerous because of their poisonous thorns whereas the passive poisonous fish species poison when they are eaten. These toxins can cause morbidity and rarely, mortality in humans. Apart from these, swallowing the blood of species such as European eel Anguilla anguilla and European conger Conger conger might also cause poisoning. Besides, as there has been an invasion of puffer fish especially on the Turkish Mediterranean and Aegean coasts in recent years, there is a danger in question. Thus, it is very important to particularly draw attention to these fish on the Turkish coasts.

  15. Acute Drug Poisoning in Tunisian Children: About 150 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hager Barakizou

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute drug poisoning remains an important public health problem and represents the second most frequent accidental disease in children. In this study, we identified epidemiological and clinical features of children admitted for acute drug poisoning and related factors associated with suicidal poisoning. Methods: We conducted a retrospective study in the Department of Pediatrics, the Military Hospital, Tunis, over a period of 8 years (2008-2014. Children aged less than 16 yr and admitted for acute drug poisoning were included. Cases of drug addiction were excluded. Two groups were compared: accidental poisoning / suicidal poisoning. Results: We collected 150 cases. The ratio male / female was 1:1.2. The mean age was 4.3 yr. Poisoning was due to one drug in 82% of cases. Children were asymptomatic in 39% of cases, had digestive and neurologic symptoms respectively in 30% and 20% of cases, respectively. Psychotropics came in the first place (20% followed by paracetamol (16%. Two groups were identified: accidental poisoning (74 % and suicidal poisoning (26%. Four factors were significantly associated with suicidal poisoning: age ≥ 8 yr (P< 0.001, OR= 16.25, 95% IC : [6.44-40.95], female gender (P=0.011, OR= 5.4, 95% IC: [2.09-13.91], multiple drug intake (P < 0.001, OR= 9.42, 95% IC: [3.05-29.03] and use of psychotropics (P= 0.003, OR=4.81, 95%IC: [2.06-11.26] . Conclusion: Two groups had to be distinguished: accidental and suicidal drug poisoning. The identification of their characteristics and their predisposing factors is necessary in order to take appropriate preventive actions.

  16. [Poisoning with Jatropha curcas: 24 cases reported to Paris and Marseille Poisons Centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langrand, J; Médernach, C; Schmitt, C; Blanc-Brisset, I; Villa, A F; de Haro, L; Garnier, R

    2015-03-01

    Jatropha curcas L. is an inedible plant belonging to the Euphorbiaceae family that is growing in subtropical zones of all continents. We report a series of 24 cases of poisoning with J. curcas seeds or fruits reported to poison centers in Paris and Marseille between December 2000 and June 2014. Fifteen adults and 9 children ingested J. curcas seeds or fruits. All patients experienced gastrointestinal disorders, within the first hours following ingestion: nausea, vomiting, diarrhea and abdominal pain. Laboratory investigations performed in 10 patients revealed minor abnormalities: CK elevation (8 cases), dehydration (5 cases) with moderate elevation of serum creatinine levels (3 cases), and mildly increased serum bilirubin (8 cases). Complete remission of all clinical signs was observed within 48 hours in the 20 cases for which the outcome was known. Previously published cases of J. curcas poisoning were very similar to ours: As in our series, gastrointestinal disorders were always present. They were sometimes associated with neurological or cardiovascular signs, and hepatic or renal disorders; these were generally interpreted as complications of severe gastroenteritis, although direct toxic effects could not be formally excluded. In most cases, simple supportive measures were sufficient to ensure complete recovery within 24-48 hours. J Curcas poisoning incidence is certainly increasing because the plant is cultivated to produce biodiesel and is now largely present in most subtropical countries. As a consequence, local health professionals should be informed of the toxic properties of this plant.

  17. Understanding lactic acidosis in paracetamol (acetaminophen) poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Anoop D; Wood, David M; Dargan, Paul I

    2011-01-01

    Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is one of the most commonly taken drugs in overdose in many areas of the world, and the most common cause of acute liver failure in both the UK and USA. Paracetamol poisoning can result in lactic acidosis in two different scenarios. First, early in the course of poisoning and before the onset of hepatotoxicity in patients with massive ingestion; a lactic acidosis is usually associated with coma. Experimental evidence from studies in whole animals, perfused liver slices and cell cultures has shown that the toxic metabolite of paracetamol, N-acetyl-p-benzo-quinone imine, inhibits electron transfer in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and thus inhibits aerobic respiration. This occurs only at very high concentrations of paracetamol, and precedes cellular injury by several hours. The second scenario in which lactic acidosis can occur is later in the course of paracetamol poisoning as a consequence of established liver failure. In these patients lactate is elevated primarily because of reduced hepatic clearance, but in shocked patients there may also be a contribution of peripheral anaerobic respiration because of tissue hypoperfusion. In patients admitted to a liver unit with paracetamol hepatotoxicity, the post-resuscitation arterial lactate concentration has been shown to be a strong predictor of mortality, and is included in the modified King's College criteria for consideration of liver transplantation. We would therefore recommend that post-resuscitation lactate is measured in all patients with a severe paracetamol overdose resulting in either reduced conscious level or hepatic failure. © 2010 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology © 2010 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. Rhabdomyolysis as a manifestation of clomipramine poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Oliveira de Santana

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Tricyclic antidepressive agents are widely used in suicide attempts and present a variety of deleterious effects. Rhabdomyolysis is a rare complication of such poisoning. CASE REPORT: A 55-year-old woman ingested 120 pills of 25 mg clomipramine in a suicide attempt two days before admission. After gastric lavage in another emergency department on the day of intake, 80 pills were removed. On admission to our department, she was disoriented, complaining of a dry mouth and tremors at the extremities. An electrocardiogram showed a sinus rhythm with narrow QRS complexes. Laboratory results showed high creatine phosphokinase (CK = 15,094 U/l on admission; normal range = 26 to 140 U/l, hypocalcemia, slightly increased serum transaminases and mild metabolic acidosis. The patient's medical history included depression with previous suicide attempts, obsessive-compulsive disorder, hypothyroidism and osteoporosis. She presented cardiac arrest with pulseless electric activity for seven minutes and afterwards, without sedation, showed continuous side-to-side eye movement. She developed refractory hypotension, with need for vasopressors. Ceftriaxone and clindamycin administration was started because of a hypothesis of bronchoaspiration. The patient remained unresponsive even without sedation, with continuous side-to-side eye movement and a decerebrate posture. She died two months later. Rhabdomyolysis is a very rare complication of poisoning due to tricyclic drugs. It had only previously been described after an overdose of cyclobenzaprine, which has a toxicity profile similar to tricyclic drugs. CONCLUSIONS: Although arrhythmia is the most important complication, rhabdomyolysis should be investigated in cases of clomipramine poisoning.

  19. Rhabdomyolysis among acute human poisoning cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaie, H; Pajouhmand, A; Abdollahi, M; Panahandeh, R; Emami, H; Hajinasrolah, S; Tghaddosinezhad, M

    2007-07-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is a clinical and biochemical syndrome occurring when skeletal muscle cells erupt and result in release of creatine phosphokinase (CPK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and myoglobin into the interstitial space and plasma. Mechanical trauma, compression, excessive muscle activity and ischemia are frequent causes, but non-traumatic rhabdomyolysis is usually caused by a toxic reaction to drugs. In this study, 181 patients suspected of rhabdomyolysis were admitted to the poisoning center of Loghman-Hakim Hospital in Tehran during one year (September 2004 to September 2005) were studied. Patients were included on the basis of physical examination and blood analysis for CPK and LDH. Rhabdomyolysis was confirmed if CPK level has been greater than 975 U/L. Out of 181 patients, 64 were female and 117 were male with an age range between 13-78 years. One-hundred and forty-three (79%) patients had CPK greater than 975 U/L. In 6% of the cases, multiple drug poisoning were observed. Two patients (1.1%) had muscle pain, five patients (2.8%) had rigidity and five patients (2.8%) had muscle inflammation. One-hundred and nineteen patients (65.7%) were febrile. The most common cause of rhabdomyolysis was opium. Blood ALT showed an increase in 109 patients (60.9%), AST in 80 patients (44.7%), and LDH in 144 patients (79.6%). Fifty patients (28.2%) had higher blood direct bilirubin and 64 patients (36.4%) showed higher total bilirubin. Six percent of patients had been diagnosed as ARF by indication of creatinine greater than 1.4 mg/dL. Five percent of patients had hypernatremia and 1.1% of patients had hyperkalemia. It is concluded that rhabdomyolysis is a matter of concern in human poisonings and needs special approach to attend.

  20. POISONOUS PLANTS – TWO CASES OF POISONING WITH THORN APPLE (DATURA STRAMONIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljuba Gangl-Žvikart

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available   Background. In attempt to provoke hallucinations two adolescents were poisoned with thorn apple. This plant could be easily found near urban and rural areas such as fields and dykes. It spreads around as a weed and its seeds are found even in bird’s food. In nowadays these seeds could be found in seedman’s shops offered for sale as decorative plants. While free acces to the internet enables the targeted population, in this case mostly adolescents, to gather large amount of information on hallucinogenic effects of seeds described above. It does not provide them with information on negative side effects which causes urgent visits at intensive care units of hospitals. The fact that the abuse of thorn apple’s seeds causes intoxications is more and more often described in scientific literature. In 1997/98 the paediatricians from Maribor described three cases of accidental poisoning of adolescents. In Slovenia there are only four out of twelve pediatric departments which haven’t had any case of poisoning of that kind yet.Results. Clinical data – simptoms of central and peripherial anticholinergic syndrom and the history (heteroanamnesy showed the possibility of poisoning with plant’s alkaloids with anticholinergic activity which was comfirmed by doctor on duty. She provided me in person with exact, specific and detailed description of seeds consumed by two young men. Physostigmine salicilate is the drug of choice and it is used in cases of serious poisoning.Conclusions. After serious clinical simptoms at the beginning both adolescents recovered well and after three days of medical supervision they were released from the hospital without any consequences harmful to their health.   

  1. Get the Lead Out: Facts about Childhood Lead Poisoning [and] Housekeeping Tips To Reduce Lead Exposure [and] Nutrition and Lead Poisoning [and] The Medical Consequences of Lead Poisoning [and] Lead Poisoning for Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    This document is comprised of five fact sheets from the Illinois Department of Public Health regarding childhood lead poisoning. Recent studies claim that childhood lead poisoning can contribute to problems later in life, such as academic failure, juvenile delinquency, and high blood pressure. Directed to parents, caregivers, and health care…

  2. Patients With Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and Subsequent Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ching-Yuan; Huang, Yu-Wei; Tseng, Chun-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Sung, Fung-Chang; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The present study evaluated the dementia risk after carbon monoxide poisoning (CO poisoning). Using the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan, a total of 9041 adults newly diagnosed with CO poisoning from 2000 to 2011 were identified as the CO poisoning cohort. Four-fold (N = 36,160) of non-CO poisoning insured people were randomly selected as controls, frequency-matched by age, sex, and hospitalization year. Incidence and hazard ratio (HR) of dementia were measured by the end 2011. The dementia incidence was 1.6-fold higher in the CO exposed cohort than in the non-exposed cohort (15.2 vs 9.76 per 10,000 person-years; n = 62 vs 174) with an adjusted HR of 1.50 (95% CI = 1.11–2.04). The sex- and age-specific hazards were higher in male patients (adjusted HR = 1.74, 95% CI = 1.20–2.54), and those aged poisoning patients on hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) therapy had an adjusted HR of 1.80 (95% CI = 0.96–3.37). This study suggests that CO poisoning may have association with the risk of developing dementia, which is significant for severe cases. The effectiveness of HBO2 therapy remains unclear in preventing dementia. Patients with CO poisoning are more prevalent with depression. PMID:26735545

  3. Acute kidney injury following Paraquat poisoning in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Malleshappa

    2013-01-01

    Paraquat is highly toxic to human and is widely used in agriculture as a contact herbicide. Paraquat poisoning is associated with high mortality varying from 35% to 50%. Six cases of paraquat poisoning were treated in our center. Acute kidney injury developed in all the cases and mortality was 66%. Respiratory and multiorgan failure are the main causes for mortality.

  4. Transport signatures of quasiparticle poisoning in a Majorana island

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrecht, S. M.; Hansen, E. B.; Higginbotham, A. P.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate effects of quasiparticle poisoning in a Majorana island with strong tunnel coupling to normal-metal leads. In addition to the main Coulomb blockade diamonds, "shadow" diamonds appear, shifted by 1e in gate voltage, consistent with transport through an excited (poisoned) state...

  5. Paraffin (kerosene) poisoning in childhood is prevention affordable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    areas with child-resistant paraffin containers. In these areas age-specific paraffin poisoning rates ranged from. 1,8/1 000 to 7,7/1 000. Strategically planned interventions can be cost-effective when weighed against the treatment cost of cases of paraffin poisoning. S Atr Med J 1994; 84: 735-738. National Trauma Research ...

  6. Childhood Lead Poisoning: Rhode Island Kids Count Issue Brief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhode Island KIDS COUNT, Providence.

    Noting that childhood lead poisoning is one of the most common preventable pediatric health problems, this report examines lead poisoning as a health problem to which infants and young children are most susceptible and as a housing problem directly related to a shortage of safe, affordable housing. The report details screening rates in Rhode…

  7. Strategic Plan for Preventing Childhood Lead Poisoning in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    The severity of the silent epidemic of lead poisoning and its long range effects on young children in impairment of intellectual ability, short-term memory, concentration, and reaction time have been recognized. A 3-year strategic plan for preventing childhood lead poisoning in Illinois was developed by a planning committee working through four…

  8. Recognition and Management of Pesticide Poisonings. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Donald P.

    This manual aids health professionals in recognizing and treating pesticide poisonings. Suggested treatments are appropriate for implementation in the small hospitals and clinics which usually receive the victims of pesticide poisoning. Classes of compounds covered include: (1) organophosphate cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides; (2) carbamate…

  9. Pattern of acute poisoning in Tehran-Iran in 2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadnia, Shahin; Esmaily, Hadi; Sasanian, Ghazal; Pajoumand, Abdolkarim; Hassanian-Moghaddam, Hosein; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2007-09-01

    To characterize the poisoning cases admitted to the Loghman-Hakim Hospital Poison Center (a teaching reference hospital of poisoning) in Tehran, Iran. All admitted acutely poisoned patients from January to December 2003 were evaluated retrospectively. Information of socio-demographic characteristics, agents and cause of poisoning, and the mortality rate were collected from medical records of the hospital. During this period, 24 179 cases were referred to the emergency department that 10 206 of them were admitted. Of the admitted cases, 51% were male and 49% female. The majority (38%) of cases were in the age range of 21-30 years. Most (79%) of poisonings were intentional and 21% were unintentional. The most important agents of acute poisoning were drugs (69.13%) especially sedative-hypnotics followed by opioids (12.34%) and pesticides especially organophosphates (OPs) (6.21%). The mortality rate was 1.3% (318 patients). Death was mostly occurred by opioids (41.54%), followed by drugs (28%) and pesticides especially OPs (12%). The prevention and treatment of poisoning due to opioids, pesticides specially OPs and sedative-hypnotics drugs should merit high priority in the health care of the indigenous population of Tehran.

  10. Unearthing poison use and consequent anecdotal vulture mortalities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We show that estimated mortalities of vultures due to anthropogenic causes amount to over 800 individuals over the period 2000–2015, which underscores the magnitude of the problem. The highest numbers of ... Poison is typically used by means of distributing poisoned baits in the landscape. Furthermore, willingness to ...

  11. Systematic account of animal poisonings in Germany, 2012-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, S E; Mischke, R H; Hopster-Iversen, C; von Krueger, X; Ammer, H; Potschka, H; Stürer, A; Begemann, K; Desel, H; Greiner, M

    2017-04-01

    A systematic retrospective study on animal poisonings in Germany (wildlife excluded) between January 2012 and December 2015 was conducted. Data were collected on animal exposure calls to German poison centres, poisoning cases presenting to the University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover Small Animal and Equine Clinics, cases involving off-label use of veterinary medicinal products reported to the Federal Office of Consumer Protection and Food Safety and toxicological submissions to the Institute of Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Pharmacy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich. Descriptive statistics were used to characterise animal type, exposure reason, type and substance, year/month of exposure, case severity and outcome. An evaluation of the data and data sources was also carried out. Variation in poisoning patterns was seen. However, dogs and cats were the most frequently reported species and medicinal products, pesticides and plants were consistently implicated as top causes of poisoning. Advantages and disadvantages were associated with each data source; bias was found to be an important consideration when evaluating poisoning data. This study provided useful information on animal poisonings in Germany and highlights the need for standardised approaches for the collection, evaluation and integration of poisoning data from multiple sources. British Veterinary Association.

  12. Paraffin poisoning in children: what can we do differently? | Malangu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The purpose of this study was to describe the occurrence, health cost and management of paraffin poisoning in a rural South African hospital. Methods: A retrospective study was undertaken of 145 children admitted with a diagnosis of paraffin poisoning at Philadelphia Hospital, Mpumalanga from January 2000 ...

  13. 4-Aminopyridine (fampridine) effectively treats amlodipine poisoning : a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilffert, B.; Boskma, R. J.; van der Voort, P. H. J.; Uges, D. R. A.; van Roon, E. N.; Brouwers, J. R. B. J.

    2007-01-01

    A case of a serious poisoning with the calcium entry blocker amlodipine is described, which was treated effectively with 4-aminopyridine. Calcium is suggested as general treatment of poisoning with calcium entry blockers in many guidelines. The use of intravenous 4-aminopyridine is theoretically

  14. 4-Aminopyridine (fampridine) effectively treats amlodipine poisoning: A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilffert, B.; Boskma, R.J.; Van Der Voort, P.H.J.; Uges, D.R.A.; Van Roon, E.N.; Brouwers, J.R.B.J.

    2007-01-01

    A case of a serious poisoning with the calcium entry blocker amlodipine is described, which was treated effectively with 4-aminopyridine. Calcium is suggested as general treatment of poisoning with calcium entry blockers in many guidelines. The use of intravenous 4-aminopyridine is theoretically

  15. Topoisomerase II poisoning by indazole and imidazole complexes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The clinical use of these compounds however was hindered due to toxic side effects on the human body. Our present study on topoisomerase II poisoning by these compounds shows that they effectively poison the activity of topoisomerase II by forming a ternary cleavage complex of DNA, drug and topoisomerase II.

  16. Acute organo-phosphorus pesticide poisoning in North Karnataka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pesticide poisoning is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in India. Objectives: To assess the oxidative damage, hemoglobin level and leukocyte count in acute organophosphorus pesticide poisoning. Methods: Plasma cholinesterase was assessed as a toxicity marker. Oxidative damage was ...

  17. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in a Child: A Case Report | Asani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The exact incidence of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in Nigeria is unknown. Globally, CO poisoning is frequently unrecognized and under-reported since the clinical presentation is relatively non-specific. The circumstances usually involve an unsuspected increase of CO in an enclosed environment. We present the ...

  18. Accidental childhood poisoning in Benin City: Still a problem ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian children. Reports on AP are infrequent in Nigeria. This retrospective descriptive study examined the prevailing pattern of accidental childhood poisoning in Benin City. Accidental poisonings were identified in 226 (3.3%) of the cases during the 10 – year period. The children were aged 9 months to 5 years with peak ...

  19. Anatomy of lead poisoning | Duru | Research Journal of Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Lead poisoning and lead toxicity is usually often interchangeably used by different Scientists. The Anatomy of lead poisoning encompasses its effects on different organ-systems of different species of organisms. It also includes environmental, functional and biochemical components associated with most heavy ...

  20. Accidental childhood poisoning in Ebonyi State University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There was an increasing trend of accidental childhood poisoning during the study period, males (68.2%) and toddlers (59.1%) were the most vulnerable group. In view of the predominate contribution of kerosene in accidental childhood poisoning there is a need to educate the public about the hazard of storage of kerosene ...

  1. Pesticide Poisonings in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørs, Erik; Neupane, Dinesh; London, Leslie

    2018-01-01

    Aims and scope This editorial is an introduction to the papers making up the special issue on 'pesticide poisonings in low- and middle income countries'.......Aims and scope This editorial is an introduction to the papers making up the special issue on 'pesticide poisonings in low- and middle income countries'....

  2. Kratom exposures reported to Texas poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2013-01-01

    Kratom use is a growing problem in the United States. Kratom exposures reported to Texas poison centers between January 1998 and September 2013 were identified. No kratom exposures were reported from 1998 to 2008 and 14 exposures were reported from 2009 to September 2013. Eleven patients were male, and 11 patients were in their 20s. The kratom was ingested in 12 patients, inhaled in 1, and both ingested and inhaled in 1. Twelve patients were managed at a healthcare facility and the remaining 2 were managed at home.

  3. Lead poisoning in woodpeckers in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mörner, T; Petersson, L

    1999-10-01

    Lead poisoning was demonstrated in two gray-headed woodpeckers (Picus canus) and one white-backed woodpecker (Dendrocopus leucotos) in Sweden; they had liver lead levels between 9.4 and 26.2 mg(-1) wet weight. At necropsy one gray-headed woodpecker showed signs of emaciation and the other one had severe traumatic injuries, caused by a cat. The white-backed woodpecker died in the transportation box during a translocation program. The source of the lead could not be determined, but it was suspected that it may have originated from lead pellets shot into trees and picked out by the woodpeckers during food search.

  4. Poisoning due to Savlon (cetrimide) liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, T Y

    1994-10-01

    1. Seven adult cases of deliberate oral exposure to 'Savlon' liquid (chlorhexidine gluconate 0.3%, cetrimide 3%) are presented. 2. In six patients, the symptoms were relatively mild including nausea, vomiting, sore throat and abdominal pain. 3. One patient who had concomitantly taken 'Dettol' liquid was comatose and hypotensive at presentation and was complicated by aspiration pneumonia and adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). She was ventilated for a total of 10 days and was hospitalised for 5 weeks. 4. The data from this study suggest that symptoms associated with Savlon poisoning are usually mild. When aspirated, Savlon together with 'Dettol' liquid can cause ARDS.

  5. An uncommon but lethal poisoning – Amitraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joydeep Chakraborty

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Amitraz, a centrally acting alpha-2 adrenergic agonist, isincreasingly being used for treatment of ectoparasiticinfestation in cattle. Its effects in humans may mimicorganophosphate poisoning. We report a case of poisoningafter suicidal ingestion of Amitraz. The patient presented ina deeply comatose state with respiratory depression,bradycardia and mydriasis (instead of miosis, the morecommon presentation in previous reports. He recoveredcompletely within 24 hours with adequate supportivemeasures. The importance of this case report is highlightedby the increasing use of this compound, the life-threateningpresentation, the excellent prognosis with early recognitionand supportive management and the limited humantoxicological data.

  6. Chronic copper poisoning in feeder lambs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tait, R.M.; Krishnamurti, C.R.; Gilchrist, E.W.; MacDonald, K.

    1971-03-01

    Nineteen of 55 feeder lambs succumbed to chronic copper poisoning after consuming a concentrate ration containing 27 ppm copper for a period of 16 weeks. Liver copper levels averaged 1312 +/- 172 ppm on a dry matter basis, being at least three to four times normal. The use of soybean meal or urea as sources of supplemental nitrogen did not appear to influence the occurrence of this disorder. The fastest growing lambs were not necessarily the first to succumb. The copper content of ingredients and mineral supplements should receive attention when rations for sheep are formulated. 10 references, 3 figures.

  7. A Case Report of Puffer Fish Poisoning in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. S. Yong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although many Asians regard puffer fish as a delicacy since ancient times, puffer fish (Lageocephalus scitalleratus is also a well-known source of possibly lethal food poisoning. The fish is gaining popularity in Singapore and can be found in quite a few restaurants now. Puffer fish contains tetrodotoxin (TTX, a potent poison affecting the neural pathway. Puffer fish poisoning may cause a constellation of symptoms, such as giddiness, numbness and tingling sensation of the mouth, paresthesia, and muscle weakness. Severe cases may present with respiratory depression, circulatory failure, and death. TTX poisonings have been reported in Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Bangladesh, and the United States (Haque et al. 2008. We report a case of mild poisoning and suggest observation for such cases.

  8. Acute abdominal pain and constipation due to lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mongolu, S; Sharp, P

    2013-01-01

    Although uncommon, lead poisoning should be considered as a differential diagnosis in cases of unexplained acute abdominal pain in both adults and children. We present the case of a 35-year-old Asian male who presented with abdominal pain and constipation secondary to lead poisoning. Initially, the source of lead exposure was not apparent; this was later found to be due to ingestion of an Ayurvedic herbal medicine for the treatment of infertility. Lead poisoning due to the ingestion of Ayurvedic remedies is well described. We discuss the diagnosis, pathophysiology and treatment of lead poisoning. This case illustrates one of the rarer medical causes of acute abdominal pain and emphasizes the need to take a thorough history (including specific questioning regarding the use of over-the-counter and traditional/ herbal remedies) in cases of suspected poisoning or drug toxicity.

  9. Pesticide poisoning: a major health problem in Sri Lanka

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoek, Wim van der; Konradsen, F; Athukorala, K

    1998-01-01

    Acute pesticide poisoning is a major public health problem in Sri Lanka. In several agricultural districts, it precedes all other causes of death in government hospitals. Most of the acute poisoning cases are intentional (suicide) and occur among young adults, mainly males. Poisoning due...... to occupational exposure is also common, but less well documented. In an irrigation area in Sri Lanka a very high incidence of serious pesticide poisoning was observed, with 68% due to intentional ingestion of liquid pesticides. It is argued that the easy availability and widespread use of highly hazardous...... that promote the safe use of pesticides through education and training of farmers will be ineffective in Sri Lanka because knowledge is already high and most poisoning cases are intentional. Instead, enforcement of legislation to restrict availability of the most hazardous pesticides would result...

  10. Diagnosis and Treatment of Amanita Phalloides-Type Mushroom Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Charles E.; Tong, Theodore G.; Roe, Robert L.; Scott, Robert A. T.; MacQuarrie, Michael B.; Boerner, Udo; Bartter, Frederic

    1976-01-01

    The number of cases of mushroom poisoning is increasing as a result of the increasing popularity of “wild” mushroom consumption. Amanitin and phalloidin cytotoxins found in some Amanita and Galerina species produce the most severe and frequent life-threatening symptoms of Amanita phalloidestype poisoning. Delay in onset of symptoms, individual susceptibility variation and lack of rapid and reliable identification have contributed to the significant morbidity and mortality of this type of poisoning. A rapid chromatographic assay for identifying the potent cytotoxins and apparently successful management using thioctic acid of two cases of A. phalloides-type mushroom poisoning are reported. All known cases of A. phalloides-type mushroom poisoning treated with thioctic acid in the United States are summarized. PMID:788340

  11. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning and Subsequent Cardiovascular Disease Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Feng-You; Chen, Wei-Kung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is considered one of the most crucial health concerns. Few studies have investigated the correlation between CO poisoning and the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Therefore, we conducted a population-based, longitudinal cohort study in Taiwan to determine whether patients with CO poisoning are associated with higher risk of developing subsequent CVDs, including arrhythmia, coronary artery disease (CAD) and congestive heart failure (CHF). This retrospective study used the National Health Insurance Research Database. The study cohort comprised all patients aged ≥20 years with a diagnosis of CO poisoning and hospitalized during 2000 to 2011 (N = 8381), and the comparison cohort comprised randomly selected non-CO-poisoned patients (N = 33,524) frequency-matched with the study cohort by age, sex, and the year of index date. Each patient was individually tracked to identify those who develop CVD events during the follow-up period. Cox proportional hazards regression model was performed to calculate the hazard ratios of CVDs after adjusting for possible confounders. The overall incidences of arrhythmia, CAD, and CHF were higher in the patients with CO poisoning than in the controls (2.57 vs 1.25/1000 person-years, 3.28 vs 2.25/1000 person-years, and 1.32 vs 1.05/1000 person-years, respectively). After adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities, the patients with CO poisoning were associated with a 1.83-fold higher risk of arrhythmia compared with the comparison cohort, and nonsignificantly associated with risk of CAD and CHF. CO-poisoned patients with coexisting comorbidity or in high severity were associated with significantly and substantially increased risk of all 3 CVDs. CO poisoning is associated with increased risk of subsequent development of arrhythmia. Future studies are required to explore the long-term effects of CO poisoning on the cardiovascular system. PMID:25761191

  12. [What is a "poison"? Proposal of definition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitart, Raimon; Giménez, Nuria

    2012-02-18

    We discuss different interpretations of the term poison as well as the need of bringing up to date the changes in this matter according to the science progress. A clear and exact definition is proposed after analysing the factors that affect the relativity of the concept and its boundaries. The proposal for a definition is presented taking into account the most broadly extended concepts concerning its significance. That is to say: "a poison is, for human beings and their non-pathogenic and non-harmful biological environment, an electromagnetic or corpuscular radiation, or a non-infectious chemical agent, structured no larger in size than a small particle or fibre that, after being generated internally or after contact, penetration and/or absorption by a live organism, in sufficiently high dose, can produce or produces a direct or indirect adverse effect unrelated to its temperature or measurable electrical potential difference". The scientific knowledge needs accurate definitions to avoid ambiguities. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Occupational Metallic Mercury Poisoning in Gilders

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    M Vahabzadeh

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to elemental mercury vapor usually occurs through inhalation during its utilizations. This leads to a variety of adverse health effects. In some Islamic cities, this type of poisoning may occur during gilding of shrines using elemental mercury with gold. Herein, we report on three male patients aged 20–53 years, who were diagnosed with occupational metallic mercury poisoning due to gilding of a shrine. All patients presented with neuro-psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, loss of memory and concentration, and sleep disorders with high urinary mercury concentrations of 326–760 μg/L upon referring, 3–10 days after cessation of elemental mercury exposure. Following chelating therapy, the patients recovered clinically and their mercury concentrations declined to non-toxic level (<25 μg/L. Health, environmental and labor authorities, as well as the gilders should be aware of the toxicity risk of exposure to metalic mercury during gilding in closed environments and act accordingly.

  14. Acute mercury poisoning: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Mercury poisoning can occur as a result of occupational hazard or suicide attempt. This article presents a 36-year-old case admitted to emergency department (ED) due to exposure to metallic mercury. Case Presentatıon A 36-year-old woman presented to the ED with a three-day history of abdominal pain, diarrhea and fever. One week ago her daughter had brought mercury in the liquid form from the school. She had put it on the heating stove. One day later, her 14-month old sister baby got fever and died before admission to the hospital. Her blood pressure was 134/87 mmHg; temperature, 40.2°C; heart rate 105 bpm and regular; respiration, 18 bpm; O2 saturation, 96%. Nothing was remarkable on examination and routine laboratory tests. As serine or urinary mercury levels could not be tested in the city, symptomatic chelation treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) was instituted with regard to presumptive diagnosis and history. At the 7th day of admission she was discharged without any sequelae or complaint. At the discharge day blood was drawn and sent for mercury levels which turned out to be 30 μg/dL (normal range: 0 - 10 μg/dL). Conclusion Public education on poisoning and the potential hazards of mercury are of vital importance for community health. PMID:20302609

  15. Gallium poisoning: a rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Chris S; Ivanoff, Athena E; Hottel, Timothy L

    2012-02-01

    The authors present a case of a college student who suffered acute gallium poisoning as a result of accidental exposure to gallium halide complexes. This is extremely rare and has never been reported in the literature. Acute symptoms after the incident, which initially presented as dermatitis and appeared relatively not life-threatening, rapidly progressed to dangerous episodes of tachycardia, tremors, dyspnea, vertigo, and unexpected black-outs. Had there been effective emergency medical care protocols, diagnostic testing, treatment and antidotes, the latent manifestations of irreversible cardiomyopathy may have been prevented. Given how quickly exposure led to morbidity, this article aims to raise an awareness of the toxic potential of gallium. This has particular relevance for workers involved in the production of semiconductors where there is a potential for accidental exposure to gallium by-products during device processing. It may also have implications for dentists who use gallium alloys to replace mercury containing amalgam. In the absence of threshold limit values and exposure limits for humans, as well as emergency medical guidelines for treatment of poisoning, the case calls on the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration to establish guidelines and medical management protocols specific for gallium. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Paralytic complications of puffer fish (tetrodotoxin) poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahasan, H A M N; Mamun, A A; Karim, S R; Bakar, M A; Gazi, E A; Bala, C S

    2004-02-01

    Puffer fish is available in Bangladesh and is occasionally eaten by some people. Ignorance regarding its proper cooking process may lead to serious health hazards, including fatality. An unusual catastrophic event happened recently in Khulna, Bangladesh that drew nationwide attention. Eight families were affected. Thirty-seven patients were admitted with a history of consumption of puffer fish. Peri-oral paraesthesia (24), weakness of both lower limbs (22), paraesthesia all over the body (18), headache (15), difficulty in respiration (14), nausea and vomiting (8), blurring of vision (7), and vertigo (6) were common clinical presentations. Twenty-two patients developed ascending paralysis of limbs and involved the respiratory muscles in 17 patients. Eight patients died due to respiratory failure while the rest improved. Health personnel should have sufficient knowledge regarding the clinical manifestations, complications and management of puffer fish poisoning. During its preparation, organs that contain the highest level of tetrodotoxin should be removed. Since there is no specific treatment, people should be made aware of the potential risk of eating puffer fish, about the warning symptoms and signs of puffer fish poisoning, and when to seek medical help.

  17. Acute mercury poisoning: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aktas Can

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mercury poisoning can occur as a result of occupational hazard or suicide attempt. This article presents a 36-year-old case admitted to emergency department (ED due to exposure to metallic mercury. Case Presentatıon A 36-year-old woman presented to the ED with a three-day history of abdominal pain, diarrhea and fever. One week ago her daughter had brought mercury in the liquid form from the school. She had put it on the heating stove. One day later, her 14-month old sister baby got fever and died before admission to the hospital. Her blood pressure was 134/87 mmHg; temperature, 40.2°C; heart rate 105 bpm and regular; respiration, 18 bpm; O2 saturation, 96%. Nothing was remarkable on examination and routine laboratory tests. As serine or urinary mercury levels could not be tested in the city, symptomatic chelation treatment with N-acetyl cysteine (NAC was instituted with regard to presumptive diagnosis and history. At the 7th day of admission she was discharged without any sequelae or complaint. At the discharge day blood was drawn and sent for mercury levels which turned out to be 30 μg/dL (normal range: 0 - 10 μg/dL. Conclusion Public education on poisoning and the potential hazards of mercury are of vital importance for community health.

  18. N-acetylcysteine overdose after acetaminophen poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoudi GA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ghafar Ali Mahmoudi,1 Peyman Astaraki,1 Azita Zafar Mohtashami,1 Maryam Ahadi2 1Faculty of Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, 2Legal Medicine Research Center of Lorestan, Khorramabad, Iran Abstract: N-acetylcysteine (NAC is used widely and effectively in oral and intravenous forms as a specific antidote for acetaminophen poisoning. Here we report a rare case of iatrogenic NAC overdose following an error in preparation of the solution, and describe its clinical symptoms. Laboratory results and are presented and examined. A 23-year-old alert female patient weighing 65 kg presented to the emergency ward with weakness, lethargy, extreme fatigue, nausea, and dizziness. She had normal arterial blood gas and vital signs. An excessive dosage of NAC over a short period of time can lead to hemolysis, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure in patients with normal glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and finally to death. Considering the similarity between some of the clinical symptoms of acetaminophen overdose and NAC overdose, it is vitally important for the administration phases and checking of the patient's symptoms to be carried out attentively and cautiously. Keywords: N-acetylcysteine, overdose, acetaminophen poisoning, medication error

  19. Cisplatin Analogs Confer Protection against Cyanide Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Anjali K; Shi, Xu; Harrison, Devin L; Morningstar, Jordan E; Mahon, Sari; Chan, Adriano; Sips, Patrick; Lee, Jangwoen; MacRae, Calum A; Boss, Gerry R; Brenner, Matthew; Gerszten, Robert E; Peterson, Randall T

    2017-05-18

    Cisplatin holds an illustrious position in the history of chemistry most notably for its role in the virtual cure of testicular cancer. Here we describe a role for this small molecule in cyanide detoxification in vivo. Cyanide kills organisms as diverse as insects, fish, and humans within seconds to hours. Current antidotes exhibit limited efficacy and are not amenable to mass distribution requiring the development of new classes of antidotes. The binding affinity of the cyanide anion for the positively charged metal platinum is known to create an extremely stable complex in vitro. We therefore screened a panel of diverse cisplatin analogs and identified compounds that conferred protection from cyanide poisoning in zebrafish, mice, and rabbits. Cumulatively, this discovery pipeline begins to establish the characteristics of platinum ligands that influence their solubility, toxicity, and efficacy, and provides proof of concept that platinum-based complexes are effective antidotes for cyanide poisoning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute Pancreatitis Caused By Mushroom Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samet Karahan Research Fellow

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Of the more than 5000 species of mushrooms known, 100 types are toxic and approximately 10% of these toxic types can cause fatal toxicity. A type of mushroom called Amanita phalloides is responsible for 95% of toxic mushroom poisonings. In this article, we report 2 cases of mushroom poisonings caused by Lactarius volemus, known as Tirmit by the local people. The patient and his wife were admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting 20 hours after consuming Lactarius volemus, an edible type of mushroom. The patients reported that they had been collecting this mushroom from the mountains and eating them for several years but had never developed any clinicopathology to date. Further examination of the patients revealed a very rare case of acute pancreatitis due to mushroom intoxication. The male patient was admitted to the intensive care unit while his wife was followed in the internal medicine service, because of her relative mild clinical symptoms. Both patients recovered without sequelae and were discharged. In this article, we aimed to emphasize that gastrointestinal symptoms are often observed in mushroom intoxications and can be confused with acute pancreatitis, thus leading to misdiagnosis of patients. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can improve patients’ prognosis and prevent the development of complications.

  1. Acute Pancreatitis Caused By Mushroom Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Samet; Erden, Abdulsamet; Cetinkaya, Ali; Avci, Deniz; Ortakoyluoglu, Adile Irfan; Karagoz, Hatice; Bulut, Kadir; Basak, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Of the more than 5000 species of mushrooms known, 100 types are toxic and approximately 10% of these toxic types can cause fatal toxicity. A type of mushroom called Amanita phalloides is responsible for 95% of toxic mushroom poisonings. In this article, we report 2 cases of mushroom poisonings caused by Lactarius volemus, known as Tirmit by the local people. The patient and his wife were admitted to the emergency room with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting 20 hours after consuming Lactarius volemus, an edible type of mushroom. The patients reported that they had been collecting this mushroom from the mountains and eating them for several years but had never developed any clinicopathology to date. Further examination of the patients revealed a very rare case of acute pancreatitis due to mushroom intoxication. The male patient was admitted to the intensive care unit while his wife was followed in the internal medicine service, because of her relative mild clinical symptoms. Both patients recovered without sequelae and were discharged. In this article, we aimed to emphasize that gastrointestinal symptoms are often observed in mushroom intoxications and can be confused with acute pancreatitis, thus leading to misdiagnosis of patients. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment can improve patients’ prognosis and prevent the development of complications. PMID:26835473

  2. Mushroom poisoning: retrospective analysis of 294 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevki Hakan Eren

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to present special clinical and laboratory features of 294 cases of mushroom poisoning. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study, 294 patients admitted to the Pediatric and Adult Emergency, Internal Medicine and ICU Departments of Cumhuriyet University Hospital were investigated. RESULTS: Of 294 patients between the ages of 3 and 72 (28.97 ± 19.32, 173 were female, 121 were male and 90 were under the age of 16 years. One hundred seventy-three patients (58.8% had consumed the mushrooms in the early summer. The onset of mushroom toxicity symptoms was divided into early (within 6 h after ingestion and delayed (6 h to 20 d. Two hundred eighty-eight patients (97.9% and six (2.1% patients had early and delayed toxicity symptoms, respectively. The onset of symptoms was within two hours for 101 patients (34.3%. The most common first-noticed symptoms were in the gastrointestinal system. The patients were discharged within one to ten days. Three patients suffering from poisoning caused by wild mushrooms died from fulminant hepatic failure. CONCLUSION: Education of the public about the consumption of mushrooms and education of health personnel working in health centers regarding early treatment and transfer to hospitals with appropriate facilities are important for decreasing the mortality.

  3. Acute aluminium phosphide poisoning, what is new?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yatendra Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide (AlP is a cheap solid fumigant and a highly toxic pesticide that is commonly used for grain preservation. AlP has currently generated interest with increasing number of cases in the past four decades because of its increased use for agricultural and nonagricultural purposes, and also its easy availability in the markets has led to its increased misuse to commit suicide. Ingestion is usually suicidal in intent, uncommonly accidental and rarely homicidal. The poison affects all systems, shock, cardiac arrhythmias with varied ECG changes and gastrointestinal features being the most prominent. Diagnosis is made on the basis of clinical suspicion, a positive silver nitrate paper test to phosphine, and gastric aspirate and viscera biochemistry. Treatment includes early gastric lavage with potassium permanganate or a combination of coconut oil and sodium bicarbonate, administration of charcoal and palliative care. Specific therapy includes intravenous magnesium sulphate and oral coconut oil. Unfortunately, the lack of a specific antidote Results in very high mortality and the key to treatment lies in rapid decontamination and institution of resuscitative measures. This article aims to identify the salient features and mechanism of AlP poisoning along with its management strategies and prognostic variables.

  4. Lead poisoning and brain cell function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldstein, G.W. (Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA) Kennedy Institute, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Exposure to excessive amounts of inorganic lead during the toddler years may produce lasting adverse effects upon brain function. Maximal ingestion of lead occurs at an age when major changes are occurring in the density of brain synaptic connections. The developmental reorganization of synapses is, in part, mediated by protein kinases, and these enzymes are particularly sensitive to stimulation by lead. By inappropriately activating specific protein kinases, lead poisoning may disrupt the development of neural networks without producing overt pathological alterations. The blood-brain barrier is another potential vulnerable site for the neurotoxic action of lead. protein kinases appear to regulate the development of brain capillaries and the expression of the blood-brain barrier properties. Stimulation of protein kinase by lead may disrupt barrier development and alter the precise regulation of the neuronal environment that is required for normal brain function. Together, these findings suggest that the sensitivity of protein kinases to lead may in part underlie the brain dysfunction observed in children poisoned by this toxicant.

  5. Mushroom poisoning in Ireland: the collaboration between the National Poisons Information Centre and expert mycologists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Nicola

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Occasionally, mycologist assistance is requested to reliably identify mushroom species in symptomatic cases where there is a concern that a toxic species is involved. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of mushroom poisoning in Ireland, to describe the working arrangement between the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) and professional mycologists and to present a case series detailing the circumstances when mycologists were consulted. METHODS: Computerised records from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and data on patient demographics, circumstances, and mushroom species collated. In 1999, the NPIC established a national registry of volunteer professional mycologists who are available 24 h\\/day for mushroom identification. The NPIC staff liaises directly with the mycologist and arranges transport of mushroom material. Digital photographic images are requested if there is likely to be a delay in arranging transportation of mushroom material, and the images are subsequently emailed to a mycologist. Five cases of suspected mushroom poisoning were chosen to demonstrate the inter-professional collaboration between the NPIC and mycologists. RESULTS: From 2004 to 2009, the NPIC was consulted about 70 cases of suspected mushroom exposures. Forty-five children ingested unknown mushrooms, 12 adults and 2 children ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms and 11 adults ingested wild toxic mushrooms that were incorrectly identified or confused with edible species. The mycologists were consulted 10 times since 1999. In this series, Amanita species were identified in two cases. In three cases, the species identified were Clitocybe nebularis, Coprinus comatus and Panaeolina foenisecii, respectively, and serious poisoning was excluded. Incorrect mushroom identification by a health care professional using the Internet occurred in two cases. The mycologists assisted Poisons Information Centres in Northern Ireland and the

  6. Mushroom poisoning in Ireland: The collaboration between the National Poisons Information Centre and expert mycologists.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Nicola

    2011-03-01

    Background. Occasionally, mycologist assistance is requested to reliably identify mushroom species in symptomatic cases where there is a concern that a toxic species is involved. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of mushroom poisoning in Ireland, to describe the working arrangement between the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) and professional mycologists and to present a case series detailing the circumstances when mycologists were consulted. Methods. Computerised records from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and data on patient demographics, circumstances, and mushroom species collated. In 1999, the NPIC established a national registry of volunteer professional mycologists who are available 24 h\\/day for mushroom identification. The NPIC staff liaises directly with the mycologist and arranges transport of mushroom material. Digital photographic images are requested if there is likely to be a delay in arranging transportation of mushroom material, and the images are subsequently emailed to a mycologist. Five cases of suspected mushroom poisoning were chosen to demonstrate the inter-professional collaboration between the NPIC and mycologists. Results. From 2004 to 2009, the NPIC was consulted about 70 cases of suspected mushroom exposures. Forty-five children ingested unknown mushrooms, 12 adults and 2 children ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms and 11 adults ingested wild toxic mushrooms that were incorrectly identified or confused with edible species. The mycologists were consulted 10 times since 1999. In this series, Amanita species were identified in two cases. In three cases, the species identified were Clitocybe nebularis, Coprinus comatus and Panaeolina foenisecii, respectively, and serious poisoning was excluded. Incorrect mushroom identification by a health care professional using the Internet occurred in two cases. The mycologists assisted Poisons Information Centres in Northern Ireland

  7. Mushroom poisoning in Ireland: the collaboration between the National Poisons Information Centre and expert mycologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, Nicola; Duggan, Edel; Tracey, Joseph A

    2011-03-01

    Occasionally, mycologist assistance is requested to reliably identify mushroom species in symptomatic cases where there is a concern that a toxic species is involved. The aim of this study was to describe the epidemiology of mushroom poisoning in Ireland, to describe the working arrangement between the National Poisons Information Centre (NPIC) and professional mycologists and to present a case series detailing the circumstances when mycologists were consulted. Computerised records from 1 January 2004 to 31 December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed and data on patient demographics, circumstances, and mushroom species collated. In 1999, the NPIC established a national registry of volunteer professional mycologists who are available 24 h/day for mushroom identification. The NPIC staff liaises directly with the mycologist and arranges transport of mushroom material. Digital photographic images are requested if there is likely to be a delay in arranging transportation of mushroom material, and the images are subsequently emailed to a mycologist. Five cases of suspected mushroom poisoning were chosen to demonstrate the inter-professional collaboration between the NPIC and mycologists. From 2004 to 2009, the NPIC was consulted about 70 cases of suspected mushroom exposures. Forty-five children ingested unknown mushrooms, 12 adults and 2 children ingested hallucinogenic mushrooms and 11 adults ingested wild toxic mushrooms that were incorrectly identified or confused with edible species. The mycologists were consulted 10 times since 1999. In this series, Amanita species were identified in two cases. In three cases, the species identified were Clitocybe nebularis, Coprinus comatus and Panaeolina foenisecii, respectively, and serious poisoning was excluded. Incorrect mushroom identification by a health care professional using the Internet occurred in two cases. The mycologists assisted Poisons Information Centres in Northern Ireland and the United Kingdom in two cases

  8. Renal replacement therapy in acute poisonings--one center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mydlík, Miroslav; Derzsiová, Katarina; Frank, Katarina

    2013-01-01

    The authors described three groups of patients after acute poisonings. In the first group were 60 patients after carbon tetrachioride poisoning, the second group consisted of 81 patients after mushroom poisoning and 20 patients after ethylene glycol poisoning were in the third group. Besides two patients with rare poisonings after potassium dichromate and after paraquat poisoning were analysed. All groups of patients with the kidney damage were presented from the diagnostic, differential diagnostic, conservative, ntra- and extracorporeal elimination treatment point of view. In the group of patients suffering from acute carbon tetrachloride poisoning and with acute renal failure following therapy was used: conservative treatment, exchange blood transfusion--in 4 patients in hepatic coma, renal replacement therapy (peritoneal dialysis, haemodialysis, plasmapheresis). From the total number of 60 patients 58 survived and 2 patients died in liver coma. Survival of patients after mushroom poisoning depended on amount of oral use of mushroom (Amanita phalloides), on early admission in dialysis centre and on early beginning of renal replacement therapy within 24 hr after acute poisoning. Twenty four patients from 81 patients of this group died. Main clinical signs of ethylene glycol poisoning were various neurological symptoms (cramps, hemiparesis, coma), severe metabolic acidosis (pH = 7.06 +/- 0.14), leucocytosis (26.4 +/- 5.5x 10(9)/L) and the signs of acute toxic hepatitis and of acute renal failure. Calcium oxalic crystals in urine were present in 17 patients and leucocytosis was observed in every patient. In the first 4 patients we administered intravenously ethylalcohol as an antidotum and later in other patients we used ethylalcohol in dialysis solution. The concentration of ethylalcohol in dialysis solution was 100 mg%. Severe metabolic acidosis improved in 17 patients using bicarbonate haemodialysis and 3 patients died before the possibility to use bicarbonate

  9. Our experience in the treatment of acute Amanita phalloides poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliev, Y; Andonova, S; Akabaliev, V

    1999-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating phalloid mushroom poisoning and the toxicological aid services in Plovdiv region as this pathology shows in this country high mortality rate (40-100%) and increasing incidence; it is difficult to diagnose and is far from featuring adequately in the literature in our country. A caseload of 270 patients with mushroom poisoning from Plovdiv region, Bulgaria, admitted for treatment to the Clinic of Toxicology, Higher Medical Institute, Plovdiv, for the period 1991-1998 was studied. Of these 270 patients 25 (9.26%) had an acute phalloid poisoning. The following indicators were registered: gender, age, reported type of consumed mushrooms, time of appearance of the first complaints after the mushroom consumption, time of medical aid, disease outcome. The diagnosis and the applied treatment was based on our own diagnostic-therapeutic protocol for phalloid intoxication. All phalloid poisoning cases were accidental by character. The most frequently reported type of ingested mushroom was unidentified wild edible mushrooms. Of all the patients males were 56%, females--44% with mean age of 47.71 years (SD = 17.53). From 25 phalloid poisoning cases 15 survived (60%), 10 died (40%). The summer-fall seasonal pattern of phalloid poisoning occurrence was apparent. The mean duration of the latency period was 12 hours (SD--6.66). In 4 (16%) patients the disease exhibited an unusually early onset--up to 2 hours after the mushroom ingestion. The mean time period from the mushroom ingestion to the presentation in a medical institution for first medical aid was 32 hours (SD--21.69), for men--27.59 hours, for women--43.75 hours. Almost one third (32%) of the diseased presented for medical help more than 36 hours after the poisoning. The acute mushroom poisoning cases in adults comprise 7.01% of the total acute poisoning caseload. The phalloid poisoning accounts for 9.26% of the total number of patients with mushroom poisoning admitted for treatment

  10. Eliminating Childhood Lead Poisoning: A Federal Strategy Targeting Lead Paint Hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Noting that lead poisoning is a preventable disease, this report details a coordinated federal program to eliminate childhood lead poisoning in the United States. The report describes how lead poisoning harms children, how pervasive lead poisoning is, and how lead paint hazards in housing could be eliminated in 10 years. Following information on…

  11. 24 CFR 965.701 - Lead-based paint poisoning prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lead-based paint poisoning... URBAN DEVELOPMENT PHA-OWNED OR LEASED PROJECTS-GENERAL PROVISIONS Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention § 965.701 Lead-based paint poisoning prevention. The requirements of the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning...

  12. An unusual case of insecticide poisoning presenting as acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjusha Yadla

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Poisoning due to insecticides such as organophosphorus and super vasmol presenting as acute kidney injury (AKI is well-reported. Poisoning due to fipronil (phenylpyrazole is known to present with mild neurological and dermatological complaints. However, fipronil poisoning presenting as AKI and hepatic dysfunction is not known. Herein, we are presenting a case of fipronil poisoning presenting with severe AKI.

  13. 76 FR 78263 - Advisory Committee on Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention (ACCLPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ... childhood lead poisoning prevention efforts. The committee also reviews and reports regularly on childhood lead poisoning prevention practices and recommends improvements in national childhood lead poisoning... Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning Prevention Branch at (770) 488-3300 or Barry Brooks at (770) 488-3641...

  14. Guidelines for the Detection and Management of Lead Poisoning for Physicians and Health Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Dept. of Public Health, Springfield.

    These Illinois guidelines provide information on the medical management and treatment of children with lead poisoning, based on Federal guidelines (revised in 1991) for determining lead poisoning at lower levels. The guidelines outline the effects of lead poisoning, sources of lead, estimated incidence of lead poisoning in Illinois, screening…

  15. [Pidemiological analysis of pesticide poisoning in hangzhou during 2006-2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Hao, Li; Zhang, Xuhui; Chen, Jianchun; Wang, Qiang; Yu, Long

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this current investigation was to describe the distribution characteristics of pesticides poisoning in Hangzhou during 2006-2013. The registration data of pesticide poisoning in Hangzhou during 2006-2013 were collected from health disserve surveillance information system which was part of China information system for disease control and prevention. The statistical analysis method included Pearson Chi-square test and Cochran-Armitage trend test. There were totally 6232 cases with pesticide poisoning during 2006-2013, of which 414 cases died. The fatality rate of poisoning patients was 6.64%. The pesticides, especially organophosphorus pesticides, were the main poison that caused poisoning, and patients with pesticide poisoning accounted for 80.60% of all the poisoning patient. There was more female patients than male patients among non-productive pesticide poisoning, but on the contrary among productive pesticide poisoning. The incidence of pesticides poisoning had significant increase in the third season. Occupational pesticide poisoning and non-occupational pesticide poisoning had the different distribution character. Non-occupational pesticide poisoning was the chief reason of pesticide poisoning. The pesticides, especially organophosphorus pesticides, were the main poisons threatening the health of people in Hangzhou, and the effective prevention and control measures should be taken immediately.

  16. 49 CFR 174.680 - Division 6.1 (poisonous) materials with foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... by humans or animals. (b) A carrier must separate any package bearing a POISON label displaying the text “PG III,” or bearing a “PG III” mark adjacent to the POISON label, from materials marked as or... not transport any package bearing a POISON or POISON INHALATION HAZARD label in the same car with any...

  17. Carbon monoxide poisoning: a new incidence for an old disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, N B; Weaver, L K

    2007-01-01

    While carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is common in the USA, its incidence is uncertain. Fatal poisonings are counted with relative accuracy from death certificate data, but estimates of the more common nonfatal poisonings are either old or limited. This study was performed to estimate the number of emergency department (ED) visits annually in the USA for carbon monoxide poisoning. ED visit rates in five states (Idaho, Maine, Montana, Utah, and Washington) from three prior studies, each using different methodology, were used to extrapolate independent estimates of national ED visits. After correcting for regional differences in CO poisoning incidence, estimates of national ED visits per year ranging from 32,413 to 56,037 were obtained. Excluding the estimate derived from the Maine rate because it did not include intentional and fire-related poisonings, the national average is 50,558 +/- 4,843 visits per year. There are approximately 50,000 ED visits for CO poisoning in the USA annually, 3-5 times the numbers previously estimated. As this disease can result in significant long-term morbidity even when treated, enhanced prevention efforts are warranted.

  18. The evaluation of forensic cases reported due to food poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beyza Urazel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study it is aimed to examine forensic food poisoning cases and to evaluate the clinical presentation of food poisoning in people within the context of forensic medicine. Methods: In the study, 215 food poisoning cases are evaluated, which applied to the forensic medicine branch office in our city between 01.01.2007 and 31.12.2011. The forensic reports and forensic investigations of these cases are analyzed retrospectively. The cases are examined in terms of gender, age, the type of food consumed, the treatment applied and the result of the forensic report. Results: It is determined that in 83 cases (38.6% food poisoning was caused by chicken products, and in 178 cases (82.8% the poisoned people were students. In 3 cases (1.4% the poisoning was life threatening. For 75 cases (34.9% no forensic report was prepared in emergency service and among the 140 cases for which a forensic report was prepared, only 3 of the reports were prepared in a correct manner. Conclusions: It is determined that the demographic data of the cases complies with the city where the study was conducted. It is found out that in emergency services the food poisoning cases are usually misevaluated.

  19. Childhood poisoning--a changing profile with scope for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D; Oates, R K

    1992-02-17

    To study the pattern of poisoning in children admitted to the Children's Hospital between 1983 and 1988; to compare this pattern with the last study of poisoning in childhood from this institution, done in 1956; and to survey knowledge of a sample of general practitioners and pharmacists about common childhood poisonings. A retrospective review of 407 medical records of children admitted after poisoning and a postal questionnaire to 150 randomly selected pharmacists and 150 randomly selected general practitioners. Poisoning accounted for one in 200 admissions to the Children's Hospital. The pattern of poisoning has changed since 1956 when the main agents were kerosene, pesticides, aspirin and digoxin. Now they are the benzodiazepines, iron preparations, paracetamol and anticonvulsants. There were four deaths due to the ingestion of quinine, caustic soda, ferrous sulphate and an arsenic-based weed killer respectively. Five per cent of the admissions resulted in significant morbidity. Sixty-five per cent of general practitioners and 45% of pharmacists responded to the questionnaire. The high toxicity of quinine, anticonvulsants, iron preparations and digoxin was not widely appreciated by over 50% of the general practitioners while over 60% of the pharmacists were not aware of the high toxicity of anticonvulsants and paracetamol. Although the pattern of childhood poisoning has changed, it remains a significant but largely preventable cause of mortality and morbidity.

  20. Outcome of Patients with Carbon Monoxide Poisoning at a Far-East Poison Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ja-Liang; Huang, Wen-Hung; Yang, Huang-Yu; Weng, Cheng-Hao; Lin, Che-Min; Lee, Shwu-Hua; Wang, I-Kuan; Liang, Chih-Chia; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Lin, Wey-Ran; Yen, Tzung-Hai

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Many cases of carbon monoxide poisoning in Taiwan are due to burning charcoal. Nevertheless, few reports have analyzed the mortality rate of these patients who survive to reach a hospital and die despite intensive treatment. Therefore, this study examined the clinical features, physiological markers, and outcomes after carbon monoxide poisoning and the associations between these findings. Methods We analyzed the records of 261 patients who were referred for management of carbon monoxide intoxication between 2000 and 2010. Patients were grouped according to status at discharge as alive (survivor, n = 242) or dead (non-survivor, n = 19). Demographic, clinical, laboratory, and mortality data were obtained for analysis. Results Approximately half of the cases (49.4%) attempted suicide by burning charcoal. Most of the patients were middle-aged adults (33±19 years), and were referred to our hospital in a relatively short period of time (6±10 hours). Carbon monoxide produced many serious complications after exposure: fever (26.1%), hypothermia (9.6%), respiratory failure (34.1%), shock (8.4%), myocardial infarction (8.0%), gastrointestinal upset (34.9%), hepatitis (18.4%), renal failure (25.3%), coma (18.0%) and rhabdomyolysis (21.8%). Furthermore, the non-survivors suffered greater incidences of hypothermia (Pcarbon monoxide poisoning (OR 8.696, 95% CI 2.053-37.370, P=0.003). Finally, Kaplan-Meier analysis confirmed that patients with shock suffered greater cumulative mortality than without shock (Log-rank test, Chi-square 147.404, Pcarbon monoxide-poisoned patients at our center was 7.3%. Furthermore, the analysis indicates that shock was most strongly associated with higher risk of mortality. PMID:25745854

  1. Neurologic Complications of Methanol Poisoning: A Clinicoepidemiological Report from Poisoning Treatment Centers in Tehran, Iran

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    Hakimeh Eghbali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: In this study we sought to investigate clinical findings (with a focus on neurologic effects and also to analyze outcomes of a series of patients with methanol poisoning admitted to two poisoning treatment centers in Tehran, Iran. Methods: In this prospective cross-sectional study, methanol-poisoned patients admitted to departments of forensic medicine and toxicology of Loghman Hakim and Baharloo hospitals in Tehran during October 2010 to October 2011 were included; and their data were recorded in predesigned checklists. Results: Twenty-eight methanol poisoned patients (82.1% men with mean age of 29.3±4.6 years were studied. Most patients (67.9% had metabolic acidosis at presentation. On admission, all patients had different degrees of decrease in consciousness, who the majority of them (57.1% were admitted with mildly reduced consciousness (grade I of Grady coma scale. Headache and vertigo were observed in 7.1% and 17.9% of patients, respectively. Most patients (53.6% had no ocular effects, while 46.6% of patients developed impaired vision. All patients received sodium bicarbonate. Ethanol as antidote and folic acid were given to 18 patients (64.2% and 16 patients (57.1%, respectively. Six patients (21.4% underwent hemodialysis. Over half of the patients (53.6% fully recovered and were discharged without complications. Four patients (14.3% developed total blindness. Four patients (14.3% left the hospital against medical advice by self-discharge (they had no significant complication at the time of discharge. Five patients (17.9% died; who compared to survived cases had significantly lower blood pH (P=0.028, higher coma grade (P

  2. A promising poison information centre model for Africa

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    Carine Marks

    2016-06-01

    Conclusion: A number of benefits might result from such a poisons centre network hub, including: (1 Improved cooperation between countries on poisoning problems; (2 Harmonisation and strengthening of research and surveillance; (3 Common standards and best practices e.g. regulating chemicals, data management, and staff training; and (4 Greater bargaining power to secure resources. Further investigation is needed to identify the most suitable location for the network hub, the activities it should fulfil, and the availability of specialists in poisons information who could become members of the hub.

  3. Paraquat poisoning: A case report and review of literature

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    Kondle Raghu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Paraquat (1, r-dimethyl-4,4′-bipyridium dichloride, a brown syrupy liquid is an effective herbicide that has low chronic toxicity because of its rapid deactivation on contact with soil. A high dose of paraquat or severe poisoning has a poor prognosis. At present there is no specific antidote to paraquat poisoning, hence the need to focus on prevention and in case of exposure or ingestion, aggressive decontamination to prevent further absorption. Although uncommon, paraquat ingestion can lead to severe and often fatal toxicity. However, despite its widespread availability, reports of this herbicide poisoning in India are uncommon.

  4. Pre-hospital treatment of acute poisonings in Oslo

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    Nore Anne K

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poisoned patients are often treated in and discharged from pre-hospital health care settings. Studies of poisonings should therefore not only include hospitalized patients. Aims: To describe the acutely poisoned patients treated by ambulance personnel and in an outpatient clinic; compare patients transferred to a higher treatment level with those discharged without transfer; and study the one-week mortality after pre-hospital discharge. Methods A one-year multi-centre study with prospective inclusion of all acutely poisoned patients ≥ 16 years of age treated in ambulances, an outpatient clinic, and hospitals in Oslo. Results A total of 3757 health service contacts from 2997 poisoning episodes were recorded: 1860 were treated in ambulances, of which 15 died and 750 (40% were discharged without transfer; 956 were treated in outpatient clinic, of which 801 (84% were discharged without transfer; and 941 episodes were treated in hospitals. Patients discharged alive after ambulance treatment were mainly poisoned by opiates (70%, were frequently comatose (35%, had respiratory depression (37%, and many received naloxone (49%. The majority of the patients discharged from the outpatient clinic were poisoned by ethanol (55%, fewer were comatose (10%, and they rarely had respiratory depression (4%. Among the hospitalized, pharmaceutical poisonings were most common (58%, 23% were comatose, and 7% had respiratory depression. Male patients comprised 69% of the pre-hospital discharges, but only 46% of the hospitalized patients. Except for one patient, who died of a new heroin overdose two days following discharge from an ambulance, there were no deaths during the first week after the poisonings in the 90% of the pre-hospital discharged patients with known identity. Conclusion More than half of the poisoned patients treated in pre-hospital treatment settings were discharged without transfer to higher levels. These poisonings were more often

  5. Emergency management and treatment of the poisoned small animal patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Justine A

    2013-07-01

    This article reviews management of the acutely poisoned veterinary patient, including initial telephone triage, appropriate communication and history gathering from the pet owner, decontamination methods (including the use of appropriate emetic agents and dosing of activated charcoal), and general treatment of the poisoned patient. Symptomatic and supportive care of the poisoned patient includes the use of fluid therapy, gastrointestinal support (eg, antacids), central nervous system support (eg, muscle relaxants, anticonvulsants), sedatives/reversal agents (eg, phenothiazines, naloxone, flumazenil), hepatoprotectants, and miscellaneous antidotal therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ventricular bigeminy in acute organophorous poisoning – A rare ECG finding

    OpenAIRE

    Bharati Taksande; Bhawik Dhirawani

    2015-01-01

    India being a land of farmer, the pesticides are freely and easily available and therefore organophosphorous poisoning is one of the major health issues. Suicidal poisoning is more common than accidental poisoning. Cardiac manifestations of organophosphorous poisoning are well known. It results in various electrocardiographic changes from sinus tachycardia to ST elevation. We hereby present a rare ECG finding of ventricular bigeminy in a case of acute organophosphorous poisoning.

  7. Group and insidious tetraethyl lead poisoning occurred in industry of plastic weaving: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Bai, Ying; Zhu, Baoli; Zhu, Wenjing; Ye, Mingxian

    2016-05-01

    Tetraethyl lead (TEL) poisoning has declined sharply with decreasing consumption of gasoil and other chemicals contained TEL. Here we reported group TEL poisoning in the plastic weaving factory. We investigated 16 cases with the typical nerves disorder which is similar to organotin poisoning, and the result suggested that the poisoning may cause by applied "white oil" contented TEL. Despite its rareness, our cases emphasize that clinicians should pay attention to the difference from the treatment of organic tin poisoning.

  8. Baclofen Self-Poisoning in the Era of Changing Indication: Multicentric Reports to a French Poison Control Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léger, Maxime; Brunet, Marion; Le Roux, Gaël; Lerolle, Nicolas; Boels, David

    2017-09-28

    Baclofen has gained interest in treating alcohol use disorder patients. These patients are at risk of voluntary drug intoxications. Understanding the context of baclofen's widespread use for alcohol use disorder, a recent evaluation of the epidemiology, morbidity and mortality of baclofen self-poisoning episodes is necessary. All baclofen self-poisoning reported to the Western France Poison Control Centre between January 2008 and December 2015 were included for analysis in this retrospective study. Baclofen poisoning cases were compared to the 31,859 non-baclofen voluntary poisoning cases declared over the same period. Number of baclofen poisoning grew from 8 cases in 2008 to 91 cases in 2015, attributable to patients purposely treated for alcohol use disorder. Overall, 190 cases were considered: 111 patients (59%) had Glasgow coma score (GCS) ≤12 at hospital admission and 77 had GCS > 12 (41%). Eighty patients required mechanical ventilation (42.6%). Neurological severity (GCS ≤ 12) was associated with seizures (n = 24, 22% vs. n = 2, 3%, P < 0.001). Two patients were deceased at first medical evaluation and three died in the hospital (mortality rate 2.6%). Non-baclofen cases had lower rate of endotracheal intubation (n = 1833, 6%, P < 0.001) and mortality rate (n = 299, 0.1%, P = 0.02). Baclofen self-poisoning cases has risen in recent years due to baclofen intake for alcohol use disorder therapies. The risk-benefit ratio may be evaluated before baclofen is safely prescribed.

  9. Lead Poisoning Due to Herbal Medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambial, Shailja; Bhardwaj, Pankaj; Mahdi, Abbas Ali; Sharma, Praveen

    2017-06-01

    Lead ranks as one of the most serious environmental poisons all over the world amongst toxic heavy metals with no known biological function useful for the human body. A case of lead toxicity due to consumption of herbal medicine is being discussed. The case presented with gastrointestinal complaints and history of intake of herbal medicines for diabetes control for past 8 months. The analysis of the powdered herbal medicine procured from ayurveda practitioner was found to have high content of lead responsible for the lead toxicity. The patient is under regular followup. He has improved symptomatically on chelating therapy and blood lead levels have gradually improved. Regular awareness programs should be conducted in the population regarding possible exposure through home made herbal remedies so that general public can be made aware of the dangerous side effects of lead and other heavy metals on health.

  10. Theophylline: Adverse Effects, Poisoning and Treatment Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Charehsaz

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Theophylline, which is a methylxanthine derivative, has been commonly used in all over the world for many years due to its cheapness and effectiveness in treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. There is a close relationship between its bronchodilator effect and blood levels of theophylline. Maintenance of its blood level between 10-20 μg/ml is important to obtain a maximum bronchodilator effect. Besides having a narrow therapeutic range, its alteration of pharmacokinetic characteristics due to individually factors, drugs, diet, and habits such as smoking and alcohol has led to requirement of more carefully use of theophylline for patients at every age. In the present review article, in addition to pharmacokinetic/ dynamic properties of theophylline, its adverse effects, poisoning with over dose of theophylline and approaches of its treatment have been given.

  11. Aconite poisoning presenting as hypotension and bradycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Thomas Y K

    2009-12-01

    The principal toxic ingredients of aconite roots include aconitine, mesaconitine and hypaconitine, which are known cardiotoxins and neurotoxins. A 58-year-old man took a decoction of 11 g each of processed 'chuanwu' (the main root of Aconitum carmichaeli) and processed 'caowu' (the root of A. kusnezoffii) as treatment for his neck pain. One hour later, he experienced numbness of tongue and the four limbs, generalized weakness, nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea and dizziness. Three hours after ingestion, he was admitted to hospital. His blood pressure was 106/53 mmHg and heart rate 65 beats/min. Six hours after ingestion, he became hypotensive (systolic blood pressure aconite poisoning, prolonged hypotension and sinus bradycardia may occur and supportive therapy with close monitoring of blood pressure and cardiac rhythm are essential.

  12. Bidirectional tachycardia induced by herbal aconite poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Y T; Lau, C P; But, P P; Fong, P C; Li, J P

    1992-05-01

    This report details the clinical, electrocardiographic, and electropharmacological characteristics of an unusual case of bidirectional tachycardia induced by aconites present in a Chinese herbal decoction consumed by a previously healthy subject. The tachycardia showed marked susceptibility to vagotonic maneuvers, cholinesterase inhibition, and adenosine triphosphate. The incessant nature of the tachycardia, rapid recurrence after transient suppression, and failure to respond to direct current cardioversion suggested an automatic tachycardia mechanism consistent with known data on the cellular electrophysiological mechanism of aconitine-mediated arrhythmogenesis. A fascicular or ventricular myocardial origin of the tachycardia with alternating activation patterns, or dual foci with alternate discharge, appeared most plausible. The rootstocks of aconitum plants have been commonly employed in traditional Chinese herbal recipes for "cardiotonic" actions and for relieving "rheumatism." Multiple pitfalls could occur during the processing of these herbs that might have predisposed to aconite poisoning. The need for strict control and surveillance of herbal substances with low margins of safety is highlighted.

  13. Clinical and radiological findings in chlorfenapyr poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharaknath, Vemuri Rama; Prabhakar, Y V S; Kumar, K Suseel; Babu, Noorthi Kalyan

    2013-04-01

    This is a case report of suicidal ingestion of chlorfenapyr, presenting with neurological complications after a latent period of more than a week, and rapidly progressing to death within days of symptoms. Chlorfenapyr is a moderately hazardous pesticide according to World Health Organization toxicity classification, and kills target organism by depriving it of energy through interference with oxidative phosphorylation at mitochondrial level. A pro-pesticide, chlorfenapyr takes time to convert to its active form and either this active form or a toxic metabolite causes delayed neurological symptoms. It causes significant neurotoxicity in rat models. This case report provides for the first time from India (second worldwide), clinical and "radiological evidence" (magnetic resonance imaging showing demyelinating/oedematous changes) of "chlorfenapyr neurotoxicity in humans." It also highlights the "latent period" between ingestion and onset of fatal manifestations. Earlier, similar case reports of human deaths with delayed onset neurological symptoms, due to chlorfenapyr poisoning have been reported, from Japan, Columbia, and Korea.

  14. Indigenous tooth powders = covert lead poisoning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Sapna; Shubha, A B; Rao, B Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to measure the concentration of lead in various indigenous preparations of tooth powders available and used locally in and around Udaipur, Rajasthan, India. Seven different brands of tooth powders manufactured and/or marketed locally were obtained from stores all over Udaipur city. Some home-made powders commonly used for cleaning teeth were also collected. The tooth powders were analyzed for lead content by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. All tooth powders tested were found to contain high levels of lead ranging from 21 ppm to 82 ppm, above the maximum permissible level of 20 ppm prescribed by the Bureau of Indian Standards. Indigenous tooth powders contain high levels of lead and thus may be a source of lead poisoning that is often overlooked.

  15. Ayurvedic herbal medicine and lead poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunturu, Krishna S; Nagarajan, Priyadharsini; McPhedran, Peter; Goodman, Thomas R; Hodsdon, Michael E; Strout, Matthew P

    2011-12-20

    Although the majority of published cases of lead poisoning come from occupational exposures, some traditional remedies may also contain toxic amounts of lead. Ayurveda is a system of traditional medicine that is native to India and is used in many parts of world as an alternative to standard treatment regimens. Here, we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain, anemia, liver function abnormalities, and an elevated blood lead level. The patient was found to have been taking the Ayurvedic medicine Jambrulin prior to presentation. Chemical analysis of the medication showed high levels of lead. Following treatment with an oral chelating agent, the patient's symptoms resolved and laboratory abnormalities normalized. This case highlights the need for increased awareness that some Ayurvedic medicines may contain potentially harmful levels of heavy metals and people who use them are at risk of developing associated toxicities.

  16. Ayurvedic herbal medicine and lead poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunturu Krishna S

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although the majority of published cases of lead poisoning come from occupational exposures, some traditional remedies may also contain toxic amounts of lead. Ayurveda is a system of traditional medicine that is native to India and is used in many parts of world as an alternative to standard treatment regimens. Here, we report the case of a 58-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain, anemia, liver function abnormalities, and an elevated blood lead level. The patient was found to have been taking the Ayurvedic medicine Jambrulin prior to presentation. Chemical analysis of the medication showed high levels of lead. Following treatment with an oral chelating agent, the patient's symptoms resolved and laboratory abnormalities normalized. This case highlights the need for increased awareness that some Ayurvedic medicines may contain potentially harmful levels of heavy metals and people who use them are at risk of developing associated toxicities.

  17. A literature study on lacquer poison

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    Kyoung-Min, Lee

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: It will be examined in this research whether Lacquer poison can be used as an distinguished treatment to cure incurable diseases by considering literature existing and various papers. Method: I studies origin, alias, species, toxicity, effect, treatment, component, medical action and contraindication of Rhus vemiciflua stokes through various kinds literatures. Results: Sap of Rhus vemiciflua stokes that is used for medical purposes, has an effect on anti-tumor, anti-oxidation, hangover cure, and gastritis suppression. Even though urushiol and fIavonoids, the main ingredient of lacquer, has medical cure effects. but urushiol results in a dermatropic allergy. Sincc xylem of a Rhus vemiciflua stokes, however. does not induce the allergy but has medical efficacy, research on this topic is needed.

  18. Datura stramonium poisoning in a child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkaya, Ahmet Kağan; Güler, Ekrem; Karabel, Nihal; Namlı, Ali Rıza; Göksügür, Yalçın

    2015-01-01

    Hallucinogenic plant poisoning in children is a significant problem for the emergency physician. We describe the case of a boy who had slurred speech, fever, hallucinations, tachycardia, dilated pupils, confusion and disorientation. He had no history of drug use or toxin intake. All signs and symptoms were improved by supportive therapy within 48 hours. It turned out that the patient had ingested seeds of Datura stramonium in a neighbor's garden two days previously. The medical history should be taken repeatedly in cases of unknown etiology, and physicians should keep in mind the possibility that unexplained anticholinergic toxidromes could be the result of exposure to toxic plants, in particular those containing atropine and atropine derivates.

  19. Renal transplantation after Cortinarius speciosissimus poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmdahl, J; Blohmé, I

    1995-10-01

    During the years 1979-1993 22 individuals were intoxicated in Sweden by the mushroom Cortinarius speciosissimus. Nine of them developed end-stage renal failure (ESRF), and we describe five who have received renal transplants. Three were transplanted after 6-9 months on haemodialysis; the other two regained some renal function after 2-6 months on haemodialysis, but had to be restarted on dialysis 24-30 months later and were eventually transplanted. Two patients had kidneys donated by a father and a brother respectively, three had cadaveric organs. All five developed satisfactory renal function with current glomerular filtration rate (GFR) 31-79 ml/min (mean 56.2) after 5-10 (mean 7.0) years. To our knowledge, renal transplantation after Cortinarius poisoning has not been reported before.

  20. Four patients with Amanita Phalloides poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanooteghem, S; Arts, J; Decock, S; Pieraerts, P; Meersseman, W; Verslype, C; Van Hootegem, Ph

    2014-09-01

    Mushroom poisoning by Amanita phalloides is a rare but potentially fatal disease. The initial symptoms of nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and diarrhea, which are typical for the intoxication, can be interpreted as a common gastro-enteritis. The intoxication can progress to acute liver and renal failure and eventually death. Recognizing the clinical syndrome is extremely important. In this case report, 4 patients with amatoxin intoxication who showed the typical clinical syndrome are described. The current therapy of amatoxin intoxication is based on small case series, and no ran- domised controlled trials are available. The therapy of amatoxin intoxication consists of supportive care and medical therapy with silibinin and N-acetylcysteine. Patients who develop acute liver failure should be considered for liver transplantation.

  1. Collective acute poisoning by nitrous gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touze, M.D.; Desjars, P.; Baron, D.; Tasseau, F.; Delajartre, A.Y.; Nicolas, F.

    1983-09-01

    A collective nitrous fumes poisoning (five cases) is reported. Two patients (case 3 and case 4) were comatose, in severe respiratory distress. Shock and slate blue cyanosis were noted. Physical examination and chest X ray revealed acute pulmonary edema-Methemoglobin levels were 71,3% (case 3) and 58% (case 4). Despite treatment both of them died from severe hypoxia resulting in cardiorespiratory arrest. Post-mortem examination was performed upon these four men. On admission the last one (case 5) was conscious, and in good hemodynamic condition. Acute pulmonary edema and cyanosis were present. Methemoglobin level was 37,3%. This patient recovered appropriate therapy. For case 1 and 2 acute anoxia due to methemoglobinemia seems to be cause of death. For cases 3 and 4 death is due to hypoxemia associated with pulmonary edema.

  2. Bupropion "Abuse" Reported to US Poison Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassinos, Gina L; Klein-Schwartz, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    Bupropion use to obtain nonmedical psychoactive effects has been reported. The objective was to determine the prevalence, characteristics, clinical effects, and outcomes of bupropion "abuse." A 14-year retrospective review was conducted of single substance bupropion cases with "intentional abuse" as the coded reason for exposure in individuals 13 and older reported to the National Poison Data System. Data were evaluated for prevalence, demographics, clinical effect, route, final management site, and coded outcome. There were 975 bupropion abuse cases, which accounted for 3.3% of single substance bupropion cases reported to US poison centers. The prevalence of abuse increased by 75%, from 2000 to 2012, declining slightly in 2013. The majority of cases were 13 to 29 years old (67.4%). The most frequent clinical effects were tachycardia (57.0%), seizures (33.5%), agitation/irritable (20.2%), hallucinations/delusions (14.0%), and tremor (13.1%). Most exposures were ingestions (745) followed by insufflation (166), parenteral (17), and other/unknown (17); 30 cases involved 2 routes. Seizure frequency was not significantly different between routes (P = 0.783) or exposure chronicity (P = 0.264). Final management sites were predominantly emergency department (36.9%) and admission to critical care unit (27.3%) or noncritical care unit (20.1%). Outcomes were major (11.4%), moderate (48.2%), minor (24.5%), and no effect (15.5%). There were 4 deaths. Most bupropion abuse occurs in adolescents and young adults. Tachycardia and seizures are common indicating the potential for serious effects. Seizures occur regardless of route. Providers should be aware of risk of bupropion abuse.

  3. Presentations of patients of poisoning and predictors of poisoning-related fatality: Findings from a hospital-based prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Hung-Jung

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poisoning is a significant public health problem worldwide and is one of the most common reasons for visiting emergency departments (EDs, but factors that help to predict overall poisoning-related fatality have rarely been elucidated. Using 1512 subjects from a hospital-based study, we sought to describe the demographic and clinical characteristics of poisoning patients and to identify predictors for poisoning-related fatality. Methods Between January 2001 and December 2002 we prospectively recruited poisoning patients through the EDs of two medical centers in southwest Taiwan. Interviews were conducted with patients within 24 hours after admission to collect relevant information. We made comparisons between survival and fatality cases, and used logistic regressions to identify predictors of fatality. Results A total of 1512 poisoning cases were recorded at the EDs during the study period, corresponding to an average of 4.2 poisonings per 1000 ED visits. These cases involved 828 women and 684 men with a mean age of 38.8 years, although most patients were between 19 and 50 years old (66.8%, and 29.4% were 19 to 30 years. Drugs were the dominant poisoning agents involved (49.9%, followed by pesticides (14.5%. Of the 1512 patients, 63 fatalities (4.2% occurred. Paraquat exposure was associated with an extremely high fatality rate (72.1%. The significant predictors for fatality included age over 61 years, insufficient respiration, shock status, abnormal heart rate, abnormal body temperature, suicidal intent and paraquat exposure. Conclusion In addition to well-recognized risk factors for fatality in clinical settings, such as old age and abnormal vital signs, we found that suicidal intent and ingestion of paraquat were significant predictors of poisoning-related fatality. Identification of these predictors may help risk stratification and the development of preventive interventions.

  4. Outpatient treatment of acute poisonings in Oslo: poisoning pattern, factors associated with hospitalization, and mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund Cathrine

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most patients with acute poisoning are treated as outpatients worldwide. In Oslo, these patients are treated in a physician-led outpatient clinic with limited diagnostic and treatment resources, which reduces both the costs and emergency department overcrowding. We describe the poisoning patterns, treatment, mortality, factors associated with hospitalization and follow-up at this Emergency Medical Agency (EMA, "Oslo Legevakt", and we evaluate the safety of this current practice. Methods All acute poisonings in adults (> or = 16 years treated at the EMA during one year (April 2008 to April 2009 were included consecutively in an observational study design. The treating physicians completed a standardized form comprising information needed to address the study's aims. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors associated with hospitalization. Results There were 2348 contacts for 1856 individuals; 1157 (62% were male, and the median age was 34 years. The most frequent main toxic agents were ethanol (43%, opioids (22% and CO or fire smoke (10%. The physicians classified 73% as accidental overdoses with substances of abuse taken for recreational purposes, 15% as other accidents (self-inflicted or other and 11% as suicide attempts. Most (91% patients were treated with observation only. The median observation time until discharge was 3.8 hours. No patient developed sequelae or died at the EMA. Seventeen per cent were hospitalized. Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid, respiratory depression, paracetamol, reduced consciousness and suicidal intention were factors associated with hospitalization. Forty-eight per cent were discharged without referral to follow-up. The one-month mortality was 0.6%. Of the nine deaths, five were by new accidental overdose with substances of abuse. Conclusions More than twice as many patients were treated at the EMA compared with all hospitals in Oslo. Despite more than a doubling of

  5. An interesting cause of pulmonary emboli: Acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevinc, A.; Savli, H.; Atmaca, H. [Gaziantep University, Gaziantep (Turkey). School of Medicine

    2005-07-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning, a public health problem of considerable significance, is a relatively frequent event today, resulting in thousands of hospitalizations annually. A 70-year-old lady was seen in the emergency department with a provisional diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning. The previous night, she slept in a tightly closed room heated with coal ember. She was found unconscious in the morning with poor ventilation. She had a rare presentation of popliteal vein thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and possible tissue necrosis with carbon monoxide poisoning. Oxygen treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (nadroparine) and warfarin therapy resulted in an improvement in both popliteal and pulmonary circulations. In conclusion, the presence of pulmonary emboli should be sought in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning.

  6. Epidemiology of paediatric poisoning reporting to a tertiary hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medicinal and nonmedicinal substances have been identified as common agents causing poisoning in children as well as adolescents.[6] Common medicinal substances ingested by children are analgesics, antiinflammatory agents, psychotropic drugs such as antidepressants and benzodiazepines, and related agents.[7].

  7. Survival after severe self poisoning with sodium valproate.

    OpenAIRE

    Lakhani, M; McMurdo, M E

    1986-01-01

    A 48 year old patient deliberately poisoned herself with 25 g of sodium valproate and survived with supportive measures only. This case contradicts the experience of those who advocate aggressive management of such severe overdoses.

  8. NCHS - Drug Poisoning Mortality by State: United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This dataset describes drug poisoning deaths at the U.S. and state level by selected demographic characteristics, and includes age-adjusted death rates for drug...

  9. Poisonous plants: a guide for parents & childcare providers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dauncey, Elizabeth A

    2010-01-01

    .... Thomas' Hospital, London. Helpful descriptions and more than 230 photographs will assist you in identifying 132 of the most poisonous plants and plant groups likely to be encountered as pot plants, in flower beds...

  10. Concomitant overdosing of other drugs in patients with paracetamol poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Lars E; Dalhoff, Kim

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: Paracetamol is frequently involved in intended self-poisoning, and concomitant overdosing of other drugs is commonly reported. The purpose of the study was to investigate further concomitant drug overdose in patients with paracetamol poisoning and to evaluate its effects on the outcome...... of the paracetamol intoxication. METHODS: Six hundred and seventy-one consecutive patients admitted with paracetamol poisoning were studied and concomitant drug intake was recorded. The relative risk of hepatic encephalopathy, death or liver transplantation, hepatic dysfunction, liver cell damage, and renal...... favourable outcome was observed in patients with concomitant NSAID overdose. CONCLUSIONS: Concomitant overdosing of benzodiazepines or analgesics is frequent in patients admitted with paracetamol poisoning. Concomitant benzodiazepine or acetylsalicylic acid overdose was associated with more severe toxicity...

  11. [Abdominal pain as a presentation by lead poisoning. Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottiera, Daniel M; Cargnel, Elda

    2017-04-01

    Acute lead poisoning is not a common pathology seen in the pediatrician's office. Lead poisoning symptoms can be digestive or neurological, and they can be confused with other pathologies. That is the reason why it should be considered and, in case of doubt, complementary studies to confirm lead poisoning should be requested. This is the case of a nine-year-old child that comes to the office with a strong abdominal pain and vomiting, and after a close physical examination and a detailed anamnesis, a suspicious diagnosis of "acute" lead poisoning is obtained. Therefore, the infant is hospitalized, and after taking a venous sampling to confirm the lead level, a chelation therapy is performed under the toxicology expert's supervision. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  12. 78 FR 17069 - National Poison Prevention Week, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-20

    ... rates from accidental poisoning--but work remains. To keep our kids safe, parents and caregivers can..., storing, and disposing of medications correctly, and by speaking out about drug misuse and abuse in our...

  13. CPSC Warns of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning with Camping Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Warns of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning Hazard with Camping Equipment The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) warns ... about the carbon monoxide (CO) hazard with camping equipment. CO can kill you! From 2002–2006, CPSC ...

  14. [Cortinarius poisoning. Analysis of cases in the literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviuc, P; Garon, D; Danel, V; Richard, J M

    2001-01-01

    Cortinarius spp. poisoning is characterized by a delayed acute renal failure (ARF). The main features of this severe poisoning are still poorly known and often overlooked. The aim of this review of the literature was a better description of Cortinarius spp. poisoning. The main medical databases were searched and analysed. 245 cases were collected and 90 cases could be analysed in details. Gastrointestinal disorders appeared a few days after the ingestion of the mushrooms (median: three days). The renal phase is delayed (median: 8.5 days). Hepatic failure and muscular lesions are highly questionable. Treatment is supportive in half of the cases, ARF progressed towards chronic renal failure, which progressed in 70% of the cases towards terminal renal failure. Cortinarius spp. poisoning is severe. Ingestion of Cortinarius species must be systematically suspected whenever tubulo-interstitial nephritis is diagnosed.

  15. Acute Liver Failure Caused by Amanita phalloides Poisoning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Santi, Luca; Maggioli, Caterina; Mastroroberto, Marianna; Tufoni, Manuel; Napoli, Lucia; Caraceni, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    ... and deadly cause of mushroom poisoning. Liver damage from Amanita phalloides is related to the amanitins, powerful toxins that inhibit RNA polymerase II resulting in a deficient protein synthesis and cell necrosis...

  16. [Amanita phalloides poisoning--diagnosis, clinical course, treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiernikowski, A; Szczepanek, M

    1999-01-01

    This study presents a general review of current opinion on Amanita phalloides and other toxic Amanita species poisonings, clinical symptoms, elementary principles of mycological, clinical and laboratory diagnostics, and treatment. Early diagnosis, centralization of the treatment have been particularly emphasized.

  17. Fatal poisonings in Oslo: a one-year observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyerdahl Fridtjof

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute poisonings are common and are treated at different levels of the health care system. Since most fatal poisonings occur outside hospital, these must be included when studying characteristics of such deaths. The pattern of toxic agents differs between fatal and non-fatal poisonings. By including all poisoning episodes, cause-fatality rates can be calculated. Methods Fatal and non-fatal acute poisonings in subjects aged ≥16 years in Oslo (428 198 inhabitants were included consecutively in an observational multi-centre study including the ambulance services, the Oslo Emergency Ward (outpatient clinic, and hospitals, as well as medico-legal autopsies from 1st April 2003 to 31st March 2004. Characteristics of fatal poisonings were examined, and a comparison of toxic agents was made between fatal and non-fatal acute poisoning. Results In Oslo, during the one-year period studied, 103 subjects aged ≥16 years died of acute poisoning. The annual mortality rate was 24 per 100 000. The male-female ratio was 2:1, and the mean age was 44 years (range 19-86 years. In 92 cases (89%, death occurred outside hospital. The main toxic agents were opiates or opioids (65% of cases, followed by ethanol (9%, tricyclic anti-depressants (TCAs (4%, benzodiazepines (4%, and zopiclone (4%. Seventy-one (69% were evaluated as accidental deaths and 32 (31% as suicides. In 70% of all cases, and in 34% of suicides, the deceased was classified as drug or alcohol dependent. When compared with the 2981 non-fatal acute poisonings registered during the study period, the case fatality rate was 3% (95% C.I., 0.03-0.04. Methanol, TCAs, and antihistamines had the highest case fatality rates; 33% (95% C.I., 0.008-0.91, 14% (95% C.I., 0.04-0.33, and 10% (95% C.I., 0.02-0.27, respectively. Conclusions Three per cent of all acute poisonings were fatal, and nine out of ten deaths by acute poisonings occurred outside hospital. Two-thirds were evaluated as accidental

  18. Acute tramadol poisoning and its clinical and laboratory findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Rahimi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tramadol is a centrally acting analgesic with opioid and nonopioid properties, which extensively used in the relief of mild to moderate pain. Tramadol poisoning is a common cause of acute pharmaceutical poisoning in Iran. There are a few studies about clinical and laboratory findings related to acute tramadol poisoning. Therefore, the aim of this study was to demonstrate the clinical and laboratory findings in tramadol acute poisoning cases. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive study of patients with acute tramadol poisoning who referred to Loghman Hakim Hospital Poison Center during January to April 2012. Data such as patient′s age, sex, time of ingestion, ingested dose, cause of poisoning, mean duration of hospitalization, patient′s clinical presentations, laboratory findings, therapeutic measures, and patient′s outcome have collected in a predesigned checklist. Results: A total of 144 patients including 111 men (77% and 33 women (23% with acute tramadol poisoning was included in this study. The mean ingested dose was 1971.2 mg (100-20000 mg. Seizure (47.91% was the most frequent clinical symptom. Blood gas on admission showed pH (7.3 ± 0.1, PCO 2 (49.7 ± 8.6 mmHg and HCO3− (24.1 ± 3.8 mEq/L, indicating pure acute respiratory acidosis may be occurred in tramadol-intoxicated patients. There were significant differences between tramadol-intoxicated cases with and without a seizure with regard to the time interval between ingestion and admission on hospital, ingested dose and PCO 2. Conclusion: Seizure and rise of PCO 2 were the most findings in this study.

  19. Neurological Effects of Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning in Children

    OpenAIRE

    YARAR, Coskun

    2009-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning (COP) is one of the most common causes of mortality and morbidity due to poisoning in all over the world. Although the incidence of COP has not been known exactly in the childhood, almost one-third of CO exposures occurred in children. The data regarding COP in children are inconclusive. Children may be more vulnerable to CO exposure than adults as a result of their high respiration and metabolic rates, high oxygen metabolism, and immature central nervous system. Rec...

  20. Recent Advances in the Treatment of Organophosphorous Poisonings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Balali-Mood

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Organophosphorous compounds have been employed as pesticides and chemical warfare nerve agents. Toxicity of organophosphorous compounds is a result of excessive cholinergic stimulation through inhibition of acetyl cholinesterase. Clinical manifestations include cholinergic syndromes, central nervous system and cardiovascular disorders. Organophosphorous pesticide poisonings are common in developing worlds including Iran and Sri Lanka. Nerve agents were used during the Iraq-Iran war in 1983-1988 and in a terrorist attack in Japan in 1994-1995. Following decontamination, depending on the severity of intoxication the administration of atropine to counteract muscarinic over-stimulation, and an oxime to reactivate acetyl cholinesterase are indicated. Supportive and intensive care therapy including diazepam to control convulsions and mechanical respiration may be required. Recent investigations have revealed that intravenous infusion of sodium bicarbonate to produce mild to moderate alkalinization is effective. Gacyclidine; an antiglutamatergic compound, was also proved to be beneficial in conjunction with atropine, pralidoxime, and diazepam in nerve agent poisoning. Intravenous magnesium sulfate decreased hospitalization duration and improved outcomes in patients with organophosphorous poisoning. Bio-scavengers including fresh frozen plasma or albumin have recently been suggested as a useful therapy through clearing of free organophosphates. Hemofiltration and antioxidants are also suggested for organophosphorous poisoning. Recombinant bacterial phosphotriesterases and hydrolases that are able to transfer organophosphorous-degrading enzymes are very promising in delayed treatment of organophosphorous poisoning. Recently, encapsulation of drugs or enzymes in nanocarriers has also been proposed. Given the signs and symptoms of organophosphorous poisoning, health professionals should remain updated about the recent advances in treatment of

  1. AN EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF POISONING IN A TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen; Sahajanand; Rangalakshmi; Kasim

    2015-01-01

    AIMS : The aim of this retrospective study was to analyze the rate and chara cteristics of acute poisoning cases admitted to adult intensive care unit ( ICU ) in a tertiary care medical college hospital. We report clinical features , demographic data , laboratory results , mortality rate , and the results of our treatment in cases who ca me with the history of poisoning. METHODS: The study was done in patients admitted with his...

  2. Pesticide poisoning in Chitwan, Nepal: a descriptive epidemiological study

    OpenAIRE

    Gyenwali, Deepak; Vaidya, Abhinav; Tiwari, Sundar; Khatiwada, Prakash; Lamsal, Daya Ram; Giri, Shrikrishana

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Globally, there is a growing concern over pesticides use, which has been linked to self-harm and suicide. However, there is paucity of research on the epidemiology of pesticides poisoning in Nepal. This study is aimed at assessing epidemiological features of pesticides poisoning among hospital-admitted cases in selected hospitals of Chitwan District of Nepal. Methods A hospital-based quantitative study was carried out in four major hospitals of Chitwan District. Informatio...

  3. The availability of toxicological analyses for poisoned patients in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cassidy, Nicola

    2010-05-01

    The National Poisons Information Service and the Association of Clinical Biochemists in the United Kingdom published guidelines on laboratory analyses for poisoned patients in 2002. In 2003, U.S. guidelines were prepared by an expert panel of analytical toxicologists and emergency department (ED) physicians. Some professional associations in different countries quote these guidelines but there are no data to support adherence to these recommendations in the medical literature.

  4. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDY OF POISONING CASES IN COASTAL ANDHRA PRADESH

    OpenAIRE

    Anand; Ashok Chakravarthy

    2014-01-01

    Acute poisoning is one of the common causes of admission in emergency department of various hospitals. This is a common socio medical problem. Green revolution has increased the production of food grain but the wide spread use of organophosphorus compounds has increased incidence of its poisoning to the human kind by accidental or suicidal. Around one hundred fifty six patient admitted in Konaseema Institute of Medical Science and General Hospital with diagnosis of acute p...

  5. Domoic acid and amnesic shellfish poisoning in public health

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez-Falconí, Pedro P.; Médico Farmacólogo, Doctor en Medicina, Master (c) en Ética Médica y Bioética Clínica, Bachiller en Derecho. Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú.

    2009-01-01

    Domoic acid is a sea biotoxin that was first identified to produce food poisoning in more than a hundred people in Canada, in 1987, with some deaths reported, after intake of contaminated mussels. As part of the clinical presentation, anterograde amnesia is highlighted. As it had not been seen before with any know biotoxin or drug, and could be permanent, the syndrome was called “amnesic poisoning due to shellfish”. In the histopathological examination of the brain of the dead patients, t...

  6. Welfare Impacts of Pindone Poisoning in Rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, Penny; Brown, Samantha; Arrow, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary The nature and duration of the effects of pindone poisoning in rabbits were evaluated through observational monitoring of affected animals and necropsy. Using the resulting data in a formal assessment framework, the welfare impacts of pindone poisoning were ranked as relatively higher than other vertebrate toxic agents currently used for rabbit control. Abstract Control methods used to manage unwanted impacts of the European rabbit in Australia and New Zealand include the use o...

  7. [Characteristics of emergency poisoning cases in elderly versus younger patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supervía Caparrós, August; Pallàs Villaronga, Oriol; Clemente Rodríguez, Carlos; Aranda Cárdenas, María Dolores; Pi-Figueras Valls, María; Cirera Lorenzo, Isabel

    2017-10-01

    To compare cases of poisoning according to age to detect differences in frequency of visits to the emergency department, patient characteristics, case management, and immediate outcome in terms of related mortality. Descriptive study of a retrospective series of patients who visited a university hospital emergency department for treatment of poisoning between 2009 and 2014. We collected patient characteristics and data related to the event, case management, and poisoning-related death. Patients were grouped according to age (cut-off 65 y). Of a total of 3847 poisoning episodes, 341 (8.9%) were in patients aged 65 years or older. The percentage of women among these older patients (61.3%) was greater than among younger patients (36.3%; P<.001). Poisoning was accidental in older patients more often than younger ones (64.4% vs 9.5%, respectively; P<.001), occurred more often in the home (82.1% vs 37%, P<.001), and more often required active treatment (73.3% vs 57.4%; P<.001) and admission to hospital (21.4% vs 7.3%, P<.001). The related mortality rate was also higher in the older patients (2.1% vs 0.1% in younger patients, P<.001). The percentage of poisonings in patients aged 65 years or older is not negligible. Poisoning in patients of advanced age tends to be accidental and take place in the home. Older patients more often require active treatment and hospital admission; poisoning-related death is more common in older patients than younger ones.

  8. Mushroom poisoning with Amanita phalloides - a report of four cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, A; Gouveia Ferreira, M; Paulo, J; França, A; Carvalho, A

    2001-02-01

    Amanita mushroom poisoning is a rare but serious occurrence. Physicians need to recognize the phalloides syndrome promptly and to institute effective treatment as soon as possible in order to avoid the often fatal complications. The authors report four cases of Amanita poisoning, two of which resulted in fulminant hepatic failure and required orthotopic liver transplantation. The clinical symptoms and signs, laboratory alterations, and therapeutic options available are discussed.

  9. Hallmarks of opium poisoning in infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Nasim; Sanaei-Zadeh, Hossein; Mostafazadeh, Babak

    2010-10-01

    Accidental opium intoxication in children is an extremely dangerous poisoning if it remains undiagnosed and untreated. The classic triad of miosis, decreased level of consciousness and bradypnea, which are the hallmarks of opiate intoxication, are used for the diagnosis of opium poisoning in adults and children. Little attention has been paid to the signs of opium intoxication in children and no published study has explored the frequency of hallmarks of this type of poisoning in the paediatric population. We conducted a study in order to evaluate the prevalence of major signs of opium poisoning in infants and toddlers. In this study, a total of 228 infants and 82 toddlers who had been admitted to Loghman Hakim Hospital as a result of opium poisoning between 2001 and 2009 were evaluated, retrospectively. The most usual sign of opium poisoning was miosis (90%) followed by a decreased level of consciousness (88.4%), bradypnea (28.4%) and seizure (10.3%). The prevalence of the triad of miosis, bradypnea and a decreased level of consciousness was 25.2%. Miosis in association with decreased level of consciousness was detected in 82.6% of our patients. Bradypnea was present in 74 infants and 14 toddlers, which shows a statistically significant difference (P = 0.01). The mean age and weight of the patients with bradypnea were significantly less than those without bradypnea (P = 0.008 and P = 0.0001, respectively). Bradypnea and seizure were significantly more common in females (36.7% versus 26%; P = 0.05 and 15.2% versus 6.5%; P = 0.01, respectively). Miosis in association with a decreased level of consciousness is the most useful indicator of opium poisoning in infants and toddlers. Furthermore, seizure is a more common feature of this type of poisoning in infants, especially in those who are less than 1 month old.

  10. Prevention and Treatment of Vesication and Poisoning Caused by Arsenicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-02-01

    the past for the treatment of heavy netal intoxication. For exanple, Jinercaprol (3AL) (1), polyaminocarboxylic acids (?), D-penicillanine (3), and 1...acetyl-DL-penicillanine are useful in the treatment of poisoning by other heavy metals, they are devoid of any protective action under these...investigators and West German investigators have recommended that it replace BAL for treatment of heavy metal poisoning. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  11. Economic burden of illness from pesticide poisonings in highland Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Donald C.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Active surveillance of acute pesticide poisonings in a potato-growing region of highland Ecuador during 1991-1992 uncovered a rate of 171/100 000, due predominantly to occupational exposures to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. Occupational exposure among agricultural workers was the most common reason for poisoning (32 male workers and 1 female worker, out of a total of 50 cases. Of these 33 cases, 28 of them reported pesticide application as the work task just prior to poisoning, with over 80% citing the use of World Health Organization Hazard Category I pesticides. The suicide rate of 17.1/100 000 and the overall mortality rate of 20.5/100 000 that we found are among the highest reported anywhere in the world. At the exchange rates prevailing at that time, median costs associated with these poisonings were estimated as follows: public and social security health care direct costs of US$ 9.85/case; private health costs of US$ 8.33/case; and lost-time indirect costs of US$ 8.33/ agricultural worker. Each one of those costs was over five times the daily agricultural wage, which was then about US$ 1.50. Further costing of pesticide poisonings should be carried out in other settings to provide appropriate information for decisions about pesticide use. In addition, integrated pest management should be further evaluated as an appropriate technology to reduce the economic burden of illness from pesticide poisonings in developing countries.

  12. Spectrum of Acute Pharmaceutical and Chemical Poisoning in Northern Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendranath Sarkar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute poisoning is a major public health problem in Bangladesh. It is a common method for suicide. A clear picture regarding clinical presentation, most commonly used toxic agents, background factors and outcome of poisoned patients is necessary in every region. The aim of this study was to investigate frequency and outcome of acute pharmaceutical and chemical poisoning cases in Northern Bangladesh. Methods: This was a retrospective descriptive study on poisoned patients with 18 years of age and above who were admitted to Rangpur Medical College Hospital during 1st December 2011 to 30th November 2012. Results: During the study period, a total of 956 patients were investigated. Males slightly outnumbered females (51.6%. The majority of patients (92% were in the 18-40 year age-group. Regarding occupation, housewives were the most frequent (33.6% followed by farmers (31.7% and students (20.9%. Organophosphate compounds (OPC were the most commonly used toxic agents (73.5%. Most of poisoning cases occurred following suicidal attempts (88%. Familial disharmony was the main cause of suicidal attempts (92.3%. Univariate Analysis showed that age less than 40 years, being married, living in rural areas and educational attainment below secondary level were significantly associated with an increased risk of poisoning (P

  13. [Acute lithium poisoning: epidemiology, clinical characteristics, and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguera Vion, Víctor; Montes, José Manuel; Del Rey, José Manuel; Rivera-Gorrín, Maite; Rodao, José María; Tenorio, Maite; Saiz-Ruiz, Jerónimo; Liaño, Fernando

    2017-02-01

    Lithium continues to be the treatment of choice for bipolar disorder. Acute lithium poisoning is a potentially serious event. We present a retrospective observational significative study of episodes of acute lithium poisoning during a 52- month period. Poisoning was defined by a blood lithium concentration of 1.5 mEq/L or higher. We analyzed treatment and epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of 70 episodes were identified (incidence density among treated patients, 1.76 per 100 patient-years). The most frequent cause of lithium poisoning was a concurrent medical condition (46%). Most poisonings were mild (74.2%), but neurologic involvement was identified in 40.3%. Electrocardiographic abnormalities were found in 8 cases. Acute renal failure, found in 23 patients (37.1%), was mild in most cases, although 11 patients required hemodialysis. We concluded that acute lithium poisoning is an uncommon complication, but risk needs to be lowered. Patients should be warned to avoid dosage errors and to take special care during concurrent illnesses and while taking other medications.

  14. Carbon monoxide poisoning in Jerusalem: epidemiology and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salameh, Shaden; Amitai, Yona; Antopolsky, Meir; Rott, David; Stalnicowicz, Ruth

    2009-02-01

    To describe the epidemiology of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning in Jerusalem and identify risk factors for such poisoning. A retrospective descriptive analysis of patients with CO poisoning who presented to the Hadassah hospitals in Jerusalem from 1994 to 2006. All patients with suspected CO poisoning were examined and those with confirmed cases [carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level >5%] were included. Sources of exposure, seasonal variation, and demographic characteristics were analyzed. There were 292 patients (49% males) with 40 family clusters that accounted for 149 patients (51%); 230 patients (79%) presented during the winter months. All but one had unintentional CO intoxication. The main sources of exposure were faulty gas heaters (n = 135), fire (n = 102), and other residential heating systems (n = 40). The estimated annual incidence of CO poisoning decreased from 6.45 per 100,000 in 1994-2000 to 3.53 per 100,000 in 2001-2006. High-risk intoxication (COHb level >25%) occurred in 84 patients (29%). Factors associated with severe intoxication were male gender, individual patients (compared with those in clusters), and faulty gas heaters (compared with other sources). Males exposed to CO may have a more severe intoxication. The lower risk in patients presenting in clusters could be explained by the assumption that severe presentation in one patient alerts the others who are less severely affected. The implementation of safer standards for residential heating systems and CO detectors together with the public education may explain the decline in the incidence of CO poisoning.

  15. [Prehospital management of acute childhood poisoning in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, June; Zubiaur, Oihane; Azkunaga, Beatriz; Molina, Juan Carlos; Mintegi, Santiago

    2017-06-01

    This objective was to analyze prehospital management of acute childhood poisonings. Poisonings treated in 59 pediatric emergency departments participating in the Toxicology Observation Project of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Emergency Medicine were registered prospectively between 2008 and 2014. We analyzed consultations made and treatments received before the patient arrived in the emergency department. A total of 902 poisonings were registered; in 870 cases (96.4%) cases whether or not a prehospital consultation had been made was on record. An emergency service of come type was contacted or visited in 312 cases (35.9%). Calls were most often made to the central emergency service (122 cases [14%]), primary care centers (100 cases [11.5%]), or the National Toxicology Institute (60 cases, [6.9%]). Choice of service to call or visit varied greatly according to type of poisoning. Prehospital treatment was more often received if a service had been contacted (26.3%) than if not (6.8%) (Pprehospital service had been contacted. About half the cases that consulted a poisoning service but did not receive treatment before coming to a hospital did receive treatment in the hospital emergency department. We conclude that a substantial percentage of patients who seek care for childhood poisoning from an emergency department have also consulted a prehospital service. Better prehospital management of such cases could facilitate earlier treatment when required and also preempt unnecessary trips to pediatric emergency departments.

  16. Fatal poisoning in drug addicts in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steentoft, Anni; Teige, Brita; Ceder, Gunnel

    2001-01-01

    The study includes medicolegally examined fatal poisonings among drug addicts in 1997 in the five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, and the results are compared to a similar investigation from 1991. A common definition of ‘‘drug addict’’ was applied by the participat......The study includes medicolegally examined fatal poisonings among drug addicts in 1997 in the five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, and the results are compared to a similar investigation from 1991. A common definition of ‘‘drug addict’’ was applied...... and Denmark, however, heroin/morphine caused only about 70% of the fatal poisonings. About 30% of the fatal poisonings in Denmark and Sweden were caused by other group I drugs, in Denmark mainly methadone and in Sweden mainly propoxyphene. Apart from two cases in Sweden methadone deaths were not seen...... in the other Nordic countries. In Finland heroin/morphine deaths have increased from about 10% in 1991 to about 40% in 1997. Forty-four percent of the fatal poisonings in Finland were caused by other group I drugs, mainly codeine and propoxyphene. The two fatal poisonings in Iceland were caused by carbon...

  17. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning: Pathogenesis, Management, and Future Directions of Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jason J; Wang, Ling; Xu, Qinzi; McTiernan, Charles F; Shiva, Sruti; Tejero, Jesus; Gladwin, Mark T

    2017-03-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning affects 50,000 people a year in the United States. The clinical presentation runs a spectrum, ranging from headache and dizziness to coma and death, with a mortality rate ranging from 1 to 3%. A significant number of patients who survive CO poisoning suffer from long-term neurological and affective sequelae. The neurologic deficits do not necessarily correlate with blood CO levels but likely result from the pleiotropic effects of CO on cellular mitochondrial respiration, cellular energy utilization, inflammation, and free radical generation, especially in the brain and heart. Long-term neurocognitive deficits occur in 15-40% of patients, whereas approximately one-third of moderate to severely poisoned patients exhibit cardiac dysfunction, including arrhythmia, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, and myocardial infarction. Imaging studies reveal cerebral white matter hyperintensities, with delayed posthypoxic leukoencephalopathy or diffuse brain atrophy. Management of these patients requires the identification of accompanying drug ingestions, especially in the setting of intentional poisoning, fire-related toxic gas exposures, and inhalational injuries. Conventional therapy is limited to normobaric and hyperbaric oxygen, with no available antidotal therapy. Although hyperbaric oxygen significantly reduces the permanent neurological and affective effects of CO poisoning, a portion of survivors still have substantial morbidity. There has been some early success in therapies targeting the downstream inflammatory and oxidative effects of CO poisoning. New methods to directly target the toxic effect of CO, such as CO scavenging agents, are currently under development.

  18. Medical treatment of acute poisoning with organophosphorus and carbamate pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokanović, Milan

    2009-10-28

    Organophosphorus compounds (OPs) are used as pesticides and developed as warfare nerve agents such as tabun, soman, sarin, VX and others. Exposure to even small amounts of an OP can be fatal and death is usually caused by respiratory failure. The mechanism of OP poisoning involves inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) leading to inactivation of the enzyme which has an important role in neurotransmission. AChE inhibition results in the accumulation of acetylcholine at cholinergic receptor sites, producing continuous stimulation of cholinergic fibers throughout the nervous systems. During more than five decades, pyridinium oximes have been developed as therapeutic agents used in the medical treatment of poisoning with OP. They act by reactivation of AChE inhibited by OP. However, they differ in their activity in poisoning with pesticides and warfare nerve agents and there is still no universal broad-spectrum oxime capable of protecting against all known OP. In spite of enormous efforts devoted to development of new pyridinium oximes as potential antidotes against poisoning with OP only four compounds so far have found its application in human medicine. Presently, a combination of an antimuscarinic agent, e.g. atropine, AChE reactivator such as one of the recommended pyridinium oximes (pralidoxime, trimedoxime, obidoxime and HI-6) and diazepam are used for the treatment of OP poisoning in humans. In this article the available data related to medical treatment of poisoning with OP pesticides are reviewed and the current recommendations are presented.

  19. Economic burden of illness from pesticide poisonings in highland Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald C. Cole

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Active surveillance of acute pesticide poisonings in a potato-growing region of highland Ecuador during 1991-1992 uncovered a rate of 171/100 000, due predominantly to occupational exposures to organophosphate and carbamate pesticides. Occupational exposure among agricultural workers was the most common reason for poisoning (32 male workers and 1 female worker, out of a total of 50 cases. Of these 33 cases, 28 of them reported pesticide application as the work task just prior to poisoning, with over 80% citing the use of World Health Organization Hazard Category I pesticides. The suicide rate of 17.1/100 000 and the overall mortality rate of 20.5/100 000 that we found are among the highest reported anywhere in the world. At the exchange rates prevailing at that time, median costs associated with these poisonings were estimated as follows: public and social security health care direct costs of US$ 9.85/case; private health costs of US$ 8.33/case; and lost-time indirect costs of US$ 8.33/ agricultural worker. Each one of those costs was over five times the daily agricultural wage, which was then about US$ 1.50. Further costing of pesticide poisonings should be carried out in other settings to provide appropriate information for decisions about pesticide use. In addition, integrated pest management should be further evaluated as an appropriate technology to reduce the economic burden of illness from pesticide poisonings in developing countries.

  20. Main features of Cortinarius spp. poisoning: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danel, V C; Saviuc, P F; Garon, D

    2001-07-01

    Cortinarius spp. poisoning is characterized by a delayed acute renal failure. The main features of this severe poisoning are still poorly known and often overlooked. The aim of this literature review is a better description of Cortinarius spp. poisoning. The main medical databases were searched: Abstracts of Mycology, Current Contents, Medline, Pascal, Micromedex Poisindex, Toxicology abstracts, Toxline. All case reports that included a description of the clinical features of Cortinarius spp. poisoning were studied. 245 cases were collected and 90 cases could be analyzed in details. Gastrointestinal disorders are the main symptoms of the prerenal phase of the poisoning. They appear a few days after the ingestion of the mushrooms (median 3 days). The renal phase is delayed (median 8.5 days). Moderate and transient hepatic abnormalities have been reported. A severe hepatic failure can be ruled out. Muscular lesions are highly questionable. Treatment is supportive. No specific treatment can be recommended. Acute renal failure progressed towards chronic renal failure in half of the cases; intermittent hemodialysis or kidney transplantations were necessary in 70% of those cases. Cortinarius spp. poisoning is severe. Ingestion of Cortinarius species must be systematically suspected whenever tubulo-interstitial nephritis is diagnosed, especially as mushrooms may have been ingested 1-2 weeks before.