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Sample records for burn-up nuclear fuel

  1. Nuclear fuel burn-up economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the period 1981-1985, for the needs of Utility Organization, Beograd, and with the support of the Scientific Council of SR Srbija, work has been performed on the study entitled 'Nuclear Fuel Burn-up Economy'. The forst [phase, completed during the year 1983 comprised: comparative analysis of commercial NPP from the standpoint of nuclear fuel requirements; development of methods for fuel burn-up analysis; specification of elements concerning the nuclear fuel for the tender documentation. The present paper gives the short description of the purpose, content and results achieved in the up-to-now work on the study. (author)

  2. Study of nuclear fuel burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors approach theoretical treatment of isotopic composition changement for nuclear fuel in nuclear reactors. They show the difficulty of exhaustive treatment of burn-up problems and introduce the principal simplifying principles. Due to these principles they write and solve analytically the evolution equations of the concentration for the principal nuclides both in the case of fast and thermal reactors. Finally, they expose and comment the results obtained in the case of a power fast reactor. (author)

  3. Nuclear fuel burn-up credit for criticality safety justification of spent nuclear fuel storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn-up credit analysis of RBMK-1000 an WWER-1000 spent nuclear fuel accounting only for actinides is carried out and a method is proposed for actinide burn-up credit. Two burn-up credit approaches are analyzed, which consider a system without and with the distribution of isotopes along the height of the fuel assembly. Calculations are performed using SCALE and MCNP computer codes

  4. Radiochemical analysis of nuclear fuel burn-up and spent fuel key nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Destructive radiochemical analysis of spent nuclear fuels is an important tool to determine burn-up with high accuracy and to better understand the process of depletion and formation of actinides and fission products during irradiation as a result of fission and successive neutron capture. The resulting isotope inventories and nuclear databases that are created, are of high importance to evaluate the performance of nuclear fuels in a reactor, to evaluate computer codes applied for a safe transport, storage and disposal/reprocessing of spent fuels and to safeguard fissile material. The objective is to provide chemical and radiochemical analyses procedures for an accurate determination of isotopic compositions and concentrations of actinides and fission products in different types of industrial (UO2, MOX) and experimental nuclear fuels (UAlx, U3Si2, UMo, ...). For a burn-up determination program typically 21 actinides and fission products are analyzed. For an extended characterization program this can increase to up to approximately 50 isotopes

  5. PLD-IDMS studies towards direct measurement of burn-up of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method based on Pulsed laser deposition followed by Isotope dilution mass spectrometric method is evaluated towards the possibility of direct measurement of burn up of nuclear fuel and also to find out spatial distribution of burn-up along the pellet. The wave length dependent results show larger error with 1064 nm, compared to 532 nm laser beam. Much less error is expected with shorter wave length and shorter pulse width laser beam. Further work is being carried out in this direction

  6. High Burn-Up Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Wang, Hong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jiang, Hao [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Rob L [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed the cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT) approach to successfully demonstrate the controllable fatigue fracture on high burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in a normal vibration mode. CIRFT enables examination of the underlying mechanisms of SNF system dynamic performance. Due to the inhomogeneous composite structure of the SNF system, the detailed mechanisms of the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interactions and the stress concentration effects at the pellet-pellet interface cannot be readily obtained from a CIRFT system measurement. Therefore, finite element analyses (FEAs) are used to translate the global moment-curvature measurement into local stress-strain profiles for further investigation. The major findings of CIRFT on the HBU SNF are as follows: SNF system interface bonding plays an important role in SNF vibration performance. Fuel structure contributes to SNF system stiffness. There are significant variations in stress and curvature of SNF systems during vibration cycles resulting from segment pellets and clad interactions. SNF failure initiates at the pellet-pellet interface region and appears to be spontaneous.

  7. Experimental methods for burn-up determination in nuclear fuels, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method is presented that allows the calculation of the total percentage of atoms having undergone fission ('burn up') in nuclear fuels, from the measurement of absolute amounts of fission product neodymium-148 and of uranium and plutoniun present in the spent fuel, the fission yield of neodymium-148 being known. These measurements are performed through the mass spectrometry- isotope dilution technique

  8. Key issues in nuclear fuel cycle concerning high burn-up strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present high burn-up strategy in Japan, the economic efficiency and reduction of the spent nuclear fuel have been in progress. On the other hand, in the further progress of the strategy, several issues may appear. The amount and activity of nuclides, heat generation, and radiation for a fuel pin in the typical 17x17 PWR assembly were calculated as functions of burn-up and cooling time, using the SWAT code system. Waste loading in glass waste forms from spent UO2 fuel and MOX fuel were discussed, assuming the number of glass canisters of 150 liter per THM is 1.25 at 45 GWd/THM. The number of glass canisters per GWd is almost constant in the range of burn-up up to 70 GWd/THM. The amount of molybdate from Pu-239 fissions linearly increases as a function of burn-up similarly like increase from U-235 fissions. The current vitrification technology may not face serious situation to be required substantial reduction in waste loading relating to molybdate up to 70 GWd/THM. The initial cooling period prior to vitrification, the waste loading and the interim storage period prior to final disposal are major factors which determine the way of storage and final disposal. The higher burn-up above 45 GWd/THM may require pretreatment of HLLW or substantial reduction in waste loading to retain the integrity of the ceramic melter for e.g. five years. Further promotion of high burn-up strategy should be consistent with nuclear fuel cycle including waste management. A potential approach, a conceptual new reprocessing system for thermal reactors is described. (author)

  9. Calculation of fuel burn-up and fuel reloading for the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculation of fuel burnup and fuel reloading for the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor was carried out by using a new programme named HEXA-BURNUP, realized in a PC. The programme is used to calculate the following parameters of the Dalat reactor: a/Critical configurations of the core loaded with 69, 72, 74, 86, 88, 89 and 92 fuel elements. The effective multiplication coefficients equal 1 within the error ranges of less than 0.38%. b/ The thermal neutron flux distribution in the reactor. The calculated results agree with the experimental data measured at 11 typical positions. c/The average fuel burn-up for the period from Feb. 1984 to Sep. 1992. The difference between calculation and experiment is only about 1.9%. 10 fuel reloading versions are calculated, from which an optimal version is proposed. (author). 9 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Development of high performance liquid chromatography for rapid determination of burn-up of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn-up an important parameter during evaluation of the performance of any nuclear fuel. Among the various techniques available, the preferred one for its determination is based on accurate measurement of a suitable fission product monitor and the residual heavy elements. Since isotopes of rare earth elements are generally used as burn-up monitors, conditions were standardized for rapid separation (within 15 minutes) of light rare earths using high performance liquid chromatography based on either anion exchange (Partisil 10 SAX) in methanol-nitric acid medium or by cation exchange on a reverse phase column (Spherisorb 5-ODS-2 or Supelcosil LC-18) dynamically modified with 1-octane sulfonate or camphor-10-sulfonic acid (β). Both these methods were assessed for separation of individual fission product rare earths from their mixtures. A new approach has been examined in detail for rapid assay of neodymium, which appears promising for faster and accurate measurement of burn-up. (author)

  11. Criticality and burn up evolutions of the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor with alternative fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time evolution of criticality and burn-up grades of the Fixed Bed Nuclear Reactor (FBNR) are investigated for alternative fuels. These are: (1) low enriched uranium, (2) weapon grade plutonium, (3) reactor grade plutonium, and (4) minor actinides in the spent fuel of light water reactors (LWRs). The criticality calculations are conducted with SCALE 5.1 using S8-P3 approximation in 238 neutron energy groups with 90 groups in thermal energy region. The main results of the study can be summarized as follows: (1)Low enriched uranium (UO2): FBNR with an enrichment grade of 9% and 19% will start with keff = 1.2744 and keff = 1.36 and can operate ∼8 and >15 years with the same fuel charge, where criticality drops to keff = 1.06 and a burn-up grade of 54 000 and >110 000 MW.D/t can be attained. (2)Weapon grade plutonium: Such a high quality nuclear fuel suggests to be mixed with thorium. Second series of criticality calculations are conducted with fuel compositions made of thoria (ThO2) and weapon grade PuO2, where PuO2 component has been varied from 1% to 100%. Criticality with keff > 1.0 is achieved by ∼2.5% PuO2. At 4% PuO2, the reactor criticality will become satisfactory (keff = 1.1121), rapidly increasing with more PuO2. A reasonable mixture will by around 20% PuO2 and 80% ThO2 with a keff = 1.2864. This mixed fuel would allow full power reactor operation for >20 years and burn-up grade can reach 136 000 MW.D/t. (3)Reactor grade plutonium: Third series of criticality calculations are conducted with fuel compositions made of thoria and reactor grade PuO2, where PuO2 is varied from 1% to 100%. Reactor becomes critical by ∼8% PuO2 content. One can achieve keff = 1.2670 by 35% PuO2 and would allow full power reactor operation also for >20 years and burn-up grade can reach 123 000 MW.D/t. (4)Minor actinides in the spent fuel of LWRs: Fourth series of criticality calculations are conducted with fuel compositions made of thoria and MAO2, where MAO2 is varied from 1

  12. A contribution to the understanding of the high burn-up structure formation in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An increase of the discharge burn-up of UO2 nuclear fuels in the light water reactors results in the appearance of a change of microscopic structure, called HBS. Although well characterised experimentally, important points on the mechanisms of its formation remain to be cleared up. In order to answer these questions, a study of the contribution of the dislocation-type defects was conducted. In a first part, a calculation method of the stress field associated with periodic configurations of dislocations was developed. The method was applied to the cases of edge dislocation pile-up and wall, for which an explicit expression of the internal stress potential was obtained. Through the study of other examples of dislocation configurations, it was highlighted that this method also allows the calculation of any periodic dislocation configuration. In a second part, the evolution of interstitial-type dislocation loops was studied in UO2 fuel samples doped with 10% in mass of alpha emitters. The experimental loop size distributions were obtained for these samples stored during 4 and 7 years at room temperature. Kinetic equations are proposed in order to study the influence of the resolution process of interstitials from a loop back to the matrix due to an impact with the recoil atom 234U, as well as the coalescence of two interstitial loops that can diffuse by a volume mechanism. The application of the model shows that the two processes must be considered in the study of the evolution of radiation damage. (author)

  13. Cellular automata approach to investigation of high burn-up structures in nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micrographs of uranium dioxide (UO2) corresponding to exposure times in reactor during 323, 953, 971, 1266 and 1642 full power days were investigated. The micrographs were converted into digital files isomorphous to cellular automata (CA) checkerboards. Such a representation of the fuel structure provides efficient tools for its dynamics simulation in terms of primary 'entities' imprinted in the micrographs. Besides, it also ensures a possibility of very effective micrograph processing by CA means. Interconnection between the description of fuel burn-up development and some exactly soluble models is ascertained. Evidences for existence of self-organization in the fuel at high burn-ups were established. The fractal dimension of microstructures is found to be an important characteristic describing the degree of radiation destructions

  14. Development of destructive methods of burn-up determination and their application on WWER type nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results are described of a cooperation between the Central Institute of Nuclear Research Rossendorf and the Radium Institute 'V.G. Chlopin' Leningrad in the field of destructive burn-up determination. Laboratory methods of burn-up determination using the classical monitors 137Cs, 106Ru, 148Nd and isotopes of heavy metals (U, Pu) as well as the usefulness of 90Sr, stable isotopes of Ru and Mo as monitors are dealt with. The analysis of the fuel components uranium (spectrophotometry, potentiometric titration, mass-spectrometric isotope dilution) and plutonium (spectrophotometry, coulometric titration, mass- and alpha-spectrometric isotope dilution) is fully described. Possibilities of increasing the reproducibility (automatic adjusting of measurement conditions) and the sensibility (ion impuls counting) of mass-spectrometric measurements are proposed and applied to a precise determination of Am and Cm isotopic composition. The methods have been used for burn-up analysis of spent WWER (especially WWER-440) fuel. (author)

  15. Instant release fraction and matrix release of high burn-up UO2 spent nuclear fuel: Effect of high burn-up structure and leaching solution composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two weak points in Performance Assessment (PA) exercises regarding the alteration of Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are the contribution of the so-called Instant Release Fraction (IRF) and the effect of High Burn-Up Structure (HBS). This manuscript focuses on the effect of HBS in matrix (long term) and instant release of a Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) SNF irradiated in a commercial reactor with a mean Burn-Up (BU) of 60 GWd/tU. In order to study the HBS contribution, two samples from different radial positions have been prepared. One from the centre of the SNF, labelled CORE, and one from the periphery, enriched with HBS and labelled OUT. Static leaching experiments have been carried out with two synthetic leaching solutions: bicarbonate (BIC) and Bentonitic Granitic Groundwater (BGW), and in all cases under oxidising conditions. IRF values have been calculated from the determined Fraction of Inventory in Aqueous Phase (FIAP). In all studied cases, some radionuclides (RN): Rb, Sr and Cs, have shown higher release rates than uranium, especially at the beginning of the experiment, and have been considered as IRF. Redox sensitive RN like Mo and Tc have been found to dissolve slightly faster than uranium and further studies might be needed to confirm if they can also be considered part of the IRF. Most of the remaining studied RN, mainly actinides and lanthanides, have been found to dissolve congruently with the uranium matrix. Finally, Zr, Ru and Rh presented lower release rates than the matrix. Higher matrix release has been determined for CORE than for OUT samples showing that the formation of HBS might have a protective effect against the oxidative corrosion of the SNF. On the contrary, no significant differences have been observed between the two studied leaching solutions (BIC and BGW). Two different IRF contributions have been determined. One corresponding to the fraction of inventory segregated in the external open grain boundaries, directly available to water and

  16. Non-destructive burn-up degree evaluation method for nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Makoto; Kumanomido, Hironori

    1998-01-06

    The present invention concerns a non-destructive burn-up degree evaluation method for spent fuels by a spontaneous neutron releasing rate method. Namely, an equation (1) is provided as: S = ({phi}/P)x(1-k) where {phi} is spontaneous neutron flux, P is the proportional coefficient, S is neutron releasing rate and k is neutron effective multiplication factor. S is further given by an equation (2): S = S4{sub 0}x(1+S2/S4{sub 0})xVxT where S2 is releasing rate from Cm242, S4{sub 0} is releasing rate from other nuclides, v is a void ratio of coolants and T is a time decaying effect, and the equations (1) and (2) are joined. P is determined by theoretical calculation, and S2/S4{sub 0} is determined based on a half decay characteristics of Cm242 to determine a correction amount. S4{sub 0} and V are determined as a correlational function of the burn-up degree: x based on burning calculation while using the Pu enrichment degree {epsilon}, Pu compositional ratio f, and concrete void ratio v. k is determined as a correlational function of v. A first appropriate value of x is obtained while having the burnup degree x{sup (0)} as an initial value. x is determined successively by repeating calculation based on modified k in this case. (I.S.)

  17. Effects of fuel burn-up and cooling periods on thermal responses in a repository for spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flexible methods and codes have been developed to calculate thermal responses in a spent nuclear fuel repository located in granitic bedrock. The thermal resistance of the backfill material makes an essential contribution to the temperature at the canister surface. The backfill is however so thin compared to the rock masses of the repository that a stationary solution for the temperature drop across the backfill can be used. Combining analytical solutions of thermal diffusion in the rock and the stationary temperature following the released heat power across the backfill gives a very good description of the thermal behaviour of a repository. Temperatures at different points in a repository were calculated for encapsuled spent fuel with different cooling times (10, 20, 30 and 40 years) and having different burn-up values (33, 35 and 45 MWd/kgU). The amount of spent fuel in each canister was supposed to originate from 1.4 tons of fresh Uranium in the calculated examples. A more crucial variable in a thermal analysis of a repository configuration is however the heat power of canisters as a function of time and not the content of canisters. The study shows that the largest temperature rise at the boundary of a centrally located canister and buffer mass will be at most 85 K with assumed thermal data, when the heat power of 900 canisters does not exceed 1200-1400 W each at the time of emplacement depending on burn-up and cooling time. Assuming a higher value for the heat conductivity of the buffer material corresponding to that of the water saturated bentonite gives 15% higher limits respectively. The canisters were supposed to be placed in 15 rows 25 m apart from each other and 60 canisters in each row. The distance between canisters was taken to be 6 m

  18. Development of a method for xenon determination in the microstructure of high burn-up nuclear fuel[Dissertation 17527

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, M. I

    2008-07-01

    In nuclear fuel, in approximately one quarter of the fissions, one of the two formed fission products is gaseous. These are mainly the noble gases xenon and krypton with isotopes of xenon contributing up to 90% of the product gases. These noble fission gases do not combine with other species, and have a low solubility in the normally used uranium oxide matrix. They can be dissolved in the fuel matrix or precipitate in nanometer-sized bubbles within the fuel grain, in micrometer-sized bubbles at the grain boundaries, and a fraction also precipitates in fuel pores, coming from fuel fabrication. A fraction of the gas can also be released into the plenum of the fuel rod. With increasing fission, and therefore burn-up, the ceramic fuel material experiences a transformation of its structure in the 'cooler' rim region of the fuel. A subdivision occurs of the original fuel grains of few microns size into thousands of small grains of sub-micron sizes. Additionally, larger pores are formed, which also leads into an increasing porosity in the fuel rim, called high burn-up structure. In this structure, only a small fraction of the fission gas remains in the matrix, the major quantity is said to accumulate in these pores. Because of this accumulation, the knowledge of the quantities of gas within these pores is of major interest in consideration to burn-up, fuel performance and especially for safety issues. In case of design based accidents, i.e. rapidly increasing temperature transients, the behavior of the fuel has to be estimated. Various analytical techniques have been used to determine the Xe concentration in nuclear fuel samples. The capabilities of EPMA (Electron Probe Micro-Analyser) and SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) have been studied and provided some qualitative information, which has been used for determining Xe-matrix concentrations. First approaches combining these two techniques to estimate pore pressures have been recently reported. However

  19. Determination of high burn-up nuclear fuel elastic properties with acoustic microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Elastic constants of nuclear fuel were measured by acoustic microscopy. ► Our approach was in line with existing literature on non-irradiated material. ► Measurements on several samples of irradiated fuel (HBRP and N118) were performed. ► A decrease of 25% of the elastic modulus between 0 and 100 GWd/tM was observed. ► This trend is in good agreement with measurements conducted with indentation method. - Abstract: We report the measurement of elastic constants of non-irradiated UO2, SIMFUEL (simulated spent fuel: UO2 with several additives which aim to simulate the effect of burnup) and irradiated fuel by focused acoustic microscopy. To qualify the technique a parametric study was conducted by performing measurements on depleted uranium oxide (with various volume fraction of porosity, Oxygen-to-metal ratios, grain sizes) and SIMFUEL and by comparing them with previous works presented in the literature. Our approach was in line with existing literature for each parameter studied. It was shown that the main parameters influencing the elastic moduli are the amount of fission products in solution (related to burnup) and the pore density and shape, the influence of which has been evaluated. The other parameters (irradiation defects, oxygen-to-metal ratio and grain sizes) mainly increase the attenuation of the ultrasonic wave but do not change the wave velocity, which is used in the proposed method to evaluate Young’s modulus. Measurements on irradiated fuel (HBRP and N118) were then performed. A global decrease of 25% of the elastic modulus between 0 and 100 GWd/tM was observed. This observation is compared to results obtained with measurements conducted at ITU by Knoop indentation techniques.

  20. Development of a method for xenon determination in the microstructure of high burn-up nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear fuel, in approximately one quarter of the fissions, one of the two formed fission products is gaseous. These are mainly the noble gases xenon and krypton with isotopes of xenon contributing up to 90% of the product gases. These noble fission gases do not combine with other species, and have a low solubility in the normally used uranium oxide matrix. They can be dissolved in the fuel matrix or precipitate in nanometer-sized bubbles within the fuel grain, in micrometer-sized bubbles at the grain boundaries, and a fraction also precipitates in fuel pores, coming from fuel fabrication. A fraction of the gas can also be released into the plenum of the fuel rod. With increasing fission, and therefore burn-up, the ceramic fuel material experiences a transformation of its structure in the 'cooler' rim region of the fuel. A subdivision occurs of the original fuel grains of few microns size into thousands of small grains of sub-micron sizes. Additionally, larger pores are formed, which also leads into an increasing porosity in the fuel rim, called high burn-up structure. In this structure, only a small fraction of the fission gas remains in the matrix, the major quantity is said to accumulate in these pores. Because of this accumulation, the knowledge of the quantities of gas within these pores is of major interest in consideration to burn-up, fuel performance and especially for safety issues. In case of design based accidents, i.e. rapidly increasing temperature transients, the behavior of the fuel has to be estimated. Various analytical techniques have been used to determine the Xe concentration in nuclear fuel samples. The capabilities of EPMA (Electron Probe Micro-Analyser) and SIMS (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry) have been studied and provided some qualitative information, which has been used for determining Xe-matrix concentrations. First approaches combining these two techniques to estimate pore pressures have been recently reported. However, relevant Xe

  1. Evolution of the nuclear fuel mechanical properties at high burn-up at extensive European experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer codes have been developed in order to simulate the nuclear fuel rod mechanical behaviour, and therefore compare the evolution of the main parameters against a certain number of safety criteria, for reactor class 1 and class 2 operating conditions. Concerning the fuel material (UO2, MOX or UO2 with additives) the mechanical properties have been determined on non irradiated samples. One can expect that these properties evolve with burn-up, due to the transmutation, the evolution of the oxygen potential, the accumulation of fission defects and in some case the material restructuring (High Burn-up Structure). In order to provide the fuel thermo-mechanical calculation with more accurate mechanical properties, a large experimental project has been launched since several years by CEA, EDF and ITU ; furthermore a recent collaboration has been started with Studsvik, Sweden, concerning the possibility of performing in-pile creep measurements. The program is indeed organised in three folds, which can be described as follows: 1 - Acquisition of mechanical properties on non irradiated materials (UO2, UO2+Gd, UO2+Cr, MOX) with axial creep tests, three points bending tests up to 1700 oC, acoustic measurements at room temperature, instrumented micro-indentation tests and Vickers test from room temperature to 1200 oC. This allowed the development of a mechanical behaviour law available for these materials in the non-irradiated state. 2 - Acquisition of mechanical properties on irradiated materials in hot cells, using a micro-indentation machine developed especially in TUI, Vickers tests with the same machine, and a focused acoustic technique developed by the LAIN laboratory in the Montpellier University (France). The target is to define the evolution of the elastic properties, of the yield stress and of the thermal creep properties. 3 - More recently with the Studsvik Laboratories, the design of a specific rig for in-pile indentation has been completed. This aims at

  2. Ultrasonic measurement of high burn-up fuel elastic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ultrasonic method developed for the evaluation of high burn-up fuel elastic properties is presented hereafter. The objective of the method is to provide data for fuel thermo-mechanical calculation codes in order to improve industrial nuclear fuel and materials or to design new reactor components. The need for data is especially crucial for high burn-up fuel modelling for which the fuel mechanical properties are essential and for which a wide range of experiments in MTR reactors and high burn-up commercial reactor fuel examinations have been included in programmes worldwide. To contribute to the acquisition of this knowledge the LAIN activity is developing in two directions. First one is development of an ultrasonic focused technique adapted to active materials study. This technique was used few years ago in the EdF laboratory in Chinon to assess the ageing of materials under irradiation. It is now used in a hot cell at ITU Karlsruhe to determine the elastic moduli of high burnup fuels from 0 to 110 GWd/tU. Some of this work is presented here. The second on going programme is related to the qualification of acoustic sensors in nuclear environments, which is of a great interest for all the methods, which work, in a hostile nuclear environment

  3. TRIGA fuel burn-up calculations supported by gamma scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy based non-destructive methods is employed to measure spent fuel parameters. By this method, the axial distribution of Cesium-137 has been measured which results in an axial burn up profiles. Knowing the exact irradiation history of the fuel, four spent TRIGA fuel elements have been selected for on-site gamma scanning using a special shielded scanning device developed at the Atominstitute. Each selected fuel element was transferred into the fuel inspection unit using the standard fuel transfer cask. Each fuel element was scanned in one centimetre steps of its active fuel length and the Cesium-137 activity was determined as a proved burn up indicator. The absolute activity of each centimetre was measured and compared with the reactor physics code ORIGEN2.2 results. This code was used to calculate average burn up and isotopic composition of fuel element. The comparison between measured and calculated results shows good agreement. (author)

  4. TRIGA fuel burn-up calculations and its confirmation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cesium (Cs-137) isotopic concentration due to irradiation of TRIGA Fuel Elements FE(s) is calculated and measured at the Atominstitute (ATI) of Vienna University of Technology (VUT). The Cs-137 isotope, as proved burn-up indicator, was applied to determine the burn-up of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor FE. This article presents the calculations and measurements of the Cs-137 isotope and its relevant burn-up of six selected Spent Fuel Elements SPE(s). High-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy based non-destructive method is employed to measure spent fuel parameters. By the employment of this method, the axial distribution of Cesium-137 for six SPE(s) is measured, resulting in the axial burn-up profiles. Knowing the exact irradiation history and material isotopic inventory of an irradiated FE, six SPE(s) are selected for on-site gamma scanning using a special shielded scanning device developed at the ATI. This unique fuel inspection unit allows to scan each millimeter of the FE. For this purpose, each selected FE was transferred to the fuel inspection unit using the standard fuel transfer cask. Each FE was scanned at a scale of 1 cm of its active length and the Cs-137 activity was determined as proved burn-up indicator. The measuring system consists of a high-purity germanium detector (HPGe) together with suitable fast electronics and on-line PC data acquisition module. The absolute activity of each centimeter of the FE was measured and compared with reactor physics calculations. The ORIGEN2, a one-group depletion and radioactive decay computer code, was applied to calculate the activity of the Cs-137 and the burn-up of selected SPE. The deviation between calculations and measurements was in range from 0.82% to 12.64%.

  5. Burn-up measurement of irradiated rock-like fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to obtain burn-up data of plutonium rock-like (ROX) fuels irradiated at JRR-3M in JAERI, destructive chemical analysis of zirconia or thoria system ROX fuels was performed after development of a new dissolution method. The dissolution method and procedure have been established using simulated ROX fuel, which is applicable to the hot-cell handling. Specimens for destructive chemical analysis were obtained by applying the present method to irradiated ROX fuels in a hot-cell. Isotopic ratios of neodymium and plutonium were determined by mass-spectrometry using the isotope dilution procedure. Burn-up of the irradiated ROX fuels was calculated by the 148Nd procedure using measured data. The burn-ups of thoria and zirconia system fuels that irradiated same location in the capsule showed almost same values. For the ROX fuel containing thorium, 233U was also determined by the same techniques in order to evaluate the effect of burn-up of thorium. As the result, it was found that the fission of 233U was below 1% of total fission number and could be negligible. In addition, americium and curium were determined by alpha-spectrometry. These data, together with isotopic ratio of plutonium, are important data to analyze the irradiation behavior of plutonium. (author)

  6. Experimental studies of spent fuel burn-up in WWR-SM reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alikulov, Sh. A.; Baytelesov, S.A.; Boltaboev, A.F.; Kungurov, F.R. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Ulughbek township, 100214, Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Menlove, H.O.; O’Connor, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Osmanov, B.S., E-mail: bari_osmanov@yahoo.com [Research Institute of Applied Physics, Vuzgorodok, 100174 Tashkent (Uzbekistan); Salikhbaev, U.S. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Ulughbek township, 100214, Tashkent (Uzbekistan)

    2014-10-01

    Highlights: • Uranium burn-up measurement from {sup 137}Cs activity in spent reactor fuel. • Comparison to reference sample with known burn-up value (ratio method). • Cross-check of the approach with neutron-based measurement technique. - Abstract: The article reports the results of {sup 235}U burn-up measurements using {sup 137}Cs activity technique for 12 nuclear fuel assemblies of WWR-SM research reactor after 3-year cooling time. The discrepancy between the measured and the calculated burn-up values was about 3%. To increase the reliability of the data and for cross-check purposes, neutron measurement approach was also used. Average discrepancy between two methods was around 12%.

  7. Experimental studies of spent fuel burn-up in WWR-SM reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Uranium burn-up measurement from 137Cs activity in spent reactor fuel. • Comparison to reference sample with known burn-up value (ratio method). • Cross-check of the approach with neutron-based measurement technique. - Abstract: The article reports the results of 235U burn-up measurements using 137Cs activity technique for 12 nuclear fuel assemblies of WWR-SM research reactor after 3-year cooling time. The discrepancy between the measured and the calculated burn-up values was about 3%. To increase the reliability of the data and for cross-check purposes, neutron measurement approach was also used. Average discrepancy between two methods was around 12%

  8. High-burn-up fuels for fast reactors. Past experience and novel applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast reactors in the U.S. routinely achieved fuel burn-ups of 10%, with some fuel able to reach peak burn-ups of 20%, notably in the Experimental Breeder Reactor II and the Fast Flux Test Facility. Maximum burn-up has historically been constrained by chemical and mechanical interactions between the fuel and its cladding, and to some extent by radiation damage and thermal effects (e.g., radiation-induced creep, thermal creep, and radiation embrittlement) that cause the cladding to weaken. Although fast reactors have used several kinds of fuel - including oxide, metal alloy, carbide, and nitride - the vast majority of experience with fast reactors has been using oxide (including mixed oxide) and metal-alloy fuels based on uranium. Our understanding of high-burn-up operation is also limited by the fact that breeder reactor programs have historically assumed that their fuel would eventually undergo reprocessing; the programs thus have not made high burn-up a top priority. Recently a set of novel designs have emerged for fast reactors that require little initial enrichment and no reprocessing. These reactors exploit a concept known as a traveling wave (sometimes referred to as a breed-and-burn wave, fission wave, or nuclear-burning wave). By breeding and using its own fuel in place as it operates, a traveling-wave reactor can obtain burn-ups that approach 50%, well beyond the current base of knowledge and experience. Our computational work on the physics of traveling-wave reactors shows that they require metal-alloy fuel to provide the margins of reactivity necessary to sustain a breed-and-burn wave. This paper reviews operating experience with high-burn-up fuels and the technical feasibility of moving to a qualitatively new burn-up regime. We discuss our calculations on traveling-wave reactors, including those concerning the possible use of thorium. The challenges associated with high burn-up and fluence in fuels and materials are also discussed. (author)

  9. An iterative approach for TRIGA fuel burn-up determination using nondestructive gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Tienko E-mail: tkw@faculty.nthu.edu.tw; Peir Jinnjer

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a method for evaluating the burn-up values of the rod-type TRIGA spent fuel by using gamma-ray spectrometry of the short-lived fission products {sup 97}Zr/{sup 97}Nb, {sup 132}I, and {sup 140}La. Fuel irradiation history is not needed in this method. Short-lived fission-product activities were established by re irradiating the spent fuels in a nuclear reactor. Based on the measured activities, {sup 235}U burn-up values can be deduced by iterative calculations. The complication caused by {sup 239}Pu production and fission is also discussed in detail. The burn-up values obtained by this method are in good agreement with those deduced from the conventional method based on long-lived fission products {sup 137}Cs, {sup 134}Cs/{sup 137}Cs ratio and {sup 106}Ru/{sup 137}Cs ratio.

  10. An iterative approach for TRIGA fuel burn-up determination using nondestructive gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to establish a method for evaluating the burn-up values of the rod-type TRIGA spent fuel by using gamma-ray spectrometry of the short-lived fission products 97Zr/97Nb, 132I, and 140La. Fuel irradiation history is not needed in this method. Short-lived fission-product activities were established by re irradiating the spent fuels in a nuclear reactor. Based on the measured activities, 235U burn-up values can be deduced by iterative calculations. The complication caused by 239Pu production and fission is also discussed in detail. The burn-up values obtained by this method are in good agreement with those deduced from the conventional method based on long-lived fission products 137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs ratio and 106Ru/137Cs ratio

  11. An iterative approach for TRIGA fuel burn-up determination using nondestructive gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, T K; Peir, J J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to establish a method for evaluating the burn-up values of the rod-type TRIGA spent fuel by using gamma-ray spectrometry of the short-lived fission products 97Zr/97Nb, 132I, and 140La. Fuel irradiation history is not needed in this method. Short-lived fission-product activities were established by reirradiating the spent fuels in a nuclear reactor. Based on the measured activities, 235U burn-up values can be deduced by iterative calculations. The complication caused by 239Pu production and fission is also discussed in detail. The burn-up values obtained by this method are in good agreement with those deduced from the conventional method based on long-lived fission products 137Cs, 134Cs/137Cs ratio and 106Ru/137Cs ratio. PMID:10670930

  12. Microstructural Modeling of Thermal Conductivity of High Burn-up Mixed Oxide Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predicting the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels as a function of burn-up and temperature is fundamental to the efficient and safe operation of nuclear reactors. However, modeling the thermal conductivity of fuel is greatly complicated by the radially inhomogeneous nature of irradiated fuel in both composition and microstructure. In this work, radially and temperature-dependent models for effective thermal conductivity were developed utilizing optical micrographs of high burn-up mixed oxide fuel. The micrographs were employed to create finite element meshes with the OOF2 software. The meshes were then used to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of the microstructures using the BISON fuel performance code. The new thermal conductivity models were used to calculate thermal profiles at end of life for the fuel pellets. These results were compared to thermal conductivity models from the literature, and comparison between the new finite element-based thermal conductivity model and the Duriez-Lucuta model was favorable

  13. Raman micro-spectroscopy of UOX and MOX spent nuclear fuel characterization and oxidation resistance of the high burn-up structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jegou, C.; Gennisson, M.; Peuget, S.; Desgranges, L.; Guimbretière, G.; Magnin, M.; Talip, Z.; Simon, P.

    2015-03-01

    Raman micro-spectroscopy was applied to study the structure and oxidation resistance of UO2 (burnup 60 GWd/tHM) and MOX (burnup 47 GWd/tHM) irradiated fuels. The Raman technique, adapted to working under extreme conditions, enabled structural information to be obtained at the cubic micrometer scale in various zones of interest within irradiated fuel (central and zones like the Rim for UOX60, and the plutonium-enriched agglomerates for MOX47 characterized by a high burn-up structure), and the study of their oxidation resistance. As regards the structural information after irradiation, the spectra obtained make up a set of data consistent with the systematic presence of the T2g band characteristic of the fluorite structure, and of a triplet band located between 500 and 700 cm-1. The existence of this triplet can be attributed to the presence of defects originating in changes to the fuel chemistry occurring in the reactor (presence of fission products) and to the accumulation of irradiation damage. As concerns the oxidation resistance of the different zones of interest, Raman spectroscopy results confirmed the good stability of the restructured zones (plutonium-enriched agglomerates and Rim) rich in fission products compared to the non-restructured UO2 grains. A greater structural stability was noticed in the case of high plutonium content agglomerates, as this element favors the maintenance of the fluorite structure.

  14. ORIGEN computer code use in non-destructive analysis of irradiated fuel elements for burn-up determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An iterative method for burn-up determination in the non-destructive analysis of irradiated fuel elements using the ORIGEN computer code is presented. On the bases of data obtained from ORIGEN code the calibration coefficient for the neutron flux is determined as a function of one fission product activity while the burn-up is determined as a function of the calibration coefficient for a given irradiation history. These functions are used for determining the burn-up of nuclear fuel elements measured by gamma-scanning. The method is tested for fuel elements irradiated in a TRIGA reactor facility. (Author)

  15. Inventories of high burn up LWR UO2 spent fuel and ATR MOX spent fuel in Tokai reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes calculated results of inventory of radioactivity in the Tokai Reprocessing Plant with calculation code, based on initial conditions and nuclear data library. The inventories were compared with three types of spent fuels, High burn up U oxide for light water reactor, U-Pu mixed oxide for advanced thermal reactor and the design based fuel for Tokai Reprocessing Plant. (author)

  16. Microstructural characterization of high burn-up mixed oxide fast reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teague, Melissa, E-mail: melissa.teague@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Gorman, Brian; King, Jeffrey [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois St, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Porter, Douglas; Hayes, Steven [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    High burn-up mixed oxide fuel with local burn-ups of 3.4–23.7% FIMA (fissions per initial metal atom) were destructively examined as part of a research project to understand the performance of oxide fuel at extreme burn-ups. Optical metallography of fuel cross-sections measured the fuel-to-cladding gap, clad thickness, and central void evolution in the samples. The fuel-to-cladding gap closed significantly in samples with burn-ups below 7–9% FIMA. Samples with burn-ups in excess of 7–9% FIMA had a reopening of the fuel-to-cladding gap and evidence of joint oxide-gain (JOG) formation. Signs of axial fuel migration to the top of the fuel column were observed in the fuel pin with a peak burn-up of 23.7% FIMA. Additionally, high burn-up structure (HBS) was observed in the two highest burn-up samples (23.7% and 21.3% FIMA). The HBS layers were found to be 3–5 times thicker than the layers found in typical LWR fuel. The results of the study indicate that formation of JOG and or HBS prevents any significant fuel-cladding mechanical interaction from occurring, thereby extending the potential life of the fuel elements.

  17. Burn up determination of IEAR-1 fuel elements by non destructive gamma ray spectrometry method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of nuclear fuel burn up by non destructive gamma ray spectrometry is discussed, and results of such measurements, made at the Instituto de Energia Atomica (IEA), are given. Specifically, the burn up of an MTR (Material Testing Reactor) fuel element removed from the IEAR-1 swimming pool reactor in 1958 is evaluated from the measured Cs-137 activity, which gives a single 661,6 keV gamma ray. Due to the long decay time of the test element, no other fission decay product activity could be detected. Analysis of measurements, made with a 3'' x 3'' NaI(Tl) detector at 330 distinct points of the element, showed the total burn up to 3.3 +- -+ 0.8 mg. This is in agreement with a calculated value. As the maximum temperature of IEAR-1 fuel elements is of the order of 400C, migration effects of Cs-137 was not considered, this being significant only at fuel temperature in excess of 10000C

  18. In-core fuel management amd attainable fuel burn-up in TRIGA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of in-core fuel management in research reactors, and especially in TRIGA, are discussed. Calculations made to determine the attainable fuel burn-up values of various fuel element types in the Otaniemi TRIGA Mark II reactor are described and the results obtained are given. Recommendations are given of how to perform the in-core fuel management to achieve good fuel utilization. The results obtained indicate that burn-up values of up to 5 and 2.5 MWd/element can be achieved for the 8 wt-% U Al clad and the 8.5 wt-% U SS clad elements, respectively. (author)

  19. Burn-up measurements at TRIGA fuel elements containing strong burnable poison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactivity method of determining the burn-up of research reactor fuel elements is applied to the highly enriched FLIP elements of TRIGA reactors. In contrast to other TRIGA fuel element types, the reactivity of FLIP elements increases with burn-up due to consumption of burnable poison. 33 fuel elements with burn-up values between 3% and 14% were investigated. The experiments showed that variations in the initial fuel composition significantly influence the reactivity and, consequently, increase the inaccuracy of the burn-up measurements. Particularly important are variations in the initial concentration of erbium, which is used as burnable poison in FLIP fuel. A method for reducing the effects of the material composition variations on the measured reactivity is presented. If it is applied, the accuracy of the reactivity method for highly poisoned fuel elements becomes comparable to the accuracy of other methods for burn-up determination. (orig.)

  20. High burn-up structure of U(Mo) dispersion fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaers, A.; Van Renterghem, W.; Van den Berghe, S.

    2016-08-01

    The evolution of the high burn-up structure (HBS) in U(Mo) fuel irradiated up to a burn-up of ∼70% 235U or ∼5 × 1021 f/cm3 or ∼120 GWd/tHM is described and compared to the observation made on LWR fuel. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy was performed on several samples having different burn-ups in order to get a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to the high burn-up structure formation. Even though there are some substantial differences between the irradiation of ceramic and U(Mo) alloy fuels (crystal structure, enrichment, irradiation temperature …), it was found that in both fuels recrystallization initiates at the same threshold and progresses in a similar way with increasing fission density. In case of U(Mo), recrystallization leads to accelerated swelling of the fuel which could result in instability of the fuel plate.

  1. New Strategies for Licensing the Storage and Transportation of High Burn-up Spent Nuclear Fuel in the United States - 12546

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An alternative approach may be needed to the licensing of high-burnup fuel for storage and transportation based on the assumption that spent fuel cladding may not always remain intact. The approach would permit spent fuel to be retrieved on a canister basis and could lessen the need for repackaging of spent fuel. This approach is being presented as a possible engineering solution to address the uncertainties and lack of data availability for cladding properties for high burnup fuel and extended storage time frames. The proposed approach does not involve relaxing current safety standards for criticality safety, containment, or permissible external dose rates. Packaging strategies and regulations should be developed to reduce the potential for requiring fuel to be repackaged unnecessarily. This would lessen the chance of accidents and mishaps during loading and unloading of casks, and decrease dose to workers. A packaging approach that shifts the safety basis from reliance upon the fuel condition to reliance upon an inner canister could eliminate or lessen the need for repackaging. In addition, the condition of canisters can be more readily monitored and inspected than the condition of fuel cladding. Canisters can also be repaired and/or replaced when deemed necessary. In contrast, once a fuel assembly is loaded into a canister and placed in a storage overpack, there is little opportunity to monitor its condition or take mitigating measures if cladding degradation is suspected or proven to occur. (authors)

  2. Modeling of WWER-440 fuel pin behavior at extended burn-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Koliel, Moustafa S. E-mail: moustafa_elkoliel@yahoo.com; Abou-Zaid, Attya A.; El-Kafas, A.A

    2004-04-01

    Currently, there is an ongoing effort to increase fuel discharge burn-up of all LWRs fuel including WWERs as much as possible in order to decrease power production cost. Therefore, burn-up is expected to be increased from 60 to 70 MWd/kg U. The change in the fuel radial power distribution as a function of fuel burn-up can affect the radial fuel temperature distribution as well as the fuel microstructure in the fuel pellet rim. Both of these features, commonly termed the 'rim effect'. High burn-up phenomena in WWER-440 UO{sub 2} fuel pin, which are important for fission gas release (FGR) were modeled. The radial burn-up as a function of the pellet radius and enrichment has to be known to determine the local thermal conductivity. In this paper, the radial burn-up and fissile products distributions of WWER-440 UO{sub 2} fuel pin were evaluated using MCNP4B and ORIGEN2 codes. The impact of the thermal conductivity on predicted FGR calculations is needed. For the analysis, a typical WWER-440 fuel pin and surrounding water moderator are considered in a hexagonal pin well. The thermal release and the athermal release from the pellet rim were modeled separately. The fraction of the rim structure and the excessive porosity in the rim structure in isothermal irradiation as a function of the fuel burn-up was predicted. A computer program; RIMSC-01, is developed to perform the required FGR calculations. Finally, the relevant phenomena and the corresponding models together with their validation are presented.

  3. Modeling of WWER-440 fuel pin behavior at extended burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, there is an ongoing effort to increase fuel discharge burn-up of all LWRs fuel including WWERs as much as possible in order to decrease power production cost. Therefore, burn-up is expected to be increased from 60 to 70 MWd/kg U. The change in the fuel radial power distribution as a function of fuel burn-up can affect the radial fuel temperature distribution as well as the fuel microstructure in the fuel pellet rim. Both of these features, commonly termed the 'rim effect'. High burn-up phenomena in WWER-440 UO2 fuel pin, which are important for fission gas release (FGR) were modeled. The radial burn-up as a function of the pellet radius and enrichment has to be known to determine the local thermal conductivity. In this paper, the radial burn-up and fissile products distributions of WWER-440 UO2 fuel pin were evaluated using MCNP4B and ORIGEN2 codes. The impact of the thermal conductivity on predicted FGR calculations is needed. For the analysis, a typical WWER-440 fuel pin and surrounding water moderator are considered in a hexagonal pin well. The thermal release and the athermal release from the pellet rim were modeled separately. The fraction of the rim structure and the excessive porosity in the rim structure in isothermal irradiation as a function of the fuel burn-up was predicted. A computer program; RIMSC-01, is developed to perform the required FGR calculations. Finally, the relevant phenomena and the corresponding models together with their validation are presented

  4. Serviceability of VVER-1000 fuel rods at extended burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To-day in Russia fuel cycles are under development intended for fuel assembly burn-up up to 65MW.day/kgU. To validate the fuel serviceability standard VVER-1000 fuel assemblies are in trial operation to reach the burn-up >60MW.day/kgU. Late in 2002 fuel assemblies that reached the burn-up of 55MW.day/kgU after 5 years of operation were discharged from the Balakovo NPP. A series of assemblies will continue their trial operation during the 6th year. The post-irradiation examinations of high burn-up UO2 base fuel rods of the VVER type reveal that one of the most important consequences of burn-up extension is the so-called rim-effect. The term 'rim-effect' assumes a complex of specific features of the structure and thermophysical behaviour of a fuel rod related to processes proceeding in a fuel layer that is on the periphery of a fuel pellet

  5. Recent view to the results of pulse tests in the IGR reactor with high burn-up fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asmolov, V.; Yegorova, L. [Russian Research Centre, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-03-01

    Testing of 43 fuel elements (13 fuel elements with high burn-up fuel, 10 fuel elements with preirradiated cladding and fresh fuel, and 20 non-irradiated fuel elements) was carried out in the IGR pulse reactor with a half width of the reactor power pulse of about 0.7 sec. Tests were conducted in capsules with no coolant flow and with standard initial conditions in the capsule of 20{degrees}C and 0.2 MPa. Two types of coolant were used: water and air. One purpose of the test program was to determine the thresholds and mechanisms of fuel rod failure under RIA conditions for VVER fuel rods over their entire exposure range, from zero to high burn-up. These failure thresholds are often used in safety analyses. The tests and analyses were designed to reveal the influence on fuel rod failure of (1) the mechanical properties of the cladding, (2) the pellet-to-cladding gap, (3) fuel burn-up, (4) fuel-to-coolant heat transfer, and other parameters. The resulting data base can also be used for validation of computer codes used for analyzing fuel rod behavior. Three types of test specimens were used in the tests, and diagrams of these specimens are shown in Fig. 1. {open_quotes}Type-C{close_quotes} specimens were re-fabricated from commercial fuel rods of the VVER-1000 type that had been subjected to many power cycles of operation in the Novovoronezh Nuclear Power Plant (NV NPP). {open_quotes}Type-D{close_quotes} specimens were fabricated from the same commercial fuel rods used above, but the high burn-up oxide fuel was removed from the cladding and was replaced with fresh oxide fuel pellets. {open_quotes}Type-D{close_quotes} specimens thus provided a means of separating the effects of the cladding and the oxide fuel pellets and were used to examine cladding effects only.

  6. Technical Development on Burn-up Credit for Spent LWR Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2001-12-26

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled ''Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels.'' Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burnup and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report.

  7. Technical Development on Burn-up Credit for Spent LWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical development on burn-up credit for spent LWR fuels had been performed at JAERI since 1990 under the contract with Science and Technology Agency of Japan entitled ''Technical Development on Criticality Safety Management for Spent LWR Fuels.'' Main purposes of this work are to obtain the experimental data on criticality properties and isotopic compositions of spent LWR fuels and to verify burnup and criticality calculation codes. In this work three major experiments of exponential experiments for spent fuel assemblies to obtain criticality data, non-destructive gamma-ray measurement of spent fuel rods for evaluating axial burn-up profiles, and destructive analyses of spent fuel samples for determining precise burn-up and isotopic compositions were carried out. The measured data obtained were used for validating calculation codes as well as an examination of criticality safety analyses. Details of the work are described in this report

  8. Parameterized representation of macroscopic cross section in the PWR fuel element considering burn-up cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belo, Thiago F.; Fiel, Joao Claudio B., E-mail: thiagofbelo@hotmail.com [Instituto Militar de Engenharia (IME), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    Nuclear reactor core analysis involves neutronic modeling and the calculations require problem dependent nuclear data generated with few neutron energy groups, as for instance the neutron cross sections. The methods used to obtain these problem-dependent cross sections, in the reactor calculations, generally uses nuclear computer codes that require a large processing time and computational memory, making the process computationally very expensive. Presently, analysis of the macroscopic cross section, as a function of nuclear parameters, has shown a very distinct behavior that cannot be represented by simply using linear interpolation. Indeed, a polynomial representation is more adequate for the data parameterization. To provide the cross sections of rapidly and without the dependence of complex systems calculations, this work developed a set of parameterized cross sections, based on the Tchebychev polynomials, by fitting the cross sections as a function of nuclear parameters, which include fuel temperature, moderator temperature and density, soluble boron concentration, uranium enrichment, and the burn-up. In this study is evaluated the problem-dependent about fission, scattering, total, nu-fission, capture, transport and absorption cross sections for a typical PWR fuel element reactor, considering burn-up cycle. The analysis was carried out with the SCALE 6.1 code package. The results of comparison with direct calculations with the SCALE code system and also the test using project parameters, such as the temperature coefficient of reactivity and fast fission factor, show excellent agreements. The differences between the cross-section parameterization methodology and the direct calculations based on the SCALE code system are less than 0.03 percent. (author)

  9. Burn-up credit criticality benchmark. Phase 4-B: results and analysis of MOX fuel depletion calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DECD/NEA Expert Group on Burn-up Credit was established in 1991 to address scientific and technical issues connected with the use of burn-up credit in nuclear fuel cycle operations. Following the completion of six benchmark exercises with uranium oxide (UOX) fuels irradiated in pressurised water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs), the present report concerns mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) fuels irradiated in PWRs. The exercises consisted of inventory calculations of MOX fuels for two initial plutonium compositions. The depletion calculations were carried out using three representations of the MOX assemblies and their interface with UOX assemblies. This enabled the investigation of the spatial and spectral effects during the irradiation of the MOX fuels. (author)

  10. Burn-up credit applications for UO2 and MOX fuel assemblies in AREVA/COGEMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the last seven years, AREVA/COGEMA has been implementing the second phase of its burn-up credit program (the incorporation of fission products). Since the early nineties, major actinides have been taken into account in criticality analyses first for reprocessing applications, then for transport and storage of fuel assemblies Next year (2004) COGEMA will take into account the six main fission products (Rh103, Cs133, Nd143, Sm149, Sm152 and Gd155) that make up 50% of the anti-reactivity of all fission products. The experimental program will soon be finished. The new burn-up credit methodology is in progress. After a brief overview of BUC R and D program and COGEMA's application of the BUC, this paper will focus on the new burn-up measurement for UO2 and MOX fuel assemblies. It details the measurement instrumentation and the measurement experiments on MOX fuels performed at La Hague in January 2003. (author)

  11. Determination of burn-up of irradiated PHWR fuel samples from KAPS-1 by mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn-up was determined experimentally using thermal ionization mass spectrometry for three spent UO2 fuel samples, which had undergone extended irradiation in Kakrapar Atomic Power Station Unit 1 (KAPS-1). The method involves dissolution of the irradiated fuel sample, separation and determination of burn-up monitor, uranium and plutonium. Isotope Dilution-Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (ID-TIMS) using Triple Spike Mixture consisting of (142Nd+233U+242Pu) was employed for the concentration determination of Nd, U and Pu in the dissolved fuel samples. The atom percent fission was calculated based on 148Nd as a burn-up monitor and also from the changes in the abundances of heavy element isotopes. Fractional fission contributions from the major fissile nuclides were calculated from heavy elemental data and also from the Nd isotopic ratios. (author)

  12. Study on the thermal-hydraulic stability of high burn up STEP III fuel in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japanese BWR utilities have performed a joint study of the Thermal Hydraulic Stability of High Burn up STEP III Fuel. In this study, the parametric dependency of thermal hydraulic stability threshold was obtained. It was confirmed through experiments that the STEP III Fuel has sufficient stability characteristics. (author)

  13. High fuel burn-up and nonproliferation in PWR-type reactor on the basis of modified Th-fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutronics-physical characteristics of the fuel lattice of a PWR-type reactor cooled by light water and by a mixture of light and heavy water have been analyzed. Th-fuel containing an essential amount of 231Pa and 232U is used, which allows an increase in fuel burn-up by a factor of 2-5 compared with that of traditional oxide uranium fuel with light water. It is important to underline that this is attained under the negative coolant density reactivity effect using cross sections of 231Pa and 232U from the updated JENDL-3.2 nuclear library. This radical increase of fuel burn-up is accompanied by a small change of reactivity during fuel irradiation (K∞=1.1 / 1.0), that favorably affects safety parameters of the reactor operation. A considerable percentage of 232U in fuel, and consequently in U, is a strong barrier against the proliferation of such weapon nuclide as 233U. (authors)

  14. Burn-up and cycle length optimization project of the robust fuel programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spanish electric sector (UNESA) takes part in the Robust Fuel programme in the different work groups set up by EPRI. Iberinco, with the collaboration of Iberdrola Generacion (TECNO and Cofrentes NPP) and Soluziona Ingenieria, has created a stable multidisciplinary group to assimilate and follow up this program, analyzing in detail the technology generated and evaluating the conclusions to provide the most suitable recommendations for application. Along these lines, one of the most promising projects within technical group 3 (High burn properties) has been the one called Burn-up and cycle Length Optimization. In January 2000 Duke Power published a study on the plants it owns (PWR type) and 18-month cycles, to establish the optimum unloading burn-up of fuel. The conclusion it reached is that the fuel cost drops t a minimum for average unload burn-ups of between 60 and 70 GWd/MTU. As an extension to this study and covering a wider base of considerations, Exelon, with the support of Westinghouse and the University of Pennsylvania, released a study in December 2001 on different reference cores with different cycle lengths. In this study, the optimum burn-up without exceeding current maximum enrichment limits (5%) is determined. Publication of the results of the second phase, considering higher enrichments, was due in the summer of 2002. The design of the core to be refueled and economic analyzes show that both pressurized water reactors (PWR) and boiling water reactors (BWR) can obtain significant benefits by increasing the fuel unloading burn-up above currently licensed limits. However, the optimum unload burn-up level is not reached without exceeding the current enrichment limit of 5% . (Author)

  15. Burn-up credit in criticality safety of PWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Designing spent fuel wet storage using WIMS-5D and MCNP-5 code. • Studying fresh and burned fuel with/out absorber like “B4C and Ag–In–Cd” in racks. • Sub-criticality was confirmed for fresh and burned fuel under specific cases. • Studies for BU credit recommend increasing fuel burn-up to 60.0 GWD/MTU. • Those studies require new core structure materials, fuel composition and cladding. - Abstract: The criticality safety calculations were performed for a proposed design of a wet spent fuel storage pool. This pool will be used for the storage of spent fuel discharged from a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR). The mathematical model based on the international validated codes, WIMS-5 and MCNP-5 were used for calculating the effective multiplication factor, keff, for the spent fuel stored in the pool. The data library for the multi-group neutron microscopic cross-sections was used for the cell calculations. The keff was calculated for several changes in water density, water level, assembly pitch and burn-up with different initial fuel enrichment and new types and amounts of fixed absorbers. Also, keff was calculated for the conservative fresh fuel case. The results of the calculations confirmed that the effective multiplication factor for the spent fuel storage is sub-critical for all normal and abnormal states. The future strategy for the burn-up credit recommends increasing the fuel burn-up to a value >60.0 GWD/MTU, which requires new fuel composition and new fuel cladding material with the assessment of the effects of negative reactivity build up

  16. Burn-Up Dependence of Bubble Morphology of Uranium Silicide Dispersion Fuels Used in Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn-up dependence of fission gas bubble morphology of U3Si2-Al and U3Si-Al dispersion fuels are reviewed with the data of ANL(Argonne Nation Laboratory) and KAERI(Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

  17. Fission Gas Release in LWR Fuel Rods Exhibiting Very High Burn-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, H.

    1980-01-01

    uses an empirical gas release model combined with a strongly burn-up dependent correction term, developed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The paper presents the experimental results and the code calculations. It is concluded that the model predictions are in reasonable agreement (within 15...

  18. Nuclear data needs for the analysis of generation and burn-up of actinide isotopes in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reliable prediction of the in-pile and out-of-pile physics characteristics of nuclear fuel is one of the objectives of present-day reactor physics. The paper describes the main production paths of important actinides for light water and fast breeder reactors. The accuracy of recent nuclear data is examined by comparisons of theoretical predictions with the results from post-irradiation analysis of nuclear fuel from power reactors, and partly with results obtained in zero-power facilities. A world-wide comparison of nuclear data to be used in large fast power reactor burn-up and long term considerations is presented. The needs for further improvement of nuclear data are discussed. (orig.)

  19. Propagation of Nuclear Data Uncertainties for ELECTRA Burn-up Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöstrand, H.; Alhassan, E.; Duan, J.; Gustavsson, C.; Koning, A. J.; Pomp, S.; Rochman, D.; Österlund, M.

    2014-04-01

    The European Lead-Cooled Training Reactor (ELECTRA) has been proposed as a training reactor for fast systems within the Swedish nuclear program. It is a low-power fast reactor cooled by pure liquid lead. In this work, we propagate the uncertainties in 239Pu transport data to uncertainties in the fuel inventory of ELECTRA during the reactor lifetime using the Total Monte Carlo approach (TMC). Within the TENDL project, nuclear models input parameters were randomized within their uncertainties and 740 239Pu nuclear data libraries were generated. These libraries are used as inputs to reactor codes, in our case SERPENT, to perform uncertainty analysis of nuclear reactor inventory during burn-up. The uncertainty in the inventory determines uncertainties in: the long-term radio-toxicity, the decay heat, the evolution of reactivity parameters, gas pressure and volatile fission product content. In this work, a methodology called fast TMC is utilized, which reduces the overall calculation time. The uncertainty of some minor actinides were observed to be rather large and therefore their impact on multiple recycling should be investigated further. It was also found that, criticality benchmarks can be used to reduce inventory uncertainties due to nuclear data. Further studies are needed to include fission yield uncertainties, more isotopes, and a larger set of benchmarks.

  20. Upgrading spent fuel shipping casks to meet higher burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to allow the transportability of high burn-up fuel and of MOX fuel in existing casks, TRANSNUCLEAIRE presents a two-step proven solution: (1) starting from 35/40 GWd/tU and 3.5 % enrichment, casks of the TN 12 family can be upgraded to 40/45 GWd/tU and 4.3 % enrichment by the use high performance baskets. (2) a second step consists in adding neutron shielding to allow transportation of fuel with a burn-up of 45/50 GWd/tU with a standard basket and of 50/55 GWd/tU with a high performance basket. (J.P.N.)

  1. Determination of the fuel element burn-up for mixed TRIGA core by measurement and calculation with new TRIGLAV code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagar, T.; Ravnik, M.; Persic, A. (J.Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia))

    1999-12-15

    Results of fuel element burn-up determination by measurement and calculation are given. Fuel element burn-up was calculated with two different programs TRIGLAV and TRIGAC using different models. New TRIGLAV code is based on cylindrical, two-dimensional geometry with four group diffusion approximation. TRIGAC program uses one-dimensional cylindrical geometry with twogroup diffusion approximation. Fuel element burn-up was measured with reactivity method. In this paper comparison and analysis of these three methods is presented. Results calculated with TRIGLAV show considerably better alignment with measured values than results calculated with TRIGAC. Some two-dimensional effects in fuel element burn-up can be observed, for instance smaller standard fuel element burn-up in mixed core rings and control rod influence on nearby fuel elements. (orig.)

  2. Propagation of nuclear data uncertainties for ELECTRA burn-up calculations

    CERN Document Server

    ostrand, H; Duan, J; Gustavsson, C; Koning, A; Pomp, S; Rochman, D; Osterlund, M

    2013-01-01

    The European Lead-Cooled Training Reactor (ELECTRA) has been proposed as a training reactor for fast systems within the Swedish nuclear program. It is a low-power fast reactor cooled by pure liquid lead. In this work, we propagate the uncertainties in Pu-239 transport data to uncertainties in the fuel inventory of ELECTRA during the reactor life using the Total Monte Carlo approach (TMC). Within the TENDL project the nuclear models input parameters were randomized within their uncertainties and 740 Pu-239 nuclear data libraries were generated. These libraries are used as inputs to reactor codes, in our case SERPENT, to perform uncertainty analysis of nuclear reactor inventory during burn-up. The uncertainty in the inventory determines uncertainties in: the long-term radio-toxicity, the decay heat, the evolution of reactivity parameters, gas pressure and volatile fission product content. In this work, a methodology called fast TMC is utilized, which reduces the overall calculation time. The uncertainty in the ...

  3. Burn-up credit criticality benchmark. Phase 4-A: reactivity prediction calculations for infinite arrays of PWR MOX fuel pin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD/NEA Expert Group on Burn-up Credit was established in 1991 to address scientific and technical issues connected with the use of burn-up credit in nuclear fuel cycle operations. Following the completion of six benchmark exercises with uranium oxide fuels irradiated in pressurised water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs), the present report concerns mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) fuels irradiated in PWRs. The report summarises and analyses the solutions to the specified exercises provided by 37 contributors from 10 countries. The exercises were based upon the calculation of infinite PWR fuel pin cell reactivity for fresh and irradiated MOX fuels with various MOX compositions, burn-ups and cooling times. In addition, several representations of the MOX fuel assembly were tested in order to check various levels of approximations commonly used in reactor physics calculations. (authors)

  4. Burn up calculations and validation by gamma scanning of a TRIGA HEU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan).; Karimzadeh, S.; Boeck, H.; Villa, M.; Stummer, T. [Vienna Univ. of Technology (Austria). Atominstitut

    2013-03-15

    The TRIGA Mark II research reactor operated by Atominstitut (Vienna/Austria) is one of the few TRIGA reactors, which still utilizes several High Enriched Uranium (HEU) Zirconium-Hydride (U-Zr-H) fuel elements. Its current core is a completely mixed core with 3 different types of fuel elements including one HEU type with 70 % enrichment and a stainless steel cladding. The present paper calculates the burn up of the FLIP (Fuel Lifetime Improvement Program) fuel using the burn up code ORIGEN2 and validates the theoretical results by high resolution gamma spectrometry using a unique fuel scanning device (FSD) developed at the Atominstitut especially for TRIGA fuel. For this purpose a FLIP fuel element was removed from the reactor core and stored in the research reactor pool for an appropriate cooling period. The fuel element was then transferred into the fuel scanning device to determine the Cesium-137 isotope distribution along the axis of the fuel element. The comparison between theoretical predictions and experimental results is the highlight of the present paper. (orig.)

  5. Burn up calculations and validation by gamma scanning of a TRIGA HEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II research reactor operated by Atominstitut (Vienna/Austria) is one of the few TRIGA reactors, which still utilizes several High Enriched Uranium (HEU) Zirconium-Hydride (U-Zr-H) fuel elements. Its current core is a completely mixed core with 3 different types of fuel elements including one HEU type with 70 % enrichment and a stainless steel cladding. The present paper calculates the burn up of the FLIP (Fuel Lifetime Improvement Program) fuel using the burn up code ORIGEN2 and validates the theoretical results by high resolution gamma spectrometry using a unique fuel scanning device (FSD) developed at the Atominstitut especially for TRIGA fuel. For this purpose a FLIP fuel element was removed from the reactor core and stored in the research reactor pool for an appropriate cooling period. The fuel element was then transferred into the fuel scanning device to determine the Cesium-137 isotope distribution along the axis of the fuel element. The comparison between theoretical predictions and experimental results is the highlight of the present paper. (orig.)

  6. Preliminary TRIGA fuel burn-up evaluation by means of Monte Carlo code and computation based on total energy released during reactor operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borio Di Tigliole, A.; Bruni, J.; Panza, F. [Dept. of Nuclear and Theoretical Physics, Univ. of Pavia, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Italian National Inst. of Nuclear Physics INFN, Section of Pavia, Via A. Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Alloni, D.; Cagnazzo, M.; Magrotti, G.; Manera, S.; Prata, M.; Salvini, A. [Italian National Inst. of Nuclear Physics INFN, Section of Pavia, Via A. Bassi, 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Applied Nuclear Energy Laboratory LENA, Univ. of Pavia, Via Aselli, 41, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Chiesa, D.; Clemenza, M.; Pattavina, L.; Previtali, E.; Sisti, M. [Physics Dept. G. Occhialini, Univ. of Milano Bicocca, 20126 Milano (Italy); Italian National Inst. of Nuclear Physics INFN, Section of Milano Bicocca, P.zza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Cammi, A. [Italian National Inst. of Nuclear Physics INFN, Section of Milano Bicocca, P.zza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Dept. of Energy Enrico Fermi Centre for Nuclear Studies CeSNEF, Polytechnic Univ. of Milan, Via U. Bassi, 34/3, 20100 Milano (Italy)

    2012-07-01

    Aim of this work was to perform a rough preliminary evaluation of the burn-up of the fuel of TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the Applied Nuclear Energy Laboratory (LENA) of the Univ. of Pavia. In order to achieve this goal a computation of the neutron flux density in each fuel element was performed by means of Monte Carlo code MCNP (Version 4C). The results of the simulations were used to calculate the effective cross sections (fission and capture) inside fuel and, at the end, to evaluate the burn-up and the uranium consumption in each fuel element. The evaluation, showed a fair agreement with the computation for fuel burn-up based on the total energy released during reactor operation. (authors)

  7. Preliminary TRIGA fuel burn-up evaluation by means of Monte Carlo code and computation based on total energy released during reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim of this work was to perform a rough preliminary evaluation of the burn-up of the fuel of TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the Applied Nuclear Energy Laboratory (LENA) of the Univ. of Pavia. In order to achieve this goal a computation of the neutron flux density in each fuel element was performed by means of Monte Carlo code MCNP (Version 4C). The results of the simulations were used to calculate the effective cross sections (fission and capture) inside fuel and, at the end, to evaluate the burn-up and the uranium consumption in each fuel element. The evaluation, showed a fair agreement with the computation for fuel burn-up based on the total energy released during reactor operation. (authors)

  8. Fuel element burn-up calculation in ITU TRIGA Mark-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactivity defect of fuel elements in ITU TRIGA Mark-II reactor core at 250 kW power have been calculated by considering the reactor operation history. A two-dimensional, four-group diffusion computer code TRIGLAV is used for the calculations. The unit-cell macroscopic cross sections and diffusion coefficients are generated with the WIMS-D/4 code. Two dimensional effects like vicinity of control rods, water gaps, dummy graphite elements, void channels are considered. The calculated reactivity worth of the fuel elements at known burn up are in agreement with experimental values of the fuel elements located in the reactor core without two dimensional effects. (author)

  9. Burn-up calculation of different thorium-based fuel matrixes in a thermal research reactor using MCNPX 2.6 code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamzadeh Zohreh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Decrease of the economically accessible uranium resources and the inherent proliferation resistance of thorium fuel motivate its application in nuclear power systems. Estimation of the nuclear reactor’s neutronic parameters during different operational situations is of key importance for the safe operation of nuclear reactors. In the present research, thorium oxide fuel burn-up calculations for a demonstrative model of a heavy water- -cooled reactor have been performed using MCNPX 2.6 code. Neutronic parameters for three different thorium fuel matrices loaded separately in the modelled thermal core have been investigated. 233U, 235U and 239Pu isotopes have been used as fissile element in the thorium oxide fuel, separately. Burn-up of three different fuels has been calculated at 1 MW constant power. 135X and 149Sm concentration variations have been studied in the modelled core during 165 days burn-up. Burn-up of thorium oxide enriched with 233U resulted in the least 149Sm and 135Xe productions and net fissile production of 233U after 165 days. The negative fuel, coolant and void reactivity of the used fuel assures safe operation of the modelled thermal core containing (233U-Th O2 matrix. Furthermore, utilisation of thorium breeder fuel demonstrates several advantages, such as good neutronic economy, 233U production and less production of long-lived α emitter high radiotoxic wastes in biological internal exposure point of view

  10. Propagation of statistical and nuclear data uncertainties in Monte Carlo burn-up calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Herranz, Nuria [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain)], E-mail: nuria@din.upm.es; Cabellos, Oscar [Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain); Sanz, Javier [Departamento de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, UNED (Spain); Juan, Jesus [Laboratorio de Estadistica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, UPM (Spain); Kuijper, Jim C. [NRG - Fuels, Actinides and Isotopes Group, Petten (Netherlands)

    2008-04-15

    Two methodologies to propagate the uncertainties on the nuclide inventory in combined Monte Carlo-spectrum and burn-up calculations are presented, based on sensitivity/uncertainty and random sampling techniques (uncertainty Monte Carlo method). Both enable the assessment of the impact of uncertainties in the nuclear data as well as uncertainties due to the statistical nature of the Monte Carlo neutron transport calculation. The methodologies are implemented in our MCNP-ACAB system, which combines the neutron transport code MCNP-4C and the inventory code ACAB. A high burn-up benchmark problem is used to test the MCNP-ACAB performance in inventory predictions, with no uncertainties. A good agreement is found with the results of other participants. This benchmark problem is also used to assess the impact of nuclear data uncertainties and statistical flux errors in high burn-up applications. A detailed calculation is performed to evaluate the effect of cross-section uncertainties in the inventory prediction, taking into account the temporal evolution of the neutron flux level and spectrum. Very large uncertainties are found at the unusually high burn-up of this exercise (800 MWd/kgHM). To compare the impact of the statistical errors in the calculated flux with respect to the cross uncertainties, a simplified problem is considered, taking a constant neutron flux level and spectrum. It is shown that, provided that the flux statistical deviations in the Monte Carlo transport calculation do not exceed a given value, the effect of the flux errors in the calculated isotopic inventory are negligible (even at very high burn-up) compared to the effect of the large cross-section uncertainties available at present in the data files.

  11. Effect of the Lattice Pitch Variation on the Burn-up of the ETRR-1 Reactor Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent development in the field of reactor physics and nuclear safety calculation is providing a modern aspect to the fuel cycle economics through the reactor operations. For that, it is necessary to review the previous design of the old operating reactors. One of these reactors is the ETRR-1, which is operating since 1961. The fuel basket of this reactor contains 16 fuel rods arranged in 4 x 4 shape with a lattice pitch 17.5 mm. The lattice cell parameters and burn-up calculations were performed by using the WIMSD4 code for different lattice pitch configurations including the exist one. This study shows that, the present lattice pitch of the ETRR-1 reactor fuel element is not the best one and the 15 mm lattice pitch is more convenient from the fuel cycle economics point of view

  12. Irradiation performance of PFBR MOX fuel after 112 GWd/t burn-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkiteswaran, C.N., E-mail: cnv@igcar.gov.in; Jayaraj, V.V.; Ojha, B.K.; Anandaraj, V.; Padalakshmi, M.; Vinodkumar, S.; Karthik, V.; Vijaykumar, Ran; Vijayaraghavan, A.; Divakar, R.; Johny, T.; Joseph, Jojo; Thirunavakkarasu, S.; Saravanan, T.; Philip, John; Rao, B.P.C.; Kasiviswanathan, K.V.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-06-01

    The 500 MWe Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) which is in advanced stage of construction at Kalpakkam, India, will use mixed oxide (MOX) fuel with a target burnup of 100 GWd/t. The fuel pellet is of annular design to enable operation at a peak linear power of 450 W/cm with the requirement of minimum duration of pre-conditioning. The performance of the MOX fuel and the D9 clad and wrapper material was assessed through Post Irradiation Examinations (PIE) after test irradiation of 37 fuel pin subassembly in Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) to a burn-up of 112 GWd/t. Fission product distribution, swelling and fuel–clad gap evolution, central hole diameter variation, restructuring, fission gas release and clad wastage due to fuel–clad chemical interaction were evaluated through non-destructive and destructive examinations. The examinations have indicated that the MOX fuel can safely attain the desired target burn-up in PFBR.

  13. Burn-up calculation of different thorium-based fuel matrixes in a thermal research reactor using MCNPX 2.6 code

    OpenAIRE

    Gholamzadeh Zohreh; Hossein Feghhi Seyed Amir; Soltani Leila; Rezazadeh Marzieh; Tenreiro Claudio; Joharifard Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    Decrease of the economically accessible uranium resources and the inherent proliferation resistance of thorium fuel motivate its application in nuclear power systems. Estimation of the nuclear reactor’s neutronic parameters during different operational situations is of key importance for the safe operation of nuclear reactors. In the present research, thorium oxide fuel burn-up calculations for a demonstrative model of a heavy water- -cooled reactor have been performed using MCNPX 2.6 code. N...

  14. Criticality safety evaluation in Tokai reprocessing plant. High burn up LWR UO2 spent fuel and ATR MOX spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents criticality safety evaluation of each equipment in Tokai reprocessing plant for two types of spent fuels, High burn up 4.2 % enrichment U oxide spent fuel for light water reactor and U-Pu mixed oxide spent fuel for advanced thermal reactor. As a result, it was confirmed that the equipments were safe enough for two types of the spent fuels from view point of criticality safety of single unit and multiple units. (author)

  15. Changes of the inventory of radioactive materials in reactor fuel from uranium in changing to higher burn-up and determining the important effects of this

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The knowledge of the nuclide composition during and after use in the reactor is an essential, in order to be able to determine the effects associated with the operation of nuclear plants. The missing reliable data on the inventory of radioactive materials resulting from the expected change to higher burn-ups of uranium fuels in West Germany are calculated. The reliability of the program system used for this, which permits a one-dimensional account taken of the fuel rod cell and measurement of the changes of specific sets of nuclear data depending on burn-up, is confirmed by the comparison with experimentally found concentrations of important nuclides in fuel samples at Obrigheim nuclear power station. Realistic conditions of use are defined for a range of burn-up of 33 GWd/t to 55 GWd/t and the effects of changes of the number of cycles and the use of types of fuel elements being developed on the composition of the inventory are determined. The plutonium compositions during use in the reactor are given and are tabulated with the inventory for decay times up to 30 years. Effects during change to higher burn-ups are examined and discussed for the maximum inventories during use of fuel and for heat generation during final storage. (orig./HP)

  16. Establishing the fuel burn-up measuring system for 106 irradiated assemblies of Dalat reactor by using gamma spectrometer method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel burn-up is an important parameter needed to be monitored and determined during a reactor operation and fuel management. The fuel burn-up can be calculated using computer codes and experimentally measured. This work presents the theory and experimental method applied to determine the burn-up of the irradiated and 36% enriched VVR-M2 fuel type assemblies of Dalat reactor. The method is based on measurement of Cs-137 absolute specific activity using gamma spectrometer. Designed measuring system consists of a collimator tube, high purity Germanium detector (HPGe) and associated electronics modules and online computer data acquisition system. The obtained results of measurement are comparable with theoretically calculated results. (author)

  17. Comparison of nuclear data uncertainty propagation methodologies for PWR burn-up simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Diez, Carlos Javier; Hoefer, Axel; Porsch, Dieter; Cabellos, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Several methodologies using different levels of approximations have been developed for propagating nuclear data uncertainties in nuclear burn-up simulations. Most methods fall into the two broad classes of Monte Carlo approaches, which are exact apart from statistical uncertainties but require additional computation time, and first order perturbation theory approaches, which are efficient for not too large numbers of considered response functions but only applicable for sufficiently small nuclear data uncertainties. Some methods neglect isotopic composition uncertainties induced by the depletion steps of the simulations, others neglect neutron flux uncertainties, and the accuracy of a given approximation is often very hard to quantify. In order to get a better sense of the impact of different approximations, this work aims to compare results obtained based on different approximate methodologies with an exact method, namely the NUDUNA Monte Carlo based approach developed by AREVA GmbH. In addition, the impact ...

  18. Burn-Up Calculations for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel bum-up calculations for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor involve a distribution of the thermal megawatt days of operations to the fuel elements in proportion to the average thermal neutron flux at their location in the reactor. The megawatt days so assigned can be converted to equivalent uranium-235 consumption when needed. The original fuel loading for the BGRR was neutral uranium and a single calculation was performed on each fuel element upon discharge from the reactor. A subsequent change to a fully enriched uranium-235 fuel element, however, introduced complications. The average loading of enriched uranium involves about 4800 individual elements, each occupying four different reactor positions during its term in the reactor. The total term for a central channel element is about one year as against six to eight years for an element in a peripheral channel. With the large number of individual fuel elements involved and the approximately monthly small changes needed for operation, it was necessary to resort to a computer programme to follow the burn-up of all the elements on the reactor continuously. Both this and other functions of the computer programme are discussed in the paper. To date, uranium has been recovered from two batches of spent fuel. On the first, involving 3674 elements discharged from the reactor over a period of 4.9 years, the recovery figures were 5.5% higher than the calculated total of 32.3 kg uranium-235. On the second batch, involving 1296 elements discharged from the reactor over a period of one year, the recovery figures were 2.3% higher than the calculated figures of 10.8 kg uranium-235. This relatively close agreement seems to indicate that the assumptions made to simplify the programme are acceptable and that the results of the programme are satisfactory for our particular accounting and operating requirements. (author)

  19. Methods used in burn-up determination of the irradiated fuel rods at TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short presentation of the methods used at INR TRIGA reactor for the burn-up determination is given together with some considerations on ORIGEN 2 computer code used for calculating fission products activities and nuclide concentration. Burn-up is determined by gamma spectroscopy and thermal power monitoring. (Author)

  20. Effect of additives on corrosion resistance of Zirconium alloy for extended burn-up fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumitomo Metal Industries, Ltd. (SMI) supplies Zircaloy cladding tubes and has been developing high corrosion resistance Zr alloys for extended burn-up fuel claddings for BWR and PWR, respectively. For BWR cladding tube, small addition of IVb and Vb elements to Low Sn Zircaloy-2 improved nodular corrosion resistance. It was observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy that these additives complied with a Zr(Cr, Fe)2 type intermetallic compound and those size were finer than that precipitated in a conventional Zircaloy-2. That was assumed to result in suppressing nodular corrosion occurrence. For PWR cladding tube, small addition of Ni and Nb to extremely low Sn zirconium alloy improved uniform corrosion resistance and suppressed hydrogen pick-up. As this results Zr-1.0Sn-0.27Fe-0.16Cr-0.1Nb-0.01Ni were selected as a candidate alloy. In spite of extremely low Sn content, its mechanical properties were almost same as conventional Zircaloy-4. (author)

  1. Stereological evolution of the rim structure in PWR-fuels at prolonged irradiation: Dependencies with burn-up and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stereology of the rim-structure was studied for PWR-fuels up to the ninth irradiation cycle, achieving maximum local burn-ups of 240 GWd/tM and beyond. At intermediate radial positions (0.55 0 c = 0.29. Rim-cavities are expected to remain closed at least up to this limit

  2. Non destructive determination of fuel burn up of the RA reactor at Vinca by gamma radiation spectra analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of non destructive determination of the burn-up of used up fuel of the powerful experimental reactor RA at Vinca, by the analysis of gamma radiation spectra using a gamma-spectrometer with a semiconductor Ge(Li) detector has been studied. The first part of this analytical problem is concerned with calculation of fuel burn up. In the preparation of its solution material and energetic balance of the fuel composition and conditions of fuel irradiation. The obtained solution uses numerical methods. In this solution fuel burn up is determined: 1) on the basis of the data on the composition of 106Ru, 134Cs and 137Cs, than 2) from a series of the data on the fuel and reactor and 3) on the basis of those, numerous, literature data which participate in defining of the balance of fuel burn up process. The second part of this problem refers to determination of the composition of the above gamma radioactive fission products from the obtained instrumental spectrum. Under strictly defined conditions of the measurement of gamma radiation from the fuel elements, when a determined type of the gamma ray collimator is used, the photo peak area of the corresponding line in the instrumental spectrum is defined as a function of the fission products activity, energy and yield of its gamma rays, the thickness of fuel and added absorbers as well as the dimensions of the collimator used. On this basis, the activity quotient of two fission products is a function of: 1) two areas of two photo peaks of their two lines and 2) some of the above cited values. Unknown magnitudes of the remaining values of the same relation are determined from the photo peak areas of the lines of the complex spectrum of one fission product by solving a system of equations. Accuracy of the solutions of these two separate parts of the observed analytical problems was confirmed experimentally. The results obtained are characterized by high repeatability. Total errors are generally greater, primarily due to

  3. Isotopic analyses and calculation by use of JENDL-3.2 for high burn-up UO{sub 2} and MOX spent fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasahara, Akihiro; Matsumura, Tetsuo [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Komae, Tokyo (Japan). Komae Research Lab.; Nicolaou, G.; Betti, M.; Walker, C.T.

    1997-03-01

    The post irradiation examinations (PIE) were carried out for high burn-up UO{sub 2} spent fuel (3.8%U235, average burn-up:60GWd/t) and mixed oxide (MOX) spent fuel (5.07%Pu, average burn-up:45GWd/t). The PIE includes, (a) isotopic analysis, (b) electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) in pellet cross section and so on. The results of isotopic analyses and EPMA were compared with ORIGEN2/82 and VIM-BURN calculation results. In VIM-BURN calculation, the nuclear data of actinides were proceeded from new data file, JENDL-3.2. The sensitivities of power history and moderator density to nuclides composition were investigated by VIM-BURN calculation and consequently power history mainly effected on Am241 and Am242m and moderator density effected on fissile nuclides. From EPMA results of U and Pu distribution in pellet, VIM-BURN calculation showed reasonable distribution in pellet cross section. (author)

  4. Impact of the fission yield nuclear data uncertainties in the pin-cell burn-up OECD/NEA UAM Benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prediction of fission products and the impact of their uncertainties to different safety-related spent fuel applications (burn-up credit, decay heat generation, radiological safety, waste management, burn-up prediction) are required for the evaluation of spent fuel system designs and safety analysis options. One of the nuclear data needs to this prediction is the independent fission yields. The mostly used general-purpose evaluated nuclear data libraries provide these data including their uncertainties as standard deviation, with no-correlation between fission yields. However, new developments in the theory and measurements of fission product yields are expected to result in new evaluated files in the next coming years. These files will include considerably more accurate yields including neutron energy dependence combined with new covariance information allowing realistic uncertainty estimates. In this paper, we focused on the effect of fission yield covariance information on criticality and depletion calculations. A LWR pin-cell burn-up benchmark, proposed in the general framework of the OECD/UAM Benchmark is analyzed to address the impact of independent fission yield uncertainties. Calculations were performed with the SCALE6 system and the ENDF/B-VII.1 fission yield data library, adding covariance data obtained from including covariance info of mass yields. Results are compared with those obtained with the uncertainty data currently provided by ENDF/B-VII.1. The uncertainty quantification is performed with a Monte Carlo sampling and then compared with linear perturbation. (author)

  5. A study of the effects of changing burn-up and gap gaseous compound on the gap convection coefficient (in a hot fuel pin) in VVER-1000 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article we worked on the result and process of calculation of the gap heat transfer coefficient for a hot fuel pin in accordance with burn-up changes in the VVER-1000 reactor at the Bushehr nuclear power plant (Iran). With regard to the fact that in calculating the fuel gap heat transfer coefficient, various parameters are effective and the need for designing a model is being felt, therefore, in this article we used Ross and Stoute gap model to study impacts of different effective parameters such as thermal expansion and gaseous fission products on the hgap change rate. Over time and with changes in fuel burn-up some gaseous fission products such as xenon, argon and krypton gases are released to the gas mixture in the gap, which originally contained helium. In this study, the composition of gaseous elements in the gap volume during different times of reactor operation was found using ORIGEN code. Considering that the thermal conduction of these gases is lower than that of helium, and by using the Ross and Stoute gap model, we find first that the changes in gaseous compounds in the gap reduce the values of gap thermal conductivity coefficient, but considering thermal expansion (due to burn-up alterations) of fuel and clad resulting in the reduction of gap thickness we find that the gap heat transfer coefficient will augment in a broad range of burn-up changes. These changes result in a higher rate of gap thickness reduction than the low rate of decrease of heat conduction coefficient of the gas in the gap during burn-up. Once these changes have been defined, we can proceed with the analysis of the results of calculations based on the Ross and Stoute model and compare the results obtained with the experimental results for a hot fuel pin as presented in the final safety analysis report of the VVER-1000 reactor at Bushehr. It is noteworthy that the results of accomplished calculations based on the Ross and Stoute model correspond well with the existing

  6. Burn-up effect on instant release from an initial corrosion of UO2 and MOX fuel under anoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the work is to obtain instant release experimental values for different radionuclides as a function of spent fuel type (UO2 and MOX) and burn-up (from 30 to 63 MWd/kgU) that will be useful for the performance assessment studies related to the behaviour of spent fuel under repository conditions or, in any case, spent fuel conditions in which labile radionuclides can be released. To determine the instant release source terms, sets of leaching experiments were conducted with spent UO2 and MOX fuel with burnups ranging from 30 to 63 MWd/kg U in presence of cladding as the container material. The fuels were leached in carbonated groundwater (CW) having a buffered pH of 7.5 at room temperature. Some observations are also made of the differences in matrix dissolution behaviour of the different fuels based on observed U, Pu and Np concentrations The ultimate issue is to evaluate the differences in the ''instant'' inventory measurements for spent fuels in order to provide experimental data that allow to evaluate the source terms used in the safety-assessment calculations, and to improve the accuracy of such data for the future. It is important to remark that the quality of the experimental results obtained describes the influence of the spent fuel (SF) burn-up on fast release of inventory fraction (release under 200 days). (authors)

  7. Results of AVR fuel pebble irradiation at increased temperature and burn-up in the HFR Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation experiment HFR-EU1bis was performed by the European Commission's Joint Research Centre-Institute for Energy (JRC-IE) in the HFR Petten to test five spherical High Temperature Reactor (HTR) fuel pebbles of former German production with TRISO coated particles for their potential for very high temperature performance and high burn-up. The irradiation started on 9 September 2004 and was terminated on 18 October 2005 after 10 reactor cycles totaling 249 efpd and a maximum burn-up of 11.07% FIMA. The objective of the HFR-EU1bis test was to irradiate five HTR fuel pebbles at conditions beyond the characteristics of current HTR reactor designs with pebble bed cores, e.g. HTR-Modul, HTR-10 and PMBR. This should demonstrate that pebble bed HTRs are capable of enhanced performance in terms of sustainability (further increased power conversion efficiency, better use of fuel) and thus reduced waste production. The central temperature of all pebbles was kept as closely as possible at 1250 deg. C and held constant during the entire irradiation, with the exception of HFR downtime and power transients. This is the expected maximum central fuel temperature of a pebble bed VHTR with a coolant outlet temperature of 1000 deg. C. HFR-EU1bis should demonstrate the feasibility of low coated particle failure fractions under normal operating conditions and more specifically: - increased central fuel temperature of 1250 deg. C compared to 1000-1200 deg. C in earlier irradiation tests; - irradiation to a burn-up close to 16% FIMA, which is double the license limit of the HTR-Modul; due to a neutronics data processing error, the experiment was prematurely terminated at 11.07% FIMA maximum so that this objective was not fully achieved; - confirmation of low coated particle failure fractions due to temperature, burn-up and neutron fluence. This paper provides the irradiation history of the experiment including data on fission gas release. Post-irradiation examinations at NRG

  8. A specification of 235U burn-up values in fuel assemblies of WWR-M reactor with the aid of incomplete history of refuelings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A problem of reliability of an information about burn-up distribution in nuclear WWR-M core is considered and a method to specify this information of the least 12 reactor reloadings is made and as a result enough reliable data of burn-up values are obtained

  9. Burn-up measurements coupling gamma spectrometry and neutron measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need to apply for burn-up credit arises with the increase of the initial enrichment of nuclear fuel. When burn-up credit is used in criticality safety studies, it is often necessary to confirm it by measurement. For the last 10 years, CANBERRA has manufactured the PYTHON system for such measurements. However, the method used in the PYTHON itself uses certain reactor data to arrive at burn-up estimates. Based on R and D led by CEA and COGEMA in the framework of burn-up measurement for burn-up credit and safeguards applications, CANBERRA is developing the next generation of burn-up measurement device. This new product, named SMOPY, is able to measure burn-up of any kind of irradiated fuel assembly with a combination of gamma spectrometry and passive neutron measurements. The measurement data is used as input to the CESAR depletion code, which has been developed and qualified by CEA and COGEMA for burn-up credit determinations. In this paper, we explain the complementary nature of the gamma and neutron measurements. In addition, we draw on our previous experience from PYTHON system and from COGEMA La Hague to show what types of evaluations are required to qualify the SMOPY system, to estimate its uncertainties, and to detect discrepancies in the fuel data given by the reactor plant to characterize the irradiated fuel assembly. (authors)

  10. Axial gas transport and loss of pressure after ballooning rupture of high burn-up fuel rods subjected to LOCA conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The OECD Halden Reactor Project has implemented integral in-pile tests on issues related to fuel behaviour under LOCA conditions. In this test series, the interaction of bonded fuel and cladding, the behaviour of fragmented fuel around the ballooning area, and the axial gas communication in high burn-up rods as affected by gap closure and fuel-clad bonding are of major interest for the investigations. In the Halden reactor tests, the decay heat is simulated by a low level of nuclear heating, in contrast to the heating conditions implemented in hot laboratory set-ups, and the thermal expansion of fuel and cladding relative to each other is more similar to the real event. The paper deals with observations regarding the loss of rod pressure following the rupture of the cladding. In the majority of the tests conducted so far, the rod pressure dropped practically instantaneously as a consequence of ballooning rupture, while one test showed a remarkably slow pressure loss. The slow loss of pressure in this test was analysed, showing that the 'hydraulic diameter' of the rod over an un-distended upper part was about 30 - 35 μm which is typical of high burn-up fuel at hot-standby conditions. The 'plug' of fuel restricts the gas flow from the plenum through the fuel column and thus limits the availability of high pressure gas for driving the ballooning. This observation is relevant for the analysis of the behaviour of a full length fuel rod under LOCA conditions since restricted gas flow may influence bundle blockage and the number of failures. (authors)

  11. Burn up Analysis for Fuel Assembly Unit i n a Pressurized Heavy Water CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MCNPX code has been used for modeling a nd simulation of an assembly of CANDU Fuel bundle . The assembly is composed of a heterogeneous lattice of 37-element natural Uranium fuel, heavy water moderator and coolant. The fuel bundle is burnt in normal operation conditions of CANDU reactors. The effective multiplication factor (Keff ) of the bundle is calculated as a function of fuel burnup. The flux and power distribution are determined. Comparing t he concentrations of both Uranium and Plutonium isotopes are analyzed in the bundle. The results of the present model with the results of a benchmark problem, a good agreement was found PWR

  12. Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment, Burn-up and Cooling Time of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-13

    An outline of this presentation of what a Differential Die-Away (DDA) instrument can do are: (1) Principle of operation of DDA instrument; (2) Determination of initial enrichment (IE) ({sigma} < 5%); (3) Determination of burn up (BU) ({sigma} {approx} 6%); (4) Determination of cooling time (CT) ({sigma} {approx} 20-50%); and (5) DDA instrument as a standalone device. DDA response (fresh fuel vs. spent fuel) is: (1) Fresh fuel => DDA response increases (die-away time is longer) with increasing fissile content; and (2) Spent fuel => DDA response decreases (die-away time is shorter) with higher burn-up (i.e. more neutron absorbers present).

  13. Criticality calculations of various spent fuel casks - possibilities for burn up credit implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A methodology for criticality safety analysis of spent fuel casks with possibilities for burnup credit implementation is presented. This methodology includes the world well-known and applied program systems: NESSEL-NUKO for depletion and SCALE-4.4 for criticality calculations. The abilities of this methodology to analyze storage and transportation casks with different type of spent fuel are demonstrated on the base of various tests. The depletion calculations have been carried out for the power reactors (WWER-440 and WWER-1000) and the research reactor IRT-2000 (C-36) fuel assemblies. The criticality calculation models have been developed on the basis of real fuel casks, designed by the leading international companies (for WWER-440 and WWER-1000 spent fuel assemblies), as well as for real a WWER-440 storage cask, applied at the 'Kozloduy' NPP. The results obtained show that the criticality safety criterion Keff less than 0.95 is satisfied for both: fresh and spent fuel. Besides the implementation of burnup credit allows to account for the reduced reactivity of spent fuel and to evaluate the conservatism of the fresh fuel assumption. (author)

  14. A state of the Art report on Manufacturing technology of high burn-up fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyeong Ho; Nam, Cheol; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Byung Kwon; Park, Sang Yoon; Lee, Myung Ho; Jeong, Yong Hwan

    1999-09-01

    In order to manufacturing the prototype fuel cladding, overall manufacturing processes and technologies should be thoroughly understood on the manufacturing processes and technologies of foreign cladding tubes. Generally, the important technology related to fuel cladding tube manufacturing processes for PWRs/PHWRs is divided into three stages. The first stage is to produce the zirconium sponge from zirconium sand, the second stage is to produce the zircaloy shell or TREX from zirconium sponge ingot and finally, cladding is produced from TREX or zircaloy shell. Therefore, the manufacturing processes including the first and second stages are described in brief in this technology report in order to understand the whole fuel cladding manufacturing processes. (author)

  15. A state of the Art report on Manufacturing technology of high burn-up fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to manufacturing the prototype fuel cladding, overall manufacturing processes and technologies should be thoroughly understood on the manufacturing processes and technologies of foreign cladding tubes. Generally, the important technology related to fuel cladding tube manufacturing processes for PWRs/PHWRs is divided into three stages. The first stage is to produce the zirconium sponge from zirconium sand, the second stage is to produce the zircaloy shell or TREX from zirconium sponge ingot and finally, cladding is produced from TREX or zircaloy shell. Therefore, the manufacturing processes including the first and second stages are described in brief in this technology report in order to understand the whole fuel cladding manufacturing processes. (author)

  16. The fuel burn-up determination by combined passive neutron and gamma - spectrometric ND - measurements. Final report for the period 1 July 1980 - 30 April 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The non-destructive gamma-spectrometric method (HRGS) and the passive neutron technique (PNT) were applied to the determination of WWER 440 reactor spent fuel assemblies burn-up for safeguard purposes. Rapid codes FISPR-2 and BUNECO were compiled on HP-85 and OLIVETTI M24 computers for the IAEA inspectors. An improved equipment was constructed and tested for the fixation of the ''fork detector''. Measurements were carried-out at 1st unit of NPP Bohunice. The correlation between burn-up and fission product ratio 134Cs/137Cs or neutron count rate were analysed. Correlations between concentrations 235U, Pu and burn-up were analysed as well. A simplified procedure for assemblies burn-up check by PNT was proposed for the inspectors. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Irradiation behavior of FBTR mixed carbide fuel at various burn-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast breeder test reactor at Kalpakkam has completed nearly 25 years of operation and is now operating at 18 MWt capacity with 46 fuel subassemblies (FSA) in the core consisting of 27 Mark-I (70% PuC + 30% UC), 13 Mark-II (55% PuC + 45% UC) and 6 MOX (44% PuO2 + 56% UO2) and one test PFBR FSA. Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) campaigns on FSAs at different burnup levels has provided valuable information about the irradiation behavior of the carbide fuel. This paper gives a summary of the irradiation performance of the carbide fuel evaluated through some of the investigations such as neutron radiography, x-radiography, gamma scanning, fission gas analysis and ceramography. Burnup of the carbide fuel could be enhanced from the initial design burnup limit of 50 GWd/t to 165 GWd/through systematic PIE. (author)

  18. Extended fuel swelling models and ultra high burn-up fuel behavior of U–Pu–Zr metallic fuel using FEAST-METAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Improved fuel swelling models in phase structure dependent form. ► A probabilistic verification exercise for the open porosity formation threshold. ► Satisfactory validation effort for available EBR-II database. ► Ultra high burn-up behavior of U–6Zr fuel with 60% smear density fuel. -- Abstract: Computational models in FEAST-METAL U–Pu–Zr metallic fuel behavior code have been upgraded to improve fission gas, solid fission product swelling, and pore sintering behavior in a microstructure dependent form. First, fission gas bubble growth is modeled by selecting small and large bubble groups according to a fixed number of gas atoms per bubble group. Small bubbles nucleated at phase boundaries grow via gas migration and turn into large bubbles. Furthermore, bubble morphology for each phase structure is captured by selecting the number of atoms per bubble and the shape of the bubbles in a phase dependent form. The gas diffusion coefficients for the single gamma phase and effective dual (α + δ) and (β + γ) phase structures are modeled separately, using the activation energy of the corresponding phase structure. In this study, it is found that pressure sintering of the interconnected porosity in dual phases should be less effective than the reference model in order to match clad strain and fission gas release behavior. In addition to these improvements, a probabilistic approach is taken to verify the fission gas-swelling threshold at which interconnected porosity begins. This fracture problem is treated as a function of critical crack length formed via bubble coalescence. It was found that a 10% gas-swelling threshold is appropriate for a wide range of gas bubble sizes. The new version of FEAST-METAL predicts the burn-up, smear density, and axial variation of the clad hoop strain and fission gas release behavior satisfactorily for selected test pins under EBR-II conditions. The code is used to predict ultra-high burn-up U–Pu–6Zr vented

  19. Determination of the burn-up of TRIGA fuel elements by calculation and reactivity experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burnup of 17 fuel elements of the TRIGA Mark-II reactor in Vienna was measured. Different types of fuel elements had been simultaneously used for several years. The measured burnup values are compared with those calculated on the basis of core configuration and reactor operation history records since the beginning of operation. A one-dimensional, two-group diffusion computer code TRIGAP was used for the calculations. Comparison with burnup values determined by γ-scanning is also made. (orig./HP)

  20. Transmutation, Burn-Up and Fuel Fabrication Trade-Offs in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor Thorium Fuel Cycles - 13502

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindley, Benjamin A.; Parks, Geoffrey T. [University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Franceschini, Fausto [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Cranberry Township, PA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Multiple recycle of long-lived actinides has the potential to greatly reduce the required storage time for spent nuclear fuel or high level nuclear waste. This is generally thought to require fast reactors as most transuranic (TRU) isotopes have low fission probabilities in thermal reactors. Reduced-moderation LWRs are a potential alternative to fast reactors with reduced time to deployment as they are based on commercially mature LWR technology. Thorium (Th) fuel is neutronically advantageous for TRU multiple recycle in LWRs due to a large improvement in the void coefficient. If Th fuel is used in reduced-moderation LWRs, it appears neutronically feasible to achieve full actinide recycle while burning an external supply of TRU, with related potential improvements in waste management and fuel utilization. In this paper, the fuel cycle of TRU-bearing Th fuel is analysed for reduced-moderation PWRs and BWRs (RMPWRs and RBWRs). RMPWRs have the advantage of relatively rapid implementation and intrinsically low conversion ratios. However, it is challenging to simultaneously satisfy operational and fuel cycle constraints. An RBWR may potentially take longer to implement than an RMPWR due to more extensive changes from current BWR technology. However, the harder neutron spectrum can lead to favourable fuel cycle performance. A two-stage fuel cycle, where the first pass is Th-Pu MOX, is a technically reasonable implementation of either concept. The first stage of the fuel cycle can therefore be implemented at relatively low cost as a Pu disposal option, with a further policy option of full recycle in the medium term. (authors)

  1. Transmutation, Burn-Up and Fuel Fabrication Trade-Offs in Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor Thorium Fuel Cycles - 13502

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiple recycle of long-lived actinides has the potential to greatly reduce the required storage time for spent nuclear fuel or high level nuclear waste. This is generally thought to require fast reactors as most transuranic (TRU) isotopes have low fission probabilities in thermal reactors. Reduced-moderation LWRs are a potential alternative to fast reactors with reduced time to deployment as they are based on commercially mature LWR technology. Thorium (Th) fuel is neutronically advantageous for TRU multiple recycle in LWRs due to a large improvement in the void coefficient. If Th fuel is used in reduced-moderation LWRs, it appears neutronically feasible to achieve full actinide recycle while burning an external supply of TRU, with related potential improvements in waste management and fuel utilization. In this paper, the fuel cycle of TRU-bearing Th fuel is analysed for reduced-moderation PWRs and BWRs (RMPWRs and RBWRs). RMPWRs have the advantage of relatively rapid implementation and intrinsically low conversion ratios. However, it is challenging to simultaneously satisfy operational and fuel cycle constraints. An RBWR may potentially take longer to implement than an RMPWR due to more extensive changes from current BWR technology. However, the harder neutron spectrum can lead to favourable fuel cycle performance. A two-stage fuel cycle, where the first pass is Th-Pu MOX, is a technically reasonable implementation of either concept. The first stage of the fuel cycle can therefore be implemented at relatively low cost as a Pu disposal option, with a further policy option of full recycle in the medium term. (authors)

  2. The high burn-up restructuring of fuel, the so called rim effect: a consideration of its impact on steady-state and transient behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report sets out to investigate our current understanding on the occurrence, properties and effect of restructured fuel material as observed in the pellet rim of high burn-up fuel. It appears that restructuring occurs solely as a function of burn-up and temperature. In this case, the driving force is likely to be the accumulation of irradiation damage and fission products. There are differing theories for which of these dominate the transformation, although the conditions for HBS formation are well established. The major part of the report addressed the influence this HBS has on fuel performance and to this end a simple model for the restructuring thickness and local swelling was inserted into a code to calculate fuel temperatures and Fission Gas Release. By running this code for three Halden experiments it was shown that inclusion of a rim had a measurable effect on both centreline temperatures and FGR. The calculations have shown that the effect of the HBS increases FGR by around 30% or 10% depending on the assumption made as to the HBS matrix thermal conductivity. From an appraisal of several experiments, it is proposed that fuel immediately prior to restructuring has the most influence on PCMI and fuel dispersal in high burn-up RIA. It is suggested that in the forthcoming IFA-655 test, the transient behaviours of fuel at less than the maximum burn-up of 100 MWd/kg is investigated. (Author)

  3. A study on metallurgical properties of two zirconium alloys for high burn-up fuel tube applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microstructure development and mechanical properties after different thermomechanical processing treatment of two types of zirconium alloys, namely, the quaternary Zr-1 Nb-1 Sn-0.1 Fe and the binary Zr-1Nb has been studied. These alloys and their derivatives are finding increasing applications as fuel tube materials and have the potential for meeting the requirement of high burn up fuel. The different phase constituents and their morphological features such as shape, size distribution and the nature of precipitate phases and the extent of recrystallization which are expected to have strong effects on both short term mechanical behavior and long term performance during service have been found to be strongly dependent on thermomechanical processing parameters and annealing parameters. The extent of recrystallization has been found to be an important parameter in deciding the mechanical properties. Hot processing maps have identified optimum processing parameters for quaternary alloy and the strain rate-temperature domains corresponding to the occurrence of dynamic recovery and recrystallization processes. Microstructural features of hydrides formed in these alloys and the tensile properties of these alloys in different temperatures are also discussed. (author)

  4. Burn-up behavior of FBR fuels sourced in uranium and plutonium recycled in PWRs and its influence on fuel economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering the strategic security of uranium resources, the authors investigated the effectual use of fuels recycled in a current LWR system (1.1 GWe-class PWRs of standard type), where they supposed the uranium fuel remade by re-enrichment of the recovery uranium from PWR spent fuels and the MOX fuel produced with the recovery plutonium as main fissile, and examined three cases of MOX fuels prepared by making choice of these matrixes among (A) the recovery uranium, (B) the depleted uranium as waste from natural uranium enrichment and (C) the depleted one sourced from recovery uranium re-enrichment. The result suggests that the multi-recycle of fuels in the LWR system brings the decline in fuel qualities. Particularly, the re-enrichment of recovery uranium brings the issue of an increase of 236U in remanufactured fuel. Thus, in order to investigate the burn-up of fast reactor fuels sourced from the PWR fuel system, they designed a model core of practical-FBR with reference to a concept of FBR reported by JAEA, using the SRAC numerical system. The burn-up behavior of FBR fuels was analyzed which were sourced in the original uranium spent-fuel and the remade uranium spent-fuel. And also, the breeding behavior of blanket materials was investigated which were individually of the depleted natural uranium, the recovery uranium from the original uranium spent-fuel and the recovery uranium from the remade uranium spent-fuel. The fissile 235U in FBR fuels reduces the burden of plutonium while the containment of 236U declines the neutron multiplication in FBRs. (author)

  5. Development of fuel performance code FEMAXI-6 and analysis of mechanical loading on cladding during power ramp for high burn-up fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel performance code FEMAXI-6 has been developed for the analysis of LWR fuel rod behaviors in normal operation and transient (not accident) conditions. The code uses FEM for mechanical analysis, and has incorporated thermal and mechanical models of phenomena anticipated in high burn-up fuel rods, such as fuel thermal conductivity degradation and pellet-clad bonding. In the present study, PCMI induced by swelling in a high burn-up BWR type fuel rod has been analyzed by the FEMAXI-6 code. During a power ramp for the high burn-up fuel, instantaneous pellet swelling can significantly exceed the level that is predicted by a 'steady-rate' swelling model, causing a large circumferential strain in cladding. This phenomenon has been simulated by a new swelling model to take into account the fission gas bubble growth, and we found that the new model can give satisfactory predictions on cladding diametral expansion in comparison with measurements in test rod. The bubble growth model assumes an equilibrium between bubble size and external pressure on the bubble, and simultaneous solution is obtained with both bubble size determination and diffusion equation of fission gas atoms. In addition, a pellet-clad bonding model which assumes firm mechanical coupling between pellet outer surface and cladding inner surface predicts an elevated tensile stress in the axial direction of cladding during ramp, indicating the generation of bi-axial stress state in the cladding. These analyses by the FEMAXI-6 code enable us to predict the magnitude of mechanical loading on cladding during transient and also serve for failure investigation. Clearly, prediction by code calculation depends on the creep and stress-strain properties of highly irradiated cladding. (author)

  6. Application of integral ex-core and differential in-core neutron measurements for adjustment of fuel burn-up distributions in VVER-1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodkin, P. G.; Borodkin, G. I.; Khrennikov, N. N. [SEC NRS, Moscow, (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    The paper deals with calculational and semi-analytical evaluations of VVER-1000 reactor core neutron source distributions and their influence on measurements and calculations of the integral through-vessel neutron leakage. Time-integrated neutron source distributions used for DORT calculations were prepared by two different approaches based on a) calculated fuel burn-up (standard routine procedure) and b) in-core measurements by means of SPD (self-powered detectors) and TC (thermocouples) in a new approach. Taking into account that fuel burn-up distributions in operating VVER may be evaluated now by analytical methods (calculations) it is only needed to develop new approaches for testing and correcting calculational evaluations. Results presented in this paper allow to consider a reverse task of alternative estimation of fuel burn-up distributions. The approach proposed is based on adjustment (fitting) of time-integrated neutron source distributions, and hence fuel burn-up patterns in some part of reactor core, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurement, neutron-physical calculation and in-core SPD and TC measurement data. (authors)

  7. Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment and Burn-up of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-16

    A key objective of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is to utilize non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques to determine the elemental plutonium (Pu) content in a commercial-grade nuclear spent fuel assembly (SFA). In the third year of the NGSI Spent Fuel NDA project, the research focus is on the integration of a few NDA techniques. One of the reoccurring challenges to the accurate determination of Pu content has been the explicit dependence of the measured signal on the presence of neutron absorbers which build up in the assembly in accordance with its operating and irradiation history. The history of any SFA is often summarized by the parameters of burn-up (BU), initial enrichment (IE) and cooling time (CT). While such parameters can typically be provided by the operator, the ability to directly measure and verify them would significantly enhance the autonomy of the IAEA inspectorate. Within this paper, we demonstrate that an instrument based on a Differential Die-Away technique is in principle capable of direct measurement of IE and, should the CT be known, also the BU.

  8. Long-Term Dry Storage of High Burn-Up Spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Fuel in TAD (Transportation, Aging, and Disposal) Containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A TAD canister, in conjunction with specially-designed over-packs can accomplish the functions of transportation, aging, and disposal (TAD) in the management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Industrial dry cask systems currently available for SNF are licensed for storage-only or for dual-purpose (i.e., storage and transportation). By extending the function to include the indefinite storage and perhaps, eventual geologic disposal, the TAD canister would have to be designed to enhance, among others, corrosion resistance, thermal stability, and criticality-safety control. This investigative paper introduces the use of these advanced iron-based, corrosion-resistant materials for SNF transportation, aging, and disposal.The objective of this investigative project is to explore the interest that KAERI would research and develop its specific SAM coating materials for the TAD canisters to satisfy the requirements of corrosion-resistance, thermal stability, and criticality-controls for long-term dry storage of high burn-up spent PWR fuel

  9. The effect of dissolved hydrogen on the dissolution of 233U doped UO2(s) high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report the results of the experimental work carried out in a large EU-research project (SFS, 2001-2004) on spent fuel stability in the presence of various amounts of near field hydrogen are presented. Studies of the dissolution of 233U doped UO2(s) simulating 'old' spent fuel were carried out as static leaching tests, autoclave tests with various hydrogen concentrations and electrochemical tests. The results of the leaching behaviour of a high burn-up spent fuel pellet in 5 M NaCl solutions in the presence of 3.2 bar H2 pressure and of MOX fuel in dilute synthetic groundwater under 53 bar H2 pressure are also presented. In all the experimental studies carried out in this project, a considerable effect of hydrogen in the dissolution rates of radioactive materials was observed. The experimental results obtained in this project with a-doped UO2, high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel together with literature data give a reliable background to use fractional alteration/dissolution rates for spent fuel of the order of 10-6/yr - 10-8/yr with a recommended value of 4x10-7/yr for dissolved hydrogen concentrations above 10-3 M and Fe(II) concentrations typical for European repository concepts. Finally, based on a review of the experimental data and available literature data, potential mechanisms of the hydrogen effect are also discussed. The work reported in this document was performed as part of the Project SFS of the European Commission 5th Framework Programme under contract no FIKW-CT-2001-20192 SFS. It represents the deliverable D10 of the experimental work package 'Key experiments using a-doped UO2 and real spent fuel', coordinated by SKB with the participation of ITU, FZK-INE, ENRESA, CIEMAT, ARMINES-SUBATECH and SKB

  10. Rapid aqueous release of fission products from high burn-up LWR fuel: Experimental results and correlations with fission gas release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Günther-Leopold, I.; Kobler Waldis, J.; Linder, H. P.; Low, J.; Cui, D.; Ekeroth, E.; Spahiu, K.; Evins, L. Z.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of the rapid aqueous release of fission products from UO 2 and MOX fuel are of interest for the assessment of the safety of geological disposal of spent fuel, because of the associated potential contribution to dose in radiological safety assessment. Studies have shown that correlations between fission gas release (FGR) and the fraction rapidly leached of various long-lived fission products can provide a useful method to obtain some of this information. Previously, these studies have been limited largely to fuel with burn-up values below 50 MWd/kg U. Collaborative studies involving SKB, Studsvik, Nagra and PSI have provided new data on short-term release of 137Cs and 129I for a number of fuels irradiated to burn-ups of 50-75 MWd/kgU. In addition a method for analysis of leaching solutions for 79Se was developed. The results of the studies show that the fractional release of 137Cs is usually much lower than the FGR covering the entire range of burn-ups studied. Fractional 129I releases are somewhat larger, but only in cases in which the fuel was forcibly extracted from the cladding. Despite the expected high degree of segregation of fission gas (and by association 137Cs and 129I) in the high burn-up rim, no evidence was found for a significant contribution to release from the rim region. The method for 79Se analysis developed did not permit its detection. Nonetheless, based on the detection limit, the results suggest that 79Se is not preferentially leached from spent fuel.

  11. Ultra-sensitive detection of defective fuel rods (sipping test) with low core burn-up and long-decay period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wet sipping method is employed by KWU to detect defective fuel rods: water containing fission products are expelled from the damaged fuel rods and analysed by γ-spectrometry. The preferred defect indicators are 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs. During a fuel defect inspection carried out at the Biblis Plant. Unit B, in September 1976, the fission caesium of the sipping samples was concentrated and separated selectively from the radionuclide mixture. The AMP (ammonium-molybdate-phosphate) precipitation process employed for the first time in this context attained the same degree of reliability as with sipping tests performed on highly burned-up fuel rods. (orig.)

  12. Increment of capacity of casks for PWR spent fuel transport. (1) Analysis taking into account pin-wised distribution of nuclides for introduction of burn-up credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subcriticality of a fuel assembly immersed in light water is studied to take burn-up credit for spent fuel transport. For the purpose, pin-wised nuclide density distribution in a typical PWR spent fuel assembly is evaluated with a code used for designing of fuel loading patterns in commercial PWRs. Taking the heterogeneous distribution into account, multiplication and radiation of neutrons inside / outside the assembly is analyzed with MCNP-5 and SOURCES-4C. As the results, neutron leakage ratio to water surrounding the assembly is found to vary little with burn-up of the assembly so that total neutron yield can be estimated by measuring neutron absorption in the water. Provided 252Cf of known intensity is inserted to the assembly, the subcritical multiplication factor ksub is evaluated by the number of neutron absorption. If not 252Cf but Sb-Be is only available, it is recommended to measure spatial decay constant in middle height of the assembly with it by the exponential method. The axial buckling which is the square of the constant is found to be a good indicator for burn-up of the assembly. (author)

  13. Design and construction of a prototype advanced on-line fuel burn-up monitoring system for the modular pebble bed reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Bingjing; Hawari, Ayman, I.

    2004-03-30

    Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) is a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear power reactor currently under study as a next generation reactor system. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multi-pass fuel circulation in which the fuel pebbles are randomly loaded and continuously cycled through the core until they reach their prescribed End-of-Life burn-up limit. Unlike the situation with a conventional light water reactor, depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management for MPBR will be highly inaccurate. An on-line measurement system is needed to accurately assess whether a given pebble has reached its End-of-Life burn-up limit and thereby provide an on-line, automated go/no-go decision on fuel disposition on a pebble-by-pebble basis. This project investigated approaches to analyzing fuel pebbles in real time using gamma spectroscopy and possibly using passive neutron counting of spontaneous fission neutrons to provide the speed, accuracy, and burn-up range required for burnup determination of MPBR. It involved all phases necessary to develop and construct a burn-up monitor, including a review of the design requirements of the system, identification of detection methodologies, modeling and development of potential designs, and finally, the construction and testing of an operational detector system. Based upon the research work performed in this project, the following conclusions are made. In terms of using gamma spectrometry, two possible approaches were identified for burnup assay. The first approach is based on the measurement of the absolute activity of Cs-137. However, due to spectral interference and the need for absolute calibration of the spectrometer, the uncertainty in burnup determination using this approach was found to range from {approx} {+-}40% at beginning of life to {approx} {+-}10% at the discharge burnup. An alternative approach is to use a relative burnup indicator. In this

  14. Design and construction of a prototype advanced on-line fuel burn-up monitoring system for the modular pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) is a high temperature gas-cooled nuclear power reactor currently under study as a next generation reactor system. In addition to its inherently safe design, a unique feature of this reactor is its multi-pass fuel circulation in which the fuel pebbles are randomly loaded and continuously cycled through the core until they reach their prescribed End-of-Life burn-up limit. Unlike the situation with a conventional light water reactor, depending solely on computational methods to perform in-core fuel management for MPBR will be highly inaccurate. An on-line measurement system is needed to accurately assess whether a given pebble has reached its End-of-Life burn-up limit and thereby provide an on-line, automated go/no-go decision on fuel disposition on a pebble-by-pebble basis. This project investigated approaches to analyzing fuel pebbles in real time using gamma spectroscopy and possibly using passive neutron counting of spontaneous fission neutrons to provide the speed, accuracy, and burn-up range required for burnup determination of MPBR. It involved all phases necessary to develop and construct a burn-up monitor, including a review of the design requirements of the system, identification of detection methodologies, modeling and development of potential designs, and finally, the construction and testing of an operational detector system. Based upon the research work performed in this project, the following conclusions are made. In terms of using gamma spectrometry, two possible approaches were identified for burnup assay. The first approach is based on the measurement of the absolute activity of Cs-137. However, due to spectral interference and the need for absolute calibration of the spectrometer, the uncertainty in burnup determination using this approach was found to range from ∼ ±40% at beginning of life to ∼ ±10% at the discharge burnup. An alternative approach is to use a relative burnup indicator. In this case, a self

  15. High-Pressure Liquid Chromatography of Irradiated Nuclear Fue - Separation of Neodymium for Burn-up Determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, N. R.

    1979-01-01

    Neodymium is separated from solutions of spent nuclear fuel by high-pressure liquid chromatography in methanol-nitric acid-water media using an anion-exchange column. Chromatograms obtained by monitoring at 280 nm, illustrate the difficulties especially with the fission product ruthenium in nuclear...

  16. Renewal plan of the JMTR hot laboratory for the irradiation test of high burn-up fuels in FY2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refurbishment of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), which is recognized as one of important facilities in Japan for safety research, is in progress by the JAEA. In 'Extensive safety research of light-water reactor (LWR) fuels and materials' under a contract with the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency of Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan, the irradiation tests are planned in order to examine integrity of the LWR fuels and structure materials. For the irradiation tests of high burnup fuels and irradiated materials in the JMTR, modification of the hot laboratory facilities are needed, which are (1) preparing of documents books for strengthening JMTR hot-lab. cell-shielding, (2) detailed design of the capsule assembling device, (3) safety analysis for domestic transportation cask, and (4) confirmation test of diamond drill of fuel-rod center-hole processing. This paper summarizes investigation results for the design and manufacture, future on these equipments conducted in FY2008. (author)

  17. Renewal plan of the JMTR hot laboratory for the irradiation test of high burn-up fuels in FY2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refurbishment of the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), which is recognized as one of important facilities in Japan for safety research, is in progress by the JAEA. In 'Extensive safety research of light-water reactor (LWR) fuels and materials' under a contract with the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency of Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan, the irradiation tests are planned in order to examine integrity of the LWR fuels and structure materials. For the irradiation tests of high burnup fuels and irradiated materials in the JMTR, modifications of the hot laboratory facilities are needed, which are (1) strengthening JMTR hot-lab. cell-shielding, (2) the capsule assembling device, (3) domestic transportation cask, (4) fuel-rod center-hole processing device, (5) master-slave manipulators, (6) power manipulator, and (7) scanning electron microscope. In FY2007, above related modifications were investigated. This paper summarizes the investigation results of them. (author)

  18. Determination of the burn-up in fuels of the MTR type by means of gamma spectroscopy with crystal of INa(Tl)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the responsibilities of the Laboratory of Analysis by Neutronic Activation of the RA-6 reactor is to determine the burn-up in fuels of the MTR type. In order to gain experience, up to the arrival of the hyperpure Germanium detector (HPGe) to be used in normal operation, preliminary measurements with a crystal of INa(Tl) were made. The fuel elements used are originated in the RA-3 reactor, with a decay superior to the thirteen years. For this reason, the unique visible photoelectric peak is the one of Cs-137, owing to the low resolution of the INa(Tl). After preliminary measurements, the profiles of burn-up, rectified by attenuation, were measured. Once the efficiency of the detector was determined, the calculation of the burn-up was made; for the element No. 144, a value of 21.6 ± 2.9 g was obtained to be compared with the value 21.9 g which was the evaluation made by the operators. (Author)

  19. Development of a FBR fuel bundle-duct interaction analysis code-BAMBOO. Analysis model and verification by Phenix high burn-up fuel subassemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bundle-duct interaction analysis code ''BAMBOO'' has been developed for the purpose of predicting deformation of a wire-wrapped fuel pin bundle of a fast breeder reactor (FBR). The BAMBOO code calculates helical bowing and oval-distortion of all the fuel pins in a fuel subassembly. We developed deformation models in order to precisely analyze the irradiation induced deformation by the code: a model to analyze fuel pin self-bowing induced by circumferential gradient of void swelling as well as thermal expansion, and a model to analyze dispersion of the orderly arrangement of a fuel pin bundle. We made deformation analyses of high burn-up fuel subassemblies in Phenix reactor and compared the calculated results with the post irradiation examination data of these subassemblies for the verification of these models. From the comparison we confirmed that the calculated values of the oval-distortion and bowing reasonably agreed with the PIE results if these models were used in the analysis of the code. (author)

  20. The effect of dissolved hydrogen on the dissolution of {sup 233}U doped UO{sub 2}(s) high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbol, P. [Inst. for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Spahiu, K. (ed.) [and others

    2005-03-01

    In this report the results of the experimental work carried out in a large EU-research project (SFS, 2001-2004) on spent fuel stability in the presence of various amounts of near field hydrogen are presented. Studies of the dissolution of {sup 233}U doped UO{sub 2}(s) simulating 'old' spent fuel were carried out as static leaching tests, autoclave tests with various hydrogen concentrations and electrochemical tests. The results of the leaching behaviour of a high burn-up spent fuel pellet in 5 M NaCl solutions in the presence of 3.2 bar H{sub 2} pressure and of MOX fuel in dilute synthetic groundwater under 53 bar H{sub 2} pressure are also presented. In all the experimental studies carried out in this project, a considerable effect of hydrogen in the dissolution rates of radioactive materials was observed. The experimental results obtained in this project with a-doped UO{sub 2}, high burn-up spent fuel and MOX fuel together with literature data give a reliable background to use fractional alteration/dissolution rates for spent fuel of the order of 10{sup -6}/yr - 10{sup -8}/yr with a recommended value of 4x10{sup -7}/yr for dissolved hydrogen concentrations above 10{sup -3} M and Fe(II) concentrations typical for European repository concepts. Finally, based on a review of the experimental data and available literature data, potential mechanisms of the hydrogen effect are also discussed. The work reported in this document was performed as part of the Project SFS of the European Commission 5th Framework Programme under contract no FIKW-CT-2001-20192 SFS. It represents the deliverable D10 of the experimental work package 'Key experiments using a-doped UO{sub 2} and real spent fuel', coordinated by SKB with the participation of ITU, FZK-INE, ENRESA, CIEMAT, ARMINES-SUBATECH and SKB.

  1. Chemical Analysis of High Burn-up PuO2 Fuel. II Results on Dragon-Fuel. RCN Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a chemical analysis with respect to isotopic composition and total content of the elements Zr, Mo, Ru, Cs, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu and Pu in a batch of irradiated pyro-carbon / silicon-carbide-coated PuO2 fuel particles are reported and discussed. (author)

  2. The REBUS experimental programme for burn-up credit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international programme called REBUS for the investigation of the burn-up credit has been initiated by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK·CEN and Belgonucleaire with the support of EdF and IRSN from France and VGB, representing German nuclear utilities and NUPEC, representing the Japanese industry. Recently also ORNL from the U.S. jointed the programme. The programme aims to establish a neutronic benchmark for reactor physics codes in order to qualify the codes for calculations of the burn-up credit. The benchmark exercise investigate the following fuel types with associated burn-up: reference fresh 3.3% enriched UO2 fuel, fresh commercial PWR UO2 fuel and irradiated commercial PWR UO2 fuel (54 GWd/tM), fresh PWR MOX fuel and irradiated PWR MOX fuel (20 GWd/tM). The experiments on the three configurations with fresh fuel have been completed. The experiments show a good agreement between calculation and experiments for the different measured parameters: critical water level, reactivity effect of the water level and fission-rate and flux distributions. In 2003 the irradiated BR3 MOX fuel bundle was loaded into the VENUS reactor and the associated experimental programme was carried out. The reactivity measurements in this configuration with irradiated fuel show a good agreement between experimental and preliminary calculated values. (author)

  3. In-reactor behaviour of centrifugally atomized U3Si dispersion fuel irradiated up to high burn-up for HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation test on atomized and comminuted U3Si dispersion mini-element fuels has been performed up to about 69 at.% U-235 burn-up under normal linear power condition in OR-4 hole position of HANARO reactor, in order to examine the irradiation performance of the atomized U3Si for the driver fuels of HANARO. Irrespective of the powdering method, the in-reactor interaction of U3Si dispersion fuel meats is generally assumed to be acceptable with the range of ca. 9 μm in average thickness. The U3Si particles have relatively fine and uniform bubble size distribution, irrespective of the powdering method. Both the atomized and comminuted U3Si dispersion mini-element fuels exhibit sound swelling behaviours with the swelling range of ca. 5 % in ΔV/Vm, which meets with the safety criterion of the fuel rod, 20vol.% for HANARO. (author)

  4. Development of high-strength aluminum alloys for basket in transport and storage cask for high burn-up spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. (MHI) has developed high-strength borated aluminum alloys (high-strength B-Al alloys), suitable for application to baskets in transport and storage casks for high burn-up spent fuels. Aluminum is a suitable base material for the baskets due to its low density and high thermal conductivity. The aluminum basket would reduce weight of the cask, and effectively release heat generated by spent fuels. MHI had already developed borated aluminum alloys (high-toughness B-Al alloy), and registered them as ASME Code Case ''N-673''. However, there has been a strong demand for basket materials with higher strength in the case of MSF (Mitsubishi Spent Fuel) casks for high-burn up spent fuels, since the basket is required to stand up to higher stress at higher temperature. The high-strength basket material enables the design of a compact cask under a limitation of total size and weight. MHI has developed novel high-strength B-Al alloys which meet these requirements, based on a new manufacturing process. The outline of mechanical and metallurgical characteristics of the high-strength B-Al alloys is described in this paper

  5. Applications of ''candle'' burn-up strategy to several reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new burn-up strategy CANDLE is proposed, and the calculation procedure for its equilibrium state is presented. Using this strategy, the power shape does not change as time passes, and the excess reactivity and reactivity coefficient are constant during burn-up. No control mechanism for the burn-up reactivity is required, and power control is very easy. The reactor lifetime can be prolonged by elongating the core height. This burn-up strategy can be applied to several kinds of reactors whose maximum neutron multiplication factor changes from less than unity to more than unity, and then to less than unity. In the present paper it is applied to some fast reactors, thus requiring some fissile material such as plutonium for the nuclear ignition region of the core, but only natural uranium is required for the other region of the initial reactor and for succeeding reactors. The drift speed of the burning region for this reactor is about 4 cm/year, which is a preferable value for designing a long-life reactor. The average burn-up of the spent fuel is about 40%; that is, equivalent to 40% utilisation of the natural uranium without the reprocessing and enrichment. (author)

  6. Verification of the OREST (HAMMER-ORIGEN) burn-up program system in the post-irradiation analyses of fuel elements BE-168, 170, 171 and 176 of the Obrigheim reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burn-up code OREST has a spectrum code assigned to it, which determines the neutron spectrum in the actual fuel element mixture at the start and during burn-up and carries out the resonance treatment for the most important uranium and transuranic element isotopes. The reliability of the OREST system is shown for UO2 burn-up in PWR's. Post-irradiation analyses of five UO2 fuel elements of KWO with an initial enrichment of 3.13% by weight of U235 and a mean burn-up of 28.4 GWd/tV are used for comparison. The reliability of OREST information for UO2 fuel in PWR's is proved by the good agreement between experiment and calculation, also compared with KfK's results. (orig./HP)

  7. Calculation of isotope composition of WWER- 440 spent fuel assembly by the NESSEL-NUKO code system on the basis of the ISTS burn-up credit project data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiming at validation of depletion codes against WWER-440 spent fuel data some calculations of isotope composition of WWER-440 spent fuel assembly have been carried out by the NESSEL-NUKO code system. The initial data and data for the comparisons were taken from the ISTS burn up credit project data, recently published in the ISTC report 'Radiochemical Assays of Irradiated WWER-440 Fuel for Use in Spent Fuel Burnup Credit Activities. The specific work scope included the destructive assay (DA) of spent fuel assembly rod segments with an - -38.5 MWd/KgU burn up from a single WWER-440 fuel assembly from the Novovorenezh reactor in Russia (Authors)

  8. A neural network approach for burn-up calculation and its application to the dynamic fuel cycle code CLASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Development of a neural network model to predict the requiered plutonium content. • The accuracy of this model is very good (0.37% of error). • Development of a neural network model to predict evolution of average cross sections. • Predictions allow calculating fuel depletion quickly and with a very good accuracy. • This approach has been applied to the PWR MOX case in a dynamic fuel cycle code. - Abstract: Dynamic fuel cycle simulation tools calculate nuclei inventories and mass flows evolution in an entire fuel cycle, from the mine to the final disposal. Usually, the fuel depletion in reactor is handled by a fuel loading model and a mean cross section predictor. In the case of a PWR–MOX, a fuel loading model provides from a plutonium stock the plutonium fraction in the fresh fuel needed to reach a specific burnup. A mean cross section predictor aims to assess isotopic cross sections required for building Bateman equations for any fresh fuel composition with a sufficient accuracy and a reasonable computing time. This paper presents a methodology based on neural networks for building a fuel loading model and a cross section predictor for a PWR reactor loaded with MOX fuel. The mean error of the plutonium content prediction from the fuel loading model is 0.37%. Furthermore, the mean cross section predictor allows completion of the fuel depletion calculation in less than one minute with excellent accuracy. A maximum deviation of 3% on main nuclei is obtained at the end of cycle between inventories calculated from neural networks and from the reference coupled neutron transport/fuel depletion calculation

  9. Oxide fuel fabrication technology development of the FaCT project (5). Current status on 9Cr-ODS steel cladding development for high burn-up fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes evaluation results of in-reactor integrity of 9Cr and 12Cr-ODS steel cladding tubes and the plan for reliability improvement in homogeneous tube production, both of which are key points for the commercialized use of ODS steels as long-life fuel cladding tubes. A fuel assembly in the BOR-60 irradiation test including 9Cr and 12Cr-ODS fuel pins has achieved the highest burn-up, i.e. peak burn-up of 11.9at% and peak neutron dose of 51dpa, without any fuel pin rupture and microstructure instability. In another fuel assembly containing 9Cr and 12Cr-ODS steel fuel pins whose peak burn-up was 10.5at%, one 9Cr-ODS steel fuel pin failed near the upper end of the fuel column. A peculiar microstructure change occurred in the vicinity of the ruptured area. The primary cause of this fuel pin rupture and microstructure change was shown to be the presence of metallic Cr inclusions in the 9Cr-ODS steel tube, which had passed an ultrasonic inspection test for defects. In the next stage from 2011 to 2013, the fabrication technology of full pre-alloy 9Cr-ODS steel cladding tube will be developed, where the handling of elemental powder is prohibited in the process. (author)

  10. Post-irradiation examination of uranium-molybdenum dispersion fuel irradiated to high burn-up in NRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UMo dispersion fuels are promising candidates for research and test reactors. Mini-elements containing U7Mo and U10Mo (7 and 10 wt% Mo in U alloy) fuel particles dispersed in aluminium have been fabricated with a nominal loading of 4.5 gU/cm3. In order to compare the performance of the different UMo alloys, the mini-elements were irradiated adjacent to each other under nominally identical conditions in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor. Maximum element linear ratings up to 100 kW/m and discharge burnups up to 80 atom% 235U were achieved. The experiment was conducted in phases such that adjacent pairs of mini-elements could be removed for post-irradiation examinations (PIE) after 20, 40, 60 and 80 atom% 235U burnup. PIE included underwater inspections, visual examinations and photography in the hot cells, gamma spectroscopy, dimensional measurements, immersion density measurements, metallography, and chemical burnup analysis. The results from the high burnup fuels are presented in this paper. The assessments compare the microstructural changes, porosity formation and fuel swelling in the two UMo dispersion fuels. The results indicate that U7Mo fuel is less stable that U10 Mo fuel under the conditions tested in NRU. (author)

  11. Analysis of UO2 fuel structure for low and high burn-up and its impact on fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During irradiation, uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel undergo important restructuring mainly represented by densification and swelling, void migration, equiaxed grain growth, grain subdivision, and the formation of columnar grains. The purpose of this study is to obtain a comprehensive picture of the phenomenon of equiaxed grain growth in UO2 ceramic material. The change of the grain size in high-density uranium dioxide as a function of temperature, initial grain size, time, and burnup is calculated. Algorithm of fission gas release from UO2 fuel during high temperature irradiation at high burnup taking into account grain growth effect is presented. Theoretical results are compared with experimental data. (author)

  12. Methodology of Fuel Burn Up Fitting in VVER-1000 Reactor Core by Using New Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry and In-Core Measurements and its Application for Routine Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculations

    OpenAIRE

    Borodkin Pavel; Borodkin Gennady; Khrennikov Nikolay

    2016-01-01

    Paper describes the new approach of fitting axial fuel burn-up patterns in peripheral fuel assemblies of VVER-1000 type reactors, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations and in-core SPND measured data. The developed approach uses results of new ex-vessel measurements on different power units through different reactor cycles and their uncertainties to clear the influence of a fitted fuel burn-up profile to the RPV neutron fluence calculations. The new...

  13. Study of morphology on the oxidation and the annealing of high burn-up UO2 spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The morphology of the high burnup UO2 spent fuel, which was oxidized and annealed in a PIA (Post Irradiation Annealing) apparatus, has been observed. The high burnup fuel irradiated in Ulchin Unit 2, average rod burnup 57,000 MWd/tU, was transported to the KAERI's PIEF. The test specimen was used with about 200 mg of the spent UO2 fuel fragment of the local burnup 65,000 MWd/tU. This specimen was annealed at 1400 .deg. C for 4hrs after the oxidation for 3hrs to grain boundary using the PIA apparatus in a hot-cell. In order to oxidize the grain boundary, the oxidation temperature increased up to 500 .deg. C and held for 3hrs in the mixed gas (60 ml He and 100 ml STD-air) atmosphere. The amount of 85Kr during the whole test process was measured to know the fission gas release behavior using the online system of a beta counter and a gamma counter. The detailed micro-structure was observed by a SEM to confirm the change of the fuel morphology after this test. As the annealing temperature increased, the fission products were observed to move to the grain surface and grain boundary of the UO2 matrix. This specimen was re-structured through the reduction process, and the grain sizes were distributed from 5 to 10 μm

  14. Study of morphology on the oxidation and the annealing of high burn-up UO{sub 2} spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Jae Geun; Yang, Yong Sik; Song, Keun Woo; Lee, Hyung Kwon; Kwon, Hyung Moon [KAERI, Daejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-12-15

    The morphology of the high burnup UO{sub 2} spent fuel, which was oxidized and annealed in a PIA (Post Irradiation Annealing) apparatus, has been observed. The high burnup fuel irradiated in Ulchin Unit 2, average rod burnup 57,000 MWd/tU, was transported to the KAERI's PIEF. The test specimen was used with about 200 mg of the spent UO{sub 2} fuel fragment of the local burnup 65,000 MWd/tU. This specimen was annealed at 1400 .deg. C for 4hrs after the oxidation for 3hrs to grain boundary using the PIA apparatus in a hot-cell. In order to oxidize the grain boundary, the oxidation temperature increased up to 500 .deg. C and held for 3hrs in the mixed gas (60 ml He and 100 ml STD-air) atmosphere. The amount of 85Kr during the whole test process was measured to know the fission gas release behavior using the online system of a beta counter and a gamma counter. The detailed micro-structure was observed by a SEM to confirm the change of the fuel morphology after this test. As the annealing temperature increased, the fission products were observed to move to the grain surface and grain boundary of the UO{sub 2} matrix. This specimen was re-structured through the reduction process, and the grain sizes were distributed from 5 to 10 {mu}m.

  15. Zircaloy-4 clad UO2 fuel elements irradiation to a burn-up of 7,500 MWd/tu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six Zircaloy-4 clad uranium oxide elements have been irradiated in the pressurized capsules of the BR2 reactor. All elements were intact up to the end of the test. Final dimensions of the elements remained almost unchanged compared to the pre-irradiation measurements. Changes in UO2 fuel microstructure were not observed. Discrete UO2 particles have been seen in the fuel pellets. The amounts of released fission gas are small. The ZrO2 film on the outside of the cladding was thicker and more uniform than on the inside. The ultimate tensile strength of the irradiated Zircaloy had increased with 90% while the elongation was reduced to 72%. (auths.)

  16. Twenty-fifth water reactor safety information meeting: Proceedings. Volume 2: Human reliability analysis and human performance evaluation; Technical issues related to rulemakings; Risk-informed, performance-based initiatives; High burn-up fuel research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the conference. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Japan, Norway, and Russia. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. This volume contains the following: (1) human reliability analysis and human performance evaluation; (2) technical issues related to rulemakings; (3) risk-informed, performance-based initiatives; and (4) high burn-up fuel research

  17. Experimental control of burn-up calculations for high temperature reactor fuel by introduction of a special alpha spectrometric method for the determination of transuranium content. An attempt to establish isotopic correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the field of high-temperature-reactor (HTR) fuel investigation there is a great interest in the experimental and calculational determination of heavy metal content under the aspects of burn-up physics and for the prediction of reliable data for reprocessing and waste management. Using a laser-micro-boring preparation method, high resolution alpha-spectroscopy and sophisticated computer decomposition programs we identify qualitatively and quantitatively most of the important actinide isotopes in irradiated HTR-fuel. Additionally we use data, delivered by gamma- and mass-spectroscopy of the same fuel samples. The evaluated results are compared with calculational results from the burn-up code ORIGEN, using a special generated HTR-neutron-cross-section library. In a first step we determine new cross sections for the uranium and plutonium isotopes depending on the irradiation conditions. In a second step we calculate correlations between the heavy metal isotopes and the burn-up or the fission products

  18. Methodology of Fuel Burn Up Fitting in VVER-1000 Reactor Core by Using New Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry and In-Core Measurements and its Application for Routine Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borodkin Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper describes the new approach of fitting axial fuel burn-up patterns in peripheral fuel assemblies of VVER-1000 type reactors, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations and in-core SPND measured data. The developed approach uses results of new ex-vessel measurements on different power units through different reactor cycles and their uncertainties to clear the influence of a fitted fuel burn-up profile to the RPV neutron fluence calculations. The new methodology may be recommended to be included in the routine fluence calculations used in RPV lifetime management and may be taken into account during VVER-1000 core burn-up pattern correction.

  19. Methodology of Fuel Burn Up Fitting in VVER-1000 Reactor Core by Using New Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry and In-Core Measurements and its Application for Routine Reactor Pressure Vessel Fluence Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodkin, Pavel; Borodkin, Gennady; Khrennikov, Nikolay

    2016-02-01

    Paper describes the new approach of fitting axial fuel burn-up patterns in peripheral fuel assemblies of VVER-1000 type reactors, on the base of ex-core neutron leakage measurements, neutron-physical calculations and in-core SPND measured data. The developed approach uses results of new ex-vessel measurements on different power units through different reactor cycles and their uncertainties to clear the influence of a fitted fuel burn-up profile to the RPV neutron fluence calculations. The new methodology may be recommended to be included in the routine fluence calculations used in RPV lifetime management and may be taken into account during VVER-1000 core burn-up pattern correction.

  20. Analysis of Fuel Temperature Reactivity Coefficients According to Burn-up and Pu-239 Production in CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resonances for some kinds of nuclides such as U-238 and Pu-239 are not easy to be accurately processed. In addition, the Pu-239 productions from burnup are also significant in CANDU, where the natural uranium is used as a fuel. In this study, the FTCs were analyzed from the viewpoints of the resonance self-shielding methodology and Pu-239 build-up. The lattice burnup calculations were performed using the TRITON module in the SCALE6 code system, and the BONAMI module was executed to obtain self-shielded cross sections using the Bondarenko approach. Two libraries, ENDF/B-VI.8 and ENDF/B-VII.0, were used to compare the Pu-239 effect on FTC, since the ENDF/B-VII has updated the Pu-239 cross section data. The FTCs of the CANDU reactor were newly analyzed using the TRITON module in the SCALE6 code system, and the BONAMI module was executed to apply the Bondarenko approach for self-shielded cross sections. When compared with some reactor physics codes resulting in slightly positive FTC in the specific region, the FTCs evaluated in this study showed a clear negativity over the entire fuel temperature range on fresh/equilibrium fuel. In addition, the FTCs at 960.15 K were slightly negative during the entire burnup. The effects on FTCs from the library difference between ENDF/B-VI.8 and ENDF/B-VII.0 are recognized to not be large; however, they appear more positive when more Pu-239 productions with burnup are considered. This feasibility study needs an additional benchmark evaluation for FTC calculations, but it can be used as a reference for a new FTC analysis in CANDU reactors

  1. New generation of CASTOR registered casks for high enriched, high burn-up fuel from German NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requirements for new cask designs for transport and long-term dry storage of spent fuel assemblies (FA) from LWR-reactors are based on both increased source terms of the LWR FA including MOX FA, as well as the demand for economical optimisation of decommissioning costs by increased cask capacities. For this, cask development is the challenge to create and establish cask designs that can accommodate more FA with higher source terms, each under fixed boundary conditions (i.e. transport requirements and limitations of the power plants as crane loads and/or fixed maximum dimensions). This task has been elaborated by working simultaneously on different development actions each focussed to improve the cask performance. In the following a brief summary will be presented to give an overview which developments and investigations have been and are still will be performed for development and safety analyses of the new CASTOR registered -designs under the main subjects: material investigation and qualification, component tests and verifications, detailed design analysis and not at least design verification

  2. Burn up physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present communication is devoted to a body of theoretical and experimental work carried out at the C.E.A. with the aim of adding to the current knowledge on the evolution of the reactivity (during fuel irradiation) in natural or slightly enriched Uranium reactors. The difficulties of performing direct experiments on large amounts of irradiated fuels are reviewed - especially in operating power reactors - and the necessity is underlined for fundamental research in two directions: on one hand, the change in the composition of the fuels (chains of heavy nuclei, fission products), and on the other hand the effect of changes in composition on the neutron balance. Before presenting three types of experiments which have been carried out, the importance of the problems associated with the neutron spectra is stressed and the practical methods used for the calculations are briefly described. The systematic irradiation of several types of fuel, followed by their chemical and isotopic analysis has been going on for several years. An outline of the experimental programme is given with a description of the methods employed: α, β, γ chain for the preparation of samples determination of the plutonium content by coulometry and double isotopic dilution, separation of Boron used in some cases for the measurement of integrated neutron densities. The interpretation of the measurements is discussed with some examples. A second and more recent series of experiments deals with the investigation of lattices, using synthetic fuels (Uranium-Plutonium alloys) as compared to slightly depleted or enriched Uranium Various experiments are considered on heavy water and on cold graphite, then on graphite heated up to 500 C Some results already obtained are listed. These experiments, requiring nearly a metric ton of each type of fuel cannot be pursued in a systematic manner. This is why is developed since several years a method of differential measurement by oscillation, which requires

  3. Thermochemistry of nuclear fuels in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of a large number of elements, accompanied with steep temperature gradient results in dynamic chemistry during nuclear fuel burn-up. Understanding this chemistry is very important for efficient and safe usage of nuclear fuels. The radioactive nature of these fuels puts lot of constraint on regulatory bodies to ensure their accident free operation in the reactors. One of the common aims of advanced fuels is to achieve high burn-up. As burn-up of the fuel increases, chemistry of fission-products becomes increasingly more important. To understand different phenomenon taking place in-pile, many out of-pile experiments are carried out. Extensive studies of thermodynamic properties, phase analysis, thermophysical property evaluation, fuel-fission product clad compatibility are carried out with relevant compounds and simulated fuels (SIMFUEL). All these data are compiled and jointly evaluated using different computational methods to predict fuel behaviour during burn-up. Only when this combined experimental and theoretical information confirms safe operation of the pin, a test pin is prepared and burnt in a test reactor. Every fuel has a different chemistry and different constraints associated with it. In this talk, various thermo-chemical aspects of some of the advanced fuels, mixed carbide, mixed nitride, 'Pu' rich MOX, 'Th' based AHWR fuels and metallic fuels will be discussed. (author)

  4. Detailed neutron activation measurements in lattices with 31-element PuOsub(2)-UOsub(2) clusters of simulated burned-up natural uranium fuel in heavy water moderator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low power experiments have been performed in the ZED-2 reactor to determine detailed neutron activation distributions in the central cell of lattices containing 31-element clusters of PuOsub(2)-UOsub(2), simulated burned-up natural uranium oxide fuel in heavy water moderator. The measurements included Mn and Cu activity distributions, Lu/Mn and in/Mn activity ratios, and Pu/U fission rate ratios over a range of three lattice pitches with air, Hsub(2)O and HB-40 coolants. Relative total neutron densities, and the Westcott spectral parameters r√Tsub(n)/Tsub(o) and Tn were inferred from the experimental results. The results indicate that the neutron density gradient across a lattice cell is larger for Hsub(2)O and HB-40 coolants, and increases with increasing Pu-239 enrichment. The spectral parameters increase (harden) with decreasing pitch and coolant moderator power (Hsub(2)O yields HB-40 yields Air), and with increasing Pu-239 content, as expected

  5. TRIGA criticality experiment for testing burn-up calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persic, Andreja; Ravnik, Matjaz; Zagar, Tomaz [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Physics Division, Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    1999-07-01

    A criticality experiment with partly burned TRIGA fuel is described. 20 wt % enriched standard TRIGA fuel elements initially containing 12 wt % U are used. Their average burn-up is 1.4 MWd. Fuel element burn-up is calculated in 2-D four group diffusion approximation using TRIGLAV code. The burn-up of several fuel elements is also measured by reactivity method. The excess reactivity of several critical and subcritical core configurations is measured. Two core configurations contain the same fuel elements in the same arrangement as were used in the fresh TRIGA fuel criticality experiment performed in 1991. The results of the experiment may be applied for testing the computer codes used for fuel burn-up calculations. (author)

  6. Preliminary Content Evaluation of the North Anna High Burn-Up Sister Fuel Rod Segments for Transportation in the 10-160B and NAC-LWT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketusky, E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-09

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) Program has transported high-burnup nuclear sister fuel rods from a commercial nuclear power plant for purposes of evaluation and testing. The evaluation and testing of high-burnup used nuclear fuel is integral to DOE initiatives to collect information useful in determining the integrity of fuel cladding for future safe transportation of the fuel, and for determining the effects of aging, on the integrity of UNF subjected to extended storage and subsequent transportation. The UFDC Program, in collaboration with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the commercial nuclear industry, has obtained individual used nuclear fuel rods for testing. The rods have been received at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for both separate effects testing (SET) and small-scale testing (SST). To meet the research objectives, testing on multiple 6 inch fuel rod pins cut from the rods at ORNL, will be performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Up to 10 rod equivalents will be shipped. Options were evaluated for multiple shipments using the 10-160B (based on 4.5 rod equivalents) and a single shipment using the NAC-LWT.

  7. Burn up calculation applied to the NEACRP fast breeder benchmark

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burn up calculations have been performed for the NEACRP fast breeder benchmark. The calculated core parameters are based on the proposal at the NEACRP meeting due to Hammer (CEA). The present calculations have been perfomed basing on JENDL-2 (Japanese Evaluated Nuclear Data Library) instead of JENDL-1 which was used for the previous international comparison calculation of a large LMFBR. The core parameters of the fresh core have been recalculated using JENDL-2 in order to enable direct comparison with those of the end-of-cycle core. The effective microscopic cross sections for fresh core elements have been obtained with use of the ESELEM5 code in 25 groups by weighting with a fundamental mode fine spectrum. Those of F.P. and Actinide nuclides have been generated by using the PROF-GROUCH-G2 code by weighting with 1/E and fission spectrum. The calculations based on the seventy group constants set (JENDL-2B-70) have been performed for a comparison. The burn up calculations have been performed in R-Z geometry by the diffusion theory code PHENIX. The irradiated fuel composition have been obtained at the end of-cycle of the inner core zone 1 by using the zero dimensional burn-up code, FPG S-3. The final report has been submitted to Hammer and intercomparison of solution will be made at NEACRP. Tables of group cross sections for Actinides and F.P. are shown in Appendixes. (author)

  8. Heterogeneous UO2 fuel irradiated up to a high burn-up: Investigation of the HBS and of fission product releases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noirot, J.; Lamontagne, J.; Nakae, N.; Kitagawa, T.; Kosaka, Y.; Tverberg, T.

    2013-11-01

    A UO2 fuel with a heterogeneous distribution of 235U was irradiated up to a high burn-up in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR). The last 100 days of irradiation were performed with an increased level of linear power. The effect of the heterogeneous fissile isotope distribution on the formation of the HBS was studied free of the possible influence of Pu which exists in heterogeneous MOX fuels. The HBS formed in 235U-rich agglomerates and its main characteristics were very similar to those of the HBS formed in Pu-rich agglomerates of heterogeneous MOX fuels. The maximum local contents of Nd and Xe before HBS formation were studied in this fuel. In addition to a Pu effect that promotes the HBS phenomenon, comparison with previous results for heterogeneous MOX fuels showed that the local fission product concentration was not the only parameter that has to be taken into consideration. It appears that the local actinide depletion by fission and/or the energy locally deposited through electronic interactions in the fission fragment recoils also have an effect on the HBS formation threshold. Moreover, a major release of fission gases from the peripheral 235U-rich agglomerates of HBS bubbles and a Cs radial movement are also evidenced in this heterogeneous UO2. Cs deposits on the peripheral grain boundaries, including the HBS grain boundaries, are considered to reveal the release paths. SUP>235U-rich agglomerates, SUP>235U-poor areas, an intermediate phase with intermediate 235U concentrations. Short fuel rods were fabricated with these pellets. The main characteristics of these fuel rods are shown in Table 1.These rods were irradiated to high burn-ups in the IFA-609/626 of the HBWR and then one was irradiated in the IFA-702 for 100 days. Fig. 2 shows the irradiation history of this fuel. The final average burn-up of the rod was 69 GWd/tU. Due to the flux differences along the rod, however, the average burn-up of the cross section examined was 63 GWd/tU. This fuel

  9. Approaches to modeling of high burn-up structure and analysis of its effects on the behaviour of light water reactor fuels in the START-3 fuel performance code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced model GRSWEL-A for fission gas behavior and micro-structural evolutions in Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuels was developed for and embedded in the START-3 fuel performance code. This paper represents the physical basis and verification of the model with emphasis on analysis of High Burn-up Structure (HBS), which is generally ascribed to a so-called rim-layer of high burn-up fuel pellets. Specifically, the issues of microscopic polygonization, loss of matrix fission gas, growth of fuel porosity and fission gas release are highlighted. The effects of HBS on total fission gas release, temperature distribution in the pellet, pellet swelling and permanent strain of the cladding are considered in the appropriate section of the paper by means of comparative and sensitivity analysis with the use of both modeling and available experimental data. In all the cases, an accounting for the present effects is found to be an important integral part of thorough analysis of LWR fuel behavior. Aside from the description of current capabilities of modeling, some priority directions of further improvement are outlined. (author)

  10. Modelling of thermal mechanical behaviour of high burn-Up VVER fuel at power transients with special emphasis on the impact of fission gas induced swelling of fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is devoted to the modelling of unsteady state mechanical and thermo-physical behaviour of high burn-up VVER fuel at a power ramp. The contribution of the processes related to the kinetics of fission gas to the consequences of pellet-clad mechanical interaction is analysed by the example of integral VVER-440 rod 9 from the R7 experimental series, with a pellet burn-up in the active part at around 60 MWd/kgU. This fuel rod incurred ramp testing with a ramp value ΔW1 ∼ 250 W/cm in the MIR research reactor. The experimentally revealed residual deformation of the clad by 30-40 microns in the 'hottest' portion of the rod, reaching a maximum linear power of up to 430 W/cm, is numerically justified on the basis of accounting for the unsteady state swelling and additional degradation of fuel thermal conductivity due to temperature-induced formation and development of gaseous porosity within the grains and on the grain boundaries. The good prediction capability of the START-3 code, coupled with the advanced model of fission gas related processes, with regard to the important mechanical (residual deformation of clad, pellet-clad gap size, central hole filling), thermal physical (fission gas release) and micro-structural (profiles of intra-granular concentration of the retained fission gas and fuel porosity across a pellet) consequences of the R7 test is shown. (authors)

  11. Thermonuclear burn-up in deuterated methane $CD_4$

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, Alexei M

    2010-01-01

    The thermonuclear burn-up of highly compressed deuterated methane CD$_4$ is considered in the spherical geometry. The minimal required values of the burn-up parameter $x = \\rho_0 \\cdot r_f$ are determined for various temperatures $T$ and densities $\\rho_0$. It is shown that thermonuclear burn-up in $CD_4$ becomes possible in practice if its initial density $\\rho_0$ exceeds $\\approx 5 \\cdot 10^3$ $g \\cdot cm^{-3}$. Burn-up in CD$_2$T$_2$ methane requires significantly ($\\approx$ 100 times) lower compressions. The developed approach can be used in order to compute the critical burn-up parameters in an arbitrary deuterium containing fuel.

  12. Testing experimental fuel elements of the BN-600 fuel element type up to various depth of burn up in the BOR-60 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the investigation of experimental fuel elements are presented. The authors discuss fuel element construction, basic testing parameters, results of measuring gas release from fuel, deformation of cladding and swelling of steel, and also data on material investigations of macro- an micro-structures of fuel and cladding with an analysis of the degree and character of their physico-chemical interaction with fission fragments

  13. Evaluation and Parameter Analysis of Burn up Calculations for the Assessment of Radioactive Waste - 13187

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn up calculations facilitate a determination of the composition and nuclear inventory of spent nuclear fuel, if operational history is known. In case this information is not available, the total nuclear inventory can be determined by means of destructive or, even on industrial scale, nondestructive measurement methods. For non-destructive measurements however only a few easy-to-measure, so-called key nuclides, are determined due to their characteristic gamma lines or neutron emission. From these measured activities the fuel burn up and cooling time are derived to facilitate the numerical inventory determination of spent fuel elements. Most regulatory bodies require an independent assessment of nuclear waste properties and their documentation. Prominent part of this assessment is a consistency check of inventory declaration. The waste packages often contain wastes from different types of spent fuels of different history and information about the secondary reactor parameters may not be available. In this case the so-called characteristic fuel burn up and cooling time are determined. These values are obtained from a correlations involving key-nuclides with a certain bandwidth, thus with upper and lower limits. The bandwidth is strongly dependent on secondary reactor parameter such as initial enrichment, temperature and density of the fuel and moderator, hence the reactor type, fuel element geometry and plant operation history. The purpose of our investigation is to look into the scaling and correlation limitations, to define and verify the range of validity and to scrutinize the dependencies and propagation of uncertainties that affect the waste inventory declarations and their independent verification. This is accomplished by numerical assessment and simulation of waste production using well accepted codes SCALE 6.0 and 6.1 to simulate the cooling time and burn up of a spent fuel element. The simulations are benchmarked against spent fuel from the real reactor

  14. Enlarged Halden programme group meeting on high burn-up fuel performance, safety and reliability and degradation of in-core materials and water chemistry effects and man-machine systems research. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Academy of Sciences, KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, the N.V. KEMA, the Netherlands, the Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', the Slovakian VUJE - Nuclear Power Plant Research Institute, and from USA: the ABB Combustion Engineering Inc., the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the General Electric Co. The right to utilise information originating from the research work of the Halden Project is limited to persons and undertakings specifically given this right by one of these Project member organisations. The activities in the area of fuel and materials performance are based on extensive in-reactor measurements. The programmes are expanding in the areas of fuel performance at extended burn-ups, waterside corrosion and material testing in general. Development of in-core instruments is an important activity in support of the experimental programmes. The research programme at the Halden Project addresses the research needs of the nuclear industry in connection with introduction of digital I and C systems in NPPs. The programme provides information supporting design and licensing of upgraded, computer-based control room systems, and demonstrates the benefits of such systems through validation experiments in Halden's experimental research facility, HAMMLAB and pilot installations in NPPs. The Enlarged Halden Programme Group Meeting at Loen, Norway, was arranged to provide an opportunity to present results of work carried out at Halden and within participating organisations, and to encourage comments and impulses related to future Halden Project work. This HPR-351 relates to the fuel and materials part of the meeting and is divided in two volumes, HPR-351 Volume I and HPR-351 Volume II. The corresponding collection of papers in the man-machine area are given in one volume, HPR-352 Volume I. The overall programme of the Loen Enlarged Meeting covering the Fuel and Materials Research is given in the following pages. The papers with denomination HWR have

  15. A burn-up module coupling to an AMPX system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactors and Neutrons Division of the Bariloche Atomic Center uses the AMPX system for the study of high conversion reactors (HCR). Such system allows to make neutronic calculations from the nuclear data library (ENDF/B-IV). The Nuclear Engineering career of the Balseiro Institute developed and implemented a burn-up module at a μ-cell level (BUM: Burn-up Module) which agrees with the requirement to be coupled to the AMPX system. (Author)

  16. Enlarged Halden programme group meeting on man-machine systems research and high burn-up fuel performance, safety and reliability and degradation of in-core materials and water chemistry effects. Volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Academy of Sciences, KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute, the N.V. KEMA, the Netherlands, the Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', the Slovakian VUJE - Nuclear Power Plant Research Institute, and from USA: the ABB Combustion Engineering Inc., the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the General Electric Co. The right to utilise information originating from the research work of the Halden Project is limited to persons and undertakings specifically given this right by one of these Project member organisations. The activities in the area of fuel and materials performance are based on extensive in-reactor measurements. The programmes are expanding in the areas of fuel performance at extended burn-ups, waterside corrosion and material testing in general. Development of in-core instruments is an important activity in support of the experimental programmes. The research programme at the Halden Project addresses the research needs of the nuclear industry in connection with introduction of digital I and C systems in NPPs. The programme provides information supporting design and licensing of upgraded, computer-based control room systems, and demonstrates the benefits of such systems through validation experiments in Halden's experimental research facility, HAMMLAB and pilot installations in NPPs. The Enlarged Halden Programme Group Meeting at Loen, Norway, was arranged to provide an opportunity to present results of work carried out at Halden and within participating organisations, and to encourage comments and impulses related to future Halden Project work. This HPR-352 relates to the man-machine systems research part of the meeting and is in one volume, HPR-352 Volume I. The corresponding collection of papers in the fuel and materials research are given in two volumes, HPR-351 Volume I and HPR-351 Volume II. The overall programme of the Loen Enlarged Meeting covering the man-machine systems research is given in the following pages. The papers with

  17. Prediction of fission gas release at high burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable design of LWR fuel rods requires the fission gas release to be predicted as accurately as possible. Indeed that physical phenomenon governs both the fuel temperatures and the inner gas pressure. Fission gas release data have been reviewed by the NRC and it has been concluded that a fission gas release enhancement occurs at burn-up above 20 GWd/tM. To correct deficient fission gas release models which do not include burn-up dependence, the NRC developed an empirical correction method to describe burn-up enhancement effect. BELGONUCLEAIRE has developed its own fission gas release model which is utilized in licensing calculation through the COMETHE code. Fission gas release predictions at high burn-up are confronted to the experimental data as well as to the predictions of the NRC correlation. The physics of the fission gas release phenomenon is discussed

  18. Establishing a PWR burn-up library

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting out from data file ENDF/B IV /1/, a cross-section library has been established for the calculation of operating conditions in pressurized water reactors of the type used in BIBLIS B. The library includes macroscopic, homogenized 2-group cross-sections for all types of fuel elements used in this reactor, including those equipped with boron glass rods. For their calculation the previous irradiation of the fuel has been taken into consideration by approximation. Information on fuel consumption from cell burn-up calculations has been stored in a separate data file. It was designed as a base for the determination of cross sections to be used in the calculation of the incident ''main-steam pipe fracture''. For this library the description of cross sections as a function of the moderator status chose the water densities at 3000C/155 bar, 1900C/140 bar and 1000C/100 bar as fixed values. The burn-up library has been tested by a three-dimensional calculation for the 1sup(st) cycle of the BIBLIS B-reactor using program QUABOX /2/. This showed variances with the anticipated course concerning critically, which can be explained almost quantitatively by known deficiencies of the ENDF/b-IV library. (orig.)

  19. Cogema and the nuclear fuel. A clue role in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present issue of 'Les Cahiers de COGEMAGAZINE' addresses the topics of nuclear fuel production especially for PWR and Breeder Reactors. The papers deal with: the sketchy history of French nuclear industry, the economy and fuel marketing, the situation of the PWR programme, the fuels for breeder and research reactors. In the end prospective and concluding considerations are given. The most significant lines of progress related to the new fuels are estimated to be: high burn-up (by increasing the resistance to fission gas pressure and irradiation), improvement of response to power excursions, fuel matrices of stronger retention, increase in the plutonium content of MOF, 100% MOF-fuelled reactors, optimizing the utilization of consumable poisons (for PWR) and very high burn-up and very long service lifetimes (for breeders)

  20. The Influence Of Fuel-To-Clad Gap Anti) UO2 Grain Size On Fission Gas Release In High Burn-Up PWR Design Fuel Rods; IFA-519.9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiment described in this report was designed to test the effect of gap size, and hence fuel temperatures, and grain size on the fission gas release characteristics of PWR design UO2 fuel rods. Three rods with different combinations of gap and grain size irradiated during several loadings in IFA-429 at an average linear heat rate below 20 kW/m. At this low power, there was minimal fission gas release. The burn-up achieved at the end of this irradiation was 26-29 MWd/kgUO2. The rods were reinstrumented with bellows type pressure transducers so that fission gas release could be monitored during irradiation from measurements of the rod internal pressure. The rods were loaded into IFA-519.9, and irradiated at a higher power level,≅ 40 kW/m. Irradiation at high power continued to ≅ 90 MWd/kgUO2. In-pile pressure data obtained from two rods confirmed a substantial fission gas release in both rods. The data have been analyzed using a simple diffusion and re-solution based release model incorporated into the FUEL TEMP-2 code. The predictions are in excellent agreement with the in-pile data and suffice to separate the individual effects of the two parameters on the fission gas release characteristics. It is concluded that in the present experiment, the effect of different gap sizes dominates that due to differences in UO2 grain size. (author)

  1. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is expected that nuclear power generation will reach 49 million kW in 1985 and 129 million kW in 1995, and the nuclear fuel having to be supplied and processed will increase in proportion to these values. The technical problems concerning nuclear fuel are presented on the basis of the balance between the benefit for human beings and the burden on the human beings. Recently, especially the downstream of nuclear fuel attracts public attention. Enriched uranium as the raw material for light water reactor fuel is almost monopolized by the U.S., and the technical information has not been published for fear of the diversion to nuclear weapons. In this paper, the present situations of uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, transportation, reprocessing and waste disposal and the future problems are described according to the path of nuclear fuel cycle. The demand and supply of enriched uranium in Japan will be balanced up to about 1988, but afterwards, the supply must rely upon the early establishment of the domestic technology by centrifugal separation method. No problem remains in the fabrication of light water reactor fuel, but for the fabrication of mixed oxide fuel, the mechanization of the production facility and labor saving are necessary. The solution of the capital risk for the construction of the second reprocessing plant is the main problem. Japan must develop waste disposal techniques with all-out efforts. (Kako, I.)

  2. Nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All stages of nuclear fuel cycle are analysed with respect to the present situation and future perspectives of supply and demand of services; the prices and the unitary cost estimation of these stages for the international fuel market are also mentioned. From the world resources and projections of uranium consumption, medium-and long term analyses are made of fuel availability for several strategies of use of different reactor types. Finally, the cost of nuclear fuel in the generation of electric energy is calculated to be used in the energetic planning of the electric sector. (M.A.)

  3. Nuclear fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Guerin, Y.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, Ch.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Sollogoub, P.; Vernaz, E.; Guillet, J.L.; Ballagny, A.; Bechade, J.L.; Bonin, B.; Brachet, J.Ch.; Delpech, M.; Dubois, S.; Ferry, C.; Freyss, M.; Gilbon, D.; Grouiller, J.P.; Iracane, D.; Lansiart, S.; Lemoine, P.; Lenain, R.; Marsault, Ph.; Michel, B.; Noirot, J.; Parrat, D.; Pelletier, M.; Perrais, Ch.; Phelip, M.; Pillon, S.; Poinssot, Ch.; Vallory, J.; Valot, C.; Pradel, Ph.; Bonin, B.; Bouquin, B.; Dozol, M.; Lecomte, M.; Vallee, A.; Bazile, F.; Parisot, J.F.; Finot, P.; Roberts, J.F

    2009-07-01

    Fuel is one of the essential components in a reactor. It is within that fuel that nuclear reactions take place, i.e. fission of heavy atoms, uranium and plutonium. Fuel is at the core of the reactor, but equally at the core of the nuclear system as a whole. Fuel design and properties influence reactor behavior, performance, and safety. Even though it only accounts for a small part of the cost per kilowatt-hour of power provided by current nuclear power plants, good utilization of fuel is a major economic issue. Major advances have yet to be achieved, to ensure longer in-reactor dwell-time, thus enabling fuel to yield more energy; and improve ruggedness. Aside from economics, and safety, such strategic issues as use of plutonium, conservation of resources, and nuclear waste management have to be addressed, and true technological challenges arise. This Monograph surveys current knowledge regarding in-reactor behavior, operating limits, and avenues for R and D. It also provides illustrations of ongoing research work, setting out a few noteworthy results recently achieved. Content: 1 - Introduction; 2 - Water reactor fuel: What are the features of water reactor fuel? 9 (What is the purpose of a nuclear fuel?, Ceramic fuel, Fuel rods, PWR fuel assemblies, BWR fuel assemblies); Fabrication of water reactor fuels (Fabrication of UO{sub 2} pellets, Fabrication of MOX (mixed uranium-plutonium oxide) pellets, Fabrication of claddings); In-reactor behavior of UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels (Irradiation conditions during nominal operation, Heat generation, and removal, The processes involved at the start of irradiation, Fission gas behavior, Microstructural changes); Water reactor fuel behavior in loss of tightness conditions (Cladding, the first containment barrier, Causes of failure, Consequences of a failure); Microscopic morphology of fuel ceramic and its evolution under irradiation; Migration and localization of fission products in UOX and MOX matrices (The ceramic under

  4. A study, using noise analysis, of fuel thermo-mechanical behaviour in the high burn-up MOX experiment IFA 648.1 and the PWR/WWER comparison experiment IFA 503.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reactor start-up in March 1999 offered an opportunity to extend the range of fuel types and conditions for which noise data were available by making measurements on several rods with different fuel types and instrumentation, and repeating the measurements at different power levels as the start-up progressed. Measurements were made on the high burn-up (50 MWd/kg) MOX experiment IFA 648.1 (instrumented with fuel centre thermocouples and a cladding extensometer), and the PWR/WWER comparison experiment IFA 503.2 (fresh fuel instrumented with expansion thermometers and fuel extensometers). The various time constants obtained from analysis of the resulting noise data show themselves to be a useful way of studying fuel performance. Different sensor types have different impulse responses and yield complementary information; fuel thermocouples and expansion thermometers provide data on fuel thermal behaviour and gap closure, clad extensometers yield information on the extent of PCMI, and fuel extensometers are sensitive to pellet relocation effects (author) (ml)

  5. Extension of the TRANSURANUS burn-up model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The validation range of the model in the TRANSURANUS fuel performance code for calculating the radial power density and burn-up in UO2 fuel has been extended from 64 MWd/kgHM up to 102 MWd/kgHM, thereby improving also its precision. In addition, the first verification of calculations with post-irradiation examination data is reported for LWR-MOX fuel with a rod average burn-up up to 45 MWd/kgHM. The extension covers the inclusion of new isotopes in order to account for the production of 238Pu. The corresponding one-group cross-sections used in the equations rely on results obtained with ALEPH, a new Monte Carlo burn-up code. The experimental verification is based on electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and on secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) as well as radiochemical data of fuel irradiated in commercial power plants. The deviations are quantified in terms of frequency distributions of the relative errors. The relative errors on the burn-up distributions in both fuel types remain below 12%, corresponding to the experimental scatter

  6. The analysis of behaviour of pin claddings made of 16Cr15Ni3MoNbB steel at high fuel burn-ups in BN-600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Postreactor investigations into BN-600 fuel cans made of the 0Cr16Ni15Mo3NbB steel after irradiation to maximum burnup 10% heav. at. and higher have been conducted. It is demonstrated that the most degradation of performance attributes takes place in the zone of maximum increasing diameter of fuel cans. Processes leading to the degradation of fuel cans (embrittlement, corrosion resistance lowering) are connected either with swelling or radiation-induced segregation being in the same temperature range and under the same motive force that swelling is

  7. Experimental techniques and results related to high burn-up investigations at the OECD Halden Reactor Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Investigations of phenomena associated with extended or high burn-up comprise a considerable part of the fuel and materials research programme carried out at the OECD Halden Reactor Project, reflecting the interests and priorities of the nuclear industry in this area. For this purpose, sensors, re-instrumentation techniques, irradiation rigs and data evaluation methods have been developed and successfully applied which allow tests to be conducted at extended burn-up with high data quality. Re-instrumentation of base-irradiated fuel rods (50 MWd/kgU) with pressure transducers has been carried out with several rods, which were then subjected to high power, to study fission gas release. The results as well as those from another high burn-up test confirm the empirical fission gas release threshold developed at Halden, which predicts the onset of FGR to be about 1100 deg. C at this burn-up. The related interlinkage-resintering effects can be studied in special assemblies allowing sweep-out and analysis of fission products. Comprehensive investigations of fuel temperature data suggest a gradual degradation of UO2 thermal conductivity with burn-up. A special experiment is presently being irradiated to burn-up beyond 60 MWd/kgU, where the accuracy of temperature measurements is maintained by utilising expansion thermometers, insensitive to irradiation induced decalibration. A preliminary evaluation of the temperature increase points to a UO2 conductivity degradation of 35% at 50 MWd/kgUO2 and 600 deg. C. (author). 5 refs, 5 figs

  8. Improvement of computer programs 'BAMBOO' and 'ASFRE-IV' for coupling analysis of deformation and thermal-hydraulics in a high burn-up fuel subassembly of fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simulation system of a deformed fuel subassembly is being developed for the structure integrity of high burn-up wire-spacer-type fuel subassemblies of sodium-cooled fast breeder reactors. This report describes a computer program improvement work for coupling analyses of deformation and thermal-hydraulics in a fuel subassembly as part of the simulation system development. In this work, a function of data conversion as an interface between a bundle deformation analysis program BAMBOO and a thermal hydraulic analysis program ASFRE-IV was incorporated to each program. BAMBOO was improved to accept the coolant temperature data from ASFRE-IV and to offer bundle deformation data to ASFRE-IV. ASFRE-IV was also improved to offer the coolant temperature data to BAMBOO and to obtain the bundle deformation data from BAMBOO. Improved BAMBOO and ASFRE-IV were applied to an analysis of 169-pin bundle for the program verification. It was confirmed that the coupling analysis gave the physically reasonable results on both deformation and thermal hydraulic behaviors in the fuel subassembly. (author)

  9. A preliminary neutronic evaluation of the high temperature nuclear reactor (HTTR) using reprocessed fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The HTTR was simulated using reprocessed fuels spiked with thorium and depleted uranium. • The effective neutron multiplication factor and the nuclear fuel evolution during the burn-up were analyzed. • The results indicated that reprocessed fuels can be used in the HTTR. - Abstract: The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor constructed by the Japanese government was simulated using reprocessed fuel obtained by UREX+ and spiked with thorium-232 and with depleted uranium. The effective neutron multiplication factor and the nuclear fuel evolution during the burn-up were analyzed. This study was performed using the ORNL SCALE 6.0 code, with CSAS6 and TRITON6 control modules. The results show in a preliminary way that the burn-up of reprocessed fuels in the HTTR core is possible, although the fissile material quantities should be increased while compared with the enrichments of the standard fuel

  10. Surrogate Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements under normal and accident conditions as specified by federal regulations. During transportation, SNF experiences unique conditions and challenges to cladding integrity due to the vibrational and impact loading encountered during road or rail shipment. ORNL has been developing testing capabilities that can be used to improve our understanding of the impacts of vibration loading on SNF integrity, especially for high burn-up SNF in normal transportation operation conditions. This information can be used to meet nuclear industry and U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission needs in the area of safety of SNF storage and transportation operations.

  11. The measurement of burn-up level in HTR-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Without shutting down the HTR-10, each fuel ball unloaded from the core must be measured. Judgment is made whether the desired burn-up level is reached. A fuel ball should be reloaded into the core when its burn-up level is less than 72,000 Mwd/tu. Since the measurement of burn-up level for a ball containing 0.9g 235U at most must be nondestructive, a γ spectroscopy method with high-resolution for the fission product 137Cs is typically chosen. However, because the HTR-10 is not provided with any kind of external calibrating source, it is impossible to achieve the goal that the accuracy of measurement is up to 2% by the above method. The method measuring burn-up levels without external source uses the ratio of 134Cs to 137Cs and gets bogged down in something unusual that both successful and failed examples have alternated in publications. The inner calibrating method is proposed in the paper. It is necessary to solve the following problems: a) The simple relationship between 134Cs/137Cs and burn-up level is held only in a specified range, but not for a spent ball. b) The migration must be ignored. c) How to deal with the neutron spectrum within HTR-10? The paper also introduces such useful method as neutron spectrum correction, picking out the graphite balls and extraction of 137Cs from γ spectra of reactor. The appropriate instrumentation that discriminates out the spent fuel balls and picks out the graphite balls is described. (author)

  12. Considerations on burn-up dependent RIA and LOCA criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For RIA transients, a fuel failure threshold has been derived and compared with recent experimental data relevant for BWR and PWR fuel. The threshold can be applied to HZP and CZP transients, account taken for the different initial enthalpy and for the lower ductility at cold conditions. It can also be used for non-zero power transients, provided that a term accounting for the initial power is incorporated. The proposed threshold predicts reasonably well the results obtained in the CABRI and NSRR tests when the different state of the cladding, i.e. ductile or brittle, is taken into account. Apart from some exceptions discussed in the paper, such as the effect of oxide spalling, one should consider ductile state for HZP conditions and brittle state for CZP conditions. The threshold applies equally well to UO2 and MOX fuel, but the database on MOX is limited. For LOCA transients, the cladding limit may decrease with burn-up due to cladding corrosion and hydrogen pick-up. A provisional criterion shows that the predicted burn-up effect is moderate or negligible if one uses the results obtained with actual high burn-up cladding. On the other hand, a large effect is predicted based on the results obtained with non-irradiated, pre-hydrided cladding specimens. There is a question however on as to whether these specimens can be representative for high burn-up material. The experimental evidence is still scarce and more data on high burn-up cladding is needed in order to arrive to firm conclusions. Most of the data currently available relates to Zr-4 cladding. The experiments made on ZIRLO and M5 cladding show that these alloys have a RIA and LOCA behaviour similar to or better than Zr-4. However, the data is limited, especially for LOCA conditions, where only un-irradiated specimens have been tested so far. (author)

  13. Determination of plutonium’s isotopic composition in PWR spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article the isotopic composition of the plutonium contained in spent nuclear fuel at discharge is analysed. The composition is analysed as a function of burn-up of a light water reactor using once-through cycle. The results are obtained using two different software products. Key words: pressurized water reactors, plutonium, spent nuclear fuel

  14. Effect of Core Configurations on Burn-Up Calculations For MTR Type Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional burn-up calculations of MTR-type research reactor were performed using different patterns of control rods , to examine their effect on power density and neutron flux distributions throughout the entire core and on the local burn-up distribution. Calculations were performed using the computer codes' package MTRPC system, using the cell calculation transport code WIMS-D4 and the core calculation diffusion code CITVAP. A depletion study was done and the effects on the reactor fuel were studied, then an empirical formula was generated for every fuel element type, to correlate irradiation to burn-up percentage. Keywords: Neutronic Calculations, Burn-Up, MTR-Type Research Reactors, MTRPC Package, Empirical Formula For Fuel Burn-Up.

  15. Effects of burn-up, recovery efficiency and waste form on the environmental impact of fusion-fission transmutation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of fuel cycle parameters on nuclear waste environmental impact are analyzed for an advanced system that includes a Fusion-Fission Hybrid reactor. The system aims at reduction of the long-term radiotoxicity of waste by transmuting highly radiotoxic transuranics. However, the radiological risk of the system is measured by annual doses to the public, which are controlled by reactor operations, fuel cycle processes, waste treatment processes, and design of geological repositories. In this study, the waste environmental impact for a fuel cycle with a Fusion-Fission transmutation is analyzed as a function of three different parameters: burn-up, recovery efficiency and waste form durability for two different geological repositories, one with low actinide solubility and the other with high solubility. It is found that burn-up and recovery efficiency effects on environmental impact strongly depend on repository conditions, while the most influential parameter is found to be the durability of the waste form. (author)

  16. A Study On The Initial Characteristics Of Domestic Spent Nuclear Fuels For Long Term DRY Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last three decades, South Korean nuclear power plants have discharged about 5,950 tons of spent fuel and the maximum burn-up reached 55 GWd/MTU in 2002. This study was performed to support the development of Korean dry spent fuel storage alternatives. First, we chose V5H-17 Χ 17 and KSFA-16 Χ 16 as representative domestic spent fuels, considering current accumulation and the future generation of the spent fuels. Examination reveals that their average burn-ups have already increased from 33 to 51 GWd/MTU and from 34.8 to 48.5 GWd/MTU, respectively. Evaluation of the fuel characteristics shows that at the average burn-up of 42 GWd/MTU, the oxide thickness, hydrogen content, and hoop stress ranged from 30 ∼ 60 μm, 250 ∼ 500 ppm, and 50 ∼ 75 MPa, respectively. But when burn-up exceeds 55 GWd/MTU, those characteristics can increase up to 100 μm, 800 ppm, and 120 MPa, respectively, depending on the power history. These results demonstrate that most Korean spent nuclear fuels are expected to remain within safe bounds during long-term dry storage, however, the excessive hoop stress and hydrogen concentration may trigger the degradation of the spent fuel integrity early during the long-term dry storage in the case of high burn-up spent fuels exceeding 45 GWd/MTU

  17. PWR Fuel licensing in France - from design to reprocessing: licensing of nuclear PWR fuel rod design to satisfy with criteria for normal and abnormal fuel operation in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this lecture are presented: French regulatory context; Current fuel management methods; Request from the french operator EdF; Most recent actions of the french Nuclear safety authority; Fuel assemblies deformations (impact of high burn-up; investigations during reactor's exploitation; control rods drop off times)

  18. Time-dependent radiation release characteristics of irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies in Korean nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-dependent radiation release characteristics of nuclear fuel assemblies need to be understood to manage operation safely and protect workers from the radiation released over the operation period of a nuclear reactor, including its overhaul period. This study examines the time-dependent radiation release characteristics of 2 types of PWR nuclear fuel assemblies in Korea according to their burn-up. Two types of nuclear fuel assemblies considered were: a 16 x 16 fuel assembly of Ulchin units 5 and 6 (KSNP type) and a 17 x 17 fuel assembly of Kori units 3 and 4 (Westinghouse type). The 5 different burn-ups (MWD/MTU) were considered: 100, 10,000, 20,000, 30,000, and 40,000. The calculations showed that the increase rate of neutron dose distribution was relatively higher than that of the gamma dose distribution according to burn-up, while the gamma dose distributions were much higher than the neutron dose distributions. (orig.)

  19. Review of high burn-up RIA and LOCA database and criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is intended to provide regulators, their technical support organizations and industry with a concise review of existing fuel experimental data at RIA and LOCA conditions and considerations on how these data affect fuel safety criteria at increasing burn-up. It mostly addresses experimental results relevant to BWR and PWR fuel and it encompasses several contributions from the various experts that participated in the CSNI SEGFSM activities. It also covers the information presented at the joint CSNI/CNRA Topical Discussion on high burn-up fuel issues that took place on this subject in December 2004. The report is organized in the following way: the CABRI RIA database (14 tests), the NSRR database (26 tests) and other databases, RIA failure thresholds, comparison of failure thresholds for the HZP case, LOCA database ductility tests and quench tests, LOCA safety limit, provisional burn-up dependent criterion for Zr-4. The conclusions are as follows. On RIA, there is a well-established testing method and a significant and relatively consistent database from NSRR and Cabri tests, especially on high burn-up Zr-2 and Zr-4 cladding. It is encouraging that several correlations have been proposed for the RIA fuel failure threshold. Their predictions are compared and discussed in this paper for a representative PWR case. On LOCA, there are two different test methods, one based on ductility determinations and the other based on 'integral' quench tests. The LOCA database at high burn-up is limited to both testing methods. Ductility tests carried out with pre-hydrided non-irradiated cladding show a pronounced hydrogen effect. Data for actual high burn-up specimens are being gathered in various laboratories and will form the basis for a burn-up dependent LOCA limit. A provisional burn-up dependent criterion is discussed in the paper

  20. MODRIB - a zero dimensional code for criticality and burn-up of LWR's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer program MODRIB is a zero-dimensional code for calculating criticality and burn-up of light water reactors (LWR's). It is a version of an Italian code RIBOT-2 with an updated cross-section data library. The nuclear constants of MODRIB-code are calculated with a two group scheme (fast and thermal), where the fast group is an average of three fast groups. The code requires as input data essential extensive reactor parameters such as fuel rod radius, clad thickness, fuel enrichment, lattice pitch, water density and temperature etc. A summary of the physical model description and the input-output procedures are given in this report. Selected results of two sample problems are also given for the purpose of checking the validity and reliability of the code. The first is BWR and the second is PWR. The calculation time for a criticality problem with burn-up is about 8 seconds for the first time step and about 3 seconds for each subsequent time step on the ICL-1906 computer facility. The requirements on the memory size is less than 32 K-word. (author)

  1. Fission-product burn-up in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In fast reactors where breeding is emphasized the burn-up of fission products can be of considerable importance. Statistical estimates of fission-product cross-sections are combined with recent yield data for the various fissionable species to estimate the gross fission-product cross-section as a function of irradiation time in a number of fast reactor spectra with various fuels. Because of gaps in yield data for some of the fuel species, it is necessary to interpolate on the yield curves in some cases. The chain yield for a given mass is then apportioned among the chain members through use of the equal charge displacement recipe. The cross-sections estimated for U235 fission products by previous authors are supplemented by estimates for fission products important for other fuels. A range of such spectra is considered. These spectra are characterized by the index (average (Ε-1/2)) in the spectra. The sensitivity of the gross poisoning and its burn-up with respect to spectrum variations are considered. The results are also expressed in terms of a few pseudo-fission products, so that changes in effective cross-section of fission products with irradiation can be taken into account in a simple computational fashion. (author)

  2. TEM Characterization of High Burn-up Microstructure of U-7Mo Alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian Gan; Brandon Miller; Dennis Keiser; Adam Robinson; James Madden; Pavel Medvedev; Daniel Wachs

    2014-04-01

    As an essential part of global nuclear non-proliferation effort, the RERTR program is developing low enriched U-Mo fuels (< 20% U-235) for use in research and test reactors that currently employ highly enriched uranium fuels. One type of fuel being developed is a dispersion fuel plate comprised of U-7Mo particles dispersed in Al alloy matrix. Recent TEM characterizations of the ATR irradiated U-7Mo dispersion fuel plates include the samples with a local fission densities of 4.5, 5.2, 5.6 and 6.3 E+21 fissions/cm3 and irradiation temperatures of 101-136?C. The development of the irradiated microstructure of the U-7Mo fuel particles consists of fission gas bubble superlattice, large gas bubbles, solid fission product precipitates and their association to the large gas bubbles, grain subdivision to tens or hundreds of nanometer size, collapse of bubble superlattice, and amorphisation. This presentation will describe the observed microstructures specifically focusing on the U-7Mo fuel particles. The impact of the observed microstructure on the fuel performance and the comparison of the relevant features with that of the high burn-up UO2 fuels will be discussed.

  3. Recycling in the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel cycle comprises the total scope from uranium mining to reprocessing and/or (direct) final disposal. In all stages there are waste arisings. Depending on the concentration of the activity, various degrees of shieldings are necessary. For many process wastes transport/storage casks are needed and repackaging for final disposal gives an unnecessary dose-rate. Thus it was almost natural to stretch the function of the packages also to final disposal. And since 1983 in Germany, most of the heavy casks are made from recycled scrap metal. For the spent fuel reprocessing gives a high percentage of recycling of energy-containing 'wastes'. However, this is combined with a complicated chemical process and the continuing trend towards higher burn-up is 'replacing' reprocessing and favouring final disposal. This is due to the deteriorating isotopic composition of uranium and plutonium in the spent fuel. (author) 2 figs., 5 refs

  4. Nuclear fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To reduce the probability of stress corrosion cracks in a zirconium alloy fuel can even when tensile stresses are resulted to the fuel can. Constitution: Sintered nuclear fuel pellets composed of uranium dioxide or a solid solution of gadolinium as a burnable poison in uranium dioxide are charged in a tightly sealed zirconium alloy fuel can. The nuclear fuel pellets for the nuclear fuel element are heat-treated in a gas mixture of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide. Further, a charging gas containing a mixture of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide is charged within a zirconium alloy fuel can packed with the nuclear fuel pellets and tightly sealed. (Aizawa, K.)

  5. Manufacture of nuclear fuel elements for commercial PWR in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yibin Nuclear Fuel Element Plant (YFP) under the leadership of China National Nuclear Corporation is sole manufacturer in China to specialize in the production of fuel assemblies and associated core components for commercial PWR nuclear power plant. At the early of 1980's, it began to manufacture fuel assemblies and associated core components for the first core of QINSHAN 300 MW nuclear power plant designed and built by China itself. With the development of nuclear power industry in China and the demand for localization of nuclear fuel elements in the early 1990's, YFP cooperated with FRAMATOME France in technology transfer for design and manufacturing of AFA 2G fuel assembly and successfully supplied the qualified fuel assemblies for the reloads of two units of GUANGDONG Da Ya Bay 900 MW nuclear power plant (Da Ya Bay NPP), and has achieved the localization of fuel assemblies and nuclear power plants. Meanwhile, it supplied fuel assemblies and associated core components for the first core and further reloads of Pakistan CHASHMA 300 MW nuclear power plant which was designed and built by China, and now it is manufacturing AFA 2G fuel assemblies and associated core components for the first core of two units of NPQJVC 600 MW nuclear power plant. From 2001 on, YFP will be able to supply Da Ya Bay NPP with the third generation of fuel assembly-AFA 3G which is to realize a strategy to develop the fuel assembly being of long cycle reload and high burn-up

  6. Handbook on process and chemistry on nuclear fuel reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Wet-type' nuclear fuel reprocessing technology, based on PUREX technology, has wide applicability as the principal reprocessing technology of the first generation, and relating technologies, waste management for example, are highly developed, too. It is quite important to establish a database summarizing fundamental information about the process and the chemistry of 'wet-type' reprocessing, because it contributes to establish and develop fuel reprocessing process and nuclear fuel cycle treating high burn-up UO2 fuel and spent MOX fuel, and to utilize 'wet-type' reprocessing technology much widely. This handbook summarizes the fundamental data on process and chemistry, which was collected and examined by 'Editing Committee of Handbook on Process and Chemistry of Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing', from FY 1993 until FY 2000. (author)

  7. Handbook on process and chemistry on nuclear fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Atsuyuki (ed.) [Tokyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan); Asakura, Toshihide; Adachi, Takeo (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-12-01

    'Wet-type' nuclear fuel reprocessing technology, based on PUREX technology, has wide applicability as the principal reprocessing technology of the first generation, and relating technologies, waste management for example, are highly developed, too. It is quite important to establish a database summarizing fundamental information about the process and the chemistry of 'wet-type' reprocessing, because it contributes to establish and develop fuel reprocessing process and nuclear fuel cycle treating high burn-up UO{sub 2} fuel and spent MOX fuel, and to utilize 'wet-type' reprocessing technology much widely. This handbook summarizes the fundamental data on process and chemistry, which was collected and examined by 'Editing Committee of Handbook on Process and Chemistry of Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing', from FY 1993 until FY 2000. (author)

  8. Development of Coolant Flow Simulation System for Nuclear Fuel Test Rigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jintae; Joung, Chang-Young; Heo, Sung-Ho; Kim, Ka-Hye [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    To remove heat generated during a burn-up test of nuclear fuels, the heat generation rate of nuclear fuels should be calculated accurately, and a coolant should be circulated in the test loop at an adequate flow rate. HANARO is an open pool-type reactor with an independent test loop for the burn-up test of nuclear fuels. A test rig is installed in the test loop, and a coolant is circulated through the test loop to maintain the temperature of the nuclear fuel rods within a desired temperature during an irradiation test. The components and sensors in the test rig can be broken or malfunction owing to the flow-induced vibration. In this study, a coolant flow simulation system was developed to verify and confirm the soundness of components and sensors assembled in the test rig with a high flow rate of the coolant.

  9. Comparison of MCB and FISPACT burn-up performances using the HELIOS experiment technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The burn-up analysis of HELIOS using MCB and FISPACT. ► New method of branching ratio estimation. ► Usage of JEF2.2 and JEFF3.1 cross-section libraries. ► Power calculations using Qfiss and KERMA factors. ► Highest differences for Am242m. - Abstract: The objective of the HELIOS experiment was to test innovative, uranium-free nuclear fuel containing americium and to study helium release and fuel swelling behaviour during irradiation. The experiment consisted of irradiation of five fuel samples, each containing various initial concentrations of Pu and Am in different inert matrices. The irradiation was performed in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) at Petten during nine cycles (i.e. about nine months) for a total duration of 240 equivalent full-power days. The neutronic calculations play an important role in preparation and analysis of the irradiation experiments. Therefore, this paper presents an explicit burn-up analysis of the HELIOS samples using two numerical tools, the MCB and FISPACT codes. The focus of this calculation is on the concentrations of Pu, minor actinides (MAs) and He during irradiation time and on total sample power due to nuclear reactions and decay. Particular attention was paid to Am242m, the fission cross-section of which is significant in the thermal neutron spectrum. The MCB code incorporates an improved method of producing this, which was subsequently tested and qualified. The sensitivity of the nuclide evolution to the choice of JEF2.2 and JEFF3.1 transport cross-section libraries was also investigated.

  10. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved nuclear power reactor fuel element is described which consists of fuel rods, rod guide tubes and an end plate. The system allows direct access to an end of each fuel rod for inspection purposes. (U.K.)

  11. Nuclear fuel transporting container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent the failure of nuclear fuel rods constituting a nuclear fuel assembly contained to the inside of a container upon fire accidents or the likes. Constitution: The nuclear fuel transportation container comprises a tightly sealed inner vessel made of steels for containing a nuclear fuel assembly consisting of bundled nuclear fuel rods, a heat shielding material surrounding the inner vessel, shock absorber and an outer vessel. A relief safety valve is disposed to the inner vessel that actuates at a specific pressure higher than the normal inner pressure for the nuclear fuel rods of the fuel assembly and lower than the allowable inner pressure of the inner vessel. The inside of the inner vessel is pressurized by way of the safety valve such that the normal inner pressure in the inner vessel is substantially equal to the normal inner pressure for the nuclear fuel rods. (Aizawa, K.)

  12. Fission product partitioning in aerosol release from simulated spent nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Di Lemma, F.G.; Colle, J.Y.; Rasmussen, G.; Konings, R J M

    2014-01-01

    Aerosols created by the vaporization of simulated spent nuclear fuel (simfuel) were produced by laser heating techniques and characterised by a wide range of post-analyses. In particular attention has been focused on determining the fission product behaviour in the aerosols, in order to improve the evaluation of the source term and consequently the risk associated with release from spent fuel sabotage or accidents. Different simulated spent fuels were tested with burn-up up to 8 at. %. The re...

  13. Large grain size UO2 sintered pellets obtaining used for burn up extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actual tendency all over the world is to manufacture fuel bundles capable to resist high burn-up. The main factors affecting the burn-up increase are: the pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI), the oxidation and hydriding of the Zircaloy-4 sheath, the increase of internal pressure, stress corrosion cracking, Zircaloy-4 irradiation growth, fuel swelling. A way to increase fuel burn-up is to diminish the elements internal pressure by an adequate large grain UO2 fuel pellet structure. In the large grain size UO2 pellets, fission gas release rate decreases and the elements internal pressure increase slowly. One of the ways to increase pellets grain size without increasing sintering temperature and time is the addition of small quantities (2 powder (TiO2, Nb2O5, Cr2O3, CaO, V2O5), the grain size, the porosity and the mean free diffusion path are increased, whereas the grain boundary area is reduced. At the Institute for Nuclear Research (ICN) at Pitesti a project for obtaining large grains size UO2 pellets using dopants was developed. Two UO2 non-free flowing powders, manufactured by ADU and IDR routes, were mixed with dopants (TiO2, Nb2O5, Cr2O3), content of metals being 0.05-1 % wt M/U. The green pellets obtained by pressing UO2 powders were directly sintered (4 hours at 1700 degC) in a sintering furnace. The physical, mechanical and microstructural properties of UO2 sintered pellets with large grain size are studied, as compared to the undoped ones. The diagrams presented the dependency of the main sintered pellet characteristics (pore radius distribution, pores volume, density, grains size) as function of the dopant nature and concentration, UO2 sinterable powder nature and sintering temperature. Other sintered pellets characteristics (electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, high temperature molar heat capacity and thermomechanical properties) are important to study. The beneficial effects resulted from theoretical and practical projects are

  14. Dynamic leaching studies of 48 MWd/kgU UO2 commercial spent nuclear fuel under oxic conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano Purroy, D.; Casas Pons, Ignasi; Gonzalez Robles, E.; Glatz, Jean Paul; Wegen, D.H.; Clarens Blanco, Frederic; Giménez Izquierdo, Francisco Javier; Pablo Ribas, Joan de; Martínez Esparza, A.

    2013-01-01

    The leaching of a high-burn-up spent nuclear fuel (48 MWd/KgU) has been studied in a carbonate-containing solution and under oxic conditions using a Continuously Stirred Tank Flow-Through Reactor (CSTR). Two samples of the fuel, one prepared from the centre of the pellet (labelled CORE) and another one from the fuel pellet periphery, enriched with the so-called High Burn-Up Structure (HBS, labelled OUT) have been used. For uranium and actinides, the results showed that U, Np, Am and Cm ga...

  15. Observations on the CANDLE burn-up in various geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have looked at all geometrical conditions under which an auto catalytically propagating burnup wave (CANDLE burn-up) is possible. Thereby, the Sine Gordon equation finds a new place in the burn-up theory of nuclear fission reactors. For a practical reactor design the axially burning 'spaghetti' reactor and the azimuthally burning 'pancake' reactor, respectively, seem to be the most promising geometries for a practical reactor design. Radial and spherical burn-waves in cylindrical and spherical geometry, respectively, are principally impossible. Also, the possible applicability of such fission burn-waves on the OKLO-phenomenon and the GEOREACTOR in the center of Earth, postulated by Herndon, is discussed. A fast CANDLE-reactor can work with only depleted uranium. Therefore, uranium mining and uranium-enrichment are not necessary anymore. Furthermore, it is also possible to dispense with reprocessing because the uranium utilization factor is as high as about 40%. Thus, this completely new reactor type can open a new era of reactor technology

  16. Calculation of the linear heat generation rates which violate the thermomechanical limit of plastic deformation of the fuel cladding in function of the burn up of a BWR fuel rod type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The linear heat generation rates (LHGR) for a BWR type generic fuel rod, as function of the burnup that violate the thermomechanical limit of circumferential plastic deformation of the can (canning) in nominal operation in stationary state of the fuel rod are calculated. The evaluation of the LHGR in function of the burnt of the fuel, is carried out under the condition that the deformation values of the circumferential plastic deformation of the can exceeds in 0.1 the thermomechanical value operation limit of 1%. The results of the calculations are compared with the generation rates of linear operation heat in function of the burnt for this fuel rod type. The calculations are carried out with the FEMAXI-V and RODBURN codes. The results show that for exhibitions or burnt between 0 and 16,000 M Wd/tU a minimum margin of 160.8 W/cm exists among LHGR (439.6 W/cm) operation peak for the given fuel and maximum LHGR of the fuel (calculated) to reach 1.1% of circumferential plastic deformation of the can, for the peak factor of power of 1.40. For burnt of 20,000 MWd/tU and 60,000 MWd/tU exist a margin of 150.3 and 298.6 W/cm, respectively. (Author)

  17. Nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The source of energy in the nuclear reactors in fission if a heavy nuclei by absorbing a neutron and giving fission products, few neutrons and gamma radiation. The Nuclear Fuel Cycle may be broadly defined as the set of process and operations needed to manufacture nuclear fuels, to irradiate them in nuclear reactors and to treat and store them, temporarily or permanently, after irradiation. Several nuclear fuel cycles may be considered, depending on the type of reactor and the type of fuel used and whether or not the irradiated fuel will be reprocessed. The nuclear fuel cycle starts with uranium exploration and ends with final disposal of the material used and generated during the cycle. For practical reasons the process has been further subdivided into the front-end and the back-end. The front-end of the cycle occurs before irradiation and the back-end begins with the discharge of spent fuel from the reactor

  18. Study on the Standard Establishment for the Integrity Assessment of Nuclear Fuel Cladding Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel cladding material plays important role as a primary structure under the high temperature, high pressure and neutron environment of nuclear power plant. According to this environment, cladding material can be experienced several type aging phenomena including the neutron irradiation embrittlement. On the other hand, although the early nuclear power plant was designed to fitting into the 40MWd/KgU burn-up, the currently power plant intends to go to the high burn-up range. In this case, the safety criteria which was established at low burn-up needs to conform the applicability at the high burn-up. In this study, the safety criteria of fuel cladding material was reviewed to assess the cladding material integrity, and the material characteristics of cladding were reviewed. The current LOCA criterial was also reviewed, and the basic study for re-establishment of LOCA criteria was performed. The time concept safety criteria was also discussed to prevent the breakaway oxidation. Through the this study, safety issues will be produced and be helpful for integrity insurance of nuclear fuel cladding material. This report is the final report

  19. Study on the Standard Establishment for the Integrity Assessment of Nuclear Fuel Cladding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S-S; Kim, S-H; Jung, Y-K; Yang, C-Y; Kim, I-G; Choi, Y-H; Kim, H-J; Kim, M-W; Rho, B-H [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    Fuel cladding material plays important role as a primary structure under the high temperature, high pressure and neutron environment of nuclear power plant. According to this environment, cladding material can be experienced several type aging phenomena including the neutron irradiation embrittlement. On the other hand, although the early nuclear power plant was designed to fitting into the 40MWd/KgU burn-up, the currently power plant intends to go to the high burn-up range. In this case, the safety criteria which was established at low burn-up needs to conform the applicability at the high burn-up. In this study, the safety criteria of fuel cladding material was reviewed to assess the cladding material integrity, and the material characteristics of cladding were reviewed. The current LOCA criterial was also reviewed, and the basic study for re-establishment of LOCA criteria was performed. The time concept safety criteria was also discussed to prevent the breakaway oxidation. Through the this study, safety issues will be produced and be helpful for integrity insurance of nuclear fuel cladding material. This report is the final report.

  20. Study on the standard establishment for the integrity assessment of nuclear fuel cladding Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, S. S.; Kim, S. H.; Jung, Y. K.; Yang, C. Y.; Kim, I. G.; Choi, Y. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, M. W.; Rho, B. H. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-02-15

    Fuel cladding material plays important role as a primary structure under the high temperature, high pressure and neutron environment of nuclear power plant. According to this environment, cladding material can be experienced several type aging phenomena including the neutron irradiation embrittlement. On the other hand, although the early nuclear power plant was designed to fitting into the 40MWd/KgU burn-up, the currently power plant intends to go to the high burn-up range. In this case, the safety criteria which was established at low burn-up needs to conform the applicability at the high burn-up. In this study, the safety criteria of fuel cladding material was reviewed to assess the cladding material integrity, and the material characteristics of cladding were reviewed. The current LOCA criterial was also reviewed, and the basic study for re-establishment of LOCA criteria was performed. The time concept safety criteria was also discussed to prevent the breakaway oxidation. Through the this study, safety issues will be produced and be helpful for integrity insurance of nuclear fuel cladding material. This report is 2nd term report.

  1. Nuclear fuel lease accounting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject of nuclear fuel lease accounting is a controversial one that has received much attention over the years. This has occurred during a period when increasing numbers of utilities, seeking alternatives to traditional financing methods, have turned to leasing their nuclear fuel inventories. The purpose of this paper is to examine the current accounting treatment of nuclear fuel leases as prescribed by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC's) Uniform System of Accounts. Cost accounting for leased nuclear fuel during the fuel cycle is also discussed

  2. Plant Design Nuclear Fuel Element Production Capacity Optimization to Support Nuclear Power Plant in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimization production capacity for designing nuclear fuel element fabrication plant in Indonesia to support the nuclear power plant has been done. From calculation and by assuming that nuclear power plant to be built in Indonesia as much as 12 NPP and having capacity each 1000 MW, the optimum capacity for nuclear fuel element fabrication plant is 710 ton UO2/year. The optimum capacity production selected, has considered some aspects such as fraction batch (cycle, n = 3), length of cycle (18 months), discharge burn-up value (Bd) 35,000 up 50,000 MWD/ton U, enriched uranium to be used in the NPP (3.22 % to 4.51 %), future market development for fuel element, and the trend of capacity production selected by advances country to built nuclear fuel element fabrication plant type of PWR. (author)

  3. Burn-up determination of irradiated thoria samples by isotope dilution-thermal ionisation mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burn-up was determined experimentally using thermal ionization mass spectrometry for two samples from ThO2 bundles irradiated in KAPS-2. This involved quantitative dissolution of the irradiated fuel samples followed by separation and determination of Th, U and a stable fission product burn-up monitor in the dissolved fuel solution. Stable fission product 148Nd was used as a burn-up monitor for determining the number of fissions. Isotope Dilution-Thermal Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (ID-TIMS) using natural U, 229Th and enriched 142Nd as spikes was employed for the determination of U, Th and Nd, respectively. Atom % fission values of 1.25 ± 0.03 were obtained for both the samples. 232U content in 233U determined by alpha spectrometry was about 500 ppm and this was higher by a factor of 5 compared to the theoretically predicted value by ORIGEN-2 code. (author)

  4. Kinetic parameter calculation as function of burn-up of candu reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic parameter calculation as function of burn-up of candu reactor. Kinetic marameter calculation as function of burp-up of CANDU reactor with Canflex fuel type-CANDU has been done. This type of fuel is currently being develop, so kinetic parameter such as effective delay neutron fraction (.......), delay neutron decay constant ( .... ) and prompt neutron generation time ( ...... ) are very important for analysis of reactor operation safety. WIMS-CRNL code was used to generate macroscopic cross section and reaction rate based on transport theory. Fast and thermal neutron velocity and macroscopic cross section fission product of the unit cell were determined by KINETIC Code. The result of calculation showed that the value of effective delay neutron fraction was 7,785616 x 10-3 at the beginning of operation at burn-up of 0 MWD/T and after the reactor operated at burn-up of 7,2231 x 10-3 MWD/T was 4,962766 x 10-3, or reduced by 36%. The value of prompt generation time was 9,982703 x 10-4 s at the beginning of operation at burn-up of 0 MWD/T and 8,965416 x 10-4 s after the reactor operated at burn-up of 7,2231 x 103 MWD/T, or reduced by 10%. The result of calculation showed that the values of effective delay neutron fraction and prompt neutron generation time are still great enough

  5. UK regulatory perspective on the application of burn-up credit to the BNFL thorp head end plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the UK the Health and Safety Executive, which incorporates the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII), is responsible for regulation of safety on nuclear sites. This paper reports progress made in the application and development of a UK regulatory position for assessing licensee's plant safety caes which invoke the use of Burn-up Credit for criticality applications. The NII's principles and strategy for the assessment of this technical area have been developed over a period of time following expressions of interest from UK industry and subsequent involvement in the international collaborations and debate in this area. This experience has now been applied to the first main plant safety case application claiming Burn-up Credit. This case covers the BNFL Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) dissolver at Sellafield, where dissolved gadolinium neutron poison is used as a criticality control. The case argues for a reduction in gadolinium content by taking credit for the burn-up of input fuel. The UK regulatory process, assessment principles and criteria are briefly outlined, showing the regulatory framework used to review the case. These issues include the fundamental requirement in UK Health and Safety law to demonstrate that risks have been reduced to as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP), the impact on safety margins, compliance and operability procedures, and the need for continuing review. Novel features of methodology, using a ''Residual Enrichment'' and ''Domain Boundary'' approach, were considered and accepted. The underlying validation, both of criticality methodology and isotopic determination, was also reviewed. Compliance was seen to rely heavily on local in-situ measurements of spent fuel used to determine ''Residual Enrichment'' and other parameters, requiring review of the development and basis of the correlations used to underpin the measurement process. Overall, it was concluded that the case as presented was adequate. Gadolinium reduction

  6. The nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short introduction about nuclear power in the world, fission physics and the French nuclear power plants, this brochure describes in a digest way the different steps of the nuclear fuel cycle: uranium prospecting, mining activity, processing of uranium ores and production of uranium concentrates (yellow cake), uranium chemistry (conversion of the yellow cake into uranium hexafluoride), fabrication of nuclear fuels, use of fuels, reprocessing of spent fuels (uranium, plutonium and fission products), recycling of energetic materials, and storage of radioactive wastes. (J.S.)

  7. Fission product release in high-burn-up UO2 oxidized to U3O8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of oxidation experiments on high-burn-up UO2 are presented where fission-product vaporisation and release rates have been measured by on-line mass spectrometry as a function of time/temperature during thermal annealing treatments in a Knudsen cell under controlled oxygen atmosphere. Fractional release curves of fission gas and other less volatile fission products in the temperature range 800-2000 K were obtained from BWR fuel samples of 65 G Wd t-1 burn-up and oxidized to U3O8 at low temperature. The diffusion enthalpy of gaseous fission products and helium in different structures of U3O8 was determined

  8. DELIGHT-6: one dimensional lattice burn-up code for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The code, DELIGHT-6, performs multi-group neutron spectrum calculation and provides few-group constans for succeeding core calculations. The main objective of the code is to serve as the lattice burn-up code for the core of a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor. The fuel rods of the reactor contain many coated fuel particles resulting double heterogeneous arrangement. The main calculational schema of DELIGHT-6 code is as follows; (1) Energy range for fast neutrons covers from 10 MeV to 2.38 eV and is divided into 61 fine groups. The thermal neutrons covers the rest of the energy range from 2.38 eV to 0 eV. Thermal spectrum is calculated by P1 or P0 approximation with 50 fine groups. (2) To treat resonance absorption, IR method is employed. (3) Zero and one dimensional models are available for the fuel lattice geometry and used for criticality and burn-up calculations. Collision probability method is adopted for the calculation of one dimensional model. (4) Shielding factor of burnable poison is calculated by collision probability method. (5) Other functions of the code are; 1. Spatial shielding factor calculation of 240Pu, 2. Calculation of neutron streaming effect caused by a gap or a hole in the fuel lattice, 3. Calculation of neutron flux distribution in the fuel lattice by diffusion theory, 4. Calculation of Xe and Sm absorption cross sections with burn-up. (6) Cross section library in both fast and thermal energy range is compiled from ENDF/B-4 except burn-up data of Xm, Sm and pseudo FPs which are supplied by ENDF/B-3. (7) The code provides the macroscopic group constants of fuel lattice with burn-up in CITATION input format. (jin)

  9. Radiological surveillance in the nuclear fuel fabrication in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to present the obtained results related to the application of the radiological safety programme established at the Nuclear Fuel Fabrication Pilot Plant (NFFPF) in Mexico, such as: surveillance methods, radiological protection criteria and regulations, radiation control and records and the application of ALARA recommendation. During the starting period from April 1994 to April 1995, at the NFFPF were made two nuclear fuel bundles a Dummy and other to be burned up in a BWR the mainly process activities are: UO2 powder receiving, powder pressing for the pellets formation, pellets grinding, cleaning and drying, loading into a rod, Quality Control testing, nuclear fuel bundles assembly. The NFFPF is divided into an unsealed source area (pellets manufacturing plant) and into a sealed source area (rods fabrication plant). The control followed have helped to detect failures and to improve the safety programme and operation. (authors). 1 ref., 3 figs

  10. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To obtain a nuclear fuel assembly having a function of eliminating corrosion products exfoliating from the surface of a fuel can, thereby reduce the radioactive crud in primary sodium coolant during operation of a FBR type reactor. Constitution: Nickel plates or grids made of metal plate with a nickel coated on the surface thereof are inserted in the upper blanket of a nuclear fuel element and between nuclear fuel element corresponding to the gas plenum. The nickel becomes helpful at high temperature in adsorbing Mn-54 which accounts for a major portion of the corrosion products. (J.P.N.)

  11. Nuclear fuel assembly spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor a fuel element spacer formed of an array of laterally positioned cojoined tubular ferrules each providing a passage for one of the fuel elements, the elements being laterally supported in the ferrules between slender spring members and laterally oriented rigid stops

  12. Closing nuclear fuel cycle with fast reactors: problems and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The closed nuclear fuel cycle (CNFC) with fast reactors (FR) is the most promising way of nuclear energetics development because it prevents spent nuclear fuel (SNF) accumulation and minimizes radwaste volume due to minor actinides (MA) transmutation. CNFC with FR requires the elaboration of safety, environmentally acceptable and economically effective methods of treatment of SNF with high burn-up and low cooling time. The up-to-date industrially implemented SNF reprocessing technologies based on hydrometallurgical methods are not suitable for the reprocessing of SNF with high burn-up and low cooling time. The alternative dry methods (such as electrorefining in molten salts or fluoride technologies) applicable for such SNF reprocessing have not found implementation at industrial scale. So the cost of SNF reprocessing by means of dry technologies can hardly be estimated. Another problem of dry technologies is the recovery of fissionable materials pure enough for dense fuel fabrication. A combination of technical solutions performed with hydrometallurgical and dry technologies (pyro-technology) is proposed and it appears to be a promising way for the elaboration of economically, ecologically and socially accepted technology of FR SNF management. This paper deals with discussion of main principle of dry and aqueous operations combination that probably would provide safety and economic efficiency of the FR SNF reprocessing. (authors)

  13. The collision of two burn-up soliton waves in an infinite fertile medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting with the basic non-linear partial differential equation for the autocatalytic propagation process of a burn-up wave into fertile material it is shown that the shapes of the neutron fluence and the neutron flux solitons can be identified in a zeroth approximation as a Gudermannian and a reciprocal catenary, respectively, and that this type of wave propagation is 'dissipation-poor'. Furthermore, the collision of two burn-up waves was studied by means of the corresponding two-solition solutions resulting in a good-natured nuclear quenching process which is an important safety point of view when toroidal fast soliton reactor configurations are considered. (orig.)

  14. Characterisation of spent nuclear fuels by an on-line coupled HPLC-ICP-MS system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther-Leopold, I.; Gabler, F.; Wernli, B.; Kopajtic, Z

    2000-07-01

    The determination of burn-up is one of the essential components of post-irradiation examination of nuclear fuel samples. In the framework of the ARIANE programme (Actinides Research in a Nuclear Element), at PSI the analysis of the isotopic vectors of uranium, plutonium, neodymium and some other fission and spallation products was carried out for the first time in the Hot Lab using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), coupled on-line with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The results of these investigations, a comparison with the classical technique for burn-up determination, the advantages and limitations of the new method, the accuracy and precision of these types of analyses, the applicability of the technique to other samples and separation problems, and conclusions for further analyses of nuclear fuel samples, are here presented. (authors)

  15. Characterisation of spent nuclear fuels by an on-line coupled HPLC-ICP-MS system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of burn-up is one of the essential components of post-irradiation examination of nuclear fuel samples. In the framework of the ARIANE programme (Actinides Research in a Nuclear Element), at PSI the analysis of the isotopic vectors of uranium, plutonium, neodymium and some other fission and spallation products was carried out for the first time in the Hot Lab using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), coupled on-line with an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The results of these investigations, a comparison with the classical technique for burn-up determination, the advantages and limitations of the new method, the accuracy and precision of these types of analyses, the applicability of the technique to other samples and separation problems, and conclusions for further analyses of nuclear fuel samples, are here presented. (authors)

  16. Evolution of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel is the primary energy source for sustaining the nuclear fission chain reactions in a reactor. The fuels in the reactor cores are exposed to highly aggressive environment and varieties of advanced fuel materials with improved nuclear properties are continuously being developed to have optimum performance in the existing core conditions. Fabrications of varieties of nuclear fuels used in diverse forms of reactors are mainly based on two naturally occurring nuclear source elements, uranium as fissile 235U and fertile 238U, and thorium as fertile 232Th species. The two metals in the forms of alloys with specific elements, ceramic oxides like MOX and ceramic non-oxide as mixed carbide and nitride with suitable nuclear properties like higher metal density, thermal conductivity, etc. are used as fuels in different reactor designs. In addition, efficiency of various advanced fuels in the forms of dispersion, molten salt and other types are also under investigations. The countries which have large deposits of thorium but limited reserves of uranium, are trying to give special impetus on the development of thorium-based fuels for both thermal and fast reactors in harnessing nuclear energy for peaceful uses of atomic energy. (author)

  17. Nuclear fuel activities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel activities in Canada are considered in the presentation on the following directions: Canadian utility fuel performance; CANDU owner's group fuel programs; AECL advanced fuel program (high burnup fuel behaviour and development); Pu dispositioning (MOX) activities. 1 tab

  18. Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is a submission for the Encyclopedia of Sustainable Technology on the subject of Reprocessing Spent Nuclear Fuel. Nuclear reprocessing is the chemical treatment of spent fuel involving separation of its various constituents. Principally, it is used to recover useful actinides from the spent fuel. Radioactive waste that cannot be re-used is separated into streams for consolidation into waste forms. The first known application of nuclear reprocessing was within the Manhattan Project to recover material for nuclear weapons. Currently, reprocessing has a peaceful application in the nuclear fuel cycle. A variety of chemical methods have been proposed and demonstrated for reprocessing of nuclear fuel. The two most widely investigated and implemented methods are generally referred to as aqueous reprocessing and pyroprocessing. Each of these technologies is described in detail in Section 3 with numerous references to published articles. Reprocessing of nuclear fuel as part of a fuel cycle can be used both to recover fissionable actinides and to stabilize radioactive fission products into durable waste forms. It can also be used as part of a breeder reactor fuel cycle that could result in a 14-fold or higher increase in energy utilization per unit of natural uranium. Reprocessing can also impact the need for geologic repositories for spent fuel. The volume of waste that needs to be sent to such a repository can be reduced by first subjecting the spent fuel to reprocessing. The extent to which volume reduction can occur is currently under study by the United States Department of Energy via research at various national laboratories and universities. Reprocessing can also separate fissile and non-fissile radioactive elements for transmutation.

  19. Spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a country becomes self-sufficient in part of the nuclear cycle, as production of fuel that will be used in nuclear power plants for energy generation, it is necessary to pay attention for the best method of storing the spent fuel. Temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel is a necessary practice and is applied nowadays all over the world, so much in countries that have not been defined their plan for a definitive repository, as well for those that already put in practice such storage form. There are two main aspects that involve the spent fuels: one regarding the spent nuclear fuel storage intended to reprocessing and the other in which the spent fuel will be sent for final deposition when the definitive place is defined, correctly located, appropriately characterized as to several technical aspects, and licentiate. This last aspect can involve decades of studies because of the technical and normative definitions at a given country. In Brazil, the interest is linked with the storage of spent fuels that will not be reprocessed. This work analyses possible types of storage, the international panorama and a proposal for future construction of a spent nuclear fuel temporary storage place in the country. (author)

  20. SFCOMPO: A new database of isotopic compositions of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The numerous applications of nuclear fuel depletion simulations impact all areas related to nuclear safety. They are at the basis of, inter alia, spent fuel criticality safety analyses, reactor physics calculations, burn-up credit methodologies, decay heat thermal analyses, radiation shielding, reprocessing, waste management, deep geological repository safety studies and safeguards. Experimentally determined nuclide compositions of well-characterised spent nuclear fuel (SNF) samples are used to validate the accuracy of depletion code predictions for a given burn-up. At the same time, the measured nuclide composition of the sample is used to determine the burn-up of the fuel. It is therefore essential to have a reliable and well-qualified database of measured nuclide concentrations and relevant reactor operational data that can be used as experimental benchmark data for depletion codes and associated nuclear data. The Spent Fuel Isotopic Composition Database (SFCOMPO) has been hosted by the NEA since 2001. In 2012, a collaborative effort led by the NEA Data Bank and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the United States, under the guidance of the NEA Expert Group on Assay Data of Spent Nuclear Fuel (EGADSNF) of the Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety (WPNCS), has resulted in the creation of an enhanced relational database structure and a significant expansion of the SFCOMPO database, which now contains experimental assay data for a wider selection of international reactor designs. The new database was released online in 2014. This new SFCOMPO database aims to provide access to open experimental SNF assay data to ensure their preservation and to facilitate their qualification as evaluated assay data suitable for the validation of methodologies used to predict the composition of irradiated nuclear fuel. Having a centralised, internationally reviewed database that makes these data openly available for a large selection of international reactor designs is of

  1. Transportation of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipment of used fuel from nuclear reactors to a central fuel management facility is discussed with particular emphasis on the assessment of the risk to the public due to these shipments. The methods of transporting used fuel in large shipping containers is reviewed. In terms of an accident scenario, it is demonstrated that the primary risk of transport of used fuel is due to injury and death in common road accidents. The radiological nature of the used fuel cargo is, for all practical purposes, an insignificant factor in the total risk to the public. (author)

  2. Japan Nuclear Fuel, Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just over a month ago, on July 1, Japan Nuclear Fuel Industries (JNFI) and Japan Nuclear Fuel Services (JNFS) merged to form the integrated nuclear fuel cycle company, Japan Nuclear Fuel, Ltd. (JNFL). The announcement in mid-January that the country's two major fuel cycle firms intended to merge had long been anticipated and represents one of the most significant restructuring events in Japan's nuclear industry. The merger forming JNFL was a logical progression in the evolution of Japan's fuel cycle, bringing complementary technologies together to encourage synergism, increased efficiency, and improved community relations. The main production facilities of both JNFI and JNFS were located near the village of Rokkashomura, on the northern end of the main island of Honshu, and their headquarters were in Tokyo. The former JNFS was responsible for spent fuel reprocessing and also was building a high-level waste (HLW) management facility. The former JNFI focused on uranium enrichment and low-level waste (LLW) disposal. It was operating the first stage of a centrifuge enrichment plant and continuing to construct additional capacity. These responsibilities and activities will be assumed by JNFL, which now will be responsible for all JNFI and JNFS operations, including those at Rokkashomura

  3. Nuclear fuel manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technologies used to manufacture nuclear fuel from uranium ore are outlined, with particular reference to the light water reactor fuel cycle. Capital and operating cost estimates for the processing stages are given, and the relevance to a developing uranium industry in Australia is discussed

  4. Nuclear fuel transportation containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention discloses an inner container for a nuclear fuel transportation flask for irradiated fuel elements comprising a cylindrical shell having a dished end closure with a drainage sump and means for flushing out solid matter by way of the sump prior to removing a cover

  5. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  6. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear fuel assembly comprises a cluster of elongated fuel, retained parallel and at the nodal points of a square network by a bottom supporting plate and by spacing grids. The supporting plate is connected to a top end plate via tie-rods which replace fuel pins at certain of the nodal points of the network. The diameter of the tie-rods is equal to that of the pins and both are slidably received in the grids

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear fuel assembly includes and upper yoke, a base, an elongated, outer flow channel disposed substantially along the entire length of the fuel assembly and an elongated, internal, central water cross, formed by four, elongated metal angles, that divides the nuclear fuel assembly into four, separate, elongated fuel sections and that provides a centrally disposed path for the flow of subcooled neutron moderator along the length of the fuel assembly. A separate fuel bundle is located in each of the four fuel sections and includes an upper tie plate, a lower tie plate and a plurality of elongated fuel rods disposed therebetween. Preferably, each upper tie plate is formed from a plurality of interconnected thin metal bars and includes an elongated, axially extending pin that is received by the upper yoke of the fuel assembly for restraining lateral motion of the fuel bundle while permitting axial movement of the fuel bundle with respect to the outer flow channel. The outer flow channel is fixedly secured at its opposite longitudinal ends to the upper yoke and to the base to permit the fuel assembly to be lifted and handled in a vertical position without placing lifting loads or stresses on the fuel rods. The yoke, removably attached at the upper end of the fuel assembly to four structural ribs secured to the inner walls of the outer flow channel, includes, as integrally formed components, a lifting bail or handle, laterally extending bumpers, a mounting post for a spring assembly, four elongated apertures for receiving with a slip fit the axially extending pins mounted on the upper tie plates and slots for receiving the structural ribs secured to the outer flow channel. Locking pins securely attach the yoke to the structural ribs enabling the fuel assembly to be lifted as an entity

  8. Nuclear Fuel in France: an ever changing world - most recent safety concerns of DSIN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and management of nuclear fuel have seen many changes in France the last few years. Such changes, brought about by the operating organisation, are essentially based on the increase of the fuel discharge burn up before unloading, the adoption of MOX fuel in reactors, and the improvement and diversification of nuclear fuel products (introduction of fuels of foreign origins, i.e. German, Spanish and Swedish). The French safety authority is not, a priori, opposed to these changes but it has to ensure that, at each step, identified safety problems are being analysed and resolved appropriately. New safety concerns arise in the whole fuel cycle: better care needs to be taken in the handling and transporting of high burn up fuels than fresh UO2 fuels, the use of MOX fuel demands the reinforcement of the radiation protection measures taken at all steps of the fuel cycle (manufacturing, handling during fabrication and in the reactor, transportation, reprocessing and disposal), and imposes a longer cooling period than UO2 fuel. After a comprehensive view of the main regulatory actions of the French nuclear safety authority, the DSIN, supported by the Institute for Nuclear Safety and Protection (IPSN) in the field of nuclear fuel, emphasizing its responsibilities versus those of the operating organisation in particular where the evolution of fuel is concerned, this present paper tries to roughly depict the most recent changes in management and design that affected the nuclear fuel loaded in French pressurized water reactors, such as GEMMES fuel management, penetration of MOX fuel, fuel product development, etc. It also intends to address some of the main current safety and regulatory issues associated with these changes

  9. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

  10. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report provides data and assessments of the status and prospects of nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle. The report discusses the economic competitiveness of nuclear electricity generation, the extent of world uranium resources, production and requirements, uranium conversion and enrichment, fuel fabrication, spent fuel treatment and radioactive waste management. A review is given of the status of nuclear fusion research

  11. All about nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The demand for energy continues to rise while natural resources are depleted day after day and the planet chokes on greenhouse gas emissions. It is not easy to strike a balance, yet these issues must be resolved. The nuclear revival in a number of countries may be the beginning of a solution. This is a good time to take a closer look at this industry and learn about the different 'lives' of nuclear fuel: uranium mining and conversion (new deposits to be mined, evenly distributed reserves), uranium enrichment and fuel fabrication: continually evolving technologies), recycling, waste management: multiple solutions. In an inset, Dr Dorothy R. Davidson, nuclear fuel specialist, presents her expert opinion on the future of the fuel cycle in the United States

  12. Nuclear fuel deformation phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel encounters severe thermomechanical environments. Its mechanical response is profoundly influenced by an underlying heterogeneous microstructure but also inherently dependent on the temperature and stress level histories. The ability to adequately simulate the response of such microstructures, to elucidate the associated macroscopic response in such extreme environments is crucial for predicting both performance and transient fuel mechanical responses. This chapter discusses key physical phenomena and the status of current modelling techniques to evaluate and predict fuel deformations: creep, swelling, cracking and pellet-clad interaction. This chapter only deals with nuclear fuel; deformations of cladding materials are discussed elsewhere. An obvious need for a multi-physics and multi-scale approach to develop a fundamental understanding of properties of complex nuclear fuel materials is presented. The development of such advanced multi-scale mechanistic frameworks should include either an explicit (domain decomposition, homogenisation, etc.) or implicit (scaling laws, hand-shaking,...) linkage between the different time and length scales involved, in order to accurately predict the fuel thermomechanical response for a wide range of operating conditions and fuel types (including Gen-IV and TRU). (authors)

  13. Fessenheim: 30 years of nuclear fuel operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fessenheim units 1 and 2 are the first two 900 MW PWR put into operation in France (1977). This article reviews 30 years of change, optimization and feedback experience from Fessenheim, concerning: -) fuel assemblies (particularly the design of some components like grids, ends and guide tubes), -) the reload fuel management (to get a higher unloading burn-up), -) the refueling machine and tools (heavy modifications to reduce the human factor), and -) work organization (work shifts and staff training). (A.C.)

  14. Comparison of Nuclear Fuel Management at U.S. Nuclear Utility and KHNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes of reload core design for economic efficiency, such as extended reload cycle, power uprate and license renewal, can cause the changes in safety margins, peak power and burn-up trends in the core. The changes of reload core design can increase the risk of various kinds of unusual core power distribution such as AOA (Axial Offset Anomaly) and, at worst, CILC (Crud Induced Localized Corrosion). In short, because the importance of reload fuel change management is emerging as a major configuration management issue, nuclear utilities should have an appropriate self-review and work process for reload design or reload fuel change management. From this background, this study will be conducted by choosing the US utility Exelon as a leading fuel management organization and comparing their fuel change package and reload design management know-how with our core group

  15. Void effect analysis of Pb-208 of fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widiawati, Nina, E-mail: nina-widiawati28@yahoo.com; Su’ud, Zaki, E-mail: szaki@fi.itb.ac.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology Jalan Ganesha 10, Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    Void effect analysis of Pb-208 as coolant of fast reactors with modified candle burn-up scheme has been conducted. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of the fourth-generation reactor designs. The reactor is designed with a thermal power output of 500 MWt. Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme allows the reactor to have long life operation by supplying only natural uranium as fuel cycle input. This scheme introducing discrete region, the fuel is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn up it is shifted to region 2 and region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. The reactor is designed for 100 years with 10 regions arranged axially. The results of neutronic calculation showed that the void coefficients ranged from −0.6695443 % at BOC to −0.5273626 % at EOC for 500 MWt reactor. The void coefficients of Pb-208 more negative than Pb-nat. The results showed that the reactors with Pb-208 coolant have better level of safety than Pb-nat.

  16. Void effect analysis of Pb-208 of fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiawati, Nina; Su'ud, Zaki

    2015-09-01

    Void effect analysis of Pb-208 as coolant of fast reactors with modified candle burn-up scheme has been conducted. Lead cooled fast reactor (LFR) is one of the fourth-generation reactor designs. The reactor is designed with a thermal power output of 500 MWt. Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme allows the reactor to have long life operation by supplying only natural uranium as fuel cycle input. This scheme introducing discrete region, the fuel is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn up it is shifted to region 2 and region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. The reactor is designed for 100 years with 10 regions arranged axially. The results of neutronic calculation showed that the void coefficients ranged from -0.6695443 % at BOC to -0.5273626 % at EOC for 500 MWt reactor. The void coefficients of Pb-208 more negative than Pb-nat. The results showed that the reactors with Pb-208 coolant have better level of safety than Pb-nat.

  17. Advanced nuclear fuel for VVER reactors. Status and operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses the major VVER fuel trends, aimed at the enhancement of FAs' effectiveness and reliability, flexibility of their operating performances and fuel cycle efficiency, specifically: (i) Fuel burnup increasing is one of the major objectives during the development of improved nuclear fuel and fuel cycles. At present, the achieved fuel rod burn up is 65 MWdays/kgU. The tasks are set and the activities are carried out to achieve fuel rod burnup up to 70 MWdays/kgU and burnup of discharged batch of FAs - up to 60 MWdays/kgU. (ii) Improvement of FA rigidity enables to increase operating reliability of fuel due to gaps reducing between FAs and, as a result, the fall of peak load coefficients. FA geometric stability enables to optimize the speed of handling procedures with fuel. (iii) Increasing of uranium content of FA is aimed at extension of fuel cycles' duration. Fuel weight increase in FA is achieved both due to fuel column height extension and to changes of pellet geometrical size. (iv) Extension of FA service live satisfies the up-to-date NPP requirements for fuel cycles of various duration from 4x320 eff. days to 5x320 eff. days and 3x480 eff. days. (v) The development of new-generation FAs with increased strength characteristics has required the zirconium alloys' improvement. Advanced zirconium alloys shall provide safety and effectiveness of FA and fuel rods during long-life operation up to 40 000 eff. hours. (vi) Utilization of reprocessed uranium enables to use spent nuclear fuel in cycle and to create the partly complete fuel cycle for VVER reactors. This paper summarizes the major operating results of LTAs, which meet the modern and prospective requirements for VVER fuel, at Russian NPPs with VVER-440 and VVER-1000 reactors. (author)

  18. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To increase the fuel assembly rigidity while making balance in view of the dimension thereby improving the earthquake proofness. Constitution: In a nuclear fuel assembly having a control rod guide thimble tube, the gap between the thimble tube and fuel insert (inner diameter of the guiding thimble tube-outer diameter of the fuel insert) is made greater than 1.0 mm. Further, the wall thickness of the thimble tube is made to about 4 - 5 % of the outer diameter, while the flowing fluid pore cross section S in the thimble tube is set as: S = S0 x A0/A where S0: cross section of the present flowing fluid pore, A: effective cross section after improvement, = Π/4(d2 - D2) in which d is the thimble tube inner diameter and the D is the fuel insert outer diameter. A0: present effective cross section. (Seki, T.)

  19. Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dale, Deborah J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-10-28

    These slides will be presented at the training course “International Training Course on Implementing State Systems of Accounting for and Control (SSAC) of Nuclear Material for States with Small Quantity Protocols (SQP),” on November 3-7, 2014 in Santa Fe, New Mexico. The slides provide a basic overview of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. This is a joint training course provided by NNSA and IAEA.

  20. The nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The papers presented at the International Conference on The Nuclear Fuel Cycle, held at Stockholm, 28 to 31 October 1975, are reviewed. The meeting, organised by the U.S. Atomic Industrial Forum, and the Swedish Nuclear Forum, was concerned more particularly with economic, political, social and commercial aspects than with tecnology. The papers discussed were considered under the subject heading of current status, uranium resources, enrichment, and reprocessing. (U.K.)

  1. Some elaborating methods of gamma scanning results on irradiated nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma scanning, as a post-irradiation examination, is a technique which provides a large number of informations on irradiated nuclear fuels. Power profile, fission products distribution, average and local burn-up of single elements structural and nuclear behaviour of fuel materials are examples of the obtained informations. In the present work experimental methods and theoretical calculations used at the CNEN hot cell laboratory for the mentioned purposes are described. Errors arising from the application of the gamma scanning technique are also discussed

  2. Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold F. McFarlane; Terry Todd

    2013-11-01

    Reprocessing is essential to closing nuclear fuel cycle. Natural uranium contains only 0.7 percent 235U, the fissile (see glossary for technical terms) isotope that produces most of the fission energy in a nuclear power plant. Prior to being used in commercial nuclear fuel, uranium is typically enriched to 3–5% in 235U. If the enrichment process discards depleted uranium at 0.2 percent 235U, it takes more than seven tonnes of uranium feed to produce one tonne of 4%-enriched uranium. Nuclear fuel discharged at the end of its economic lifetime contains less one percent 235U, but still more than the natural ore. Less than one percent of the uranium that enters the fuel cycle is actually used in a single pass through the reactor. The other naturally occurring isotope, 238U, directly contributes in a minor way to power generation. However, its main role is to transmute into plutoniumby neutron capture and subsequent radioactive decay of unstable uraniumand neptuniumisotopes. 239Pu and 241Pu are fissile isotopes that produce more than 40% of the fission energy in commercially deployed reactors. It is recovery of the plutonium (and to a lesser extent the uranium) for use in recycled nuclear fuel that has been the primary focus of commercial reprocessing. Uraniumtargets irradiated in special purpose reactors are also reprocessed to obtain the fission product 99Mo, the parent isotope of technetium, which is widely used inmedical procedures. Among the fission products, recovery of such expensive metals as platinum and rhodium is technically achievable, but not economically viable in current market and regulatory conditions. During the past 60 years, many different techniques for reprocessing used nuclear fuel have been proposed and tested in the laboratory. However, commercial reprocessing has been implemented along a single line of aqueous solvent extraction technology called plutonium uranium reduction extraction process (PUREX). Similarly, hundreds of types of reactor

  3. Nuclear fuel cycle information workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work; second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity; and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US

  4. A nuclear reactor core fuel reload optimization using Artificial-Ant-Colony Connective Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Pressurized Water Reactor core must be reloaded every time the fuel burnup reaches a level when it is not possible to sustain nominal power operation. The nuclear core fuel reload optimization consists in finding a burned-up and fresh-fuel-assembly pattern that maximizes the number of full operational days. This problem is NP-hard, meaning that complexity grows exponentially with the number of fuel assemblies in the core. Besides that, the problem is non-linear and its search space is highly discontinual and multimodal. In this work a parallel computational system based on Ant Colony System (ACS) called Artificial-Ant-Colony Networks is introduced to solve the nuclear reactor core fuel reload optimization problem. ACS is a system based on artificial agents that uses the reinforcement learning technique and was originally developed to solve the Traveling Salesman Problem, which is conceptually similar to the nuclear fuel reload problem. (author)

  5. Burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Atta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1, reference operating core, has been carried out utilizing standard computer codes WIMS/D4, CITATION, and RELAP5/MOD3.4. Reactor codes WIMS/D4 and CITATION have been used for the calculations of neutronic parameters including peaking factors and power profiles at different burn-up considering a xenon free core and also the equilibrium xenon values. RELAP5/MOD3.4 code was utilized for the determination of peak fuel centerline, clad and coolant temperatures to ensure the safety of the reactor throughout the cycle. The calculations reveal that the reactor is safe and no nucleate boiling will commence at any part of the core throughout the cycle and that the safety margin increases with burnup as peaking factors decrease.

  6. Burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1, reference operating core, has been carried out utilizing standard computer codes WIMS/D4, CITATION, and RELAP5/MOD3.4. Reactor codes WIMS/D4 and CITATION have been used for the calculations of neutronic parameters including peaking factors and power profiles at different burn-up considering a xenon free core and also the equilibrium xenon values. RELAP5/MOD3.4 code was utilized for the determination of peak fuel centerline, clad and coolant temperatures to ensure the safety of the reactor throughout the cycle. The calculations reveal that the reactor is safe and no nucleate boiling will commence at any part of the core throughout the cycle and that the safety margin increases with burnup as peaking factors decrease. (author)

  7. The SMOPY system: Quantitative burn-up measurement monitor combining gamma spectrometry and neutron measurement for safeguards applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: IAEA uses today FORK Detector in attended and unattended mode for the verification of spent fuels. This system uses a neutron fission chamber and an ionisation chamber to combine total neutron counting and total gamma counting. CANBERRA now proposes the new SMOPY system, which enhances performance as it combines a fission chamber and a CZT gamma spectrometer. This new measurement capability associated with a depletion code embedded in the interpretation software of the system allows a complete identification of the burn-up of any type of fuel (also MOX for example). A first prototype of the SMOPY system was developed in collaboration between AREVA NC CEA and CANBERRA for safeguards but also burn-up credit applications. This prototype has been already used by the IAEA. CANBERRA has now completed the industrialization of this system adding new functionalities. The system allows also axial scanning of the fuel assembly instead of a single point measurement. Two types of interpretation of the measurement have been developed. The first one requires the irradiation history to determine very precisely the burn-up of the fuel assembly, thus allow to verify the operator's declaration. The second method is less precise but doesn't require any data of the fuel to determine the cooling time, burn-up, and the fuel type (MOX or LEU). The new CANBERRA industrialized SMOPY system will allow new possibilities of IAEA verifications and will also permit to address new scenarios of IAEA safeguards activities. (author)

  8. Drilling Experiments of Dummy Fuel Rods Using a Mock-up Drilling Device and Detail Design of Device for Drilling of Irradiated Nuclear Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Yong; Lee, H. K.; Chun, Y. B.; Park, S. J.; Kim, B. G

    2007-07-15

    KAERI are developing the safety evaluation method and the analysis technology for high burn-up nuclear fuel rod that is the project, re-irradiation for re-instrumented fuel rod. That project includes insertion of a thermocouple in the center hole of PWR nuclear fuel rod with standard burn-up, 3,500{approx}4,000MWD/tU and then inspection of the nuclear fuel rod's heat performance during re-irradiation. To re-fabricate fuel rod, two devices are needed such as a drilling machine and a welding machine. The drilling machine performs grinding a center hole, 2.5 mm in diameter and 50 mm in depth, for inserting a thermocouple. And the welding machine is used to fasten a end plug on a fuel rod. Because these two equipment handle irradiated fuel rods, they are operated in hot cell blocked radioactive rays. Before inserting any device into hot cell, many tests with that machine have to be conducted. This report shows preliminary experiments for drilling a center hole on dummy of fuel rods and optimized drilling parameters to lessen operation time and damage of diamond dills. And the design method of a drilling machine for irradiated nuclear fuel rods and detail design drawings are attached.

  9. Materials and technology needs for the management of spent nuclear fuel and nuclear wastes within different fuel cycle scenarios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European policies concerning nuclear energy are multifaceted and correspond to strategies which range from sustainable development with waste minimisation, to nuclear energy stagnation, and even phase-out policy. Although these strategies and associated objectives can be divergent, one issue that is commonly addressed, at national and international level, is the management of the spent fuel. In this context, independently from specific objectives, several common R and D issues can be identified. A notable common aspect is the general agreement that, systems with a fast neutron spectrum are the most appropriate ones in terms of transmutation performance. The preliminary design and safety requirements for these systems imply challenging issues on materials as e.g. the compatibility the selected coolant, their application in a range of different operating temperatures, and high irradiation dose due to the objective to reach high burn-ups. Materials research has been promoted by the European commission in particular to support the development of Accelerator Driven Sub-critical Transmutation Systems cooled with heavy liquid metals. Moreover, for fast reactors development, where higher temperatures (> 500 deg C) and higher burn-ups (20%) have been envisaged, alternative materials as the ODS alloys have been indicated to be most promising. A summary of past and present European experimental programs and results on structural materials and associated technologies selected for their use in fast neutron spectrum systems and neutron spallation targets will be given. (author)

  10. nuclear fuel design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel design is strictly dependent on reactor type and experiences obtained from performance of nuclear fuels. The objectives of the design are reliability, and economy. Nuclear fuel design requires an interdisciplinary work which has to cover, at least nuclear design, thermalhydraulic design, mechanical design, and material properties.The procedure of design, as describe in the quality assurance, consist of a number of steps. The most important parts are: Design description or inputs, preliminary design, detailed design and design output, and design verification. The first step covers objectives and requirements, as defined by the customer and by the regulatory authority for product performance,environmental factors, safety, etc. The second describes assumptions and alternatives, safety, economy and engineering analyses. The third covers technical specifications, design drawings, selection of QA program category, etc. The most important form of design verification is design review by qualified independent internal or external reviewers. The scope of the review depends on the specific character of the design work. Personnel involved in verification and review do not assume prime responsibility for detecting errors. Responsibility for the design remains with the personnel involved in the design work

  11. Nuclear fuel element cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Composite cladding for a nuclear fuel element containing fuel pellets is formed with a zirconium metal barrier layer bonded to the inside surface of a zirconium alloy tube. The composite tube is sized by a cold working tube reduction process and is heat treated after final reduction to provide complete recrystallization of the zirconium metal barrier layer and a fine-grained microstructure. The zirconium alloy tube is stress-relieved but is not fully recrystallized. The crystallographic structure of the zirconium metal barrier layer may be improved by compressive deformation such as shot-peening. (author)

  12. Safety analysis and code development for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development effort of computer codes applicable to nuclear fuel cycle facilities for assisting the task of NISA has been carried out. The work consists of 1) verification of criticality safety analysis codes : MVP and SCALE, 2) studies on burn-up credit applied methods, 3) preparation of non-uniformity effect calculation for criticality safety, 4) development of the new convenient library for shielding calculation based on JENDL-3.3 nuclear data, 5) development of a numerical simulation code DYMPL for analyzing abnormal transients of PUREX processes, 6) radiation dose evaluation code development for reprocessing facilities, 7) updating the dose evaluation data for the probabilistic environmental assessment code MACCS2-JF by emergency scenario. (author)

  13. Characterization of spent nuclear fuels by an online combination of chromatographic and mass spectrometric techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of the burn-up is one of the essential parts in post-irradiation examinations on nuclear fuel samples. In the frame of national and international research programs the analysis of the isotopic vectors of uranium, plutonium, neodymium and some other fission products and actinides was carried out in the Hot lab of the Paul Scherrer Institute in the last years by using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled online with an inductively coupled plasma quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the meantime a multicollector ICP-MS, suitable for high precision isotope ratio measurements, was installed within the Hot lab and has been used now in combination with a chromatographic separation system for the first time for burn-up determinations of nuclear fuel samples. The results of these investigations, a comparison of both methods with the classical technique for burn-up analyses (thermal ionization mass spectrometry), the advantages and limitations of the methods and the accuracy and precision of this type of analyses are presented in the paper. (author)

  14. The impact of time dependant spectra on fusion blanket burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We modelled tritium production and nuclide burn-up within a spherical, solid-breeder blanket, with a 1 GW DT fusion source. ► The effect of updating reaction rates regularly is not significant for parent nuclides. ► Updating reaction rates regularly can change the daughter nuclide inventories by several hundred percent. ► Hydrogen and helium production within steels are not significantly effected by reaction rate update. ► A time step duration of 2 weeks or less is required for tritium breeding calculations. -- Abstract: Knowledge of nuclide burn-up within tritium breeding blankets has a crucial part to play in the safety, reliability and efficiency of fusion reactors. The modelling of burn-up requires a series of neutron transport calculations which can compute the reaction rate either directly, via Monte-Carlo estimators, or by implementing the multi-group method. These reaction rates can then be directly substituted into the burn-up equations, which can calculate nuclide number densities after a specified period of burn-up. The material burn-up will change the neutron spectra and the rate of nuclear reactions. Hence, a new neutron transport calculation needs to be performed after burn-up and the sequence is repeated for several time-steps. Radiation transport calculations are computationally expensive, therefore the minimisation of reaction rate calculations via Monte-Carlo simulations is desirable. Thus, time-intervals between Monte-Carlo simulations should be as large as possible. This paper addresses the effect of neutron spectra on the burn-up of parent and daughter nuclides found in EUROFER steel and the tritium self-sufficiency time. Using a spherical reactor geometry with lithium–lead tritium breeding material, a neutron spectrum is computed at time = 0 and time = 2 years after a detailed depletion calculation using 1 day time intervals. These two spectra are then used to calculate reaction rates for every isotope listed within

  15. A nuclear reactor core fuel reload optimization using artificial ant colony connective networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Alan M.M. de [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PEN/COPPE - UFRJ, Ilha do Fundao s/n, CEP 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: alanmmlima@yahoo.com.br; Schirru, Roberto [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PEN/COPPE - UFRJ, Ilha do Fundao s/n, CEP 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: schirru@lmp.ufrj.br; Carvalho da Silva, Fernando [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PEN/COPPE - UFRJ, Ilha do Fundao s/n, CEP 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: fernando@con.ufrj.br; Medeiros, Jose Antonio Carlos Canedo [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PEN/COPPE - UFRJ, Ilha do Fundao s/n, CEP 21945-970 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)], E-mail: canedo@lmp.ufrj.br

    2008-09-15

    The core of a nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) may be reloaded every time the fuel burn-up is such that it is not more possible to maintain the reactor operating at nominal power. The nuclear core fuel reload optimization problem consists in finding a pattern of burned-up and fresh-fuel assemblies that maximize the number of full operational days. This is an NP-Hard problem, meaning that complexity grows exponentially with the number of fuel assemblies in the core. Moreover, the problem is non-linear and its search space is highly discontinuous and multi-modal. Ant Colony System (ACS) is an optimization algorithm based on artificial ants that uses the reinforcement learning technique. The ACS was originally developed to solve the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP), which is conceptually similar to the nuclear core fuel reload problem. In this work a parallel computational system based on the ACS, called Artificial Ant Colony Networks is introduced to solve the core fuel reload optimization problem.

  16. A nuclear reactor core fuel reload optimization using artificial ant colony connective networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The core of a nuclear Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) may be reloaded every time the fuel burn-up is such that it is not more possible to maintain the reactor operating at nominal power. The nuclear core fuel reload optimization problem consists in finding a pattern of burned-up and fresh-fuel assemblies that maximize the number of full operational days. This is an NP-Hard problem, meaning that complexity grows exponentially with the number of fuel assemblies in the core. Moreover, the problem is non-linear and its search space is highly discontinuous and multi-modal. Ant Colony System (ACS) is an optimization algorithm based on artificial ants that uses the reinforcement learning technique. The ACS was originally developed to solve the Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP), which is conceptually similar to the nuclear core fuel reload problem. In this work a parallel computational system based on the ACS, called Artificial Ant Colony Networks is introduced to solve the core fuel reload optimization problem

  17. Nuclear fuel reprocessing method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a nuclear fuel reprocessing method for supplying nitrogen oxides used for driving out iodine and for oxidizing plutonium, according to the present invention, nitric acid is decomposed in a nitrogen oxide production step to form nitrogen oxides. The nitrogen oxides formed are supplied to the reprocessing step described above. Excess nitric acid recovered from the reprocessing step is recycled to the nitrogen oxide production step. Accordingly, the amount of wastes discharged from the reprocessing step is remarkably reduced. (T.M.)

  18. Nuclear fuel assembly spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spacer for use in a fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor having thin, full-height divider members, slender spring members and laterally oriented rigid stops and wherein the total amount of spacer material, the amount of high neutron cross section material, the projected area of the spacer structure and changes in cross section area of the spacer structure are minimized whereby neutron absorption by the spacer and coolant flow resistance through the spacer are minimized

  19. Mixed oxide fuel development for the Indian Nuclear Power Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian Nuclear Power Programme at present is based mainly on Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (LHWRs) with the exception of two Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) in operation since 1969. The former use Zircaloy-clad natural uranium oxide (Nat.UO2) fuel and the latter low enriched uranium oxide (LEU) fuel elements. India has adopted the philosophy of closed fuel cycle and recycling of plutonium (Pu) essentially in the fast reactor programme. However, due to slower progress of fast reactor programme, utilization of plutonium as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in a recycle mode in the thermal reactors is contemplated as an interim measure. Studies have been carried out for the introduction of MOX in the PHWR cores using identical Zircaloy hardware as for natural uranium core, consisting of 19-rod fuel bundles. Some of the fuel characteristics for extended burn-up such as higher grain size, controlled porosity, etc. had been under study. These studies enabled working out an appropriate flow-sheet and establishing the requirements of process machinery and equipment for MOX fuel manufacturing plant. The standard process flow-sheet for ceramic fuel fabrication by pelletizing route has been adopted for manufacturing, with selection of some of the process steps to suit glove-box operations. 3 refs, 5 figs, 4 tabs

  20. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a nuclear fuel assembly comprising a nuclear fuel bundle in which a plurality of nuclear rods are bond by an upper tie plate, spacers and lower tie plate and a channel box containing them, the inner surface of the channel box and the surface of the lower tie plate opposing thereto are fabricated into step-like configuration respectively and the two fabricated surfaces are opposed to each other to constitute a step-like labyrinth flow channel. With such a configuration, when a fluid flows from higher pressure to lower pressure side, pressure loss is caused due to fluid friction in proportion with the length of the flow channel, due to the change of the flowing direction and, further, in accordance with deceleration or acceleration at each of the stepped portions. The total for each of the pressure loses constitutes the total pressure loss in the labyrinth. That is, if the pressure difference between the inside and the outside of the channel box is identical, the amount of leakage is reduced by so much as the increase of the total pressure loss, to thereby improve the stability of the reactor core and fuel economy. (T.M.)

  1. Nuclear reactor fuel element splitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for removing nuclear fuel from a clad fuel element. The fuel element is power driven past laser beams which simultaneously cut the cladding lengthwise into at least two longitudinal pieces. The axially cut lengths of cladding are then separated, causing the nuclear fuel contained therein to drop into a receptacle for later disposition. The cut lengths of cladding comprise nuclear waste which is disposed of in a suitable manner. 6 claims, 10 drawing figures

  2. Development in the manufacture of fuel assembly components at Nuclear Fuel Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integrity of the fuel bundle and pellet-clad mechanical and chemical interaction (PCMCI) is the major limiting factor in achieving high burn up in thermal as well as fast reactors. Zircaloy based fuel bundle used for Indian pressurized heavy water reactor consists of number of components such as fuel clad tube, end cap bearing pad and spacer pad. These tubular, bar and sheet components are manufactured at Nuclear Fuel Complex using a series of thermomechanical processes involving hot and cold working with intermediate heat treatment. This paper is aimed at bringing out recent advances in NFC in the manufacture of fuel assembly components. Zircaloy based double clad tube adopting co-extrusion route followed by cold pilgering was successfully produced for its potential usage for high burnup in advance thermal reactors such as Advanced Heavy Water Reactors, This paper also includes process modifications carried out in the manufacture of clad tube and end cap components based on in-depth metallurgical studies. A radial forging process was established for primary breakdown of arc melted ingot which allows for better soundness and homogeneous microstructure. Manufacturing route of bar components for end caps was suitably modified by adopting only barrel straightening to minimize the residual stress and thereby increasing the recovery appreciably. NFC also supplies clad tube for fast breeder reactors where limiting factor for burn up are void swelling and fuel-clad interaction. In view of this, advance claddings such as P/M based 9Cr - Oxide Dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel clad and Zirconium lined T91 (9Cr-1 Mo) steel double clad have been successfully produced. Zirconium lined T91 (9Cr-1 Mo) double clad tubes required was successfully produced by adopting the method of co-pilgering, as a candidate material for clad tubes of Fast Breeder Reactors. (author)

  3. Nuclear inventory and post decay power of spent fuel assemblies from the research reactor IRT-2000 Sofia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to sign an agreement for spent fuel shipment and following the international requirements for the generation of computerized system for management of nuclear materials, the nuclear inventory, the post decay power and some other important physical characteristics have been determined for 73 spent fuel assemblies to be transported off the IRT-2000 Sofia site. The results obtained for the fuel burn up, the post decay power, the 137Cs activity and the total amount of Nd isotopes are shown graphically as an illustration. (author)

  4. Spent nuclear fuel structural response when subject to an end impact accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) is responsible for licensing spent fuel storage and transportation systems. A subset of this responsibility is to investigate and understand the structural performance of these systems. Studies have shown that the fuel rods of intact spent fuel assemblies with burn-ups up to 45 gigawatt days per metric ton of uranium (Gwd/MTU) are capable of resisting the normally expected impact loads subjected during drop accident conditions. However, effective cladding thickness for intact spent fuel assemblies with burn ups greater than 45 Gwd/MTU can be reduced due to corrosion. The capability of the fuel rod to withstand the expected loads encountered under normal and accident conditions may also be reduced, given degradation of the material properties under extended use, such as decrease in ductility. The USNRC and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNNL) performed computational studies to predict the structural response of spent nuclear fuel in a transport system that is subjected to a hypothetical regulatory impact accident, as defined in 10 CFR71.73. This study performs a structural analysis of a typical high burn up Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assembly using the ANSYS registered ANSYS registered /LS- DYNA registered finite element analysis (FEA) code. The material properties used in the analyses were based on expert judgment and included uncertainties. Ongoing experimental programs will reduce the uncertainties. The current evaluations include the pins, spacer grids, and tie plates to assess possible cladding failure/rupture under hypothetical impact accident loading. This paper describes the USNRC and PNNL staff's analytical approach, provides details on the single pin model developed for this assessment, and presents the results

  5. CRISTAL V1: Criticality package for burn up credit calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first version of the CRISTAL package, created and validated as part of a joint project between IRSN, COGEMA and CEA, was delivered to users in November 1999. This fruitful cooperation between IRSN, COGEMA and CEA has been pursued until 2003 with the development and the validation of the package CRISTAL V1, whose main objectives are to improve the criticality safety studies including the Burn up Credit effect. (author)

  6. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durmazucar, Hasan H.; Guenduez, Guengoer E-mail: ggunduz@metu.edu.tr

    2000-12-01

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed.

  7. Boron coating on boron nitride coated nuclear fuels by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium dioxide-only and uranium dioxide-gadolinium oxide (5% and 10%) ceramic nuclear fuel pellets which were already coated with boron nitride were coated with thin boron layer by chemical vapor deposition to increase the burn-up efficiency of the fuel during reactor operation. Coating was accomplished from the reaction of boron trichloride with hydrogen at 1250 K in a tube furnace, and then sintering at 1400 and 1525 K. The deposited boron was identified by infrared spectrum. The morphology of the coating was studied by using scanning electron microscope. The plate, grainy and string (fiber)-like boron structures were observed

  8. South Korea's nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    March 1990 marked a major milestone for South Korea's nuclear power program, as the country became self-sufficient in nuclear fuel fabrication. The reconversion line (UF6 to UO2) came into full operation at the Korea Nuclear Fuel Company's fabrication plant, as the last step in South Korea's program, initiated in the mid-1970s, to localize fuel fabrication. Thus, South Korea now has the capability to produce both CANDU and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. This article covers the nuclear fuel industry in South Korea-how it is structures, its current capabilities, and its outlook for the future

  9. Nuclear fuel structure and fuel behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the research has been to produce information on structural properties of nuclear fuel and their effects on the fuel behaviour. The research subjects were new fuel fabrication and quality control methods, the effects of as-fabricated pellets properties on the behaviour of fuel rods, behaviour of cladding materials and irradiated cladding and structural materials. At the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) the nuclear fuel structure and behaviour programme has produced data which have been utilized in procurement, behavioural analysis and surveillance of the fuel used in the Finnish nuclear power stations. In addition to our own research, data on fuel behaviour have been received by participating in the international cooperation projects, such as OECD/Halden, Studsvik-Ramp-programmes, IAEA/BEFAST II and VVER-fuel research projects. The volume of the research work financed by the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland in the years 1987-1989 has been about 8 man years. The report is the summary report of the research work conducted in the KTM-financed nuclear fuel structure and fuel behaviour programme in the years 1987-1989

  10. Actinides and fissions products in the spent nuclear fuel from slovak NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Five nuclear units with reactor WWER-440 are in this time in operation in Slovakia - four units in Bohunice and one in Mochovce sites. Start-up of another unit can be expected in Mochovce soon. Spent nuclear fuel was considered as a waste with final disposal in deep repository. Characterization and evaluation of burned-up is now under process of changes in connection with development of Accelerator Driven Transmutation Technology systems. Applicability of transmutation technology in particular nuclear economy depends on the amount and composition of burned fuel assemblies. This study deals with evaluation of Slovak WWER-440 spent fuel composition based on ORIGEN calculation. The paper provides calculation results of WWER-440 (1.6%, 2.4%, 3.6%, 3.82% enrichment) spent fuel inventory. Amounts and activities of important nuclides are tabled. (Authors)

  11. Protactinium-231 as a new fissionable material for nuclear reactors that can produce nuclear fuel with stable neutron-multiplying properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shmelev, Anatoly N.; Kulikov, Gennady G.; Kulikov, Evgeny G.; Apse, Vladimir A. [National Research Nuclear Univ. MEPHI, Moscow (Russian Federation). Moscow Engineering Physics Inst.

    2016-03-15

    Main purpose of the study is justifying doping of protactinium-231 into fuel compositions of advanced nuclear reactors with the ultimate aim to improve their operation safety and economic efficiency. Protactinium-231 could be generated in thorium blankets of hybrid thermonuclear facilities. The following results were obtained: 1. Protactinium-231 has some favorable features for its doping into nuclear fuel; 2. Protactinium containing fuel compositions can be characterized by the higher values of fuel burn-up, the longer values of fuel lifetime and the better proliferation resistance; 3. as protactinium-231 is the stronger neutron absorber than uranium-238, remarkably lower amounts of protactinium-231 may be doped into fuel compositions. The free space could be occupied by materials which are able to improve heat conductivity and refractoriness of fuel. As a consequence, operation safety of nuclear reactors could be upgraded.

  12. Protactinium-231 as a new fissionable material for nuclear reactors that can produce nuclear fuel with stable neutron-multiplying properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main purpose of the study is justifying doping of protactinium-231 into fuel compositions of advanced nuclear reactors with the ultimate aim to improve their operation safety and economic efficiency. Protactinium-231 could be generated in thorium blankets of hybrid thermonuclear facilities. The following results were obtained: 1. Protactinium-231 has some favorable features for its doping into nuclear fuel; 2. Protactinium containing fuel compositions can be characterized by the higher values of fuel burn-up, the longer values of fuel lifetime and the better proliferation resistance; 3. as protactinium-231 is the stronger neutron absorber than uranium-238, remarkably lower amounts of protactinium-231 may be doped into fuel compositions. The free space could be occupied by materials which are able to improve heat conductivity and refractoriness of fuel. As a consequence, operation safety of nuclear reactors could be upgraded.

  13. Quantification of the computational accuracy of code systems on the burn-up credit using experimental re-calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to account for the reactivity-reducing effect of burn-up in the criticality safety analysis for systems with irradiated nuclear fuel (''burnup credit''), numerical methods to determine the enrichment and burnup dependent nuclide inventory (''burnup code'') and its resulting multiplication factor keff (''criticality code'') are applied. To allow for reliable conclusions, for both calculation systems the systematic deviations of the calculation results from the respective true values, the bias and its uncertainty, are being quantified by calculation and analysis of a sufficient number of suitable experiments. This quantification is specific for the application case under scope and is also called validation. GRS has developed a methodology to validate a calculation system for the application of burnup credit in the criticality safety analysis for irradiated fuel assemblies from pressurized water reactors. This methodology was demonstrated by applying the GRS home-built KENOREST burnup code and the criticality calculation sequence CSAS5 from SCALE code package. It comprises a bounding approach and alternatively a stochastic, which both have been exemplarily demonstrated by use of a generic spent fuel pool rack and a generic dry storage cask, respectively. Based on publicly available post irradiation examination and criticality experiments, currently the isotopes of uranium and plutonium elements can be regarded for.

  14. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The description is given of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising fuel elements arranged in a supporting frame composed of two end pieces, one at the top and the other at the bottom, on which are secured the ends of a number of vertical tubes, each end piece comprising a plane bottom on which two series of holes are made for holding the tubes and for the passage of the coolant. According to the invention, the bottom of each end piece is fixed to an internal plate fitted with the same series of holes for holding the tubes and for the fluid to pass through. These holes are of oblong section and are fitted with fixing elements cooperating with corresponding elements for securing these tubes by transversal movement of the inside plate

  15. Swelling-resistant nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenlis, Athanasios; Satcher, Jr., Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei O.

    2011-12-27

    A nuclear fuel according to one embodiment includes an assembly of nuclear fuel particles; and continuous open channels defined between at least some of the nuclear fuel particles, wherein the channels are characterized as allowing fission gasses produced in an interior of the assembly to escape from the interior of the assembly to an exterior thereof without causing significant swelling of the assembly. Additional embodiments, including methods, are also presented.

  16. Characterization Of Cladding Hull Wastes From Used Nuclear Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang K.H.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Used cladding hulls from pressurized water reactor (PWR are characterized to provide useful information for the treatment and disposal of cladding hull wastes. The radioactivity and the mass of gamma emitting nuclides increases with an increase in the fuel burn-up and their removal ratios are found to be more than 99 wt.% except Co-60 and Cs-137. In the result of measuring the concentrations of U and Pu included in the cladding hull wastes, most of the residues are remained on the surface and the removal ratio of U and Pu are revealed to be over 99.98 wt.% for the fuel burn-up of 35,000 MWd/tU. An electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA line scanning shows that radioactive fission products are penetrated into the Zr oxide layer, which is proportional to the fuel burn-up. The oxidative decladding process exhibits more efficient removal ratio of radionuclides.

  17. ALEPH 1.1.2: A Monte Carlo burn-up code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last 40 years, Monte Carlo particle transport has been applied to a multitude of problems such as shielding and medical applications, to various types of nuclear reactors, . . . The success of the Monte Carlo method is mainly based on its broad application area, on its ability to handle nuclear data not only in its most basic but also most complex form (namely continuous energy cross sections, complex interaction laws, detailed energy-angle correlations, multi-particle physics, . . . ), on its capability of modeling geometries from simple 1D to complex 3D, . . . There is also a current trend in Monte Carlo applications toward high detail 3D calculations (for instance voxel-based medical applications), something for which deterministic codes are neither suited nor performant as to computational time and precision. Apart from all these fields where Monte Carlo particle transport has been applied successfully, there is at least one area where Monte Carlo has had limited success, namely burn-up and activation calculations where the time parameter is added to the problem. The concept of Monte Carlo burn-up consists of coupling a Monte Carlo code to a burn-up module to improve the accuracy of depletion and activation calculations. For every time step the Monte Carlo code will provide reaction rates to the burn-up module which will return new material compositions to the Monte Carlo code. So if static Monte Carlo particle transport is slow, then Monte Carlo particle transport with burn-up will be even slower as calculations have to be performed for every time step in the problem. The computational issues to perform accurate Monte Carlo calculations are however continuously reduced due to improvements made in the basic Monte Carlo algorithms, due to the development of variance reduction techniques and due to developments in computer architecture (more powerful processors, the so-called brute force approach through parallel processors and networked systems

  18. Development of a MCNP–ORIGEN burn-up calculation code system and its accuracy assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MCNP and ORIGEN are coupled to perform nuclides depletion and decay calculation. • Coupled system MCORE uses “modified predictor corrector” approach. • MCORE can use different depletion schemes and simulate fuel shuffling. • MCORE is assessed by a “VVER-1000 LEU Assembly Computational Benchmark”. • MCORE is also assessed by a fast reactor benchmark problem. - Abstract: An MCNP–ORIGEN burn-up calculation code system, named MCORE (MCNP and ORIGEN burn-up Evaluation code), is developed in this work. MCORE makes use of the Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code MCNP4C and nuclides depletion and decay calculation code ORIGEN2.1. MCNP and ORIGEN are coupled by data processing and linking subroutines. In MCORE, a so called “modified predictor corrector” approach is used. MCORE provides the capability of using different depletion calculation schemes and simulating fuel shuffling. Total nuclide density changes in active cells are considered in MCORE. The validity and applicability of the developed code are tested by investigating and predicting the neutronic and isotopic behavior of a “VVER-1000 LEU Assembly Computational Benchmark” at lattice level and a “Physics of Plutonium Recycling” fast reactor at core level (OECD-NEA). The comparison results show that the MCORE code predicts the nuclide composition within 5% accuracy and k∞ within 800 pcm at the end of the burn-up for LEU assembly (40 MWD/kg HM). For a fast reactor, the results obtained by MCORE are in the range of reported results except for 243Am. In general, MCORE results show a good agreement with the benchmark values

  19. Nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization maintains an ongoing assessment of the world's nuclear technology developments, as a core activity of its Strategic Plan. This publication reviews the current status of the nuclear power and the nuclear fuel cycle in Australia and around the world. Main issues discussed include: performances and economics of various types of nuclear reactors, uranium resources and requirements, fuel fabrication and technology, radioactive waste management. A brief account of the large international effort to demonstrate the feasibility of fusion power is also given. 11 tabs., ills

  20. The credit analysis of recycling beryllium and uranium in BeO-UO2 nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study quantifies the credits of beryllium and uranium which are used as the raw materials for BeO-UO2 nuclear fuel by analyzing the influence of their credits on the nuclear fuel cycle cost was analyzed, where the credit was defined as the value of raw materials recovered from spent fuel and the raw materials that were re-cycled. The credits of beryllium and uranium at 60 MWD/kg burn-up were -0.22 Mills/kWh and -0.14 Mills/kWh, respectively. These findings were based on the assumption that the optimal mixing proportion of beryllium in the BeO-UO2 nuclear fuel is 4.8 wt%. In sum, the present study verified that the credits of beryllium and uranium in relation to BeO-UO2 nuclear fuel are significant cost drivers in the cost of the nuclear fuel cycle and in estimating the nuclear fuel cycle of the reprocessing option for spent nuclear fuels. (author)

  1. Reactor Structure Materials: Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress and achievements in 1999 in SCK-CEN's programme on applied and fundamental nuclear fuel research in 1999 are reported. Particular emphasis is on thermochemical fuel research, the modelling of fission gas release in LWR fuel as well as on integral experiments

  2. Nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns an improvement for corrosion resistance of the welded portion of materials which constitutes a reprocessing plant of spent nuclear fuels. That is, Mo-added austenite stainless steel is used for a plant member at the portion in contact with a nitric acid solution. Then, laser beams are irradiated to the welded portion of the plant member and the surface layer is heated to higher than 1,000degC. If such a heat treatment is applied, the degradation of corrosion resistance of the welded portion can be eliminated at the surface. Further, since laser beams are utilized, heating can be limited only to the surface. Accordingly, undesired thermal deformation of the plant members can be prevented. As a result, the plant member having high pit corrosion resistance against a dissolution solution for spent fuels containing sludges comprising insoluble residue and having resistance to nitric acid solution also in the welded portion substantially equal to that of the matrix can be attained. (I.S.)

  3. Reprocessing of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The survey on hand aims at analysing in an unbiassed way the great number of recently issued inconsistent statements on pros and cons of prompt disposal of spent fuel from German nuclear power plants by reprocessing it according to the PUREX principle. Nuclear energy opponents emphatically doubt the technical feasability. Discussions on the issue were actually initiated by the official inquiry commission ''future energy policies'' of the 8sup(th) Bundestag of the FRG; in its final report on June 27, 1980 the commission also made suggestions concerning the erection of a demonstration reprocessing plant. On the authority of the Federal Minister of Research and Technology, Professor Wolf Haefele did a survey determining the ideal size of a demonstration reprocessing plant which the Federal Bundestag's Committee of Research and Technology approved in its meeting of December 7, 1981. When said survey was published, controversial discussion concerning contents and statements of the ''Haefele-paper'' began. Replies and independent statements were made, yet these have only in part been made available for the general public. (orig.)

  4. Nuclear fuel tax in court

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides the 'Nuclear Energy Moratorium' (temporary shutdown of eight nuclear power plants after the Fukushima incident) and the legally decreed 'Nuclear Energy Phase-Out' (by the 13th AtG-amendment), also the legality of the nuclear fuel tax is being challenged in court. After receiving urgent legal proposals from 5 nuclear power plant operators, the Hamburg fiscal court (4V 154/13) temporarily obliged on 14 April 2014 respective main customs offices through 27 decisions to reimburse 2.2 b. Euro nuclear fuel tax to the operating companies. In all respects a remarkable process. It is not in favour of cleverness to impose a political target even accepting immense constitutional and union law risks. Taxation 'at any price' is neither a statement of state sovereignty nor one for a sound fiscal policy. Early and serious warnings of constitutional experts and specialists in the field of tax law with regard to the nuclear fuel tax were not lacking. (orig.)

  5. CDFR design and performance implications of extended burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The restrained core was adopted for the UK Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) in the mid 1970's. The reasons for its adoption are still valid today although increased importance is now given to its seismic performance. During an earthquake of ''safe shutdown'' intensity the rigid restraint barrel, small clearances of the restraint pads and the cross sectional strength of the sub-assemblies, particularly at the upper restraint level adequately maintain the relative positions of sub-assemblies. A general analysis of sub-assembly motions with simplifying but conservative assumptions indicates that the transient reactivity insertions due to horizontal core movements in the safe shutdown earthquakes will be less than 1$. A programme of experiments is being initiated to support the analysis and demonstrate that the present predictions are pessimistic. The effect of higher burn-up on CDFR performance will be discussed in this paper

  6. Simulation of triton burn-up in JET plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughlin, M.J.; Balet, B.; Jarvis, O.N.; Stubberfield, P.M. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    This paper presents the first triton burn-up calculations for JET plasmas using the transport code TRANSP. Four hot ion H-mode deuterium plasmas are studied. For these discharges, the 2.5 MeV emission rises rapidly and then collapses abruptly. This phenomenon is not fully understood but in each case the collapse phase is associated with a large impurity influx known as the ``carbon bloom``. The peak 14 MeV emission occurs at this time, somewhat later than that of the 2.5 MeV neutron peak. The present results give a clear indication that there are no significant departures from classical slowing down and spatial diffusion for tritons in JET plasmas. (authors). 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Center (CCN) of IPEN produces nuclear fuel for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor of IPEN. The serial production started in 1988, when the first nuclear fuel element was delivered for IEA-R1. In 2011, CCN proudly presents the 100th nuclear fuel element produced. Besides routine production, development of new technologies is also a permanent concern at CCN. In 2005, U3O8 were replaced by U3Si2-based fuels, and the research of U Mo is currently under investigation. Additionally, the Brazilian Multipurpose Research Reactor (RMB), whose project will rely on the CCN for supplying fuel and uranium targets. Evolving from an annual production from 10 to 70 nuclear fuel elements, plus a thousand uranium targets, is a huge and challenging task. To accomplish it, a new and modern Nuclear Fuel Factory is being concluded, and it will provide not only structure for scaling up, but also a safer and greener production. The Nuclear Engineering Center has shown, along several years, expertise in the field of nuclear, energy systems and correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained during decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program, personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. Along the last two decades, numerous specialized services of engineering for the Brazilian nuclear power plants Angra 1 and Angra 2 have been carried out. The contribution in service, research, training, and teaching in addition to the development of many related technologies applied to nuclear engineering and correlated areas enable the institution to fulfill its mission that is to

  8. Effect of Self-Shielding on Burn-Up Calculation of ETRR-2 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There exist two approaches for burn-up calculation. The first on is to use cell parameters generated using cell calculation code at different degrees of burn-up. The other is to use microscopic cross sections with self-shielding in order to compensate for the variation of spectrum at different degree of burn-up. The effect of using different forms of self-shielding factors on burn-up calculation for ETRR-2 reactor has been determined. The results of the two approaches are inter-compared up to 50% burn-up

  9. Halden fuel and material experiments beyond operational and safety limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main tasks of any research reactor is to investigate the behavior of nuclear fuel and materials prior to their introduction into the market. For commercial NPPs, it is important both to test nuclear fuels at a fuel burn-up exceeding current limits and to investigate reactor materials for higher irradiation dose. For fuel vendors such tests enable verification of fuel reliability or for the safety limits to be found under different operational conditions and accident situations. For the latter, in-pile experiments have to be performed beyond some normal limits. The program of fuel tests performed in the Halden reactor is aimed mainly at determining: The thermal FGR threshold, which may limit fuel operational power with burn-up increase, the “lift-off effect” when rod internal pressure exceeds coolant pressure, the effects of high burn-up on fuel behavior under power ramps, fuel relocation under LOCA simulation at higher burn-up, the effect of dry-out on high burn-up fuel rod integrity. This paper reviews some of the experiments performed in the Halden reactor for understanding some of the limits for standard fuel utilization with the aim of contributing to the development of innovative fuels and cladding materials that could be used beyond these limits. (author)

  10. Cranes, trains and nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the technology which backs up the various remote handling operations necessary for the removal of spent fuels from nuclear reactors, its transport to reactor ponds and finally to interim storage at British Nuclear Fuels Ltd.'s Sellafield reprocessing plant. Spent fuels are first loaded into stainless steel multi-element bottles (MEBs) and then into flasks. The design and construction of the flasks aims to prevent contamination during transport and ensure safe handling. The interim fuel storage of MEBs is also described. (UK)

  11. Nuclear criticality safety at global nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear criticality safety is the art and science of preventing or terminating an inadvertent nuclear chain reaction in non-reactor environment. Nuclear criticality safety as part of integrated safety program in the nuclear industry is the responsibility of regulators, management and operators. Over the past 36 years, Global Nuclear Fuel (GNF) has successfully developed an integrated nuclear criticality safety program for its BWR fuel manufacturing business. Implementation of this NRC-approved program includes three fundamental elements: administrative practices, controls and training. These elements establish nuclear criticality safety function responsibilities and nuclear criticality safety design criteria in accordance with double contingency principle. At GNF, a criticality safety computational system has been integrated into nuclear criticality safety program as an incredibly valuable tool for nuclear criticality safety design and control applications. This paper describes select elements of GNF nuclear criticality safety program with emphasis being placed on need for clear criticality safety function responsibilities, nuclear safety design criteria and associated double contingency implementation, as well as advanced Monte Carlo neutron transport codes used to derive subcritical safety limits. (authors)

  12. Development of a precise drilling machine for a nuclear fuel pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a new nuclear fuel is developed, an irradiation test needs to be carried out in the research reactor to analyze the performance of the new nuclear fuel. In addition, to check the performance of a nuclear fuel during the burn up test in the test loop, it is necessary to attach sensors near the fuel rod and connect them with instrumentation cables to the measuring device located outside of the reactor pool. In particular, to check the temperature fluctuation of a nuclear fuel during an irradiation test, a C-type thermocouple should be instrumented at the center of the nuclear fuel. Therefore, a hole needs to be made at the center of the fuel pellet to put in the thermocouple. However, because the hardness and density of a sintered UO2 pellet are very high, it is difficult to make a small fine hole on a sintered UO2 pellet using a simple drilling machine. The author developed an automated drilling machine which makes a fine hole in a fuel pellet without changing tools or breakage of the workpiece. Its performance is then verified by primary experiments using sintered Alumina, which has a similar hardness and density with a sintered UO2 pellet

  13. Nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method and apparatus for the storage of fuel in a stainless steel egg crate structure within a storage pool are described. Fuel is initially stored in a checkerboard pattern or in each opening if the fuel is of low enrichment. Additional fuel (or fuel of higher enrichment) is later stored by adding stainless steel angled plates within each opening, thereby forming flux traps between the openings. Still higher enrichment fuel is later stored by adding poison plates either with or without the stainless steel angles. 8 claims

  14. Nuclear fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable a wider range of output fluctuation by reducing the stress in the way of the connection between the lower end plug and the cladding tubes and thus increase the stress corrosion life. Constitution: Plurality of uranium dioxide pellets are filled in the zirconium alloy cladding tubes and the upper and lower ends are closed by zirconium alloy plugs to form nuclear fuel rods. The lower plug is provided with a hole from the inner side and in the axial direction of the plug. A structure of thermally conductive material, the conductivity of which is higher than that of the zirconium used for forming the plug, is provided in such a way that it has some clearance with the side of the said hole. By providing a hole on the lower plug and by installing a highly thermally conductive structure in it, the average temperature differential between the lower plug and the cladding tube is reduced thus reducing the thermal stress on the lower plug. (Yoshihara, Y.)

  15. The 1st Irradiation Test Results of the High Burn-up Large Grain UO{sub 2} Pellets in HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Ho; Bang, Jae Geun; Yang, Yong Sik; Song, Keun Woo; Kim, Sun Kee; Kim, Young Min; Seo, Chul Gyo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    The large grain UO{sub 2} pellet developed for the high burn-up PWR fuel was finished the 1st irradiation test in the HANARO since July of 2002. The large grain UO{sub 2} pellets will be irradiated up to the burn-up higher than 70 MWD/kgU. To irradiate the UO{sub 2} pellets up to the burn-up 70 MWD/kgU, it will take about 60 months. Now the 1st irradiation test for about 30 months was finished. The burn-up of the fuel rods was 33.62 MWD/kgU for the upper three fuel rods and 37.39 MWD/kgU for the lower three fuel rods, as of the June of 2005 by which the effective irradiation time is 320.6 day at the OR-4 of HANARO. These test rods were burned the lower about 9 % against target burn-up because the control rod of HANARO was operated at the lower position than analysis condition. The lower test rod assembly is loading into the new non-instrument capsule for the 2nd irradiation test and the 2nd irradiation test will be started in time.

  16. Nuclear Fuel Cycle & Vulnerabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-18

    The objective of safeguards is the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful nuclear activities to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or of other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown, and deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards system should be designed to provide credible assurances that there has been no diversion of declared nuclear material and no undeclared nuclear material and activities.

  17. LOFT nuclear fuel rod behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview of the calculational models used to predict fuel rod response for Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) data from the first LOFT nuclear test is presented and discussed and a comparison of predictions with experimental data is made

  18. How Stuk Verifies Spent Nuclear Fuel And Why?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finnish Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority (STUK) has a NDA-measuring program for spent nuclear fuel in Finland. Several hundred assemblies per year are verified in measuring campaigns using various measuring methods and equipments. All these methods used are based on the detection of spent fuel specific signals i.e. fission product gamma rays or passive neutron emission from actinides. STUK actively uses three measuring methods: 1) SFAT is air-filled collimator tube submerged in spent fuel pond equipped with a radiation detector at the top of the tube. The tube is transferred on the top of the spent fuel assembly, and detector sees radiation signal. Usually solid state spectrometers are used as a detector. STUK has its disposal NaI detectors and one transportable liquid nitrogen cooled HPGe detector. The asset of SFAT is, that no fuel assembly movements are required, which makes verification fast. On the other hand, only the top of the assembly can be verified. This makes verification of certain designs of fuel assemblies, e.g. fuel followers, quite difficult. 2) Gamma burn-up verifier (GBUV) is used in Olkiluoto Spent Fuel Storage only. GBUV utilises a measuring station behind the wall of storage pond. In the wall there is a slit, through which radiation can penetrate to the detector. Usually HPGe detector is used. Accurate burn-up verification and identification of multiple fission nuclides make the conclusions very definite. 3) Enhanced FORK (EFORK) is a modification of traditional FORK device. Traditional FORK has four fission chamber neutron detectors located in two watertight prongs and two ionisation chambers measuring gross gamma signal. In addition to this, EFORK is equipped with CdZnTe spectrometer. The assembly being measured is placed between FORK prongs. EFORK is capable of partial defect verification, but only, if irradiation history data given by operator is assumed to be correct. Preliminary timetable for NDA measurement inspections are drawn

  19. Nuclear fuel rod supporting arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A grid structure for holding a number of nuclear fuel rods is described. The grid structure is of the type having walls including rigidly interconnected generally rectangular metal strips, forming passageways and adapted to support nuclear fuel rods within some of the passageways. The improvement provides elongated slots intermediate and normal to the longitudinal edges of each of the strips at each intersection of the strips. The slots form openings in each corner of each passageway

  20. Effect of burn-up on the radioactivation behavior of cladding hull materials studied using the ORIGEN-S code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of fuel burn-up on the radioactivation behavior of cladding hull materials was investigated using the ORIGEN-S code for various materials of Zircaloy-4, Zirlo, HANA-4, and HANA-6 and for various fuel burn-ups of 30, 45, 60, and 75 GWD/MTU. The Zircaloy-4 material is the only one that does not contain Nb as an alloy constituent, and it was revealed that 125Sb, 125mTe, and 55Fe are the major sources of radioactivity. On the other hand, 93mNb was identified as the most radioactive nuclide for the other materials although minor radioactive nuclides varied owing to their different initial constituents. The radioactivity of 94Nb was of particular focus owing to its acceptance limit against a Korean intermediate-/low-level waste repository. The radioactivation calculation results revealed that only Zircaloy-4 is acceptable for the Korean repository, while the other materials required at least 4,900 of Nb decontamination factor owing to the high radioactivity of 94Nb regardless of the fuel burn-up. A discussion was also made on the feasibility of Zr recovery methods (chlorination and electrorefining) for selective recovery of Zr so that it can be disposed of in the Korean repository. (author)

  1. Modeling Deep Burn TRISO particle nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besmann, T. M.; Stoller, R. E.; Samolyuk, G.; Schuck, P. C.; Golubov, S. I.; Rudin, S. P.; Wills, J. M.; Coe, J. D.; Wirth, B. D.; Kim, S.; Morgan, D. D.; Szlufarska, I.

    2012-11-01

    Under the DOE Deep Burn program TRISO fuel is being investigated as a fuel form for consuming plutonium and minor actinides, and for greater efficiency in uranium utilization. The result will thus be to drive TRISO particulate fuel to very high burn-ups. In the current effort the various phenomena in the TRISO particle are being modeled using a variety of techniques. The chemical behavior is being treated utilizing thermochemical analysis to identify phase formation/transformation and chemical activities in the particle, including kernel migration. Density functional theory is being used to understand fission product diffusion within the plutonia oxide kernel, the fission product's attack on the SiC coating layer, as well as fission product diffusion through an alternative coating layer, ZrC. Finally, a multiscale approach is being used to understand thermal transport, including the effect of radiation damage induced defects, in a model SiC material.

  2. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheelock, C.W.; Baumeister, E.B.

    1961-09-01

    A reactor fuel element utilizing fissionable fuel materials in plate form is described. This fuel element consists of bundles of fuel-bearing plates. The bundles are stacked inside of a tube which forms the shell of the fuel element. The plates each have longitudinal fins running parallel to the direction of coolant flow, and interspersed among and parallel to the fins are ribs which position the plates relative to each other and to the fuel element shell. The plate bundles are held together by thin bands or wires. The ex tended surface increases the heat transfer capabilities of a fuel element by a factor of 3 or more over those of a simple flat plate.

  3. Alternatives for nuclear fuel disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel is one of the most important issues in the nuclear industry, currently spent fuel management is been cause of great amount of research, investments in the construction of repositories or constructing the necessary facilities to reprocess the fuel, and later to recycle the plutonium recovered in thermal reactors. What is the best solution? or, What is the best technology for a specific solution? Many countries have deferred the decision on selecting an option, while other works actively constructing repositories and others implementing the reprocessing facilities to recycle the plutonium obtained from nuclear spent fuel. In Mexico the nuclear power is limited to two reactors BWR type and medium size. So the nuclear spent fuel discharged has been accommodated at reactor's spent fuel pools. Originally these pools have enough capacity to accommodate spent fuel for the 40 years of designed plant operation. However, currently is under process an extended power up rate to 20% of their original power and also there are plans to extend operational life for 20 more years. Under these conditions there will not be enough room for spent fuel in the pools. So this work describes some different alternatives that have been studied in Mexico to define which will be the best alternative to follow. (Author)

  4. Nuclear reactors and fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Nuclear Engineering has shown expertise in the field of nuclear and energy systems ad correlated areas. Due to the experience obtained over decades in research and technological development at Brazilian Nuclear Program personnel has been trained and started to actively participate in the design of the main system that will compose the Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor (RMB) which will make Brazil self-sufficient in the production of radiopharmaceuticals. The institution has participated in the monitoring and technical support concerning the safety, licensing and modernization of the research reactors IPEN/MB-01 and IEA-R1. The Nuclear Fuel Center is responsible for the production of the nuclear fuel necessary for the continuous operation of the IEA-R1 research reactor. Development of new fuel technologies is also a permanent concern

  5. PWR rod ejection accident: uncertainty analysis on a high burn-up core configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Pallec, J.C.; Studer, E.; Royer, E. [CEA Saclay, Direction de l' Energie Nucleaire, Service d' Etudes de Reacteurs et de Modelisation Avancee (DEN/SERMA), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-07-01

    With the increasing of the discharge burn-up assembly, the rod ejection accident (REA) methodology based on the analyse of the hot spot from a decoupling methods of calculation does not allow to ensure the respect of safety criteria. The main reason is that the irradiated fuel certainly less solicited thermally is in the other hand more sensitive to a transient due to a rod ejection. Thus, the hot spot is not necessarily the sensitive point of the core. In the framework of high burn-up configurations, a new methodology tends to replace the former. It characterizes by the use of a best-estimate 3-dimensional modelling: coupling of the thermal hydraulics and neutronics, taking in account fuel properties depending on irradiation. To ensure the conservatism of the modelling response, this new approach has to be followed by an uncertainties analysis. Inputs from the benchmark RIA TMI-1 conducted by IRSN (France), NRC (United State of America) and KI (Russian) are used to perform a first analysis. The response of the modelling is the enthalpy deposited in an assembly. The analysis is based on the Design of Experiments (DoE) that permits to measure the weight of the main parameters and their interactions on the response. These last cannot be disregarded because they represent up to 20% of the penalizing uncertainty. This study shows that the main fuel modifications due to irradiation (radial power distribution, thermal properties degradation) have to be taken into account in a realistic thermal modelling during a strong transient.

  6. IAEA activities on nuclear fuel cycle 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presentation discussing the IAEA activities on nuclear fuel cycle reviews the following issues: organizational charts of IAEA, division of nuclear power and the fuel cycle, nuclear fuel cycle and materials section; 1997 budget estimates; budget trends; the nuclear fuel cycle programme

  7. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  8. Spent Nuclear Fuel project, project management plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuquay, B.J.

    1995-10-25

    The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project has been established to safely store spent nuclear fuel at the Hanford Site. This Project Management Plan sets forth the management basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. The plan applies to all fabrication and construction projects, operation of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project facilities, and necessary engineering and management functions within the scope of the project

  9. Nuclear fuel cycle. V. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle information in some countries that develop, supply or use nuclear energy is presented. Data about Argentina, Australia, Belgium, Netherlands, Italy, Denmarmark, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Finland, Spain and India are included. The information is presented in a tree-like graphic way. (C.S.A.)

  10. Nuclear fuel cycle. V. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle information in the main countries that develop, supply or use nuclear energy is presented. Data about Japan, FRG, United Kingdom, France and Canada are included. The information is presented in a tree-like graphic way. (C.S.A.)

  11. Nuclear fuel materials research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the research has been to produce information and develop our own testing resources related to new fuel designs, behaviour of present fuel designs, fuel inspection methods and control rod materials. At the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) the nuclear fuel materials programme has produced data which have been utilized in procurement, behavioural analysis and surveillance of the fuel used in the Finnish nuclear power stations. In addition to our own experience, data on fuel behaviour have been received by participating in the international cooperation projects, such as OECD/Halden, Studsvik-Ramp-programmes, IAEA/BEFAST and VVER-fuel research projects. The volume of the research work financed by the Finnish Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) and the Technical Research Centre of Finland in the years 1984-1986 has been about 9 man years. The report is the summary report of the research work conducted in the KTM-financed nuclear fuel materials programme in the years 1984-1986

  12. Burn-Up Determination by High Resolution Gamma Spectrometry: Axial and Diametral Scanning Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the gamma spectrometric determination of burn-up the use of a single fission product as a monitor of the specimen fission rate is subject to errors caused by activity saturation or, in certain cases, fission product migration. Results are presented of experiments in which all the resolvable gamma peaks in the fission product spectrum have been used to calculate the fission rate; these results form a pattern which reflect errors in the literature values of the gamma branching ratios, fission yields etc., and also represent a series of empirical correction factors. Axial and diametral scanning experiments on a long-irradiated low-enrichment fuel element are also described and demonstrate that it is possible to differentiate between fissions in U-235 and in Pu-239 respectively by means of the ratios of the Ru-106 activity to the activities of the other fission products

  13. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The grid-shaped spacer for PWR fuel elements consists of flat, upright metal bars at right angles to the fuel rods. In one corner of a grid mesh it has a spring with two end parts for the fuel rod. The cut-outs for the end parts start from an end edge of the metal bar parallel to the fuel rods. The transverse metal bar is one of four outer metal bars. Both end parts of the spring have an extension parallel to this outer metal arm, which grips a grid mesh adjacent to this grid mesh at the side in one corner of the spacer and forms an end part of a spring for the fuel rod there on the inside of the outer metal bar. (HP)

  14. Nuclear fuel procurement management at nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The market situation of nuclear fuel cycles is highlighted. It also summarises the possible contract models and the elements of effective management for nuclear fuel procurement at nuclear power station based upon the nuclear fuel procurement practice of Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS)

  15. Thermal-hydraulics analysis for advanced fuel to be used in Candu 600 nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catana, Alexandru [RAAN, Institute for Nuclear Research, Str. Campului Nr. 1, Pitesti, Arges (Romania); Danila, Nicolae; Prisecaru, Ilie; Dupleac, Daniel [University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    Two Candu 600 pressure tube nuclear reactors cover about 17% of Romania's electricity demand. These nuclear reactors are moderated/cooled with D{sub 2}O, fuelled on-power with Natural Uranium (NU) dioxide encapsulated in a standard (STD37) fuel bundle. High neutron economy is achieved using D{sub 2}O as moderator and coolant in separated systems. To reduce fuel cycle costs, programs were initiated in Canada, S.Korea, Argentina and Romania for the design and build new fuel bundles able to accommodate different fuel compositions. Candu core structure and modular fuel bundles, permits flexible fuel cycles. The main expected achievements are: reduced fuel cycle costs, increased discharge burn-up, plutonium and minor actinides management, thorium cycle, use of recycled PWR and in the same time waste minimization and operating cost reduction. These new fuel bundles are to be used in already operated Candu reactors. Advanced fuel bundle were proposed: CANFLEX bundle (Canada, S-Korea); the Romanian 'SEU43' bundle (Fig 1). In this paper thermal-hydraulic analysis in sub-channel approach is presented for SEU43. Comparisons with standard (STD37) fuel bundles are made using SEU-NU for NU fuel composition and SEU-0.96, for recycled uranium (RU) fuel with 0.96% U-235. Extended and comprehensive analysis must be made in order to assess the TH behaviour of SEU43. In this paper, considering STD37, SEU43-NU and SEU43-0.96 fuel bundles, main TH parameters were analysed: pressure drop, fuel highest temperatures, coolant density, critical heat flux. Differences between these fuel types are outlined. Benefits are: fuel costs reduction, spent fuel waste minimization, increase in competitiveness of nuclear power. Safety margins must be, at least, conserved. (authors)

  16. Nondestructive measurements on spent fuel for the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nondestructive measurements on spent fuel are being developed to meet safeguards and materials managment requirements at nuclear facilities. Spent-fuel measurement technology and its applications are reviewed

  17. Nuclear fuels accounting interface: River Bend experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry, J.E.

    1986-01-01

    This presentation describes nuclear fuel accounting activities from the perspective of nuclear fuels management and its interfaces. Generally, Nuclear Fuels-River Bend Nuclear Group (RBNG) is involved on a day-by-day basis with nuclear fuel materials accounting in carrying out is procurement, contract administration, processing, and inventory management duties, including those associated with its special nuclear materials (SNM)-isotopics accountability oversight responsibilities as the Central Accountability Office for the River Bend Station. As much as possible, these duties are carried out in an integrated, interdependent manner. From these primary functions devolve Nuclear Fuels interfacing activities with fuel cost and tax accounting. Noting that nuclear fuel tax accounting support is of both an esoteric and intermittent nature, Nuclear Fuels-RBNG support of developments and applications associated with nuclear fuel cost accounting is stressed in this presentation.

  18. Nuclear fuels accounting interface: River Bend experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes nuclear fuel accounting activities from the perspective of nuclear fuels management and its interfaces. Generally, Nuclear Fuels-River Bend Nuclear Group (RBNG) is involved on a day-by-day basis with nuclear fuel materials accounting in carrying out is procurement, contract administration, processing, and inventory management duties, including those associated with its special nuclear materials (SNM)-isotopics accountability oversight responsibilities as the Central Accountability Office for the River Bend Station. As much as possible, these duties are carried out in an integrated, interdependent manner. From these primary functions devolve Nuclear Fuels interfacing activities with fuel cost and tax accounting. Noting that nuclear fuel tax accounting support is of both an esoteric and intermittent nature, Nuclear Fuels-RBNG support of developments and applications associated with nuclear fuel cost accounting is stressed in this presentation

  19. Rack for nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements in which a plurality of aligned rows of upright enclosures of generally square cross-sectional areas contain vertically disposed spent fuel elements. Each fuel element is supported at the lower end thereof by a respective support that rests on the floor of the spent fuel pool for a nuclear power plant. An open rack frame is employed as an upright support for the enclosures containing the spent fuel elements. Legs at the lower corners of the frame rest on the floor of the pool to support the frame. In one exemplary embodiment, the support for the fuel element is in the form of a base on which a fuel element rests and the base is supported by legs. In another exemplary embodiment, each fuel element is supported on the pool floor by a self-adjusting support in the form of a base on which a fuel element rests and the base rests on a ball or swivel joint for self-alignment. The lower four corners of the frame are supported by legs adjustable in height for leveling the frame. Each adjustable frame leg is in the form of a base resting on the pool floor and the base supports a threaded post. The threaded post adjustably engages a threaded column on which rests the lower end of the frame. 16 claims, 14 figures

  20. Material input of nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Material Input (MI) of nuclear fuel, expressed in terms of the total amount of natural material needed for manufacturing a product, is examined. The suitability of the MI method for assessing the environmental impacts of fuels is also discussed. Material input is expressed as a Material Input Coefficient (MIC), equalling to the total mass of natural material divided by the mass of the completed product. The material input coefficient is, however, only an intermediate result, which should not be used as such for the comparison of different fuels, because the energy contents of nuclear fuel is about 100 000-fold compared to the energy contents of fossil fuels. As a final result, the material input is expressed in proportion to the amount of generated electricity, which is called MIPS (Material Input Per Service unit). Material input is a simplified and commensurable indicator for the use of natural material, but because it does not take into account the harmfulness of materials or the way how the residual material is processed, it does not alone express the amount of environmental impacts. The examination of the mere amount does not differentiate between for example coal, natural gas or waste rock containing usually just sand. Natural gas is, however, substantially more harmful for the ecosystem than sand. Therefore, other methods should also be used to consider the environmental load of a product. The material input coefficient of nuclear fuel is calculated using data from different types of mines. The calculations are made among other things by using the data of an open pit mine (Key Lake, Canada), an underground mine (McArthur River, Canada) and a by-product mine (Olympic Dam, Australia). Furthermore, the coefficient is calculated for nuclear fuel corresponding to the nuclear fuel supply of Teollisuuden Voima (TVO) company in 2001. Because there is some uncertainty in the initial data, the inaccuracy of the final results can be even 20-50 per cent. The value

  1. Software system for fuel management at Embalse nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    capabilities are the following: retrieval of information from neutronic calculation, overall reactivity, bundle burn-ups; operating fuelling list generator; fuel element failure prevention assessment; cobalt 60 build up evaluation in adjuster rods; fuel element serial number updating; in-core vanadium detector burn-up calculation; files for the inventory base system required by regulatory boards. (author)

  2. Nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly of PWR comprises a fuel bundle portion supported by a plurality of support lattices and an upper and lower nozzles each secured to the upper and lower portions. Leaf springs are attached to the four sides of the upper nozzle for preventing rising of the fuel assembly by streams of cooling water by the contact with an upper reactor core plate. The leaf springs are attached to the upper nozzle so that four leaf springs are laminated. The uppermost leaf spring is bent slightly upwardly from the mounted portion and the other leaf springs are extended linearly from the mounted portion without being bent. The mounted portions of the leaf springs are stacked and secured to the upper nozzle by a bolt obliquely relative to the axial line of the fuel assembly. (I.N.)

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fuel assembly construction for liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors is described in which the sub-assemblies carry a smaller proportion of parasitic material than do conventional sub-assemblies. (U.K.)

  4. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel element for a BWR known from the patent application DE 2824265 is developed so that the screw only breaks on the expansion shank with reduced diameter if the expansion forces are too great. (HP)

  5. Dry spent nuclear fuel transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newport News Shipbuilding, (NNS), has been transferring spent nuclear fuel in a dry condition for over 25 years. It is because of this successful experience that NNS decided to venture into the design, construction and operation of a commercial dry fuel transfer project. NNS is developing a remote handling system for the dry transfer of spent nuclear fuel. The dry fuel transfer system is applicable to spent fuel pool-to-cask or cask-to-cask or both operations. It is designed to be compatible with existing storage cask technology as well as the developing multi-purpose canister design. The basis of NNS' design is simple. It must be capable of transferring all fuel designs, it must be capable of servicing 100 percent of the commercial nuclear plants, it must protect the public and nuclear operators, it must be operated cost efficiently and it must be transportable. Considering the basic design parameters, the following are more specific requirements included in the design: (a) Total weight of transfer cask less than 24 tons; (b) no requirement for permanent site modifications to support system utilization; (c) minimal radiation dose to operating personnel; (d) minimal generation of radioactive waste; (e) adaptability to any size and length fuel or cask; (f) portability of system allowing its efficient movement from site to site; (g) safe system; all possible ''off normal'' situations are being considered, and resultant safety systems are being engineered into NNS' design to mitigate problems. The primary focus of this presentation is to provide an overview of NNS' Dry Spent Nuclear Fuel Transfer System. (author). 5 refs

  6. Recovery of actinides from spent nuclear fuel by pyrochemical reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Partitioning and Transmutation (P and T) strategy is based on reduction of the long-term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel by recovery and recycling of plutonium and minor actinides, i.e. Np, Am and Cm. Regardless if transmutation of actinides is conceived by a heterogeneous accelerator driven system, fast reactor concept or as integrated waste burning with a homogenous recycling of all actinides, the reprocessed fuels used are likely to be significantly different from the commercial fuels of today. Because of the fuel type and the high burn-up reached, traditional hydrometallurgical reprocessing such as used today might not be the most adequate method. The main reasons are the low solubility of some fuel materials in acidic aqueous solutions and the limited radiation stability of the organic solvents used in extraction processes. Therefore, pyrochemical separation techniques are under development worldwide, usually based on electrochemical methods, reductive extraction in a high temperature molten salt solvent or fluoride volatility techniques. The pyrochemical reprocessing developed in ITU is based on electrorefining of metallic fuel in molten LiCl-KCl using solid aluminium cathodes. This is followed by a chlorination process for the recovery of actinides from formed actinide-aluminium alloys, and exhaustive electrolysis is proposed for the clean-up of salt from the remaining actinides. In this paper, the main achievements in the electrorefining process are summarised together with results of the most recent experimental studies on characterisation of actinides-aluminium intermetallic compounds. U, Np and Pu alloys were investigated by electrochemical techniques using solid aluminium electrodes and the alloys formed by electrodeposition of the individual actinides were analysed by XRD and SEM-EDX. Some thermodynamic properties were determined from the measurements (standard electrode potentials, Gibbs energy, enthalpy and entropy of formation) as well as

  7. Gaseous fuel nuclear reactor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, F. C.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors are described; their distinguishing feature is the use of fissile fuels in a gaseous or plasma state, thereby breaking the barrier of temperature imposed by solid-fuel elements. This property creates a reactor heat source that may be able to heat the propellant of a rocket engine to 10,000 or 20,000 K. At this temperature level, gas-core reactors would provide the breakthrough in propulsion needed to open the entire solar system to manned and unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of fuel recycling makes possible efficiencies of up to 65% and nuclear safety at reduced cost, as well as high-thrust propulsion capabilities with specific impulse up to 5000 sec.

  8. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and

  9. Inspection of nuclear fuel transport in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experience acquired in inspecting nuclear fuel shipments carried out in Spain will serve as a basis for establishing the regulations wich must be adhered to for future transports, as the transport of nuclear fuels in Spain will increase considerably within the next years as a result of the Spanish nuclear program. The experience acquired in nuclear fuel transport inspection is described. (author)

  10. The impact of burn-up credit in criticality studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays optimization goes with everything. So French engineering firms try to demonstrate that fuel transport casks and storage pools are able to receive assemblies with higher 235U initial enrichments. Fuel Burnup distribution contributes to demonstrate it. This instruction has to elaborate a way to take credit of burnup effects on criticality safety designs. The calculation codes used are CESAR 4.21-APOLLO 1-MORET III. The assembly studied (UO2) is irradiated in a French Pressurized Water Reactor like EDF nuclear power reactor: PWR 1300 MWe, 17 x 17 array. Its initial enrichment in 235U equals 4.5%. The studies exposed in this report have evaluated the effects of: i) the 15 fission products considered in Burnup Credit (95Mo, 99Tc, 101Ru, 103Rh, 109Ag, 133Cs, 143Nd, 145Nd, 147Sm, 149Sm, 150Sm, 151Sm, 152Sm, 153Eu, 155Gd), ii) the calculated abundances corrected or not by fixed factors, iii) the choice of one cross sections library used by CESAR 4.21, iu) the zone number elected in the axial burnup distribution zoning, u) the kind of cut applied on (regular/optimized). Two axial distribution profiles are studied: one with 44 GWd/t average burnup, the other with 20 GWd/t average burnup. The second one considers a shallow control rods insertion in the upper limit of the assembly. The results show a margin in reactivity about 0.045 with consideration of the 6 most absorbent fission products (103Rh, 133Cs, 143Nd, 149Sm, 152Sm, 155Gd), and about 0.06 for all Burnup Credit fission products whole. Those results have been calculated with an average burnup of 44 GWj/t. In a conservative approach, corrective factors must be apply on the abundance of some fission products. The cross sections library used by CESAR 4.21 (BBL 4) is sufficient and gives satisfactory results. The zoning of the assembly axial distribution burnup in 9 regular zones grants a satisfying calculation time/result precision compromise. (author)

  11. Regulating nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When Parliament passed the Atomic Energy Control Act in 1946, it erected the framework for nuclear safety in Canada. Under the Act, the government created the Atomic Energy Control Board and gave it the authority to make and enforce regulations governing every aspect of nuclear power production and use in this country. The Act gives the Control Board the flexibility to amend its regulations to adapt to changes in technology, health and safety standards, co-operative agreements with provincial agencies and policy regarding trade in nuclear materials. This flexibility has allowed the Control Board to successfully regulate the nuclear industry for more than 40 years. Its mission statement 'to ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment' concisely states the Control Board's primary objective. The Atomic Energy Control Board regulates all aspects of nuclear energy in Canada to ensure there is no undue risk to health, safety, security or the environment. It does this through a multi-stage licensing process

  12. Nuclear fuel elements design, fabrication and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Frost, Brian R T

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear Fuel Elements: Design, Fabrication and Performance is concerned with the design, fabrication, and performance of nuclear fuel elements, with emphasis on fast reactor fuel elements. Topics range from fuel types and the irradiation behavior of fuels to cladding and duct materials, fuel element design and modeling, fuel element performance testing and qualification, and the performance of water reactor fuels. Fast reactor fuel elements, research and test reactor fuel elements, and unconventional fuel elements are also covered. This volume consists of 12 chapters and begins with an overvie

  13. PWR-UO2 nuclear fuel criticality study: control rod effects on infinite neutron multiplication factor and spent fuel composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A three-dimensional model of a PWR fuel were simulated. • Results using TRITON/T6-DEPL module in SCALE 6.0 and two libraries (238 and 44 groups) were compared. • Variations in the infinite neutron multiplication factor and the nuclides concentrations, both under control rod insertion effects were analysed. • Results show very good agreement with those published by OECD. -- Abstract: Deterministic and stochastic nuclear codes are software packages used to perform reactor physics calculations, especially in PWRs, the most common type of nuclear reactor currently in operation. The NEA Expert Group on Burn-up Credit Criticality Safety has published a Benchmark with results obtained from simulations of PWR-UO2 nuclear fuel. The same simulations were performed at DEN/UFMG with SCALE 6.0, a modular nuclear system code developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory using two different neutron energy libraries (238 and 44 groups). The results obtained using a three-dimensional model with the T6-DEPL sequence of the TRITON module in SCALE 6.0 for spent fuel inventory and infinite neutron multiplication factor calculations show very good agreement with those published by the OECD. The main goal of this work is to validate the methodology at DEN/UFMG for future use in simulations related to Angra I, II and III Nuclear Power Plants

  14. Simplified models for pebble-bed HTR core burn-up calculations with Monteburns2.0©

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► PBMR-400 annular core is very difficult to simulate in a reliable way. ► Nuclide evolutions given by different lattice models can differ significantly. ► To split fixed lattice models into two axial zones does not affect results significantly. ► We can choose a (simplified) core model on the basis of the analysis aim. ► Monteburns gives by survey burn-up calculations reasonable nuclide evolution trends. - Abstract: This paper aims at comparing some simplified models to simulate irradiation cycles of Pu fuelled pebble-bed reactors with Monteburns2.0© code. As a reference core, the PBMR-400 (proposed in the framework of the EU PUMA project, where this kind of core fuelled by a Pu and Pu–Np fuel has been studied) was taken into account. Pebble-bed High Temperature Reactor (HTR) cores consist of hundreds of thousands pebbles arranged stochastically in a cylindrical or annular space and each pebble is a single fuel element, and it is able to reach ultra-high burn-ups, i.e. up to 750 GWd/tHM (for Pu-based fuels). Additionally, pebble-bed cores are characterised by a continuous recirculation of pebbles from the top to the bottom of the core. Modelling accurately with current computer codes such an arrangement, in order to predict the behaviour of the core itself, is a very difficult task and any depletion code specifically devoted to pebble-bed burn-up calculation is not available at the moment. Because of limitations of the most common current MCNP-based depletion codes as well as huge calculation times, simplified models have to be implemented. After an analysis of the literature available on pebble-bed models for criticality and burn-up calculations, a preliminary assessment of the impact of different kind of simplified models for a Pu-Np fuelled Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR), proposed in the framework of the EU PUMA project, is shown, particularly as far as burn-up prediction with Monteburns2.0© code is concerned.

  15. Nuclear fuel cycle studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the metal-matrix encapsulation of radioactive waste, brittle-fracture, leach-rate, and migration studies are being conducted. For fuel reprocessing, annular and centrifugal contactors are being tested and modeled. For the LWBR proof-of-breeding project, the full-scale shear and the prototype dissolver were procured and tested. 5 figures

  16. Contracting for nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with uranium sales contracts, i.e. with contractual arrangements in the first steps of the fuel cycle, which cover uranium production and conversion. The various types of contract are described and, where appropriate, their underlying business philosophy and their main terms and conditions. Finally, the specific common features of such contracts are reviewed. (NEA)

  17. Nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable a tight seal in fuel rods while keeping the sealing gas pressure at an exact predetermined pressure in fuel rods. Constitution: A vent aperture and a valve are provided to the upper end plug of a cladding tube. At first, the valve is opened to fill gas at a predetermined pressure in the fuel can. Then, a conical valve body is closely fitted to a valve seat by the rotation of a needle valve to eliminate the gap in the engaging thread portion and close the vent aperture. After conducting the reduced pressure test for the fuel rod in a water tank, welding joints are formed between the valve and the end plug through welding to completely seal the cladding tube. Since the welding is conducted after the can has been closed by the valve, the predetermined gas pressure can be maintained at an exact level with no efforts from welding heat and with effective gas leak prevention by the double sealing. (Kawakami, Y.)

  18. Grid for nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spacer grid for nuclear fuel rods is formed of generally identical metal straps arranged in crossed relation to define a multiplicity of cells adapted to receive elongated fuel elements or the like. The side walls of each cell have openings for intercell mixing of coolant and tabs from edges of the openings defining helical coolant deflectors in the cells. Tabs from adjacent side walls are fixedly secured together to provide rigidifying flanges for the grid. Spring fingers at the ends of the cells provide for holding fuel rods against fixed stops

  19. The Mechanical Control Absorber reactivity dependence on the enrichment and burn-up in Candu-SEU super-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balaceanu, Victoria; Constantin, Marin [Institute for Nuclear research, Pitesti (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this work is to highlight some aspects of the local neutronic behaviour of the Candu SEU-43 fuel bundles (Slightly Enriched Uranium fuel bundles with 43 fuel elements). More exactly, the study refers to the dependence of some local neutronic parameters, mainly the reactivity, on the enrichment and the burn-up of the fuel. It was taken in consideration two types of super-cells: reference supercell (containing only fuel bundle and moderator) and perturbed supercell (containing fuel bundle, moderator and additionally a strong reactivity device). The considered reactivity device is the Mechanical Control Absorber (MCA). The performed parameters are: k{sub eff}. values, MCA reactivities and flux distributions. For reaching this objective, it is used a local neutronic calculation methodology based on WIMS and PIJXYZ codes. The paper ends with an analysis of the obtained results. (authors)

  20. Country nuclear fuel cycle profiles. Second ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication presents an overall review of worldwide nuclear fuel cycle activities, followed by country specific nuclear fuel cycle information. This information is presented in a concise form and focuses on the essential activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle in each country operating commercial nuclear power reactors or providing nuclear fuel cycle services. It also includes country specific diagrams which illustrate the main material flow in the nuclear fuel cycle. These illustrations are intended to help clarify understanding of both the essential nuclear fuel cycle activities in each country and international relationships. Section 1 provides an introduction and Section 2 a review of worldwide nuclear fuel cycle activities, dealing with mining and milling, conversion, enrichment, fuel fabrication, heavy water production, spent fuel management, and the dismantling of facilities. Individual country profiles are then given in Section 3

  1. Nuclear fuel rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent eutectic reaction between coil spring material and end plug material at the welding work of fuel fabrication. Constitution: Close-contact windings are formed at the end of a coil spring, and base end of a stainless steel supporting member is screwed to the close-contact winding portion of the coil spring. The other end of the supporting member is formed in a conical shape whose apex is in contact with the center of the bottom surface of a zirconium alloy end plug of a cladding tube. In the fuel rod thus constructed, the heating temperature of the end contact portion of the supporting member, at the time of welding the end plug to the cladding tube, can be somewhat lower than the eutectic temperatures of iron, chromium, nickel (the main ingredients of the stainless steel) and zirconium (the main ingredient of the end plug), and accourdingly no eutectic reaction occurs. (Yoshihara, H.)

  2. Spent nuclear fuel reprocessing modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term wide development of nuclear power requires new approaches towards the realization of nuclear fuel cycle, namely, closed nuclear fuel cycle (CNFC) with respect to fission materials. Plant nuclear fuel cycle (PNFC), which is in fact the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel unloaded from the reactor and the production of new nuclear fuel (NF) at the same place together with reactor plant, can be one variant of CNFC. Developing and projecting of PNFC is a complicated high-technology innovative process that requires modern information support. One of the components of this information support is developed by the authors. This component is the programme conducting calculations for various variants of process flow sheets for reprocessing SNF and production of NF. Central in this programme is the blocks library, where the blocks contain mathematical description of separate processes and operations. The calculating programme itself has such a structure that one can configure the complex of blocks and correlations between blocks, appropriate for any given flow sheet. For the ready sequence of operations balance calculations are made of all flows, i.e. expenses, element and substance makeup, heat emission and radiation rate are determined. The programme is open and the block library can be updated. This means that more complicated and detailed models of technological processes will be added to the library basing on the results of testing processes using real equipment, in test operating mode. The development of the model for the realization of technical-economic analysis of various variants of technologic PNFC schemes and the organization of 'operator's advisor' is expected. (authors)

  3. Training nuclear watchdogs: Safeguards and nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a Swedish fuel fabrication plant the IAEA inspectors learn the ins and outs of the powder and the pellets which are key parts of the nuclear fuel process under IAEA safeguards. They learn about a variety of plant configurations so they can detect indications to divert sensitive material. Closed circuit TV cameras zoom in on gauges giving the operator critical indicators from the control room. Enrichment levels in cylinders have to be determined by germanium detectors. Inspectors attach IAEA metallic seals which provide evidence of any unauthorized attempt to gain access to secured material. The pellet's enrichment has to be verified by a Mini-Multichannel Analyzer. Once fully trained, the inspector team spend over 100 days a year at various sites throughout the world to help make sure that peaceful nuclear materials and activities stay peaceful

  4. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste

  5. Disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    This report addresses the topic of the mined geologic disposal of spent nuclear fuel from Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR). Although some fuel processing options are identified, most of the information in this report relates to the isolation of spent fuel in the form it is removed from the reactor. The characteristics of the waste management system and research which relate to spent fuel isolation are discussed. The differences between spent fuel and processed HLW which impact the waste isolation system are defined and evaluated for the nature and extent of that impact. What is known and what needs to be determined about spent fuel as a waste form to design a viable waste isolation system is presented. Other waste forms and programs such as geologic exploration, site characterization and licensing which are generic to all waste forms are also discussed. R and D is being carried out to establish the technical information to develop the methods used for disposal of spent fuel. All evidence to date indicates that there is no reason, based on safety considerations, that spent fuel should not be disposed of as a waste.

  6. Gamma spectrometric characterization of short cooling time nuclear spent fuels using hemispheric CdZnTe detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Lebrun, A; Szabó, J L; Arenas-Carrasco, J; Arlt, R; Dubreuil, A; Esmailpur-Kazerouni, K

    2000-01-01

    After years of cooling, nuclear spent fuel gamma emissions are mainly due to caesium isotopes which are emitters at 605, 662 and 796-801 keV. Extensive work has been done on such fuels using various CdTe or CdZnTe probes. When fuels have to be measured after short cooling time (during NPP outage) the spectrum is much more complex due to the important contributions of niobium and zirconium in the 700 keV range. For the first time in a nuclear power plant, four spent fuels of the Kozloduy VVER reactor no 4 were measured during outage, 37 days after shutdown of the reactor. In such conditions, good resolution is of particular interest, so a 20 mm sup 3 hemispheric crystal was used with a resolution better than 7 keV at 662 keV. This paper presents the experimental device and analyzes the results which show that CdZnTe commercially available detectors enabled us to perform a semi-quantitative determination of the burn-up after a short cooling time. In addition, it is discussed how a burn-up evolution code (CESAR)...

  7. Gamma spectrometric characterization of short cooling time nuclear spent fuels using hemispheric CdZnTe detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, A.; Bignan, G.; Szabo, J. L.; Arenas-Carrasco, J.; Arlt, R.; Dubreuil, A.; Esmailpur Kazerouni, K.

    2000-07-01

    After years of cooling, nuclear spent fuel gamma emissions are mainly due to caesium isotopes which are emitters at 605, 662 and 796-801 keV. Extensive work has been done on such fuels using various CdTe or CdZnTe probes. When fuels have to be measured after short cooling time (during NPP outage) the spectrum is much more complex due to the important contributions of niobium and zirconium in the 700 keV range. For the first time in a nuclear power plant, four spent fuels of the Kozloduy VVER reactor no 4 were measured during outage, 37 days after shutdown of the reactor. In such conditions, good resolution is of particular interest, so a 20 mm 3 hemispheric crystal was used with a resolution better than 7 keV at 662 keV. This paper presents the experimental device and analyzes the results which show that CdZnTe commercially available detectors enabled us to perform a semi-quantitative determination of the burn-up after a short cooling time. In addition, it is discussed how a burn-up evolution code (CESAR) coupled to a gamma transport code (MCNP) allows us to predict and interpret the experimental data from CdZnTe detectors. Particularly, bremsstrahlung contribution to the gamma spectra is suggested and modeled. Calculation results indicate a good agreement between this hypothesis and the present measurements.

  8. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, ''burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs

  9. Nuclear reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel element box for a BWR is situated with a corner bolt on the inside in one corner of its top on the top side of the top plate. This corner bolt is screwed down with a bolt with a corner part which is provided with leaf springs outside on two sides, where the bolt has a smaller diameter and an expansion shank. The bolt is held captive to the bolt head on the top and the holder on the bottom of the corner part. The holder is a locknut. If the expansion forces are too great, the bolt can only break at the expansion shank. (HP)

  10. High level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transformations involved in the nuclear fuels during the burn-up at the power nuclear reactors for burn-up levels of 33.000 MWd/th are considered. Graphs and data on the radioactivity variation with the cooling time and heat power of the irradiated fuel are presented. Likewise, the cycle of the fuel in light water reactors is presented and the alternatives for the nuclear waste management are discussed. A brief description of the management of the spent fuel as a high level nuclear waste is shown, explaining the reprocessing and giving data about the fission products and their radioactivities, which must be considered on the vitrification processes. On the final storage of the nuclear waste into depth geological burials, both alternatives are coincident. The countries supporting the reprocessing are indicated and the Spanish programm defined in the Plan Energetico Nacional (PEN) is shortly reviewed. (author) 8 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Fully ceramic nuclear fuel and related methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venneri, Francesco; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-03-29

    Various embodiments of a nuclear fuel for use in various types of nuclear reactors and/or waste disposal systems are disclosed. One exemplary embodiment of a nuclear fuel may include a fuel element having a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles embedded in a silicon carbide matrix. An exemplary method of manufacturing a nuclear fuel is also disclosed. The method may include providing a plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles, mixing the plurality of tristructural-isotropic fuel particles with silicon carbide powder to form a precursor mixture, and compacting the precursor mixture at a predetermined pressure and temperature.

  12. Method and facility for reprocessing nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For reprocessing of nuclear fuels used in fuel elements with several metallic cladding tubes that are especially applied for light water reactors, the cladding tubes separated from the fuel element structure are individually cut in longitudinal direction so that the nuclear fuel can be removed from the metal parts. The nuclear fuel then is filled into an acid bath for further treatment, whereas the metal parts are conditioned in solid form for ultimate storage by embedding them in a binder. (orig./RW)

  13. Apparatus for locating defective nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ultrasonic search unit for locating defective fuel elements within a fuel assembly used in a water cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The unit is capable of freely traversing the restricted spaces between the fuel elements

  14. Nuclear propulsion technology advanced fuels technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Walter A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on advanced fuels technology are presented. Topics covered include: nuclear thermal propulsion reactor and fuel requirements; propulsion efficiency and temperature; uranium fuel compounds; melting point experiments; fabrication techniques; and sintered microspheres.

  15. Nuclear fuel stress corrosion prevention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the operation of nuclear reactors employing sintered fuel tablets sheathed in zirconium alloy sheaths it has been found that, during irradiation, cadmium is released from the fuel and migrates outwardly to the inner surface of the sheath, where it can create an embrittlement phenomenon, resulting in sheath failure due to stress corrosion cracking. In accordance with the present disclosure copper is provided as a barrier or partial barrier between the fuel and the sheath inner surface, to facilitate the formation of a stable copper-cadmium alloy during the irradiation life of the fuel, to thereby impede the formation of a concentration of cadmium or active compounds thereof on the sheath inner surface. (auth)

  16. Compositions and methods for treating nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z; Johnsen, Amanda M; McNamara, Bruce K; Hanson, Brady D; Smith, Steven C; Peper, Shane M

    2014-01-28

    Compositions are provided that include nuclear fuel. Methods for treating nuclear fuel are provided which can include exposing the fuel to a carbonate-peroxide solution. Methods can also include exposing the fuel to an ammonium solution. Methods for acquiring molybdenum from a uranium comprising material are provided.

  17. Quantification of the computational accuracy of code systems on the burn-up credit using experimental re-calculations; Quantifizierung der Rechengenauigkeit von Codesystemen zum Abbrandkredit durch Experimentnachrechnungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behler, Matthias; Hannstein, Volker; Kilger, Robert; Moser, Franz-Eberhard; Pfeiffer, Arndt; Stuke, Maik

    2014-06-15

    In order to account for the reactivity-reducing effect of burn-up in the criticality safety analysis for systems with irradiated nuclear fuel (''burnup credit''), numerical methods to determine the enrichment and burnup dependent nuclide inventory (''burnup code'') and its resulting multiplication factor k{sub eff} (''criticality code'') are applied. To allow for reliable conclusions, for both calculation systems the systematic deviations of the calculation results from the respective true values, the bias and its uncertainty, are being quantified by calculation and analysis of a sufficient number of suitable experiments. This quantification is specific for the application case under scope and is also called validation. GRS has developed a methodology to validate a calculation system for the application of burnup credit in the criticality safety analysis for irradiated fuel assemblies from pressurized water reactors. This methodology was demonstrated by applying the GRS home-built KENOREST burnup code and the criticality calculation sequence CSAS5 from SCALE code package. It comprises a bounding approach and alternatively a stochastic, which both have been exemplarily demonstrated by use of a generic spent fuel pool rack and a generic dry storage cask, respectively. Based on publicly available post irradiation examination and criticality experiments, currently the isotopes of uranium and plutonium elements can be regarded for.

  18. Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

    2011-02-18

    Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount

  19. Spent nuclear fuel sampling strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report proposes a strategy for sampling the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stored in the 105-K Basins (105-K East and 105-K West). This strategy will support decisions concerning the path forward SNF disposition efforts in the following areas: (1) SNF isolation activities such as repackaging/overpacking to a newly constructed staging facility; (2) conditioning processes for fuel stabilization; and (3) interim storage options. This strategy was developed without following the Data Quality Objective (DQO) methodology. It is, however, intended to augment the SNF project DQOS. The SNF sampling is derived by evaluating the current storage condition of the SNF and the factors that effected SNF corrosion/degradation

  20. Grids for nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to grids for nuclear fuel assemblies with the object of providing an improved grid, tending to have greater strength and tending to offer better location of the fuel pins. It comprises sets of generally parallel strips arranged to intersect to define a structure of cellular form, at least some of the intersections including a strip which is keyed to another strip at more than one point. One type of strip may be dimpled along its length and another type of strip may have slots for keying with the dimples. (Auth.)

  1. Nuclear fuel microsphere gamma analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Kenneth H.; Long, Jr., Ernest L.; Willey, Melvin G.

    1977-01-01

    A gamma analyzer system is provided for the analysis of nuclear fuel microspheres and other radioactive particles. The system consists of an analysis turntable with means for loading, in sequence, a plurality of stations within the turntable; a gamma ray detector for determining the spectrum of a sample in one section; means for analyzing the spectrum; and a receiver turntable to collect the analyzed material in stations according to the spectrum analysis. Accordingly, particles may be sorted according to their quality; e.g., fuel particles with fractured coatings may be separated from those that are not fractured, or according to other properties.

  2. Calculation of the linear heat generation rates which violate the thermomechanical limit of plastic deformation of the fuel cladding in function of the burn up of a BWR fuel rod type; Calculo de las razones de generacion de calor lineal que violen el limite termomecanico de deformacion plastica de la camisa en funcion del quemado de una barra combustible tipo BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Hernandez L, H. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: mal@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    The linear heat generation rates (LHGR) for a BWR type generic fuel rod, as function of the burnup that violate the thermomechanical limit of circumferential plastic deformation of the can (canning) in nominal operation in stationary state of the fuel rod are calculated. The evaluation of the LHGR in function of the burnt of the fuel, is carried out under the condition that the deformation values of the circumferential plastic deformation of the can exceeds in 0.1 the thermomechanical value operation limit of 1%. The results of the calculations are compared with the generation rates of linear operation heat in function of the burnt for this fuel rod type. The calculations are carried out with the FEMAXI-V and RODBURN codes. The results show that for exhibitions or burnt between 0 and 16,000 M Wd/tU a minimum margin of 160.8 W/cm exists among LHGR (439.6 W/cm) operation peak for the given fuel and maximum LHGR of the fuel (calculated) to reach 1.1% of circumferential plastic deformation of the can, for the peak factor of power of 1.40. For burnt of 20,000 MWd/tU and 60,000 MWd/tU exist a margin of 150.3 and 298.6 W/cm, respectively. (Author)

  3. Coal and nuclear electricity fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparative economic analysis is used to contrast the economic advantages of nuclear and coal-fired electric generating stations for Canadian regions. A simplified cash flow method is used with present value techniques to yield a single levelized total unit energy cost over the lifetime of a generating station. Sensitivity analysis illustrates the effects of significant changes in some of the cost data. The analysis indicates that in Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and British Columbia nuclear energy is less costly than coal for electric power generation. In the base case scenario the nuclear advantage is 24 percent in Quebec, 29 percent in Ontario, 34 percent in Manitoba, and 16 percent in British Columbia. Total unit energy cost is sensitive to variations in both capital and fuel costs for both nuclear and coal-fuelled power stations, but are not very sensitive to operating and maintenance costs

  4. Closing the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Generally the case for closing the nuclear fuel cycle is based on the strategic value of the uranium and plutonium recovered by reprocessing spent fuel. The energy content of 1 t of spent fuel varies from 10,000 to 40,000 t of coal equivalent depending on the reactor type from which the spent fuel arises. Recycling in fast reactors would increase these values by a factor or roughly 40. Reprocessing in the UK has its roots in the technology developed during and after the 1939-45 war to provide plutonium for defence purposes. At BNFL's Sellafield site in northern England the commercial reprocessing of spent fuel has been undertaken for over 30 years with a cumulative throughput of over 30,000 tU. Over 15,000 tU of the uranium recovered has been recycled and some 70% of all the UK's AGR fuel has been produced from this material. As a consequence the UK's bill for imported uranium has been reduced by several hundred million pounds sterling. This report discusses issues associated with reprocessing, uranium, and plutonium recycle

  5. Nuclear Fuels: Present and Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald R. Olander

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The important new developments in nuclear fuels and their problems are reviewed and compared with the status of present light-water reactor fuels. The limitations of these fuels and the reactors they power are reviewed with respect to important recent concerns, namely provision of outlet coolant temperatures high enough for use in H2 production, destruction of plutonium to eliminate proliferation concerns, and burning of the minor actinides to reduce the waste repository heat load and long-term radiation hazard. In addition to current oxide-based fuel-rod designs, the hydride fuel with liquid metal thermal bonding of the fuel-cladding gap is covered. Finally, two of the most promising Generation IV reactor concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor and the Sodium Fast Reactor, and the accompanying reprocessing technologies, aqueous-based UREX and pyrometallurgical, are summarized. In all of the topics covered, the thermodynamics involved in the material's behavior under irradiation and in the reprocessing schemes are emphasized.

  6. Method of manufacturing nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To provide a nuclear fuel pellet, which has low water content and adequate density of sintering and is less liable to shrinkage of sintering. Constitution: To manufacture an uranium dioxide fuel pellet for the nuclear reactor, uranium dioxide powder and 1 to 10 weight % of uranium oxide powder of coarser grain size than the uranium dioxide powder and with U3O8 or O/U ratio of 2.3 to 2.7 are mixed together and uniformly blended by a blender. This mixture is press molded with a high pressure above 0.5 t/cm2. This molding is sintered in a reducing atmosphere of hydrogen gas or cracking ammonia gas at a high temperature above 1,5000C to obtain a uranium dioxide pellet. This pellet has comparatively large pores which are uniformly distributed, low water content and adequate density of sintering and is less liable to shrinkage. (Aizawa, K.)

  7. Marking method for nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitamura, Akira; Yoshimuta, Hideharu.

    1991-06-28

    Nuclear fuels are molded by dispersing coated fuel particles in a matrix mainly composed of graphite. Printing is applied by using an ink containing a colorant and a binder resin. As the colorants pigments and dyes, or organic metal chelates and various kinds of ceramics are used. The printed products are heated in an inert gas or under vacuum, to thermally decompose the binder resin, and then they are sintered under vacuum, during which organic ingredients in the ink are carbonized so that volatile materials are removed completely. With such procedures, the color tones are made different due to the residue of metal ingredients in the colorants, the difference of the density of carbonization layers and the protrusion of carbon layers, to enable easy identificaiton. Accordingly, printing can be conducted clearly on the surface of the products without damaging the coated fuel particles. (I.N.).

  8. Marking method for nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuels are molded by dispersing coated fuel particles in a matrix mainly composed of graphite. Printing is applied by using an ink containing a colorant and a binder resin. As the colorants pigments and dyes, or organic metal chelates and various kinds of ceramics are used. The printed products are heated in an inert gas or under vacuum, to thermally decompose the binder resin, and then they are sintered under vacuum, during which organic ingredients in the ink are carbonized so that volatile materials are removed completely. With such procedures, the color tones are made different due to the residue of metal ingredients in the colorants, the difference of the density of carbonization layers and the protrusion of carbon layers, to enable easy identificaiton. Accordingly, printing can be conducted clearly on the surface of the products without damaging the coated fuel particles. (I.N.)

  9. Antineutrino monitoring of spent nuclear fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Brdar, Vedran; Huber, Patrick; Kopp, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Military and civilian applications of nuclear energy have left a significant amount of spent nuclear fuel over the past 70 years. Currently, in many countries world wide, the use of nuclear energy is on the rise. Therefore, the management of highly radioactive nuclear waste is a pressing issue. In this letter, we explore antineutrino detectors as a tool for monitoring and safeguarding nuclear waste material. We compute the flux and spectrum of antineutrinos emitted by spent nuclear fuel eleme...

  10. Nuclear fuel element and container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention is based on the discovery that a substantial reduction in metal embrittlement or stress corrosion cracking from fuel pellet-cladding interaction can be achieved by the use of a copper layer or liner in proximity to the nuclear fuel, and an intermediate zirconium oxide barrier layer between the copper layer and the zirconium cladding substrate. The intermediate zirconia layer is a good copper diffusion barrier; also, if the zirconium cladding surface is modified prior to oxidation, copper can be deposited by electroless plating. A nuclear fuel element is described which comprises a central core of fuel material and an elongated container using the system outlined above. The method for making the container is again described. It comprises roughening or etching the surface of the zirconium or zirconium alloy container, oxidizing the resulting container, activating the oxidized surface to allow for the metallic coating of such surfaces by electroless deposition and further coating the activated-oxidized surface of the zirconium or zirconium alloy container with copper, iron or nickel or an alloy thereof. (U.K.)

  11. Monte Carlo uncertainty propagation approaches in ADS burn-up calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Two Monte Carlo uncertainty propagation approaches are compared. ► How to make both approaches equivalent is presented and applied. ► ADS burn-up calculation is selected as the application of approaches. ► The cross-section uncertainties of 239Pu and 241Pu are propagated. ► Cross-correlations appear as a source of differences between approaches. - Abstract: In activation calculations, there are several approaches to quantify uncertainties: deterministic by means of sensitivity analysis, and stochastic by means of Monte Carlo. Here, two different Monte Carlo approaches for nuclear data uncertainty are presented: the first one is the Total Monte Carlo (TMC). The second one is by means of a Monte Carlo sampling of the covariance information included in the nuclear data libraries to propagate these uncertainties throughout the activation calculations. This last approach is what we named Covariance Uncertainty Propagation, CUP. This work presents both approaches and their differences. Also, they are compared by means of an activation calculation, where the cross-section uncertainties of 239Pu and 241Pu are propagated in an ADS activation calculation

  12. Contribution to the study of the evolution of nuclear fuel composition in PWR type reactors. Reactor cores in three and four regions of enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main methods for calculations of fuel depletion are studied and some approaches to do it are mentioned; the LEOPARD Code is described and full details are given for each subroutine, flow charts are included; the method given by the code for calculation of fuel depletion is described; some imperfections from the IPR's version are listed, and corrected, for instance: the method for burn-up calculation of heavy isotopes; the results of calculations for a reference reactor based on data of the Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for Angra I Nuclear Plant are presented and discussed. (author)

  13. COREBN: A core burn-up calculation module for SRAC2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COREBN is an auxiliary code of the SRAC system for multi-dimensional core burn-up calculation based on the diffusion theory and interpolation of macroscopic cross-sections tabulated to local parameters such as burn-up degree, moderator temperature and so on. The macroscopic cross-sections are prepared by cell burn-up calculations with the collision probability method of SRAC. SRAC and COREBN have wide applicability for various types of cell and core geometries. They have been used mainly for the purpose of core burn-up management of research reactors in Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The report is a revision of the users manual for the latest version of COREBN served with the SRAC released in 2006. (author)

  14. Burn-up calculation and measurement for mixed LEU-HEU of TRIGA-14 MW reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciocanescu, M.; Preda, M. [Romanian Power Authority, Pitesti (Romania). Inst. for Nuclear Research; Covaci, S.; Toma, C.; Bita, R.

    1996-07-01

    In this paper the use of a three-dimensional diffusion model for burn-up evaluation for the named reactor is described. The results are presented together with the corresponding measured values. (HSI)

  15. Simulation of differential die-away instrument's response to asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinik, Tomas; Henzl, Vladimir; Grape, Sophie; Svärd, Staffan Jacobsson; Jansson, Peter; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Tobin, Stephen J.

    2015-07-01

    Previous simulation studies of Differential Die-Away (DDA) instrument's response to active interrogation of spent nuclear fuel from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) yielded promising results in terms of its capability to accurately measure or estimate basic spent fuel assembly (SFA) characteristics, such as multiplication, initial enrichment (IE) and burn-up (BU) as well as the total plutonium content. These studies were however performed only for a subset of idealized SFAs with a symmetric BU with respect to its longitudinal axis. Therefore, to complement the previous results, additional simulations have been performed of the DDA instrument's response to interrogation of asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel in order to determine whether detailed assay of SFAs from all 4 sides will be necessary in real life applications or whether a cost and time saving single sided assay could be used to achieve results of similar quality as previously reported in case of symmetrically burned SFAs. The results of this study suggest that DDA instrument response depends on the position of the individual neutron detectors and in fact can be split in two modes. The first mode, measured by the back detectors, is not significantly sensitive to the spatial distribution of fissile isotopes and neutron absorbers, but rather reflects the total amount of both contributors as in the cases of symmetrically burned SFAs. In contrary, the second mode, measured by the front detectors, yields certain sensitivity to the orientation of the asymmetrically burned SFA inside the assaying instrument. This study thus provides evidence that the DDA instrument can potentially be utilized as necessary in both ways, i.e. a quick determination of the average SFA characteristics in a single assay, as well as a more detailed characterization involving several DDA observables through assay of the SFA from all of its four sides that can possibly map the burn-up distribution and/or identify diversion or

  16. Simulation of differential die-away instrument’s response to asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinik, Tomas, E-mail: tomas.martinik@physics.uu.se [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516 Sweden, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); Grape, Sophie; Svärd, Staffan Jacobsson; Jansson, Peter [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516 Sweden, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); Tobin, Stephen J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 516 Sweden, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM, 87545 (United States); Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company, Blekholmstorget 30, Box 250, SE-101 24 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-07-11

    Previous simulation studies of Differential Die‐Away (DDA) instrument’s response to active interrogation of spent nuclear fuel from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) yielded promising results in terms of its capability to accurately measure or estimate basic spent fuel assembly (SFA) characteristics, such as multiplication, initial enrichment (IE) and burn-up (BU) as well as the total plutonium content. These studies were however performed only for a subset of idealized SFAs with a symmetric BU with respect to its longitudinal axis. Therefore, to complement the previous results, additional simulations have been performed of the DDA instrument’s response to interrogation of asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel in order to determine whether detailed assay of SFAs from all 4 sides will be necessary in real life applications or whether a cost and time saving single sided assay could be used to achieve results of similar quality as previously reported in case of symmetrically burned SFAs. The results of this study suggest that DDA instrument response depends on the position of the individual neutron detectors and in fact can be split in two modes. The first mode, measured by the back detectors, is not significantly sensitive to the spatial distribution of fissile isotopes and neutron absorbers, but rather reflects the total amount of both contributors as in the cases of symmetrically burned SFAs. In contrary, the second mode, measured by the front detectors, yields certain sensitivity to the orientation of the asymmetrically burned SFA inside the assaying instrument. This study thus provides evidence that the DDA instrument can potentially be utilized as necessary in both ways, i.e. a quick determination of the average SFA characteristics in a single assay, as well as a more detailed characterization involving several DDA observables through assay of the SFA from all of its four sides that can possibly map the burn-up distribution and/or identify diversion or

  17. Simulation of differential die-away instrument’s response to asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous simulation studies of Differential Die‐Away (DDA) instrument’s response to active interrogation of spent nuclear fuel from a pressurized water reactor (PWR) yielded promising results in terms of its capability to accurately measure or estimate basic spent fuel assembly (SFA) characteristics, such as multiplication, initial enrichment (IE) and burn-up (BU) as well as the total plutonium content. These studies were however performed only for a subset of idealized SFAs with a symmetric BU with respect to its longitudinal axis. Therefore, to complement the previous results, additional simulations have been performed of the DDA instrument’s response to interrogation of asymmetrically burned spent nuclear fuel in order to determine whether detailed assay of SFAs from all 4 sides will be necessary in real life applications or whether a cost and time saving single sided assay could be used to achieve results of similar quality as previously reported in case of symmetrically burned SFAs. The results of this study suggest that DDA instrument response depends on the position of the individual neutron detectors and in fact can be split in two modes. The first mode, measured by the back detectors, is not significantly sensitive to the spatial distribution of fissile isotopes and neutron absorbers, but rather reflects the total amount of both contributors as in the cases of symmetrically burned SFAs. In contrary, the second mode, measured by the front detectors, yields certain sensitivity to the orientation of the asymmetrically burned SFA inside the assaying instrument. This study thus provides evidence that the DDA instrument can potentially be utilized as necessary in both ways, i.e. a quick determination of the average SFA characteristics in a single assay, as well as a more detailed characterization involving several DDA observables through assay of the SFA from all of its four sides that can possibly map the burn-up distribution and/or identify diversion or

  18. MACSTOR trademark: Dry spent fuel storage for the nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safe storage of spent fuel has long been an area of critical concern for the nuclear power industry. As fuel pools fill up and re-racking possibilities become exhausted, power plant operators will find that they must ship spent fuel assemblies off-site or develop new on-site storage options. Many utility companies are turning to dry storage for their spent fuel assemblies. The MACSTOR (Modular Air-cooled Canister STORage) concept was developed with this in mind. Derived from AECL's successful vertical loading, concrete silo program for storing CANDU nuclear spent fuel, MACSTOR was developed for light water reactor spent fuel and was subjected to full scale thermal testing. The MACSTOR Module is a monolithic, shielded concrete vault structure than can accommodate up to 24 spent fuel canisters. Each canister holds 12 PWR or 32 PWR previously cooled spent fuel assemblies with burn-up rates as high as 45,000 MWD/MTU. The structure is passively cooled by natural convection through an array of inlet and outlet gratings and galleries serving a central plenum where the (vertically) stored canisters are located. The canisters are continuously monitored by means of a pressure monitoring system developed by TNI. The MACSTOR system includes the storage module(s), an overhead gantry system for cask handling, a transfer cask for moving fuel from wet to dry storage and a cask transporter. The canister and transfer cask designs are based on Transnuclear transport cask designs and proven hot cell transfer cask technology, adapted to requirements for on-site spent fuel storage. This Modular Air Cooled System has a number of inherent advantages: efficient use of construction materials and site space; cooling is virtually impossible to impede; has the ability to monitor fuel confinement boundary integrity during storage; the fuel canisters may be used for both storage and transport and canisters utilize a flanged, ASME-III closure system that allows for easy inspection

  19. A university course in nuclear fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A graduate course currently offered as part of the Nuclear Engineering curriculum at MIT and Purdue University develops the reactor physics and engineering skills essential for the effective managing of the nuclear fuel in reactor power systems. Maximum use is made of computer codes to demonstrate methods of analyzing in-core fuel performance and the various ex-core fuel cycle activities. The course in Nuclear Fuel Management helps the student integrate the wide range of engineering disciplines necessary to insure the nuclear fuel is being utilized as safely and economically as possible

  20. The nuclear fuel cycle business in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, the development and use of nuclear power are considered key building blocks of safe energy supply in the 21st century. Closing the nuclear fuel cycle so as to utilize uranium and plutonium from spent fuel elements is to establish nuclear power as a quasi-domestic energy source in Japan. Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd. is the only private enterprise in Japan to offer nuclear fuel cycle services. At Rokkasho, the company operates plants for reprocessing (under construction), uranium enrichment, treatment of radioactive waste, and a repository for low level radioactive materials. Consequently, an important sector of Japan's future energy supply is ensured on this location. (orig.)

  1. Thermal conductivity of oxide fuel under reactor irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal conductivity and its temperature dependence for UO2 and (U,Pu) O2 under irradiation in nuclear reactor were reviewed and discussed. Fuel restructuring, oxygen redistribution, build-up of fission products and so forth occured in fuel pellets under irradiation were taken up as the facters having influence on thermal conductivity. Classifing roughly irradiation into low burn-up and high burn-up, increase or decrease of thermal conductivity due to the phenomenal changes in fuel pellets was speculated. (author)

  2. An introduction to the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This overview of the nuclear fuel cycle is divided into three parts. First, is a brief discussion of the basic principles of how nuclear reactors work;second, is a look at the major types of nuclear reactors being used and world-wide nuclear capacity;and third, is an overview of the nuclear fuel cycle and the present industrial capability in the US. 34 figs., 10 tabs

  3. Physics of BWR MOX fuel results of an international benchmark study by the OECD/NEA nuclear science committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a theoretical benchmark of boiling water reactor (BWR) assembly containing MOX fuel rods are summarised. This study was carried out by the OECD/NEA Working Party on Physics of Plutonium Fuels and Innovative Fuel Cycles (WPPR). A modern 10 x 10 BWR design with large internal water structure was chosen for this exercise. It corresponds to an ATRIUM 10 (10-9Q) type with symmetrical water gaps. About 30 solutions were submitted by approximately 20 participants using a dozen different code systems with data from well-known state-of-the-art evaluated nuclear data files, a response which underlines the widespread interest in BWR MOX physics. The discrepancies between the participants for the infinite multiplication factor from beginning of life through burn-ups up to 50 MWd/kg are relatively small (less than 1%). The effect due to diverse evaluated data libraries, e.g. JEF and ENDF represents about 1%. The peaking factor is a local value, more dependent on the methods used in the codes, and with lower compensation effects than for reactivity. The discrepancies are larger in value and there are inconsistencies in the location of the peak. The average values with and without the extreme values differ by 2%, implying that the extreme values could be outside the acceptable range. Other parameters examined include the behaviour of the peaking factor under cold conditions, the evolution of peaking factor with burn-up and the effect of voiding the assembly. Close attention was also paid to the depletion behaviour of gadolinia and the burn-up evolution of the heavy metals. The paper describes the results from this benchmark study and draws conclusions on the consistency of the different solutions provided and provides recommendations for the most effective methods. (author)

  4. Graphite coating of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives an account of work conducted on graphite coating of (1) zircaloy fuel tubes for CANDU type power reactors and (2) stainless steel bearing plates for S3F vault structure commissioned at Tarapur for storage of radioactive waste. Graphite has been chosen as a coating material because it is not only an excellent lubricating material but also can withstand severe radiation from nuclear fuel or radioactive waste up to fairly high temperatures. The paper first describes in detail the equipments and experimental procedure standardised to achieve an adherent graphite coating of 5 to 9 μm thickness by using alcohol based suspension of graphite. Graphite coated tubes were evaluated by subjecting it to various destructive and nondestructive testing. Thousands of fuel tubes were coated so far and loaded in RAPP-2 for studying their inpile behaviour. Finally a flowsheet is presented to achieve the graphite coating on fuel tubes as per specifications. The second part of the paper deals with the various techniques examined to obtain the graphite coating on 450 mm square stainless steel plates with alcohol based graphite suspension. An unique spray coating procedure involving both graphite suspension and lacquor was evolved for carrying out the coating operation at site. Co-efficient of friction between graphite coated SS plates was found to be as low as 6.77 per cent. A batch of 280 SS bearing plates were coated with graphite and utilised for commissioning the vault structure at Tarapur. (author). 5 figures

  5. Comparative analysis of radiation characteristics from various types of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryuchkov, E.F.; Opalovsky, V.A.; Tikhomirov, G.V. [Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University) (Russian Federation)

    2003-07-01

    At the present time, in purposes of the most effective utilization of nuclear materials, new advanced fuel cycles are under development. These cycles imply application of uranium-plutonium, uranium-thorium and some other types of nuclear fuel. However, it is obvious that the parameters of new nuclear fuel (NF) types will be quite different from those for traditional NF types. These differences can affect significantly the conditions for storage, transportation and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). So, it is necessary to carry out a comparative analysis of radiation characteristics for various NF types at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). The present paper addresses radiation properties of the following NF types: UO{sub 2}, UO{sub 2}-PuO{sub 2}, ThO{sub 2}-PaO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2}. Numerical studies have been carried out to determine radiation properties of these NF types at the following NFC stages: radiation properties of NF directly before and after irradiation in the reactor core, after different cooling time, radiation properties of uranium and plutonium fractions after chemical separation, radiation properties of NF re-fabricated for recycle, radiation properties of NF after the second and third recycles. The computer code package SCALE is used for evaluating the radiation properties of different SNF types. Finally, the following major conclusions can be made: 1) Correct description of SNF radiation and dosimetric properties requires available benchmark data on contents of heavy nuclides in SNF; 2) ThO{sub 2}-PaO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} fuel demonstrates an important feature: internal transmutation of minor actinides provided the ultra-high fuel burn-up is achieved.

  6. Comparative analysis of radiation characteristics from various types of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present time, in purposes of the most effective utilization of nuclear materials, new advanced fuel cycles are under development. These cycles imply application of uranium-plutonium, uranium-thorium and some other types of nuclear fuel. However, it is obvious that the parameters of new nuclear fuel (NF) types will be quite different from those for traditional NF types. These differences can affect significantly the conditions for storage, transportation and reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). So, it is necessary to carry out a comparative analysis of radiation characteristics for various NF types at different stages of nuclear fuel cycle (NFC). The present paper addresses radiation properties of the following NF types: UO2, UO2-PuO2, ThO2-PaO2-UO2. Numerical studies have been carried out to determine radiation properties of these NF types at the following NFC stages: radiation properties of NF directly before and after irradiation in the reactor core, after different cooling time, radiation properties of uranium and plutonium fractions after chemical separation, radiation properties of NF re-fabricated for recycle, radiation properties of NF after the second and third recycles. The computer code package SCALE is used for evaluating the radiation properties of different SNF types. Finally, the following major conclusions can be made: 1) Correct description of SNF radiation and dosimetric properties requires available benchmark data on contents of heavy nuclides in SNF; 2) ThO2-PaO2-UO2 fuel demonstrates an important feature: internal transmutation of minor actinides provided the ultra-high fuel burn-up is achieved

  7. Nuclear fuel assembly debris filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a nuclear fuel assembly having fuel rods held in a spaced array by grid assemblies, guide tubes extending through the grid assemblies and attached at their upper and lower ends to an upper end fitting and a lower end fitting, the end fittings having openings therethrough for coolant flow, and a debris filter. The debris filter comprises: a plate attached to the bottom periphery of and spanning the lower end fitting; and the plate having substantially triangular-shaped flow holes therethrough that each measure approximately 0.181 inch from the base to the apex with the majority of the triangular- shaped flow holes arranged in groups of four to define square clusters that each measure approximately 0.405 inch on each side whereby the portions of the plate between the flow holes in each cluster are diagonally oriented relative to the sides of the plate

  8. Nuclear reactor fuel rod spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A spacer for positioning at least the four corner fuel rods in a tubular flow channel of a nuclear reactor is disclosed. The spacer comprises a support member having four side bands interconnected by four corner bands to form a unitary structure. Each of the side bands has a L-shaped lobe adjacent to each of its ends with one leg of each lobe extending to the adjacent end of its side band. Each of the corner bands is narrower than the side bands and is offset so as to be spaced from the lobe. One leg of each lobe is positioned to engage the tubular flow channel to maintain proper spacing between the flow channel and the adjacent corner fuel rod and to improve the thermal-hydraulic performance of the spacer

  9. Nuclear fuel control in fuel fabrication plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic control problems of measuring uranium and of the environment inside and outside nuclear fuel fabrication plants are reviewed, excluding criticality prevention in case of submergence. The occurrence of loss scraps in fabrication and scrap-recycling, the measuring error, the uranium going cut of the system, the confirmation of the presence of lost uranium and the requirement of the measurement control for safeguard make the measurement control very complicated. The establishment of MBA (material balance area) and ICA (item control area) can make clearer the control of inventories, the control of loss scraps and the control of measuring points. Besides the above basic points, the following points are to be taken into account: 1) the method of confirmation of inventories, 2) the introduction of reliable NDT instruments for the rapid check system for enrichment and amount of uranium, 3) the introduction of real time system, and 4) the clarification of MUF analysis and its application to the reliability check of measurement control system. The environment control includes the controls of the uranium concentration in factory atmosphere, the surface contamination, the space dose rate, the uranium concentration in air and water discharged from factories, and the uranium in liquid wastes. The future problems are the practical restudy of measurement control under NPT, the definite plan of burglary protection and the realization of the disposal of solid wastes. (Iwakiri, K.)

  10. Investigation of the effect of different disposal paths on a secure nuclear fuel supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prices of natural uranium passed through a high phase in the Western World during the 1970's. However, the supply of natural uranium was never endangered in the past. A large number of other parameters are also decisive for the supply position of the next decade, which will be determined by the further use of nuclear power. These include, in particular: - uranium deposits and contents of ores, - burn-up and working use (load factor) of the nuclear powerstations and the degree of depletion of the natural uranium, - storage, disposal routes: integrated disposal with reprocessing or direct final storage of spent fuel elements. The aim of this study was to analyse quantitatively the different parameters in this system affecting the nuclear fuel supply, particularly the effects of different disposal routes by model calculations and to relate them by comparison to the amount of effect of other parameters. The study is firstly intended to show the quantitative development of the demand for natural uranium for nuclear powerstations in the Federal German Republic and in the Western World. In the context of worldwide considerations, the effects on the price level of natural uranium were also shown. The international situation, especially with regard to the countries of the former Eastern Block entering the western fuel market should be analysed as a dominent factor. The investigation covers a period from 1990 to the year 2030. (orig.)

  11. Radioecology of nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides information to help assess the environmental impacts and certain potential human hazards associated with nuclear fuel cycles. A data base is being developed to define and quantify biological transport routes, which will permit credible predictions and assessment of routine and potential large-scale releases of radionuclides and other toxic materials. These data, used in assessment models, will increase the accuracy of estimating radiation doses to man and other life forms. Results will provide information to determine if waste management procedures on the Hanford site have caused ecological perturbations, and, if so, to determine the source, nature and magnitude of such disturbances

  12. Field experience of new nuclear fuel types on the Kola NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specificity of the Kola nuclear power plant geographical position, conditions of region economics determine fuel management strategy. Isolation of Kola power supply system and, as a consequence, generating capacities redundancy cause operation of the nuclear power plant on reduced power level. At the same time there is a need to operate the power unit on the maximum power level in the case of not planned conditions. The basis of in-core fuel management is an achievement of the maximal burnup under providing of high installed capacity. At present there are not abilities to improve the fuel cycle based on traditional implementation fuel assemblies. Burnup maximum in these fuel cycles is achieved. At the core periphery installed highest possible quantity of the burned-up assemblies in the view of safety operation margins satisfaction. Works on application of the second generation fuel have been carried out on the Kola NPP since 2002. Fuel assemblies of this type are profiled. Burnable absorber, changed lattice spacing in relation to standard fuel, changed height of a fuel column, thickness of fuel pin clad are applied. In CR fuel followers modernized docking unit (with hafnium plates are intended for energy-release splash suppression) is used. At present 2-nd generation fuel is in experimental operation on unit 3 (18-21 fuel cycles, 2002-2007 years) and unit 4 (18-19 fuel cycles, 2005-2007 years). Safety margins did not exceeded. Coolant activity did not exceed the limiting value. There were not damaged fuel assemblies of second generation. Originally in the project of applications of new fuel it was supposed to refuel annually 78 fresh assemblies. At the moment annual refueling consists of 66 assemblies with effective enrichment 3.82 %. Cycle duration does not exceed 250-260 effective days. The part of assemblies is left on 5-th cycle of operation. In a similar fuel cycle in 2007 on the unit 1 operation with profiled fuel (enrichment of 3.82 %) of shakeproof type

  13. Dynamic leaching studies of 48 MWd/kgU UO{sub 2} commercial spent nuclear fuel under oxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano-Purroy, D., E-mail: Daniel.serrano-purroy@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Casas, I. [Department of Chemical Engineering, UPC, Barcelona (Spain); González-Robles, E. [Environmental Technology Department, Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain); Glatz, J.P.; Wegen, D.H. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Clarens, F. [Environmental Technology Department, Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain); Giménez, J. [Department of Chemical Engineering, UPC, Barcelona (Spain); Pablo, J. de [Department of Chemical Engineering, UPC, Barcelona (Spain); Environmental Technology Department, Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Manresa, Barcelona (Spain); Martínez-Esparza, A. [High Level Waste Department, ENRESA, Empresa Nacional de Residuos Radioactivos, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-03-15

    The leaching of a high-burn-up spent nuclear fuel (48 MWd/KgU) has been studied in a carbonate-containing solution and under oxic conditions using a Continuously Stirred Tank Flow-Through Reactor (CSTR). Two samples of the fuel, one prepared from the centre of the pellet (labelled CORE) and another one from the fuel pellet periphery, enriched with the so-called High Burn-Up Structure (HBS, labelled OUT) have been used. For uranium and actinides, the results showed that U, Np, Am and Cm gave very similar normalized dissolution rates, while Pu showed slower dissolution rates for both samples. In addition, dissolution rates were consistently two to four times lower for OUT sample compared to CORE sample. Considering the fission products release the main results are that Y, Tc, La and Nd dissolved very similar to uranium; while Cs, Sr, Mo and Rb have up to 10 times higher dissolution rates. Rh, Ru and Zr seemed to have lower dissolution rates than uranium. The lowest dissolution rates were found for OUT sample. Three different contributions were detected on uranium release, modelled and attributed to oxidation layer, fines and matrix release.

  14. Method of assembling nuclear fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films are formed to the surface of a fuel rod for preventing the occurrence of injuries at the surface of the fuel rod. That is, in a method of assembling a nuclear fuel assembly by inserting fuel rods into lattice cells of a support lattice, thin films of polyvinyl alcohol are formed to a predetermined thickness at the surface of each of the fuel rods and, after insertion of the fuel rods into the lattice cells, the nuclear fuel assemblies are dipped into water or steams to dissolve and remove the thin films. Since polyvinyl alcohol is noncombustible and not containing nuclear inhibitive material as the ingredient, they cause no undesired effects on plant facilities even if not completely removed from the fuel rods. The polyvinyl alcohol thin films have high strength and can sufficiently protect the fuel rod. Further, scraping damages caused by support members of the support lattice upon insertion can also be prevented. (T.M.)

  15. The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) is an international directory of civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Its purpose is to identify existing and planned nuclear fuel cycle facilities throughout the world and to indicate their main parameters. It includes information on facilities for uranium ore processing, refining, conversion and enrichment, for fuel fabrication, away-from-reactor storage of spent fuel and reprocessing, and for the production of zirconium metal and Zircaloy tubing. NFCIS currently covers 271 facilities in 32 countries and includes 171 references

  16. Fuel development program of the nuclear fuel element centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel technology development program pf the nuclear fuel element centre is still devised into two main pillars, namely the research reactors fuel technology and the power reactor fuel technology taking into account the strategic influencing environment such as better access to global market of fuel cycle services, the state of the art and the general trend of the fuel technology in the world. Embarking on the twenty first century the fuel development program has to be directed toward strengthening measure to acquire and self-reliance in the field of fuel technology in support to the national energy program as well as to the utilisation of research reactor. A more strengthened acquisition of fuel cycle technology, in general, and particularly of fuel technology would improve the bargaining power when negotiation the commercial fuel technology transfer in the future

  17. Actinide and fission product evolution benchmarking with Vandellos II (PWR-Spain) measured isotopic values with considering all the burn-up history with consecutive calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At this study, isotopic evolution of the sample E58-263 of assembly WZR0058 of Vandellos Unit II (PWR-Spain) is calculated with MONTEBURNS code system. The sample was exposed with different neutron spectrum because of its different core location at fuel different cycles. At fuel calculation, all fuel cycle burn-up history of Use sample is 1 considered consecutively by using the 'remove' and 'add' option of the MONTEBURNS code. The calculated results are compared with fuel measurement and with cycle by cycle calculation methodology results.

  18. Sustainable thorium nuclear fuel cycles: A comparison of intermediate and fast neutron spectrum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, N.R., E-mail: nbrown@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Powers, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Feng, B.; Heidet, F.; Stauff, N.E.; Zhang, G. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Todosow, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Worrall, A.; Gehin, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Comparison of intermediate and fast spectrum thorium-fueled reactors. • Variety of reactor technology options enables self-sustaining thorium fuel cycles. • Fuel cycle analyses indicate similar performance for fast and intermediate systems. • Reproduction factor plays a significant role in breeding and burn-up performance. - Abstract: This paper presents analyses of possible reactor representations of a nuclear fuel cycle with continuous recycling of thorium and produced uranium (mostly U-233) with thorium-only feed. The analysis was performed in the context of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to develop a compendium of informative nuclear fuel cycle performance data. The objective of this paper is to determine whether intermediate spectrum systems, having a majority of fission events occurring with incident neutron energies between 1 eV and 10{sup 5} eV, perform as well as fast spectrum systems in this fuel cycle. The intermediate spectrum options analyzed include tight lattice heavy or light water-cooled reactors, continuously refueled molten salt reactors, and a sodium-cooled reactor with hydride fuel. All options were modeled in reactor physics codes to calculate their lattice physics, spectrum characteristics, and fuel compositions over time. Based on these results, detailed metrics were calculated to compare the fuel cycle performance. These metrics include waste management and resource utilization, and are binned to accommodate uncertainties. The performance of the intermediate systems for this self-sustaining thorium fuel cycle was similar to a representative fast spectrum system. However, the number of fission neutrons emitted per neutron absorbed limits performance in intermediate spectrum systems.

  19. Sustainable thorium nuclear fuel cycles: A comparison of intermediate and fast neutron spectrum systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Comparison of intermediate and fast spectrum thorium-fueled reactors. • Variety of reactor technology options enables self-sustaining thorium fuel cycles. • Fuel cycle analyses indicate similar performance for fast and intermediate systems. • Reproduction factor plays a significant role in breeding and burn-up performance. - Abstract: This paper presents analyses of possible reactor representations of a nuclear fuel cycle with continuous recycling of thorium and produced uranium (mostly U-233) with thorium-only feed. The analysis was performed in the context of a U.S. Department of Energy effort to develop a compendium of informative nuclear fuel cycle performance data. The objective of this paper is to determine whether intermediate spectrum systems, having a majority of fission events occurring with incident neutron energies between 1 eV and 105 eV, perform as well as fast spectrum systems in this fuel cycle. The intermediate spectrum options analyzed include tight lattice heavy or light water-cooled reactors, continuously refueled molten salt reactors, and a sodium-cooled reactor with hydride fuel. All options were modeled in reactor physics codes to calculate their lattice physics, spectrum characteristics, and fuel compositions over time. Based on these results, detailed metrics were calculated to compare the fuel cycle performance. These metrics include waste management and resource utilization, and are binned to accommodate uncertainties. The performance of the intermediate systems for this self-sustaining thorium fuel cycle was similar to a representative fast spectrum system. However, the number of fission neutrons emitted per neutron absorbed limits performance in intermediate spectrum systems

  20. Safety Aspects of Long-Term Interim Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For spent nuclear fuel management in Germany the concept of dry interim storage in dual purpose casks before direct disposal is being pursued. The current operation licenses for existing storage facilities have been granted for a storage time of 40 years. In addition, transportability of the casks must be assured. Due to current delay in the selection of a disposal site the probability increases, that an extension of the storage time will be needed. Therefore additional safety analyses will be required, as the current licenses are based on safety evaluations for 40 years. This is valid for the performance of the transport and storage casks as well as for the stored fuel. Under this point of view basic aspects of the safety demonstration for long-term interim storage with regard to casks and stored fuel will be presented in the paper. For spent nuclear fuel it has to be demonstrated, that no systematic failure of the fuel rods during storage will occur and the fuel structure remains intact. Relevant parameters are the pressure build-up inside the fuel rods, the temperature in the cask and the hoop tension acting on the cladding. In GRS, generic studies and analyses on this issue have been performed for storage times up to 100 years, based on burn-up and depletion calculation for up to 50 GWd/tHM some years ago under conservative assumptions. This work is now being continued in order to improve the calculation model for burn-up values of UO2 and MOX fuels up to 70 GWd/tHM. Results from the analyses will be presented. For casks all safety demonstrations have been performed for storage periods of up to 40 years. Extended storage periods require additional safety demonstrations for all relevant safety issues as safe enclosure, shielding, sub-criticality and decay heat removal under consideration of operation conditions during storage. Thus has to consider material degradation affects by aging mechanisms. On the other hand, radiation levels and decay heat decrease during

  1. Preliminary safety analysis of Pb-Bi cooled 800 MWt modified CANDLE burn-up scheme based fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su' ud, Zaki, E-mail: szaki@fi.itba.c.id [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Group, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Science, Bandung Institute of Technology (Ganesha 10 Bandung, Indonesia) (Indonesia); Sekimoto, H., E-mail: hsekimot@gmail.com [Research Lab. For Nuclear Reactors, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-09-30

    Pb-Bi Cooled fast reactors with modified CANDLE burn-up scheme with 10 regions and 10 years cycle length has been investigated from neutronic aspects. In this study the safety aspect of such reactors have been investigated and discussed. Several condition of unprotected loss of flow (ULOF) and unprotected rod run-out transient over power (UTOP) have been simulated and the results show that the reactors excellent safety performance. At 80 seconds after unprotected loss of flow condition, the core flow rate drop to about 25% of its initial flow and slowly move toward its natural circulation level. The maximum fuel temperature can be managed below 1000°C and the maximum cladding temperature can be managed below 700°C. The dominant reactivity feedback is radial core expansion and Doppler effect, followed by coolant density effect and fuel axial expansion effect.

  2. Thermomechanical behavior and modeling of zircaloy cladding tubes from an unirradiated state to high burn-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffler-Le Pichon, I.; Geyer, P.; Bouffioux, P. [Electricite de France (EDF), 77 - Moret, Loing (France). Direction des Etudes et Recherches; Delobelle, P. [Laboratoire de Mecanique Appliquee, 25 - Besancon (France)

    1997-12-31

    Creep laws are nowadays commonly used to simulate the fuel rod response to the solicitations it faces during its life. These laws are sufficient for describing the base operating conditions (where only creep appears), but they have to be improved for power ramp conditions (where hardening and relaxation appear). The modification due to a neutronic irradiation of the thermomechanical behavior of stress-relieved Zircaloy 4 fuel tubes that have been analysed for five different fluences ranging from a non-irradiated material to a material for which the combustion rate was very high is presented. In the second part, a viscoplastic model able to simulate, for different isotherms, out-of-flux anisotropic mechanical behavior of the cladding tubes irradiated until high burn-up is proposed. Finally, results of numerical simulations show the ability of the model to reproduce the totality of the thermomechanical experiments. (author) 13 refs.

  3. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  4. OECD - HRP Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures

  5. International Summer School on Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on nuclear fuel in the period August 28 September 1, 2000. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with fuel-related subjects and issues without being experts. It was especially hoped that the summer school would serve to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear fuel. Experts from Halden Project member organisations gave the following presentations: (1) Overview of the nuclear community, (2) Criteria for safe operation and design of nuclear fuel, (3) Fuel design and fabrication, (4) Cladding Manufacturing, (5) Overview of the Halden Reactor Project, (6) Fuel performance evaluation and modelling, (7) Fission gas release, and (8) Cladding issues. Except for the Overview, which is a written paper, the other contributions are overhead figures from spoken lectures.

  6. Nuclear Fusion Fuel Cycle Research Perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, we at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and our National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) colleagues are investigating nuclear fusion fuel cycle hardware including a nuclear fusion fuel Storage and Delivery System (SDS). To have a better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we present our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). To have better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we presented our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). Our efforts to enhance the tritium confinement will be continued for the development of cleaner nuclear fusion power plants

  7. Nuclear Fusion Fuel Cycle Research Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Hongsuk; Koo, Daeseo; Park, Jongcheol; Kim, Yeanjin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Sei-Hun [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    As a part of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Project, we at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and our National Fusion Research Institute (NFRI) colleagues are investigating nuclear fusion fuel cycle hardware including a nuclear fusion fuel Storage and Delivery System (SDS). To have a better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we present our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). To have better knowledge of the nuclear fusion fuel cycle, we presented our research efforts not only on SDS but also on the Fuel Supply System (FS), Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP), Isotope Separation System (ISS), and Detritiation System (DS). Our efforts to enhance the tritium confinement will be continued for the development of cleaner nuclear fusion power plants.

  8. Variants of closing the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrianova, E. A., E-mail: Andrianova-EA@nrcki.ru; Davidenko, V. D.; Tsibulskiy, V. F.; Tsibulskiy, S. V. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Influence of the nuclear energy structure, the conditions of fuel burnup, and accumulation of new fissile isotopes from the raw isotopes on the main parameters of a closed fuel cycle is considered. The effects of the breeding ratio, the cooling time of the spent fuel in the external fuel cycle, and the separation of the breeding area and the fissile isotope burning area on the parameters of the fuel cycle are analyzed.

  9. Variants of closing the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of the nuclear energy structure, the conditions of fuel burnup, and accumulation of new fissile isotopes from the raw isotopes on the main parameters of a closed fuel cycle is considered. The effects of the breeding ratio, the cooling time of the spent fuel in the external fuel cycle, and the separation of the breeding area and the fissile isotope burning area on the parameters of the fuel cycle are analyzed

  10. Development of Fabrication Technology for Ceramic Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H. S.; Lee, Y. W.; Na, S. H.; Kim, Y. G.; Jung, C. Y.; Kim, S. H.; Lee, S. C.; Son, D. S

    2006-04-15

    on the high burn-up MOX pellet, Milling technology for the mixture containing a great quantity of CeO{sub 2}(PuO{sub 2}), Fabrication technology for the pellet containing a great quantity of CeO{sub 2}(PuO{sub 2}), Fabrication technology development of UO{sub 2}+CeO{sub 2}+Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} pellet, Fabrication technology development of annular (U,Ce)O{sub 2} pellet, Fabrication and property analysis of simulated IMF pellet, Fabrication and property analysis of SIMMOX pellet, Improvement methods of the MOX pellet from the simulated irradiation. This project proceeded to establish the unique fabrication technology of MOX fuel, and the products during the 3rd stage are as followings ; patent application: 3 cases(domestic 2, foreign 1), patent registration: 4 cases(domestic 3, foreign 1), paper; 9 publication, 71 presentation. The result corresponding to the research content are as followings; Improvement of pellet characteristics along with the MOX irradiation analysis - Comparison and analysis of the MOX fabrication process - Comparison and analysis of the MOX irradiation data - Improvement methods of the characteristics of MOX pellet. Establishment of the MOX pellet fabrication process by the unique technology - Construction of the database for MOX pellet fabrication process - Establishment of applicability between database and fabrication process - Applicability of the unique process to a workshop and confirmation of the good performance of powder milling machine. Applicability of the unique fabrication processes to the glove box technology - Design and manufacture of glove box - Installment and operation of the process equipments in the glove boxes - Fabrication of the MOX pellet inside the glove box by the unique technology. Research on the high burn-up MOX pellet - Homogeneous powder treatment technology for a powder mixture containing a great quantity of CeO{sub 2} - Fabrication technology of homogeneous (U,Ce,Gd)O{sub 2} pellet - Fabrication technology of

  11. Reactor Physics and the Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Minhaj Ahmed

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Questions regarding the feasibility of fusion power are examined, taking into account fuel cycles and breeding reactions, energy balance and reactor conditions, approaches to fusion, magnetic confinement, magneto hydro dynamic instabilities, micro instabilities, and the main technological problems which have to be solved. Basic processes and balances in fusion reactors are considered along with some aspects of the neutronics in fusion reactors, the physics of neutral beam heating, plasma heating by relativistic electrons, radiofrequency heating of fusion plasmas, adiabatic compression and ignition of fusion reactors, dynamics and control of fusion reactors, and aspects of thermal efficiency and waste heat. Attention is also given to fission-fusion hybrid systems, inertial-confinement fusion systems, the radiological aspects of fusion reactors, design considerations of fusion reactors, and a comparative study of the approaches to fusion power. The nuclear fuel cycle, also called nuclear fuel chain, is the progression of nuclear fuel through a series of differing stages. It consists of steps in the front end, which are the preparation of the fuel, steps in the service period in which the fuel is used during reactor operation, and steps in the back end, which are necessary to safely manage, contain, and either reprocess or dispose of spent nuclear fuel. If spent fuel is not reprocessed, the fuel cycle is referred to as an open fuel cycle (or a once-through fuel cycle; if the spent fuel is reprocessed, it is referred to as a closed fuel cycle..

  12. Non destructive assay of nuclear LEU spent fuels for burnup credit application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Criticality safety analysis devoted to spent fuel storage and transportation has to be conservative in order to be sure no accident will ever happen. In the spent fuel storage field, the assumption of freshness has been used to achieve the conservative aspect of criticality safety procedures. Nevertheless, after being irradiated in a reactor core, the fuel elements have obviously lost part of their original reactivity. The concept of taking into account this reactivity loss in criticality safety analysis is known as Burnup credit. To be used, Burnup credit involves obtaining evidence of the reactivity loss with a Burnup measurement. Many non destructive assays (NDA) based on neutron as well as on gamma ray emissions are devoted to spent fuel characterization. Heavy nuclei that compose the fuels are modified during irradiation and cooling. Some of them emit neutrons spontaneously and the link to Burnup is a power link. As a result, burn-up determination with passive neutron measurement is extremely accurate. Some gamma emitters also have interesting properties in order to characterize spent fuels but the convenience of the gamma spectrometric methods is very dependent on characteristics of spent fuel. In addition, contrary to the neutron emission, the gamma signal is mostly representative of the peripheral rods of the fuels. Two devices based on neutron methods but combining different NDA methods which have been studied in the past are described in detail: 1. The PYTHON device is a combination of a passive neutron measurement, a collimated total gamma measurement, and an online depletion code. This device, which has been used in several Nuclear Power Plants in western Europe, gives the average Burnup within a 5% uncertainty and also the extremity Burnup, 2. The NAJA device is an automatic device that involves three nuclear methods and an online depletion code. It is designed to cover the whole fuel assembly panel (Active Neutron Interrogation, Passive Neutron

  13. Spent nuclear fuel disposal liability insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis examines the social efficiency of nuclear power when the risks of accidental releases of spent fuel radionuclides from a spent fuel disposal facility are considered. The analysis consists of two major parts. First, a theoretical economic model of the use of nuclear power including the risks associated with releases of radionuclides from a disposal facility is developed. Second, the costs of nuclear power, including the risks associated with a radionuclide release, are empirically compared to the costs of fossil fuel-fired generation of electricity. Under the provisions of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, the federally owned and operated spent nuclear fuel disposal facility is not required to maintain a reserve fund to cover damages from an accidental radionuclide release. Thus, the risks of a harmful radionuclide release are not included in the spent nuclear fuel disposal fee charged to the electric utilities. Since the electric utilities do not pay the full, social costs of spent fuel disposal, they use nuclear fuel in excess of the social optimum. An insurance mechanism is proposed to internalize the risks associated with spent fueled disposal. Under this proposal, the Federal government is required to insure the disposal facility against any liabilities arising from accidental releases of spent fuel radionuclides

  14. Sustainability Features of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Passerini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear fuel cycle is the series of stages that nuclear fuel materials go through in a cradle to grave framework. The Once Through Cycle (OTC is the current fuel cycle implemented in the United States; in which an appropriate form of the fuel is irradiated through a nuclear reactor only once before it is disposed of as waste. The discharged fuel contains materials that can be suitable for use as fuel. Thus, different types of fuel recycling technologies may be introduced in order to more fully utilize the energy potential of the fuel, or reduce the environmental impacts and proliferation concerns about the discarded fuel materials. Nuclear fuel cycle systems analysis is applied in this paper to attain a better understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of fuel cycle alternatives. Through the use of the nuclear fuel cycle analysis code CAFCA (Code for Advanced Fuel Cycle Analysis, the impact of a number of recycling technologies and the associated fuel cycle options is explored in the context of the U.S. energy scenario over 100 years. Particular focus is given to the quantification of Uranium utilization, the amount of Transuranic Material (TRU generated and the economics of the different options compared to the base-line case, the OTC option. It is concluded that LWRs and the OTC are likely to dominate the nuclear energy supply system for the period considered due to limitations on availability of TRU to initiate recycling technologies. While the introduction of U-235 initiated fast reactors can accelerate their penetration of the nuclear energy system, their higher capital cost may lead to continued preference for the LWR-OTC cycle.

  15. Nuclide inventory for nuclear fuel waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assist research projects in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Prgram, a compilation has been made of all the nuclides that are likely to be present in a nuclear fuel waste disposal vault and that are potentially hazardous to man during the post-closure phase. The compilation includes radiologically toxic and chemically toxic nuclides

  16. Handling and inspection of nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention provides improvements in the handling and inspection of nuclear fuel elements. A mobile bridge is mounted astraddle over a water tank, and from said bridge is suspended and immersed insulating plate capable of vertically receiving a fuel element and of taking a horizontal position for inspecting the latter. This can be applied to nuclear power stations

  17. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities

  18. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Execution Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEROY, P.G.

    2000-11-03

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project supports the Hanford Site Mission to cleanup the Site by providing safe, economic, environmentally sound management of Site spent nuclear fuel in a manner that reduces hazards by staging it to interim onsite storage and deactivates the 100 K Area facilities.

  19. Analysis of burn up effects on kinetic parameters in an Accelerator Driven Subcritical TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Among the kinetic parameters, the most important ones are βeff and Λ. • The kinetic parameters at the end of cycle for 20 days operation at 1 MW reactor power have been calculated using MCNPX code. • The system sub-criticality levels, the required accelerator current and power have been calculated for each burnup step. • Burnup effects on neutronic parameters and accelerator requirements are analysed for a life cycle of the reactor core. - Abstract: In this paper, the kinetic parameters at the end of cycle for 20 days operation at 1 MW reactor power have been calculated using MCNPX code for source multiplication factors (Ks) of critical and 0.97 levels. Accelerator Driven Subcritical TRIGA reactor has been considered as the case study of the problem. The system sub-criticality levels, the required accelerator current (Ip) and power (Pacc) have been calculated for each burn up step. According to the results, the required Ip and Pacc increased as system sub-criticality level decreased. Also, the results show that the effective delayed neutron fraction (βeff) does not depend on sub-criticality levels significantly but the neutron reproduction time (Λ) strongly depends on the number of fuel elements in the core and sub-criticality levels. In addition, it was observed that in comparison with the beginning-of-cycle values, at end-of-cycle, the Λ increases by 112.6% and 108.4% respectively but the βeff decreases by 6.1% and 1.8% respectively in critical and 0.97 levels

  20. Determination of deuterium–tritium critical burn-up parameter by four temperature theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazirzadeh, M.; Ghasemizad, A. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, 41335-1914 Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khanbabei, B. [School of Physics, Damghan University, 36716-41167 Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Conditions for thermonuclear burn-up of an equimolar mixture of deuterium-tritium in non-equilibrium plasma have been investigated by four temperature theory. The photon distribution shape significantly affects the nature of thermonuclear burn. In three temperature model, the photon distribution is Planckian but in four temperature theory the photon distribution has a pure Planck form below a certain cut-off energy and then for photon energy above this cut-off energy makes a transition to Bose-Einstein distribution with a finite chemical potential. The objective was to develop four temperature theory in a plasma to calculate the critical burn up parameter which depends upon initial density, the plasma components initial temperatures, and hot spot size. All the obtained results from four temperature theory model are compared with 3 temperature model. It is shown that the values of critical burn-up parameter calculated by four temperature theory are smaller than those of three temperature model.

  1. Determination of deuterium-tritium critical burn-up parameter by four temperature theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazirzadeh, M.; Ghasemizad, A.; Khanbabei, B.

    2015-12-01

    Conditions for thermonuclear burn-up of an equimolar mixture of deuterium-tritium in non-equilibrium plasma have been investigated by four temperature theory. The photon distribution shape significantly affects the nature of thermonuclear burn. In three temperature model, the photon distribution is Planckian but in four temperature theory the photon distribution has a pure Planck form below a certain cut-off energy and then for photon energy above this cut-off energy makes a transition to Bose-Einstein distribution with a finite chemical potential. The objective was to develop four temperature theory in a plasma to calculate the critical burn up parameter which depends upon initial density, the plasma components initial temperatures, and hot spot size. All the obtained results from four temperature theory model are compared with 3 temperature model. It is shown that the values of critical burn-up parameter calculated by four temperature theory are smaller than those of three temperature model.

  2. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System. A directory of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. 2009 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) is an international directory of civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities, published online as part of the Integrated Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (iNFCIS: http://www-nfcis.iaea.org/). This is the fourth hardcopy publication in almost 30 years and it represents a snapshot of the NFCIS database as of the end of 2008. Together with the attached CD-ROM, it provides information on 650 civilian nuclear fuel cycle facilities in 53 countries, thus helping to improve the transparency of global nuclear fuel cycle activities

  3. The safety of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel cycle covers the procurement and preparation of fuel for nuclear power reactors, its recovery and recycling after use and the safe storage of all wastes generated through these operations. The facilities associated with these activities have an extensive and well documented safety record accumulated over the past 40 years by technical experts and safety authorities. This report constitutes an up-to-date analysis of the safety of the nuclear fuel cycle, based on the available experience in OECD countries. It addresses the technical aspects of fuel cycle operations, provides information on operating practices and looks ahead to future activities

  4. Construction and operation program of reprocessing plant of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reprocessing plant of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation which is constructed in Tokai is operated according to the purex system, and the following design parameters; the capacity is 0.7 t/day, the burn-up of fuel is about 28,000 MWd/t, the cooling period is more than 180 days, the uranium enrichment is less than 4%, the maximum dimensions of fuel assembly is 470cm x 26cm x 26cm and the maximum weight of the fuel assembly is 1.2 t. The flow diagram of the reprocessing system in this plant, the plant layout at the site, the main specifications of the civil engineering, the main instrumentation cask specifications, the functional test of these facilities especially for the cleaning of the components and pipings by compressed air, water and steam, the inspection of the volumes of tanks, the characteristic test of components, the water flow test of piping system, the chemical characteristic test, waste disposal test, the test using uranium, the organization and the training of operators in this plant and the safety considerations are described in detail in this paper. The hot test will be conducted with the spent fuel which is taken from JPDR at first and then from BWR and PWR plants in Japan step by step. The hot test with the OTL facility using uranium is particularly explained in detail. (Nakai, Y.)

  5. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-08-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  6. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO2 or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures

  7. Nuclear fuels for very high temperature applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The success of the development of nuclear thermal propulsion devices and thermionic space nuclear power generation systems depends on the successful utilization of nuclear fuel materials at temperatures in the range 2000 to 3500 K. Problems associated with the utilization of uranium bearing fuel materials at these very high temperatures while maintaining them in the solid state for the required operating times are addressed. The critical issues addressed include evaporation, melting, reactor neutron spectrum, high temperature chemical stability, fabrication, fission induced swelling, fission product release, high temperature creep, thermal shock resistance, and fuel density, both mass and fissile atom. Candidate fuel materials for this temperature range are based on UO{sub 2} or uranium carbides. Evaporation suppression, such as a sealed cladding, is required for either fuel base. Nuclear performance data needed for design are sparse for all candidate fuel forms in this temperature range, especially at the higher temperatures.

  8. Degree of Sustainability of Various Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brogli, R.; Krakowski, R.A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico (United States)

    2002-08-01

    similar evaluation methodology .The evaluation of the various scenarios focussed on the influence of an increased fuel burn-up in the LWR-based technologies. One focus of this report is the description and evaluation of the model and methodology for conducting Multi-Criteria Analyses (MCA) based on a range of stakeholder interests and/or biases. In addition to these scenario-based results and comparisons, the methodology developed also represents an important product of this investigation that could be useful in expanded NFC studies that ultimately must incorporate dynamic simulation and/or optimisation analyses. The results from this study are organized into main findings, specific conclusions, and recommendations, with the recommendations being divided into areas of policy and future work. In composite, it concluded that the richness of options for nuclear energy on the one hand represents a vast field of research wherein the economy, ecology, and society 'pillars' of sustainability must be addressed, and, on the other hand, nuclear energy shows that the full potential of sustainable nuclear energy can only be reaped through the implementation of advanced fuels, fuel cycles, and reactors that together use both present-day and advanced reprocessing technologies. Within the limitations of the model used, a quantitative basis for this conclusion is presented in the form of detailed results. (author)

  9. Degree of Sustainability of Various Nuclear Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    methodology .The evaluation of the various scenarios focussed on the influence of an increased fuel burn-up in the LWR-based technologies. One focus of this report is the description and evaluation of the model and methodology for conducting Multi-Criteria Analyses (MCA) based on a range of stakeholder interests and/or biases. In addition to these scenario-based results and comparisons, the methodology developed also represents an important product of this investigation that could be useful in expanded NFC studies that ultimately must incorporate dynamic simulation and/or optimisation analyses. The results from this study are organized into main findings, specific conclusions, and recommendations, with the recommendations being divided into areas of policy and future work. In composite, it concluded that the richness of options for nuclear energy on the one hand represents a vast field of research wherein the economy, ecology, and society 'pillars' of sustainability must be addressed, and, on the other hand, nuclear energy shows that the full potential of sustainable nuclear energy can only be reaped through the implementation of advanced fuels, fuel cycles, and reactors that together use both present-day and advanced reprocessing technologies. Within the limitations of the model used, a quantitative basis for this conclusion is presented in the form of detailed results. (author)

  10. System for assembling nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automatic system is described for assembling nuclear fuel elements, in particular those employing mixed oxide fuels. The system includes a sealing mechanism which allows movement during the assembling of the fuel element along the assembly stations without excessive release of contaminants. (U.K.)

  11. Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel cycle is substantially more complicated than the energy production cycles of conventional fuels because of the very low abundance of uranium 235, the presence of radioactivity, the potential for producing fissile nuclides from irradiation, and the risk that fissile materials will be used for nuclear weapons. These factors add enrichment, recycling, spent fuel storage, and safeguards to the cycle, besides making the conventional steps of exploration, mining, processing, use, waste disposal, and transportation more difficult

  12. Burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Atta; Iqbal Masood; Mahmood Tayyab

    2011-01-01

    The burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1, reference operating core, has been carried out utilizing standard computer codes WIMS/D4, CITATION, and RELAP5/MOD3.4. Reactor codes WIMS/D4 and CITATION have been used for the calculations of neutronic parameters including peaking factors and power profiles at different burn-up considering a xenon free core and also the equilibrium xenon values. RELAP5/MOD3.4 code was utilized for the determin...

  13. Selection of nuclear fuel evaluation technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel performance parameters, such as nuclear efficiency, are defined by the design of the bundle. The metrics used to evaluate fuel capability are often fuel cycle cost, thermal margin, cycle length flexibility and hot-to-cold reactivity swing. These metrics emerge from a nuclear fuel cycle analysis, which must be properly posed to evaluate a fuel's performance within the application space of interest. When viewed in terms of the goals and constraints, the selection of fuel design characteristics takes on the form of a constrained optimization problem. As with any such problem, definition of the constraints can strongly influence what constitutes an optimum fuel design. As the complexity increases, the accuracy and relevance of the boundary conditions becomes more critical. Presented in this paper is a survey of fuel cycle analysis methodologies for BWRs and the corresponding metrics that can be observed. (author)

  14. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under three nuclear supply scenarios. Two of these scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries with free market economies (FME countries). A No New Orders scenario is presented only for the United States. These nuclear supply scenarios are described in Commercial Nuclear Power 1990: Prospects for the United States and the World (DOE/EIA-0438(90)). This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the FME projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2030 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2040, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case. These disaggregated projections are provided at the request of the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

  15. Investigation of Spent Nuclear Fuel Pool Coolability

    OpenAIRE

    Nimander, Fredrik

    2011-01-01

    The natural catastrophe at Fukushima Dai-ichi 2011 enlightened the nuclear community. This master thesis reveals the non-negligible risks regarding the short term storage of spent nuclear fuel. The thesis has also investigated the possibility of using natural circulation of air in a passive safety system to cool the spent nuclear fuel pools. The results where conclusive: The temperature difference between the heated air and ambient air is far too low for natural circulation of air to remove a...

  16. Establishment of China Nuclear Fuel Assembly Database

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENPeng; ZHANGYing-chao; LIUTing-jin; JINYong-li

    2003-01-01

    During researching, designing, manufacturing and post irradiation, a large amount of data on fuel assembly of China nuclear power plants has been accumulated. It is necessary to collect the data together,so that the researchers, designers, manufactures and managers could use the data conveniently. It was proposed to establish a China Nuclear Fuel Assembly Database through the Internet on workstations during the year of 2003 to 2006, so the data would be shared in China nuclear industry.

  17. Studies of Nuclear Fuel by Means of Nuclear Spectroscopic Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The increasing demand for characterization of nuclear fuel, both from an operator and authority point of view, motivates the development of new experimental and, preferable, non-destructive methods. In this thesis, some methods based on nuclear spectroscopic techniques are presented. Various parameters of irradiated fuel are shown to be determined with high accuracy and confidence by utilizing gamma-ray scanning, tomography and passive neutron assay. Specifically, fuel parameters relevant for...

  18. Self-sustained regime of nuclear burning wave in safe fast reactor using mixed Th-U-Pu fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of further development of perspective conception of nuclear fission reactor with the so-called intrinsic safety based on the phenomenon of self-sustained regime of nuclear burning wave are presented. We consider a critical fast reactor of cylindrical form with the metal fuel of the mixed Th-U-Pu cycle and study the possibility of the burning wave propagation in the axial breeding zone containing fuel consisting of 232Th and 238U in different proportions. The presence of the constructional material Fe and the coolant Pb-Bi eutectic in reactor composition is taken into account. The initiation and propagation of the burning wave in a fast reactor of this type are described on the basis of deterministic approach using the non-stationary multi-group diffusion description of neutron transport, taking into account the burn-up of fuel components and the nuclear kinetics for precursor nuclei of delayed neutrons. The calculation results of the space-time evolution of neutron flux and fuel component concentrations are presented for different values of main parameters of the reactor. The possibility of creating a self-sustained regime of a running nuclear burning wave in the critical fast reactor under consideration has been demonstrated for the mixed Th-U fuel. The wave propagation velocity strongly depends on the Th-U ratio and transverse size of the reactor. (authors)

  19. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, the fifth of a series of annual reports, reviews the progress that has been made in the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The report summarizes activities over the past year in the following areas: public interaction; used fuel storage and transportation; immobilization of used fuel and fuel recycle waste; geoscience research related to deep underground disposal; environmental research; and environmental and safety assessment

  20. Risk management and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If nuclear fuel is the answer to the future energy crisis, more must be done in the area of protecting financial interests. This paper discusses what has been done in the area of insurance to protect the owner, processor, vendors, etc. What is available in the insurance market is reviewed; the Nuclear Energy Liability Property Insurance Association is virtually the only nuclear insuror, except for the mutual company Nuclear Mutual Limited in Bermuda. Methods being used today to insure each phase of the processing for nuclear fuel are reviewed next. There are basically three (overlapping) types of primary insurance for the fuel cycle: conventional insurance, nuclear insurance pools, and Price-Anderson indemnification. There is no clearcut assumption of risk because the contract between owner, converter, fabricator or reprocessor is usually completed before insurance is considered. The need to educate the insurors about nuclear matters is emphasized

  1. National Policy on Nuclear Fuel Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National policy on nuclear fuel cycle is aimed at attaining the expected condition, i.e. being able to support optimality the national energy policy and other related Government policies taking into account current domestic nuclear fuel cycle condition and the trend of international nuclear fuel cycle development, the national strength, weakness, thread and opportunity in the field of energy. This policy has to be followed by the strategy to accomplish covering the optimization of domestic efforts, cooperation with other countries, and or purchasing licences. These policy and strategy have to be broken down into various nuclear fuel cycle programmes covering basically assesment of the whole cycle, performing research and development of the whole cycle without enrichment and reprocessing being able for weapon, as well as programmes for industrialization of the fuel cycle stepwisery commencing with the middle part of the cycle and ending with the edge of the back-end of the cycle

  2. Nuclear fuel cycle and legal regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel cycle is regulated as a whole in Japan by the law concerning regulation of nuclear raw materials, nuclear fuel materials and reactors (hereafter referred to as ''the law concerning regulation of reactors''), which was published in 1957, and has been amended 13 times. The law seeks to limit the use of atomic energy to peaceful objects, and nuclear fuel materials are controlled centering on the regulation of enterprises which employ nuclear fuel materials, namely regulating each enterprise. While the permission and report of uses are necessary for the employment of nuclear materials under Article 52 and 61 of the law concerning regulation of reactors, the permission provisions are not applied to three kinds of enterprises of refining, processing and reprocessing and the persons who install reactors as the exceptions in Article 52, when nuclear materials are used for the objects of the enterprises themselves. The enterprises of refining, processing and reprocessing and the persons who install reactors are stipulated respectively in the law. Accordingly the nuclear material regulations are applied only to the users of small quantity of such materials, namely universities, research institutes and hospitals. The nuclear fuel materials used in Japan which are imported under international contracts including the nuclear energy agreements between two countries are mostly covered by the security measures of IAEA as internationally controlled substances. (Okada, K.)

  3. Automated Characterization of Spent Fuel through the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coble, Jamie B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orton, Christopher R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schwantes, Jon M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2012-07-31

    This research developed an algorithm for characterizing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) samples based on simulated gamma spectra. The gamma spectra for a variety of light water reactor fuels typical of those found in the United States were simulated. Fuel nuclide concentrations were simulated in ORIGEN-ARP for 1296 fuel samples with a variety of reactor designs, initial enrichments, burn ups, and cooling times. The results of the ORIGEN-ARP simulation were then input to SYNTH to simulate the gamma spectrum for each sample. These spectra were evaluated with partial least squares (PLS)-based multivariate analysis methods to characterize the fuel according to reactor type (pressurized or boiling water reactor), enrichment, burn up, and cooling time. Characterizing some of the features in series by using previously estimated features in the prediction greatly improves the performance. By first classifying the spent fuel reactor type and then using type-specific models, the prediction error for enrichment, burn up, and cooling time improved by a factor of two to four. For some features, the prediction was further improved by including additional information, such as including the predicted burn up in the estimation of cooling time. The optimal prediction flow was determined based on the simulated data. A PLS discriminate analysis model was developed which perfectly classified SNF reactor type. Burn up was predicted within 0.1% root mean squared percent error (RMSPE) and both cooling time and initial enrichment within approximately 2% RMSPE.

  4. A Path Forward to Advanced Nuclear Fuels: Spectroscopic Calorimetry of Nuclear Fuel Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal is to relieve the shortage of thermodynamic and kinetic information concerning the stability of nuclear fuel alloys. Past studies of the ternary nuclear fuel UPuZr have demonstrated constituent redistribution when irradiated or with thermal treatment. Thermodynamic data is key to predicting the possibilities of effects such as constituent redistribution within the fuel rods and interaction with cladding materials

  5. Study of advanced nuclear fuel cycles in Candu type power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel burn up can be increased to a large extent, up to 14, 0000 MWD/te, by using the slightly enriched uranium or Pu mixed fuel in CANDU type power reactors. In the present study, the previous work was extended to compare the isotopic inventories and corresponding activities of important nuclides for different fuel cycles of a CANDU 600 type power reactor. The detail can be found in our studies. The calculations were performed using the computer code WIMSD4. The isotopic inventories and corresponding activities were calculated versus the fuel burn-up for the natural UO/sub 2/ fuel, 1.2 % enriched UO/sub 2/ fuel and 0.45 % PuO/sub 2/-UO/sub 2/ fuel. It was found that 1.2 % enriched uranium fuel has the lowest activity as compared to other two fuel cycles. It means that improvement in the fuel cycle technology of CANDU type power reactors can lead to high burn up which results in the reduction of actinide content in the spent fuel, and hence has a good environmental impact. (orig./A.B.)

  6. The management strategy of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The assessment of management strategy of spent nuclear fuel has been carried out. Spent nuclear fuel is one of the by-products of nuclear power plant. The technical operations related to the management of spent fuel discharged from reactors are called the back-end fuel cycle. It can be largely divided into three option s : the once-through cycle, the closed cycle and the so-called ‟wait and see” policy. Whatever strategy is selected for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, Away-from-Reactor (AFR) storage facilities has to be constructed. For the once through cycle, the entire content of spent fuel is considered as waste, and is subject to be disposed of into a deep underground repository. In the closed cycle, however, can be divided into: (1) uranium and plutonium are recovered from spent fuel by reprocessing and recycled to manufacture mixed oxide (MOX) fuel rods, (2) waste transmutation in accelerator-driven subcritical reactors, (3) DUPIC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In CANDU) concept. In wait and see policy, which means first storing the spent fuel and deciding at a later stage on reprocessing or disposal. (author)

  7. Spent fuel management options and nuclear fuel supplies in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spent fuel management pathway adopted has a direct bearing on the supply of nuclear fuel. Compared to direct disposal, reprocessing is able to reduce the consumption of uranium, thus making nuclear power a quasi-indigenous source of power. The breeder technology was developed to make use of as many fuel constituents of natural uranium as possible, especially Pu-239. When used in mixed oxide fuel assemblies, plutonium can be burnt even in light water reactors. On the basis of three different scenarios for the development of the installed nuclear generating capacity, the annual uranium requirement up to 2030 is simulated in a computer model. The parameters influencing the calculation are the time, final storage, reprocessing, the use of mixed oxide fuel, and a higher fuel burnup. The service life of a nuclear power plant is assumed to be 35 years throughout. All steps of the nuclear fuel cycle are modeled, from purchasing the natural uranium to final storage. In each of the three scenarios, the model calculations arrive at clearly lower prices of natural uranium, of approx. US Dollar 65/kg of U, than actually prevailed in the second half of the seventies, i.e. more than US Dollar 190/kg of U. (orig.)

  8. Reactivity follow of the two first loadings of the Jose Cabrera Reactor; Seguimiento de la ractividad durante las dos primeras cargas del Reactor de la Central Nuclear Jose Cabrera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bru, A.

    1975-07-01

    In this paper the first two cores together with the in-core measurements taken during the operation of the Nuclear Power Station Jose Cabrera are described. The results of this measurements have been processed with the INCORE and FOLLOW codes. The peaking factors and the boron concentration versus burn-up are displayed. The final burn-up of the fuel elements in these two loading are given, too. (Author)

  9. Core analysis of the first cycle of Chashma nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The up coming 300 MWe CHASHMA NPP will provide the opportunity to study the burn-up behavior of the fuel. Our experience is limited to the in-core fuel management studies when fuel burn-up remains within the design limits. The initial core is loaded in three regions with fuel of three different enrichments 2.4 w/o, 2.67 w/o and 3.0 w/o. It is intended to study the enhanced fuel burn-up vis-a-vis the expected cost benefit in due course of time. The core of the Chashma nuclear power plant is that of a typical PWR NPP of 300 MWe capacity. It has 121 fuel assemblies and all of them have identical external dimensions and hydraulic characteristics. The core height is 290 cm and equivalent diameter is 248·6 cm. The core is cooled and moderated by H2O and surrounded by a stainless steel baffle. Each fuel assembly consists of 15x15 rod array and the assembly pitch is 20·03 cm The average discharge burn-up is 30,000 MWd/MTU. Core analysis was carried out for the first cycle at hot full power (HFP). Two dimensional calculations were performed for burn-up analysis including core multiplication, flux distribution, burn-up length, isotopic inventory, peaking factor and critical boron concentration to achieve the economical fuel management within the constraints imposed by safe reactor operation. Calculations indicate that expected burn-up of the first cycle is 13479 MWd/MTU equivalent to 485 EFPD, with 25 ppm of boron is still in the system, which is very near to the design value. Similarly assembly power distribution, pin by pin power distribution and reactivity coefficients, calculated are within the acceptable limits. Efforts are on to improve further these calculations. (author)

  10. Sensitivity analysis and benchmarking of low and broad energy photon measurements for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While gamma measurements are a well understood technique for estimating burn up and cooling time in spent nuclear fuel, only a few isotopes are currently used and calculations are dependent on operator declarations. Utilizing a larger set of nuclide measurements as well as including low energy measurements (around 100 keV) could provide a significant increase in the information gained from such measurements. Nuclides investigated in this work include 235U, 238U, 239Pu, 240Pu, 137Cs, 154Eu, 241Am, 155Eu, 149Sm, and 155Gd. Low energy, broad range, and high energy gamma measurements have been performed on a variety of spent uranium dioxide and MOX fuel from PWRs. Selected measured fuel locations have been simulated with Origen, TransLAT, SCALE, and Monteburns to benchmark each of these programs with destructive analysis results. Monteburns was identified as the most accurate program for prediction of isotopes of interest and will be used for future analysis. Origen was chosen as a quick but relatively accurate program to perform a preliminary sensitivity analysis of the effects of fuel parameters (burnup, cooling time, and initial enrichment) on each nuclide measurement. (author)

  11. Material accountancy measurement techniques in dry-powdered processing of nuclear spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper addresses the development of inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICPMS), thermal ionization-mass spectrometry (TIMS), alpha-spectrometry, and gamma spectrometry techniques for in-line analysis of highly irradiated (18 to 64 GWD/T) PWR spent fuels in a dry-powdered processing cycle. The dry-powdered technique for direct elemental and isotopic accountancy assay measurements was implemented without the need for separation of the plutonium, uranium and fission product elements in the bulk powdered process. The analyses allow the determination of fuel burn-up based on the isotopic composition of neodymium and/or cesium. An objective of the program is to develop the ICPMS method for direct fissile nuclear materials accountancy in the dry-powdered processing of spent fuel. The ICPMS measurement system may be applied to the KAERI DUPIC (direct use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU reactors) experiment, and in a near-real-time mode for international safeguards verification and non-proliferation policy concerns

  12. Elemental analysis of fuel CRUD obtained from Korean nuclear power plant using zinc addition technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation and transportation of corrosion products in reactor coolant systems have been considered as an important issue for the safe and optimal operation of nuclear power plants. Corrosion products are expected to be released from the oxide layer of structural metals and the released product may cause metal oxide deposits, generally referred to as CRUD (Chalk River Unidentified Deposits), on all surfaces in the coolant system including the fuel and steam generators. The corrosion product deposit on fuel surfaces is referred to as fuel CRUD. As the fuel CRUD is placed under the high neutron flux condition, it results in undesirable effects on the plant operation by distorting the neutron flux of the core and increasing the radioactivity in the coolant system due to the neutron activation of corrosion products. The main radioactivity source of CRUD is caused by cobalt 58 and 60 which come from Ni and Co elements, respectively. Therefore, Ni content of a CRUD sample has a close relationship with its radioactivity of 58Co. In addition, the two isotopes 58Co and 60Co have quite different half-lives of 71 days and 1,920 days, respectively. From the difference, the irradiation duration of the CRUD sample in the reactor core can be estimated. Therefore, if the radioactivity ratios of 58Co to 60Co of CRUD samples have similar values, it is estimated that their fuels have similar burn-up history in reactor core. In the present study, we carried out elemental analysis and radioactivity measurements of four different fuel CRUD sample sets obtained from a nuclear power plant. The radionuclide ratio analysis used for this study could be useful to enhance the elemental data credibility of fuel CRUD samples. (authors)

  13. Method for making nuclear fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of manufacturing a nuclear rod is described. It comprises only partially filling a mold cavity with nuclear fuel particles, closing the mold cavity and reducing the volume thereof such that the fuel particles substantially fill the mold cavity, injecting a fluid solidifiable binder into the particle-filled mold cavity to fill the interstices between the fuel particles. The volume of particle-filled mold cavity is reduced by applying pressure to the contents thereof via a movable portion of mold cavity, and solidifying binder in cavity to form a fuel rod

  14. The Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program involves research into the storage and transportation of used nuclear fuel, immobilization of fuel waste, and deep geological disposal of the immobilized waste. The program is now in the fourth year of a ten-year generic research and development phase. The objective of this phase of the program is to assess the safety and environmental aspects of the deep underground disposal of immobilized fuel waste in plutonic rock. The objectives of the research for each component of the program and the progress made to the end of 1983 are described in this report

  15. Management of Spent Nuclear Fuel from Nuclear Power Plant Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Management of spent nuclear fuel from Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) reactor had been studied to anticipate program of NPP operation in Indonesia. In this paper the quantity of generated spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is predicted based on the national electrical demand, power grade and type of reactor. Data was estimated using Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) NPP type 1.000 MWe and the SNF management overview base on the experiences of some countries that have NPP. There are four strategy nuclear fuel cycle which can be developed i.e: direct disposal, reprocessing, DUPlC (Direct Use of Spent PWR Fuel In Candu) and wait and see. There are four alternative for SNF management i.e : storage at the reactor building (AR), away from reactor (AFR) using wet centralized storage, dry centralized storage AFR and prepare for reprocessing facility. For the Indonesian case, centralized facility of the wet type is recommended for PWR or BWR spent fuel. (author)

  16. Annotated Bibliography for Drying Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebecca E. Smith

    2011-09-01

    Internationally, the nuclear industry is represented by both commercial utilities and research institutions. Over the past two decades many of these entities have had to relocate inventories of spent nuclear fuel from underwater storage to dry storage. These efforts were primarily prompted by two factors: insufficient storage capacity (potentially precipitated by an open-ended nuclear fuel cycle) or deteriorating quality of existing underwater facilities. The intent of developing this bibliography is to assess what issues associated with fuel drying have been identified, to consider where concerns have been satisfactorily addressed, and to recommend where additional research would offer the most value to the commercial industry and the U. S. Department of Energy.

  17. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project dose management plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dose management plan facilitates meeting the dose management and ALARA requirements applicable to the design activities of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project, and establishes consistency of information used by multiple subprojects in ALARA evaluations. The method for meeting the ALARA requirements applicable to facility designs involves two components. The first is each Spent Nuclear Fuel Project subproject incorporating ALARA principles, ALARA design optimizations, and ALARA design reviews throughout the design of facilities and equipment. The second component is the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project management providing overall dose management guidance to the subprojects and oversight of the subproject dose management efforts

  18. Method for fabricating ceramic nuclear fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To fabricate ceramic nuclear fuel pellets with ease and efficiently capable of preventing deformation failures in cladding tubes due to thermal deformation of pellets. Method: Nuclear fuel pellets are arranged in one layer while incorporating grinding material in the inner wall of a cylindrical vessel and the end face of the nuclear fuel pellets are rounded to a predetermined shape by rotating the cylindrical vessel. Since the pellets do not form a saddle-like shape (expanded at both ends) upon thermal deformation the surface of the cladding tube less tends to form bamboo node-like ridges, thus to reduce the deformation failure of the cladding tube. (Aizawa, K.)

  19. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I.W.; Patridge, M.D.

    1991-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECN/NEA activities reports; not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  20. Nuclear fuel conversion and fabrication chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following irradiation and reprocessing of nuclear fuel, two operations are performed to prepare the fuel for subsequent reuse as fuel: fuel conversion, and fuel fabrication. These operations complete the classical nuclear fuel cycle. Fuel conversion involves generating a solid form suitable for fabrication into nuclear fuel. For plutonium based fuels, either a pure PuO2 material or a mixed PuO2-UO2 fuel material is generated. Several methods are available for preparation of the pure PuO2 including: oxalate or peroxide precipitation; or direct denitration. Once the pure PuO2 is formed, it is fabricated into fuel by mechanically blending it with ceramic grade UO2. The UO2 can be prepared by several methods which include direct denitration. ADU precipitation, AUC precipitation, and peroxide precipitation. Alternatively, UO2-PuO2 can be generated directly using coprecipitation, direct co-denitration, or gel sphere processes. In coprecipitation, uranium and plutonium are either precipitated as ammonium diuranate and plutonium hydroxide or as a mixture of ammonium uranyl-plutonyl carbonate, filtered and dried. In direct thermal denitration, solutions of uranium and plutonium nitrates are heated causing concentration and, subsequently, direct denitration. In gel sphere conversion, solutions of uranium and plutonium nitrate containing additives are formed into spherical droplets, gelled, washed and dried. Refabrication of these UO3-PuO2 starting materials is accomplished by calcination-reduction to UO2-PuO2 followed by pellet fabrication. (orig.)

  1. Fuel cycle economical improvement by reaching high fuel burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improvements of fuel utilization in the light water reactors, burnup increase have led to a necessity to revise strategic approaches of the fuel cycle development. Different trends of the fuel cycle development are necessary to consider in accordance with the type of reactors used, the uranium market and other features that correspond to the nuclear and economic aspects of the fuel cycle. The fuel burnup step-by-step extension Program that successfully are being realized by the leading, firms - fuel manufacturers and the research centres allow to say that there are no serious technical obstacles for licensing in the near future of water cooling reactors fuel rod burnup (average) limit to 65-70 MWd/kgU and fuel assembly (average) limit to (60-65) MWd/kgU. The operating experience of Ukrainian NPPs with WWER-1000 is 130 reactor * years. At the beginning of 1999, a total quantity of the fuel FA discharged during all time of operation of 11 reactors was 5819 (110 fuel cycles). Economical improvement is reached by increase of fuel burn-up by using of some FA of 3 fuel cycles design in 4th fuel loading cycle. Fuel reliability is satisfactory. The further improvement of FA is necessary, that will allow to reduce the front-end fuel cycle cost (specific natural uranium expenditure), to reduce spent fuel amount and, respectively, the fuel cycle back end costs, and to increase burn-up of the fuel. (author)

  2. Radioecology of nuclear fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sites where radioactive wastes are found are solid waste burial grounds, soils below liquid stoage areas, surface ditches and ponds, and the terrestrial environment around chemical processing facilities that discharge airborne radioactive debris from stacks. This study provides information to help assess the environmental impacts and certain potentiall human hazards associated with nuclear fuel cycles. A data base is being developed to define and quantify biological transport routes which will permit credible predictions and assessment of routine and potential large-scale releases of radionuclides and other toxic materials. These data, used in assessment models, will increase the accuracy of estimating radiation doses to man and other life forms. Information obtained from existing storage and disposal sites will provide a meaningful radioecological perspective with which to improve the effectiveness of waste management practices. Results will provide information to determine if waste management procedures on the Hanford Site have caused ecological perturbations, and if so, to determine the source, nature, and magnitude of such disturbances

  3. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under two nuclear supply scenarios. These two scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries in the World Outside Centrally Planned Economic Areas (WOCA). A No New Orders scenarios is also presented for the Unites States. This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the WOCA projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel; discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2020 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2036, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case

  4. Overview of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of nuclear reactors to provide electrical energy has shown considerable growth since the first nuclear plant started commercial operation in the mid 1950s. Although the main purpose of this paper is to review the fuel cycle capabilities in the United States, the introduction is a brief review of the types of nuclear reactors in use and the world-wide nuclear capacity

  5. Country nuclear fuel cycle profile: Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four WWER-440/213 reactors are in operation at the Paks nuclear power plant with a total capacity of 1866 MW(e). The first reactor started operation in 1983. Nuclear generation accounted for 37% of the country's total electricity production in 2002. Hungary has not yet decided about its nuclear fuel cycle. Prior to its closure, the Mecsekuran Lic/Cserkut mining and ore processing facility produced up to 500 t U/a, or half the requirements of the Paks nuclear power plant. The mine was closed in 1997 and production at the milling facility was phased out in 1999. There is no domestic fuel fabrication. At present, nuclear fuel is flown in from the Russian Federation. Westinghouse has developed advanced fuel designs for the Paks nuclear power plant in conjunction with TVO (Finland). Between 1989 and 1998 spent fuel was sent back to the Mayak facility (RT-1) in the Russian Federation without U, Pu or high level waste from reprocessing needing to be returned. At the Paks nuclear power plant, the AFR dry storage facility (modular vault dry storage) is in operation. The capacity of the first phase (11 vaults) is 4950 fuel assemblies (574 t HM)

  6. A contingency safe, responsible, economic, increased capacity spent nuclear fuel (SNF) advance fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    to be authorized by the U.S. Congress for commercial SNF and nuclear weapons would amount to only one quarter of the needs by 2100. The contingency strategy proposes to Recognize the presence of Transuranics (TRUs) at YM due to defense wastes being disposed there. Discourage the accumulation of separated Pu to satisfy the National Energy Policy Development Group of May 2001. Dispose the 'oldest' once-through fuel at YM due to its reduced burn up, decay heat, and Transuranics (TRUs) content and to use the NRC to be approved Total System Performance Analysis (TSPA) methodology to show that its impact on dose would be minimal compared to the dose 'performance floor' set by defense wastes (4). Avoid disposal of radioactive products at YM which do not need long isolation periods, i.e. Uranium (U), short term fission products, including Cesium and Strontium which can be allowed to decay separately in order to reduce the heat produced in SNF at YM(5). That element of the strategy will reduce significantly the material volume reaching YM. Stabilize the fission products capable of migrating, e.g. fixing the technetium in a matrix with cladding hulls (3) and capturing iodine in a stable solid waste form because its meteorological release as carried out in France will not be allowed in the U. S. Burn TRUs in LWRs in 10 to 20 percent fertile free fuel (FFF) or annular inert matrix fuel (IMF) rods using zirconia, ZrO2 and its cubic phase stabilized with Ytria (Y2O3) and including a burnable poison (erbia for pressurized water and gadolinia for boiling water reactors). References (6) and (7) show that after one fuel cycle, the Pu content of IMF is 'highly undesirable' or 'conceivably unusable '. Disposition the separable IMF fuel rods at YM after one cycle to avoid multiple costly recycles because, as noted in reference (8), 'cubic zirconia is attractive as both a nuclear fuel-form and a nuclear waste form because it is an actinide host phase'. The proposed SNF contingency plan at

  7. fuel cost analysis in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel cycle typically extends over a period of between 50 to 100 years, from mining the uranium ore to finally disposing of the high level waste. These operations are divided in two as front-end and back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle. Accordingly, fuel cycle costs comprise front-end costs and back-end costs. Fuel cycle cost take full account of the investment and operating experience in meeting the strict regulatory requirement for environmental protection and public safety. They cover all expected costs over the 50 to 100 year period of the entire nuclear fuel cycle. The investment appraisal method of deriving the lifetime levelised fuel cost requires the examination of the entire fuel cycle cash outflow based on component prices. The cash outflows are discounted to a base date using the selected discount rate which was set for the reference case at 5% p.a. (real). The unit costs for the different stages of the fuel cycle are discounted back to a selected base date and added together in order to arrive at a total fuel cost in present value terms. In this paper, fuel cycle cost of a reference PWR and CANDU nuclear reactors has investigated using 'Levelised Cost Method'

  8. Levelized nuclear fueling cost in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic nuclear fuel cycle mode options are discussed as they apply to PWR-type reactors. Forecast fueling costs have been computed and are reported for the two main choices - basic front-end cost supplemented by either a throw- away mode option or a reprocessing mode option. It is concluded that reprocessing could result in total unit fueling costs ranging from a minimum slightly lower, through a maximum about 30% higher than the total unit fueling cost using the throw-away mode option. Moreover, in massive breeder development the total unit fueling cost can extend even below the numerically calculated limit. (H.K.)

  9. New Nuclear Fuel-Management Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a new course on in-core fuel management in nuclear reactors. The course concentrates mostly on nuclear fuel management in CANDU reactors, but it does touch on fuel management in Light-Water Reactors also. I have given this course at both McMaster Univ. and the Univ. Institute of technology. The course over all aspects of the use of nuclear fuel. In addition to shorter conventional assignments, students are asked to complete significant hands-on projects for CANDU reactors using computer codes. A fundamental philosophy of the course, which is to have students carry out typical calculations with both lattice codes and full-core diffusion codes. A basic objective of the course is to give students a strong flavour of the type of fuel-management work actually done in industry

  10. Proceedings of the Topical Meeting on the safety of nuclear fuel cycle intermediate storage facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    reprocessing plant (Thorp). Description, safety design criteria and cold commissioning of the storage facility for HLW and MLW in Belgium. Burn-up assessment of spent PWR fuel assemblies by analysis of the neutron emission; Comparison of measured and calculated data. Study on burnup credit evaluation method at JAERI towards securing criticality safety rationale for management of spent fuel. Handling and storage of decommissioning wastes at BNFL Sellafield - A criticality perspective. Uncertainties of radiation source terms for the shielding safety analysis of high burnup fuels

  11. New developments in nuclear fuel technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been over thirty years since the initiation of the commercial electricity with nuclear reactors. Significant operational experience has been gained with various reactor types during this period. Countries with their own national strategies and continued to improve these designs. Especially Three Mile Island and Chernobyl accidents resulted in significant design changes in reactors from the safety point of view. As a consequence of this, advanced reactor concepts have been developed. In such designs,changes in fuel assemblies are observed in addition to the changes in safety systems. Besides increasing safety margins, the desire of decreasing energy production cost has motivated the development of new fuel design. The use of burnable absorber with fuel has been initiated and it has been a common practice in current applications. The most important development in the context of nuclear fuels in recent years is the use of plutonium which is covered from nuclear weapons in nuclear reactor

  12. Perspective of nuclear fuel cycle for sustainable nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power, on a life-cycle basis, emits about the same level of carbon per unit of electricity generated as wind and solar power. Long-term energy demand and supply analysis projects that global nuclear capacities will expand substantially, i.e. from 350 GW today to more than 1,500 GW by 2050. Uranium supply, spent fuel and waste management, and a non-proliferation nuclear fuel cycle are essential factors for sustainable nuclear power growth. An analysis of the uranium supply up to 2050 indicates that there is no real shortage of potential uranium available if based on the IIASA/WEC scenario on medium nuclear energy growth, although its market price may become more volatile. With regard to spent fuel and waste management, the short term prediction foresees that the amount of spent fuel will increase from the present 145,000 tHM to more than 260,000 tHM in 2015. The IPCC scenarios predicted that the spent fuel quantities accumulated by 2050 will vary between 525 000 tHM and 3 210 000 tHM. Even according to the lowest scenario, it is estimated that spent fuel quantity in 2050 will be double the amount accumulated by 2015. Thus, waste minimization in the nuclear fuel cycle is a central tenet of sustainability. The proliferation risk focusing on separated plutonium and resistant technologies is reviewed. Finally, the IAEA Project INPRO is briefly introduced. (author)

  13. Spacer for fuel rods in nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spacers for fuel rods in nuclear reactor fuel elements are described, especially for use aboard ships. Spacers are used in a grid formed by web plates orthogonally intersecting and assembled together in a tooth-comb fashion forming a plurality of channels. The web plates are joined together and each of the web plates includes apertures through which resilient and separator members are joined. The resilient and separator members are joined. The resilient and separator members are in adjacent channels and with other similar members in the same channel, contact a fuel rod in the channel. The contact pressure between the members and fuel rod is radially directed

  14. Reference Neutron Radiographs of Nuclear Reactor Fuel

    OpenAIRE

    Domanus, Joseph Czeslaw

    1986-01-01

    Reference neutron radiographs of nuclear reactor fuel were produced by the Euraton Neutron Radiography Working Group and published in 1984 by the Reidel Publishing Company. In this collection a classification is given of the various neutron radiographic findings, that can occur in different parts of pelletized, annular and vibro-conpacted nuclear fuel pins. Those parts of the pins are shown where changes of appearance differ from those for the parts as fabricated. Also radiographs of those as...

  15. Country nuclear fuel cycle profile: Slovenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovenia has one 676 MW(e) PWR unit (imported from the USA) in operation. Nuclear power generation accounted for 39.8% of the country's total electricity production in 2002. Slovenia has not yet decided about its nuclear fuel cycle policy. Between 1982 and 1990, 362 t of uranium were produced at the Zirovski VRH mine and processing plant. This plant is now being decommissioned. A spent fuel storage pool (capacity 690 t HM) is in operation at the plant site

  16. Nuclear fuel resources: enough to last?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need to meet ever-growing energy demands in an environmentally sustainable manner has turned attention to the potential for nuclear energy to play an expanded role in future energy supply mixes. One of the key aspects in defining the sustainability of any energy source is the availability of fuel resources. This article shows that available nuclear energy fuel resources can meet future needs for hundreds, even thousands, of years

  17. Oxygen potential measurements on irradiated oxide nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method has been developed whereby direct data on the radial variation of oxygen potential in an oxide fuel pin can be determined. The method uses a miniature solid state galvanic cell which enables EMF measurements to be made on micro samples extracted from different radial positions in the fuel pin. Measurements have been made on a pin irradiated in the Dounreay Fast Reactor to approximately 6 % burn-up. The oxygen gradient deduced from the experimental results was smaller than that predicted theoretically although the mean O/M was within the manufacturing tolerances of the fuel pin. During the testing of the galvanic cell, new data were obtained for the relationship between oxygen to metal ratio and oxygen potential for hypostoichiometric uranium, plutonium oxide. Some anomalous results from these experiments, arising from inhomogeneities in the sample, have been interpreted as an explanation for discrepancies in the published data for this system. (Auth.)

  18. Nuclear fuel irradiation in ACPR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciocanescu, M.; Negut, G.; Costescu, C.; Georgescu, D.; Pop, I. (Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors, Pitesti (Romania))

    1984-07-01

    For our fuel program, experiments were proposed on CANDU fuel in ACPR in pulsing regimes. These experiments were intended to determine the fuel behavior during large deposition of heat, fuel-clad interaction mechanisms, and failure thresholds. The fuel is 159 mm long, 6.5% enriched UO{sub 2}. The capsule used for irradiation is an atmospheric capsule assembled in the central dry tube. The capsule is 1 m long, 12 cm i.d., and is locked on the lead ballast through a locking device. The fuel is instrumented with three thermocouples (for clad temperature) and a fission gas transducer. The coolant pressure and temperature are also measured. During irradiation, the data are recorded by a high-speed magnetic tape recorder. For the first campaign, three fuel elements will be irradiated. (orig.)

  19. Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Technical Databook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Technical Databook is developed for use as a common authoritative source of fuel behavior and material parameters in support of the Hanford SNF Project. The Technical Databook will be revised as necessary to add parameters as their Databook submittals become available

  20. Nuclear reactor fuel elements charging tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assist the loading of nuclear reactor fuel elements in a reactor core, positioning blocks with a pyramidal upper face charged to guide the fuel element leg are placed on the lower core plate. A carrier equipped with means of controlled displacement permits movement of the blocks over the lower core plate

  1. Pyrolytic carbon-caoted nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved nuclear fuel kernel having at least one pyrolytic carbon coating and a silicon carbon layer is provided in which extensive interaction of fission product lanthanides with the silicon carbon layer is avoided by providing sufficient UO2 to maintain the lanthanides as oxides during in-reactor use of said fuel

  2. Assembly mechanism for nuclear fuel bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to an assembly mechanism for nuclear power reactor fuel bundles using a novel, simple and inexpensive means. The mechanism is readily operable remotely, avoids separable parts and is applicable to fuel assemblies in which the upper tie plate is rigidly mounted on the tie rods which hold it in place. (UK)

  3. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designs of nuclear reactor fuel assembly spacer grids for supporting and spacing fuel elements are described which do not utilize resilient grid plate protrusions in the peripheral band but retain the advantages inherent in the combination resilient and rigid protrusion cells. (U.K.)

  4. Dry Processing of Used Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. M. Goff; M. F. Simpson

    2009-09-01

    Dry (non-aqueous) separations technologies have been used for treatment of used nuclear fuel since the 1960s, and they are still being developed and demonstrated in many countries. Dry technologies offer potential advantages compared to traditional aqueous separations including: compactness, resistance to radiation effects, criticality control benefits, compatibility with advanced fuel types, and ability to produce low purity products. Within the Department of Energy’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, an electrochemical process employing molten salts is being developed for recycle of fast reactor fuel and treatment of light water reactor oxide fuel to produce a feed for fast reactors. Much of the development of this technology is based on treatment of used Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) fuel, which is metallic. Electrochemical treatment of the EBR-II fuel has been ongoing in the Fuel Conditioning Facility, located at the Materials and Fuel Complex of Idaho National Laboratory since 1996. More than 3.8 metric tons of heavy metal of metallic fast reactor fuel have been treated using this technology. This paper will summarize the status of electrochemical development and demonstration activities with used nuclear fuel, including high-level waste work. A historic perspective on the background of dry processing will also be provided.

  5. Nuclear spent fuel management. Experience and options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel can be stored safely for long periods at relatively low cost, but some form of permanent disposal will eventually be necessary. This report examines the options for spent fuel management, explores the future prospects for each stage of the back-end of the fuel cycle and provides a thorough review of past experience and the technical status of the alternatives. Current policies and practices in twelve OECD countries are surveyed

  6. Nuclear fuel pellet collating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a system for collating nuclear fuel pellets. The system consists of: (a) a pellet collating line including serially-arranged pellet input, work and output stations; (b) a plurality of mobile carts, some supporting pellet supply trays and others supporting pellet storage trays, the trays adapted to support pellets in multiple rows thereof, the pellets on a given one tray being of the same enrichment with enrichments of pellets on some trays behind different from on other trays; (c) a tray positioning station located adjacent to the pellet collating line and defining positions in which are lodged the mobile carts; (d) tray transfer robot located between the pellet collating line and the try positioning station, the robot being operable to transfer supply and storage trays one at a time between the respective carts at the tray positioning station and respective input and output stations; (e) an input sweep head disposed adjacent the input station and being operable for sweeping pellets resting in multiple rows on a given one of the supply trays at the input station from the supply tray onto the work station; (f) a gripping and measuring head disposed adjacent the work station and being operable for measuring a desired length of pellets in the multiple rows thereof on the work station and then separating the measured desired length of pellets from the remaining pellets, if there be any; (g) an output sweep head disposed adjacent to the output station and operable for sweeping the measured lengths of pellets from the work station onto a given one of the storage trays at the output station; (h) one the input sweep head, the gripping and measuring head and the output sweep head being operable for sweeping the remaining pellets, if any, in the multiple rows thereof from the work station back onto the given one of the supply trays at the input station

  7. Fuels for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuels for advanced nuclear reactors differ greatly from conventional light water reactor fuels and vary widely between the different concepts, due differences in reactor architecture and deployment. Functional requirements of all fuel designs include (1) retention of fission products and fuel nuclides, (2) dimensional stability, and (3) maintaining a coolable geometry. In all cases, the anticipated fuel performance under normal or off-normal conditions is the limiting factor in reactor system design, and cumulative effects of increased exposure to higher burnup degrades fuel performance. In high-temperature (thermal) gas reactor systems, fuel particles of uranium dioxide or uranium oxycarbide particles are coated with layers of carbon and SiC (or ZrC). Such fuels have been used successfully to very high burnup (10-20% of heavy-metal atoms) and can withstand transient temperatures up to 1600 C. Oxide (pellet-type) and metal (pin-type) fuels clad in stainless steel tubes have been successfully used in liquid metal cooled fast reactors, attaining burnup of 20% or more of heavy-metal atoms. Those fuel designs are being adapted for actinide management missions, requiring greater contents of minor actinides (e.g. Am, Np, Cm). The current status of each fuel system is reviewed and technical challenges confronting the implementation of each fuel in the context of the entire advanced reactor fuel cycle (fabrication, reactor performance, recycle) are discussed

  8. Analysis of high burnup spent nuclear fuel by ICP-MS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) as the primary tool for determining concentrations of a suite of nuclides in samples excised from high-burnup spent nuclear fuel rods taken from light water nuclear reactors. The complete analysis included the determination of 95Mo, 99Tc, 101Ru, 103Rh, 109Ag, 137Cs, 143Nd, 145Nd, 148Nd, 147Sm, 149Sm, 150Sm, 151Sm, 152Sm, 151Eu, 153Eu, 155Eu, 155Gd, 237Np, 234U, 235U, 236U, 238U, 238Pu, 239Pu, 240Pu, 241Pu, 242Pu, 241Am, 242mAm, and 243Am. The isotopic composition of fissiogenic lanthanide elements was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ICP-MS detection. These analytical results allow the determination of fuel burn-up based on 148Nd, Pu, and U content, as well as provide input for storage and disposal criticality calculations. Results show that ICP-MS along with HPLC-ICP-MS are suitable of performing routine determinations of most of these nuclides, with an uncertainty of ±10% at the 95% confidence level. (author)

  9. Neutron Monitoring Systems for the Characterisation of Nuclear Fuel and Waste - Methodology and Applications - 12055

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most characteristic behaviour of nuclear fuel or waste contaminated by fission material or isotopes resulting from fissile processes is the emission of neutrons. At the same time because of the high penetration of the material by neutrons, they are an ideal probe for measurement by non-destructive assay. The detection and data analysis in this case is quite different compared to methods using gamma measuring techniques. Neutron detection monitors have been in routine operation for a long time, showing their excellent detection capabilities. The neutron monitors designed for different applications have demonstrated their capabilities during daily operation in the field of burned up fuel elements and for nuclear waste with alpha activity. Lately the data analysis was refined and the quality of the results was improved by using MCNP calculations. Last but not least the layout and the calibration of neutron monitors are nowadays unfeasible without support by MCNP simulations. In the field of non-destructive assay the neutron monitors are undisputed. (authors)

  10. Nuclear fuel cycle simulation system (VISTA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Fuel Cycle Simulation System (VISTA) is a simulation system which estimates long term nuclear fuel cycle material and service requirements as well as the material arising from the operation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities and nuclear power reactors. The VISTA model needs isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel in order to make estimations of the material arisings from the nuclear reactor operation. For this purpose, in accordance with the requirements of the VISTA code, a new module called Calculating Actinide Inventory (CAIN) was developed. CAIN is a simple fuel depletion model which requires a small number of input parameters and gives results in a very short time. VISTA has been used internally by the IAEA for the estimation of: spent fuel discharge from the reactors worldwide, Pu accumulation in the discharged spent fuel, minor actinides (MA) accumulation in the spent fuel, and in the high level waste (HLW) since its development. The IAEA decided to disseminate the VISTA tool to Member States using internet capabilities in 2003. The improvement and expansion of the simulation code and the development of the internet version was started in 2004. A website was developed to introduce the simulation system to the visitors providing a simple nuclear material flow calculation tool. This website has been made available to Member States in 2005. The development work for the full internet version is expected to be fully available to the interested parties from IAEA Member States in 2007 on its website. This publication is the accompanying text which gives details of the modelling and an example scenario

  11. Fuel rod for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel or breeder element with fission gas plenum has hollow spaces on the central part of the fuel or breeder material volume, which are filled with sodium. During operation, this sodium provides a second heat transport mechanism, as the sodium evaporates, rises into the fission gas plenum, condenses on the metal sleeve there and returns to the fuel or breeding zone under gravity or capillary effect. (DG)

  12. KTG: verification of fuel performance by post irradiation examination and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Further burn-up extension is one of the key factors to improve fuel cycle economics in many countries. The data base for higher burn-up is increasing. The German nuclear society KTG took the opportunity to join some 130 experts to discuss achievements and further developments in a 2 day conference. For steady state operation the current fuel performance was summarized by the fuel vendors ABB, BNFL, FRAMATOME, GNF (former GE) and Siemens. Although the burn-up was increased substantially in the past, there is no detrimental effect on fuel reliability. Recent PWR as well a BWR operating expences were discussed in detail. For BWRs the enhanced spacer shadow corrosion phenomenon was evaluated under test conditions and compared with in reactor data. Laboratory capabilities and testing results on steady state fuel and component materials behaviour were presented by the research centers Halden, ITU, Studsvik and PSI. The results discussed comprised fission gas release in the pellet R1M at high burn-up as well as metalliographic analysis of cladding materials. The transient fuel behaviour was analyzed for PCI and RIA conditions. Interpretation for test results were given. The CABRI- (presented by IPSN) and NSRR-RIA test post irradiation examinations (presented by JAERI) revealed, that the cladding failed under internal gas overpressure in high burn-up tests. At the NSRR all BWR-cladding remained intact even when tested at high burn-up. For LOCO conditions the use of statistical methods to determine the extent of core damage was presented by Siemens. BWR thermal hydraulic testing for void distribution using y densitometer (Siemens) or y tomography (ABB) were presented. The test results may lead to introduction of new void correlations in the future to improve the fuel design codes by reduced uncertainties. As a final session - somewhat outside of the fuel scope - the back end handling and intermediate storage possibilities were discussed. Creep deformation of fuel rods under

  13. Integrated spent nuclear fuel database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Distributed Information Systems software Unit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has designed and developed an Integrated Spent Nuclear Fuel Database System (ISNFDS), which maintains a computerized inventory of all US Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Commercial SNF is not included in the ISNFDS unless it is owned or stored by DOE. The ISNFDS is an integrated, single data source containing accurate, traceable, and consistent data and provides extensive data for each fuel, extensive facility data for every facility, and numerous data reports and queries

  14. Waste management and the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present lecture deals with energy needs and nuclear power, the importance of waste and its relative place in the fuel cycle, the games of controversies over nuclear waste in the strategies of energy and finally with missions and functions of the IAEA for privileging the rational approach and facilitating the transfer of technology. (RW)

  15. Nuclear fuel treatment facility for 'Mutsu'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new fixed mooring harbor in Sekinehama and surrounding land facilities to accommodate a test voyage for the nuclear-powered ship 'Mutsu' in 1990 were constructed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Kobe Steel took part in the construction of the nuclear fuel treatment process in various facilities, beginning in October, 1988. This report describes the outline of the facility. (author)

  16. The nuclear fuel cycle in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From the introduction of the peaceful uses of nuclear power it has been the objective of the French Government and the French nuclear power industry to create a self-sufficient closed nuclear fuel cycle. This objective was attained many years ago, with the only exception of the final storage of high level radioactive waste for which, however, at least the problem of conditioning to a state fit for final storage was solved and has been employed in practice for many years. The French nuclear fuel cycle has assumed special importance within the use of nuclear power in Europe and, especially, in the Federal Republic of Germany, in terms both of competition and cooperation. Driven also by specific developments in the Federal Republic of Germany, the German power economy decided in the summer of 1989 to have spent nuclear fuel elements from German nuclear power plants reprocessed to a considerable extent, and on a long term basis, in France. This includes not only the awarding and acceptance of commercial contracts, but also close cooperation based on a government agreement. This cooperation, which initially has been focused on reprocessing, may give rise to various joint steps in research and development also in other sectors of the fuel cycle and thus make important contributions to putting the peaceful uses of nuclear power on a broader European base. (orig.)

  17. A study on the evaluation of source term for spent fuel of nuclear power plant in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As nuclear power has been used in our country over 20 years, spent fuel management is raised seriously as one of the national's problems, which lies in similar situation to other countries having nuclear power plants. An interim storage facility has been planned to operate in 1997, it is highly uncertain whether this facility will start to operate by the time because the site has not been decided yet. After the intermediate storage, the spent fuel periodical management strategy has not prepared yet. Therefore it has to be preceded that the spent fuel quantity which is happening at the power station and the following source term. Now the main have evaluated the source term according to enrichment, burn-up, and cooling time for 17x17 of spent fuel form. I used the SCALE code which were certified by Nuclear Regulatory Commission(NRC) for the source term calculations of Spent Fuel. The source term was calculated, which reflected the feature of target nuclear fuel using ORIGEN-S, a module of the SCALE Code, and the exposure dose rates were calculated by using the QADS modules, considering the geometry. When the enrichment in the evaluated result of source term is 3.5 w/o and the burn-up is 35 GWD/MTU, the cooling time 0.3year is 7.561E+16(photon/second), 1year 2.8954E+16, 3year 9.8242E+15, 5year 5.400E+15, 10year 3.0945E+15 and found that the big difference in Photon Spectrum of cooling time 0.3year and 10year. I have found that radiation dose rate is decreased in 10 cm 4.8365E+03(Gy/hr) into 500 cm 7.8456E+01 for dose rate according to distance from 10 cm to 500 cm. It is not made the source term evaluation on the domestic spent fuel, and since the data base construction is basic level, some time later, if the storage place is constructed, in connection with the safety, these basic data can be used and we can construct these basic data base

  18. Long term wet spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting showed that there is continuing confidence in the use of wet storage for spent nuclear fuel and that long-term wet storage of fuel clad in zirconium alloys can be readily achieved. The importance of maintaining good water chemistry has been identified. The long-term wet storage behaviour of sensitized stainless steel clad fuel involves, as yet, some uncertainties. However, great reliance will be placed on long-term wet storage of spent fuel into the future. The following topics were treated to some extent: Oxidation of the external surface of fuel clad, rod consolidation, radiation protection, optimum methods of treating spent fuel storage water, physical radiation effects, and the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies of long-term wet storage conditions. A number of papers on national experience are included

  19. The burn-up credit physics and the 40. Minerve anniversary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical meeting organized by the SFEN on the burn-up credit (CBU) physics, took place the 23 november 1999 at Cadarache. the first presentation dealt with the economic interest and the neutronic problems of the CBU. Then two papers presented how taking into account the CBU in the industry in matter of transport, storage in pool, reprocessing and criticality calculation (MCNP4/Apollo2-F benchmark). An experimental method for the reactivity measurement through oscillations in the Minerve reactor, has been presented with an analysis of the possible errors. The future research program OSMOSE, taking into account the minor actinides in the CBU, was also developed. The last paper presented the national and international research programs in the CBU domain, in particular experiments realized in CEA/Valduc and the OECD Burn-up Criticality Benchmark Group activities. (A.L.B.)

  20. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

    2014-04-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel • A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension • Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR • New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel • Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions • Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and • An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.