WorldWideScience

Sample records for burn wound infection

  1. Fungal Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Aspergillus), Blasto- T he use of effective topical chemotherapeutic agents to myces (Candida), and Zygomycetes (Mucor, Rhizopus ).6 reduce...below the infected burn wound . If the infection was controlled by these measures and the patient’s condition permit- ted, the involved area was...species, 18%; Mucor species and Rhizopus species, acetate in the morning and silver sulfadiazine in the evening. Prophy- 9.1%; and Microspora species and

  2. Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    generalized. Clinically, the like- controlled Pseudomonas burn wound infection in most lihood of septicemia appears to increase as the area of patients (2,4...31 patients, dida, Coccidiodes, Phycomyces, and Rhizopus . In 69 of pneumonia was the primary septic process in 27 (20 of these 75 patients (92%), the...carried out as described above and appropriate systemic anti- to which the invading organisms were sensitive and fungal agents are employed to control

  3. Mouse Model of Burn Wound and Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2017-01-01

    The immunosuppression induced by thermal injury renders the burned victim susceptible to infection. A mouse model was developed to examine the immunosuppression, which was possible to induce even at a minor thermal insult of 6% total body surface area. After induction of the burn (48 hr) a depres......The immunosuppression induced by thermal injury renders the burned victim susceptible to infection. A mouse model was developed to examine the immunosuppression, which was possible to induce even at a minor thermal insult of 6% total body surface area. After induction of the burn (48 hr......) a depression of leukocytes in the peripheral blood was found of the burned mice. This depression was due to a reduction in the polymorphonuclear cells. The burned mice were not able to clear a Pseudomonas aeruginosa wound infection, since the infection spread to the blood as compared to mice only infected...... with P. aeruginosa subcutaneously. The burn model offers an opportunity to study infections under these conditions. The present model can also be used to examine new antibiotics and immune therapy. Our animal model resembling the clinical situation is useful in developing new treatments of burn wound...

  4. Subeschar Treatment of Burn-Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    patients (31.5%) had suffered inhalation in- burn wound, after the course of subeschar antibiotic infusion, jury, a diagnosis established by some...combination of history, All surviving patients were Infected with Pseudomonas physical examination, flexible fiberoptic bronchoscopy, xenon Xe aeruglnosa... Inhalation Organism In Initial Posttreatment Age/Sex Trotl Full Injury Biopsy Specimen (No.)t Biopsy Results Outcome$ Autopsy 23 yr/M 83.0 67.5 Yes

  5. Surgical Burn Wound Infections and Their Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posluszny, Joseph A.; Conrad, Peggie; Halerz, Marcia; Shankar, Ravi; Gamelli, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    Typically, burn wound infections are classified by the organisms present in the wound within the first several days following injury or later, by routine surveillance cultures. With universal acceptance of early excision and grafting, classification of burn wound colonization in unexcised burn wounds is less relevant shifting clinical significance to open burn-related surgical wound infections (SWI). To better characterize SWIs and their clinical relevance, we identified the pathogens responsible for SWIs, their impact on rates of regrafting, and the relationship between SWI and nosocomial infection (NI) pathogens. Epidemiologic and clinical data for 71 adult patients with ≥20% TBSA burn were collected. Following excision and grafting, if a grafted site had clinical characteristics of infection, a wound culture swab was obtained and organism identified. Surveillance cultures were not obtained. SWI pathogen, anatomic location, post-burn day of occurrence and need for regrafting were compiled. A positive culture obtained from an isolated anatomic location at any time point after excision and grafting of that location was considered a distinct infection. Pathogens responsible for NIs (urinary tract infections, pneumonia, bloodstream and catheter-related bloodstream infections, pseudomembranous colitis and donor site infections) and their post-burn day were identified. The profiles of SWI pathogens and NI pathogens were then compared. Of the 71 patients included, 2 withdrew, 6 had no excision or grafting performed and 1 had incomplete data. Of the 62 remaining, 24 (39%) developed a SWI. In these 24 patients, 70 distinct infections were identified of which 46% required regrafting. Candida species (24%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22%), Serratia marcescens (11%) and Staphylococcus aureus (11%) comprised the majority of pathogens. The development of a SWI with the need for regrafting increased overall length of stay, area of autograft, number of operative events and was

  6. Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection in a dedicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a major cause of morbidity in burns patients. There is a paucity of publications dealing with this infection in the paediatric population. We describe the incidence, microbiology and impact of P. aeruginosa infection in a dedicated paediatric burns unit. Methods.

  7. Burn Wound Infections and Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns at Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences, Islamabad, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saaiq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Shehzad; Zaib, Muhammad Salman

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROND Burn wound infections carry considerable mortality and morbidity amongst burn injury victims who have been successfully rescued through the initial resuscitation. This study assessed the prevalent microrganisms causing burn wound infections among hospitalized patients; their susceptibility pattern to commonly used antibiotics; and the frequency of infections with respect to the duration of the burn wounds. METHODS This study was carried out at Burn Care Centre, Pakistan Institute of Medical Sciences (PIMS), Islamabad, Pakistan over a period of two years (i.e. from June 2010 to May 2012). The study included all wound-culture-positive patients of either gender and all ages, who had sustained deep burns and underwent definitive management with wound excisions and skin auto-grafting. Patients with negative cultures of the wounds were excluded. Tissue specimens for culture and sensitivity were collected from burn wounds using standard collection techniques and analyzed at microbiological laboratory. RESULTS Out of a total of 95 positive microbial growths, 36 were Pseudomonas aeruginosa (35.29%) as the most frequent isolate found, followed by 21 Klebsiella pneumoniae (20.58%), 19 Staphylococcus aureaus (18.62%), 10 Proteus (9.80%), 7 E. coli (6.86%), 7 Acinetobacter (6.86%), and 4 Candida (3.92%). A variable antibiotic susceptibility pattern was observed among the grown microbes. Positive cultures were significantly more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. CONCLUSION P. aeruginosa, K. pneumoniae and S. aureus constituted the most common bacterial microbes of burn wounds in our in-patients cases. Positive cultures were more frequent among patients with over two weeks duration of burn wounds. Early excision and skin grafting of deep burns and adherence to infection control measures can help to effectively reduce the burden of these infections. PMID:25606471

  8. Pseudomonas aeruginosa burn wound infection in a dedicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    according to standard management protocols. The standard of care during the study period was to treat wounds infected with. P. aeruginosa (even if clinically suspected and not yet proven with a positive swab) with daily soaks with an unbuffered sodium hypochlorite solution,[13] after which the wounds were dressed with.

  9. Thermal injury induces impaired function in polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes and reduced control of burn wound infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, H.; Moser, C.; Jensen, P. O.

    2009-01-01

    with infected burn wound. Furthermore, the oxidative burst and the phagocytic capacity of the PMNs were reduced in the group of mice with burn wound. Using this novel mouse model of thermal injury a decline of peripheral leucocytes was observed, whereas the increased local inflammatory response at the site......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6% third-degree burn...... injury was induced in mice with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. The mice were allocated into five groups: control, shave, burn, infection and burn infection group. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group...

  10. The Healing Effect of Licorice on Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infected Burn Wounds in Experimental Rat Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tanideh, Nader; Rokhsari, Pedram; Mehrabani, Davood; Mohammadi Samani, Soleiman; Sabet Sarvestani, Fatemeh; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad; Koohi Hosseinabadi, Omid; Shamsian, Shahram; AHMADI, Nasrollah

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burn is still one of the most devastating injuries in emergency medicine while improvements in wound healing knowledge and technology have resulted into development of new dressings. This study was undertaken to evaluate the healing effect of licorice in Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected burn wounds of experimental rat model. METHODS One hundred and twenty female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to 4 equal groups. Group A received silver sulfadiazine ointment, Group B rece...

  11. Risk factors for nosocomial burn wound infection caused by multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekin, Recep; Dal, Tuba; Bozkurt, Fatma; Deveci, Ozcan; Palanc, Ylmaz; Arslan, Eyüp; Selçuk, Caferi Tayyar; Hoşoğlu, Salih

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii infections in burn patients may lead to delays in wound healing, graft losses, and development of sepsis. Determining the risk factors for multidrug resistant A. baumannii (MDR-AB) infections is essential for infection control. In the present study, the authors aimed to evaluate risk factors for wound infections caused by A. baumannii in burn patients. The study was conducted at Dicle University Hospital Burn Center, from April 2011 to July 2012, to investigate the risk factors for MDR-AB infections. The data of both the case and control group patients and the result of wound cultures were recorded on a daily basis, on individual forms given for each patient, and analyzed. A total of 30 cases infected with MDR-AB, and 60 uninfected control patients, were included in the study. The mean age (±SD) was 7.7 ± 15.4 years in infected patients and 11.4 ± 16.5 years in uninfected patients. The mean total burn surface area was 13.5 ± 10.9% in uninfected patients and 34.7 ± 16.2% in infected patients. The mean total burn surface area, the abbreviated burn severity index, acute physiological and chronic health evaluation II score, day of admission to hospital, length of hospital stay, first excision day, prior usage of third-generation cephalosporins, and stay in intensive care unit of the infected patients were significantly higher (P infection. Univariate analysis found that high acute physiological and chronic health evaluation II score, first excision time of wound, invasive device usage, admission day to hospital, and prior usage of broad-spectrum antibiotics were risk factors for nosocomial infections. This study showed that multiple factors contribute to multidrug resistance in A. baumannii. A combination of an early diagnosis of wound infections, appropriate antimicrobial treatments, surgical debridement, and early wound closure may be effective in the management.

  12. Maggot therapy for repairing serious infective wound in a severely burned patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WU Jun-cheng

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】The larvae of musca domestica were put in use to discard the dead tissue of a case of severe burn. A total of 50 000 aseptic maggots were put onto the infective wound surface, and aseptic dressings overlaid the surface. Three days later, another 20 000 maggots were put onto the wound for the second therapy. After twice maggot debridement, most necrotic muscle tissues of the wound were cleaned up, and eventually fresh granulation tissue grew and later the wound was covered and healed by 3 times of skin grafting. The result demonstrates that maggot therapy is safe and effective with no adverse complications except pain. Key words: Biological therapy; Wound infection; Burns; Wound healing; Debridement

  13. A Hydrogel-Based Localized Release of Colistin for Antimicrobial Treatment of Burn Wound Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chongyu; Zhao, Jinxin; Kempe, Kristian; Wilson, Paul; Wang, Jiping; Velkov, Tony; Li, Jian; Davis, Thomas P; Whittaker, Michael R; Haddleton, David M

    2017-02-01

    There is an urgent unmet medical need for new treatments for wound and burn infections caused by multidrug-resistant Gram-negative "superbugs," especially the problematic Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, the incorporation of colistin, a potent lipopeptide into a self-healable hydrogel (via dynamic imine bond formation) following the chemical reaction between the amine groups present in glycol chitosan and an aldehyde-modified poly(ethylene glycol), is reported. The storage module (G') of the colistin-loaded hydrogel ranges from 1.3 to 5.3 kPa by varying the amount of the cross-linker and colistin loading providing different options for topical wound healing. The majority of the colistin is released from the hydrogel within 24 h and remains active as demonstrated by both antibacterial in vitro disk diffusion and time-kill assays. Moreover and pleasingly, the colistin-loaded hydrogel performs almost equally well as native colistin against both the colistin-sensitive and also colistin-resistant P. aeruginosa strain in the in vivo animal "burn" infection model despite exhibiting a slower killing profile in vitro. Based on this antibiotic performance along with the biodegradability of the product, it is believed the colistin-loaded hydrogel to be a potential localized wound-healing formulation to treat burn wounds against microbial infection. © 2016 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Burn wound: How it differs from other wounds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Tiwari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of burn injury has always been the domain of burn specialists. Since ancient time, local and systemic remedies have been advised for burn wound dressing and burn scar prevention. Management of burn wound inflicted by the different physical and chemical agents require different regimes which are poles apart from the regimes used for any of the other traumatic wounds. In extensive burn, because of increased capillary permeability, there is extensive loss of plasma leading to shock while whole blood loss is the cause of shock in other acute wounds. Even though the burn wounds are sterile in the beginning in comparison to most of other wounds, yet, the death in extensive burns is mainly because of wound infection and septicemia, because of the immunocompromised status of the burn patients. Eschar and blister are specific for burn wounds requiring a specific treatment protocol. Antimicrobial creams and other dressing agents used for traumatic wounds are ineffective in deep burns with eschar. The subeschar plane harbours the micro-organisms and many of these agents are not able to penetrate the eschar. Even after complete epithelisation of burn wound, remodelling phase is prolonged. It may take years for scar maturation in burns. This article emphasizes on how the pathophysiology, healing and management of a burn wound is different from that of other wounds.

  15. Bacterial isolates from burn wound infections and their antibiograms: A eight-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Manjula

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection is an important cause of mortality in burns. Rapidly emerging nosocomial pathogens and the problem of multi-drug resistance necessitates periodic review of isolation patterns and antibiogram in the burn ward. Aim: Keeping this in mind, the present retrospective study from wounds of patients admitted to burns unit was undertaken to determine the bacteriological profile and the resistance pattern from the burn ward over a period of three years (June 2002 to May 2005 and was compared with the results obtained during the previous five years (June 1997-May 2002, to ascertain any change in the bacteriological profile and antimicrobial resistance pattern. Materials and Methods: Bacterial isolates from 268 wound swabs taken from burn patients were identified by conventional biochemical methods and antimicrobial susceptibility was performed. Statistical comparison of bacterial isolates and their resistance pattern with previous five years data was done using c2 test. Results and Conclusions: During the period from 2002 to 2005 Pseudomonas species was the commonest pathogen isolated (51.5% followed by Acinetobacter species (14.28%, Staph. aureus (11.15%, Klebsiella species (9.23% and Proteus species (2.3%. When compared with the results of the previous five years i.e., 1997 to 2002, Pseudomonas species was still the commonest pathogen in the burns unit. However, the isolation of this organism and other gram-negative organisms had decreased in comparison to previous years. Newer drugs were found to be effective.

  16. Photodynamic therapy for Staphylococcus aureus infected burn wounds in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambrechts, Saskia A. G.; Demidova, Tatiana N.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2005-01-01

    The rise of multiply antibiotic resistant bacteria has led to searches for novel antimicrobial therapies to treat infections. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential candidate; it uses the combination of a photosensitizer with visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that lead to cell

  17. IL-15 Superagonist Expands mCD8+ T, NK and NKT Cells after Burn Injury but Fails to Improve Outcome during Burn Wound Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Naeem K.; Luan, Liming; Bohannon, Julia K.; Guo, Yin; Hernandez, Antonio; Fensterheim, Benjamin; Sherwood, Edward R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Severely burned patients are highly susceptible to opportunistic infections and sepsis, owing to the loss of the protective skin barrier and immunological dysfunction. Interleukin-15 (IL-15) belongs to the IL-2 family of common gamma chain cytokines and stimulates the proliferation and activation of T (specifically memory CD8), NK and NKT cells. It has been shown to preserve T cell function and improve survival during cecal ligation and puncture (CLP)-induced sepsis in mice. However, the therapeutic efficacy of IL-15 or IL-15 superagonist (SA) during infection after burn injury has not been evaluated. Moreover, very few, if any, studies have examined, in detail, the effect of burn injury and infection on the adaptive immune system. Thus, we examined the effect of burn and sepsis on adaptive immune cell populations and the effect of IL-15 SA treatment on the host response to infection. Methods Mice were subjected to a 35% total body surface area burn, followed by wound infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In some experiments, IL-15 SA was administered after burn injury, but before infection. Leukocytes in spleen, liver and peritoneal cavity were characterized using flow cytometry. Bacterial clearance, organ injury and survival were also assessed. Results Burn wound infection led to a significant decline in total white blood cell and lymphocyte counts and induced organ injury and sepsis. Burn injury caused decline in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the spleen, which was worsened by infection. IL-15 treatment inhibited this decline and significantly increased cell numbers and activation, as determined by CD69 expression, of CD4+, CD8+, B, NK and NKT cells in the spleen and liver after burn injury. However, IL-15 SA treatment failed to prevent burn wound sepsis-induced loss of CD4+, CD8+, B, NK and NKT cells and failed to improve bacterial clearance and survival. Conclusion Cutaneous burn injury and infection cause significant adaptive immune dysfunction. IL-15

  18. Prevention of bloodstream infections by photodynamic inactivation of multiresistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa in burn wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, M. C. E.; Prates, R. A.; Toffoli, D. J.; Courrol, L. C.; Ribeiro, M. S.

    2010-02-01

    Bloodstream infections are potentially life-threatening diseases. They can cause serious secondary infections, and may result in endocarditis, severe sepsis or toxic-shock syndrome. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen and one of the most important etiological factors responsible for nosocomial infections, mainly in immuno-compromissed hosts, characteristic of patients with severe burns. Its multiresistance to antibiotics produces many therapeutic problems, and for this reason, the development of an alternative method to antibiotic therapy is needed. Photodynamic inactivation (PDI) may be an effective and alternative therapeutic option to prevent bloodstream infections in patients with severe burns. In this study we report the use of PDI to prevent bloodstream infections in mice with third-degree burns. Burns were produced on the back of the animals and they were infected with 109 cfu/mL of multi-resistant (MR) P. aeruginosa. Fifteen animals were divided into 3 groups: control, PDT blue and PDT red. PDT was performed thirty minutes after bacterial inoculation using 10μM HB:La+3 and a light-emitting diode (LED) emitting at λ=460nm+/-20nm and a LED emitting at λ=645 nm+/-10nm for 120s. Blood of mice were colected at 7h, 10h, 15h, 18h and 22h pos-infection (p.i.) for bacterial counting. Control group presented 1×104 cfu/mL in bloodstream at 7h p.i. increasing to 1×106 at 22h, while mice PDT-treated did not present any bacteria at 7h; only at 22h p.i. they presented 1×104cfu/mL. These results suggest that HB:La+3 associated to blue LED or red LED is effective to delay and diminish MR P.aeruginosa bloodstream invasion in third-degree-burned mice.

  19. Frequency of Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotypes in burn wound infections and their resistance to antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estahbanati, Hamid Karimi; Kashani, Parnian Pour; Ghanaatpisheh, Fahimeh

    2002-06-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa plays a prominent role as an etiological agent involved in serious infections in burned patients. In this study P. aeruginosa infections were analyzed at the Motahari Burn Center in Tehran (from 22 December 1998 to April 1999) to estimate their frequency, antibiotic susceptibility and serotypes. One hundred and eighty-four positive cultures and 205 bacterial strains were isolated among swabs or biopsy specimens during the study period. Pseudomonas was found to be the most common (57%) followed by Acinetobacter (17%), Escherichia coli (12%), Staphylococcus aureus (8%) and other organisms (6%). The frequency of P. aeruginosa resistance to gentamicin, ceftizoxime, carbenicillin, cephalothin and ceftazidime was over 90%. The antibiotics to which P. aeruginosa was most sensitive were amikacin and tetracyclin. The "O" serotypes isolated from the 117 Pseudomona aeroginosa isolates were serotypes O:2, O:5, O:6, O:8, O:11, O:12 and O:16. The most common serotype was O:6 (20/17%) followed by O:11 (18/15%) and O:5 (14/12%). The serotype most resistant was O:16 (8%) and the most sensitive was O:8 (2%). Since treatment of infection with available antibiotics according to the results attained proved to be difficult, prevention of infection in the burned patients is considered as an appropriate means of conquering overcoming infection problems. The sum of frequencies of serotypes O:6, O:11, O:5 and O:16 was more than 60%, therefore vaccination of burn patients with polyvalent antiserum to these serotypes could possibly produce immunity in more than half of the burned patients.

  20. Comparison of silver nylon wound dressing and silver sulfadiazine in partial burn wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abedini, Fereydoon; Ahmadi, Abdollah; Yavari, Akram; Hosseini, Vahid; Mousavi, Sarah

    2013-10-01

    The study aims to perform a comparative assessment of two types of burn wound treatment. To do the assessment, patients with partial thickness burn wounds with total body surface area nylon wound dressing or silver sulfadiazine cream. Efficacy of treatment, use of analgesics, number of wound dressing change, wound infection and final hospitalisation cost were evaluated. The study showed silver nylon wound dressing significantly reduced length of hospital stay, analgesic use, wound infection and inflammation compared with silver sulfadiazine. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  1. Enzyme-responsive nanocomposites for wound infection prophylaxis in burn management: in vitro evaluation of their compatibility with healing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grützner, Verena; Unger, Ronald E; Baier, Grit; Choritz, Lars; Freese, Christian; Böse, Thomas; Landfester, Katharina; Kirkpatrick, C James

    2015-01-01

    Responsive, theranostic nanosystems, capable of both signaling and treating wound infections, is a sophisticated approach to reduce the most common and potentially traumatizing side effects of burn wound treatment: slowed wound healing due to prophylactic anti-infective drug exposure as well as frequent painful dressing changes. Antimicrobials as well as dye molecules have been incorporated into biodegradable nanosystems that release their content only in the presence of pathogens. Following nanocarrier degradation by bacterial enzymes, any infection will thus emit a visible signal and be effectively treated at its source. In this study, we investigated the effect of fluorescent-labeled hyaluronan nanocapsules containing polyhexanide biguanide and poly-L-lactic acid nanoparticles loaded with octenidine on primary human dermal microvascular endothelial cells, which play a major role in cutaneous wound healing. Microscopic and flow cytometric analysis indicated a time-dependent uptake of both the nanocapsules and the nanoparticles. However, enzyme immunoassays showed no significant influence on the expression of pro-inflammatory cell adhesion molecules and cytokines by the endothelial cells. Under angiogenic-stimulating conditions, the potential to form capillary-like structures in co-culture with dermal fibroblasts was not inhibited. Furthermore, cytotoxicity studies (the MTS and crystal violet assay) after short- and long-term exposure to the materials demonstrated that both systems exhibited less toxicity than solutions of the antiseptic agents alone in comparable concentrations. The results indicate that responsive antimicrobial nanocomposites could be used as an advanced drug delivery system and a promising addition to current best practice wound infection prophylaxis with few side effects.

  2. Aloe vera Gel: Effective Therapeutic Agent against Multidrug-Resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolates Recovered from Burn Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Goudarzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Aloe vera is an herbal medicinal plant with biological activities, such as antimicrobial, anticancer, anti-inflammatory, and antidiabetic ones, and immunomodulatory properties. The purpose of this study was investigation of in vitro antimicrobial activity of A. vera gel against multidrug-resistant (MDR Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from patients with burn wound infections. Methods. During a 6-month study, 140 clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected from patients admitted to the burn wards of a hospital in Tehran, Iran. Antimicrobial susceptibility test was carried out against the pathogens using the A. vera gel and antibiotics (imipenem, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin. Results. The antibiogram revealed that 47 (33.6% of all isolates were MDR P. aeruginosa. The extract isolated from A. vera has antibacterial activity against all of isolates. Also, 42 (89.4% isolates were inhibited by A. vera gel extract at minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC ≤ 200 µg/mL. MIC value of A. vera gel for other isolates (10.6% was 800 µg/mL. All of MDR P. aeruginosa strains were inhibited by A. vera at similar MIC50 and MIC90 200 µg/mL. Conclusion. Based on our results, A. vera gel at various concentrations can be used as an effective antibacterial agent in order to prevent wound infection caused by P. aeruginosa.

  3. Potential of combination therapy of endolysin MR-10 and minocycline in treating MRSA induced systemic and localized burn wound infections in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Shivani; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2016-12-01

    MRSA is the predominant pathogen responsible for fatal burn wound infection in patients. Antibiotic resistance and its ability to form biofilms on the surface of burn wounds limit the use of antibiotics to contain this pathogen. The results of present study have shown that single dose of combination therapy of endolysin MR-10 (50μg/s.c) and minocycline (50mg/kg/orally) resulted in 100% survival of group of mice with systemic MRSA infection. Maximum reduction in bacterial load in various organs was observed in the group that received combination therapy. In comparison to control, a significant reduction (pendolysin MR-10 and minocycline is a better option in controlling burn wound infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. A comparative study of histopathological effects of aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey with sulfadiazine on skin burn wound healing in rats infected with Pseudomonas aeuroginosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadreza Valilou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a ubiquitous opportunistic pathogen, is the most common infective agent of burn wounds. The aim of this study was to compare the histopathological effect of a mixture of aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey with silver sulfadiazine on the healing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infected second grade skin burn wounds in rats. To this end, 60 male rats were randomly assigned to four experimental groups (15 rats in each group. After inducing anesthesia, second grade burn wound with the diameter of 12 mm was created in the dorsal region of rats. Then, 1.5×108 cfu/ml P. aeruginosa PA01was equally bestrewed on the wound of all rats. Every 12 hours, silver sulfadiazine (group 1, honey (group 2 and aqueous extract of cinnamon and honey (group 3 were applied to the wounds and group 4 was kept as control. On days 7, 14, and 21, five rats were selected from each group at each time point and after inducing anesthesia and measuring the diameter of the wound by coliseum, microbial and histopathological samples were taken from the wounds. Microbial studies showed that in all groups except the control group, the growth of the microbe was stopped. Histopathological observations regarding wound healing and diameter showed that there was a significant difference between treatment groups and the control group on days 7, 14 and 21 (p

  5. Management of burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Trop, Marija; Neuhaus, Kathrin

    2013-10-01

    Small and moderate scalds in toddlers are still the most frequent thermal injuries the pediatric surgeons have to face today. Over the last years, surgical treatment of these patients has changed in many aspects. Due to new dressing materials and new surgical treatment strategies that are particularly suitable for children, today, far better functional and aesthetic long-term results are possible. While small and moderate thermal injuries can be treated in most European pediatric surgical departments, the severely burned child must be transferred to a specialized, ideally pediatric, burn center, where a well-trained multidisciplinary team under the leadership of a (ideally pediatric) burn surgeon cares for these highly demanding patients. In future, tissue engineered full thickness skin analogues will most likely play an important role, in pediatric burn as well as postburn reconstructive surgery. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Chloramphenicol encapsulated in poly-ε-caprolactone–pluronic composite: nanoparticles for treatment of MRSA-infected burn wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Sanjeeb; Devi, Banasmita; Kandimalla, Raghuram; Sharma, Kaustav Kalyan; Sharma, Arup; Kalita, Kasturi; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Kotoky, Jibon

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has increased precipitously over the past several decades, with far-reaching health care and societal costs. MRSA infections in the context of burn wounds lead to invasive disease that could potentially cause mortality. Chloramphenicol is a well-known broad-spectrum bacteriostatic antibiotic that has been used since 1949, but due to its hydrophobicity, poor penetration in skin, fast degradation, and toxicity, its application has been hindered. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that old antibiotics such as chloramphenicol remained active against a large number of currently prevalent resistant bacterial isolates due to their low-level use in the past. Recently, the novel nanoparticulate drug-delivery system has been used and reported to be exceptionally useful for topical therapeutics, due to its distinctive physical characteristics such as a high surface-to-volume ratio and minuscule size. It helps to achieve better hydrophilicity, bioavailability, and controlled delivery with enhanced therapeutic index, which has resulted in decreased toxicity levels compared to the crude drug. Here, we report a novel chloramphenicol loaded with poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-pluronic composite nanoparticles (CAM-PCL-P NPs), physicochemical characterizations, and its bioactivity evaluation in a MRSA-infected burn-wound animal model. CAM-PCL-P NPs could encapsulate 98.3% of the drug in the nanoparticles and release 81% of the encapsulated drug over 36 days with a time to 50% drug release of 72 hours (51%). Nanoparticle suspensions maintained the initial properties with respect to size and encapsulation efficiency, even after 6 months of storage at 4°C and 25°C, respectively (P>0.05). Significant reduction in the level of toxicity was observed for CAM-PCL-P NPs compared with that of free drug as confirmed from hemolytic activity against human blood erythrocytes and cytotoxicity assay against an MCF-7

  7. Chloramphenicol encapsulated in poly-ε-caprolactone-pluronic composite: nanoparticles for treatment of MRSA-infected burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Sanjeeb; Devi, Banasmita; Kandimalla, Raghuram; Sharma, Kaustav Kalyan; Sharma, Arup; Kalita, Kasturi; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Kotoky, Jibon

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection has increased precipitously over the past several decades, with far-reaching health care and societal costs. MRSA infections in the context of burn wounds lead to invasive disease that could potentially cause mortality. Chloramphenicol is a well-known broad-spectrum bacteriostatic antibiotic that has been used since 1949, but due to its hydrophobicity, poor penetration in skin, fast degradation, and toxicity, its application has been hindered. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that old antibiotics such as chloramphenicol remained active against a large number of currently prevalent resistant bacterial isolates due to their low-level use in the past. Recently, the novel nanoparticulate drug-delivery system has been used and reported to be exceptionally useful for topical therapeutics, due to its distinctive physical characteristics such as a high surface-to-volume ratio and minuscule size. It helps to achieve better hydrophilicity, bioavailability, and controlled delivery with enhanced therapeutic index, which has resulted in decreased toxicity levels compared to the crude drug. Here, we report a novel chloramphenicol loaded with poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-pluronic composite nanoparticles (CAM-PCL-P NPs), physicochemical characterizations, and its bioactivity evaluation in a MRSA-infected burn-wound animal model. CAM-PCL-P NPs could encapsulate 98.3% of the drug in the nanoparticles and release 81% of the encapsulated drug over 36 days with a time to 50% drug release of 72 hours (51%). Nanoparticle suspensions maintained the initial properties with respect to size and encapsulation efficiency, even after 6 months of storage at 4°C and 25°C, respectively (P>0.05). Significant reduction in the level of toxicity was observed for CAM-PCL-P NPs compared with that of free drug as confirmed from hemolytic activity against human blood erythrocytes and cytotoxicity assay against an MCF-7

  8. Rate of healing in skin-grafted burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, Lisa; Guerrero, Rick; Quesada, Abel R; Chan, Linda S; Garner, Warren L

    2007-08-01

    Skin grafting is a simple and common procedure for achieving wound closure. Despite its widespread use, there is little objective information about the outcomes of skin-grafted burn wounds. The purposes of this study were to determine the length of time it takes to achieve complete wound healing in split-thickness skin-grafted burn wounds and to identify factors that affect time to complete wound healing. The authors prospectively collected information from January through September of 2003 on 52 consecutive patients. Time to complete wound healing was defined as the number of days from burn wound skin grafting until the wound was 100 percent epithelialized. Percentage of total body surface area burned, preoperative prealbumin level, sex, age, graft type, burn mechanism, cause of graft loss, and presence of hypergranulation tissue were assessed and correlated with time to complete wound healing. The time to complete wound healing ranged from 2 to 75 days. Forty-six percent of skin grafts had 100 percent wound closure at postoperative day 7. No grafts were lost to infection. Factors that significantly affected time to complete wound healing were graft loss by seroma, preoperative prealbumin level, presence of hypergranulation tissue, and burns caused by hot solids. The authors' results suggest that most patients will heal skin-grafted burn wounds within 2 weeks. Meticulous attention to prevention of seroma, hypergranulation tissue formation, and malnutrition might decrease time to complete wound healing. Factors thought to influence time to complete wound healing, such as total body surface area burned, sex, age, graft type, and infection, did not significantly affect the authors' patient group.

  9. Infection control in severely burned patients

    OpenAIRE

    Coban, Yusuf Kenan

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, much progress has been made in the control of burn wound infection and nasocomial infections (NI) in severely burned patients. The continiually changing epidemiology is partially related to greater understanding of and improved techniques for burn patient management as well as effective hospital infection control measures. With the advent of antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, infection of the wound site is now not as common as, for example, urinary and blood strea...

  10. Burns, biofilm and a new appraisal of burn wound sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Peter; Brammah, Susan; Wills, Edward

    2010-02-01

    Following a burn, the wound may become colonized and septic complications may ensue. Many organisms, commonly isolated from burn wounds produce biofilms, which are defined as a collection of organisms on a surface surrounded by a matrix. Biofilms are associated with development of antibiotic resistant organisms and are refractory to the immune system. The presence of biofilm in the burn wound has not been documented. A study was undertaken using light and electron microscopy to determine the presence of biofilm in the burn wound. Specific stains were used to detect the presence of micro-organisms and associated carbohydrate, a major constituent of the biofilm matrix. A concurrent microbiological study of the burn wound was also carried out. Biofilm was detected in ulcerated areas of the burn wound. Bacterial wound invasion with mixed organisms was also commonly detected. The finding of biofilm in the burn wound has significance in our understanding of burn wound sepsis and supports the evidence for early excision and closure of the burn wound. Due to the recalcitrant nature of biofilm associated sepsis and the difficulty in disrupting biofilm it has implications for the future development of wound care dressings. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. Early pathogenic colonisers of acute burn wounds: A retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hye-Sung; Pham, Chengde; Paul, Eldho; Padiglione, Alex; Lo, Cheng; Cleland, Heather

    2017-12-01

    Early excision of burns reduces the incidence of local and systemic infections caused by colonising microorganisms, and reduces mortality and length of hospital stay. Appropriate antibiotic prophylaxis can reduce the risk of postoperative wound infections and skin graft loss. Antibiotic selection should be based on likely pathogens. However, there are few studies that have investigated the early pathogenic colonisers of acute burn wounds. To describe pathogenic microorganisms found in acute burns and to make further recommendations on the use of early perioperative prophylactic antibiotics. All burns patients admitted at the tertiary adult burns centre in Victoria over a 2-year period, who had surface swabs or tissue samples obtained from wounds within 24h of injury were included in this retrospective cohort study. Pathogenic organisms were examined with respect to patient characteristics, burn characteristics, treatment provided and immediate exposure to environmental contaminants. Nearly one third of burns patients had wounds colonised with pathogenic microorganisms. Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from 52% of these. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common isolate. Pseudomonas and Enterobacter species were the most common gram-negatives. The only independent risk factor associated with early colonisation with gram-negative bacteria was per cent TBSA burn. Increased colonisation of acute burn wounds with pathogenic gram-negative bacteria was associated with increased size of burn. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  12. Pediatric burn wound impetigo after grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikins, Kimberly; Prasad, Narayan; Menon, Seema; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2015-01-01

    Modern burn care techniques have reduced the risk of infection of the acute burn wound, resulting in more rapid healing and a lower incidence of graft loss. Secondary breakdown may still occur. The loss of epithelium in association with multifocal superficial abscesses and ulceration has been termed burns impetigo. This may result in considerable morbidity and require prolonged treatment. The events preceding development, the impact on the patient, and the ideal treatment appear unclear and poorly reported. In 5 years, between 2006 and 2011, 406 pediatric burns were treated with skin grafts, with 7% developing burns impetigo. Time to resolution ranged from 5 to 241 days: the mean time to complete healing was greatest with conservative management (96 days), followed by antibacterial dressings (37 days), oral antibiotics (36 days), topical steroids (16 days), and oral antibiotics in combination with topical steroids (13.5 days). Burns impetigo resulted in significant morbidity, requiring multiple visits to the treatment center and prolonged symptoms. Delay in diagnosis and treatment resulted in worse outcomes. Prompt consideration of burns impetigo should occur when postgraft patients present with suggestive clinical signs and treatment with oral antibiotics plus topical steroids should be considered.

  13. One year prevalence of critically ill burn wound bacterial infections in surgical ICU in Egypt: Retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossam Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    Results: The main finding of the current study described herein was the percent of isolates from burn wound (60%. The most common organism was pseudomonas (49%. Multidrug resistant gram negative organisms represent about 60% of the isolates. Pattern of antibiotic sensitivity was 84% for colistin, 39% for amikacin and 35% for imipenem. The mortalities in our study were 80%.

  14. The effect of Burns & Wounds (B&W)/burdock leaf therapy on burn-injured Amish patients: a pilot study measuring pain levels, infection rates, and healing times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolacz, Nicole M; Jaroch, Mark T; Bear, Monica L; Hess, Rosanna F

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this pilot study were to measure pain associated with dressing changes, assess the presence of infection, and document healing times of burn-injured Amish in central Ohio using an herbal therapy consisting of Burns and Wounds™ ointment (B&W) and burdock (Arctium ssp.) leaves. B&W contains honey, lanolin, olive oil, wheat germ oil, marshmallow root, Aloe vera gel, wormwood, comfrey root, white oak bark, lobelia inflata, vegetable glycerin, bees wax, and myrrh. A prospective, case series design guided the study within a community-based participatory research framework. Amish burn dressers provided burn care. Registered nurses monitored each case and documented findings. Pain scores were noted and burns were inspected for infection during dressing changes; healing times were measured from day of burn to complete closure of the skin. All cases were photographed. Between October 2011 and May 2013, five Amish were enrolled. All had first- and second-degree burns. B&W/burdock leaf dressing changes caused minimal or no pain; none of the burns became infected, and healing times averaged less than 14 days. The use of this herbal remedy appears to be an acceptable alternative to conventional burn care for these types of burns. The trauma of dressing changes was virtually nonexistent. Nurses working in communities with Amish residents should be aware of this herbal-based method of burn care and monitor its use when feasible. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. The wound/burn guidelines - 1: Wounds in general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yuji; Hasegawa, Minoru; Maekawa, Takeo; Le Pavoux, Andres; Asano, Yoshihide; Abe, Masatoshi; Ishii, Takayuki; Ito, Takaaki; Isei, Taiki; Imafuku, Shinichi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Ohtsuka, Masaki; Ohtsuka, Mikio; Ogawa, Fumihide; Kadono, Takafumi; Kodera, Masanari; Kawakami, Tamihiro; Kawaguchi, Masakazu; Kukino, Ryuichi; Kono, Takeshi; Sakai, Keisuke; Takahara, Masakazu; Tanioka, Miki; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Hashimoto, Akira; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Manabu; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Matsuo, Koma; Madokoro, Naoki; Yamasaki, Osamu; Yoshino, Yuichiro; Tachibana, Takao; Ihn, Hironobu

    2016-04-01

    The Japanese Dermatological Association determined to prepare the Wound/Burn Guidelines focusing on treatments, catering to needs for the clinical practice of dermatology. Among these guidelines, "Wounds in General" was intended to explain knowledge necessary "to heal wounds" without specifying particular disorders. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  16. Biobrane improves wound healing in burned children without increased risk of infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lal, S; Barrow, R E; Wolf, S E; Chinkes, D L; Hart, D W; Heggers, J P; Herndon, D N

    2000-01-01

    ...% TBSA with no indication of infection were seen at our hospital. Forty-one were assigned randomly to receive treatment with the skin substitute Biobrane and 48 to receive conservative treatment with topical antimicrobials and dressing...

  17. Infection control in severely burned patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Yusuf Kenan

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, much progress has been made in the control of burn wound infection and nasocomial infections (NI) in severely burned patients. The continiually changing epidemiology is partially related to greater understanding of and improved techniques for burn patient management as well as effective hospital infection control measures. With the advent of antimicrobial chemotherapeutic agents, infection of the wound site is now not as common as, for example, urinary and blood stream infections. Universal application of early excision of burned tissues has made a substantial improvement in the control of wound-related infections in burns. Additionally, the development of new technologies in wound care have helped to decrease morbidity and mortality in severe burn victims. Many examples can be given of the successful control of wound infection, such as the application of an appropriate antibiotic solution to invasive wound infection sites with simultaneous vacuum-assisted closure, optimal preservation of viable tissues with waterjet debridement systems, edema and exudate controlling dressings impregnated with Ag (Silvercel, Aquacell-Ag). The burned patient is at high risk for NI. Invasive interventions including intravenous and urinary chateterization, and entubation pose a further risk of NIs. The use of newly designed antimicrobial impregnated chateters or silicone devices may help the control of infection in these immunocomprimised patients. Strict infection control practices (physical isolation in a private room, use of gloves and gowns during patient contact) and appropriate empirical antimicrobial therapy guided by laboratory surveillance culture as well as routine microbial burn wound culture are essential to help reduce the incidance of infections due to antibiotic resistant microorganisms. PMID:24701406

  18. Stability of bacteriophages in burn wound care products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia Merabishvili

    Full Text Available Bacteriophages could be used along with burn wound care products to enhance antimicrobial pressure during treatment. However, some of the components of the topical antimicrobials that are traditionally used for the prevention and treatment of burn wound infection might affect the activity of phages. Therefore, it is imperative to determine the counteraction of therapeutic phage preparations by burn wound care products before application in patients. Five phages, representatives of two morphological families (Myoviridae and Podoviridae and active against 3 common bacterial burn wound pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were tested against 13 different products commonly used in the treatment of burn wounds. The inactivation of the phages was quite variable for different phages and different products. Majority of the anti-infective products affected phage activity negatively either immediately or in the course of time, although impact was not always significant. Products with high acidity had the most adverse effect on phages. Our findings demonstrate that during combined treatment the choice of phages and wound care products must be carefully defined in advance.

  19. Stability of bacteriophages in burn wound care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabishvili, Maia; Monserez, Riet; van Belleghem, Jonas; Rose, Thomas; Jennes, Serge; De Vos, Daniel; Verbeken, Gilbert; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Pirnay, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Bacteriophages could be used along with burn wound care products to enhance antimicrobial pressure during treatment. However, some of the components of the topical antimicrobials that are traditionally used for the prevention and treatment of burn wound infection might affect the activity of phages. Therefore, it is imperative to determine the counteraction of therapeutic phage preparations by burn wound care products before application in patients. Five phages, representatives of two morphological families (Myoviridae and Podoviridae) and active against 3 common bacterial burn wound pathogens (Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus) were tested against 13 different products commonly used in the treatment of burn wounds. The inactivation of the phages was quite variable for different phages and different products. Majority of the anti-infective products affected phage activity negatively either immediately or in the course of time, although impact was not always significant. Products with high acidity had the most adverse effect on phages. Our findings demonstrate that during combined treatment the choice of phages and wound care products must be carefully defined in advance.

  20. Management of the Chronic Burn Wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins-Williams, Stephen Tyler; Marston, William A; Hultman, Charles Scott

    2017-07-01

    This article reviews the current evidence in using hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) in burn wounds. There is also separate consideration of diabetic foot burns and a protocol for use of HBOT in a specific case. The challenges of using HBOT in an acute burn care setting are reviewed. Next the pathophysiology of Marjolin ulcers is reviewed. The current thinking in diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of Marjolin ulcers is discussed. Finally, a background in using topical growth factors (tGF) is provided, followed by a summary of the current evidence of tGF in burn wounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Surgical wound infection - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007645.htm Surgical wound infection - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... the organ and space where you had surgery Treatment Antibiotics are used to treat most wound infections. Sometimes, you also may need surgery to ...

  2. Bivalent flagellin immunotherapy protects mice against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections in both acute pneumonia and burn wound models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Hosein; Behrouz, Bahador; Irajian, Gholamreza; Amirmozafari, Nour; Naghavi, Sara

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections are a serious challenge to therapy because of the complex pathogenesis and paucity of new effective antibiotics, thus renewing interest in antibody-based therapeutic strategies. Immunotherapy strategies typically target selected virulence factors that are expressed by the majority of clinical strains of P. aeruginosa, particularly because virulence factors mediate infection. Type a and b flagellins (flagellin a+b) of P. aeruginosa are acute virulence factors that play a major role in the establishment of infection. Here we evaluate the protective efficacy of antibodies raised against "flagellin a+b" in both acute pneumonia and burn models. A combination strategy using antibodies against "flagellin a+b" provided greater protection against cell invasion and enhanced opsono-phagocytosis and decreased motility of P. aeruginosa strains, compared to strategies using antibodies against a single flagellin. Antibodies against "flagellin a+b"-protected mice infected with P. aeruginosa strains significantly reduced bacterial dissemination from the site of infection to the liver and spleen. Passive immunization with antibodies against "flagellin a+b" led to an efficacious protection against P. aeruginosa infection in both acute pneumonia and burn models. Copyright © 2016 International Alliance for Biological Standardization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of burn wound excision on bacterial colonization and invasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, JP; Herndon, DN

    Rates of survival after thermal injury have improved in the past two decades, and rates of wound infections and sepsis have decreased during the same period. Early excision has been advocated as one of the major factors, but its safety and efficacy and the exact timing of burn excision are still

  4. Bacteriological profile of burn wound isolates in a burns center of a tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amankwa Richcane

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the bacteriological profile and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of burn wound isolates. Methods: Swabs were taken from burn wound of patients admitted to Ward D2C and Burns Intensive Care Unit (BICU from December 2014 to November 2015. Samples were processed at the Microbiology Laboratory for identification and sensitivity. Bacteria isolated were identified using their morphological characteristics, Gram staining reaction and biochemical tests. The antimicrobial susceptibility testing was done using KirbyBauer disc diffusion method. Questionnaires were also administered to study participants to obtain information on demography, kind of first aid received, antibiotics received prior to culture and sensitivity. Results: A total of 86 patients comprising 45 patients from Ward D2C and 41 from BICU participated in the study. Males were 51(59.3% and females 35 (40.7%. Age of participants ranged from 0–56+ years. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the commonest pathogen isolated 26(30.2%, followed by Pseudomonas spp. 21(24.4%, Escherichia coli 17(19.8%, Klebsiella spp. 12(14.0%. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus accounted for 2(2.3%. Overall prevalence of infection in the study was 90.7%. Conclusions: Burn wound infection continues to be a major challenge in burn centers. Regular surveillance of commonly identified pathogens in the ward and their antimicrobial susceptibility will guide proper empiric selection of antibiotics for management of burn wounds.

  5. Fungal infections in burns: Diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capoor Malini

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Burn wound infection (BWI is a major public health problem and the most devastating form of trauma worldwide. Fungi cause BWI as part of monomicrobial or polymicrobial infection, fungaemia, rare aggressive soft tissue infection and as opportunistic infections. The risk factors for acquiring fungal infection in burns include age of burns, total burn size, body surface area (BSA (30-60%, full thickness burns, inhalational injury, prolonged hospital stay, late surgical excision, open dressing, artificial dermis, central venous catheters, antibiotics, steroid treatment, long-term artificial ventilation, fungal wound colonisation (FWC, hyperglycaemic episodes and other immunosuppressive disorders. Most of the fungal infections are missed owing to lack of clinical awareness and similar presentation as bacterial infection coupled with paucity of mycology laboratories. Expedient diagnosis and treatment of these mycoses can be life-saving as the mortality is otherwise very high. Emergence of resistance in non-albicans Candida spp., unusual yeasts and moulds in fungal BWI, leaves very few fungi susceptible to antifungal drugs, leaving many patients susceptible. There is a need to speciate fungi as far as the topical and systemic antifungal is concerned. Deep tissue biopsy and other relevant samples are processed by standard mycological procedures using direct microscopy, culture and histopathological examination. Patients with FWC should be treated by aggressive surgical debridement and, in the case of fungal wound infection (FWI, in addition to surgical debridement, an intravenous antifungal drug, most commonly amphotericin B or caspofungin, is prescribed followed by de-escalating with voriconazole or itraconazole, or fluconazole depending upon the species or antifungal susceptibility, if available. The propensity for fungal infection increases, the longer the wound is present. Therefore, the development of products to close the wound more rapidly

  6. The changing epidemiology of infection in burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, B A; McManus, A T

    1992-01-01

    Topical chemotherapy, prompt excision, and timely closure of the burn wound have significantly reduced the occurrence of invasive burn wound infection and its related mortality. Since wound protection is imperfect and invasive wound infection may still occur in patients with massive burns in whom wound closure is delayed, scheduled wound surveillance and biopsy monitoring are necessary to assess the microbial status of the burn wound and identify wound infections caused by resistant bacteria or non-bacterial opportunists at a stage when therapeutic intervention can control the process. As a reflection of the systemic immunosuppressive effects of burn injury, infection remains the most common cause of morbidity and mortality even though the occurrence of wound infections has been significantly decreased. Pneumonia is the most frequent infection occurring in burn patients today but the improvements in patient management, wound care, and infection control have made bronchopneumonia the most common form of this infection and gram-positive organisms the most common causative agents. The organisms causing bacteremia that exert a species specific effect on the mortality related to extent of burn injury and patient age have changed in concert with changes in wound flora. Infection control procedures, including scheduled surveillance cultures, utilization of cohort patient care methodology, strict enforcement of patient and staff hygiene, and patient monitoring have been effective in eliminating endemic resistant microbial strains, preventing the establishment of newly introduced resistant organisms, diagnosing infection in a timely fashion, instituting antibiotic and other necessary therapy in a prompt manner, and documenting the effectiveness of present day burn patient care and the improved survival of burn patients.

  7. Wound Infections PSA (:30)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-10-25

    This 30 second public service announcement is about how to avoid a wound infection after a disaster.  Created: 10/25/2017 by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Date Released: 10/25/2017.

  8. Fungal Wound Infection

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-01-28

    Dr. David Tribble, acting director of the infectious disease clinical research program at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, discusses fungal wound infections after combat trauma.  Created: 1/28/2016 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/28/2016.

  9. INTESTINAL BACTERIAL TRANSLOCATION IN EXPERIMENTALLY BURNED MICE WITH WOUNDS COLONIZED BY PSEUDOMONAS-AERUGINOSA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MANSON, WL; COENEN, JMFH; KLASEN, HJ; HORWITZ, EH

    1992-01-01

    Translocation of micro-organisms from the gastrointestinal tract may play a role in the pathogenesis of septic complications in severely burned patients. We therefore investigated the influence of burn wound infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa on translocation in experimentally burned mice. The P.

  10. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayesha Bhatia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5–treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing.

  11. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O'Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5-treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing.

  12. Dual therapeutic functions of F-5 fragment in burn wounds: preventing wound progression and promoting wound healing in pigs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Ayesha; O’Brien, Kathryn; Chen, Mei; Wong, Alex; Garner, Warren; Woodley, David T.; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Burn injuries are a leading cause of morbidity including prolonged hospitalization, disfigurement, and disability. Currently there is no Food and Drug Administration-approved burn therapeutics. A clinical distinction of burn injuries from other acute wounds is the event of the so-called secondary burn wound progression within the first week of the injury, in which a burn expands horizontally and vertically from its initial boundary to a larger area. Therefore, an effective therapeutics for burns should show dual abilities to prevent the burn wound progression and thereafter promote burn wound healing. Herein we report that topically applied F-5 fragment of heat shock protein-90α is a dual functional agent to promote burn wound healing in pigs. First, F-5 prevents burn wound progression by protecting the surrounding cells from undergoing heat-induced caspase 3 activation and apoptosis with increased Akt activation. Accordingly, F-5–treated burn and excision wounds show a marked decline in inflammation. Thereafter, F-5 accelerates burn wound healing by stimulating the keratinocyte migration-led reepithelialization, leading to wound closure. This study addresses a topical agent that is capable of preventing burn wound progression and accelerating burn wound healing. PMID:27382602

  13. Partial-thickness burn wounds healing by topical treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidinia, Amin; Keihanian, Faeze; Lashkari, Ardalan Pasdaran; Lahiji, Hossein Ghavvami; Mobayyen, Mohammadreza; Heidarzade, Abtin; Golchai, Javad

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Burns are common event and associated with a high incidence of death, disability, and high costs. Centella asiatica (L.) is a medicinal herb, commonly growing in humid areas in several tropical countries that improve wound healing. On the basis of previous studies, we compared the efficacy of Centiderm versus silver sulfadiazine (SSD) in partial thickness burning patients. Methods: Study population comprised burn victims referred to Velayat Burning Hospital at Rasht, Iran. The intervention group received Centiderm and control group SSD cream. Burn wounds were treated once daily at home. All of the wounds were evaluated till complete healing occurred and at the admission, days 3, 7, 14 objective signs; visual acuity score (VAS) and subjective signs were recorded. Re-epithelialization time and complete healing days were recorded. We used random fixed block for randomization. The randomization sequence was created using the computer. Patients and burning specialist physician were blinded. Results: Seventy-five patients randomized into 2 groups; (40 patients: Centiderm group; 35 patients: SSD group). The mean age of them was 30.67 ± 9.91 years and 19 of them were male (31.7%). Thirty patients in Centiderm and 30 patients in SSD group were analyzed. All of objective and subjective signs and mean of re-epithelialization and complete healing were significantly better in Centiderm group rather than SSD group (P < 0.05). There was no infection in Centiderm group. Conclusions: We showed that use of Centiderm ointment not only improved the objective and subjective signs in less than 3 days, but also the re-epithelialization and complete healing rather than SSD without any infection in the subjects. PMID:28248871

  14. Development of an in vitro burn wound model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coolen, N.A.; Vlig, M.; van den Bogaerdt, A.J.; Middelkoop, E.; Ulrich, M.

    2008-01-01

    Healing of a deeper burn wound is a complex process that often leads to scar formation. Skin wound model systems are important for the development of treatments preventing scarring. The aim of this study is to develop a standardized in vitro burn wound model that resembles the in vivo situation. A

  15. Infections in critically ill burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, F; Mas, D; Rubio, M; Garcia-Hierro, P

    2016-04-01

    Severe burn patients are one subset of critically patients in which the burn injury increases the risk of infection, systemic inflammatory response and sepsis. The infections are usually related to devices and to the burn wound. Most infections, as in other critically ill patients, are preceded by colonization of the digestive tract and the preventative measures include selective digestive decontamination and hygienic measures. Early excision of deep burn wound and appropriate use of topical antimicrobials and dressings are considered of paramount importance in the treatment of burns. Severe burn patients usually have some level of systemic inflammation. The difficulty to differentiate inflammation from sepsis is relevant since therapy differs between patients with and those without sepsis. The delay in prescribing antimicrobials increases morbidity and mortality. Moreover, the widespread use of antibiotics for all such patients is likely to increase antibiotic resistance, and costs. Unfortunately the clinical usefulness of biomarkers for differential diagnosis between inflammation and sepsis has not been yet properly evaluated. Severe burn injury induces physiological response that significantly alters drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. These alterations impact antimicrobials distribution and excretion. Nevertheless the current available literature shows that there is a paucity of information to support routine dose recommendations. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  16. Protocol for a systematic review of quantitative burn wound microbiology in the management of burns patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwei, Johnny; Halstead, Fenella D; Dretzke, Janine; Oppenheim, Beryl A; Moiemen, Naiem S

    2015-11-06

    Sepsis from burn injuries can result from colonisation of burn wounds, especially in large surface area burns. Reducing bacterial infection will reduce morbidity and mortality, and mortality for severe burns can be as high as 15 %. There are various quantitative and semi-quantitative techniques to monitor bacterial load on wounds. In the UK, burn wounds are typically monitored for the presence or absence of bacteria through the collection and culture of swabs, but no absolute count is obtained. Quantitative burn wound culture provides a measure of bacterial count and is gaining increased popularity in some countries. It is however more resource intensive, and evidence for its utility appears to be inconsistent. This systematic review therefore aims to assess the evidence on the utility and reliability of different quantitative microbiology techniques in terms of diagnosing or predicting clinical outcomes. Standard systematic review methods aimed at minimising bias will be employed for study identification, selection and data extraction. Bibliographic databases and ongoing trial registers will be searched and conference abstracts screened. Studies will be eligible if they are prospective studies or systematic reviews of burn patients (any age) for whom quantitative microbiology has been performed, whether it is compared to another method. Quality assessment will be based on quality assessment tools for diagnostic and prognostic studies and tailored to the review as necessary. Synthesis is likely to be primarily narrative, but meta-analysis may be considered where clinical and methodological homogeneity exists. Given the increasing use of quantitative methods, this is a timely systematic review, which will attempt to clarify the evidence base. As far as the authors are aware, it will be the first to address this topic. PROSPERO, CRD42015023903.

  17. Stromal vascular fraction improves deep partial thickness burn wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atalay, Sibel; Coruh, Atilla; Deniz, Kemal

    2014-11-01

    The practice of early burn wound excision and wound closure by immediate autologous skin or skin substitutes is the preferred treatment in extensive deep partial and full-thickness burns. To date there is no proven definite medical treatment to decrease burn wound size and accelerate burn wound healing in modern clinical practice. Stromal vascular fraction is an autologous mixture that has multiple proven beneficial effects on different kinds of wounds. In our study, we investigated the effects of stromal vascular fraction on deep partial-thickness burn wound healing. In this study, 20 Wistar albino rats were used. Inguinal adipose tissue of the rats was surgically removed and stromal vascular fraction was isolated. Thereafter, deep second-degree burns were performed on the back of the rats by hot water. The rats were divided into two groups in a randomized fashion. The therapy group received stromal vascular fraction, whereas the control group received only physiologic serum by intradermal injection. Assessment of the burn wound healing between the groups was carried out by histopathologic and immuno-histochemical data. Stromal vascular fraction increased vascular endothelial growth factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen index, and reduced inflammation of the burn wound. Furthermore, vascularization and fibroblastic activity were achieved earlier and observed to be at higher levels in the stromal vascular fraction group. Stromal vascular fraction improves burn wound healing by increasing cell proliferation and vascularization, reducing inflammation, and increasing fibroblastic activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. Burn wound: Pathophysiology and its management by herbal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhirender Kaushik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In human body, wound healing is a normal biological phenomenon. Burns may be acute or chronic depending upon the source and its time of exposure. Burn wounds may be superficial, partial or full thickness wounds. When skin comes in contact with higher temperature, protein denaturation takes place due to which the plasma membrane integrity is lost. When skin is burned, a number of inflammatory mediators and releasing agents such as histamine, nitric oxide, oxygen free radicals, eicosanoid products, tumor necrosis factors, and interleukins etc., are released at the site. For wound healing mechanism, the keratinocytes has to move from uninjured site to the burned area. For deeper burns this process takes a long time. By some unknown mechanisms, burn wounds may convert from one form to another form. So burn wound depth must be accurately measured before starting the treatment to prevent the complications. Burns can be induced in experimental animals by using different models. Many treatments such as herbal drugs, topical agents, gene therapy, volume therapy, and rehabilitation can be employed. This review article mainly deals with the theoretical and practical aspects of burn wound healing. Some burn wound healing plants with their chemical constituents, plant part used, uses and animal models are described here.

  19. Eradication of multidrug-resistant A. baumannii in burn wounds by antiseptic pulsed electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Alexander; Broelsch, G. Felix; Vecchio, Daniela; Khan, Saiqa; Hamblin, Michael R.; Austen, William G.; Sheridan, Robert L.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2014-01-01

    Emerging bacterial resistance to multiple drugs is an increasing problem in burn wound management. New non-pharmacologic interventions are needed for burn wound disinfection. Here we report on a novel physical method for disinfection: antiseptic pulsed electric field (PEF) applied externally to the infected burns. In a mice model, we show that PEF can reduce the load of multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii present in a full thickness burn wound by more than four orders of magnitude, as detected by bioluminescence imaging. Furthermore, using a finite element numerical model, we demonstrate that PEF provides non-thermal, homogeneous, full thickness treatment for the burn wound, thus, overcoming the limitation of treatment depth for many topical antimicrobials. These modeling tools and our in vivo results will be extremely useful for further translation of the PEF technology to the clinical setting, as they provide the essential elements for planning of electrode design and treatment protocol. PMID:25089285

  20. Managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, Farrah-Hani; Karim, Rahamah; Maat, Noor Hidayah

    2016-05-12

    Successful wound healing depends on various factors, including exudate control, prevention of microbial contaminants, and moisture balance. We report two cases of managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam dressing. In Case 1, a 2-year-old Asian girl presented with a delayed (11 days) wound on her right leg. She sustained a thermal injury from a hot iron that was left idle on the floor. Clinical inspection revealed an infected wound with overlying eschar that traversed her knee joint. As her parents refused surgical debridement under general anesthesia, hydrotherapy and wound dressing using SMARTPORE Technology Polyurethane foam were used. Despite the delay in presentation of this linear thermal pediatric burn injury that crossed the knee joint, the patient's response to treatment and its outcome were highly encouraging. She was cooperative and tolerated each dressing change without the need of supplemental analgesia. Her wound was healed by 24 days post-admission. In Case 2, a 25-year-old Asian man presented with a mixed thickness thermal flame burn on his left leg. On examination, the injury was a mix of deep and superficial partial thickness burn, comprising approximately 3% of his total body surface area. SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam was used on his wound; his response to the treatment was very encouraging as the dressing facilitated physiotherapy and mobility. The patient rated the pain during dressing change as 2 on a scale of 10 and his pain score remained the same in every subsequent change. His wound showed evidence of epithelialization by day 7 post-burn. There were no adverse events reported. Managing burn wounds with SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam resulted in reduced pain during dressing changes and the successful healing of partial and mixed thickness wounds. The use of SMARTPORE Technology polyurethane foam dressings showed encouraging results and requires further research as a desirable management option in

  1. Bee Pollen as a Promising Agent in the Burn Wounds Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Olczyk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to visualize the benefits and advantages derived from preparations based on extracts of bee pollen as compared to pharmaceuticals commonly used in the treatment of burns. The bee pollen ointment was applied for the first time in topical burn treatment. Experimental burn wounds were inflicted on two white, domestic pigs. Clinical, histopathological, and microbiological assessment of specimens from burn wounds, inflicted on polish domestic pigs, treated with silver sulfadiazine or bee pollen ointment, was done. The comparative material was constituted by either tissues obtained from wounds treated with physiological saline or tissues obtained from wounds which were untreated. Clinical and histopathological evaluation showed that applied apitherapeutic agent reduces the healing time of burn wounds and positively affects the general condition of the animals. Moreover the used natural preparation proved to be highly effective antimicrobial agent, which was reflected in a reduction of the number of microorganisms in quantitative research and bactericidal activity of isolated strains. On the basis of the obtained bacteriological analysis, it may be concluded that the applied bee pollen ointment may affect the wound healing process of burn wounds, preventing infection of the newly formed tissue.

  2. a profile of wound infections in national hospital abuja

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    AFRICAN JOURNAL OF CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY SEPTEMBER 2013 ISBN 1595-689X VOL14 No.3 ..... Bakare RA. Pattern of Bacterial Pathogensin Burn Wound infection in Ibadan, Nigeria.Annal of Burns and Fire disasters 2004;vol XVII(1):12-15. 7. Mohammed A, AdeshinaGO, Ibrahim YKE.

  3. Burn wound healing property of Cocos nucifera: An appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Pallavi; Durgaprasad, S.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The study was undertaken to evaluate the burn wound healing property of oil of Cocos nucifera and to compare the effect of the combination of oil of Cocos nucifera and silver sulphadiazine with silver sulphadiazine alone. Materials and Methods: Partial thickness burn wounds were inflicted upon four groups of six rats each. Group I was assigned as control, Group II received the standard silver sulphadiazine. Group III was given pure oil of Cocos nucifera , and Group IV received the combination of the oil and the standard. The parameters observed were epithelialization period and percentage of wound contraction. Results: It was noted that there was significant improvement in burn wound contraction in the group treated with the combination of Cocos nucifera and silver sulphadiazine. The period of epithelialization also decreased significantly in groups III and IV. Conclusion: It is concluded that oil of Cocos nucifera is an effective burn wound healing agent. PMID:20040946

  4. A systematic review of quantitative burn wound microbiology in the management of burns patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Fenella D; Lee, Kwang Chear; Kwei, Johnny; Dretzke, Janine; Oppenheim, Beryl A; Moiemen, Naiem S

    2018-02-01

    The early diagnosis of infection or sepsis in burns are important for patient care. Globally, a large number of burn centres advocate quantitative cultures of wound biopsies for patient management, since there is assumed to be a direct link between the bioburden of a burn wound and the risk of microbial invasion. Given the conflicting study findings in this area, a systematic review was warranted. Bibliographic databases were searched with no language restrictions to August 2015. Study selection, data extraction and risk of bias assessment were performed in duplicate using pre-defined criteria. Substantial heterogeneity precluded quantitative synthesis, and findings were described narratively, sub-grouped by clinical question. Twenty six laboratory and/or clinical studies were included. Substantial heterogeneity hampered comparisons across studies and interpretation of findings. Limited evidence suggests that (i) more than one quantitative microbiology sample is required to obtain reliable estimates of bacterial load; (ii) biopsies are more sensitive than swabs in diagnosing or predicting sepsis; (iii) high bacterial loads may predict worse clinical outcomes, and (iv) both quantitative and semi-quantitative culture reports need to be interpreted with caution and in the context of other clinical risk factors. The evidence base for the utility and reliability of quantitative microbiology for diagnosing or predicting clinical outcomes in burns patients is limited and often poorly reported. Consequently future research is warranted. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. New treatment strategies to reduce burn wound progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmauss, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: After a burn injury certain superficial partial-thickness burn wounds spontaneously progress into deep partial-thickness or full-thickness burn wounds. This poorly understood phenomenon is called burn wound progression. The aim of this study was to investigate whether treatment strategies using warm water (preservation of microcirculation on the one side and erythropoietin (EPO (molecule with anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic, vasodilatory and neoangiogenic properties can prevent, delay and/or reduce secondary burn wound progression in a rat model.Methods: We used a burn comb model in 63 rats, creating eight rectangular contact burns (2x1 cm each intercalated by unburned zones (2x0.5 cm prone to burn wound progression. In a first experimental set we treated burn wounds with locally applied warm (37°C or cold (17°C water for 20 minutes.In a second experimental set, animals were treated systemically with EPO at two different dosages of 500 and 2,500 IU/kg bodyweight (bw and initiated at 2 different time-points (45 minutes vs. 6 hours after burn injury. Evaluation of microcirculatory perfusion, interspace necrosis and burn depth was performed using respectively laser Doppler flowmetry, planimetry and histology. For statistical analysis the two-way ANOVA-test followed by an adequate post-hoc test (Bonferroni were used. Results: In untreated control animals a conversion from superficial to full-thickness burns was observed within 24 hours. Warm and cold water treatment significantly delayed burn depth progression, nevertheless after 4 days, burn depth was similar in all three groups. Warm water significantly reduced interspace necrosis compared to untreated controls and cold water with a significantly improved perfusion in the warm water group. Surface extension and particularly burn depth progression were significantly decreased by EPO only if administered at a dosage of bw and initiated 45 minutes after burn injury. EPO

  6. Burn injury and wound healing in X-linked ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancon, Andrea R; Wahl, Wendy L

    2010-01-01

    X-linked ichthyosis is a skin condition of decreased keratin degradation and hyperkeratosis resulting from a deficiency of steroid sulfatase causing scaly skin. Burns in these patients may require skin grafting and harvesting from diseased donor sites. No descriptions of the outcomes of attempted grafting, donor site healing, and burn recovery in patients with X-linked ichthyosis exist. The authors describe split-thickness skin grafting in one patient with X-linked ichthyosis who sustained a burn with crush injury to his bilateral lower extremities. Although he developed cellulitis, there is no evidence that patients with ichthyosis have higher rates of infection. The patient exhibited rapid healing at postgrafting clinic visits with a much flatter texture than expected early after meshed skin grafting. This could be a benefit of the excess keratin state. Wound healing was not impaired by the ichthyosis. Concerns over skin harvest were alleviated by aggressive topical emollients, which did not negatively impact harvest of donor skin or primary burn site healing.

  7. Apyrase: A Portable Treatment to Prevent Burn Progression and Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    surgical treatment are reduction of local inflammation, prevention of wound progression, and inhibition of bacterial infection. However, at this time...there are no effect treatments to reduce wound progression and the emergence of resistant bacteria has threated the efficacy of antibiotic therapy...of apyrase and act as a step towards translation of this treatment into burn wound therapy. Ultimately the goal is to improve recovery time, reduce

  8. Antibacterial susceptibility of bacteria isolated from burns and wounds of cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulaiman A. Alharbi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study 540 burns and wound swabs were collected from cancer patients of some Egyptian hospitals. The single infection was detected from 210, and 70 cases among wounded and burned patients, while mixed infection was 30 and 45, respectively. We recovered where 60 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 60 isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, 7 isolates of Staphylococcus epidermidis, 4 isolates of Streptococcus pyogenes, 25 isolates of Escherichia coli, 23 isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae and 27 isolates of Proteus vulgaris from 355 burn and surgical wound infections . All bacterial isolates showed high resistance to the commonly used β-lactams (amoxycillin, cefaclor, ampicillin, vancomycin, amoxicillin/clavulonic, and low resistance to imepenim and ciprofloxacin. Plasmid analysis of six multidrug resistant and two susceptible bacterial isolates revealed the same plasmid pattern. This indicated that R-factor is not responsible for the resistance phenomenon among the isolated opportunistic bacteria. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on the isolated bacteria was studied.

  9. Honey for Wound Healing, Ulcers, and Burns; Data Supporting Its Use in Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noori Al-Waili

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread existence of unhealed wounds, ulcers, and burns has a great impact on public health and economy. Many interventions, including new medications and technologies, are being used to help achieve significant wound healing and to eliminate infections. Therefore, to find an intervention that has both therapeutic effect on the healing process and the ability to kill microbes is of great value. Honey is a natural product that has been recently introduced in modern medical practice. Honey's antibacterial properties and its effects on wound healing have been thoroughly investigated. Laboratory studies and clinical trials have shown that honey is an effective broad-spectrum antibacterial agent. This paper reviews data that support the effectiveness of natural honey in wound healing and its ability to sterilize infected wounds. Studies on the therapeutic effects of honey collected in different geographical areas on skin wounds, skin and gastric ulcers, and burns are reviewed and mechanisms of action are discussed. (Ulcers and burns are included as an example of challenging wounds. The data show that the wound healing properties of honey include stimulation of tissue growth, enhanced epithelialization, and minimized scar formation. These effects are ascribed to honey's acidity, hydrogen peroxide content, osmotic effect, nutritional and antioxidant contents, stimulation of immunity, and to unidentified compounds. Prostaglandins and nitric oxide play a major role in inflammation, microbial killing, and the healing process. Honey was found to lower prostaglandin levels and elevate nitric oxide end products. These properties might help to explain some biological and therapeutic properties of honey, particularly as an antibacterial agent or wound healer. The data presented here demonstrate that honeys from different geographical areas have considerable therapeutic effects on chronic wounds, ulcers, and burns. The results encourage the use of honey

  10. Erosive pustular dermatosis: new description of a possible cause of the non-healing burn wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Benna, Sammy; Johnson, Kirsty; Perkins, William; O'Boyle, Ciaran

    2014-06-01

    Erosive pustular dermatosis (EPD) is a cutaneous condition, characterised by sterile pustular lesions, erosions and crusting. Extensive or infected disease may result in scarring. EPD has never been reported following burn. The aim of this study was to describe the presentation and management of EPD complicating burns wounds. A consecutive series of EPD cases secondary to burn. Six cases were identified. In each case, erosive lesions and crusts were located at the site of burn or at the site of split skin grafting after tangential burn excision. All cases presented as failure to heal or repeated wound breakdown, despite standard burn wound management. Pain was a significant feature in all cases. Microbiological cultures demonstrated either benign colonising bacteria or no pathogens. Time to EPD diagnosis by the interdisciplinary team was 126 ± 27 days (mean ± SEM). Topical therapy with short course, potent corticosteroids resulted in clinical remission in 15 ± 2 days (mean ± SEM) without clinical relapses after 15 ± 4 months (mean ± SEM). EPD may occur following burns. EPD should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a non-healing burn wound and resolves readily with topical potent corticosteroid therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. AEROBIC BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM INFECTED WOUNDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    of wound infection will be helpful in the control of wound infection and selection of empiric antimicrobial therapy as an infection control ... the skin (1). The exposed subcutaneous tissues provides a favourable substratum for a wide variety of microorganisms to contaminate and colonize, and .... Ayton M. Wound care. Wounds ...

  12. Open versus closed sandwich wound dressing method in burn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on 170 children under 12years admitted to the Pediatric surgical/female burn ward between the months of June 2006 to March 2007. A comparison was made between the open and closed sandwich method of burn wound dressing. The sandwich method entailed using 17 by ...

  13. Epidemiology of infections in a burn unit, Albania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belba, Monika Kristaq; Petrela, Elizana Ylber; Belba, Amy Gjergji

    2013-11-01

    Many types of nosocomial infections (NIs) can be present in the burned patient. The purpose of this study is to calculate the rates for NI in the Intensive Care Unit of the Service of Burns and Plastic Surgery in University Hospital Centre (UHC) in Tirana, Albania. The study is prospective, clinical and analytical. The study is continued/longitudinal because monitors all patients with severe burns during a specified time period (1year). For data analysis was used SPSS 19.0. The infection prevalence rate was 12 infected patients per 100 patients. The colonisation prevalence rate was 43 colonised patients for 100 patients. The most frequent infection microorganisms were Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus (67% and 24%). Incidence of BSI was 3 BSI for 1000 hospitalization days. Incidence of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) was 11.7 BSI for 1000 catheter days. Colonisation of the tip of the central catheter (CTC) was 15.6 for 1000 catheter days. The epidemiology of burn wound infections as well as the definitions have changed due to important changes in burn wound treatment but further studies should be done documented the factors that can reduce the burn wound infection rates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  14. Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera improve wound healing in an in vivo rat burn wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li-Xin; Wang, Peng; Wang, Yu-Ting; Huang, Yong; Jiang, Lei; Wang, Xue-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Aloe vera and Vitis vinifera have been traditionally used as wound healing agents. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of aloe emodin and resveratrol in the burn wound healing procedure. Burn wounds are common in developed and developing countries, however, in developing countries, the incidence of severe complications is higher and financial resources are limited. The results of the present study demonstrated that neither aloe emodin or resveratrol were cytotoxic to THP-1 macrophages at concentrations of 1, 100 and 500 ng/ml. A significant increase in wound-healing activity was observed in mice treated with the aloe emodin and resveratrol, compared with those which received control treatments. The levels of IL-1β in the exudates of the burn wound area of the treated mice increased in a time-dependent manner over 7 days following burn wound injury. At 10 days post-injury, steady and progressive wound healing was observed in the control animals. The present study confirmed that increased wound healing occurs following treatment with aloe emodin,, compared with resveratrol, providing support for the use of Aloe vera plants to improve burn wound healing.

  15. The effects of silver dressings on chronic and burns wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Chris

    Silver (Ag) has been thought to improve wound healing and reduce instances of associated infections for many years. There are centuries-old records of silver being used in wound treatment, but the past two decades in particular have seen an increasing clinical application of silver-impregnated wound dressings and as such, have seen the number of research articles similarly increase. The majority of these articles focus on the positives and potential negatives (e.g. the toxicity of silver as a heavy metal) of using silver-impregnated dressings in the clinical management of wounds. This article examines the potential advantages and disadvantages of using silver in the management of chronic and burn wounds, and provides a physiological understanding of the body's response to silver absorption. The author also attempts to critically appraise the opposing literature related to the clinical relevance of microbial kill-time and the volume of silver contained in dressings, while investigating the efficacy of silver-impregnated dressings in the management of burns and chronic wounds. In order to collect literature relevant to this review, the author searched CINAHL, Medline, BMJ, Medscape, Journal of Advanced Nursing, the Electronic Medicines Compendium (EMC), and the Cochrane Library, using the terms silver, silver sulfadiazine, impregnated, wound, burn, dressing, review, quantative, efficacy, in vitro, in vivo, nanocrystalline, toxicity, infection, microbial kill-time, and comparison.

  16. MODERN WOUND DRESSING FOR WOUND INFECTION: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Novida Rizani

    2012-01-01

    When the tissue of skin is break means a wound is happens. To seal it, many choices of wound healing are available. Moist wound dressing can be better optional than the conservative ones. A bioactive agent that being added at the dressing in fact can increase healing rate of wound, moreover can subjugate wound infection caused by the pathogens, and also capable to prevent it. In this review, there are summary of modern moist wound healing, the wound pathogens, and some of sturdy bioactive age...

  17. Healing effect of sea buckthorn, olive oil, and their mixture on full-thickness burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edraki, Mitra; Akbarzadeh, Armin; Hosseinzadeh, Massood; Tanideh, Nader; Salehi, Alireza; Koohi-Hosseinabadi, Omid

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the healing effect of silver sulfadiazine (SSD), sea buckthorn, olive oil, and 5% sea buckthorn and olive oil mixture on full-thickness burn wounds with respect to both gross and histopathologic features. Full-thickness burns were induced on 60 rats; the rats were then were divided into 5 groups and treated with sea buckthorn, olive oil, a 5% sea buckthorn/olive oil mixture, SSD, and normal saline (control). They were observed for 28 days, and the wounds' healing process was evaluated. Wound contraction occurred faster in sea buckthorn, olive oil, and the sea buckthorn/olive oil mixture groups compared with the SSD and control groups. The volume of the exudates was controlled more effectively in wounds treated with the sea buckthorn/olive oil mixture. Purulent exudates were observed in the control group, but the others did not show infection. The group treated with sea buckthorn/olive oil mixture revealed more developed re-epithelialization with continuous basement membrane with a mature granulation tissue, whereas the SSD-treated group showed ulceration, necrosis, and immature granulation. The results show that sea buckthorn and olive oil individually are proper dressing for burn wounds and that they also show a synergetic effect when they are used together. A sea buckthorn and olive oil mixture could be considered as an alternative dressing for full-thickness burns because of improved wound healing characteristics and antibacterial property.

  18. Monitoring wound healing in minor burns-A novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, Pippa; Phillips, Michael; Grisbrook, Tiffany L; Gibson, William; Wood, Fiona M; Edgar, Dale W

    2017-08-04

    Assessment of minor burn wound closure is predominately determined by visual inspection and clinical specialist assessment, which remains largely a subjective analysis and results may vary depending on the clinician's experience. Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) is an instrument that has a demonstrated ability to objectively monitor the wound healing process in various patient populations but has not yet been used in acute burn wounds. The aim of the pilot study was to examine whether the BIS technique is a valid measure of wound healing. Localised BIS resistance and phase angle triplicate measures, of minor limb burns, were collected on two serial occasions. Circumference limb measures were taken at the localised burn site to determine a truncated limb volume. Proportional-odds ordered logistic regression analyses determined resistance at zero frequency (R0, indicative of edema) and resistance of total body fluid (Rinf) were significantly associated with healing after adjustment for the influence of surgery. A one unit increase in R0 and Rinf increased the odds of wound healing by 6% and 5% respectively (phealing process. Spearman's correlation determined there was a significant association between a healing wound and limb segment volume (ml) (rho -0.30, phealing. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nanoemulsion Therapy for Burn Wounds Is Effective as a Topical Antimicrobial Against Gram-Negative and Gram-Positive Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgachev, Vladislav A; Ciotti, Susan M; Eisma, Rone; Gracon, Stephen; Wilkinson, J Erby; Baker, James R; Hemmila, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of two different nanoemulsion (NE) formulations against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in an in vivo rodent scald burn model. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and received a partial-thickness scald burn. Eight hours after burn injury, the wound was inoculated with 1 × 10(8) colony-forming units of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus. Treatment groups consisted of two different NE formulations (NB-201 and NB-402), NE vehicle, or saline. Topical application of the treatment was performed at 16 and 24 hours after burn injury. Animals were killed 32 hours after burn injury, and skin samples were obtained for quantitative wound culture and determination of dermal inflammation markers. In a separate set of experiments, burn wound progression was measured histologically after 72 hours of treatment. Both NE formulations (NB-201 and NB-402) significantly reduced burn wound infections with either P. aeruginosa or S. aureus and decreased median bacterial counts at least three logs when compared with animals with saline applications (p Gram-negative bacteria growth in burn wounds, reducing inflammation, and abrogating burn wound progression.

  20. Control of burn wound sepsis in rats by methylene blue-mediated photodynamic treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Sato, Shunichi; Kawauchi, Satoko; Saitoh, Daizoh; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi; Ashida, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Mitsuhiro

    2012-02-01

    Control of wound sepsis is an important challenge in traumatology. However, increase in the drug-resistant bacteria makes this challenge considerably difficult in recent years. In this study, we attempted to control burn wound sepsis in rats by photodynamic treatment, which has been reported to be effective against some drug-resistant bacteria. A 20% TBSA (total body surface area) full-thickness burn was made in rat dorsal skin, and five days after injury, a suspension of P. aeruginosa was applied to the wound surface. At 30 min after infection, a methylene blue (MB) solution was applied to the wound surface; 5 min afterwards, the wound was illuminated with a 665-nm light emitting diode (LED) array for 10 min. This treatment (application of MB and illumination) was repeated 3 times successively. The averaged light intensity on the wound surface was 3.3 mW/cm2, the corresponding total light dose being 5.9 J/cm2. One week after injury, the numbers of bacteria in the blood and liver were counted by colony forming assay. In the liver, the number of bacteria of the treated group was significantly lower than that of the sham control group without photodynamic treatment. In the blood, no bacteria were detected in the treated group, while a certain amount of bacteria was detected in the control group. These results demonstrate the efficacy of MB-mediated PDT with a red LED array to control burn wound sepsis.

  1. Effect of Malva sylvestris cream on burn injury and wounds in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Nasiri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Burn injury is one of the most health-threatening problems in the world. Malva sylvestris (M. sylvestris flowershave a high mucilage content and are used as a remedy for cut wound and dermal infected wounds in Iranian folklore Medicine. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of M. sylvestris cream on the second degree burn injury in rats. Materials and Methods: Five groups of 10 rats per group were burned with hot metal plate. Animals were administrated divided as control, normal saline, standard silver sulfadiazine 1% (SSD, 5% M. sylvestris, and 10% M. sylvestris into separate groups. Wound area, percentage of wound contraction, and histological and bacteriological assessments were evaluated. Results: Wound sizes were not significantly different among groups on 1st and 3rd days after burn injury, while they were significantly different among groups after 7th day post-burn injury. The average areas of wounds on the 15th day were 7.5±2.9, 6.7±2, 10.5±1.6, 4.7±2, and 4.5±2 cm2 for base cream, normal saline, SSD, 5% M. sylvestris, and 10% M. sylvestris, respectively. The results of histology exhibited well-formed horizontally-oriented collagen fibers in MS topical treatment groups. Microorganisms existed in the SSD group were most probably Staphilococcus epidermitis and for NS group were staphylococcus saprophiteccus. Conclusion: M. sylvestris cream improved histological changes of tissue components in the process of healing when compared with SSD cream. Therefore, it can be used as a topical treatment agent for burn wound.

  2. Otostegia persica extraction on healing process of burn wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Ganjali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate if the methanolic extract of the Otostegia persica can accelerating healing process of burn wound because of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects. METHODS:Forty eight male Wistar rats were randomized into three study groups of 16 rats each. Burn wounds were created on dorsal part of shaved rats using a metal rod. In group I the burn wound was left without any treatment. Group was treated with topical silver sulfadiazine pomade. In group III, ointment containing the OP extract was administered. Skin biopsies were harvested from burn area on the 3rd, 5th, 14th and 21st days after burn and examined histologically. RESULTS: Re-epithelialization in the control group and in group II was lower than in group III. Re-epithelialization in groups II and III was significantly different from that in the control group. On the 5th day of the experiment, we assessed lower inflammation in the burn area compared to control group. This means that the inflammation was suppressed by methanolic extract of OP. From day 5 to 14; the fibroblast proliferation peaked and was associated with increased collagen accumulation. It was obvious that angiogenesis improved more in the groups II and III, which facilitated re-epithelialisation. CONCLUSION:Methanolic extract of Otostegia persica exhibited significant healing activity when topically applied on rats. OP is an effective treatment for saving the burn site.

  3. Topical silver for infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Joel W

    2009-01-01

    Vermeulen H, van Hattem JM, Storm-Versloot MN, Ubbink DT. Topical silver for treating infected wounds. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2007(1);CD005486. What is the clinical evidence base for silver dressings in the management of contaminated and infected acute and chronic wounds? Investigations were identified by Cochrane Wounds Group Specialized Register (2006), CENTRAL (2006), MEDLINE (2002-2006), EMBASE (2002-2006), CINAHL (2002-2006), and digital dissertations (2006) searches. Product manufacturers were contacted to identify additional eligible studies. The search terms included wound infection, surgical wound infection, ulcer, wound healing, and silver. Each study fulfilled the following criteria: (1) The study was a randomized controlled trial of human participants that compared dressings containing silver with any dressings without silver, dressings with other antiseptics, or dressings with different dosages of silver. (2) The participants were aged 18 years and older with contaminated and infected open wounds of any cause. (3) The study had to evaluate the effectiveness of the dressings using an objective measure of healing. No language or publication status restrictions were imposed, and participants could be recruited in any care setting. Studies were excluded if the wounds were ostomies (surgically formed passages). Study quality assessment was conducted independently by 3 authors using the Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement and Dutch Cochrane Centre protocols. Characteristics of the study, participants, interventions, and outcome measures were extracted by one author and verified by a second using a standard form. The principal outcome measure was healing (time to complete healing, rate of change in wound area and volume, number and proportion of wounds healed within trial period). Secondary measures were adverse events (eg, pain, maceration, erythema), dressing leakage, and wound odor. Based on the unique comparisons in the studies, a meta

  4. Stem Cell Therapy to Improve Burn Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-13-2-0024 TITLE: Stem Cell Therapy to Improve Burn Wound Healing PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Carl Schulman, MD, PhD, MSPH...NUMBER Stem Cell Therapy to Improve Burn Wound Healing 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Carl Schulman, MD, PhD, MSPH...ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Univ ersity of Miam i M Miller School of Medicine Ryder Trauma Center 1800 NW 10th Avenue, Suite 221

  5. Spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis for the assessment of burn wounds: A service evaluation of its clinical application in 50 burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, A; Pedrini, F A; Oni, G; Frew, Q; Philp, B; Barnes, D; Dziewulski, P

    2017-05-01

    The assessment of burn depth can be challenging even to the experienced burn clinician. Clinical assessment is most widely used to determine burn depth. Because of this subjective nature, various imaging modalities have been invented. The use of photospectometry as a novel technique in burn wound depth analysis has been previously described but the literature is very limited. We carried out a single blinded non-randomized comparative study of healing potential of 50 burn wounds between tissue spectrophotometry analysis versus clinical evaluation. ScanOSkin™ technology has an overall sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 86% in predicting healing potential of wounds. Analysis of Inter Rater Agreement (IRA) using Kappa calculations showed strengths of agreement varied from fair to moderate in perfusion and burn depth. IRA for assessing pigmentation however, was poor and this was reflected in user feedback. There is a potential role for ScanOSkin™ tissue spectrophotometric analysis in burn depth assessment. Future studies comparing several imaging modalities with ScanOSkin(®), taking into account costs comparison may be useful for future health resources planning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. Severe complications after negative pressure wound therapy in burned wounds: two case reports

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    Ren H

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Haitao Ren,1 Yuan Li21Department of Burns and Wound Center, the Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Ultrasound, Women's Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: We present two typical cases of severe complications (sepsis and hemorrhage after negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT in burned patients. Necrotic tissues in some deep burn wounds are difficult to judge correctly and remove thoroughly. An electrically burned blood vessel looks “intact” but can easily break. Necrotic tissue or injured blood vessels when using NPWT are dangerous, both for causing sepsis and hemorrhage. This is the first article that reports the severe complications of NPWT in burned patients. It is imperative to heed indications and avoid contraindications. Proper preparation of wound beds, close observation, and sufficient irrigation are also crucial to avoid these severe complications, and there is an urgent need to substitute the central vacuum system with the low-pressure system.Keywords: negative pressure wound therapy, complication, burn sepsis, bleeding, drainage

  7. Porcine wound models for skin substitution and burn treatment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelkoop, E.; Bogaerdt, A.J. van den; Lamme, E.N.; Hoekstra, M.J.; Brandsma, K.; Ulrich, M.M.

    2004-01-01

    Skin regeneration is an important field of tissue engineering. Especially in larger burns and chronic wounds, present treatments are insufficient in preventing scar formation and promoting healing. Initial screening of potentially interesting products for skin substitution is usually done by in

  8. 21 CFR 878.4022 - Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. 878... Hydrogel wound dressing and burn dressing. (a) Identification. A hydrogel wound dressing is a sterile or... percent) and capable of absorbing exudate. This classification does not include a hydrogel wound dressing...

  9. Utility of Gram stain for the microbiological analysis of burn wound surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, Sameer; Gregson, Daniel B; Lloyd, Tracie; Crichton, Marilyn; Church, Deirdre L

    2003-11-01

    Surface swab cultures have attracted attention as a potential alternative to biopsy histology or quantitative culture methods for microbiological burn wound monitoring. To our knowledge, the utility of adding a Gram-stained slide in this context has not been evaluated previously. To determine the degree of correlation of Gram stain with culture for the microbiological analysis of burn wound surfaces. Prospective laboratory analysis. Urban health region/centralized diagnostic microbiology laboratory. Burn patients hospitalized in any Calgary Health Region burn center from November 2000 to September 2001. Gram stain plus culture of burn wound surface swab specimens obtained during routine dressing changes or based on clinical signs of infection. Degree of correlation (complete, high, partial, none), including weighted kappa statistic (kappa(w)), of Gram stain with culture based on quantitative microscopy and degree of culture growth. A total of 375 specimens from 50 burn patients were evaluated. Of these, 239 were negative by culture and Gram stain, 7 were positive by Gram stain only, 89 were positive by culture only, and 40 were positive by both methods. The degree of complete, high, partial, and no correlation of Gram stain with culture was 70.9% (266/375), 1.1% (4/375), 2.4% (9/375), and 25.6% (96/375), respectively. The degree of correlation for all 375 specimens, as expressed by the weighted kappa statistic, was found to be fair (kappa(w) = 0.32).Conclusion.-The Gram stain is not suitable for the microbiological analysis of burn wound surfaces.

  10. Positive Effect of Propolis on Free Radicals in Burn Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olczyk, Pawel; Ramos, Pawel; Komosinska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Stojko, Jerzy; Pilawa, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Concentration and properties of free radicals in the burn wounds treated with propolis were examined by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Magnetic spin-spin interactions and complex free radicals structures in wound beds were studied. The results were compared to those obtained for silver sulphadiazine used as a standard pharmaceutical agent. The changes of free radicals in the matrix of injury with time of exposition on these substances were tested. The aim of this study was to check the hypothesis about the best influence of propolis on the burn wounds healing. It was confirmed that a relatively lower concentration of free radicals exists in the burn wounds treated with propolis. The homogeneously broadened spectra and a complex free radical system characterize the tested tissue samples. The fastening of spin-lattice relaxation processes in the matrix of injury after treatment with propolis and silver sulphadiazine was observed. Practical usefulness of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in alternative medicine was proved. PMID:23762125

  11. Automatic wound infection interpretation for postoperative wound image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jui-Tse; Ho, Te-Wei; Shih, Hsueh-Fu; Chang, Chun-Che; Lai, Feipei; Wu, Jin-Ming

    2017-02-01

    With the growing demand for more efficient wound care after surgery, there is a necessity to develop a machine learning based image analysis approach to reduce the burden for health care professionals. The aim of this study was to propose a novel approach to recognize wound infection on the postsurgical site. Firstly, we proposed an optimal clustering method based on unimodal-rosin threshold algorithm to extract the feature points from a potential wound area into clusters for regions of interest (ROI). Each ROI was regarded as a suture site of the wound area. The automatic infection interpretation based on the support vector machine is available to assist physicians doing decision-making in clinical practice. According to clinical physicians' judgment criteria and the international guidelines for wound infection interpretation, we defined infection detector modules as the following: (1) Swelling Detector, (2) Blood Region Detector, (3) Infected Detector, and (4) Tissue Necrosis Detector. To validate the capability of the proposed system, a retrospective study using the confirmation wound pictures that were used for diagnosis by surgical physicians as the gold standard was conducted to verify the classification models. Currently, through cross validation of 42 wound images, our classifiers achieved 95.23% accuracy, 93.33% sensitivity, 100% specificity, and 100% positive predictive value. We believe this ability could help medical practitioners in decision making in clinical practice.

  12. Modulation of inflammatory and catabolic responses in severely burned children by early burn wound excision in the first 24 hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barret, JP; Herndon, DN

    Hypothesis: Early burn wound excision modulates the hypermetabolic response in severe pediatric burn injuries. Design: Before-after trial. Setting: A 30-bed burn referral center in a private, university-affiliated hospital. Methods: We studied 35 severely burned children who were divided into 2

  13. Comparison of Two Types of Gels in Improving Burn Wound

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    Rahimzadeh Golnar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Kefir are natural probiotic compounds with anti-inflammatory properties, which were tested in experimental burn injury. Kefir gels were prepared from an extract of continuously cultured kefir in Man, Rogosa and Sharpe Broth medium for 48 and 96 h. Their extracts were used for evaluation of antibacterial effect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in standard sample (ATCC 27853 and samples taken from patients with burns. The antibacterial effect of different kefir extract was assessment of minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration. The density of bacteria and percentage of organic acids (lactic and acetic acids were also determined. Materials and Methods: Similar burn injuries were made on dorsal skin surface of 40 rats. The rats were divided into 5 groups of 8 rats each. The base gel, silver sulfadiazine ointment, kefir 48 h gel, kefir 96 h gel were applied twice daily. Burn wound area was measured at baseline, 1 and 2 weeks. Results: Results indicated that by increasing the time of fermentation, concentration of lactic and acetic acid increased in orders of: Kefir 48 h < kefir 96 h, the end of the 2nd week the percentage of wound size were lowest in order of kefir 96 h gel < kefir grains 48 h gel < silver sulfadiazine 1% < untreated and based gel groups. Conclusion: In conclusion, the kefir gel therapy was an effective therapeutic approach to improve outcomes after severe burn when compared with conventional silver sulfadiazine treatment.

  14. Isolation of Bacillus Cereus from wounds and burns

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    Behzadiannejhad Gh

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The culture results of 203 cases with different wounds were studies; 150 of the latter were burn cases (mainly second and third degree burns, and 53 were of other types (surgical, traumatic, ect. Four subtypes of Bacillus cereus were isolated upon culture, and the different toxins produced in DHT broth with 0.1% glucose were assessed. The lethal toxin was injected intravenously to Syrian rats, none of whom died. VPR factor was assessed in the 4 subtypes. Three subtypes produced VPR in significant amounts.

  15. Extra-large negative pressure wound therapy dressings for burns - Initial experience with technique, fluid management, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Sebastian; Wall, Jennifer; Pomahac, Bohdan; Riviello, Robert; Halvorson, Eric G

    2016-03-01

    The use of negative-pressure-wound-therapy (NPWT) is associated with improved outcomes in smaller burns. We report our experience using extra-large (XL) NPWT dressings to treat ≥15% total body surface area (TBSA) burned and describe our technique and early outcomes. We also provide NPWT exudate volume for predictive fluid resuscitation in these critically ill patients. We retrospectively reviewed patients treated with XL-NPWT from 2012 to 2014. Following excision/grafting, graft and donor sites were sealed with a layered NPWT dressing. We documented wound size, dressing size, NPWT outputs, graft take, wound infections, and length of stay (LOS). Mean NPWT exudate volume per %TBSA per day was calculated. Twelve burn patients (mean TBSA burned 30%, range 15-60%) were treated with XL-NPWT (dressing TBSA burned and skin graft donor sites range 17-44%). Average graft take was 97%. No wound infections occurred. Two patients had burns ≥50% TBSA and their LOS was reduced compared to ABA averages. XL-NPWT outputs peaked at day 1 after grafting followed by a steady decline until dressings were removed. Average XL-NPWT dressing output during the first 5 days was 101±66mL/%BSA covered per day. 2 patients developed acute kidney injury. The use of XL-NPWT to treat extensive burns is feasible with attention to application technique. NPWT dressings appear to improve graft take, and to decrease risk of infection, LOS, and pain and anxiety associated with wound care. Measured fluid losses can improve patient care in future applications of NPWT to large burn wounds. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. A review of negative-pressure wound therapy in the management of burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantak, Neelesh A; Mistry, Riyam; Halvorson, Eric G

    2016-12-01

    Negative pressure has been employed in various aspects of burn care and the aim of this study was to evaluate the evidence for each of those uses. The PubMed and Cochrane CENTRAL databases were queried for articles in the following areas: negative pressure as a dressing for acute burns, intermediate treatment prior to skin grafting, bolster for skin autografts, dressing for integration of dermal substitutes, dressing for skin graft donor sites, and integrated dressing in large burns. Fifteen studies met our inclusion criteria. One study showed negative pressure wound therapy improved perfusion in acute partial-thickness burns, 8 out of 9 studies showed benefits when used as a skin graft bolster dressing, 1 out of 2 studies showed improved rate of revascularization when used over dermal substitutes, and 1 study showed increased rate of re-epithelialization when used over skin graft donor sites. Negative pressure can improve autograft take when used as a bolster dressing. There is limited data to suggest that it may also improve the rate of revascularization of dermal substitutes and promote re-epithelialization of skin graft donor sites. Other uses suggested by studies that did not meet our inclusion criteria include improving vascularity in acute partial-thickness burns and as an integrated dressing for the management of large burns. Further studies are warranted for most clinical applications to establish negative pressure as an effective adjunct in burn wound care. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. Wound healing activities of different extracts of Centella asiatica in incision and burn wound models: an experimental animal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The efficacy of Centella asiatica for incision and burn wounds are not fully understood. Here, we report the wound healing activities of sequential hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol, and water extracts of Centella asiatica in incision and partial-thickness burn wound models in rats. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats weighing 250–300 g were randomly divided into incision and burn wound groups. Each group was stratified into seven subgroups: (1) untreated; (2) NSS-; (3) Tween 20®- (vehicle control); (4) hexane extract-; (5) ethyl acetate extract-; (6) methanol extract-; and (7) aqueous extract-treated groups. The test substances were applied topically once daily. The tensile strength of the incision wound was measured on the seventh day after wound infliction. The general appearance and degree of wound healing of the burn wound were assessed on Days 3, 7, 10 and 14 after burn injury and prior to histopathological evaluation. Results On the seventh day after wound infliction, the tensile strength of incision wound in all extract-treated groups was significantly higher than that of the vehicle control (Tween 20®), but comparable to the NSS-treated group. The degrees of healing in the burn wound with the four extracts were significantly higher than that of the control on Days 3, 10 and 14. Histopathological findings on Day 14 after burn injury revealed prominent fibrinoid necrosis and incomplete epithelialization in the control and untreated groups, whereas fully developed epithelialization and keratinization were observed in all extract-treated groups. Analysis by thin layer chromatography demonstrated that the phyto-constituents β-sitosterol, asiatic acid, and asiaticoside and madecassocide were present in the hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts, respectively. Conclusions All extracts of Centella asiatica facilitate the wound healing process in both incision and burn wounds. Asiatic acid in the ethyl acetate extract seemed to be the most active

  18. Wound healing activities of different extracts of Centella asiatica in incision and burn wound models: an experimental animal study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somboonwong Juraiporn

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of Centella asiatica for incision and burn wounds are not fully understood. Here, we report the wound healing activities of sequential hexane, ethyl acetate, methanol, and water extracts of Centella asiatica in incision and partial-thickness burn wound models in rats. Methods Male Sprague–Dawley rats weighing 250–300 g were randomly divided into incision and burn wound groups. Each group was stratified into seven subgroups: (1 untreated; (2 NSS-; (3 Tween 20®- (vehicle control; (4 hexane extract-; (5 ethyl acetate extract-; (6 methanol extract-; and (7 aqueous extract-treated groups. The test substances were applied topically once daily. The tensile strength of the incision wound was measured on the seventh day after wound infliction. The general appearance and degree of wound healing of the burn wound were assessed on Days 3, 7, 10 and 14 after burn injury and prior to histopathological evaluation. Results On the seventh day after wound infliction, the tensile strength of incision wound in all extract-treated groups was significantly higher than that of the vehicle control (Tween 20®, but comparable to the NSS-treated group. The degrees of healing in the burn wound with the four extracts were significantly higher than that of the control on Days 3, 10 and 14. Histopathological findings on Day 14 after burn injury revealed prominent fibrinoid necrosis and incomplete epithelialization in the control and untreated groups, whereas fully developed epithelialization and keratinization were observed in all extract-treated groups. Analysis by thin layer chromatography demonstrated that the phyto-constituents β-sitosterol, asiatic acid, and asiaticoside and madecassocide were present in the hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts, respectively. Conclusions All extracts of Centella asiatica facilitate the wound healing process in both incision and burn wounds. Asiatic acid in the ethyl acetate extract seemed to

  19. Burn-associated bloodstream infections in pediatric burn patients: Time distribution of etiologic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devrim, İlker; Kara, Ahu; Düzgöl, Mine; Karkıner, Aytaç; Bayram, Nuri; Temir, Günyüz; Şencan, Arzu; Sorguç, Yelda; Gülfidan, Gamze; Hoşgör, Münevver

    2017-02-01

    Infections are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with burns in burn units. Bloodstream infections (BSIs) in patients with burns may result from burn wound infection, use of invasive devices such as central venous catheters, and translocation of the gastrointestinal flora. In this study, we investigated the distribution and antimicrobial drug resistance of causative pathogens in children with burns and the durational changes of microorganisms in the distribution of BSIs in children. This study was conducted at the Pediatric Burn Unit (PBU) of Dr. Behçet Uz Children Research and Training Hospital during the period of November 2008-April 2015. The study subjects were all the patients admitted to the PBU, in whom microorganisms were isolated at least from one of the cultures, including blood and catheter cultures. Gram-positive bacteria were the most common causative agents of BSI in patients with burns (66.4%), followed by gram-negative bacteria (22.1%) and fungi (11.5%). The median duration of development of BSIs caused by gram-positive bacteria from the time of burn was 5 days (ranging from 2 to 54 days of burn), which was significantly shorter than that of BSIs caused by gram-negative bacteria (12 days) and fungal pathogens (13 days). The etiologic agents of BSIs in children may differ from those in adults. Gram-negative drug-resistant bacteria such as multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii were important agents of BSI in patients with burns, especially in the long term; however, gram-positive bacteria should also be considered while deciding the antimicrobial therapy, especially in the early periods of burn. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. Prolonged C1 Inhibitor Administration Improves Local Healing of Burn Wounds and Reduces Myocardial Inflammation in a Rat Burn Wound Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Begieneman, Mark P. V.; Kubat, Bela; Ulrich, Magda M. W.; Hahn, Nynke E.; Stumpf-Stolker, Yvette; Tempelaars, Miranda; Middelkoop, Esther; Zeerleder, Sacha; Wouters, Diana; van Ham, Marieke S.; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Krijnen, Paul A. J.

    2012-01-01

    In a previous study, the authors found persistent presence of acute inflammation markers such as C-reactive protein and complement factors locally in burn wounds. This persistence of acute inflammation may not only delay local burn wound healing but also have a systemic effect, for instance on the

  1. Perfusion of burn wounds assessed by Laser Doppler Imaging is related to burn depth and healing time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloppenberg, FWH; Beerthuizen, GIJM; ten Duis, H. J.

    Average perfusion in various burn wounds was assessed using Laser Doppler Imaging (LDI). The time necessary for a complete healing of the wound was compared to the results of the LDI measurements. A certain depth of burn was associated with a typical pattern of perfusion in the course of time. There

  2. Anti-scar Treatment for Deep Partial-thickness Burn Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    10-45 seconds to produce consistent deep partial-thickness burns (Figure 3B). The burns were evaluated by a veterinary pathologist to confirm the...wounds C) pathology score. Additionally, burn wounds were validated using H&E, Masson’s trichrome and TUNEL staining to assess the depth of damage

  3. Combination of negative pressure wound therapy and acoustic pressure wound therapy for treatment of infected surgical wounds: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Paul A; Peters, Kim L; Bowers, Jolene M

    2008-05-01

    The optimal wound therapy for healing infected wounds post surgery or surgical debridement has not been established. Negative pressure wound therapy and acoustic pressure wound therapy are advanced wound-healing modalities that apply forms of mechanical pressure to wound tissue in an effort to promote healing by stimulating cellular proliferation. Using a combination of negative pressure wound therapy and acoustic pressure wound therapy was evaluated in a series of six patients with large, infected surgical wounds presenting with moderate to large amounts of serosanguineous drainage. After concurrent treatment with both modalities (range: 4 to 12 weeks), wound volume was reduced by 99% to 100% in all wounds except one wound for which depth at end of treatment was not measurable due to hypergranulation. Similarly, wound surface area was reduced by 82% to 100%, with the exception of the hypergranular wound, which decreased in size by 60%. Serosanguineous wound drainage was reduced in four wounds and remained unchanged in two wounds.

  4. Antimicrobial resistance pattern of bacterial isolates from burn wounds in an Iranian University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Abedi, Daryoush; Fazeli, Hossein; Javadi, Abbasali; Jalali, Mohammad; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Soltani, Rasool; Karamyafti, Mohammad Javad

    2012-07-01

    About 73% of death cases in the first 5 days after burning are due to infection complications. The aim of this study was to identify the causing agents of infections in burn patients and the sensitivity pattern of them to the commonly used antimicrobials in an Iranian Burn center University Hospital. In this cross-sectional study, patients who were admitted to one of the Iranian Burn center University hospitals in 2009 and had nosocomial infection due to burn wound, whom received antimicrobial agents for therapeutic reasons, with a hospitalization period of more than 48 hours were enrolled. Gram stain analyses were performed to help identifying growing colonies. Differential tests for identification of pathogenic bacteria species were performed following primary tests. E-test strips of each antimicrobial were placed on the culture medium plate in order to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration Studied antimicrobials for isolated Gram-negative bacteria were meropenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, ceftriaxone, cotrimoxazole, and for Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin, piperacillin/tazobactam, cotrimoxazole, and cephalothin. Only 16% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa species were sensitive to meropenem, and 13% were sensitive to piperacillin/tazobactam. Ten out of 29 Klebsiella species (34%) were sensitive to meropenem and piperacillin/tazobactam. All isolated strains of Staphylococcus aureus were sensitive to vancomycine while they were all resistant to cotrimoxazole. Pseudomona, Klebsiella and Staphylococcoci are the most common species causing burn infection in this medical center. Results showed the importance of limiting irrational use of wide-spectrum antimicrobials and recommends strict management of infections in burn injury centers.

  5. A systematic review of silver-containing dressings and topical silver agents (used with dressings) for burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Z; Abu, S F; Chong, N J

    2012-05-01

    Silver preparations are commonly used for burns, but evidence of their effectiveness remains poorly defined. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of silver-containing dressings and topical silver for preventing infection and promoting healing in burns wounds through a meta-analysis of the available evidence. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and relevant databases were searched. Drug companies and experts in this field were also contacted. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of silver dressings or topical silver (used with dressings) compared with non-silver dressings were eligible for inclusion. We identified 14 RCTs involving 877 participants. One small trial of a silver-containing dressing showed significantly better healing time compared to the control [MD -3.6; 95% CI -4.94 to -2.26 for partial thickness burns and MD -3.9; 95% CI -4.54 to -3.26 for superficial burns]. Topical silver showed significantly worse healing time compared to the non-silver group [WMD 3.96; 95% CI 2.41-5.51] and showed no evidence of effectiveness in preventing wounds infection [WMD 2.48; 95% CI 0.39-15.73]. Our review suggests that silver-containing dressings and topical silver were either no better or worse than control dressings in preventing wound infection and promoting healing of burn wounds. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  6. Fusarium spp infections in a pediatric burn unit: nine years of experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Teresa Rosanova

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Fusarium spp are ubiquitous fungi recognized as opportunistic agents of human infections, and can produce severe infections in burn patients. The literature on Fusarium spp infections in pediatric burn patients is scarce. Objectives To describe the clinical and epidemiological features as well as outcome of Fusarium spp infections in pediatric burn patients. Patients and methods Retrospective, descriptive study of Fusarium spp infections in a specialized intensive care burn unit. Results In 15 patients Fusarium spp infections were diagnosed. Median age was 48 months. Direct fire injury was observed in ten patients. The median affected burn surface area was 45%. Twelve patients had a full thickness burn. Fourteen patients had a Garces Index ≥3. Fungal infection developed at a median of 11 days after burn injury. Fungi were isolated from burn wound in 14 patients and from the bone in one patient. Amphotericin B was the drug of choice for treatment followed by voriconazole. Median time of treatment completion was 23 days. One patient (7% died of fungal infection-related causes. Conclusion In our series Fusarium spp was an uncommon pathogen in severely burnt patients. The burn wound was the most common site of infection and mortality was low.

  7. Microbial profile of canine persistent wound infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Padhy

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To analyse the microbial profile of canine persistent wound infections. Materials and Methods: The total wound samples (n=172 taken from both traumatic (140 and post-surgical (32 persistent wounds in canines were processed for routine microbial isolation and identification during a period of 15 months. Results: Staphylococcus intermedius was found to be the predominant isolate from all types of wounds under study. It was followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, E. coli, Pasteurella spp., Corynaebacterium spp. and Bacillus spp. From different traumatic wounds of dogs, S. intermedius (92/140=65.7% and from surgical wounds, P. aeruginosa (24/32=75% were found to be the predominant isolates recovered whereas the most commonly isolated bacterial genus in both traumatic and surgical wounds of dogs was Staphylococcus spp. Conclusion: Canine wounds are polymicrobial in nature. Hence proper microbial laboratory diagnosis and presence of multiple organisms in a wound are to be taken into consideration for effective treatment of persistent wound infections in dogs.

  8. Topical silver for treating infected wounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, H.; van Hattem, J. M.; Storm-Versloot, M. N.; Ubbink, D. T.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Topical silver treatments and silver dressings are increasingly used for the local treatment of contaminated or infected wounds, however, there is a lack of clarity regarding the evidence for their effectiveness. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects on wound healing of topical silver and

  9. Biofilm-infected wounds in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Elizabeth A; Freeman, Lynetta J; Seleem, Mohamed N; Snyder, Paul W

    2014-03-15

    A 4-year-old spayed female Mastiff was evaluated for treatment of chronic nonhealing pressure wounds over both elbow regions resulting from attempts at hypertrophic callus excision. The wound bed granulation tissue was mottled red and yellow with hyperemic, rolled epithelial edges. The right wound communicated with a large fluid pocket along the thoracic wall. The dog had an inflammatory leukogram with a left shift. The wounds were debrided, and tissue specimens were collected for histologic evaluation, microbial culture, and bacterial identification by means of molecular diagnostic techniques. The left wound was closed immediately. Calcium alginate rope with silver was packed into the right wound. Vacuum-assisted closure was applied for 6 days. Debridement was repeated, and a thoracodorsal axial pattern flap was used to cover the wound. Systemic treatment with antimicrobials was initiated, and pressure over the elbow regions was relieved. Bacterial biofilms were identified histologically in tissue specimens from both wounds. Staphylococcus intermedius, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Streptococcus canis were cultured and identified by 16S rRNA fragment sequencing. Pyrosequencing identified multiple bacterial species and no fungal organisms. Both wounds healed successfully. Biofilms are implicated in infected orthopedic implants in veterinary patients; however, this is the first report of a bacterial biofilm in chronic wounds in a dog. In human wound care, extensive debridement is performed to disrupt the biofilm; a multimodal treatment approach is recommended to delay reformation and help clear the infection. In this case, biofilm reformation was prevented by systemic treatment with antimicrobials, by reducing local pressure on the wounds, and by wound closure.

  10. The role of silver sulphadiazine in the conservative treatment of partial thickness burn wounds: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyneman, A; Hoeksema, H; Vandekerckhove, D; Pirayesh, A; Monstrey, S

    2016-11-01

    For more than 40 years, silver sulphadiazine 1% (SSD) is considered as standard therapy for the conservative treatment of burn wounds. However, in the last 10 years, substantial disadvantages of SSD have been reported in the literature and probably as a result of this, several new dressings for burn wounds have been developed and put on the market. The objective of this systematic review is to evaluate the available evidence on SSD in the conservative treatment of burns, specifically in comparison with the newer burn dressings that are increasingly being used nowadays. A search filter was composed to select randomized controlled trials (RCTs) from the MEDLINE database. Only RCTs studying the effect of conservative treatment on burns were selected. At least one of the two comparative groups was treated with SSD. Each included article was analysed and relevant data (baseline parameters, interventions, outcomes and methodological parameters) were registered using Microsoft Office Excel 2007. Many dressings showed superior healing properties compared to SSD, but no dressing was able to show a clear benefit over SSD regarding infection. The number of dressing changes, pain and patient's satisfaction are more favourable in the newer dressings, especially with solid and biological dressings. The results of this systematic review clearly demonstrate that a faster wound healing is obtained with the newly developed burn dressings. Additionally, these new dressings tend to be more comfortable for the patients and easier to use for care givers. The minor differences in antibacterial activity between SSD and the new products did not seem to have any influence on the rate of wound healing. Since rapid wound closure is essential to obtain an optimal functional and aesthetic outcome, it can be concluded from the results of this systemic review that the standard use of SSD in the conservative treatment of burn wounds can no longer be supported. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and

  11. Modified Meek Micrografting Technique for Wound Coverage in Extensive Burn Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Abelardo; Riegel, Timothy; Nystad, Deborah; Tredget, Edward E

    2016-01-01

    The modified Meek micrografting technique constitutes a rapid and efficient surgical approach for the skin coverage of extensive full-thickness burn injuries. A total of 10 burn patients (mean 68 ± 9.2% TBSA) admitted to our burn unit required one or more Meek micrografting procedures (mean 2.2 ± 0.5) to cover in average 43.4 ± 11.6% TBSA (range between 10 and 75% TBSA). This goal was achieved using a donor site area ranging between 2.5 and 18% TBSA. All patients developed local infection to Pseudomona aeruginosa (75%), Stenotrophomona maltophilia (25%), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (12.5%), and Acinetobacter baumannii (12.5%). Thus, the average of Meek regrafting after graft-take failure was 13.1 ± 6.4% TBSA (median: 9%; range from 0 to 36%). The period to obtain stable definitive wound closure was in average of 67.2 ± 21 days post injury. The modified Meek micrografting provides a reliable and versatile method for the coverage of large burn wounds with limited autograft donor sites and is now routinely used in our institution. Its systematic use improves operating times and overall outcomes reducing the number of surgeries, increasing the percentage of graft take, and decreasing the length of stay.

  12. Amish Culture and Their Utilization of Burns and Wounds Ointment for the Treatment of Burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinkle, Krystal Melich

    2016-01-01

    As indicated in the 2010 United States Religion Census, there are approximately 251,000 Amish people in the United States and Ontario. This census also demonstrated that a new Amish community is founded on average about every three-and-a-half weeks, suggesting that this religious culture is the fastest-growing religion throughout the United States. Because of the rapid growth of the Amish population, it is essential for health care workers to understand their background, cultural, and health care beliefs, especially in the treatment of burns. The purpose of this article is to examine the Amish background, cultural, and health care beliefs, specifically the utilization of burns and wounds ointment and burdock leaves in the treatment of burns.

  13. Multicultural understanding of infected wound care.

    OpenAIRE

    Rono, Ruth; Åstrand, Loise; Tatala, Sinthia

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to focus on the challenges nurses encounter while caring for multicultural patients with infected wounds. The purpose was to describe what sort of challenges nurses encounter with multicultural patients and how culture affects the patients’ care. The goal was to gain more knowledge/understanding on multicultural patients for the improvement of nursing practice in infected wound care. The study was done using a qualitative method and inductive analysis. The theoret...

  14. [Definition and management of wound infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, S; Körner, P; Diedrich, S; Kramer, A; Heidecke, C-D

    2011-03-01

    Surgical site infections (SSI) in the postoperative period represent the sword of Damocles in surgery. In spite of the medical progress in recent years these infections cannot always be avoided and occur in 25% of all nosocomial infections in Germany. They also generate up to 50% of the required costs in this context. The consequences vary from extended duration of hospitalization to elevated mortality. The degree of contamination of surgical wounds is of great importance as well as the patient's immune status and comorbidities. Prevention of infected surgical wounds is essential and important measures should begin even prior to the surgical procedure. In addition, during and following the surgical procedure several standards have to be followed. Rapid confirmation of diagnosis and correct management of surgical site infections are essential for the course of the disease. This study provides information on development, prevention and therapy of surgically infected wounds.

  15. Use of skin staples to fix film dressings on scalp donor wounds in patients with burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Reiji; Ishikura, Naotaka; Kawakami, Shigehiko; Heshiki, Takaya; Shimada, Kenichi; Kurosawa, Tomoko

    2002-05-01

    Split-thickness skin grafts (STSGs) from the scalp have been used in large burns. The donor site wounds are usually covered using occlusive dressings, such as film dressings because they contribute to reduce donor site pain and infection under exudative crust and to enhance re-epithelialization. However, it is not always easy to fix such film dressings to the scalp because of the presence of hair. In this paper, we report the use of skin staplers to fix the film dressings. Eight donor sites in four patients were dressed in this way. The patients had 50-78% of the body burned, all of them survived. The mean healing time for the donor sites was 6.8 days. Three patients had their scalps re-harvested several times (range two to three times). There were no infections nor secondary skin ulcers at the donor sites. The technique of this dressing is very simple and speedy, thus we recommend the use of skin staplers to fix the film dressing to scalp donor wounds in patients with burns.

  16. Bacterial isolates from infected wounds and their antibiotic susceptibility pattern: some remarks about wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessa, Lucinda J; Fazii, Paolo; Di Giulio, Mara; Cellini, Luigina

    2015-02-01

    Wound infection plays an important role in the development of chronicity, delaying wound healing. This study aimed to identify the bacterial pathogens present in infected wounds and characterise their resistance profile to the most common antibiotics used in therapy. Three hundred and twelve wound swab samples were collected from 213 patients and analysed for the identification of microorganisms and for the determination of their antibiotic susceptibility. Patients with diverse type of wounds were included in this retrospective study, carried out from March to September 2012. A total of 28 species were isolated from 217 infected wounds. The most common bacterial species detected was Staphylococcus aureus (37%), followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17%), Proteus mirabilis (10%), Escherichia coli (6%) and Corynebacterium spp. (5%). Polymicrobial infection was found in 59 (27·1%) of the samples and was mainly constituted with two species. The most common association was S. aureus/P. aeruginosa. All Gram-positives were susceptible to vancomycin and linezolid. Gram-negatives showed quite high resistance to the majority of antibiotics, being amikacin the most active against these bacteria. This study is mostly oriented to health care practitioners who deal with wound management, making them aware about the importance of wound infection and helping them to choose the adequate treatment options to control microbial infection in wounds. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Oral ketamine for wound care procedures in adult patients with burns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: This prospective study was carried out to evaluate the usefulness of oral ketamine for burn wound dressing in adult patients. The aim was to achieve a state-of-conscious sedation in which the patient would be communicative and cooperative, with minimal, or no pain during burn wound care procedures.

  18. Experimental Proteus mirabilis Burn Surface Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    mirabilis Burn Surface Infection Albert T. McManus, PhD; Charles G. McLeod, Jr, DVM; Arthur D. Mason, Jr, MD * We established a human burn Isolate of...William J1. Northam. Peter A. lDorsaneo, and Paulette langlinais MS. model may be useful in evaluation of experimental antibi - prov ided technical support

  19. Clinical Efficacy Test of Polyester Containing Herbal Extract Dressings in Burn Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangman, Pornprom; Praditsuktavorn, Banjerd; Chinaroonchai, Kusuma; Chuntrasakul, Chomchark

    2016-09-01

    Technological advancement has assisted in developing various availabilities of wound products that help in not only in healing and preventing infection but also in providing patients' comfort and pain reduction during application. However, most of advanced wound healing products in Thailand were imported at high costs to patients. Nowadays, there are increased numbers of local researches of herbs that could provide healing environment for successful wound care. Herbal wound products are currently being introduced as alternatives to those imported dressings. The aim of this study was to report the clinical efficacy of using polyester containing herbal extract dressings in healing of second-degree burns. The volunteers were divided by simply randomized method into the study group of patient using polyester containing herbal extract dressing and the control group of patients treating with dressings that are commercially available and common use. The standard treatment protocols were performed at every 3 days of dressing change. Comparative evaluation consisted of time of healing, length of hospital stays, pain analog score assessment, percentage of infection, and descriptive notification of unfavorable clinical symptoms or signs or side effects. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Anti-infective and wound healing properties of Flabellaria paniculata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The methanol leaf extract of Flabellaria paniculala was studied for its potency on normal wounds and infected wounds in rats. Wounds were inflicted on Wistar rats using excision model. Local infection was introduced into rat abdominal wounds using a 108 bacteria/ml inoculum. Two groups of infection were used: ...

  1. Evaluation of the Effects of Honey on Acute-Phase Deep Burn Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukari Nakajima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to clarify the effects of honey on acute-phase deep burn wounds. Two deep burn wounds were created on mice which were divided into four groups: no treatment, silver sulfadiazine, manuka honey, and Japanese acacia honey. Wound sizes were calculated as expanded wound areas and sampled 30 minutes and 1–4 days after wounding for histological observation. The wound sections were subjected to hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistological staining to detect necrotic cells, apoptotic cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. The no treatment group formed a scar. The redness around the wound edges in the silver sulfadiazine group was the most intense. All groups exhibited increased wound areas after wounding. The proportions of necrotic cells and the numbers of neutrophils in the manuka and acacia honey groups were lower than those in the no treatment and silver sulfadiazine groups until day 3; however, there were no significant differences between all groups on day 4. These results show that honey treatment on deep burn wounds cannot prevent wound progression. Moreover, comparing our observations with those of Jackson, there are some differences between humans and animals in this regard, and the zone of hyperemia and its surrounding area fall into necrosis, which contributes to burn wound progression.

  2. Topical Modulation of the Burn Wound Inflammatory Response to Improve Short and Long Term Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    systemic immune activation . In our burn model, we control the source of inflammation by application of a topical p38 MAPK inhibitor. The p38 MAPK pathway...Duroc pig . We hypothesize that topical p38MAPK inhibition will attenuate the depth of the burn by preventing hair-follicle cell apoptosis, attenuate...care providers in a mass- casualty incident. 2. KEYWORDS: Wounds, Burn, topical, wound healing, inflammatory signaling, Mitogen activated protein

  3. Treatment of hypergranulation tissue in burn wounds with topical steroid dressings: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Marie; Harats, Moti; Kornhaber, Rachel; Aviv, Uri; Zerach, Amir; Haik, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Hypergranulation tissue (or also known as overgranulation) may negatively influence burn wound healing time and contribute to recurrence of contractures in burn wounds and grafts. Subsequently, the treatment of hypergranulation tissue remains controversial and problematic. In this case series, we aimed to examine the feasibility and document the use of topical hydrocortisone in the treatment of hypergranulation tissue formation resulting from burn wounds. We report five cases where hypergranulation tissue developed following deep dermal/full-thickness burns. Initial burn wound treatment included necrotic tissue debridement, wound cleansing, and Flaminal(®). All five cases underwent surgical debridement and split-skin grafting. Upon identification of hypergranulation tissue, hydrocortisone acetate 0.25% was applied topically as usual care for the treatment of hypergranulation tissue. All five patients had deep dermal/full-thickness burns with a total body surface area ranging from 22% to 61% and were aged from 3-41 years. All five cases developed hypergranulation tissue during their admission after debridement and split-thickness skin grafts. All patients showed an improvement in the treated areas with a complete regression of hypergranulation tissue and closure of the burn wounds. No clinically apparent local or systemic side effects of the treatment were observed. Topical hydrocortisone can be utilized as an effective, inexpensive, and noninvasive practical option in the treatment of hypergranulation tissue resulting from burn wounds.

  4. Differential effects of Losartan and Atorvastatin in partial and full thickness burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akershoek, Johanneke J; Brouwer, Katrien M; Vlig, Marcel; Boekema, Bouke K H L; Beelen, Rob H J; Middelkoop, Esther; Ulrich, Magda M W

    2017-01-01

    Healing of burn wounds is often associated with scar formation due to excessive inflammation and delayed wound closure. To date, no effective treatment is available to prevent the fibrotic process. The Renin Angiotensin System (RAS) was shown to be involved in fibrosis in various organs. Statins (e.g. Atorvastatin), Angiotensin receptor antagonists (e.g. Losartan) and the combination of these drugs are able to reduce the local RAS activation, and reduced fibrosis in other organs. We investigated whether inhibition of the RAS could improve healing of burn wounds by treatment with Atorvastatin, Losartan or the combination of both drugs. Therefore, full and partial thickness burn wounds were inflicted on both flanks of Yorkshire pigs. Oral administration of Atorvastatin, Losartan or the combination was started at post-burn day 1 and continued for 28 days. Full thickness wounds were excised and transplanted with an autologous meshed split-thickness skin graft at post-burn day 14. Partial thickness wounds received conservative treatment. Atorvastatin treatment resulted in enhanced graft take and wound closure of the full thickness wounds, faster resolution of neutrophils compared to all treatments and reduced alpha-smooth muscle actin positive cells compared to control treatment. Treatment with Losartan and to a lesser extent the combination therapy resulted in diminished graft take, increased wound contraction and poorer scar outcome. In contrast, Losartan treatment in partial thickness wounds decreased the alpha-smooth muscle actin+ fibroblasts and contraction. In conclusion, we showed differential effects of Losartan and Atorvastatin in full and partial thickness wounds. The extensive graft loss seen in Losartan treated wounds is most likely responsible for the poor clinical outcome of these full thickness burn wounds. Therefore, Losartan treatment should not be started before transplantation in order to prevent graft loss. Atorvastatin seems to accelerate the

  5. Improved burn wound healing by the antimicrobial peptide LLKKK18 released from conjugates with dextrin embedded in a carbopol gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, João P; Dhall, Sandeep; Garcia, Monika; Chan, Alex; Costa, César; Gama, Miguel; Martins-Green, Manuela

    2015-10-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are good candidates to treat burn wounds, a major cause of morbidity, impaired life quality and resources consumption in developed countries. We took advantage of a commercially available hydrogel, Carbopol®, a vehicle for topical administration that maintains a moist environment within the wound site. We hypothesized that the incorporation of LLKKK18 conjugated to dextrin would improve the healing process in rat burns. Whereas the hydrogel improves healing, LLKKK18 released from the dextrin conjugates further accelerated wound closure, and simultaneously improving the quality of healing. Indeed, the release of LLKKK18 reduced oxidative stress and inflammation (low neutrophil and macrophage infiltration and pro-inflammatory cytokines levels). Importantly, it induced a faster resolution of the inflammatory stage through early M2 macrophage recruitment. In addition, LLKKK18 stimulated angiogenesis (increased VEGF and microvessel development in vivo). Moreover, collagen staining evaluated by Masson's Trichrome was visually much more intense after treatment with LLKKK18, suggesting higher collagen deposition. Overall, we generated an effective, safe and inexpensive formulation that maintains a moist environment in the wound, easy to apply and remove, and with potential to prevent infection due to the presence of an antimicrobial peptide. These findings propel us to further study this LLKKK18-containing formulation, setting the foundations towards a potential therapeutic approach for burn wound treatment. This work presents a newly developed formulation that holds great potential as a therapeutic approach for burn treatment. It is based on the sustained delivery of an antimicrobial peptide - LLKKK18 - from conjugates with dextrin, after degradation of dextrin backbone upon exposure to wound α-amylases. Conjugates were further embedded in Carbopol®, a commercially available hydrogel, suitable for topical administration and that provides a

  6. Allium stipitatum Extract Exhibits In Vivo Antibacterial Activity against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Accelerates Burn Wound Healing in a Full-Thickness Murine Burn Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunkumar Karunanidhi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vivo antibacterial and burn wound healing potency of Persian shallot bulbs (Allium stipitatum were explored in a mice burn model infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA. Hexane (ASHE and dichloromethane (ASDE extracts were tested. Female BALB/c mice were inflicted with third-degree thermal injury followed by infection with MRSA. ASHE and ASDE formulated with simple ointment base (SOB at concentrations of 1%, 2%, and 5% (w/w were topically applied to burn wounds twice a day for 20 days. Silver sulfadiazine (1% served as drug positive control. Microbiological analysis was carried out on 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 days postwounding (dpw and histopathological analysis at the end of the experiment (20 dpw. Both ointments demonstrated strong antibacterial activity with complete elimination of MRSA at 48–72 h after infection. The rate of wound contraction was higher (95–100% in mice groups treated with ASHE and ASDE ointments after 15 dpw. Histological analysis revealed significant increase (p<0.05 in epithelialization and collagenation in treated groups. The ASHE and ASDE were found to be relatively noncytotoxic and safe to Vero cell line (383.4 μg mL−1; 390.6 μg mL−1, suggesting the extracts as safe topical antibacterial as well as promising alternatives in managing thermal injuries.

  7. Ketamine hydrochloride - an adjunct for analgesia in dogs with burn wounds : clinical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Joubert

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The management of pain in patients with burn wounds is complex and problematic. Burn-wound pain is severe, inconsistent and underestimated. Patients experience severe pain, especially during procedures, until wound healing has occurred. A multi-modality approach is needed for effective management of pain, which requires an understanding of the mechanisms of pain. Altered pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics in burn-wound patients makes drug actions unpredictable. Opioids alone are seldom sufficient for pain control. The multi-modality approach includes the use of opioids and non-steroidal antiinflammatory, anxiolytic and alternative drugs. Ketamine has been found to be a useful agent for analgesia in burn-wound patients; a dose of 10 mg/kg qid per os was found to be an effective adjunct to pain therapy.

  8. Evaluation of wound healing activity of Thunbergia laurifolia supercritical carbon dioxide extract in rats with second-degree burn wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juthaporn Kwansang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thunbergia laurifolia Lindl (TL has been traditionally used as an antidote, anti-inflammatory, and anti-drug addiction. This study investigated the burn wound healing activity of TL leaf extract (TLL from supercritical CO 2 extraction in rats. The extract was prepared to 2.5%, 5%, and 10% gel (TLL gel. Rats were induced to second-degree burn wounds. They were randomly divided into six groups (six rats/group, which five groups were topically applied gel base, 1% silver sulfadiazine gel, 2.5%, 5%, and 10% TLL gel, respectively, for 14 days. Six untreated burn rats were used as the control group. The rats in each group were evaluated for wound healing rate, histological parameters, and wound collagen content. Rats treated with 10% TLL gel had a higher wound healing rate than rats in the control and untreated groups. An increase in collagen content, which indicates good regeneration of wound skin, was observed in the TLL treated rats from a pathological study by Masson′s trichrome and collagen content assay. The results from this study suggest that T. laurifolia leaf extract obtained by supercritical CO 2 extraction promotes the recovery of wound skin by shortening the inflammation phase, increasing collagen content, and stimulating fibroblasts proliferation and migration in wound healing.

  9. Biodegradable soy wound dressings with controlled release of antibiotics: Results from a guinea pig burn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egozi, Dana; Baranes-Zeevi, Maya; Ullmann, Yehuda; Gilhar, Amos; Keren, Aviad; Matanes, Elias; Berdicevsky, Israela; Krivoy, Norberto; Zilberman, Meital

    2015-11-01

    There is growing interest in the development of biodegradable materials from renewable biopolymers, such as soy protein, for biomedical applications. Soy protein is a major fraction of natural soybean and has the advantages of being economically competitive, biodegradable and biocompatible. It presents good water resistance as well as storage stability. In the current study, homogenous antibiotic-loaded soy protein films were cast from aqueous solutions. The antibiotic drug gentamicin was incorporated into the films in order to inhibit bacterial growth, and thus prevent or combat infection, upon its controlled release to the surrounding tissue. The current in vivo study of the dressing material in contaminated deep second-degree burn wounds in guinea pigs (n=20) demonstrated its ability to accelerate epithelialization with 71% epithelial coverage compared to an unloaded format of the soy material (62%) and a significant improved epithelial coverage as compared to the conventional dressing material (55%). Our new platform of antibiotic-eluting wound dressings is advantageous over currently used popular dressing materials that provide controlled release of silver ions, due to its gentamicin release profile, which is safer. Another advantage of our novel concept is that it is based on a biodegradable natural polymer and therefore does not require bandage changes and offers a potentially valuable and economic approach for treating burn-related infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  10. Mortality rate associated with hospital acquired infections among burn patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saima Aslam Bharwana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Hospital acquired infections (HAIs are the major contributors of mortality associated with burn injuries. The aim of this research was to document the antecedents affiliated with major burn injuries, hospitalization and mortality in burn patients. We performed a single center prospective study of patients admitted during 3 months period (April-June 2014 in burn wards of government hospital. There were 100 patients in this investigation which were observed weekly. The inclusion criterion was based on the shifting of patients from emergency to the wards after initial treatment of more than 24 h. Variables included were age and gender of the patient, the percent total body surface area (%TBSA burn, the cause of the burn. Mean age of patients was 30.29 years. More females (55.67% were admitted than males (44.32%. The total body surface area (%TBSA burnt were from 15%- 95% respectively moreover children were more sensitive to hospital acquired infections (HAIs and mortality rate was 34% in children with mean age of 5 years and disability of body parts were 42% among 75% were females. Whereas the most common (HAIs were primary blood stream (PBS with mean value of 30.50, wound infections (WIS were at second prevalence with mean value of 27.50, followed by sepsis (S and pneumonia (P 10.33, eye infections (EIs 4.833 and urinary tract infections (UTIs 2.667. Factors significantly (p-value= 0.000 associated with increased duration of hospitalization caught HAIs mortality include the age and gender of the patient, the cause of burn, inhalation injury, the region affected and %TBSA burnt. It concluded that the mortality was very much dependent on age and gender of the patient, burn causes, affected area as well as %TBSA burnt are considerable factors in determining the relationship of HAIs and whether the patients will survive or knuckle to injuries. Better compliance techniques, stricter control over disinfection and sterilization practices and usage of

  11. Can spectral-spatial image segmentation be used to discriminate experimental burn wounds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluchowski, Lukasz A.; Nordgaard, Håvard B.; Bjorgan, Asgeir; Hov, Håkon; Berget, Sissel M.; Randeberg, Lise L.

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) is a noncontact and noninvasive optical modality emerging the field of medical research. The goal of this study was to determine the ability of HSI and image segmentation to discriminate burn wounds in a preclinical porcine model. A heated brass rod was used to introduce burn wounds of graded severity in a pig model and a sequence of hyperspectral data was recorded up to 8-h postinjury. The hyperspectral images were processed by an unsupervised spectral-spatial segmentation algorithm. Segmentation was validated using results from histology. The proposed algorithm was compared to K-means segmentation and was found superior. The obtained segmentation maps revealed separated zones within the burn sites, indicating a variation in burn severity. The suggested image-processing scheme allowed mapping dynamic changes of spectral properties within the burn wounds over time. The results of this study indicate that unsupervised spectral-spatial segmentation applied on hyperspectral images can discriminate burn injuries of varying severity.

  12. Beneficial effects of hydrogen-rich saline on early burn-wound progression in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Xue Guo

    Full Text Available Deep burn wounds undergo a dynamic process known as wound progression that results in a deepening and extension of the initial burn area. The zone of stasis is more likely to develop more severe during wound progression in the presence of hypoperfusion. Hydrogen has been reported to alleviate injury triggered by ischaemia/reperfusion and burns in various organs by selectively quenching oxygen free radicals. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible protective effects of hydrogen against early burn-wound progression.Deep-burn models were established through contact with a boiled, rectangular, brass comb for 20 s. Fifty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into sham, burn plus saline, and burn plus hydrogen-rich saline (HS groups with sacrifice and analysis at various time windows (6 h, 24 h, 48 h post burn. Indexes of oxidative stress, apoptosis and autophagy were measured in each group. The zone of stasis was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining, ELISA, and Western blot to explore the underlying effects and mechanisms post burn.The burn-induced increase in malondialdehyde was markedly reduced with HS, while the activities of endogenous antioxidant enzymes were significantly increased. Moreover, HS treatment attenuated increases in apoptosis and autophagy postburn in wounds, according to the TUNEL staining results and the expression analysis of Bax, Bcl-2, caspase-3, Beclin-1 and Atg-5 proteins. Additionally, HS lowered the level of myeloperoxidase and expression of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 in the zone of stasis while augmenting IL-10. The elevated levels of Akt phosphorylation and NF-κB p65 expression post burn were also downregulated by HS management.Hydrogen can attenuate early wound progression following deep burn injury. The beneficial effect of hydrogen was mediated by attenuating oxidative stress, which inhibited apoptosis and inflammation, and the Akt/NF-κB signalling pathway may be involved in regulating the

  13. Burns dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Helen E; Wood, Fiona

    2017-03-01

    Burn injuries are common and costly; each year, there are more than 200,000 cases, costing the Australian community $150 million. Management of smaller burn injuries in the community can be improved by appropriate first aid, good burn dressings and wound management. This can reduce the risk of the burn becoming deeper or infected, and can potentially reduce the requirement for specialist review or surgery. The objective of this article is to provide healthcare professionals with information about the pathophysiology of burn wound progression. This information includes the aims of burn wound dressings and indications for different types of dressings in different burn depths, advantages of blister debridement, and the reasoning behind advice given to patients after healing of the burn wound. This article provides a framework used by the State Burn Service of Western Australia, by which clinicians can understand the needs of a specific burn wound and apply these principles when choosing an appropriate burn dressing for their patient. Every intervention in the journey of a patient with a burn injury affects their eventual outcome. By managing all burn injuries effectively at every single step, we can reduce burn injury morbidity as a community.

  14. Treatment of hypergranulation tissue in burn wounds with topical steroid dressings: a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaeger M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Marie Jaeger,1,* Moti Harats,1,* Rachel Kornhaber,2 Uri Aviv,1 Amir Zerach,1 Josef Haik1,3 1Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel; 2School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health, University of Tasmania, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel *These authors contributed equally to this work. Abstract: Hypergranulation tissue (or also known as overgranulation may negatively influence burn wound healing time and contribute to recurrence of contractures in burn wounds and grafts. Subsequently, the treatment of hypergranulation tissue remains controversial and problematic. In this case series, we aimed to examine the feasibility and document the use of topical hydrocortisone in the treatment of hypergranulation tissue formation resulting from burn wounds. We report five cases where hypergranulation tissue developed following deep dermal/full-thickness burns. Initial burn wound treatment included necrotic tissue debridement, wound cleansing, and Flaminal®. All five cases underwent surgical debridement and split-skin ­grafting. Upon identification of hypergranulation tissue, hydrocortisone acetate 0.25% was applied ­topically as usual care for the treatment of hypergranulation tissue. All five patients had deep dermal/full-thickness burns with a total body surface area ranging from 22% to 61% and were aged from 3–41 years. All five cases developed hypergranulation tissue during their admission after debridement and split-thickness skin grafts. All patients showed an improvement in the treated areas with a complete regression of hypergranulation tissue and closure of the burn wounds. No clinically apparent local or systemic side effects of the treatment were observed. Topical hydrocortisone can be utilized as an effective, inexpensive, and noninvasive practical option in the treatment of hypergranulation tissue resulting from burn wounds

  15. Biotechnological Management of Skin Burn Injuries: Challenges and Perspectives in Wound Healing and Sensory Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Dorothée; Laverdet, Betty; Buhé, Virginie; Trouillas, Marina; Ghazi, Kamélia; Alexaline, Maïa M; Egles, Christophe; Misery, Laurent; Coulomb, Bernard; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Berthod, François; Desmoulière, Alexis

    2017-02-01

    Many wound management protocols have been developed to improve wound healing after burn with the primordial aim to restore the barrier function of the skin and also provide a better esthetic outcome. Autologous skin grafts remain the gold standard in the treatment of skin burn, but this treatment has its limitation especially for patients presenting limited donor sites due to extensive burn areas. Deep burn injuries also alter the integrity of skin-sensitive innervation and have an impact on patient's quality of life by compromising perceptions of touch, temperature, and pain. Thus, patients can suffer from long-term disabilities ranging from cutaneous sensibility loss to chronic pain. The cellular mechanisms involved in skin reinnervation following injury are not elucidated yet. Depending on the depth of the burn, nerve sprouting can occur from the wound bed or the surrounding healthy tissue, but somehow this process fails to provide correct reinnervation of the wound during scarring. In addition, several clinical observations indicate that damage to the peripheral nervous system influences wound healing, resulting in delayed wound healing or chronic wounds, underlining the role of innervation and neuromediators for normal cutaneous tissue repair development. Promising tissue engineering strategies, including the use of biomaterials, skin substitutes, and stem cells, could provide novel alternative treatments in wound healing and help in improving patient's sensory recovery.

  16. [Invasive yeast infections in severely burned patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renau, Ana Isabel; García-Vidal, Carolina; Salavert, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Currently, there are few studies on candidaemia in the severely burned patient. These patients share the same risk factors for invasive fungal infections as other critically ill patients, but have certain characteristics that make them particularly susceptible. These include the loss of skin barrier due to extensive burns, fungal colonisation of the latter, and the use of hydrotherapy or other topical therapies (occasionally with antimicrobials). In addition, the increased survival rate achieved in recent decades in critically burned patients due to the advances in treatment has led to the increase of invasive Candida infections. This explains the growing interest in making an earlier and more accurate diagnosis, as well as more effective treatments to reduce morbidity and mortality of candidaemia in severe burned patients. A review is presented on all aspects of the burned patient, including the predisposition and risk factors for invasive candidiasis, pathogenesis of candidaemia, underlying immunodeficiency, local epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility, evolution and prognostic factors, as well as other non-Candida yeast infections. Finally, we include specific data on our local experience in the management of candidaemia in severe burned patients, which may serve to quantify the problem, place it in context, and offer a realistic perspective. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Mycobacterium abscessus infection in a burn intensive care unit patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaghaiwalla, Tanaz; Satahoo, Shevonne S; Zarifa, Rolla; Dauer, Marc; Davis, James S; Dearmas, Doreann; Namias, Nicholas; Pizano, Louis R; Schulman, Carl I

    2014-12-01

    Infection is the leading cause of death in burn patients. Historically, this was due to burn wound sepsis but pneumonia has now emerged as the most common source. In light of the increasing incidence of multi-drug-resistant organisms, the description of rare infections is paramount in continuing the fight against deadly pathogens. We aim to describe the second case of non-tuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) reported in a burn patient. Difficulties in diagnosis and management will also be highlighted. A 70-y-old Caucasian female, with a past medical history for type 2 diabetes mellitus, was transferred to our facility after a house fire. She had sustained a 28% total body surface area (TBSA) flame burn to her neck, torso, and all four extremities. She underwent excision and grafting on hospital day five with multiple subsequent attempts at excision and grafting due to graft loss. On hospital day 14, a tracheostomy was performed. Her hospital course was complicated by ongoing respiratory failure, renal injury, and sepsis. Mycobacterium abscessus was found on blood cultures from central venous catheters and arterial line catheters as well as on tracheal aspirate and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) on hospital day 86. Imaging then revealed multiple pulmonary nodular densities with patchy ground-glass opacities. After multiple adjustments to the antibiotic regimen, tigecycline, clarithromycin, and cefoxitin therapy was started. She remained on this regimen for almost 4 wks. Her other infections included Acinetobacter baumanii treated with tobramycin and colistin, as well as Candida albicans for which she received fluconazole. Ultimately, her clinical state worsened leading to withdrawal of care. Sepsis NTM is rare in burn patients with only one other case described in the English-language literature. Both cases reflect differences in diagnosis and management. This highlights the need to discuss rare infections in an attempt to broaden the clinician's awareness of such

  18. Gram-Negative Bacterial Wound Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    approach, but also support the implementation of studies using a well-established wound infection model using mice and pigs that will be conducted in the...Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported license, which permits unrestricted noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction

  19. AEROBIC BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM INFECTED WOUNDS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    AEROBIC BACTERIAL ISOLATES FROM INFECTED WOUNDS. Esebelahie, N. O.*1, 3 , Newton-Esebelahie, F. O.2,3& Omoregie R.3. 1. Department of Medical Laboratory Science, Faculty of Health Sciences and Technology, College of Health Sciences,. NnamdiAzikiwe University, Nnewi Campus, Nnewi, Anambra State, ...

  20. Incidence of Proteus species in wound infections and their sensitivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Proteus species are frequently recovered from infected wounds. They contaminate wounds and thus cause infections. This study was carried out at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) to determine the involvement of Proteus species as one of the major causative organisms in wound infections. The study also ...

  1. Virtual reality pain control during burn wound debridement in the hydrotank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Hunter G; Patterson, David R; Seibel, Eric; Soltani, Maryam; Jewett-Leahy, Laura; Sharar, Sam R

    2008-05-01

    Most burn-injured patients rate their pain during burn wound debridement as severe to excruciating. We explored the adjunctive use of water-friendly, immersive virtual reality (VR) to distract patients from their pain during burn wound debridement in the hydrotherapy tank (hydrotank). This study was conducted on inpatients at a major regional burn center. Eleven hospitalized inpatients ages 9 to 40 years (mean age, 27 y) had their burn wounds debrided and dressed while partially submerged in the hydrotank. Although a nurse debrided the burn wound, each patient spent 3 minutes of wound care with no distraction and 3 minutes of wound care in VR during a single wound care session (within-subject condition order randomized). Three 0 to 10 graphic rating scale pain scores (worst pain, time spent thinking about pain, and pain unpleasantness) for each of the 2 treatment conditions served as the primary dependent variables. Patients reported significantly less pain when distracted with VR [eg, "worst pain" ratings during wound care dropped from "severe" (7.6) to "moderate" (5.1)]. The 6 patients who reported the strongest illusion of "going inside" the virtual world reported the greatest analgesic effect of VR on worst pain ratings, dropping from severe pain (7.2) in the no VR condition to mild pain (3.7) during VR. Results provide the first available evidence from a controlled study that immersive VR can be an effective nonpharmacologic pain reduction technique for burn patients experiencing severe to excruciating pain during wound care. The potential applications of VR analgesia to other painful procedures (eg, movement or exercise therapy) and other pain populations are discussed.

  2. [Clinical effect of three dimensional human body scanning system BurnCalc in the evaluation of burn wound area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, J; Wang, L; Zhang, Y C; Tang, H T; Xia, Z F

    2017-10-20

    Objective: To validate the clinical effect of three dimensional human body scanning system BurnCalc developed by our research team in the evaluation of burn wound area. Methods: A total of 48 burn patients treated in the outpatient department of our unit from January to June 2015, conforming to the study criteria, were enrolled in. For the first 12 patients, one wound on the limbs or torso was selected from each patient. The stability of the system was tested by 3 attending physicians using three dimensional human body scanning system BurnCalc to measure the area of wounds individually. For the following 36 patients, one wound was selected from each patient, including 12 wounds on limbs, front torso, and side torso, respectively. The area of wounds was measured by the same attending physician using transparency tracing method, National Institutes of Health (NIH) Image J method, and three dimensional human body scanning system BurnCalc, respectively. The time for getting information of 36 wounds by three methods was recorded by stopwatch. The stability among the testers was evaluated by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). Data were processed with randomized blocks analysis of variance and Bonferroni test. Results: (1) Wound area of patients measured by three physicians using three dimensional human body scanning system BurnCalc was (122±95), (121±95), and (123±96) cm(2,) respectively, and there was no statistically significant difference among them ( F =1.55, P >0.05). The ICC among 3 physicians was 0.999. (2) The wound area of limbs of patients measured by transparency tracing method, NIH Image J method, and three dimensional human body scanning system BurnCalc was (84±50), (76±46), and (84±49) cm(2,) respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the wound area of limbs of patients measured by transparency tracing method and three dimensional human body scanning system BurnCalc ( P >0.05). The wound area of limbs of patients

  3. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Silver-Coated Dressing, Chlorhexidine Acetate (0.5%), Citric Acid (3%), and Silver Sulfadiazine (1%) for Topical Antibacterial Effects Against the Multi-Drug Resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Infecting Full-Skin Thickness Burn Wounds on Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabanoglu, Hakan; Basaran, Ozgur; Aydogan, Cem; Azap, Ozlem Kurt; Karakayali, Feza; Moray, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of four different topical antimicrobial dressings on a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa contaminated full-thickness burn wound rat model. A total of 40 adult male Wistar albino rats were used. The control group (group 1), silver sulfadiazine (1%) group 2, chlorhexidine acetate (0.5%) group 3, citric acid (3%) group 4, and silver-coated dressing group 5 were compared to assess the antibacterial effects of a daily application to a 30% full-skin thickness burn wound seeded 10 minutes earlier with 108 CFU (colony forming unit)/0.5 mL of a multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain. Five groups (1 control group and 4 treatment groups) were compared. The administration of third-degree burns to all rats was confirmed based on histopathologic data. The tissue cultures from groups 2 and 5 exhibited significant differences compared to those of the other 3 groups, whereas no significant differences were observed between groups 1, 3, and 4. The effectiveness of the treatments was as follows: 1% silver sulfadiazine > silver-coated dressing > 3% citric acid > 0.5% chlorhexidine acetate > control group. Our results supported the efficacy of topical therapy by silver sulfadiazine and silver-coated dressing on infections caused by multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas spp. PMID:24229034

  4. Oral ketamine for wound care procedures in adult patients with burns

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim was to achieve a state-of-conscious sedation in which the patient would be communicative and cooperative, with minimal, or no pain during burn wound care procedures. Method: Two hundred and forty wound care procedures were randomly assigned to six treatment groups of patients (groups A-F). The quantities ...

  5. Effect of virgin fatty oil of Pistacia lentiscus on experimental burn wound's healing in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djerrou, Zouhir; Maameri, Z; Hamdi-Pacha, Y; Serakta, M; Riachi, F; Djaalab, H; Boukeloua, A

    2010-04-03

    This study aimed to assess the efficiency of the virgin fatty oil of Pistacia lentiscus (PLVFO) for burn wounds healing. It was carried out on 6 adult male New Zealand rabbits. Four burn wounds of deep third degree were made on the back of each animal. The first was not treated and served as control (CRL group); the others were covered immediately after burning procedure by 0.5g of one of the following products: Vaseline gel (VAS group), Madecassol(®) cream 1% (MAD group) or 1ml of PLVFO (PLVFO group). The treatments were repeated once daily until complete healing. For four days post burns, the percentage of wound contraction was assessed. Also, the different healing times were noted. The results showed that both PLVFO and Madecassol(®) significantly accelerated wound healing activity compared to wounds dressed with Vaseline and the untreated wounds. However, the level of wound contraction was significantly higher and the healing time was faster in PLVFO group than those of the MAD group, VAS group and CRL group. The different epithelization periods obtained in days were respectively: 30±3.94 (PLVFO group), 33.5±3.78 (MAD group), 34.66±3.88 (VAS group) and 37.16±3.54 (CRL group). We conclude that Pistacia lentiscus virgin fatty oil promotes significantly (p< 0.05) wound contraction and reduces epithelization period in rabbit model.

  6. Adequacy of a hospital-wide standard dose of 7mg/kg bodyweight gentamicin sufficient to achieve an adequate prophylactic maximum serum concentration (Cmax) in burn patients undergoing surgical burn wound treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, Lennaert C P; Bosch, Tessa M; van Baar, Margriet E; Dokter, Jan; Oen, Irma M; Ruijgrok, Elisabeth J

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacokinetics of drugs can be significantly altered in burn patients. The aim of our study was to validate if the current hospital-wide standard dosage of 7mg/kg total bodyweight gentamicin is sufficient to achieve an adequate prophylactic Cmax (Cmax≥20mg/L). A prospective observational cohort pharmacokinetic study was conducted in burn patients undergoing surgical burn wound treatment. 36/40 (90%) burn patients undergoing surgical burn wound treatment at Rotterdam Burn Centre (Maasstad Hospital), the Netherlands, achieved adequate prophylactic serum concentrations (Cmax≥20mg/L) after a single prophylactic intravenous dose of 7mg/kg total bodyweight gentamicin. Total Body Surface Area (TBSA) burned and total bodyweight were statistically significantly correlated with the Cmax, with correlation coefficients of -0.316, 0.443 and p values of 0.047, 0.004, respectively. Other covariates (age, time after injury, serum creatinine, dose, gender, intensive care admittance) were not statistically significantly correlated. Occurrence of postoperative infection was limited (n=1), no statistically significant difference was observed between patients with a therapeutic and patients with a subtherapeutic serum concentration. The current hospital-wide standard dosage of 7mg/kg total bodyweight is sufficient to achieve an adequate prophylactic Cmax in burn patients undergoing surgical burn wound treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells transplantation promotes cutaneous wound healing of severe burned rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lingying; Yu, Yonghui; Hou, Yusen; Chai, Jiake; Duan, Hongjie; Chu, Wanli; Zhang, Haijun; Hu, Quan; Du, Jundong

    2014-01-01

    Severe burns are a common and highly lethal trauma. The key step for severe burn therapy is to promote the wound healing as early as possible, and reports indicate that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy contributes to facilitate wound healing. In this study, we investigated effect of human umbilical cord MSCs (hUC-MSCs) could on wound healing in a rat model of severe burn and its potential mechanism. Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham, burn, and burn transplanted hUC-MSCs. GFP labeled hUC-MSCs or PBS was intravenous injected into respective groups. The rate of wound closure was evaluated by Image Pro Plus. GFP-labeled hUC-MSCs were tracked by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI), and human-specific DNA expression in wounds was detected by PCR. Inflammatory cells, neutrophils, macrophages, capillaries and collagen types I/III in wounds were evaluated by histochemical staining. Wound blood flow was evaluated by laser Doppler blood flow meter. The levels of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors, VEGF, collagen types I/III in wounds were analyzed using an ELISA. We found that wound healing was significantly accelerated in the hUC-MSC therapy group. The hUC-MSCs migrated into wound and remarkably decreased the quantity of infiltrated inflammatory cells and levels of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and increased levels of IL-10 and TSG-6 in wounds. Additionally, the neovascularization and levels of VEGF in wounds in the hUC-MSC therapy group were markedly higher than those in other control groups. The ratio of collagen types I and III in the hUC-MSC therapy group were markedly higher than that in the burn group at indicated time after transplantation. The study suggests that hUC-MSCs transplantation can effectively improve wound healing in severe burned rat model. Moreover, these data might provide the theoretical foundation for the further clinical application of hUC-MSC in burn areas.

  8. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells transplantation promotes cutaneous wound healing of severe burned rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingying Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Severe burns are a common and highly lethal trauma. The key step for severe burn therapy is to promote the wound healing as early as possible, and reports indicate that mesenchymal stem cell (MSC therapy contributes to facilitate wound healing. In this study, we investigated effect of human umbilical cord MSCs (hUC-MSCs could on wound healing in a rat model of severe burn and its potential mechanism. METHODS: Adult male Wistar rats were randomly divided into sham, burn, and burn transplanted hUC-MSCs. GFP labeled hUC-MSCs or PBS was intravenous injected into respective groups. The rate of wound closure was evaluated by Image Pro Plus. GFP-labeled hUC-MSCs were tracked by in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI, and human-specific DNA expression in wounds was detected by PCR. Inflammatory cells, neutrophils, macrophages, capillaries and collagen types I/III in wounds were evaluated by histochemical staining. Wound blood flow was evaluated by laser Doppler blood flow meter. The levels of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory factors, VEGF, collagen types I/III in wounds were analyzed using an ELISA. RESULTS: We found that wound healing was significantly accelerated in the hUC-MSC therapy group. The hUC-MSCs migrated into wound and remarkably decreased the quantity of infiltrated inflammatory cells and levels of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and increased levels of IL-10 and TSG-6 in wounds. Additionally, the neovascularization and levels of VEGF in wounds in the hUC-MSC therapy group were markedly higher than those in other control groups. The ratio of collagen types I and III in the hUC-MSC therapy group were markedly higher than that in the burn group at indicated time after transplantation. CONCLUSION: The study suggests that hUC-MSCs transplantation can effectively improve wound healing in severe burned rat model. Moreover, these data might provide the theoretical foundation for the further clinical application of hUC-MSC in burn areas.

  9. Incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy for Prevention of Postoperative Infections Following Caesarean Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Surgical Wound Infection; Infection; Cesarean Section; Cesarean Section; Dehiscence; Complications; Cesarean Section; Complications; Cesarean Section, Wound, Dehiscence; Wound; Rupture, Surgery, Cesarean Section

  10. Effectiveness of Aloe Vera gel compared with 1% silver sulphadiazine cream as burn wound dressing in second degree burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Muhammad Naveed; Ahmed, Naheed

    2013-02-01

    To assess the efficacy of Aloe Vera gel compared with 1% silver sulfadiazine cream as a burn dressing for the treatment of superficial and partial thickness burns. This Interventional Comparative study was carried out at the Burn unit and Plastic surgery department, Nishtar Hospital Multan, Pakistan from July 2008 to December 2010. A total of 50 patients with superficial and partial thickness burns were divided into two equal groups randomly by consecutive sampling method, one group was dressed with Aloe Vera gel while the other was treated with 1% silversulphadiazine cream, and the results regarding duration of wound epithelialization, pain relief and cost of treatment were compared. In patients treated with Aloe Vera gel, healing of burn wounds were remarkably early than those patients treated with 1% silver sulfadiazine. All the patients of Aloe Vera group were relieved of pain earlier than those patients who were treated with SSD. Thermal burns patients dressed with Aloe Vera gel showed advantage compared to those dressed with SSD regarding early wound epithelialization, earlier pain relief and cost-effectiveness.

  11. The use of tannins in the local treatment of burn wounds – a pilot study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Twenty patients aged 3 years and above with fresh partial thickness burns of less than 20% total body surface area were randomly assigned to local treatment of the burn wound either with a solution containing tannins (tannin group), or one of the other commonly used topical agents, such as honey and ghee, silver ...

  12. Effects of ginseng saponins isolated from Red Ginseng roots on burn wound healing in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yoshiyuki; Sumiyoshi, Maho; Kawahira, Kazuhiro; Sakanaka, Masahiro

    2006-07-01

    1. We recently demonstrated that ginsenoside Rb1 (C54H92O23, molecular weight 1108) isolated from ginseng, when intravenously infused into rats with permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion, reduced cerebral infarct volume and ameliorated place navigation disability of the animals, through an anti-apoptotic action and possibly promotion of vascular regeneration. To investigate the ginsenoside Rb1-mediated vascular regeneration in vivo in a more easily accessible experimental systems, we made a burn wound on the backs of mice and topically applied either Vaseline (vehicle) alone or Vaseline containing low doses of ginsenoside Rb1 to the wound. 2. Surprisingly, we found that ginsenoside Rb1 at low concentrations (100 pg g(-1), 1 pg g(-1) and 10 fg g(-1) ointment) exhibited the strongest burn wound-healing action. Furthermore, ginsenoside Rb1 (100 fg-1 ng per wound) increased neovascularization in the surrounding tissue and production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and interleukin (IL)-1beta from the burn wound, compared to those mice with burn wounds treated with vehicle alone. 3. In human keratinocyte cultures (HaCaT cells), ginsenoside Rb1 (100 fg ml(-1) to 1 ng ml(-1)) enhanced VEGF production induced by IL-1beta and expression of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1alpha. 4. These findings suggest that the promotion of burn wound healing by ginsenoside Rb1 might be due to the promotion of angiogenesis during skin wound repair via the stimulation of VEGF production, through the increase of HIF-1alpha expression in keratinocytes, and due to the elevation of IL-1beta resulting from the macrophage accumulation in the burn wound.

  13. Development and characterization of a novel, antimicrobial, sterile hydrogel dressing for burn wounds: single-step production with gamma irradiation creates silver nanoparticles and radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonkaew, Benjawan; Barber, Philip M; Rengpipat, Sirirat; Supaphol, Pitt; Kempf, Margit; He, Jibao; John, Vijay T; Cuttle, Leila

    2014-10-01

    Patients with burn wounds are susceptible to wound infection and sepsis. This research introduces a novel burn wound dressing that contains silver nanoparticles (SNPs) to treat infection in a 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid sodium salt (AMPS-Na(+) ) hydrogel. Silver nitrate was dissolved in AMPS-Na(+) solution and then exposed to gamma irradiation to form SNP-infused hydrogels. The gamma irradiation results in a cross-linked polymeric network of sterile hydrogel dressing and a reduction of silver ions to form SNPs infused in the hydrogel in a one-step process. About 80% of the total silver was released from the hydrogels after 72 h immersion in simulated body fluid solution; therefore, they could be used on wounds for up to 3 days. All the hydrogels were found to be nontoxic to normal human dermal fibroblast cells. The silver-loaded hydrogels had good inhibitory action against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Results from a pilot study on a porcine burn model showed that the 5-mM silver hydrogel was efficient at preventing bacterial colonization of wounds, and the results were comparable to the commercially available silver dressings (Acticoat(TM) , PolyMem Silver(®) ). These results support its use as a potential burn wound dressing. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  14. Prevention and Management of Infections Associated With Burns in the Combat Casualty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    and gastrointestinal tract, such as Psuedomonas aeruginsoa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli , colonize the wound within the first 48 to 72...BW. Enterobacter cloacae septicemia in a burn center: epidemiology and control of an outbreak. J Infect Dis. 1979;139:166–171. 24. Church D, Elasayed

  15. Catheter infection risk related to the distance between insertion site and burned area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Guillermo E; Bolgiani, Alberto N; Patiño, Osvaldo; Prezzavento, Gustavo E; Guastavino, Paula; Durlach, Ricardo; Fernandez Canigia, Liliana B; Benaim, Fortunato

    2002-01-01

    A prospective observational study of central venous catheters (CVC) was carried out in order to determine if a CVC inserted near an open burn wound increases catheter infection risk in burned patients. The study was carried out during a 12-month period (1998-1999) at the Benaim Foundation's Burn Unit in Buenos Aires (C.E.P.A.Q.). Eighty-three CVCs were inserted in 20 burned patients during the study period. Twenty-six catheters were inserted near an open wound (NOW) and 57 far from an open wound (FOW). NOW CVCs were considered when 25 cm2 surrounding the catheter's insertion site overlapped the wound. Colonization rates were 84% (22/26 CVCs) in those inserted NOW and 47% (27/57 CVCs) in FOW (P = 0.001). Colonization relative risk of NOW-CVCs was 1.79 (95% confidence interval, 1.3-2.46). Bacteremia rates were 27% (7/26 CVCs) in CVCs inserted NOW and 6% (3/57 CVCs) in FOW (P = 0.004). Bacteremic risk of NOW-CVCs was 5.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.44-18.22). Colonization rates were higher and sooner in NOW-CVCs than in FOW-CVCs. We suggest that insertion of catheters near an open burn wound should be avoided and, if inevitable, should not be left in place for period exceeding 3 days.

  16. [Application of laser speckle perfusion imaging in predicting wound healing time of burn patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, M J; Chu, Z G; Xie, Q H; Huang, W W; Ruan, J J; Xie, W G

    2016-12-20

    Objective: To explore the application effect of laser speckle perfusion imaging (LSPI) in predicting wound healing time of burn patients. Methods: LSPI was performed in 84 adult burn patients hospitalized in department of burns of Tongren Hospital of Wuhan University & Wuhan Third Hospital within post injury hour (PIH) 24 to 72 to detect the blood perfusion values of the wounds. The wound healing time was recorded. The 128 wounds were divided into superficial group (wound healing time shorter than or equal to 14 d, n=57) and deep group (wound healing time longer than 14 d and shorter than or equal to 28 d, n=71) according to the healing time. The blood perfusion values of the two groups were compared. Data were processed with t test or chi-square test. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn and Youden index was calculated to determine the optimal critical blood perfusion value of wound healing time of the two groups, and the validity of the critical value was assessed by Kappa consistency test. Results: (1) The blood perfusion value of woundsin superficial group was (6.8±1.8) perfusion unit (PU), which was significantly higher than (3.5±1.3) PU in deep group (t=11.404, Phealing time was 0.931 (with 95% confidence interval 0.887-0.975, Phealing time of the two groups, with sensitivity of 76.9% and specificity of 94.7%. (3) The healing time of 44 wounds predicted was shorter than or equal to 14 d, and the healing time of 84 wounds predicted was longer than 14 d and shorter than or equal to 28 d, while the actual number of wounds was 57 and 71, respectively. The Kappa coefficient of consistency test was 0.754 (Phealing time of burn wounds.

  17. PREPARATIVE SKIN PREPARATION AND SURGICAL WOUND INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjanappa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: It is an established fact now that the normal skin of healthy human beings harbours a rich bacterial fl ora. Normally considered non - pathogenic , these organisms way be a potential source of infection of the surgical wound. Approximately 20% of the resident flora is beyond the reach of surgical scrubs and antiseptics. The goal of surgical preparation of the skin with antiseptics is to remove transient and pathogenic microorganisms on the skin surface and to reduce the resident flora to a low level. Povidone iodine (I odophors and chlorhexidine are most often used antiseptics for pre - operative skin preparation. OBJECTIVES : To evaluate the efficacy of povidone iodine alone and in combination with antiseptic agent containing alcoholic chlorhexidine in preoperative skin p reparation by taking swab culture. (2 To compare the rate of postoperative wound infection in both the groups. METHODS: One hundred patients (fifty in each group undergoing clean elective surgery with no focus of infection on the body were included in th e study. The pre - operative skin preparation in each group is done with the respective antiseptic regimen. In both the groups after application of antiseptics , sterile saline swab culture was taken immediately from site of incision. In cases which showed gr owth of organisms , the bacteria isolated were identified by their morphological and cultural characteristics. Grams staining , coagulase test and antibiotic sensitivity test were done wherever necessary and difference in colonization rates was determined as a measure of efficacy of antiseptic regimen. RESULTS: The results of the study showed that when compared to povidone iodine alone , using a combination of povidone iodine and alcoholic solution of chlorhexidine , the colonization rates of the site of incisi on were reduced significantly. As for the rate of post - operative wound infection , it is also proven that wound infections are also

  18. Epidermal-dermal crosstalk during burn wound scar maturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.E. Hakvoort (Eveline)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBurn injuries arc among the worst traumas which can happen to man. The larger a burn injury, the more severe the consequences and the highcr the chance of an adverse outcome or even death. In The Netherlands each year 40,000 people visit a general practitioner for treatment of a burn

  19. Effect of oral olive oil on healing of 10-20% total body surface area burn wounds in hospitalized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najmi, Mahtab; Vahdat Shariatpanahi, Zahra; Tolouei, Mohammad; Amiri, Zohreh

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of consumption of oral olive oil on clinical outcomes and wound healing of thermally injured patients with hospital stays. One hundred patients (mean age; 33.34±7 years) with 10-20% total body surface area, deep second degree and more burn wounds were randomized to receive either oral olive oil or sunflower oil as the oil in their diet. Patients were evaluated daily for occurrence of wound infection, sepsis and healing of the grafted skin. Also the duration of hospitalization and admission to the intensive care unit were compared in two groups. Results showed that there was no significant difference between the olive oil group and the control group in percent of TBSA involvement (14.28±0.53 vs. 13.02±0.48, P=0.7), albumin concentration (3.25±0.5 vs. 3.13±0.5, P=0.5) and mean calorie intake (2034±216.9 kcal vs2118±192.1 kcal, P=0.2). We found a significant difference in the duration of wound healing (7.2±0.5 vs. 8.7±0.5, P=0.04) and duration of hospitalization (7.4±0.5 vs. 8.9±0.4, P=0.05) in the olive oil group versus the control group. We did not find any difference in ICU admission, wound infection and occurrence of sepsis between two groups. This study showed that an oral diet provided with olive oil in patients with burn may accelerate wound healing and decrease the duration of hospitalization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. Combat-Related Invasive Fungal Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribble, David R; Rodriguez, Carlos J

    2014-12-01

    Combat-related invasive fungal (mold) wound infections (IFIs) have emerged as an important and morbid complication following explosive blast injuries among military personnel. Similar to trauma-associated IFI cases among civilian populations, as in agricultural accidents and natural disasters, these infections occur in the setting of penetrating wounds contaminated by environmental debris. Specific risk factors for combat-related IFI include dismounted (patrolling on foot) blast injuries occurring mostly in southern Afghanistan, resulting in above knee amputations requiring resuscitation with large-volume blood transfusions. Diagnosis of IFI is based upon early identification of a recurrently necrotic wound following serial debridement and tissue-based histopathology examination with special stains to detect invasive disease. Fungal culture of affected tissue also provides supportive information. Aggressive surgical debridement of affected tissue is the primary therapy. Empiric antifungal therapy should be considered when there is a strong suspicion for IFI. Both liposomal amphotericin B and voriconazole should be considered initially for treatment since many of the cases involve not only Mucorales species but also Aspergillus or Fusarium spp., with narrowing of regimen based upon clinical mycology findings.

  1. Honey dressing versus silver sulfadiazene dressing for wound healing in burn patients: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpi Singh Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective : The aim was to evaluate the effect of honey dressing and silver sulfadiazene (SSD dressing on wound healing in burn patients. Materials and Methods : We retrospectively reviewed the records of 108 patients (14-68 years of age, with first and second degree burns of less than 50% of the total body surface area admitted to our institution, over a period of 5 years (2004-2008. Fifty-one patients were treated with honey dressings and 57 with SSD. Time elapsed since burn, site, percentage, degree and depth of burns, results of culture sensitivity at various time intervals, duration of healing, formation of post-treatment hypertrophic scar, and/or contracture were recorded and analyzed. Results : The average duration of healing was 18.16 and 32.68 days for the honey and SSD group, respectively. Wounds of all patients reporting within 1 h of burns became sterile with the honey dressing in less than 7 days while there was none with SSD. All wounds treated with honey became sterile within 21 days while for SSD-treated wounds, this figure was 36.5%. A complete outcome was seen in 81% of all patients in the "honey group" while in only 37% patients in the "SSD group." Conclusion : Honey dressings make the wounds sterile in less time, enhance healing, and have a better outcome in terms of hypertropic scars and postburn contractures, as compared to SSD dressings.

  2. Managing severe burn injuries: challenges and solutions in complex and chronic wound care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers AD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alan D Rogers, Marc G Jeschke Ross Tilley Burn Centre, Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Surgery, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: Encountered regularly by health care providers across both medical and surgical fields and an increasing socioeconomic burden globally, wound care is severely neglected. Practice is heavily influenced by anecdote rather than evidence-based protocols and industry-biased literature rather than robust randomized controlled trials. Burn units are well placed to address this considerable need, as a result of their infrastructure, their multispecialty staffing, and their need to evolve in light of the declining incidence of major burn injury in developed countries. The aim of this review is to evaluate some of the ideological and practical challenges facing wound practitioners and burn surgeons while managing chronic and complex wounds. It also includes an approach to wound assessment and how to conceptualize and implement dressing strategies and new and existing multimodal therapies. Keywords: negative pressure wound therapy, instillation, antiseptic solutions, dressings, multidisciplinary wound care, stem cells, surgery, autograft, allograft, reconstructive ladder

  3. COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTIVENESS BETWEEN PROPOLIS AND SILVER SULFADIAZINE 1% ON BURN WOUND HEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Ketut Sudiana

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Silver sulfadiazine 1% is often used as topical agent in burn wound due to its antimicrobial effect. Moreover, this agent has toxigenic effect on fibroblast and keratinocyte. Propolis is a honey bee product and has been used for a long time in burn wound related to antimicrobial effect, anti-inflammation, anti-oxidant and increasing fibroblast. The purpose of this study was to examining the differences between propolis and silver sulfadiazine 1% on burn wound healing process. Method: Design used in this study was true experimental design. The samples were 18 guinea pigs divided randomizely into three group. The groups were control group, propolis group, and silver sulfadiazine group. The independent variables were  the using of propolis and silver sulfadiazine 1%. The dependent variables were inflammation phase (erythema, oedema, wound fluid and proliferation phase (wound granulation, wound size which were observed on the 3rd, 7th, 14th days. Data were collected by using observation paper based on the sign of inflammation and proliferation. Data were analyzed using One-Way ANOVA and Kruskal-wallis test with level of significance of α ≤ 0.05. Result: Results showed that there were differences between propolis and silver sulfadiazine 1% in erythema (p=0.00 and oedema (p=0.001 on 3rd day and erythema (p=0.00 and oedema (p=0.00 on7th day, furthermore burn wound size (p=0.00 on14th day was also attenuated by propolis and silver sulfadiazine 1 %. Analysis: It can be concluded that the using of propolis was more effective than silver sulfadiazine 1% in burn wound healing. Discussion: Further studies involved microscopic observation of collagen, PMN cell (neutrophile, lymphocyte and monocyte cell are needed.

  4. Virtual Reality Pain Control During Burn Wound Debridement of Combat-Related Burn Injuries Using Robot-Like Arm Mounted VR Goggles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    arm mounted VR goggle system. Key Words: Combat, Analgesia , Burn pain , Wound care, Virtual reality. (J Trauma. 2011;71: S125–S130) As the result of...excru- ciating pain during medical procedures such as wound clean- ing and physical therapy .4 Although opioids are the cornerstone analgesic for patients...reductions in pain ratings when VR is used adjunctively with opioids during civilian severe burn wound care14,16 and physical therapy .17 In addition

  5. A Dressing Solution for Burn Wounds: Antibacterial and Low-Adherent Wound Dressings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Tianyun

    Considering the infection and second trauma caused by dressing changes, development of antibacterial and low-adherent wound dressings is urgently needed. Silver ion is a widely used antimicrobial agent, but its cytotoxicity remains a problem. In this study, low-adherent PAM (polyacrylamide) hydrogel incorporated with less toxic AgNP (silver nanoparticle), was immobilized onto PET (poly(ethylene terephthalate)) substrates by an IPN (interpenetrating polymer network) method. The modified PET is effectively antibacterial and the surface is significantly less adherent than untreated PET. However, silver-resistant bacteria become a potential problem. Thus, ionic 5,5-dimethylhydantoin (DMH) analogues containing either a quaternary ammonium moiety or a phosphonate functional group were designed and synthesized. The DMH analogues were converted to antibacterial N-chloramine counterparts through chlorination to serve as potential alternatives to AgNP. The N-chloramine with a structural cation exhibited distinctly enhanced antibacterial functions both in solution and after immobilization on fabrics.

  6. Utilisatiion of topical honey In Burns wounds contaminated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    personal

    2. Koran Chapter Nahl Miracle 68,69. 3. Subrahmangam,m Topical application of honey in the treatment of burns Br J surg 1991,78: 497-. 8. 4. Subrahmangam,m Honey impregnan guaze versus polyurethane film(opsite) in the treatment of burns. Br j plast surg 1993 46: 322-3. 5. Subrahmangam,m Honey impregnate guaze.

  7. The use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of infected wounds. Case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel de Alcântara Jones

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results and benefits obtained from the topical use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT in patients with infected wounds. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of 20 patients (17 males and three females, mean age 42 years with infected wounds treated using NPWT. The infected wounds were caused by trauma. The treatment system used was VAC.(r (Vacuum Assisted Closure, KCI, San Antonio, United States applied to the wound in continuous mode from 100 to 125 mmHg. The parameters related to the wounds (location, number of VAC changes, the size of the defects in the soft parts, and the evolution of the state of the wound, length of hospital stay, length of intravenous antibiotic therapy, and complications related to the use of this therapy were evaluated. RESULTS: The mean length of the hospital stay, use of NPWT, and antibacterial therapy were 41 days, 22.5 days, and 20 days respectively. The use of the VAC led to a mean reduction of 29% in the wound area (95.65-68.1 cm2; p < 0.05. Only one patient did not show any improvement in the final appearance of the wound with complete eradication of the infection. No complication directly caused by NPWT was observed. CONCLUSION: NPWT stimulates infection-free scar tissue formation in a short time, and is a quick and comfortable alternative to conventional infected wounds treatment methods.

  8. The use of negative pressure wound therapy in the treatment of infected wounds. Case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Daniel de Alcântara; Neves Filho, Wilson Vasconcelos; Guimarães, Janice de Souza; Castro, Daniel de Araújo; Ferracini, Antonio Marcos

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the results and benefits obtained from the topical use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in patients with infected wounds. This was a retrospective study of 20 patients (17 males and three females, mean age 42 years) with infected wounds treated using NPWT. The infected wounds were caused by trauma. The treatment system used was VAC. ® (Vacuum Assisted Closure, KCI, San Antonio, United States) applied to the wound in continuous mode from 100 to 125 mmHg. The parameters related to the wounds (location, number of VAC changes, the size of the defects in the soft parts, and the evolution of the state of the wound), length of hospital stay, length of intravenous antibiotic therapy, and complications related to the use of this therapy were evaluated. The mean length of the hospital stay, use of NPWT, and antibacterial therapy were 41 days, 22.5 days, and 20 days respectively. The use of the VAC led to a mean reduction of 29% in the wound area (95.65-68.1 cm 2 ; p  wound with complete eradication of the infection. No complication directly caused by NPWT was observed. NPWT stimulates infection-free scar tissue formation in a short time, and is a quick and comfortable alternative to conventional infected wounds treatment methods.

  9. Pattern of pathogens from surgical wound infections in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of isolates were resistant to erythromycin, fusidic acid and tobramycin. Conclusions:The infections were polymicrobic and multidrug resistant. The quinolones, ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin, should be used as frontline drugs in the management of surgical wound infections at the hospital. Keywords: surgical wound infections, ...

  10. Bacteriology of Post Caesarean Wound Infection in a Specialist ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Post caesarean wound infection is a common cause of maternal morbidity and mortality especially in developing countries where strict adherence to infection control procedures is low. The aim of the present study is to establish the spectrum of microbes causing post caesarean wound infection and antibiotic sensitivity ...

  11. Innovations in Wound Infection Prevention and Management and Antimicrobial Countermeasures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-24

    medical deaths 1162 surgical deaths of 132,996 admissionsArnold. Mil Med 1978;143:161 Wound Infection Prevention and Management - Epidemiology 2011 MHS...guidelines – Rapid evacuation to surgical care (irrigation/debridement) – Limit antibiotic spectrum/duration around wound management – Emphasize basic...Hospenthal. J Trauma 2008;64:S211 2011 MHS Conference Wound Infection Prevention and Management - Prevention  Infection control basics – Handwashing

  12. Anti-Microbial Dendrimers against Multidrug-Resistant P. aeruginosa Enhance the Angiogenic Effect of Biological Burn-wound Bandages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Sayed, Philippe; Kaeppeli, Ariane; Kaeppli, Ariane; Siriwardena, Thissa; Darbre, Tamis; Perron, Karl; Jafari, Paris; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Pioletti, Dominique P; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2016-02-25

    Multi-drug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa has increased progressively and impedes further regression in mortality in burn patients. Such wound infections serve as bacterial reservoir for nosocomial infections and are associated with significant morbidity and costs. Anti-microbial polycationic dendrimers G3KL and G3RL, able to kill multi-drug resistant P. aeruginosa, have been previously developed. The combination of these dendrimers with a class of biological bandages made of progenitor skin cells, which secrete growth factors, could positively impact wound-healing processes. However, polycations are known to be used as anti-angiogenic agents for tumor suppression. Since, neovascularization is pivotal in the healing of deep burn-wounds, the use of anti-microbial dendrimers may thus hinder the healing processes. Surprisingly, we have seen in this study that G3KL and G3RL dendrimers can have angiogenic effects. Moreover, we have shown that a dendrimer concentration ranging between 50 and 100 μg/mL in combination with the biological bandages can suppress bacterial growth without altering cell viability up to 5 days. These results show that antimicrobial dendrimers can be used in combination with biological bandages and could potentially improve the healing process with an enhanced angiogenesis.

  13. The infection risk of plastic wrap as an acute burns dressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Adelene Y; Andresen, David; Martin, Hugh C O; Harvey, John G; Holland, Andrew J A

    2014-05-01

    Domestic plastic wrap has been recommended as an appropriate acute burn wound dressing in the Emergency Management of Severe Burns course. There remain limited studies reporting the risk of infection associated with this dressing. To determine the potential infection risk of domestic plastic wrap used to treat acute burns wounds by assessment for the presence of clinically significant micro-organisms. Ten plastic wrap samples were collected from a roll that had been opened for several months on the burns ward at our institution. Plastic wrap was imprinted directly onto horse-blood agar plates. The plates were incubated for 72h in aerobic conditions with 5% CO2. We found no significant growth on any agar plate after incubation. A sufficient amount of plastic wrap was sampled to be confident that areas up to 12cm×12cm from the centre of the plastic sheet were aerobically sterile. Our data suggest that the potential for plastic wrap to act as a fomite when used as an acute burn wound dressing is extremely low. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Healing efficacy of sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) seed oil in an ovine burn wound model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroshi; Asmussen, Sven; Traber, Daniel L; Cox, Robert A; Hawkins, Hal K; Connelly, Rhykka; Traber, Lillian D; Walker, Timothy W; Malgerud, Erik; Sakurai, Hiroyuki; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the efficacy of sea buckthorn (SBT) seed oil - a rich source of substances known to have anti-atherogenic and cardioprotective activity, and to promote skin and mucosa epithelization - on burn wound healing, five adult sheep were subjected to 3rd degree flame burns. Two burn sites were made on the dorsum of the sheep and the eschar was excised down to the fascia. Split-thickness skin grafts were harvested, meshed, and fitted to the wounds. The autograft was placed on the fascia and SBT seed oil was topically applied to one recipient and one donor site, respectively, with the remaining sites treated with vehicle. The wound blood flow (LASER Doppler), and epithelization (ultrasound) were determined at 6, 14, and 21 days after injury. 14 days after grafting, the percentage of epithelization in the treated sites was greater (95 ± 2.2% vs. 83 ± 2.9%, p<0.05) than in the untreated sites. Complete epithelization time was shorter in both treated recipient and donor sites (14.20 ± 0.48 vs. 19.60 ± 0.40 days, p<0.05 and 13.40 ± 1.02 vs. 19.60 ± 0.50 days, p<0.05, respectively) than in the untreated sites, confirmed by ultrasound. In conclusion, SBT seed oil has significant wound healing activity in full-thickness burns and split-thickness harvested wounds. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of phytochemicals, antioxidant and burn wound healing activities of Cucurbita moschata Duchesne fruit peel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roodabeh Bahramsoltani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Cucurbita moschata Duchesne (pumpkin is a well-known plant with several pharmacological effects. The aim of the present study was to assess burn wound healing activity of C. moschata peel extract (CE. Also, standardized CE was assessed for antioxidant activity and antibacterial effects against major pathogens of burns. Materials and Methods: Healing properties of topical preparation of 10% and 20% concentrations of CE were assessed on second degree burn in rats during a 14-day period as well as histological studies, total antioxidant power, lipid peroxidation and total thiol content of skin tissue samples. Results: Radical scavenging IC50 and ferric-reducing antioxidant power value were 4.015±0.20 mg/ml and 142.63±2.65 mmol Fe2+/g, respectively. Total mucilage content was 13.8%. The optimal results were obtained by 20% CE that showed 90.80±5.86 % wound closure and tissue repair as well as significant reduction of tissue oxidative stress biomarkers. Histological analyses confirmed wound healing activity of pumpkin peel extract. Conclusion: Considering the high mucilage content of the plant, providing a moist environment for wound, C. moschata peel extract could be a natural remedy for treatment of burns. Further clinical studies are suggested to confirm C. moschata peel extract as a wound healing agent.

  16. Evaluation of Mouse Wound Models for Probiotics-Based Wound Infection Prevention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    to aid in prevention of infection in both traumatic and surgical settings. We used established methods to produce typical wounds in a reproducible...highly desirable. The objectives of this study were to (1) establish reproducible, small animal models of infectious wounds and (2) assess if probiotics...been some interest in using these organisms in early wound care to aid in prevention of infection in both traumatic and surgical settings. Such a

  17. [Wound infections due to opportunistic corynebacterium species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olender, Alina; Łetowska, Iwona

    2010-01-01

    Wound infections are often due to endogenous bacterial flora which penetrates into a site of injury. The establishment of the etiologic agent can be problematic, especially when opportunistic bacteria are present, suggesting contamination of clinical material. Among bacteria that can cause such diagnostic problems are opportunistic Corynebacterium spp. and coryneforms colonizing skin. The aim of the study was to analyze the 24 clinical samples collected from wounds of different location, with Gram positive rods isolated in numbers suggesting the cause of infection. Bacterial identification was performed by API Coryne and additional biochemical tests (API ZYM, API NE). It was detected that the commonest species isolated were: C. amycolatum (29.2%), C. striatum (16.7%), C. group G (16.7%) and Brevibacterium spp., C. jeikeium, C. urealyticum, C. group F1. The drug susceptibility testing was performed by E-test method. Among isolated strains, 83.3% were simultaneously resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin. In 75% cases resistance to co-trimoxazole was noted, in 71.7% resistance to chloramphenicol and in 16.7% resistance to beta-lactams were detected. In presented study the high percentage of strains resistant to macrolids and linkosamids (MLSB) was noted. All strains were susceptible to vancomycin and teicoplanin.

  18. Inhaled methoxyflurane for pain and anxiety relief during burn wound care procedures: an Australian case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasiak, Jason; Mahar, Patrick D; Paul, Eldho; Menezes, Hana; Spinks, Anneliese B; Cleland, Heather

    2014-02-01

    Pain is a common and significant feature of burn injury. The use of intravenous opioids forms the mainstay of procedural burn pain management, but in an outpatient setting, the demand for novel agents that do not require parenteral access, are easy to administer and have a rapid onset are urgently needed. One such agent is the inhaled anaesthetic agent, methoxyflurane (MF). The aim of this study was to conduct a pilot investigation into the clinical effectiveness of MF inhaler on pain and anxiety scores in patients undergoing burn wound care procedures in an outpatient setting. A prospective case series involved recruiting patients undergoing a burn wound care procedure in an ambulatory burn care setting. Pain and anxiety were assessed using numerical rating scales. Overall, median numerical pain rating score was significantly higher post-dressing [pre-dressing: 2; interquartile range (IQR): 1-3 versus post-dressing: 3; IQR 1·5-4; P = 0·01], whereas median numerical anxiety score significantly reduced following the dressing (pre-dressing: 5; IQR 4-7 versus post-dressing: 2; IQR 1-2; P burn care procedures in the ambulatory care setting. However, there is an urgent need for larger case series and randomised controlled trials to determine its overall clinical effectiveness. © 2012 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2012 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. The Effects of Argan Oil in Second-degree Burn Wound Healing in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsar, Umit; Halici, Zekai; Akpinar, Erol; Yayla, Muhammed; Avsar, Ummu; Harun, Un; Harun, Un; Hasan Tarik, Atmaca; Bayraktutan, Zafer

    2016-03-01

    Argan oil, produced from the kernels of the argan tree (Argania spinosa), has been shown to have antioxidant properties. To examine the effect of argan oil in second-degree burn wound healing, an in vivo experiment was conducted among 30 adult male Wistar rats divided into 5 equal groups: a sham group, a control group (burned but no topical agent), a group in which argan oil was applied once a day, a group in which argan oil was applied twice a day, and a group treated with 1% silver sulfadiazine once a day. Second-degree burns were created by scalding hot water (85˚ C for 15 seconds). Treatment began 24 hours after the burn injury; in the argan oil groups, 1 mL of argan oil was administered via syringe to the wound. The rate of wound healing was quantified by wound measurements on days 1, 7, and 14 after burn injury. Tissues were analyzed for molecular and histologic changes in TGF-β expression and fibroblast activity. Percent contraction of burned skin tissue was determined using the stereo investigator program, which calculated the burn field to the millimeter. Means (SD) were calculated and compared using Duncan's multiple comparison test. The group receiving argan oil twice daily showed significantly increased mRNA levels of TGF-β1 from 39.66- to 58.70-fold compared to the burn control group on day 14 (P less than 0.05). Both argan oil-treated groups showed significantly increased contraction compared to the burn control group at all 3 timepoints; the group receiving argan oil twice daily had a greater contraction rate (31% on day 7, 76% on day 14) than the silver sulfadiazine group (22% on day 7, 69% on day 14), (P less than 0.05). Histopathological assessments on days 3, 7, and 14 showed greater healing/contraction in both argan oil and silver sulfadiazine groups compared to the control group. These results suggest argan oil is effective in healing experimentally created second-degree burns in rats. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies are

  20. Photobiomodulatory effects of superpulsed 904nm laser therapy on bioenergetics status in burn wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Anju; Gupta, Asheesh; Keshri, Gaurav K; Verma, Saurabh; Sharma, Sanjeev K; Singh, Shashi Bala

    2016-09-01

    Burn wounds exhibit impaired healing as the progression through the normal sequential stages of tissue repair gets hampered by epidermal barrier disruption, compromised blood circulation, abrogated defence mechanism, pathologic inflammation, and septicemia. Our earlier results reported that superpulsed 904nm LLLT enhanced healing and attenuated inflammatory response in burn wounds. The present study investigated the effect of superpulsed 904nm LLLT (200ns pulse width; 100Hz; 0.7mW mean output power; 0.4mW/cm(2) average irradiance) on biochemical and molecular markers pertaining to bioenergetics and redox homeostasis on full-thickness burn wounds in experimental rats. Results indicated that superpulsed laser irradiation for 7days post-wounding propelled the cellular milieu towards aerobic energy metabolism as evidenced by significantly enhanced activities of key energy regulatory enzymes viz. HK, PFK, CS and G6PD, whereas LDH showed reduced activity as compared to the non-irradiated controls. LLLT showed a significant increased CCO activity and ATP level. Moreover, LLLT also regulated redox homeostasis as evidenced by enhanced NADPH levels and decreased NADP/NADPH ratio. Western blot analysis demonstrated that LLLT produced an up-regulation of GLUT1, pAMPKα and down-regulation of glycogen synthase1 (GS1). Our findings suggest that superpulsed 904nm LLLT augments burn wound healing by enhancing intracellular energy contents through modulation of aerobic metabolism for maximum energy output. Bioenergetic activation and maintenance of redox homeostasis could be one of the noteworthy mechanisms responsible for the beneficial NIR photobiomodulatory effect mediated through superpulsed 904nm LLLT in burn wound healing. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Mechanism of Wound-Healing Activity of Hippophae rhamnoides L. Leaf Extract in Experimental Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin K. Upadhyay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the healing efficacy of lyophilized aqueous leaf extract of Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L., family Elaeagnaceae (SBT and to explore its possible mechanism of action on experimental burn wounds in rats. The SBT extract, at various concentrations, was applied topically, twice daily for 7 days. Treatment with silver sulfadiazine (SSD ointment was used as reference control. The most effective concentration of the extract was found to be 5.0% (w/w for burn wound healing and this was further used for detailed study. The SBT-treated group showed faster reduction in wound area in comparison with control and SSD-treated groups. The topical application of SBT increased collagen synthesis and stabilization at the wound site, as evidenced by increase in hydroxyproline, hexosamine levels and up-regulated expression of collagen type-III. The histological examinations and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and -9 expression also confirmed the healing efficacy of SBT leaf extract. Furthermore, there was significant increase in levels of endogenous enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants and decrease in lipid peroxide levels in SBT-treated burn wound granulation tissue. The SBT also promoted angiogenesis as evidenced by an in vitro chick chorioallantoic membrane model and in vivo up-regulated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF expression. The SBT leaf extract had no cytotoxic effect on BHK-21 cell line. In conclusion, SBT aqueous leaf extract possesses significant healing potential in burn wounds and has a positive influence on the different phases of wound repair.

  2. Post-operative wound infection in developing country - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A prospective survey of post-operative wound infection rates was undertaken at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi over a three-month period from April to June, 1985. The methods whereby wound sepsis data were obtained are presented. The results show an overall infection rate of 25.8% and that for ...

  3. Infected wound healing and antimicrobial effects of Chenopodium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chenopodium ambrosioides Linn. (Chenopdiaceae) and Mitracarpus scaber Zucc. (Rubiaceae) are herbal medicinal plants. They are commonly used in Togolese folk medicine to treat skin infections such as infected wounds, dermatoses, and scabies. The aim of this work was to evaluate the wound healing and ...

  4. Bacteriology and antibiogram of pathogens from wound infections at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wound infections result in sepsis, limb loss, long hospital stays, higher costs, and are responsible for significant human mortality and morbidity worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the profile of pathogens cultured from wound infection and determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. A retrospective ...

  5. Efficacy of silver sulfadiazine phonophoresis on wound healing in acute burn patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omar, Ghada Said Mohammed

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of SSD phonophoresis approaches (continuous and pulsed modes on the rate of healing following acute burn injury . forty female patients with second degree burn in thrir anterior aspect of the dominant foream were divided randomly...... with a frequency of 1 MHz , and intensity of 1 W/cm2 . the parameters investigated inclding 1.burn surface area measured by tracing the burn wound parameters , and 2.determination of glycosaminoglycan in urine by using cetylpyridinuin chloride turbidity method . both parameters are measured 24 hours post......-burn injury and at one week interval for three weeks . student's t-test was used to compare the variables between both groups of the study and paired t-test for follow up in the same group . results of the study showed that there was a significant difference between pulsed SSD phonophoresis and continues SSD...

  6. Utilisatiion of topical honey In Burns wounds contaminated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    personal

    Background Heat injury with consequent coagulation necrosis of skin layers provides an environment that is suitable for bacterial ... superior to silver sulfadiazine and Acetatmefamid in terms of granulation tissue formation, wound healing and antimicrobial ... with physiological saline ands exposed to boiling water steam for ...

  7. Biological activity of propolis-honey balm in the treatment of experimentally-evoked burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastrzębska-Stojko, Zaneta; Stojko, Rafał; Rzepecka-Stojko, Anna; Kabała-Dzik, Agata; Stojko, Jerzy

    2013-11-21

    Medicines of biogenic origin with micro-organic, regenerative and analgesic properties are becoming more and more significant in the treatment of burn wounds. These properties are found in apitherapeutics such as propolis and honey--products collected and processed by a honey bee. Their effect on the course of the healing processes is multidirectional. The aim of the study was a histopathological and biochemical analysis of the processes of scar formation in experimentally evoked burn wounds in white pigs treated with the 1% and 3% Sepropol balms containing standardized extracts of propolis and honey. The results were compared with the therapeutic effects obtained with dermazin cream (1% silver sulfadiazine). The level of collagen was determined in the wounds treated with 1% and 3% Sepropol and compared with the collagen level in healthy skin and wounds treated with dermazin. Granulation and regenerated epithelium formation times were compared, with the 3% Sepropol being by far the most effective. The 3% Sepropol also increased the collagen level to 116% with the control sub-groups scoring between 80% and 98%. The results show the healing process of burn wounds in pigs treated with the Sepropol balm starts earlier and has a faster course than the standard dermazin therapy.

  8. Biological Activity of Propolis-Honey Balm in the Treatment of Experimentally-Evoked Burn Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Żaneta Jastrzębska-Stojko

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Medicines of biogenic origin with micro-organic, regenerative and analgesic properties are becoming more and more significant in the treatment of burn wounds. These properties are found in apitherapeutics such as propolis and honey—products collected and processed by a honey bee. Their effect on the course of the healing processes is multidirectional. The aim of the study was a histopathological and biochemical analysis of the processes of scar formation in experimentally evoked burn wounds in white pigs treated with the 1% and 3% Sepropol balms containing standardized extracts of propolis and honey. The results were compared with the therapeutic effects obtained with dermazin cream (1% silver sulfadiazine. The level of collagen was determined in the wounds treated with 1% and 3% Sepropol and compared with the collagen level in healthy skin and wounds treated with dermazin. Granulation and regenerated epithelium formation times were compared, with the 3% Sepropol being by far the most effective. The 3% Sepropol also increased the collagen level to 116% with the control sub-groups scoring between 80% and 98%. The results show the healing process of burn wounds in pigs treated with the Sepropol balm starts earlier and has a faster course than the standard dermazin therapy.

  9. Microwaved bacterial cellulose-based hydrogel microparticles for the healing of partial thickness burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Manisha; Mohamad, Najwa; Low, Wan-Li; Martin, Claire; Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal

    2017-02-01

    Burn wound management is a complex process because the damage may extend as far as the dermis which has an acknowledged slow rate of regeneration. This study investigates the feasibility of using hydrogel microparticles composed of bacterial cellulose and polyacrylamide as a dressing material for coverage of partial-thickness burn wounds. The microparticulate carrier structure and surface morphology were investigated by Fourier transform infrared, X-ray diffraction, elemental analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. The cytotoxicity profile of the microparticles showed cytocompatibility with L929 cells. Dermal irritation test demonstrated that the hydrogel was non-irritant to the skin and had a significant effect on wound contraction compared to the untreated group. Moreover, histological examination of in vivo burn healing samples revealed that the hydrogel treatment enhanced epithelialization and accelerated fibroblast proliferation with wound repair and intact skin achieved by the end of the study. Both the in vitro and in vivo results proved the biocompatibility and efficacy of hydrogel microparticles as a wound dressing material.

  10. Propolis Induces Chondroitin/Dermatan Sulphate and Hyaluronic Acid Accumulation in the Skin of Burned Wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Olczyk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in extracellular matrix glycosaminoglycans during the wound repair allowed us to apply the burn model in which therapeutic efficacy of propolis and silver sulfadiazine was compared. Burns were inflicted on four pigs. Glycosaminoglycans isolated from healthy and burned skin were quantified using a hexuronic acid assay, electrophoretic fractionation, and densitometric analyses. Using the reverse-phase HPLC the profile of sulfated disaccharides released by chondroitinase ABC from chondroitin/dermatan sulfates was estimated. Chondroitin/dermatan sulfates and hyaluronic acid were found in all samples. Propolis stimulated significant changes in the content of particular glycosaminoglycan types during burn healing. Glycosaminoglycans alterations after silver sulfadiazine application were less expressed. Propolis maintained high contribution of 4-O-sulfated disaccharides to chondroitin/dermatan sulfates structure and low level of 6-O-sulfated ones throughout the observed period of healing. Propolis led to preservation of significant contribution of disulfated disaccharides especially 2,4-O-disulfated ones to chondroitin sulfates/dermatan sulfates structure throughout the observed period of healing. Our findings demonstrate that propolis accelerates the burned tissue repair by stimulation of the wound bed glycosaminoglycan accumulation needed for granulation, tissue growth, and wound closure. Moreover, propolis accelerates chondroitin/dermatan sulfates structure modification responsible for binding growth factors playing the crucial role in the tissue repair.

  11. [Influence of different inner dressings in negative-pressure wound therapy on escharectomy wound of full-thickness burn rabbits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J H; Chen, J; Xue, D J; Huang, W X; Su, G L

    2017-07-20

    Objective: To explore the influence of different inner dressings in negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) on escharectomy wound of full-thickness burn rabbits. Methods: Eighteen Japanese white rabbits were inflicted with full-thickness burn on unilateral back. They were divided into polymer dressing group (PD), biological dressing group (BD), and silver biological dressing group (SBD), according to the random number table, with 6 rabbits in each group. On 3 days post burn, the wounds were performed with escharectomy, and then wounds of rabbits in group PD were covered with polyurethane foam. Wounds of rabbits in group BD were covered with porcine acellular dermal matrix (ADM) and wounds of rabbits in group SBD were covered with silver porcine ADM. Then continuous NPWT was performed on rabbits of the three groups for 7 days. Immediately after surgery and on post surgery day (PSD) 7, general observation of wound was conducted and tissue around the wound was harvested for determination of dry to wet weight ratio. The content of bacteria was counted and the content of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 in wound was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Fibroblasts in wound were counted after Masson staining and number of microvessels was counted after CD31 antibody immunohistochemical staining. Data were processed with analysis of variance for repeated measurement, LSD-t test, paired samples t test, and Bonferroni correction. Results: (1) Immediately after surgery, there was no granulation tissue in basal wound of rabbits in the three groups, with rich blood supply and obvious edema. On PSD 7, much granulation tissue was found in basal wound of rabbits in the three groups, with no or mild edema and no obvious redness and swelling in wound edge. (2) There were no significant differences in dry to wet weight ratios of tissue around the wound among and within the three groups immediately after surgery and on PSD 7 (with F

  12. Curcumin: a novel therapeutic for burn pain and wound healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    hydrophobic drugs and phytochemicals and provide sustained delivery of these agents in vitro and in vivo [75-77]. Incorpo- ration of curcumin in an aqueous...in mice. Drug Metab Dispos 1999;27:486-94 56. Yang KY, Lin LC, Tseng TY, et al. Oral bioavailability of curcumin in rat and the herbal analysis from...injury on wound infiltration and the dermal inflammatory response. J Surg Res 2010;158:112-20 .. A detailed analysis of the differences in inflammatory

  13. Early management in children with burns: Cooling, wound care and pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baartmans, M G A; de Jong, A E E; van Baar, M E; Beerthuizen, G I J M; van Loey, N E E; Tibboel, D; Nieuwenhuis, M K

    2016-06-01

    Early management in burns, i.e. prior to admission in a burn center, is essential for an optimal process and outcome of burn care. Several publications have reported suboptimal early management, including low levels of pain medication after trauma, especially in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current practice in the Netherlands and factors related to early management in pediatric burns, i.e. cooling, wound covering and pain management. To study possible change and improvement over time, two study periods were compared. This study involved two periods; January 2002-March 2004 (period 1) and January 2007-August 2008 (period 2). All children (0-15 years of age) with acute burns admitted within 24h after burn to one of the three Dutch Burn centers with a formal referral were eligible. Data were obtained from patient records, both retrospectively and prospectively. A total of 323 and 299 children were included in periods 1 and 2, respectively. The vast majority of children in both study periods had been cooled before admission (>90%). Over time, wound covering increased significantly (from 64% to 89%) as well as pain treatment (from 68% to 79%). Predominantly paracetamol and morphine were used. Referral from ambulance services (OR=41.4, 95%CI=16.6-103.0) or general practitioners (OR=59.7, 95%CI=25.1-141.8) were strong independent predictors for not receiving pre-burn center pain medication. On the other hand, flame burns (OR=0.2, 95%CI=0.1-0.5) and more extensive burns (TBSA 5-10%: OR=0.4, 95%CI=-0.2 to 0.8; TBSA≥10%: OR=0.2, 95%CI=0.1-0.4) were independent predictors of receiving pain medication. Referring physicians of children with burns were overall well informed: they cool the wound after burns and cover it before transport to prevent hypothermia and reduce the pain. Additional studies should be conducted to clarify the duration and temperature for cooling to be effective. Furthermore, there is room and a need for improvement regarding early

  14. Cobra bite wound infection caused by Shewanella algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Po-Yu; Shi, Zhi-Yuan; Shyu, Ching-Lin; Wu, Zong-Yen; Lai, Kuo-Lung; Chang, Chih-Yen; Chen, Ying-Ju; Huang, Jin-An; Mao, Yan-Chiao; Tung, Kwong-Chung

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella wound infections after snake bites are rare. We report the case of a Shewanella algae wound infection associated with a cobra bite in a 27-year-old woman. The isolate was confirmed by sequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA gene. This case expands the reported spectrum of infection caused by S. algae and raises the possibility that S. algae could be a causative pathogen in wound infections resulting from snake bites. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Toxic shock syndrome toxin level in wound samples of hospitalized children with burn: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Javadinia

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Toxic shock syndrome (TSS, a dangerous consequence of Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1 caused by Staphylococcus aureus. The early detection for infections of Staphylococcus aureus in burned children is very important, also the pre-vention for consequences of TSST-1. Fever is one of the most noticeable sign in burned children. On the other hand, fever is one of the important consequences of TSST-1 pro-duction. Methods: This study aimed to assess the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 level in the wound’s specimens of two groups febrile and afebrile in the hospitalized burned chil-dren in Motahari hospital Tehran, Iran in the year 2013. In this case-control study, 90 children who admitted to the burn unit, divided in two groups of 45 patients: febrile (cases group and afebrile (control group. All of burned children under went wound biopsy, and then all of wound’s specimens were tested by PCR for specific primer of toxin producing genome. Finally all of data collected and statistically analyzed. This data include group febrile and afebrile, demographic characteristics, percentage of burned surface severity and result of PCR. Results: The positive result for PCR test, production of TSST-1 in febrile burned chil-dren (cases group was 37.7% and in afebrile burned children (control group was 11.1% that this different was statistically significant (P=0.003. The mean and stan-dard deviation for percentage of burned surface (severity in samples with positive re-sult for PCR test was 30.9±16.93 and in samples with negative result for PCR test was 20.09±11.02 that this different was statistically significant (P=0.01. There was no dif-ference between positive PCR result and negative PCR result of age and sex. Conclusion: Direct association was approved between the production of TSST-1 and the occurrence of fever in burned children. Increased surface severity of burns also re-lated to the production of TSST-1. Further research is recommended.

  16. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Impact of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii Complex in a Belgian Burn Wound Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Daniel; Pirnay, Jean-Paul; Bilocq, Florence; Jennes, Serge; Verbeken, Gilbert; Rose, Thomas; Keersebilck, Elkana; Bosmans, Petra; Pieters, Thierry; Hing, Mony; Heuninckx, Walter; De Pauw, Frank; Soentjens, Patrick; Merabishvili, Maia; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Bogaerts, Pierre; Glupczynski, Youri; Pot, Bruno; van der Reijden, Tanny J; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and its closely related species A. pittii and A. nosocomialis, all members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex, are a major cause of hospital acquired infection. In the burn wound center of the Queen Astrid military hospital in Brussels, 48 patients were colonized or infected with Acb complex over a 52-month period. We report the molecular epidemiology of these organisms, their clinical impact and infection control measures taken. A representative set of 157 Acb complex isolates was analyzed using repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) (DiversiLab) and a multiplex PCR targeting OXA-51-like and OXA-23-like genes. We identified 31 rep-PCR genotypes (strains). Representatives of each rep-type were identified to species by rpoB sequence analysis: 13 types to A. baumannii, 10 to A. pittii, and 3 to A. nosocomialis. It was assumed that isolates that belonged to the same rep-type also belonged to the same species. Thus, 83.4% of all isolates were identified to A. baumannii, 9.6% to A. pittii and 4.5% to A. nosocomialis. We observed 12 extensively drug resistant Acb strains (10 A. baumannii and 2 A. nosocomialis), all carbapenem-non-susceptible/colistin-susceptible and imported into the burn wound center through patients injured in North Africa. The two most prevalent rep-types 12 and 13 harbored an OXA-23-like gene. Multilocus sequence typing allocated them to clonal complex 1 corresponding to EU (international) clone I. Both strains caused consecutive outbreaks, interspersed with periods of apparent eradication. Patients infected with carbapenem resistant A. baumannii were successfully treated with colistin/rifampicin. Extensive infection control measures were required to eradicate the organisms. Acinetobacter infection and colonization was not associated with increased attributable mortality.

  17. Molecular Epidemiology and Clinical Impact of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii Complex in a Belgian Burn Wound Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilocq, Florence; Jennes, Serge; Verbeken, Gilbert; Rose, Thomas; Keersebilck, Elkana; Bosmans, Petra; Pieters, Thierry; Hing, Mony; Heuninckx, Walter; De Pauw, Frank; Soentjens, Patrick; Merabishvili, Maia; Deschaght, Pieter; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Bogaerts, Pierre; Glupczynski, Youri; Pot, Bruno; van der Reijden, Tanny J.; Dijkshoorn, Lenie

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and its closely related species A. pittii and A. nosocomialis, all members of the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex, are a major cause of hospital acquired infection. In the burn wound center of the Queen Astrid military hospital in Brussels, 48 patients were colonized or infected with Acb complex over a 52-month period. We report the molecular epidemiology of these organisms, their clinical impact and infection control measures taken. A representative set of 157 Acb complex isolates was analyzed using repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) (DiversiLab) and a multiplex PCR targeting OXA-51-like and OXA-23-like genes. We identified 31 rep-PCR genotypes (strains). Representatives of each rep-type were identified to species by rpoB sequence analysis: 13 types to A. baumannii, 10 to A. pittii, and 3 to A. nosocomialis. It was assumed that isolates that belonged to the same rep-type also belonged to the same species. Thus, 83.4% of all isolates were identified to A. baumannii, 9.6% to A. pittii and 4.5% to A. nosocomialis. We observed 12 extensively drug resistant Acb strains (10 A. baumannii and 2 A. nosocomialis), all carbapenem-non-susceptible/colistin-susceptible and imported into the burn wound center through patients injured in North Africa. The two most prevalent rep-types 12 and 13 harbored an OXA-23-like gene. Multilocus sequence typing allocated them to clonal complex 1 corresponding to EU (international) clone I. Both strains caused consecutive outbreaks, interspersed with periods of apparent eradication. Patients infected with carbapenem resistant A. baumannii were successfully treated with colistin/rifampicin. Extensive infection control measures were required to eradicate the organisms. Acinetobacter infection and colonization was not associated with increased attributable mortality. PMID:27223476

  18. Effect of chitosan acetate bandage on wound healing in infected and noninfected wounds in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkatovskaya, Marina; Castano, Ana P.; Demidova-Rice, Tatiana N.; Tegos, George P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    HemCon® bandage is an engineered chitosan acetate preparation designed as a hemostatic dressing, and is under investigation as a topical antimicrobial dressing. We studied its effects on healing of excisional wounds that were or were not infected with Staphylococcus aureus, in normal mice or mice previously pretreated with cyclophosphamide (CY). CY significantly suppressed wound healing in both the early and later stages, while S. aureus alone significantly stimulated wound healing in the early stages by preventing the initial wound expansion. CY plus S. aureus showed an advantage in early stages by preventing expansion, but a significant slowing of wound healing in later stages. In order to study the conflicting clamping and stimulating effects of chitosan acetate bandage on normal wounds, we removed the bandage from wounds at times after application ranging from 1 hour to 9 days. Three days application gave the earliest wound closure, and all application times gave a faster healing slope after removal compared with control wounds. Chitosan acetate bandage reduced the number of inflammatory cells in the wound at days 2 and 4, and had an overall beneficial effect on wound healing especially during the early period where its antimicrobial effect is most important. PMID:18471261

  19. Innate Defense Regulator Peptide 1018 in Wound Healing and Wound Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinstraesser, Lars; Hirsch, Tobias; Schulte, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    -37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However...

  20. [Effects of flow-through descending branch of lateral circumflex femoral artery flap on repairing high-voltage electrical burn wounds of wrist of patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Y M; Chen, X; Zhang, C; Wang, C; Qin, F J; Ma, C X; Hu, X H

    2017-07-20

    Objective: To investigate the effects of flow-through descending branch of lateral circumflex femoral artery flap on repairing high-voltage electrical burn wounds of wrist of patients. Methods: From January 2014 to June 2016, 5 patients with high-voltage electrical burn of unilateral wrist were hospitalized in our burn ward, with extensive necrosis of skin soft tissue of burn wrist. Five patients were transferred to our burn ward 6 to 12 days post injury after undergoing emergency dermotomy of wrist to reduce tension in other hospitals. In 2 to 3 days after admission, operation was performed by two surgeon group at the same time, when patients' general condition were stable. One group underwent debridement and the other group designed and dissected flap according to the range of skin soft tissue defect of wrist. Wrist wounds after debridement ranged from 15 cm×10 cm to 24 cm×15 cm. Three patients were treated with flow-through descending branch of lateral circumflex femoral artery flap and great saphenous vein for repairing wounds of wrist and reconstruction of ulnar and radial artery. Two patients were treated with flow-through descending branch of lateral circumflex femoral artery flap for repairing wounds of wrist and reconstruction of ulnar artery. The dissected flaps ranged from 16 cm×12 cm to 26 cm×16 cm and the length of bridging vessel ranged from 15 to 21 cm. Results: The flow-through descending branch of lateral circumflex femoral artery flaps of five patients survived well. Wounds of 4 patients healed and wounds of 1 patient with infection under the flap on 3 days after operation healed after changing wound dressing and undergoing debridement for 2 weeks. After the operation, wrists and hands of 5 patients had adequate blood supply and ulnar and radial artery recovered patency. Follow-up of patients for 6 months to 1 year showed good flap appearance and adequate blood supply of burn hands. Conclusions: The flow-through descending branch of lateral

  1. Iontophoresis with gold nanoparticles improves mitochondrial activity and oxidative stress markers of burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Paulo C L; Venâncio, Mirelli; Souza, Priscila S; Victor, Eduardo G; de Souza Notoya, Frederico; Paganini, Carla S; Streck, Emilio L; da Silva, Luciano; Pinho, Ricardo A; Paula, Marcos M S

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of microcurrent and gold nanoparticles on oxidative stress parameters and the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the healing of skin wounds. Thirty 60-day old male Wistar rats (250-300 g) were divided into five groups (N=6): Control; Burn wounds; Microcurrent (MIC); Gold nanoparticle gel (GNP gel) and Microcurrent+Gold nanoparticle gel (MIC+GNP gel). The microcurrent treatment was applied for five consecutive days at a dose of 300 μA. The results demonstrate a significant decrease in the activity of complexes I, II-III and IV in the Burn Wounds group compared to the control, and the MIC+GNP gel group was able to reverse this inhibition in complexes I, III and IV. Furthermore, a significant reduction in oxidative damage parameters and a significant increase in the levels of antioxidant defence enzymes were induced in the MIC+GNP gel group compared to the Burn Wounds group. The data strongly indicate that the group receiving treatment with MIC+GNP gel had improved mitochondrial functioning and oxidative stress parameters, which contributed to tissue repair. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Surgical Wound Infection: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Management

    OpenAIRE

    Rubin Robert H

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Surgical wound infection remains a significant problem following an operation, although surveillance for such infections remains a challenge exacerbated by early discharge and outpatient surgery. The riskof such infections isdetermined by technical problems with the operation, particularly bleeding, the amount of devitalized tissue created, and the need for drains within the wound, as well as such metabolic factors as obesity and diabetes. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis can dec...

  3. Analysis of Secondary Chemistry and Treatment of Burn Wounds with Nonthermal Plasma Induced Effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkowski, Mark; Plimpton, S. Reed; Golkowski, Czeslaw

    2013-10-01

    Exploitation of non-thermal plasmas in the biomedical setting is a rapidly growing field with a large number of diverse technologies under investigation. Potential applications of such devices range from instrument sterilization to clinical therapy. One of the key hurdles to the implementation of non-thermal plasma technologies in the relatively poor understanding of the chemical processes taking place. Our group has recently completed precise analysis of chemical species created by our indirect exposure non-thermal plasma device with hydrogen peroxide additives. Reactive nitrogen and oxygen species are observed using optical absorption spectroscopy. We report the unique detection of short lived hydroxyl radicals at a significant distance from the discharge using electron paramagnetic spin resonance trapping. The hydroxyl radicals are shown to be generated in secondary ozonide based chemical processes away from the discharge. The plasma device is applied to a porcine model of infected full thickness burn wounds. The bacteria load reduction after treatment with our device is shown to be 10-100 fold improvement over Silvadene which is the main treatment currently used in the clinic. Partially funded by NIH SBIR R43 AI096594.

  4. Dermal wound transcriptomic responses to Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a rabbit ear wound model

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Kai P.; D’Arpa, Peter; Seth, Akhil K; Geringer, Matthew R.; Jett, Marti; Xu, Wei; Hong, Seok J; Galiano, Robert D.; Chen, Tsute; Mustoe, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacterial infections of wounds impair healing and worsen scarring. We hypothesized that transcriptome analysis of wounds infected with Klebsiella pneumoniae (K.p.) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.a.) would indicate host-responses associated with the worse healing of P.a.- than K.p.-infected wounds. Methods Wounds created on post-operative day (POD) 0 were infected during the inflammatory phase of healing on POD3 and were harvested on POD4 for microarray and transcriptome analysis. Oth...

  5. Beneficial effects of extracts from Lucilia sericata maggots on burn wounds in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Haixu; Yang, Qiaoli; Ma, Tao; Li, Wei; Duan, Jialin; Wei, Guo; Wu, Xiaoxiao; Mu, Fei; Lin, Rui; Wen, Aidong; Xi, Miaomiao

    2017-11-01

    Lucilia sericata maggots have beneficial properties; however, their protective effects on burn wounds have yet to be fully elucidated. In the present study, a deep second‑degree burn rat model was used to investigate the burn wound healing properties of aqueous extract of maggots (MAE). The anti‑inflammatory, antioxidative and antibacterial activities were examined. In addition, the protein expression levels of Akt, vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) and nuclear factor‑κB (NF‑κB) were detected by western blotting. The findings of the present study revealed that MAE treatment increased burn wound healing and hydroxyproline content in the burn‑treated rats. A total of seven compounds (MAE‑P1‑P7) were separated from MAE and a comparative study was performed to identify the major active component. The results demonstrated that MAE‑P6 exerted greater antibacterial activity compared with the other compounds. MAE‑P6 treatment reduced tissue levels of malondialdehyde, tumor necrosis factor‑α and interleukin‑6, and increased superoxide dismutase activity. Furthermore, MAE‑P6 increased the expression levels of VEGFA and reduced NF‑κB expression through Akt, which was verified by treatment with the Akt‑specific inhibitor, LY294002. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the beneficial effects of MAE on burn wound healing were due to its antibacterial, antioxidative and anti‑inflammatory activities. MAE‑P6 reduced the release of inflammatory cytokines via the Akt/NF‑κB signaling pathway, and regulated angiogenesis and vasopermeability via the Akt/VEGFA pathway.

  6. [Atypical agents of wound infection and targeted samples].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucisec-Tepes, Nastja

    2012-10-01

    All open wounds are primarily contaminated and subsequently colonized by microorganisms, predominantly bacteria. Only about 30% of chronic wounds are also infected. Factors which favor the development of infection are the following: large quantity of bacteria, presence of virulence factors, their quantity and number, predominantly the synergy of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, and formation of biofilm. Common agents of infection of acute and chronic wounds are Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, Streptococcus beta-haemolyticus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacteroides spp., and Candida albicans. Difference between acute and chronic wound is in the predominance of individual agents, with an observation that Staphylococcus aureus is predominant in both cases. Atypical agents of chronic wound infection are rare, unusual, not found in the area in which we live, not proven by standard microbiological methods, but molecular methods are needed instead. They are predominantly opportunists, varying in the expression of virulence factors, or they have changed their phenotype characteristics and are not the agents of primary wound infections. They are the agents of secondary infections. Atypical agents of the chronic wound infection are diverse, from the anaerobe group, Peptoniphilus spp., Anaerococcus spp., Bacteroides ureolyticus, Finegoldia magma, the group of gram positive rods of the Corynebacterium genus, the group of bacteria from aquatic environment Mycobacterium fortuitum complex, and Vibrio alginolyticus. The targeted samples are biopsy sample as the "gold standard" and/or aspirate, when a significant quantity of exudate is present. Targeted samples are obligatory when there is a progression and decomposition of the base of the wound, increase in the size or depth of the wound, isolation of multiresistant microbes, or absence of clinical response to empirical antimicrobial therapy. In the diagnosis of opportunistic pathogens or atypical agents of chronic wound infection, it is

  7. Effect of virtual reality on adolescent pain during burn wound care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffs, Debra; Dorman, Dona; Brown, Susan; Files, Amber; Graves, Tamara; Kirk, Elizabeth; Meredith-Neve, Sandra; Sanders, Janise; White, Benjamin; Swearingen, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effect of virtual reality to passive distraction and standard care on burn treatment pain in adolescents.This single-blinded, randomized controlled study enrolled 30 adolescents who were 10 to 17 years of age from the burn clinic of a large children's hospital. After providing informed consent/assent, these participants were randomly assigned to one of three groups during wound care: standard care, passive distraction watching a movie, or virtual reality (VR) using a tripod-arm device rather than an immersive helmet. Before wound care, participants completed the Spielberger's State-Trait Anxiety Inventory for Children and Pre-Procedure Questionnaire while blinded to group assignment. A total of 28 participants completed the study and rated treatment pain after wound care by using the Adolescent Pediatric Pain Tool and completed a Post-Procedure Questionnaire. The VR group reported less pain during wound care than either the passive distraction or standard care group as determined by multivariable linear regression adjusted for age, sex, preprocedure pain, state anxiety, opiate use, and treatment length. The VR group was the only group to have an estimated decrease in pain perception from baseline preprocedure pain to procedural pain reported. Adolescents pretreated with opiate analgesics and female adolescents reported more pain during wound care.This between-subjects clinical study provides further support for VR, even without requiring wearing of an immersive helmet, in lessening burn wound care pain in adolescents. Passive distraction by watching a movie may be less effective in reducing treatment pain. Additional between-subjects randomized controlled trials with larger samples of children and during other healthcare treatments may further support VR's effectiveness in pediatric procedural pain management.

  8. Anti-inflammatory and burn injury wound healing properties of the shell of Haliotis diversicolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Cheng; Wu, Shing-Yi Sean; Su, Wei-Yang; Lin, Yuan-Chuan; Lee, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Wei-Hao; Chen, Chun-Hong; Wen, Zhi-Hong

    2016-11-28

    The shell of Haliotis diversicolor, or shijueming (SJM), is a type of traditional Chinese medicine. The SJM has appeared in historical records as early as the third and fourth centuries. Historical records have revealed that SJM had mainly been used to treat eye diseases. After the Qing Dynasty (1757), records had emerged, detailing the use of SJM for treating skin injuries, particularly for treating poorly managed ulcers or traumatic wounds. Furthermore, in our anti-inflammation-screening system, SJM significantly inhibited the expression of pro-inflammatory proteins. Previous studies have yet to adopt an animal model to verify the phenomenon and described in the historical records regarding the efficacy of SJM in promoting wound healing. Besides, the mechanism of wound healing effect of SJM is also not clear. This study applied in vitro and in vivo models, tissue section analysis, and western blotting to evaluate the effect of SJM on wound healing. The RAW 264.7 cells were used in anti-inflammatory activity assay and phagocytic assay. Male Wistar rats were used to evaluate the effect of SJM on burn injury healing. A copper block (2 × 2 cm, 150 g) preheated to 165 °C in a dry bath was used to contact the skin area for 10 s, thus creating a full-thickness burn injury. The results were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining, picrosirius red staining and Western blotting. The results revealed that in the in vitro model, the presence of SJM decreased the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression and enhanced the functions of macrophages. The results of the rat burn injury model revealed that SJM decreased neutrophil infiltration, promoted wound healing, thus increasing the collagen I content and promoting the expression of transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) protein. We speculate that the effect and mechanism of SJM on promoting wound healing is related to macrophage activation. In the inflammation phase, SJM alleviates inflammation by

  9. Effect of green tea on the second degree burn wounds in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Fatemi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Various studies indicate that the green tea has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties. Moreover, a few studies have been carried out that demonstrate beneficial effects of green tea on burned patients. Materials and Methods: In this study, green tea, Vaseline, and silver sulfadiazine dressings were used as first-aid treatment to deep dermal contact burns in rats, compared with a control of nothing. After creating second-degree burn on the dorsum of rats, the treatments were applied for 15 min in four groups. Wound dressing changes were daily. Macroscopic study was performed on days 1, 3, 7, and 14 by using a digital camera and software processing of photos. Microscopic examination was done by pathologic evaluation of skin specimens on day 14. Results: We observed that green tea usage significantly decreased burn size in comparison to the control group (P = 0.004. Conclusion: Green tea is effective on healing process of second degree burn wounds.

  10. Evaluation of haemoglobin in blister fluid as an indicator of paediatric burn wound depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanzer, Catherine; Sampson, Dayle L; Broadbent, James A; Cuttle, Leila; Kempf, Margit; Kimble, Roy M; Upton, Zee; Parker, Tony J

    2015-08-01

    The early and accurate assessment of burns is essential to inform patient treatment regimens; however, this first critical step in clinical practice remains a challenge for specialist burns clinicians worldwide. In this regard, protein biomarkers are a potential adjunct diagnostic tool to assist experienced clinical judgement. Free circulating haemoglobin has previously shown some promise as an indicator of burn depth in a murine animal model. Using blister fluid collected from paediatric burn patients, haemoglobin abundance was measured using semi-quantitative Western blot and immunoassays. Although a trend was observed in which haemoglobin abundance increased with burn wound severity, several patient samples deviated significantly from this trend. Further, it was found that haemoglobin concentration decreased significantly when whole cells, cell debris and fibrinous matrix was removed from the blister fluid by centrifugation; although the relationship to depth was still present. Statistical analyses showed that haemoglobin abundance in the fluid was more strongly related to the time between injury and sample collection and the time taken for spontaneous re-epithelialisation. We hypothesise that prolonged exposure to the blister fluid microenvironment may result in an increased haemoglobin abundance due to erythrocyte lysis, and delayed wound healing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  11. Antimicrobial photodynamic therapy in a mouse model of Acinetobacter baumannii burn infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tianhong; Tegos, George P.; Lu, Zongshun; Zhiyentayev, Timur; Huang, Liyi; Franklin, Michael J.; Baer, David G.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter baumanii infections represent a growing problem, especially in traumatic wounds and burns suffered by military personnel injured in Middle Eastern conflicts. Effective treatment using traditional antibiotics can be extremely difficult and new antimicrobial approaches are being investigated. One of these antimicrobial alternatives could be the combination of non-toxic photosensitizers (PS) and visible light known as photodynamic therapy (PDT). We report on the establishment of a new mouse model of full thickness thermal burns infected with a bioluminescent derivative of a clinical Iraqi isolate of A. baumannii and its PDT treatment by topical application of a PS produced by covalent conjugation chlorin(e6) to polyethylenimine followed by illumination of the burn surface with red light. Application of 108 A. baumannii cells to the surface of 10-second burns made on the dorsal surface of shaved female BALB/c mice led to chronic infections that lasted on average 22 days characterized by a remarkably stable bacterial bioluminescence. PDT carried out on day 0 soon after applying bacteria gave over three logs of loss of bacterial luminescence in a light exposure dependent manner, while PDT carried out on day 1 and day 2 gave approximately a 1.7-log reduction. Application of PS dissolved in 10% or 20% DMSO without light gave only modest reduction in bacterial luminescence from mouse burns. Some bacterial regrowth in the treated burn was observed but was generally modest. It was also found that PDT did not lead to inhibition of wound healing. The data suggest that PDT may be an effective new treatment for multi-drug resistant localized A. baumannii infections.

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Post-operative Wound Infections in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of post-operative wound infections was studied over a period of five months in the University College Hospital, Ibadan between February to July, 2003. Two hundred Surgical wounds were collected and routinely processed by Gram staining and culture in the Microbiology Laboratory. Of the 200 samples ...

  13. Knowledge and Practice of Post-Operative Wound Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Application of sterile dressings to the surgical wound and strict adherence to asepsis were the most occurring precautionary measures adopted by nurses in the prevention of post operative wound infection. Excess work load and poor attitude featured most frequently among the respondents as factors that militate against ...

  14. Evaluation of Punica granatum Peel Against Diabetic Wound Infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Foot infections are a common and serious problem in diabetic patients. Objectives: To investigate the antibacterial activity of some medicinal plants used by traditional healers for diabetic wounds and to examine in-vivo wound healing activity of active extracts. Materials and Methods: An experimental study in ...

  15. Spectroscopic Biomarkers for Monitoring Wound Healing and Infection in Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    collecting Raman spectra of wound effluent, and anticipate the completion of that task by the end of the grant cycle (September 30th, 2015...tomographic imaging of canine bone tissue. J Biomed Opt 2008; 13:020506. 69. Chrit L, Hadjur C, Morel S, Sockalingum G, Lebourdon G, Leroy F, Manfait M. In...C for 1 minute, followed by 35 cycles of96°C for 15 seconds, 60°C for 45 seconds, and 72°C for 45 seconds. Final extension at 72°C was clone for 2

  16. Intraoperative contamination influences wound discharge and periprosthetic infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knobben, Bas A. S.; Engelsma, Yde; Neut, Danielle

    2006-01-01

    Intraoperative bacterial contamination increases risk for postoperative wound-healing problems and periprosthetic infection, but to what extent remains unclear. We asked whether bacterial contamination of the instruments and bone during primary prosthesis insertion was associated with prolonged

  17. Postoperative wound infections after a proctectomy--Patient experiences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hassel, Karin; Andersson, Kristin; Koinberg, Inga-Lill; Wennström, Berith

    2016-01-01

    .... The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of perineal wound infections following proctectomy due to rectal cancer, and the importance of the communication with and the self-care...

  18. Bacterial pathogens associated with infected wounds in Ogun State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OSUTH) between August 1999 and July 2000 in the Orthopaedics, Obstetrics and Gynaecological units to identify the bacterial pathogens associated with infected wounds as well as their antibiotic sensitivity profile. A total of 1670 patients were ...

  19. Antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles synthesized using honey and gamma radiation against silver-resistant bacteria from wounds and burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosny, A. M. S.; Kashef, M. T.; Rasmy, S. A.; Aboul-Magd, D. S.; El-Bazza, Z. E.

    2017-12-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are promising antimicrobial agents for treatment of wounds and burns. We synthesized AgNPs using honey at different pH values or with different gamma irradiation doses. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, TEM, DLS and FTIR. Their antimicrobial activity, against standard bacterial strains and silver-resistant clinical isolates from infected wounds and burns, was evaluated in vitro through determination of their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). AgNPs prepared using 30 g of honey exposed to 5 kGy gamma radiation had the best physical characters regarding stability and uniformity of particle size and shape. They recorded the lowest MIC values against both the standard and silver-resistant isolates. In conclusion, honey and gamma radiation can be used in synthesis of highly stable pure AgNPs, without affecting the physico-chemical and antimicrobial activity of honey. This offered an advantage in terms of inhibition of silver-resistant bacteria isolates.

  20. Wound healing and infection in surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lars Tue

    2012-01-01

    : The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved.......: The aim was to clarify how smoking and nicotine affects wound healing processes and to establish if smoking cessation and nicotine replacement therapy reverse the mechanisms involved....

  1. Pentadecapeptide BPC 157 cream improves burn-wound healing and attenuates burn-gastric lesions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikus, D; Sikiric, P; Seiwerth, S; Petricevic, A; Aralica, G; Druzijancic, N; Rucman, R; Petek, M; Pigac, B; Perovic, D; Kolombo, M; Kokic, N; Mikus, S; Duplancic, B; Fattorini, I; Turkovic, B; Rotkvic, I; Mise, S; Prkacin, I; Konjevoda, P; Stambuk, N; Anic, T

    2001-12-01

    The effects of the gastric pentadecapeptide BPC 157 were investigated when administered topically or systemically in burned mice. This agent is known to have a beneficial effect in a variety of models of gastrointestinal lesions, as well as on wound or fracture healing. Deep partial skin thickness burns (1.5x1.5 cm) covering 20% of total body area, were induced under anesthesia on the back of mice by controlled burning and gastric lesions were assessed 1, 2, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days following injury. The first application of BPC 157 was immediately following burning, and thereafter, once daily, until 24 h before sacrifice. In the initial experiments, exposure to direct flame for 5 s, the BPC 157 was applied at 10 microg or 10 ng/kg b.w. intraperitoneally (i.p.) by injection or alternatively, topically, at the burn, as a thin layer of cream (50 microg of BPC 157 dissolved in 2 ml of distilled water was mixed with 50 g of commercial neutral cream (also used as local vehicle-control)), while silver sulfadiazine 1% cream was a standard agent acting locally. Others received no local medication: they were treated i.p. by injection of distilled water (distilled water-control) or left without any medication (control). In subsequent experiments involving deeper burns (direct flame for 7 s), BPC 157 creams (50 microg, 5 microg, 500 ng, 50 ng or 5 ng of BPC 157 dissolved in 2 ml of distilled water was mixed with 50 g of commercial neutral cream), or vehicle as a thin layer of cream, were applied topically, at the burn. Compared with untreated controls, in both experiments, in the BPC 157 cream-treated mice all parameters of burn healing were improved throughout the experiment: less edema was observed and inflammatory cell numbers decreased. Less necrosis was seen with an increased number of capillaries along with an advanced formation of dermal reticulin and collagen fibers. An increased number of preserved follicles were observed. Two weeks after injury, BPC 157 cream

  2. Effects of new wound dressings on healing of thermal burns of the skin in acute radiation disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legeza, V I; Galenko-Yaroshevskii, V P; Zinov'ev, E V; Paramonov, B A; Kreichman, G S; Turkovskii, I I; Gumenyuk, E S; Karnovich, A G; Khripunov, A K

    2004-09-01

    Effects of new wound dressing bacterial cellulose impregnated with SOD and poviargol (Procel-Super and Procel-PA) and Inerpan hydrogel dressing on the reparative processes in deep dermal burns (IIIa-IIIb degree) in rats exposed to total even irradiation in a dose of 4 Gy were studied. Inerpan and Procel-Super dressings proved to be the most effective under these conditions: they accelerated healing of burn wounds by 17.0 and 5.5%, respectively.

  3. Assessing burn wound depth using in vitro nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koruda, M J; Zimbler, A; Settle, R G; Jacobs, D O; Rolandelli, R H; Wolf, G L; Rombeau, J L

    1986-05-01

    There is no accurate noninvasive method for differentiating between partial-thickness and full-thickness cutaneous burn wounds. Full-thickness burns (FTB) result in slower resorption of wound edema than partial thickness burns (PTB). Since proton NMR parameters, particularly the T1 relaxation time, correlate with tissue water content (TWC), the present study determined whether proton NMR could distinguish PTB from FTB. An area of upper dorsum (approximately 15% BSA) of 35 adult rats was immersed in boiling water for either 3 sec (PTB) or 10 sec (FTB). In 10 control rats, the same area was immersed in room temperature water. Rats were sacrificed at either 3 or 48 hr after burn, and skin samples were analyzed to determine spin-lattice (T1) and spin-spin (T2) relaxation times. TWC was then measured gravimetrically by desiccation. Both T1 and T2 times significantly correlated with TWC (T1: r = 0.74, P less than 0.0001; T2: r = 0.75; P less than 0.0001). Both PTB and FTB resulted in significant elevations of T1, T2, and TWC 3 hr after injury (P less than 0.001). At 48 hr postburn the T1, T2, and TWC of the PTB group had decreased to control values (P less than 0.05), while all FTB parameters remained significantly elevated as compared to both the control and the 48-hr PTB parameters (P less than 0.001). In vitro NMR measurements distinguish PTB from FTB in this rat model within 48 hr. These data provide a basis for investigating in vitro NMR techniques for the noninvasive assessment of burn wound depth.

  4. Bioactive Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics for Corneal Wounds and Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Gina L.; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Pereira, H. Anne

    2017-01-01

    Significance: More than 2 million eye injuries and infections occur each year in the United States that leave civilians and military members with reduced or complete vision loss due to the lack of effective therapeutics. Severe ocular injuries and infections occur in varied settings including the home, workplace, and battlefields. In this review, we discuss the potential of developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as therapeutics for the treatment of corneal wounds and infections for which the current treatment options are inadequate. Recent Advances: Standard-of-care employs the use of fluorescein dye for the diagnosis of ocular defects and is followed by the use of antibiotics and/or steroids to treat the infection and reduce inflammation. Recent advances for treating corneal wounds include the development of amniotic membrane therapies, wound chambers, and drug-loaded hydrogels. In this review, we will discuss an innovative approach using AMPs with the dual effect of promoting corneal wound healing and clearing infections. Critical Issues: An important aspect of treating ocular injuries is that treatments need to be effective and administered expeditiously. This is especially important for injuries that occur during combat and in individuals who demonstrate delayed wound healing. To overcome gaps in current treatment modalities, bioactive peptides based on naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial proteins are being investigated as new therapeutics. Future Directions: The development of new therapeutics that can treat ocular infections and promote corneal wound healing, including the healing of persistent corneal epithelial defects, would be of great clinical benefit. PMID:28616359

  5. Bioactive Antimicrobial Peptides as Therapeutics for Corneal Wounds and Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Gina L; Kasus-Jacobi, Anne; Pereira, H Anne

    2017-06-01

    Significance: More than 2 million eye injuries and infections occur each year in the United States that leave civilians and military members with reduced or complete vision loss due to the lack of effective therapeutics. Severe ocular injuries and infections occur in varied settings including the home, workplace, and battlefields. In this review, we discuss the potential of developing antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) as therapeutics for the treatment of corneal wounds and infections for which the current treatment options are inadequate. Recent Advances: Standard-of-care employs the use of fluorescein dye for the diagnosis of ocular defects and is followed by the use of antibiotics and/or steroids to treat the infection and reduce inflammation. Recent advances for treating corneal wounds include the development of amniotic membrane therapies, wound chambers, and drug-loaded hydrogels. In this review, we will discuss an innovative approach using AMPs with the dual effect of promoting corneal wound healing and clearing infections. Critical Issues: An important aspect of treating ocular injuries is that treatments need to be effective and administered expeditiously. This is especially important for injuries that occur during combat and in individuals who demonstrate delayed wound healing. To overcome gaps in current treatment modalities, bioactive peptides based on naturally occurring cationic antimicrobial proteins are being investigated as new therapeutics. Future Directions: The development of new therapeutics that can treat ocular infections and promote corneal wound healing, including the healing of persistent corneal epithelial defects, would be of great clinical benefit.

  6. Burn Wound Healing and Treatment: Review and Advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    for the prevention of infections associated with combat-related injuries: 2011 update: endorsed by the Infectious Diseases Society of America and the...PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Rowan M. P., Cancio L. C., Elster E. A., Burmeister D . M., Rose L. F., Natesan S., Chan, R. K., Christy, R. J...proteins, and fats [84]. In addition to support with amino acids and vitamins [84], administration of insulin has been shown to de- crease healing time by

  7. The effect of saffron (Crocus sativus) extract for healing of second-degree burn wounds in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorasani, Ghasemali; Hosseinimehr, Seyed Jalal; Zamani, Peyman; Ghasemi, Maryam; Ahmadi, Amirhossein

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of pollen of saffron extract cream in the treatment of thermal induced burn wounds and to compare its results with silver sulfadiazine (SSD) in rats. Animals were divided into four groups and administrated a topical cream including control, base, saffron (20%) or SSD (1%) at 24 hour after a burn injury that was induced by hot water. In special days, according to a pre-planned schedule, animal's weight, wound size, as well as skin histo-pathology were determined in different groups under topical treatments. On day 25, average size of wound was 5.5, 4, 0.9 and 4.1 cm2 in control, base, saffron and silver groups. The wound size of saffron group was significantly smaller than other groups. Histological comparison has shown that saffron significantly increased re-epithelialization in burn wounds, as compared to other cream-treated wounds. Although the exact mechanism of saffron is unclear, anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of saffron may have contributed to the wound healing. The results of this study raise the possibility of potential efficacy of saffron in accelerating wound healing in burn injuries.

  8. Surgical wound infection: epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubin Robert H

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Surgical wound infection remains a significant problem following an operation, although surveillance for such infections remains a challenge exacerbated by early discharge and outpatient surgery. The riskof such infections isdetermined by technical problems with the operation, particularly bleeding, the amount of devitalized tissue created, and the need for drains within the wound, as well as such metabolic factors as obesity and diabetes. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis can decrease the incidence of such infections further, but a technically perfect operation is even more important.

  9. Innate defense regulator peptide 1018 in wound healing and wound infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Steinstraesser

    Full Text Available Innate defense regulators (IDRs are synthetic immunomodulatory versions of natural host defense peptides (HDP. IDRs mediate protection against bacterial challenge in the absence of direct antimicrobial activity, representing a novel approach to anti-infective and anti-inflammatory therapy. Previously, we reported that IDR-1018 selectively induced chemokine responses and suppressed pro-inflammatory responses. As there has been an increasing appreciation for the ability of HDPs to modulate complex immune processes, including wound healing, we characterized the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 in vitro. Further, we investigated the efficacy of IDR-1018 in diabetic and non-diabetic wound healing models. In all experiments, IDR-1018 was compared to the human HDP LL-37 and HDP-derived wound healing peptide HB-107. IDR-1018 was significantly less cytotoxic in vitro as compared to either LL-37 or HB-107. Furthermore, administration of IDR-1018 resulted in a dose-dependent increase in fibroblast cellular respiration. In vivo, IDR-1018 demonstrated significantly accelerated wound healing in S. aureus infected porcine and non-diabetic but not in diabetic murine wounds. However, no significant differences in bacterial colonization were observed. Our investigation demonstrates that in addition to previously reported immunomodulatory activities IDR-1018 promotes wound healing independent of direct antibacterial activity. Interestingly, these effects were not observed in diabetic wounds. It is anticipated that the wound healing activities of IDR-1018 can be attributed to modulation of host immune pathways that are suppressed in diabetic wounds and provide further evidence of the multiple immunomodulatory activities of IDR-1018.

  10. Hybrid wound dressings with controlled release of antibiotics: Structure-release profile effects and in vivo study in a guinea pig burn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, Meital; Egozi, Dana; Shemesh, Maoz; Keren, Aviad; Mazor, Eytan; Baranes-Zeevi, Maya; Goldstein, Nyra; Berdicevsky, Israela; Gilhar, Amos; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2015-08-01

    Over the last decades, wound dressings have evolved from a crude traditional gauze dressing to tissue-engineered scaffolds. Many types of wound dressing formats are commercially available or have been investigated. We developed and studied hybrid bilayer wound dressings which combine a drug-loaded porous poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) top layer with a spongy collagen sublayer. Such a structure is very promising because it combines the advantageous properties of both layers. The antibiotic drug gentamicin was incorporated into the top layer for preventing and/or defeating infections. In this study, we examined the effect of the top layer's structure on the gentamicin release profile and on the resulting in vivo wound healing. The latter was tested on a guinea pig burn model, compared to the neutral non-adherent dressing material Melolin® (Smith & Nephew) and Aquacel® Ag (ConvaTec). The release kinetics of gentamicin from the various studied formulations exhibited burst release values between 8% and 38%, followed by a drug elution rate that decreased with time and lasted for at least 7 weeks. The hybrid dressing, with relatively slow gentamicin release, enabled the highest degree of wound healing (28%), which is at least double that obtained by the other dressing formats (8-12%). It resulted in the lowest degree of wound contraction and a relatively low amount of inflammatory cells compared to the controls. This dressing was found to be superior to hybrid wound dressings with fast gentamicin release and to the neat hybrid dressing without drug release. Since this dressing exhibited promising results and does not require frequent bandage changes, it offers a potentially valuable concept for treating large infected burns. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effect of Coriander cream on healing of superficial second degree burn wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Abbas Zadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coriander with the binominal name of Corianda Sativum, is one of the oldest medicinal plants ever known to man. Anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial, and anti-fungal effects of its oil has been mentioned in numerous studies. This study examines the impact of coriander cream on wound healing of the second-degree singe burn. Methods: In this experimental study which was performed in the animal lab of the Hazrat Fatemeh Hospital in Tehran, 48 adult male rats with an approximate weight of 250-300 grams, with deep burns of 2 cm 4×2 dimensions were prepared and divided into 4 groups of 12. We used silver sulfadiazine cream, alpha ointment, coriander cream and vaseline gauze (control group dressings in burn wound of the groups 1 to 4 respectively. At the end of the study (30 days, rats were euthanized with a high dose of thiopental and the wounds were evaluated on days 10 and 17 with a punch biopsy. Samples were fixed with 10% formalin on histopathology slide using haematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining (to assess and determine the presence of inflammatory cells. The amount of fibrin and collagen at the site were evaluated using a software program ImageJ, version 1.45 (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA. Results: The mean of wound surface area in the first photography was no significant (P= 0. 135. The rate of wound healing in alpha ointment and coriander cream had better outcomes than either of the other two groups (P= 0.000. The healing of the wound in silver sulfadiazine group was significantly less than other groups. Pathology results showed a statistically significant difference between the four groups (coriander, alpha, SSD and control, based on the Kruskal-Wallis test. These relate to (1 polymorphonuclear in the first (P= 0.032 and the second series (P= 0.003, (2 Angiogenesis in the second series (P= 0.004. (3 Fibrosis in the first series (P= 0.024 and the second series (P= 0.000. Conclusion: The results of this study

  12. Prevention of Infections Associated with Combat-Related Burn Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    that resulted from the bombing of Hiroshima would characterize future conflicts.7 Once estab- lished, the US Army Burn Center focused research efforts...et al. Burn infections. In: Holzheimer RG, Mannick JA, eds. Surgical Treatment-Evidence Based and Problem Oriented. Bern -Weun, New York: W

  13. Healing potential of Iranian traditional medicinal plants on burn wounds in alloxan-induced diabetic rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ghasemi Pirbalouti

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Malva sylvestris, Punica granatum, Amygdalus communis, Arnebia euchroma and Scrophularia deserti are important medicinal plants in Iranian traditional medicine (Unani whose have been used as remedy against edema, burn, and wound and for their carminative, antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory activities. The ethanol extracts of M. sylvestris and P. granatum flowers, A. communis leaves, A. euchroma roots and S. deserti stems were used to evaluate the burn healing activity in alloxan-induced diabetic rats. Burns were induced in Wistar rats divided into nine groups as following; Group-I: normal rats were treated with simple ointment base (control, Group-II: diabetic rats were treated with simple ointment base (control, Groups-III and -VII: diabetic rats were treated with simple ointment base containing of extracts (diabetic animals, Groups VIII: diabetic rats were treated with simple ointment base containing of mixed extracts, Group-IX: diabetic rats received the standard drug (Silver Sulfadiazine. The efficacy of treatments was evaluated based on wound area, epithelialization time and histopathological characteristics. Wound contraction showed that there is high significant difference between the different groups (p<0.001. At the 18th day, A. euchroma, S. deserti, A. communis and mixed extract ointment treated groups healed 80-90%. At the 9th and 18th days the experiment, the best results were obtained with A. communis and standard drug, when compared to the other groups as well as to the controls. It may be concluded that almond leaves (sweet and bitter formulated in the simple ointment base is effective in the treatment of burns and thus supports its traditional use.

  14. The Effect of Lithospermum officinale, Silver Sulfadiazine and Alpha Ointments in Healing of Burn Wound Injuries in Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtasham Amiri, Zahra; Tanideh, Nader; Seddighi, Anahita; Mokhtari, Maral; Amini, Masood; Shakouri Partovi, Alborz; Manafi, Amir; Hashemi, Seyedeh Sara; Mehrabani, Davood

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Burn is the most devastating condition in emergency medicine leading to chronic disabilities. This study aimed to compare the effect of Lithospermum officinale, silver sulfadiazine and alpha ointments on healing of burn wounds in rat. METHODS Ninety-five rats were divided into 5 groups. Group 1 just underwent burn injury, and groups 2-5 received alpha ointment, silver sulfadiazine (SSD), gel base and L. officinale extract, respectively. A hot plate was used for induction of a standard 3rd degree burn wound. Burn wounds were macroscopically and microscopically evaluated on days 7th, 14th and 21st after burn induction. RESULTS A decrease in the number of inflammatory cells was noted when L. officinale and SSD were applied while the most inflammatory response was seen after administration of alpha ointment. The number of macrophages alone decreased after burn injury, while the frequency was the most when L. officinale and alpha ointment were applied. Re-epithelialization, angiogenesis and formation of granulation tissue were the best in relation to L. officinale and alpha ointment while, the worst results belonged to burn injury group and SSD regarding granulation tissue formation. Considering histological assessment, the best results were observed for scoring of inflammation, re-epithelialization, angiogenesis, formation of granulation tissue and number of macrophage when L. officinale and alpha ointment were used after burn injury. CONCLUSION It can be concluded that topical application of L. officinale as a non-toxic, inexpensive and easy to produce herbal can lead to a rapid epithelialization and wound healing and these findings can be added to the literature on burn wound healing. PMID:29218280

  15. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léguillier, Teddy; Lecsö-Bornet, Marylin; Lémus, Christelle; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Lebouvier, Nicolas; Hnawia, Edouard; Nour, Mohammed; Aalbersberg, William; Ghazi, Kamelia; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Rat, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Background Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae) is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO). In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1), Tahiti (CIO2, 3), Fiji islands (CIO4) and New Caledonia (CIO5) were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety. Methods The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain. Results Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore

  16. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddy Léguillier

    Full Text Available Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO. In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1, Tahiti (CIO2, 3, Fiji islands (CIO4 and New Caledonia (CIO5 were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety.The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain.Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore, our results

  17. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léguillier, Teddy; Lecsö-Bornet, Marylin; Lémus, Christelle; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Lebouvier, Nicolas; Hnawia, Edouard; Nour, Mohammed; Aalbersberg, William; Ghazi, Kamelia; Raharivelomanana, Phila; Rat, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae) is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO). In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1), Tahiti (CIO2, 3), Fiji islands (CIO4) and New Caledonia (CIO5) were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety. The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain. Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore, our results showed that CIO

  18. Perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis and wound infection following breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, R; Zucker, J R; Zaleznik, D F; Hopkins, C C; Dellinger, E P; Karchmer, A W; Bryan, C S; Burke, J F; Wikler, M A; Marino, S K

    1993-02-01

    The effectiveness of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis against wound infections following breast surgery was investigated by meta-analysis of published data from a randomized clinical trial and an observational data set, which included a total of 2587 surgical procedures, including excisional biopsy, lumpectomy, mastectomy, reduction mammoplasty and axillary node dissection. There were 98 wound infections (3.8%). Prophylaxis was used for 44% (1141) of these procedures, cephalosporins accounted for 986 (86%) of these courses of antibiotics. Prophylaxis prevented 38% of infections, after controlling for operation type, duration of surgery and participation in the randomized trial (Mantel-Haenszel Odds Ratio = 0.62, 95% confidence interval = 0.40-0.95, P = 0.03). There was no significant variation in efficacy according to operation type or duration. We conclude that antibiotic prophylaxis significantly reduces the risk of postoperative wound infection following these commonly performed breast procedures.

  19. Role of Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy in Deep Sternal Wound Infection After Open Heart Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cemalettin Aydın

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mediastinitis is a devastating complication in open heart surgery. The most common treatments after debridement are rewiring with antibiotic irrigation. Vacuum assisted closure therapy is a recently introduced technique that promotes the healing of difficult wounds, including post-sternotomy mediastinitis.Patients and Methods: Forty one patients with deep sternal wound infection were divided into two groups based on the treatment method used. Twenty two patients with post-cardio to my deep sternal wound infection were treated primarily by vacuum assisted closure method (group A and 19 patients with deep sternal wound infection who received closed mediastinal irrigation were treated with antibiotics (group B between January 2006 and January 2010.Results: The two groups were compared. Three patients died during treatment in group B. The median healing time was significantly shorter in group A (mean, 13.5 ± 3.2 days compared to 18 days (mean, 21.2 ± 16.4 days in group B (p< 0.001. Deep sternal wound infection showed no recurrences after the vacuum treatment, while 7 (24% patients in group B suffered recurrences. Hospital stay was significantly shorter in group A (median, 30.5 days; mean, 32.2 ± 11.3 days vs. median, 45 days; mean, 49.2 ± 19.3 days (p= 0.001.Conclusion: A significantly shorter healing time was confirmed with vacuum assisted closure. Hospital stay remained significantly shorter in group A (35 vs. 46 days.

  20. Wound-healing Activity of Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim Seed Oil on Experimentally Burned Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Qiang; Kang, Rong; Huo, Jun-Cheng; Xie, Yan-Hua; Wang, Si-Wang; Cao, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Background: The seed oil of Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim (ZBSO) is considered to be rich source of fatty acids, mainly oleic and linoleic acids, and has been used for the treatment of burns in Chinese medicine. Objective: We evaluated the healing efficacy of ZBSO and explored its possible mechanism on scalded rats. Materials and Methods: Sprague-Dawley rat models with deep second-degree burns were set up, and ZBSO (500 and 1000 μl/wound) was topically applied twice daily for 7 days and then once daily until wound healing. The therapeutic effects of ZBSO were evaluated by observing wound closure time, decrustation time, wound-healing ratio, and pathological changes. Collagen type-III, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, phospho-nuclear factor-κB (p-NF-κB) p65, inhibitor of NF-κB subunit α p-IκBα, and inhibitor of NF-κB subunit α (IκBα) expression were determined using Western blotting. Results: The ZBSO-treated group showed a higher wound-healing ratio and shorter decrustation and wound closure times than the untreated group. The topical application of ZBSO increased collagen synthesis as evidenced by an increase in hydroxyproline level and upregulated expression of collagen type-III on days 7, 14, and 21 posttreatment. A reduction in MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions also confirmed the collagen formation efficacy of ZBSO. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in superoxide dismutase levels and a decrease in malondialdehyde levels in ZBSO-treated wounds. ZBSO also decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 (IL-1) β, and IL-6 levels in serum, upregulated IκBα, and downregulated p-NF-κB p65 and p-IκBα expression in vivo, indicating the anti-inflammatory action of ZBSO. Conclusion: ZBSO has significant potential to treat burn wounds by accelerating collagen synthesis and the anti-inflammatory cascade of the healing process. SUMMARY The seed oil of Zanthoxylum bungeanum Maxim (ZBSO) is rich of fatty acidsThe healing efficacy of ZBSO on

  1. Early Post-Operative Wound Infection in Austin Moore ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Early post operative wound infection is usually seen within four weeks of orthopaedic operations 1.Use of foreign implants, operating on the elderly, the obese, diabetic or patients with other chronic diseases increase the risk further 2.This study reveals the incidence of early infection and associated factors ...

  2. [Postoperative wound infections. Pathophysiology, risk factors and preventive concepts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachenberg, T; Sentürk, M; Jannasch, O; Lippert, H

    2010-09-01

    Postoperative wound infections are the third most common type of nosocomial infection in German emergency hospitals after pneumonia and urinary infections. They are associated with increased morbidity and mortality, prolonged hospital stay and increased costs. The most important risk factors include the microbiological state of the skin surrounding the incision, delayed or premature prophylaxis with antibiotics, duration of surgery, emergency surgery, poorly controlled diabetes mellitus, malignant disease, smoking and advanced age. Anesthesiological measures to decrease the incidence of wound infections are maintaining normothermia, strict indications for allogenic blood transfusions and timely prophylaxis with antibiotics. Blood glucose concentrations should be kept in the range of 8.3-10 mmol/l (150-180 mg/dl) as lower values are associated with increased complications. Intraoperative and postoperative hyperoxia with 80% O(2) has not been shown to effectively decrease wound infections. The application of local anesthetics into the surgical wound in clinically relevant doses for postoperative analgesia does not impair wound healing.

  3. Virtual reality pain control during burn wound debridement of combat-related burn injuries using robot-like arm mounted VR goggles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maani, Christopher V; Hoffman, Hunter G; Morrow, Michelle; Maiers, Alan; Gaylord, Kathryn; McGhee, Laura L; DeSocio, Peter A

    2011-07-01

    This is the first controlled study to explore whether adjunctive immersive virtual reality (VR) can reduce excessive pain of soldiers with combat-related burn injuries during wound debridement. Patients were US soldiers burned in combat attacks involving explosive devices in Iraq or Afghanistan. During the same wound care session using a within-subject experimental design, 12 patients received half of their severe burn wound cleaning procedure (~6 minutes) with standard of care pharmacologies and half while in VR (treatment order randomized). Three 0 to 10 Graphic Rating Scale pain scores for each of the treatment conditions served as the primary variables. Patients reported significantly less pain when distracted with VR. "Worst pain" (pain intensity) dropped from 6.25 of 10 to 4.50 of 10. "Pain unpleasantness" ratings dropped from "moderate" (6.25 of 10) to "mild" (2.83 of 10). "Time spent thinking about pain" dropped from 76% during no VR to 22% during VR. Patients rated "no VR" as "no fun at all" (first evidence from a controlled study that adjunctive immersive VR reduced pain of patients with combat-related burn injuries during severe burn wound debridement. Pain reduction during VR was greatest in patients with the highest pain during no VR. These patients were the first to use a unique custom robot-like arm mounted VR goggle system.

  4. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirilova, N. V., E-mail: n.kirilova@vitavallis.com; Fomenko, A. N., E-mail: alserova@ispms.tsc.ru; Korovin, M. S., E-mail: msk@ispms.tsc.ru [Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, 2/4 Akademicheskii pr., Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5–3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  5. The effect of differing ambient oxygen tensions on wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, T K; Linsey, M; Grislis, H; Sonne, M; Jawetz, E

    1975-01-01

    Wound infections were studied in rabbits using two standard inocula (approximately equal to 10-4 and approximately equal to 10-6) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa injected into subcutaneous wound dead space made by implantation of standard wire mesh cylinders. The inoculation was done on the fourth day after implantation of the cylinders in animals kept from the day of implantation in atmospheres of 12%, 21%, or 45% oxygen content. Samples of wound fluid (0.2 ml) were removed for quantitative culture just before inoculation and 3, 7, 14, and 21 days later. No positive cultures resulted from samples taken before inoculation. One uninoculated wound served as a control in each animal. None of these control wounds became infected. Culture counts were significantly highest in the anoxic group and lowest in the hyperoxic group. Established infections were significantly lowest in the hyperoxics and highest in the hypoxics. The percent of wounds showing a significant culture count showed a similar trend. The mechanisms of this effect is not known, but a possible mechanism lies in the relative inability of leucocytes to kill this bacterium under hypoxic conditions.

  6. Application of VitaVallis dressing for infected wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilova, N. V.; Fomenko, A. N.; Korovin, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    Today there is a growing demand for safe and efficient antimicrobial dressings for infected wound treatment. The antimicrobial sorption material for VitaVallis dressings was produced by one-stage oxidation of aluminum nanopowder in water in the presence of fibrous acetylcellulose matrix. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the material is made up of fibers of diameter 1.5-3.0 µm with adhered agglomerated alumina nanosheets. An antimicrobial study revealed a high inhibitory effect of VitaVallis against the growth of gram-negative (E.coli, P. aeruginosa) and gram-positive (S. aureus) strains. The antimicrobial activity of the dressing against microbial pathogens on the wound surface was demonstrated in in vivo experiments on male rats. The dressing was also tested on volunteer patients. The testing showed reduction of the wound healing period, accelerated cleaning of the infected wound and enhanced tissue regeneration in the wound. The results demonstrate that the VitaVallis dressing can be used for the treatment of deep infected wounds.

  7. Aquatically acquired Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-15

    Sep 15, 1990 ... venous penicillin, amikacin and metronidazole pending the microbiological results of a pus swab of the wound taken on admission. While his pyrexia settled over the next 3 days, the local inflammation and cellulitis worsened, necessitating opera- tive debridement. At operation no abnormalities other than.

  8. An experimental burn wound-healing study of non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma jet arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ok Joo; Ju, Hyung Woo; Khang, Gilson; Sun, Peter P; Rivera, Jose; Cho, Jin Hoon; Park, Sung-Jin; Eden, J Gary; Park, Chan Hum

    2016-04-01

    In contrast with a thermal plasma surgical instrument based on coagulative and ablative properties, low-temperature (non-thermal) non-equilibrium plasmas are known for novel medicinal effects on exposed tissue while minimizing undesirable tissue damage. In this study we demonstrated that arrays of non-thermal microplasma jet devices fabricated from a transparent polymer can efficiently inactivate fungi (Candida albicans) as well as bacteria (Escherichia coli), both in vitro and in vivo, and that this leads to a significant wound-healing effect. Microplasma jet arrays offer several advantages over conventional single-jet devices, including superior packing density, inherent scalability for larger treatment areas, unprecedented material flexibility in a plasma jet device, and the selective generation of medically relevant reactive species at higher plasma densities. The therapeutic effects of our multi-jet device were verified on second-degree burns in animal rat models. Reduction of the wound area and the histology of the wound after treatment have been investigated, and expression of interleukin (IL)-1α, -6 and -10 was verified to evaluate the healing effects. The consistent effectiveness of non-thermal plasma treatment has been observed especially in decreasing wound size and promoting re-epithelialization through collagen arrangement and the regulation of expression of inflammatory genes. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Effects of nicotine on corneal wound healing following acute alkali burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Won; Lim, Chae Woong; Kim, Bumseok

    2017-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that smoking is a pivotal risk factor for the progression of several chronic diseases. Nicotine, the addictive component of cigarettes, has powerful pathophysiological properties in the body. Although the effects of cigarette smoking on corneal re-epithelialization have been studied, the effects of nicotine on corneal wound healing-related neovascularization and fibrosis have not been fully demonstrated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic administration of nicotine on corneal wound healing following acute insult induced by an alkali burn. BALB/C female mice randomly received either vehicle (2% saccharin) or nicotine (100 or 200 μg/ml in 2% saccharin) in drinking water ad libitum. After 1 week, animals were re-randomized and the experimental group was subjected to a corneal alkali burn, and then nicotine was administered until day 14 after the alkali burn. A corneal alkali burn model was generated by placing a piece of 2 mm-diameter filter paper soaked in 1N NaOH on the right eye. Histopathological analysis and the expression level of the pro-angiogenic genes vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP9) revealed that chronic nicotine administration enhanced alkali burn-induced corneal neovascularization. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of the pro-fibrogenic factors α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and collagen α1 (Col1) was enhanced in the high-concentration nicotine-treated group compared with the vehicle group after corneal injury. Immunohistochemical analysis also showed that the αSMA-positive area was increased in chronic nicotine-treated mice after corneal alkali burn. An in vitro assay found that expression of the α3, α7, and β1 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) subunits was significantly increased by chemical injury in human corneal fibroblast cells. Moreover, alkali-induced fibrogenic gene expression and

  10. Efficacy of 1% acetic acid in the treatment of chronic wounds infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa: prospective randomised controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhusudhan, V L

    2016-12-01

    Chronic wounds are those wounds that are persistent and do not respond to any sort of treatment. The concept of using topical antiseptics on open wounds is to prevent and treat infections. They also help to shorten the time taken to heal the wounds. The use of topical agents on wounds to prevent infection is a minimal ability to develop resistance to the microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative opportunistic pathogen with innate resistance to many antibiotics. In places that are economically backward, these problems get compounded by the inability of patients to afford newer expensive drugs. Topically applied dilute acetic acid, which is cheap and easily available, has been found to be effective in such chronic wounds. In the present study, an attempt has been made to use 1% acetic acid as the sole antimicrobial agent for the treatment of pseudomonal wound infections. A control limb was used in which the wounds were treated with normal saline. Our objective was to evaluate the efficacy of acetic acid in low concentration of 1% in chronic wounds infected with P. aeruginosa. This was a prospective study conducted over a period of 6 months. All patients with chronic wounds infected with P. aeruginosa. Wounds due to massive burns, suspected malignancy, immunocompromised individuals and individuals with sepsis. A total of 32 patients enrolled in the study. Subjects were randomised equally to the 1% acetic acid group and saline dressing group. None of the patients received any systemic antibiotics during the study period and received twice daily dressings. The endpoint of the treatment was wounds free of P. aeruginosa. The duration of treatment required to eliminate the Pseudomonas from the wounds in the acetic acid group was on an average 7 days less than that required by the saline group. P value was acetic acid group irrespective of the sensitivity of the organism to antibiotics, Pseudomonas organisms were eliminated within the same time period - 4·5

  11. Antibacterial properties of tualang honey and its effect in burn wound management: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Nur-Azida

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of honey as a natural product of Apis spp. for burn treatment has been widely applied for centuries. Tualang honey has been reported to have antibacterial properties against various microorganisms, including those from burn-related diagnoses, and is cheaper and easier to be absorbed by Aquacel dressing. The aim of this study is to evaluate the potential antibacterial properties of tualang honey dressing and to determine its effectiveness as a partial thickness burn wound dressing. Methods In order to quantitate the bioburden of the swabs, pour plates were performed to obtain the colony count (CFU/ml. Swabs obtained from burn wounds were streaked on blood agar and MacConkey agar for bacterial isolation and identification. Later, antibacterial activity of Aquacel-tualang honey, Aquacel-Manuka honey, Aquacel-Ag and Aquacel- plain dressings against bacteria isolated from patients were tested (in-vitro to see the effectiveness of those dressings by zone of inhibition assays. Results Seven organisms were isolated. Four types of Gram-negative bacteria, namely Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp., and three Gram-positive bacteria, namely Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus (CONS and Streptococcus spp., were isolated. Total bacterial count decreased on day 6 and onwards. In the in-vitro antibacterial study, Aquacel-Ag and Aquacel-Manuka honey dressings gave better zone of inhibition for Gram positive bacteria compared to Aquacel-Tualang honey dressing. However, comparable results were obtained against Gram negative bacteria tested with Aquacel-Manuka honey and Aquacel-Tualang honey dressing. Conclusions Tualang honey has a bactericidal as well as bacteriostatic effect. It is useful as a dressing, as it is easier to apply and is less sticky compared to Manuka honey. However, for Gram positive bacteria, tualang honey is not as effective as usual care

  12. Effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide on the wound healing of alkali-burned corneas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nese Tuncel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP on wound healing in experimental alkali burns of the cornea. METHODS: Twenty-seven albino rabbits, weighing 3.2±0.75 kg were used. Alkali burns were induced on corneas by applying 10 mm Whatman paper No:50 soaked in 1 mol/L NaOH. They have further classified into 5 groups as follows: 1 control group given no treatment (n=5; 2 VIP given subconjunctivally (n=6; 3 VIP injected into anterior chamber (n=6; 4 NaCl 0.9% given subconjunctivally (n=5; 5 NaCl 0.9% given into the anterior chamber (n=5. All treatment protocols except control group were followed by topical eye drops composed of VIP at two hourly intervals for one week from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. RESULTS: VIP treated groups of rabbits with alkali burns were found to have better wound healing findings histo-pathologically when compared to those of control group who have received no treatment on day 30. No differences were observed between groups in respect to degree of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL infiltration and degree of loss of amorphous substrate on day 15. However, PMNL infiltration and degree of loss of amorphous substrate were lower in Groups 2 and 3 when compared to that of control group on day 30 (P(0.05. CONCLUSION: We have shown that VIP has positive effects on alkali induced corneal burns. VIP may inhibit PMNL migration to cornea through an immunomodulatory effect. Inhibition of PMNL migration might reduce the release of collagenases and this might prevent the extracellular amorphous substance loss.

  13. SUCROSE IN INFECTED WOUNDS: A SCIENTIFIC BASIS AND SPECULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Oliver Rossi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sucrose use in wound treatment is a common practice that seems to promote tissue healing and reduce microbial load. The objective here was thus to analyze the scientific evidence through an integrative review to determinate indications and contraindications for use of sucrose in the form of granulated, brown (unrefined muscovado sugar and/or refined sugar in infected wounds and thus assist the professional in clinical decision-making. Ten studies published in full articles were selected, from the period 2002 to 2012 and indexed in the PubMed, Cinahl, Lilacs and Cochrane databases. Considering the analysis of studies, mostly experimental in the animal model, sugar’s effectiveness in tissue repair was verified, as was positive modulation in the inflammatory response. To elucidate the mechanisms or action of sucrose in the wound, further clinical trials are recommended in order to standardize the concentration, volume and frequency of sucrose in changes of wound dressings.

  14. Antimicrobial dressings: Comparison of the ability of a panel of dressings to prevent biofilm formation by key burn wound pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, Fenella D; Rauf, Maryam; Bamford, Amy; Wearn, Christopher M; Bishop, Jonathan R B; Burt, Rebecca; Fraise, Adam P; Moiemen, Naiem S; Oppenheim, Beryl A; Webber, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    Antimicrobial medicated dressings (AMD) are often used to reduce bacterial infection of burns and other wounds. However, there is limited literature regarding comparative efficacies to inform effective clinical decision making. Following on from a previous study where we demonstrated good antibiofilm properties of acetic acid (AA), we assessed and compared the in vitro anti-biofilm activity of a range of AMDs and non-AMDs to AA. Laboratory experiments determined the ability of a range of eleven commercial AMD, two nAMD, and AA, to prevent the formation of biofilms of a panel of four isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii. There is a large variation in ability of different dressings to inhibit biofilm formation, seen between dressings that contain the same, and those that contain other antimicrobial agents. The best performing AMD were Mepilex(®) Ag and Acticoat. AA consistently prevented biofilm formation. Large variation exists in the ability of AMD to prevent biofilm formation and colonisation of wounds. A standardised in vitro methodology should be developed for external parties to examine and compare the efficacies of commercially available AMDs, along with robust clinical randomised controlled trials. This is essential for informed clinical decision-making and optimal patient management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  15. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Infected Wound following Posterior Spinal Instrumentation using Simple Self-assembled System: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Chang CW; HZ Chan; SW Lim; EH Khoo; Zulkiflee O

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Postoperative wound infection in an instrumented spine patient is often disastrous. Management includes implant removal leading to spine instability. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) applied to the spine surgical wound is one of the wound care technique with successful results. We report a case of a man who sustained Chance fracture of Lumbar 1 (L1) vertebra treated with long segment posterior instrumentation, who unfortunately developed Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) ...

  16. Improving burn care and preventing burns by establishing a burn database in Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzaylov, Gennadiy; Murthy, Sushila; Dunaev, Alexander; Savchyn, Vasyl; Knittel, Justin; Zabolotina, Olga; Dylewski, Maggie L; Driscoll, Daniel N

    2014-08-01

    Burns are a challenge for trauma care and a contribution to the surgical burden. The former Soviet republic of Ukraine has a foundation for burn care; however data concerning burns in Ukraine has historically been scant. The objective of this paper was to compare a new burn database to identify problems and implement improvements in burn care and prevention in this country. Retrospective analyses of demographic and clinical data of burn patients including Tukey's post hoc test, analysis of variance, and chi square analyses, and Fisher's exact test were used. Data were compared to the American Burn Association (ABA) burn repository. This study included 1752 thermally injured patients treated in 20 hospitals including Specialized Burn Unit in Municipal Hospital #8 Lviv, Lviv province in Ukraine. Scald burns were the primary etiology of burns injuries (70%) and burns were more common among children less than five years of age (34%). Length of stay, mechanical ventilation use, infection rates, and morbidity increased with greater burn size. Mortality was significantly related to burn size, inhalation injury, age, and length of stay. Wound infections were associated with burn size and older age. Compared to ABA data, Ukrainian patients had double the length of stay and a higher rate of wound infections (16% vs. 2.4%). We created one of the first burn databases from a region of the former Soviet Union in an effort to bring attention to burn injury and improve burn care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. NOSOCOMIAL WOUND INFECTION AMONGST POST OPERATIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nosocomial infection constitutes a major public health problem worldwide. Increasing antibiotic resistance of pathogens associated with nosocomial infections also becomes a major therapeutic challenge for physicians. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify post operative bacterial infections in the patients developing ...

  18. Prophylaxis against wound infection following herniorrhaphy or breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, R; Zucker, J R; Zaleznik, D F; Hopkins, C C; Dellinger, E P; Karchmer, A W; Bryan, C S; Burke, J F; Wikler, M A; Marino, S K

    1992-09-01

    The effect of perioperative antibiotic prophylaxis on definite wound infections was assessed for 3202 herniorrhaphies or selected breast surgery procedures. Patients were identified preoperatively and monitored for greater than or equal to 4 weeks. Thirty-four percent of patients (1077/3202) received prophylaxis at the discretion of the surgeon; 86 definite wound infections (2.7%) were identified. Prophylaxis recipients were at higher risk for infection, with a higher proportion of mastectomies, longer procedures, and other factors. Patients who received prophylaxis experienced 41% fewer definite wound infections (odds ratio [OR], 0.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.35-0.99; P = .04) and 65% fewer definite wound infections requiring parenteral antibiotic therapy (OR, 0.35; 95% CI, 0.15-0.88; P = .02) after adjustment for duration of surgery and type of procedure. Additional adjustment for age, body mass index, the presence of drains, diabetes, and exposure to corticosteroids did not change the magnitude of this effect meaningfully. The effect of prophylaxis was similar for all procedures studied. In the absence of formal guidelines, surgeons at these institutions administered prophylaxis preferentially to patients at highest risk.

  19. Incidence of Proteus species in wound infections and their sensitivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... ofloxacin and gentamycin while all were resistant to tetracycline and erythromycin. Knowledge of the microbial flora of an environment and the sensitivity pattern are important tools in the management of wound infections especially those caused by Proteus species, and are also useful in formulating rational antibiotic ...

  20. Microbiology of post-operative wound infection in implant surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of fractures with implants and prosthesis has become the first line in the management of fractures in most trauma centres. Incidentally, this is associated with post-operative wound infection which is accompanied by significant morbidity, cost and mortality.

  1. Risk Factors For Wound Infections After Implant Surgery | Onche ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    OBJECTIVE: Post-operative wound infection (POWI) rates for implant surgery are in the range of 0.08 to 13% in spite of the many advances in surgery in the past decades. It is therefore imperative that we develop a system of predicting the occurrence of POWI as a key to effective prevention. One approach is for each ...

  2. Surgical wound infection in clean-contaminated and contaminated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Surgical wound (site) infection is the commonest complication following laparotomy for clean-contaminated and contaminated abdominal operations. Good surgical technique and perioperative prophylactic antibiotics in clean-contaminated and contaminated abdominal operations contribute to the low rate of ...

  3. Combining Ketamine and Virtual Reality Pain Control During Severe Burn Wound Care: One Military and One Civilian Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    cleanings. Key Words. Analgesia ; Burn Pain ; Wound Care; Distraction; Virtual Reality Introduction Opioids are the cornerstone analgesics for patients with...severe burn. Ketamine is used to potentiate opioid analgesia and to allow better pain control without exces- sive opioid side effects [10,11]. In...signals transmitted from the pain receptors to the brain, thereby decreasing pain . In contrast to the pharmacologic mechanism for ketamine analgesia

  4. Quantitative assessment of graded burn wounds using a commercial and research grade laser speckle imaging (LSI) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticorvo, A.; Rowland, R.; Yang, B.; Lertsakdadet, B.; Crouzet, C.; Bernal, N.; Choi, B.; Durkin, A. J.

    2017-02-01

    Burn wounds are often characterized by injury depth, which then dictates wound management strategy. While most superficial burns and full thickness burns can be diagnosed through visual inspection, clinicians experience difficulty with accurate diagnosis of burns that fall between these extremes. Accurately diagnosing burn severity in a timely manner is critical for starting the appropriate treatment plan at the earliest time points to improve patient outcomes. To address this challenge, research groups have studied the use of commercial laser Doppler imaging (LDI) systems to provide objective characterization of burn-wound severity. Despite initial promising findings, LDI systems are not commonplace in part due to long acquisition times that can suffer from artifacts in moving patients. Commercial LDI systems are being phased out in favor of laser speckle imaging (LSI) systems that can provide similar information with faster acquisition speeds. To better understand the accuracy and usefulness of commercial LSI systems in burn-oriented research, we studied the performance of a commercial LSI system in three different sample systems and compared its results to a research-grade LSI system in the same environments. The first sample system involved laboratory measurements of intralipid (1%) flowing through a tissue simulating phantom, the second preclinical measurements in a controlled burn study in which wounds of graded severity were created on a Yorkshire pig, and the third clinical measurements involving a small sample of clinical patients. In addition to the commercial LSI system, a research grade LSI system that was designed and fabricated in our labs was used to quantitatively compare the performance of both systems and also to better understand the "Perfusion Unit" output of commercial systems.

  5. Aquatically acquired Aeromonas hydrophila wound infection

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-15

    Sep 15, 1990 ... in 2 cases of mixed infection associated with swimming acci- dents.l Recently focal Aeromonas infections .... from human sources as early as 19374and is being recognised increasingly in human/ocal and ... activity of the fIrst-generation cephalosporins and of ampicillin against this organism. Published ...

  6. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in Infected Wound following Posterior Spinal Instrumentation using Simple Self-assembled System: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CW Chang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative wound infection in an instrumented spine patient is often disastrous. Management includes implant removal leading to spine instability. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT applied to the spine surgical wound is one of the wound care technique with successful results. We report a case of a man who sustained Chance fracture of Lumbar 1 (L1 vertebra treated with long segment posterior instrumentation, who unfortunately developed Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL positive E. coli infection one month after the operation. After careful debridement of the wound, the implant became exposed. Three cycles of NPWT were applied and the wound healed with granulation tissue completely covering the implant, and thus negating the need to remove the implant. In conclusion, the NPWT is a good alternative in postoperative wound management especially in an instrumented spine patient.

  7. 3D photography is a reliable burn wound area assessment tool compared to digital planimetry in very young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee Kee, E L; Kimble, R M; Stockton, K A

    2015-09-01

    Reliability and validity of 3D photography (3D LifeViz™ System) compared to digital planimetry (Visitrak™) has been established in a compliant cohort of children with acute burns. Further research is required to investigate these assessment tools in children representative of the general pediatric burns population, specifically children under the age of three years. To determine if 3D photography is a reliable wound assessment tool compared to Visitrak™ in children of all ages with acute burns ≤10% TBSA. Ninety-six children (median age 1 year 9 months) who presented to the Royal Children's Hospital Brisbane with an acute burn ≤10% TBSA were recruited into the study. Wounds were measured at the first dressing change using the Visitrak™ system and 3D photography. All measurements were completed by one investigator and level of agreement between wound surface area measurements was calculated. Wound surface area measurements were complete (i.e. participants had measurements from both techniques) for 75 participants. Level of agreement between wound surface area measurements calculated using an intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was excellent (ICC 0.96, 95% CI 0.93, 0.97). Visitrak™ tracings could not be completed in 19 participants with 16 aged less than two years. 3D photography could not be completed for one participant. Barriers to completing tracings were: excessive movement, pain, young age or wound location (e.g. face or perineum). This study has confirmed 3D photography as a reliable alternative to digital planimetry in children of all ages with acute burns ≤10% TBSA. In addition, 3D photography is more suitable for very young children given its non-invasive nature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. operative wound infection in implant surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CUSTOMER

    Department of Surgery, Jos University Teaching Hospital, Jos and * Department of Pathology, ... Orthopaedic Hospital, Lagos .... infection in one case with E. coli and Staphylococcus .... be sensitive to Gentamicin while essentially resistant.

  9. Betadine irrigation and post-craniotomy wound infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kunal S.; Goldenberg, Brandon; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    Object The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of betadine irrigation in preventing postoperative wound infection in cranial neurosurgical procedures. Methods A total of 473 consecutive cranial neurosurgical procedures, including craniotomies and burr hole procedures were retrospectively reviewed. Patients had either antibiotic irrigation or dilute betadine plus antibiotic irrigation prior to skin closure. Infection was determined by purulence noted on reoperation and confirmed with bacterial growth culture. One and three month postoperative infection rates were calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-squared tests. Results This study included 404 patients. Betadine was used in 117 (29.0%). At 1 month after surgery, there was no difference in the rate of wound infection between the two groups (1.7% each). However, at 90 days, the betadine group had a 2.6% infection rate compared with 3.8% in the antibiotic group, indicating a 33% decrease in infection rates with the addition of betadine (p=.527). The small sample size of the study produced a low power and high beta error. Conclusions In this small preliminary study, betadine decreased postoperative infection rates compared with antibiotic prophylaxis alone at 90 days but not 30 days. This was not statistically significant, but a larger sample size would lower the beta error and decrease confounding bias associated with group heterogeneity. The potential for betadine, a cheap, low toxicity antimicrobial, to decrease infection rates and reoperations for infection warrants a larger multicenter trial. PMID:24529229

  10. Pirfenidone nanoparticles improve corneal wound healing and prevent scarring following alkali burn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushovan Chowdhury

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of pirfenidone nanoparticles on corneal re-epithelialization and scarring, major clinical challenges after alkali burn.Effect of pirfenidone on collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA synthesis by TGFβ induced primary corneal fibroblast cells was evaluated by immunoblotting and immunocytochemistry. Pirfenidone loaded poly (lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA nanoparticles were prepared, characterized and their cellular entry was examined in primary corneal fibroblast cells by fluorescence microscopy. Alkali burn was induced in one eye of Sprague Dawley rats followed by daily topical treatment with free pirfenidone, pirfenidone nanoparticles or vehicle. Corneal re-epithelialization was assessed daily by flourescein dye test; absence of stained area indicated complete re-epithelialization and the time for complete re-epithelialization was determined. Corneal haze was assessed daily for 7 days under slit lamp microscope and graded using a standard method. After 7 days, collagen I deposition in the superficial layer of cornea was examined by immunohistochemistry.Pirfenidone prevented (P<0.05 increase in TGF β induced collagen I and α-SMA synthesis by corneal fibroblasts in a dose dependent manner. Pirfenidone could be loaded successfully within PLGA nanoparticles, which entered the corneal fibroblasts within 5 minutes. Pirfenidone nanoparticles but not free pirfenidone significantly (P<0.05 reduced collagen I level, corneal haze and the time for corneal re-epithelialization following alkali burn.Pirfenidone decreases collagen synthesis and prevents myofibroblast formation. Pirfenidone nanoparticles improve corneal wound healing and prevent fibrosis. Pirfenidone nanoparticles are of potential value in treating corneal chemical burns and other corneal fibrotic diseases.

  11. Management of wound infection after lumbar arthrodesis maintaining the instrumentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asdrubal Falavigna

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determinate whether a surgical protocol with immediate extensive debridement, closed irrigation system and antibiotic therapy would be effective to achieve healing of deep wound infection without removing the instrumentation.METHODS: Prospective cohort study with 19 patients presenting degenerative spinal stenosis or degenerative spondylolisthesis, who developed infection after posterior lumbar arthrodesis. The diagnosis was confirmed by a microbial culture from subfascial lumbar fluid and/or blood. Patients were treated with a protocol of wound exploration, extensive flushing and debridement, placement of a closed irrigation system that was maintained for five days and intravenous antibiotics. The instrumentation system was not removed.RESULTS: Mean age was 59.31 (±13.17 years old and most patients were female (94.7%; 18/19. The mean period for the identification of the infection was 2 weeks and 57.9% underwent a single wound exploration. White blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein showed a significant decrease post-treatment when compared to pre-treatment values. A significant reduction of erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein was also observed at the final evaluation. No laboratory test was useful to predict the need for more than one debridement.CONCLUSION: Patients with wound infection after instrumentation can be treated without removal of the instrumentation through wound exploration, extensive flushing, debridement of necrotic tissue, closed irrigation system during 5 days and proper antibiotic therapy. The blood tests were not useful to predict surgical re-interventions.

  12. Study of Bacteriology of Post-Operative Wound Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Abdulrauf Bagwan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: While many patients are admitted to hospital for treatment of infections, some acquire infection during their stay in the hospital. These infections are called as nosocomial infections. Surgical site infection or post operative wound infection is one of them. It is defined as infection of previously sterile tissue incised to gain exposure for operating deeper spaces operatively exposed or organs manipulated by a surgeon. It is one of the feared complications of surgery as it increases morbidity as well as cost of medical care. Aims and Objectives: Study was conducted to find out incidence of surgical site infection rate in surgical ward, evaluate various factors contributing to infection and to identify causative pathogens and their antibiogram patterns. Material and Methods: All clean and clean contaminated operative cases admitted in surgery ward in study period of 18 months were included. Preoperative, operative and postoperative management protocols of the cases were recorded in detail. Results: A total of 1082 operated cases were studied among which 59 infected cases were found. Surgical Site Infection (SSI rate was 5.45%. E. coli and Staphylococcus aureus were the commonest pathogen isolated from the infected wound. 50 % were Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA among them and 50% of rd Enterobacteriaceae group were resistant to 3 generation Cephalosporins. Conclusion: Surgical site infection rate of a hospital can be reduced easily by following proper pre-operative protocol for the patients. Those patients with surgical site infection can be treated effectively by following the antibiotic policy as provided by the Department of Microbiology.

  13. In vivo time-lapse imaging of skin burn wound healing using second-harmonic generation microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Araki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Wound healing is a process to repair the damaged tissue caused by thermal burn, incised wound, or stab wound. Although the wound healing has many aspects, it is common for dynamics of collagen fiber, such as decomposition, production, or growth, to be closely related with wound healing. If such the healing process can be visualized as a timelapse image of the collagen fiber in the same subject, one may obtain new findings regarding biological repairing mechanisms in the healing process. In this article, to investigate the temporal modoification of dermal collagen fiber in the burn wound healing, we used second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy, showing high selectivity and good image contrast to collagen molecules as well as high spatial resolution, optical three-dimensional sectioning, minimal invasiveness, deep penetration, the absence of interference from background light, and in vivo measurement without additional staining. Since SHG light arises from a non-centrosymmetric triple helix of three polypeptide chains in the collagen molecule, SHG intensity sensitively reflects the structure maturity of collagen molecule and its aggregates. A series of time-lapse SHG images during the wound healing process of 2 weeks clearly indicated that condensation and melting of dermal collagen fibers by the deep dermal burn, decomposition of the damaged collagen fibers in the inflammation phase, production of new collagen fibers in the proliferation phase, and the growth of the new collagen fibers in the remodeling phase. These results show a high potential of SHG microscopy for optical assessment of the wound healing process in vivo.

  14. Evaluation of wound healing activity of Commiphoramyrrha extract compared with silver sulfadiazine on experimental skin burn healing in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    orly yadegar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Myrrh, a traditional herbal medicine,is derived from Commiphoramyrrha (Nees Engl. (Burseraceae and various other species of Commiphora. It has widely been used in different diseases in India, China, Italy and Greece. Pharmacological studies also have showed that myrrh possesses multiple activities, including anti-inflammatory, cytotoxic, anesthetic, and antimicrobial effects.  There has been no report on the effectiveness of commiphoramyrrha in treating burn wound. Therefore, in this study, we compared the healing times of full thickness burn wounds in rats that received commiphoramyrrha treatment or the standard SSD treatment. This study was carried out on sixty male Wistar albino rats. Grade 3 burn wounds were created on the back of all rats. The animals were randomly divided into four groups, the first group of rats received no medication, the second group received eucerin (negative control, the third group received topical SSD group and the fourth group received 2.5% Commiphoramyrrha in eucerin base.Histological samplings were done on 7th, 14th and 21st days in each group, then all samples transported to the laboratory and H&E and trichrom staining was done. Histopatological evaluation on the 7th, 14th and 21st days showed burn healing to be better in the group which had received CommiphoraMyrrha with respect to other groups, in addition wound healing was significantly better in this group (p

  15. A Comparison of Biobrane™ and Cadaveric Allograft for Temporizing the Acute Burn Wound: Cost and Procedural Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan E.; Merchant, Nishant; Shahrokhi, Shahriar E.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In many circumstances early burn excision and autografting is unsafe or even impossible. In these situations, skin substitute dressings can be utilized for temporary wound coverage. Two commonly used dressings for this purpose are cadaveric allograft and Biobrane™. Materials and Methods Five year retrospective cohort study evaluating upper extremity burns treated with temporary wound coverage (Biobrane™ or allograft). The primary outcome was to determine the impact choice of wound coverage had on operative time and cost. The secondary outcome was the need for revision of upper extremity debridement prior to definitive autografting. Results 45 patients were included in this study: 15 treated with cadaveric allograft and 30 treated with Biobrane™ skin substitute. Biobrane™ had a significantly lower procedure time (21.12 vs. 54.78 minutes per %TBSA excised, p=0.02) and cost (1.30 vs. 2.35 dollars per minute per %TBSA excised, p=0.002). Both techniques resulted in 2 revisions due to complications. Conclusion Biobrane™ is superior to cadaveric allograft as a temporizing skin substitute in the acute burn wound, both in terms of procedure time and associated cost. We believe that this is largely due to the relative ease of application of Biobrane™. Furthermore, given its unique characteristics, Biobrane™ may serve as a triage and transport option for severe burns in the military and mass casualty settings. PMID:25458501

  16. In vitro and in vivo investigation of bacterial cellulose dressing containing uniform silver sulfadiazine nanoparticles for burn wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Wen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Silver sulfadiazine (SSD particles in homogeneous dispersion state were prepared by an ultrasonic method and then nano- and microparticles were separated using centrifugation. SSD particles with narrow size distribution were impregnated with bacterial cellulose (BC to produce BC–SSD composite membrane used as burn wound dressing. A scanning electron microscope (SEM was used to examine the surface morphology of BC–SSD membranes. The incorporation of SSD in BC–SSD was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD. Antimicrobial tests in vitro indicated that BC–SSD showed excellent antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The effects of BC–SSD on burn wound healing were assessed by rat models. The comparative study confirmed that the wound treated with BC–SSD showed high healing rate. The bacteria count in BC–SSD group was far less than control group. Histological analysis showed that epithelialization progressed better in wound treated with BC–SSD. These values demonstrated that the BC–SSD composite membrane could be a promising wound dressing for burn.

  17. Knowledge of burn wound healing: the heritage from traditional pharmacy of Persia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badr, Parmis; Daneshamouz, Saied; Mohammadi, Ali Akbar; Afsharypuor, Suleiman

    2014-12-01

    The traditional pharmacy of Persia is based on numerous ancient manuscripts written by the elites of medicine and pharmacy. These references which belong to different centuries (mostly from the 9th to 19th century) represent vast information about pharmaceutical and therapeutic knowledge. Studying these works could be valuable in revealing the hidden parts of the history of science, especially pharmacy and medicine. Also, modernisation of the methods of treatment and the majority of formulations seems to be possible. It is obvious that setting ancient experiences besides recent studies makes pharmacists and physicians more powerful. This review aims to introduce traditional knowledge about different treatments for burn wounds which has been extracted from various Persian manuscripts.

  18. Green Synthesis and Characterization of Silver Nanoparticles for Antimicrobial Activity Against Burn Wounds Contaminating Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Anandini; Jena, Padan K.; Sahoo, Debasish; Parida, Umesh K.; Bindhani, Birendra K.

    2014-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were prepared from the plant extract of N. arbor-tristis under atmospheric conditions through green synthesis and characterized by various physicochemical techniques like UV-Visible spectroscopy, IR Spectra, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS), X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the results confirmed the synthesis of homogeneous and stable AgNPs by the plant extracts. The antimicrobial activity of AgNPs was investigated against most common bacteria found in burn wound Staphylococcus epidermidis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In these tests, Mueller Hinton agar plates were used with AgNPs of various concentrations, supplemented in liquid systems. P. aeruginosa was inhibited at the low concentration of AgNPs, whereas the growth-inhibitory effect on S. epidermidis was mild. These results suggest that AgNPs can be used as effective growth inhibitors of various microorganisms, making them applicable to diverse medical devices and antimicrobial control systems.

  19. Superiority of terahertz over infrared transmission through bandages and burn wound ointments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suen, Jonathan Y., E-mail: j.suen@duke.edu; Padilla, Willie J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2016-06-06

    Terahertz electromagnetic waves have long been proposed to be ideal for spectroscopy and imaging through non-polar dielectric materials that contain no water. Terahertz radiation may thus be useful for monitoring burn and wound injury recovery, as common care treatments involve application of both a clinical dressing and topical ointment. Here, we investigate the optical properties of typical care treatments in the millimeter wave (150–300 GHz), terahertz (0.3–3 THz), and infrared (14.5–0.67 μm) ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum. We find that THz radiation realizes low absorption coefficients and high levels of transmission compared to infrared wavelengths, which were strongly attenuated. Terahertz imaging can enable safe, non-ionizing, noninvasive monitoring of the healing process directly through clinical dressings and recovery ointments, minimizing the frequency of dressing changes and thus increasing the rate of the healing process.

  20. Copper uptake by Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Muayad M; Saeed, Humodi A; Tarawneh, Khaled A; Khleifat, Khaled M; Al Tarawneh, Amjad

    2009-09-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from infected burn patients and characterized by standard biochemical tests. The in vitro copper uptake was compared between this isolated pathogenic strain and two non-pathogenic control strains of gram positive bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis strain Israelis as well as gram negative bacteria Enterobacter aerogenes. Maximum copper uptake of 470 ppm/g biomass was obtained by P. aeruginosa strain, while the control strains B. thuringiensis and Enterobacter aerogenes had copper uptake of 350 and 383 ppm/g biomass, respectively. However, the lowest copper uptake (60 ppm/g biomass) was observed with another control the saprophytic strain Pseudomonas (Shewanella) putrefaciens. A further investigation regarding the effect of copper toxicity on bacterial growth, gave an MIC score of 600 ppm for P. aeruginosa strain compared to 460 and 300 ppm for the two gram positive and gram negative control strains, respectively. In tandem with these in vitro findings, blood analysis on burn patients infected with P. aeruginosa has indicated a selective decrease of copper (hypocupremia) and ceruloplasmin plasma levels. The iron metabolism was also affected by this copper deprivation leading to a similar decrease in plasma levels of PCV, iron, total iron binding capacity, and transferrin. All these hematological changes were significantly different (P < 0.05) from the matched group of non-infected burn patients. The observed hypocupremia in infected burn patients was attributed to demanding scavenger ability by P. aeruginosa strain for the copper of plasma.

  1. Biochemical Indicators of Infection and Inflammation in Burn Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-18

    LIEBERMAN & PRUITT rats against death, while nonvaccinated burned-infected rats die between 7 and 10 days. Vaccination reduces the response of the 398...and 355/420 factors on day 5 and entirely abolishes the 398 response by day 7, while reducing the 355/420 response to 50% of the nonvaccinated rate

  2. U.S. Combat-related Invasive Fungal Wound Infection (IFI) Epidemiology and Wound Microbiology: Afghanistan Theater 2009–2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Anuradha; Shaikh, Faraz; Peterson, Philip; Bradley, William P; Blyth, Dana M; Lu, Dan Z; Bennett, Denise; Schnaubelt, Elizabeth; Johnson, Brian; Merritt, Teresa; Flores, Nicole; Hawthorne, Virginia; Wells, Justin; Carson, Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Culturing combat-related wounds often yields both fungi and bacteria. It is difficult to differentiate fungal contamination from infection, and objective criteria that identify patients at risk for IFI are needed. This study was designed to characterize IFI among US combat casualties in the Afghanistan Theater. Methods This retrospective study includes subjects with any labortory evidence of fungi (either histopathology or cultures). Wounds with ongoing necrosis and labortory evidence of infection were classified as IFI). Wounds with labortory evidence of fungal infection, but without ongoing necrosis were classified as either highly suspicious wounds based on objective clinical criteria (i.e., presence of systemic and local signs of infection and use of antifungals for ≥10 days) or non-IFI wounds if they failed to meet clinical criteria. Results Of 1932 subjects, 246 (12.7%) had labortory evidence of fungal infection. There were a total of 143 IFI wounds (n = 94), 157 non-IFI wounds (n = 96), and 113 high suspicion wounds (n = 56). IFI subjects had significantly higher injury severity scores (ISS median: 39.5 vs. 33), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores (7 vs. 2) and were more likely to require mechanical ventilation (66 vs. 28%). IFI patients also had higher ISS (93 vs. 84% with ISS >25) and SOFA scores (7 vs. 4) compared with the subjects with high suspicion wounds. IFI wounds often grew molds belonging to the order Mucorales compared with high suspicion (19 vs. 10%, P = 0.04) and non-IFI wounds (19 vs. 7%, P = 0.02). About half of the IF wounds grew fungi of the order Mucorales either isolated alone or in conjunction with other fungi, in comparison, 25% of the high suspicion wounds and 11% of the non-IFI wounds grew fungi of the order Mucorales. Three groups of fungi belonging to the order Mucorales, genus Aspergillus and Fusarium accounted for 83% of the IFI wounds and 74% of the high suspicion wounds

  3. Nosocomial Infections in Iranian Pediatric Patients With Burn Injuries: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Rezai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Nosocomial infections (NIs are the most common life-threatening complications and leading cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients with burn injuries. It is estimated that annually two million infections, 90000 deaths, and 4.5 billion USD in excess healthcare costs are imposed by NIs. Herein, we reviewed the articles related to NIs in Iranian pediatric patients with burn injuries. Evidence Acquisition: A review of epidemiologic studies on NI in pediatric patients with burn injuries in Iran was performed by searching studies indexed in PubMed, Google scholar, Iranmedex, Magiran, SID databases, published in English language in 2014. Keywords for searching included “Nosocomial Infections”, “Hospital- acquired infection”, “Healthcare- associated infections”, “burn”, “children”, “pediatric”, and “Iran”. All articles related to NIs in pediatric patients with burn injuries or about general population with burn injuries, which included pediatric population up to the age 18 years in Iran, were included. Articles out of the definition for age group or lack of significant data, outpatients, and patients selected for reconstructive surgeries were excluded. Results: Of 43 reviewed articles, nine eligible articles were selected. The male to female ratio was 1.6:1. The age ranged from birth to 18 years with the mean of 3.4 years. Overall incidence of NIs was 20.94%. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.39%, Klebsiella pneumonia (17.54%, Acinetobacter (17.47%, and Staphylococcus aureus (14.98% were the most common prominent isolates with high antibiotic resistance isolated from the cultures of different sites of infections including burn wound. Vancomycin was highly specific antibiotic against Gram-positive bacteria isolates. All spices of Acinetobacter were multidrug resistant. The mean of mortality rate was 8.75%. Conclusions: In spite of higher incidence of NIs in children with burn injuries, there are no well

  4. Impact of hypernatremia on burn wound healing: results of an exploratory, retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdar, Thomas; Stollwerck, Peter L; Stang, Felix H; Eisenbeiss, Werner; Siemers, Frank; Mailander, Peter; Lange, Thomas

    2011-03-01

    Severely burned patients need extensive initial fluid resuscitation. Formulas to calculate fluid needs during burn shock are well established. However, protocols for normalizing circulating fluid volume after cellular integrity has recovered do not exist. Resultant electrolyte shifts can cause hypernatremia, a possible sign of hypovolemia, which may in turn result in decreased tissue perfusion, subsequently affecting burn wound healing. The purpose of this retrospective chart review was to explore the hypothesis that hypernatremia in burn patients is a possible sign of systemic dehydration and that dehydration may affect burn wound skin graft take. Medical chart data from otherwise healthy burn victims with deep partial-thickness burns (total burn surface area [TBSA] >10%) who underwent skin grafting 7 days post injury were reviewed. Thirty (11 female; 19 male) patients with an average TBSA of 30% (± 11%) and an Abbreviated Burn Severity Index (ABSI) score of 7.9 (± 1.8) were included. Of those, 17 had normal average serum levels between day 2 and 6 following injury and 13 developed hypernatremia (serum sodium ≥146 mmol/L) an average of 5.5 days (± 1.5) after injury. Patients in this group underwent an average of 1.3 (± 0.8) re-grafting procedures compared to 0.35 (± 0.5) for patients without hypernatremia (P = 0.001). There was good correlation (r = 0.525) between daily infusion-diuresis ratios (IDR) and serum sodium levels, as well as between serum sodium levels and re-skin grafting occurrences (r = 0.62). The results indicate that research to confirm that hypernatremia is an indicator of dehydration and affects skin graft take is warranted and that protocols to optimize fluid volume following burn shock treatment are needed.

  5. Postoperative wound infections after a proctectomy—Patient experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Hassel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Poor perineal wound healing and infections after proctectomy surgery cause a significant proportion of physical and psychological morbidities, such as pain, leakage, and abscesses. In the long run, some of these symptoms will lead to extended periods of hospitalization. These kinds of postoperative complications are also associated with delays in possible chemotherapy treatment. The aim of this study was to describe patient experiences of perineal wound infections following proctectomy due to rectal cancer, and the importance of the communication with and the self-care support from the nurse for these patients. Five women and five men (61–87 years, median age 71 years were included and interviewed. A qualitative content analysis of the interviews was carried out and the following main categories emerged: “Managing postoperative complications,” “Being independent,” “Feeling safe,” and “Accepting the situation.” A perineal wound infection after a proctectomy is devastating for the individual patient. The limitations and changes to the patients’ lives turn into new daily routines, which force them to find new ways to live and to accept the situation. For many of them, the infections remained for several months and, sometimes, for years. The ability to lead an independent life is drastically reduced, but through continuity in care it is possible to create a feeling of safety. Information, communication, and self-care support are all important and valuable factors for recovery. Specialized care containing an action plan is therefore needed in clinical practice to reduce the number of perineal wound infections postoperatively and should be initiated when the patient is discharged from the ward and continue until recovery.

  6. Citric acid treatment of post operative wound infections in HIV/AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoba, Basavraj; Patil Dawale, Chandrakala; Raju, Reena; Wadher, Bharat; Chidrawar, Shruti; Selkar, Sohan; Suryawanshi, Namdev

    2014-02-01

    The normal cellular immunity is required for normal wound healing. The HIV infection affects wound healing adversely. Wound infections in HIV/AIDS patients are difficult to manage because of compromised immunity. The result is delayed wound healing and increased susceptibility to wound infection. Here we report two cases of HIV positive patients who had developed the post operative wound gape, not responding to the conventional treatment, treated simply by local application of three percent citric acid ointment. Copyright © 2013 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Oral ketamine and dexmedetomidine in adults' burns wound dressing--A randomized double blind cross over study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundra, Pankaj; Velayudhan, Savitri; Krishnamachari, Srinivasan; Gupta, Suman Lata

    2013-09-01

    Study was designed to compare analgesic efficacy and side effects of oral dexmedetomidine and ketamine in adults for burn wound dressing. Sixty healthy adults with thermal burns with burn area (20-50%) were randomly assigned into 2 groups. In Group K 5mg/kg ketamine and in Group D 4 mcg/kg dexmedetomidine was given orally. Patients crossed over to the other group the following day. Visual analogue score, sedation score, haemodynamic parameters were recorded from 30min after drug administration to 2h after procedure. Patients' preference was also recorded. Mean VAS score was significantly reduced from baseline in both the groups at all time points (Pburns wound dressing. Oral ketamine produced significantly better pain relief than dexmedetomidine but was associated with delirium and excessive salivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. Imparting commercial antimicrobial dressings with low-adherence to burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghari, Sogol; Logsetty, Sarvesh; Liu, Song

    2016-06-01

    The objective of our study was to decrease the wound adherence of commercial silver based wound dressings by depositing a non-adherent layer. Our hypothesis was that this non-adherent layer will lower the dressing's adherence to burn wounds without compromising the antimicrobial activity or increasing the cytotoxicity. A polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel layer was grafted on two commercial silver antimicrobial dressings (silver nanocrystal dressing (NC) and silver plated dressing (SP)) using a proprietary technique. The grafted PAM served as the non-adherent layer. Dressing adherence was measured with a previously published in vitro gelatin model using an Instron mechanical force testing instrument. The dressings were challenged with two clinically retrieved bacterial strains (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and multidrug resistant (MDR) Pseudomonas aeruginosa) with both a disk diffusion test, and a suspension antibacterial test. The cytotoxicity of samples to human neonatal fibroblast cells was evaluated with 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Both untreated dressings showed high peeling energy: 2070±453J/m(2) (NC) and 669±68J/m(2) (SP), that decreased to 158±119J/m(2) (NC) and 155±138J/m(2) (SP) with the PAM deposition. Addition of the PAM caused no significant difference in zone of inhibition (ZOI) (disk diffusion test) or antibacterial kinetics (suspension test) against both bacteria (p>0.05, n=6) in either dressing. Survival of fibroblasts was improved by the PAM grafting from 48±5% to 60±3% viable cells in the case of NC and from 55±8% to 61±4% viable cells in SP (pdressings in an in vitro gelatin model while preserving their antimicrobial efficacy, and reducing their cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  9. Dermal Wound Transcriptomic Responses to Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a Rabbit Ear Wound Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-02

    Dermal wound transcriptomic responses to Infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a rabbit ear wound model Kai P Leung Pt...with Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp.) or Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P.o.) would indicate host responses associated with the worse healing of P.o. than Kp...responses to injection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa versus Klebsiella pneumoniae in a rabbit ear wound model 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  10. Perineal Burns in Children | Ameh | African Journal of Paediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, in deep burns and when control of infection proves problematic, diverting colostomy may be necessary to control infection and achieve wound healing and graft take. Burns wound excision and skin grafting may be required in such cases. Contractures of various forms may develop and require plastic procedures ...

  11. Komodo dragon-inspired synthetic peptide DRGN-1 promotes wound-healing of a mixed-biofilm infected wound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M C Chung, Ezra; Dean, Scott N; Propst, Crystal N; Bishop, Barney M; van Hoek, Monique L

    2017-01-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are multifunctional molecules that have a high potential as therapeutic agents. We have identified a histone H1-derived peptide from the Komodo dragon (Varanus komodoensis), called VK25. Using this peptide as inspiration, we designed a synthetic peptide called DRGN-1. We evaluated the antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity of both peptides against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus. DRGN-1, more than VK25, exhibited potent antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity, and permeabilized bacterial membranes. Wound healing was significantly enhanced by DRGN-1 in both uninfected and mixed biofilm (Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus)-infected murine wounds. In a scratch wound closure assay used to elucidate the wound healing mechanism, the peptide promoted the migration of HEKa keratinocyte cells, which was inhibited by mitomycin C (proliferation inhibitor) and AG1478 (epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor). DRGN-1 also activated the EGFR-STAT1/3 pathway. Thus, DRGN-1 is a candidate for use as a topical wound treatment. Wound infections are a major concern; made increasingly complicated by the emerging, rapid spread of bacterial resistance. The novel synthetic peptide DRGN-1 (inspired by a peptide identified from Komodo dragon) exhibits pathogen-directed and host-directed activities in promoting the clearance and healing of polymicrobial (Pseudomonas aeruginosa & Staphylococcus aureus) biofilm infected wounds. The effectiveness of this peptide cannot be attributed solely to its ability to act upon the bacteria and disrupt the biofilm, but also reflects the peptide's ability to promsote keratinocyte migration. When applied in a murine model, infected wounds treated with DRGN-1 healed significantly faster than did untreated wounds, or wounds treated with other peptides. The host-directed mechanism of action was determined to be via the EGFR-STAT1/3 pathway. The pathogen-directed mechanism of action was

  12. A 5 - year surveillance of wound infections at a rural tertiary hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Wound infections are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Objectives: To determine the prevalence, aetiology and susceptibility profile of bacterial agents of wound infection among in- and- out patients at a rural tertiary hospital in Nigeria, within a 5 year period. Methods: Wound swabs collected ...

  13. Body protective compound-157 enhances alkali-burn wound healing in vivo and promotes proliferation, migration, and angiogenesis in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang T

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tonglie Huang,1,* Kuo Zhang,2,* Lijuan Sun,3 Xiaochang Xue,1 Cun Zhang,1 Zhen Shu,1 Nan Mu,1 Jintao Gu,1 Wangqian Zhang,1 Yukun Wang,1 Yingqi Zhang,1 Wei Zhang1 1State Key Laboratory of Cancer Biology, Department of Biopharmaceutics, School of Pharmacy, The Fourth Military Medical University, 2National Engineering Research Center for Miniaturized Detection Systems, School of Life Sciences, Northwest University, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Xijing Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chemical burns take up a high proportion of burns admissions and can penetrate deep into tissues. Various reagents have been applied in the treatment of skin chemical burns; however, no optimal reagent for skin chemical burns currently exists. The present study investigated the effect of topical body protective compound (BPC-157 treatment on skin wound healing, using an alkali burn rat model. Topical treatment with BPC-157 was shown to accelerate wound closure following an alkali burn. Histological examination of skin sections with hematoxylin–eosin and Masson staining showed better granulation tissue formation, reepithelialization, dermal remodeling, and a higher extent of collagen deposition when compared to the model control group on the 18th day postwounding. BPC-157 could promote vascular endothelial growth factor expression in wounded skin tissues. Furthermore, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and cell cycle analysis demonstrated that BPC-157 enhanced the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Transwell assay and wound healing assay showed that BPC-157 significantly promoted migration of HUVECs. We also observed that BPC-157 upregulated the expression of VEGF-a and accelerated vascular tube formation in vitro. Moreover, further studies suggested that BPC-157 regulated the phosphorylation level of

  14. Bacteriological studies of infected kerosine burn wounds in Benin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (2.8%), E. coli (13.9%), Proteus sp. (11.1%), Strept. pneumoniae (5.6%), and S. epidermidis (11.1%). The organisms were further tested for their antibiotic sensitivity pattern. The quinolones (ciproxacin, pefloxacin and ofloxacin), cefuroxime and gentamicin were the most effective on isolates from freshly admitted patients and ...

  15. Major bleeding during negative pressure wound/VAC (R) - therapy for postsurgical deep sternal wound infection - a critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wingerden, J.J.; Segers, P.; Jekel, L.

    2011-01-01

    Negative-pressure wound therapy, commercially known as vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.(R)) therapy, has become one of the most popular (and efficacious) interim (prior to flap reconstruction) or definite methods of managing deep sternal wound infection. Complications such as profuse bleeding, which

  16. Wound infections secondary to snakebite in central Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Wen Huang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There are very few microbiological data on wound infections following snakebites. The objective of this study was to investigate the treatment of secondary infection following snakebites in central Taiwan. Microbiological data and antibiotic sensitivity of wound cultures were retrospectively analyzed from December 2005 to October 2007 in a medical center in central Taiwan. A total of 121 snakebite patients participated in the study. Forty-nine (40.5% subjects were bitten by cobra (Naja atra; 34 of them had secondary infection, and 24 of them (70.6% needed surgical intervention. Cobra bites caused more severe bacterial infection than other snakebites. Morganella morganii was the most common pathogen, followed by Aeromonas hydrophila and Enterococcus. Gram-negative bacteria were susceptible to amikacin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, cefotaxime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. Enterococcus were susceptible to ampicillin, gentamicin, penicillin and vancomycin. It is reasonable to choose piperacillin/tazobactam, quinolone, second- or third-generation cephalosporin for empirical therapy following snakebite. Surgical intervention should be considered for invasive soft tissue infections.

  17. Polymeric Films Loaded with Vitamin E and Aloe vera for Topical Application in the Treatment of Burn Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Garrastazu Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Burns are serious traumas related to skin damage, causing extreme pain and possibly death. Natural drugs such as Aloe vera and vitamin E have been demonstrated to be beneficial in formulations for wound healing. The aim of this work is to develop and evaluate polymeric films containing Aloe vera and vitamin E to treat wounds caused by burns. Polymeric films containing different quantities of sodium alginate and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA were characterized for their mechanical properties and drug release. The polymeric films, which were produced, were thin, flexible, resistant, and suitable for application on damaged skin, such as in burn wounds. Around 30% of vitamin E acetate was released from the polymeric films within 12 hours. The in vivo experiments with tape stripping indicated an effective accumulation in the stratum corneum when compared to a commercial cream containing the same quantity of vitamin E acetate. Vitamin E acetate was found in higher quantities in the deep layers of the stratum corneum when the film formulation was applied. The results obtained show that the bioadhesive films containing vitamin E acetate and Aloe vera could be an innovative therapeutic system for the treatment of burns.

  18. Impact of Mucorales and Other Invasive Molds on Clinical Outcomes of Polymicrobial Traumatic Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warkentien, Tyler E; Shaikh, Faraz; Weintrob, Amy C; Rodriguez, Carlos J; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley A; Ganesan, Anuradha; Aggarwal, Deepak; Carson, M Leigh; Tribble, David R

    2015-07-01

    Combat trauma wounds with invasive fungal infections (IFIs) are often polymicrobial with fungal and bacterial growth, but the impact of the wound microbiology on clinical outcomes is uncertain. Our objectives were to compare the microbiological features between IFI and non-IFI wounds and evaluate whether clinical outcomes differed among IFI wounds based upon mold type. Data from U.S. military personnel injured in Afghanistan with IFI wounds were examined. Controls were matched by the pattern/severity of injury, including blood transfusion requirements. Wound closure timing was compared between IFI and non-IFI control wounds (with/without bacterial infections). IFI wound closure was also assessed according to mold species isolation. Eighty-two IFI wounds and 136 non-IFI wounds (63 with skin and soft tissue infections [SSTIs] and 73 without) were examined. The time to wound closure was longer for the IFI wounds (median, 16 days) than for the non-IFI controls with/without SSTIs (medians, 12 and 9 days, respectively; P molds (predominant types: order Mucorales, Aspergillus spp., and Fusarium spp.) significantly prolonged the time to wound closure. Overall, the times to wound closure were longest for the IFI wounds with Mucorales growth. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Globularia alypum methanolic extract improves burn wound healing process and inflammation in rats and possesses antibacterial and antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghlissi, Zohra; Kallel, Rim; Sila, Assaad; Harrabi, Bahira; Atheymen, Rim; Zeghal, Khaled; Bougatef, Ali; Sahnoun, Zouheir

    2016-12-01

    Burns are known as one of the most common and destructive forms of injury with a vast spectrum of consequences. Despite the discovery of various antibacterial and antiseptic agents, burn wound healing still has remained a challenge to modern medicine. Plants have been considered as potential agents for prevention and treatment of disorders in recent years. Globularia alypum L. (GA) is widely used in folk medicine against skin diseases and abscesses, however there is no scientific evidence justifying its use. This study aimed to evaluate the wound healing and anti-inflammatory effect, the antibacterial and antioxidant activities, as well as the chemical compositions of GA methanolic extract (GAME). Chemical compounds of GAME were examined by GC-MS. Wound healing effect was assessed by second-degree burn wounds in rats, anti-inflammatory activity was studied by carrageenan-induced rat paw edema, antioxidant activity was estimated by the DPPH, reducing power and β-carotene tests and antimicrobial activity was tested against 6 bacteria. A total of 17 compounds were identified. GAME-treated rats showed an improvement in healing process and carrageenan-induced hind paws edema as assessed by histological and biochemical investigations, compared to the control. A significant antioxidant and antibacterial activities were also observed in GAME-treated rats. GAME revealed a burn wound healing activity probably due to the anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of its phytochemical contents. Thus, this study confirms its traditional use, however further more precise studies are needed for future clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Wound healing and infection in nail matrix phenolization wounds. Does topical medication make a difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovison, R; Keenan, A M

    2001-05-01

    After nail matrix ablation using phenolization, a medicated wound dressing (10% povidone iodine), an amorphous hydrogel dressing (Intrasite Gel), and a control dressing (paraffin gauze) were evaluated. Forty-two participants, randomly divided into three dressing groups, were evaluated. Healing time did not differ between the 10% povidone iodine (33 days), amorphous hydrogel (33 days), and the control dressing (34 days). For all groups, the clinical infection rate was lower than in previous studies, and there was no clinical difference between groups (one infection in the povidone iodine and control groups; none in the amorphous hydrogel group). However, in the amorphous hydrogel group, other complications, such as hypergranulation, were more likely. This investigation indicated that medicated or hydrogel dressings did not enhance the rate of healing or decrease infection rates.

  1. Antiseptic wick: does it reduce the incidence of wound infection following appendectomy?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGreal, Gerald T

    2012-02-03

    The role of prophylactic antibiotics is well established for contaminated wounds, but the use of antiseptic wound wicks is controversial. The aim of this work was to study the potential use of wound wicks to reduce the rate of infection following appendectomy. This prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted at a university hospital in the department of surgery. The subjects were patients undergoing appendectomy for definite acute appendicitis. They were randomized by computer to primary subcuticular wound closure or use of an antiseptic wound wick. For the latter, ribbon gauze soaked in povidone-iodine was placed between interrupted nylon skin sutures. Wicks were soaked daily and removed on the fourth postoperative day. All patients received antibiotic prophylaxis. They were reviewed while in hospital and 4 weeks following operation for evidence of wound infection. The main outcome measures were wound infection, wound discomfort, and cosmetic result. The overall wound infection rate was 8.6% (15\\/174). In patients with wound wicks it was 11.6% (10\\/86) compared to 5.6% (5\\/88) in those whose wounds were closed by subcuticular sutures (p = NS). We concluded that the use of wound wicks was not associated with decreased wound infection rates following appendectomy. Subcuticular closure is therefore appropriate in view of its greater convenience and safety.

  2. Topical and systemic antimicrobial agents in burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollstein, R N; McDonald, C

    1980-11-01

    Infection is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in burns. Burn wound infection is defined as burn wound bacterial proliferation in a density equal to or greater than 10(5) bacteria per gram of tissue. Gram-negative bacteria, notably Pseudomonas aeruginosa, as well as staphylococci and fungal opportunists, have been identified as prominent invaders. Topical and systemic antimicrobial agents are essential adjuncts in the prevention and treatment of burn wound infection. Topical antimicrobial therapy is indicated in all hospitalized burn patients. Short-term use of systemic antimicrobials for prophylaxis and treatment is required in all moderate and major burns, specifically for early prophylaxis, perioperative prophylaxis, and clinical infection. Antimicrobial choice is based on specific patient or environmental bacteriological data.

  3. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection impairs murine S100A8/A9 and neutrophil effector cytokines—implications for delayed wound closure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Lerche, Christian Johann; Christophersen, Lars Jackie

    2017-01-01

    The impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in chronic wounds and clinical implication for healing is receiving increased attention. However, the pathophysiology of host/pathogen interplay is not fully understood. By further revealing the mechanisms, necessary new treatment strategies...... may be identified. Since the background for chronic wounds is diverse, representative animal models are important. We assessed host response and spontaneous wound closure in the relatively resistant C3H/HeN and the susceptible BALB/c mouse strain. Full-thickness burn wounds were inflicted in 108 mice....... P. aeruginosa biofilm (106 colony forming units) was injected subcutaneously in 72 mice, euthanized day 4, 7 or 10 days postinfection. Wounds were analysed for neutrophil host response markers: S100A8/A9, keratinocyte-derived chemokine and Granulocyte-Colony Stimulating Factor. Total peripheral...

  4. Collagen-Nanoparticles Composites for Wound Healing and Infection Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mădălina Elena Grigore

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the world is facing a serious crisis represented by the rapid emergence of resistant bacteria, which jeopardizes the efficacy of antibiotics. This crisis has been attributed to the overuse and misuse of antibiotics, as well as the cessation of new drug production by the pharmaceutical industry. Therefore, bacterial strains with resistance to multiple antibiotic classes have appeared, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review aims to provide an updated summary of the current approach to the treatment of infections due to resistant microorganisms, with a focus on the application of the antimicrobial effects of inorganic nanoparticles in combination with collagen to promote wound healing. In addition, the paper describes the current approaches in the field of functionalized collagen hydrogels capable of wound healing and inhibiting microbial biofilm production.

  5. Photodynamic Therapy for Acinetobacter baumannii Burn Infections in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-29

    antimicrobials could be the combination of nontoxic photosensitizers (PSs) and visible light, known as photodynamic therapy (PDT). We report on the...SEP 2009 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Photodynamic therapy for Acinetobacter baumannii burn infections in...unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 ANTIMICROBIAL AGENTS AND CHEMOTHERAPY, Sept. 2009, p. 3929–3934 Vol. 53, No. 9

  6. Total and attributable costs of surgical-wound infections at a Canadian tertiary-care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoutman, D; McDonald, S; Vethanayagan, D

    1998-04-01

    To determine the total and attributable costs of surgical-wound infections in a Canadian teaching hospital. Retrospective incidence series study with chart review and examination of resource utilization attributable to wound infection. The charts of inpatients with wound infections were examined using the Appropriateness Evaluation Protocol (AEP), a validated chart review instrument designed to determine appropriateness of care, modified for wound infections. A university referral center in Canada. Medical records were abstracted from patients with wound infections who underwent an inpatient clean or clean-contaminated procedure during 1991. During the wound-infection treatment period, the hospital costs associated with providing care were tabulated for all inpatient days and for outpatient and emergency visits. Costs taken into account included nursing salary and benefits, nonphysician professional services, operating room time, laboratory, pharmacy, supplies, ancillary tests, and hotel costs. We identified 108 wound infections. Twenty-two patients required 28 surgical procedures related to a wound infection. Inpatient days totalled 1,116, costing $394,337. Fifty-five emergency and 42 clinic visits occurred, costing $27,193. By applying the AEP to the inpatient days, 833 days, or 10.2 days per case, were directly attributable to the wound infection. The hospital costs for inpatient care attributable to wound infections were $321,533 in total, or $3,937 per infection. Costs were distributed as follows: nursing, 51%; hotel, 14%; pharmacy, 10%; laboratory, 9%; emergency and outpatient clinic, 6%; professional services, 5%; operating room, 3%; and ancillary tests, 2%. Wound infections contribute markedly to extra days of hospitalization and related costs. The AEP method is applied easily to determine attributable days of care and costs of wound infections, which are necessary to calculate the cost-benefit of infection control programs.

  7. [Clinical importance of CMV-infection in German-speaking burn centers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, M; Hamprecht, K; Schaller, H-E; Rennekampff, H-O

    2004-12-01

    Due to immunosuppression, burn patients are at risk for CMV-infection. By means of a retrospective questionnaire we evaluated the clinical rating and management of CMV-infection in German-speaking burn centers. 41 % of the participating burn centers considered the role of CMV-infection of overall minor importance, 41 % of importance only in intensive care burn patients, 18 % of overall great importance. 70 % of the participating burn centers do not perform CMV-screening at admission. More than 50 % of the participating burn centers consider application of CMV-negative human blood-derived products in CMV-seronegative individuals as essential. At present clinical importance of CMV-infection in burn patients can not be clearly determined. But further prospective studies utilizing recently developed diagnostics seem warranted to the potential influence of CMV-infection on morbidity and mortality in burn patients.

  8. In diabetic foot infections antibiotics are to treat infection, not to heal wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohamed; Uçkay, Ilker; Lipsky, Benjamin A

    2015-04-01

    Diabetic foot ulcers, especially when they become infected, are a leading cause of morbidity and may lead to severe consequences, such as amputation. Optimal treatment of these diabetic foot problems usually requires a multidisciplinary approach, typically including wound debridement, pressure off-loading, glycemic control, surgical interventions and occasionally other adjunctive measures. Antibiotic therapy is required for most clinically infected wounds, but not for uninfected ulcers. Unfortunately, clinicians often prescribe antibiotics when they are not indicated, and even when indicated the regimen is frequently broader spectrum than needed and given for longer than necessary. Many agents are available for intravenous, oral or topical therapy, but no single antibiotic or combination is optimal. Overuse of antibiotics has negative effects for the patient, the health care system and society. Unnecessary antibiotic therapy further promotes the problem of antibiotic resistance. The rationale for prescribing topical, oral or parenteral antibiotics for patients with a diabetic foot wound is to treat clinically evident infection. Available published evidence suggests that there is no reason to prescribe antibiotic therapy for an uninfected foot wound as either prophylaxis against infection or in the hope that it will hasten healing of the wound.

  9. Multispectral imaging burn wound tissue classification system: a comparison of test accuracies between several common machine learning algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squiers, John J.; Li, Weizhi; King, Darlene R.; Mo, Weirong; Zhang, Xu; Lu, Yang; Sellke, Eric W.; Fan, Wensheng; DiMaio, J. Michael; Thatcher, Jeffrey E.

    2016-03-01

    The clinical judgment of expert burn surgeons is currently the standard on which diagnostic and therapeutic decisionmaking regarding burn injuries is based. Multispectral imaging (MSI) has the potential to increase the accuracy of burn depth assessment and the intraoperative identification of viable wound bed during surgical debridement of burn injuries. A highly accurate classification model must be developed using machine-learning techniques in order to translate MSI data into clinically-relevant information. An animal burn model was developed to build an MSI training database and to study the burn tissue classification ability of several models trained via common machine-learning algorithms. The algorithms tested, from least to most complex, were: K-nearest neighbors (KNN), decision tree (DT), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), weighted linear discriminant analysis (W-LDA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), ensemble linear discriminant analysis (EN-LDA), ensemble K-nearest neighbors (EN-KNN), and ensemble decision tree (EN-DT). After the ground-truth database of six tissue types (healthy skin, wound bed, blood, hyperemia, partial injury, full injury) was generated by histopathological analysis, we used 10-fold cross validation to compare the algorithms' performances based on their accuracies in classifying data against the ground truth, and each algorithm was tested 100 times. The mean test accuracy of the algorithms were KNN 68.3%, DT 61.5%, LDA 70.5%, W-LDA 68.1%, QDA 68.9%, EN-LDA 56.8%, EN-KNN 49.7%, and EN-DT 36.5%. LDA had the highest test accuracy, reflecting the bias-variance tradeoff over the range of complexities inherent to the algorithms tested. Several algorithms were able to match the current standard in burn tissue classification, the clinical judgment of expert burn surgeons. These results will guide further development of an MSI burn tissue classification system. Given that there are few surgeons and facilities specializing in burn care

  10. [Application of the sea-buckhorn ointment for the treatment of the burn wounds and trophic ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henyk, S M; Vasyliuk, Ia I; Maskiak, T R; Romanchuk, M V; Khokhriakov, I V

    1999-01-01

    Clinical estimation was performed of the application efficacy of Unguentum cum Olei Hippopheae preparation in treatment of 30 patients with the burn wounds, 7--with the lower extremities ulcer due to postthrombophlebitis syndrome existence, 8--on the diabetic angiopathy background. The epithelisation acceleration by (4.6 +/- 1.4) days, an ulcer square reduction by (2.3 +/- 0.25)% in comparison with a control group were established.

  11. Risk analysis and outcome of mediastinal wound and deep mediastinal wound infections with specific emphasis to omental transposition

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Parissis, Haralabos

    2011-09-19

    Abstract Background To report our experience, with Deep mediastinal wound infections (DMWI). Emphasis was given to the management of deep infections with omental flaps Methods From February 2000 to October 2007, out of 3896 cardiac surgery patients (prospective data collection) 120 pts (3.02%) developed sternal wound infections. There were 104 males & 16 females; (73.7%) CABG, (13.5%) Valves & (9.32%) CABG and Valve. Results Superficial sternal wound infection detected in 68 patients (1.75%) and fifty-two patients (1.34%) developed DMWI. The incremental risk factors for development of DMWI were: Diabetes (OR = 3.62, CI = 1.2-10.98), Pre Op Creatinine > 200 μmol\\/l (OR = 3.33, CI = 1.14-9.7) and Prolong ventilation (OR = 4.16, CI = 1.73-9.98). Overall mortality for the DMWI was 9.3% and the specific mortality of the omental flap group was 8.3%. 19% of the "DMWI group", developed complications: hematoma 6%, partial flap loss 3.0%, wound dehiscence 5.3%. Mean Hospital Stay: 59 ± 21.5 days. Conclusion Post cardiac surgery sternal wound complications remain challenging. The role of multidisciplinary approach is fundamental, as is the importance of an aggressive early wound exploration especially for deep sternal infections.

  12. Insights into the use of thermography to assess burn wound healing potential: a reliable and valid technique when compared to laser Doppler imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Mariëlle E. H.; Maltha, Ilse; Klaessens, John H. G. M.; de Vet, Henrica C. W.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; van Zuijlen, Paul P. M.

    2016-09-01

    Adequate assessment of burn wounds is crucial in the management of burn patients. Thermography, as a noninvasive measurement tool, can be utilized to detect the remaining perfusion over large burn wound areas by measuring temperature, thereby reflecting the healing potential (HP) (i.e., number of days that burns require to heal). The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinimetric properties (i.e., reliability and validity) of thermography for measuring burn wound HP. To evaluate reliability, two independent observers performed a thermography measurement of 50 burns. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), the standard error of measurement (SEM), and the limits of agreement (LoA) were calculated. To assess validity, temperature differences between burned and nonburned skin (ΔT) were compared to the HP found by laser Doppler imaging (serving as the reference standard). By applying a visual method, one ΔT cutoff point was identified to differentiate between burns requiring conservative versus surgical treatment. The ICC was 0.99, expressing an excellent correlation between two measurements. The SEM was calculated at 0.22°C, the LoA at -0.58°C and 0.64°C. The ΔT cutoff point was -0.07°C (sensitivity 80% specificity 80%). These results show that thermography is a reliable and valid technique in the assessment of burn wound HP.

  13. Infections in traumatic wounds sutured at a Norwegian Accident and Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brudvik, Christina; Tariq, Hina; Bernardshaw, Soosaipillai V; Steen, Knut

    2015-05-05

    Different countries have different wound treatment traditions. We have studied the incidence and different factors related to infections in wound injuries sutured at a Norwegian A&E department. In this prospective study, clinical data were collected on 102 patients with traumatic wound injuries treated with sutures at Bergen Accident and Emergency Department between 30 February 2011 and 30 June 2011. Any wound infections in 97 of these patients at the time of suture removal were assessed and classified according to severity on a scale of grade 0 to grade 4. There were no serious infections, but mild clinical wound infections occurred in 15% of patients: 11% grade 1 and 4% grade 2 infections. Patients less than 65 years old had often cut themselves with knives (n = 33, 37%), and on their hands (n = 60, 67%), Men were most frequently injured at work (n = 38, 54%) and women most often at home (n = 18, 56%). No statistically significant correlation was found between the incidence of wound infections and the length of the wound, the time elapsed before suturing, the wound's location on the body, contamination or underlying chronic diseases. Two of the three self-inflictors in our study had clinical wound infections. Half of the bacteriological samples from ten of 15 wounds with clinical infection had plentiful growth of Staphylococcus aureus. One patient received oral antibiotic treatment for wound infection, and two had local antibiotic treatment. Mild clinical infections were found in almost one of six wounds sutured at a Norwegian A&E department. More studies are necessary to provide basic data to enable targeted improvements in wound treatment in the primary healthcare service.

  14. Burns

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... doing so puts you in danger as well. Chemical and Electrical Burns For chemical and electrical burns, call 911 or ... the power source has been turned off. For chemical burns: Dry chemicals should be brushed off the skin ...

  15. Triclosan-coated sutures do not reduce leg wound infections after coronary artery bypass grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Bjørn Edvard; Tønnessen, Theis; Woldbaek, Per Reidar

    2012-09-01

    Leg wound infection is a common complication after coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Suture contamination has been suggested as a mechanism of surgical site infections. Vicryl Plus(®) is a polyglacitin suture coated with the antiseptic chemical substance Triclosan, which has been shown to inhibit the growth of Staphylococcus aureus in vitro. The first aim of the present study was to compare Vicryl Plus with conventional Vicryl(®) sutures with regard to leg wound infections following CABG. The second aim was to examine patient- and operative characteristics, which are assumed to predict leg wound infections. After statistical calculations a priori, 328 CABG patients were prospectively randomized to leg wound closure with Vicryl Plus (164 patients) or conventional Vicryl sutures (164 patients). Incidences of leg wound infection and predictors of infection related to patient- and operative characteristics were examined. The incidence of leg wound infections was 10.4% (17/163) in the Vicryl group, and 10.0% (16/160) in the Vicryl Plus group (P = 1.00). Patients with leg wound infections had increased body mass index and prolonged extracorporeal circulation and aortic clamping time compared with patients without infections. In the present study, we report for the first time that Vicryl Plus did not reduce the incidence of leg wound infections in patients undergoing CABG. Obesity and prolonged time of extracorporeal circulation were both associated with the increased risk of infections. Currently, the clinical role and indication for the use of Vicryl Plus have yet to be defined.

  16. Fat Grafting and Adipose-Derived Regenerative Cells in Burn Wound Healing and Scarring: A Systematic Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condé-Green, Alexandra; Marano, Andrew A; Lee, Edward S; Reisler, Tom; Price, Leigh Ann; Milner, Stephen M; Granick, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    There is an abundance of literature supporting the efficacy of fat grafting in aesthetic and reconstructive cases. There has been a recent emphasis on the regenerative capacity of adipose-derived stem cells and their utility in the improvement of wound healing and scarring provided by their cytokine and growth factor profiles. Despite the wealth of evidence supporting their efficacy, little attention has been paid to their utility in burn treatment. The authors' purpose was to provide an analysis of the literature regarding the use of fat grafting and regenerative cells in the treatment of burn wounds to guide surgeons and scientists on their clinical use. A systematic review of the literature was performed by a thorough search of 12 terms using the PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane databases. Two hundred forty-one articles were subject to evaluation by predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Six murine and 12 human studies were selected, including case-control studies, case series, and case reports. They describe histologic and clinical effects of fat grafting and regenerative cell therapy, including improvements in burn scar size and texture, enhanced angiogenesis, decreased inflammation, alleviation of pain, and return of function. There is a dearth of randomized controlled trials and quantitative analysis supporting the efficacy of fat grafting and adipose regenerative cells in burns. However, the subjective improvements in scars are encouraging. The authors hope that this review will be a foundation for future studies and will highlight the breadth of knowledge yet to be explored by this therapy. Therapeutic, IV.

  17. Wound-Healing Peptides for Treatment of Chronic Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Other Infected Skin Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Gomes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available As the incidence of diabetes continues to increase in the western world, the prevalence of chronic wounds related to this condition continues to be a major focus of wound care research. Additionally, over 50% of chronic wounds exhibit signs and symptoms that are consistent with localized bacterial biofilms underlying severe infections that contribute to tissue destruction, delayed wound-healing and other serious complications. Most current biomedical approaches for advanced wound care aim at providing antimicrobial protection to the open wound together with a matrix scaffold (often collagen-based to boost reestablishment of the skin tissue. Therefore, the present review is focused on the efforts that have been made over the past years to find peptides possessing wound-healing properties, towards the development of new and effective wound care treatments for diabetic foot ulcers and other skin and soft tissue infections.

  18. Mono- and combined antimicrobial agents efficiency in experimental wound infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Наталія Ігорівна Філімонова

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern problems of antibiotic therapy are shown by wide range of side effects, both on organism and microbiological levels: the spread of allergies, toxic for organ systems reactions, dysbiosis development, and resistant pathogens formation and dissemination. Therefore the necessity of search for new effective drugs with significant antimicrobial activity applied for the wounds treatment arises. Development of combined remedies on the background of different origin antimicrobial agents’ derivatives is one of the fight directions against infectious diseases in the skin pathology. Recently among the existing antimicrobial agents one should focus on antiseptic drugs, due to degenerative and dysfunctional effect on microbial cell.Aim of research. The comparison of mono- and combined antimicrobial agents chemotherapeutic efficiency in the treatment of localized purulent infection under experimental conditions.Metods. The study of chemotherapeutic efficiency was carried out on the model of localized purulent Staphylococcus infection on albino mice weighting 14 – 16 g. S.aureus ATCC 25923 strains were used as infectious agents. The contamination was performed subcutaneously to the right side of mice’s skin after depilation. The animals were randomly divided into 4 groups: the 1st group – infected mice without treatment (control; the 2nd group – infected mice treated with a ciprofloxacin; the 3rd group – infected mice treated with a Ciprofloxacin and Decamethoxin combination; the 4th group – infected mice treated with a combined drug on the base of mutual prodrugs (Hexamethylenetetramine and Phenyl salicylate.Results. The efficiency of mono- and combined antimicrobial agents under experimental Staphylococcus wound infection conditions was studied. It was found that localized purulent staph center was formed more slowly in comparison with control and mono preparation use (2nd group of animals. The average index of skin lesions in comparison

  19. Can live music therapy reduce distress and pain in children with burns after wound care procedures? A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Marianne J E; Jeekel, Johannes; Rode, Heinz; Cox, Sharon; van Rosmalen, Joost; Hunink, Myriam G M; van Dijk, Monique

    2018-01-30

    Burn wound care procedures are very painful and lead to distress. Live music therapy has shown beneficial effects on distress and pain in specific pediatric patient populations. In this study we measured whether live music therapy has beneficial effects in terms of less distress and pain in children with burns after wound care procedures. This randomized assessor-blinded controlled trial (RCT) took place at the burns unit of the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. It included newly admitted inpatients between the ages of 0 and 13 years undergoing their first or second wound care procedures. Excluded were children with a hearing impairment or low level of consciousness. The intervention group received one live music therapy session directly after wound care in addition to standard care. The control group received standard care only. The primary outcome was distress measured with the Observational Scale of Behavioral Distress-revised (OSBD-r). The secondary outcome was pain measured with the COMFORT-behavioral scale (COMFORT-B). In addition, in children older than 5 years self-reported distress with the validated Wong-Baker scale (FACES) and pain with the Faces Pain Scale-Revised (FPS-R) were measured. Patients in both groups were videotaped for three minutes before wound care; during the music therapy or the control condition; and for two minutes thereafter. Two researchers, blinded to the study condition, independently scored the OSBD-r and the COMFORT-B from the video footage before and after music therapy. We included 135 patients, median age 22.6 months (IQR 15.4-40.7 months). Change scores did not significantly differ between the intervention and the control groups for either distress (p=0.53; d=0.11; 95% CI -0.23 to 0.45) or pain (p=0.99; d=0.04; 95% CI -0.30 to 0.38). Self-reported distress in a small group of children (n=18) older than 5 years indicated a significant reduction in distress after live music therapy (p=0

  20. Wound botulism presenting as a deep neck space infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouveia, Christopher; Mookherjee, Somnath; Russell, Matthew S

    2012-12-01

    Otolaryngologists commonly evaluate patients with findings suspicious for deep space soft tissue infections of the neck. In this case, a woman with a history of injection drug use (IDU) presented with dysphagia, odynophagia, and neck pain. Multiple neck abscesses, too small to drain, were seen on imaging. Despite broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics, she unexpectedly and rapidly developed respiratory failure requiring intubation. Further work-up diagnosed wound botulism (WB). To our knowledge, this is the first report of WB presenting as a deep neck space infection, and illustrates the importance of considering this deadly diagnosis in patients with IDU history and bulbar symptoms. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  1. Wound dressings: selecting the most appropriate type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broussard, Karen C; Powers, Jennifer Gloeckner

    2013-12-01

    Appropriate wound dressing selection is guided by an understanding of wound dressing properties and an ability to match the level of drainage and depth of a wound. Wounds should be assessed for necrosis and infection, which need to be addressed prior to selecting an ideal dressing. Moisture-retentive dressings include films, hydrogels, hydrocolloids, foams, alginates, and hydrofibers and are useful in a variety of clinical settings. Antimicrobial-impregnated dressings can be useful in wounds that are superficially infected or are at higher risk for infection. For refractory wounds that need more growth stimulation, tissue-engineered dressings have become a viable option in the past few decades, especially those that have been approved for burns, venous ulcers, and diabetic ulcers. As wounds heal, the ideal dressing type may change, depending on the amount of exudate and depth of the wound; thus success in wound dressing selection hinges on recognition of the changing healing environment.

  2. Clinico-microbiological study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in wound infections and the detection of metallo-β-lactamase production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangera, Divya; Shenoy, Suchitra M; Saldanha, Dominic Rm

    2016-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common opportunistic pathogen of humans among the Gram-negative bacilli. Clinically, it is associated with nosocomial infections like burns and surgical-site wound infections and remains a major health concern, especially among critically ill and immunocompromised patients. This is a prospective laboratory-based 2 year study conducted to isolate P. aeruginosa from wound specimens and the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern with reference to metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) production. Two hundred and twenty-four samples of P. aeruginosa isolated from wound specimens were included in the study. Antimicrobial susceptibility was done as per Clinical Laboratory Standard Institute (CLSI) guidelines. MBL-producing P. aeruginosa was detected using the EDTA disk diffusion synergy test. Statistical analysis was done using the SPSS 11 package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Out of the 224 P. aeruginosa isolates, 100% were susceptible to polymyxin B and colistin, 92·8% were sensitive to imipenem, 38% showed resistance to gentamicin followed by ceftazidime (31·69%) and meropenem (33·03). Sixteen (7·14%) isolates showed MBL production. Infection caused by drug-resistant P. aeruginosa is important to identify as it poses a therapeutic problem and is also a serious concern for infection control management. The acquired resistance genes can be horizontally transferred to other pathogens or commensals if aseptic procedures are not followed. © 2015 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Immune Modulating Topical S100A8/A9 Inhibits Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Mitigates Biofilm Infection in Chronic Wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Lerche, Christian Johann; Christophersen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    in a murine model and P. aeruginosa growth in vitro. Seventy-six mice, inflicted with a full-thickness burn wound were challenged subcutaneously (s.c.) by 10⁶ colony-forming units (CFUs) of P. aeruginosa biofilm. Mice were subsequently randomized into two treatment groups, one group receiving recombinant......-treatment ameliorated wound infection, as evaluated by quantitative bacteriology (p ≤ 0.05). In vitro, growth of P. aeruginosa was inhibited dose-dependently by S100A8/A9 in concentrations from 5 to 40 μg/mL, as determined by optical density-measurement (OD-measurement) and quantitative bacteriology......, treatment by S100A8/A9 provides local infection control. Implications for a role as adjunctive treatment in healing of chronic biofilm-infected wounds are discussed....

  4. Aquacel(®) Ag dressing versus Acticoat™ dressing in partial thickness burns: a prospective, randomized, controlled study in 100 patients. Part 1: burn wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbelen, Jozef; Hoeksema, Henk; Heyneman, Alexander; Pirayesh, Ali; Monstrey, Stan

    2014-05-01

    Studies comparing contemporary silver dressings in burns are scarce. In a prospective, randomized, controlled study, counting 50 patients/research group, we compared two frequently used silver dressings, Acticoat™ and Aquacel(®) Ag, in the management of partial thickness burns with a predicted healing time between 7 and 21 days as assessed by laser Doppler imaging between 48 and 72h after burn. Variables investigated were related to baseline research group characteristics, wound healing, bacteriology, economics, nurse, and patient experience. Both research groups were comparably composed taking into account gender, age and burn characteristics. Similar results were obtained as to healing time and bacterial control with both silver dressings. A statistically significant difference in favor of the Aquacel(®) Ag dressing was found for average ease of use (pdressing (p=0.017), silver staining (pdressings resulted in comparable healing times and bacterial control but the Aquacel(®) Ag dressing significantly increased comfort for patients as well as nurses and was significantly more cost-effective than the Acticoat™ dressing for the given indication. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  5. Transdermal uptake and organ distribution of silver from two different wound dressings in rats after a burn trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfurtscheller, Klaus; Petnehazy, Thomas; Goessler, Walter; Bubalo, Vladimir; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Trop, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Silver-containing wound dressings are an integral part of wound therapy in adult and pediatric burn patients. The antimicrobial effect of silver is well known and has been described in numerous studies. Side effects are rarely reported from silver-containing wound care products, even though systemic absorption of silver has been shown by elevated levels of silver in the blood of patients after silver exposure during wound therapy. This animal study investigated the silver levels of blood and in which organs and tissues silver is detectable after long-term application of silver-containing wound dressings after a burn trauma. In male rats, a major full-thickness scald was created on their backs according to a standardized burn model. Two different silver-containing wound dressings (nanocrystalline silver [NCS] and silver sulphate foam [SSF]) were applied initially and changed every 7 days. Weekly blood drawings revealed an increase of blood silver in week three with significant higher values in the SSF compared with NCS group (Ag μg/kg 135.8 vs. 61.7; means; p ≤ 0.05). Thereafter, the NCS group showed significantly higher blood silver levels than the SSF group at week five (Ag μg/kg 192.3 vs. 81.3; means; p ≤ 0.01) and six (Ag μg/kg 168.2 vs. 32.9; means; p ≤ 0.01). After 6 weeks, the animals were sacrificed, and the organs and tissues were analyzed for their silver content by inductively coupled plasma mass-spectrometry. Silver was detectable in all analyzed organs and tissue samples, with higher silver values in parenchymatous organs in the NCS than SSF group (Ag μg/kg; spleen: 3,469 vs. 260; kidney: 3,186 vs. 289; liver: 2,022 vs. 313; means; p ≤ 0.05). Silver was also detectable in brain, testis, lung, heart, and muscle tissue. © 2014 by the Wound Healing Society.

  6. Prevention of surgical wound infection in obese women undergoing cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldig, Nana; Vinter, Christina Anne; Kruse, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Obese women undergoing caesarean section are at increased risk of surgical wound infection, which may lead to reduced quality of life, and increased health care cost. The aim is to evaluate the effect of incisional Negative Pressure Wound Therapy applied prophylactically in obese women under......: The study is on-going. We expect to find a 50% reduction of wound infection when using iNPWT compared to standard dressings in this high-risk subpopulation....

  7. [The changing pattern of stem cell markers of sweat gland in deep partial-thickness burn wound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    JIANG, Du-yin; ZONG, Xian-lei; FU, Xiao-bing; WANG, Wei; SHAN, Fei

    2009-08-01

    To investigate the rules of proliferation of epithelial cells of sweat glands in deep partial-thickness burn wound and its transdifferentiation towards epidermal cells during healing process to explore its mechanisms. Twenty-eight patients with limbs and trunk burn hospitalized in the Fourth People's Hospital of Taizhou City of Jiangsu Province and the Second Hospital of Shandong University from January 2004 to December 2007 were enrolled in the study. Tissue samples of deep partial-thickness burn wound (DPBW, n = 37), superficial partial-thickness burn wound (SPBW, n = 21), and normal skin (NS, n = 10) were harvested. Expressions of cytokeratin 10 (CK10), bcl-2, P63, CK14 and CK19 of epithelial cells in glandular secretory portion (GSP) in DPBW, SPBW and NS were detected with immunohistochemical double staining method. In NS, CK19, CK14 and CK10 expressed in medium intensity in GSP epithelial cells, P63 and CK14 weakly expressed in basal myoepithelial cells, while no expression of bcl-2 or P63 was observed in all CK10 positive terminally differentiated cells. In SPBW, no change of the construction of GSP and above-mentioned proteins during healing process was observed. In DPBW, as examined on 7(th) post burn day (PBD), expression of P63 and bcl-2 in GSP epithelial cells was enhanced. In DPBW on 8 - 10 PBD, bcl-2, P63, CK19 and CK14 strongly positive solid island-like epithelial structure was formed by proliferation, migration and squamous epithelization of basal cells. Such structure, along with granulation tissue, migrated towards the superficial layer of wounds. The hyperplasia of squamous epithelium resulted in complete reepithelialization. In DPBW, bcl-2, CK14, CK19 and P63 still strongly expressed in hyper-proliferative epidermal basal and suprabasal layers on 13 - 30 day after healing. During the natural healing process of DPBW, monolayer epithelium (CK19 and CK10 positive) of GSP slowly develops into stratified squamous epithelium (bcl-2, P63, CK19, and CK

  8. A retrospective analysis of ambulatory burn patients: focus on wound dressings and healing times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravante, Gianpiero; Montone, Antonio

    2010-03-01

    In this study, we retrospectively analysed healing times of ambulatory burn patients after silver-based dressings were introduced in late December 2005, and compared the results with those obtained before. Data were collected in November-December 2005 and in January-February 2006. We excluded from the study: (i) admitted patients; (ii) patients with mixed superficial partial thickness and deep partial thickness burns; (iii) patients with full-thickness burns; and (iv) operated patients that came for follow-up. We recorded the age, sex, cause (flame vs scald), burn depth, dressings used and healing times. We selected 347 patients corresponding to 455 burned areas (64.4% superficial and 35.6% deep; 47.7% treated in 2005 and 52.3% in 2006). During the years 2005 and 2006, there was an increase in the use of silver-based dressings (2005, 9.7%; 2006, 38.7%; chi-squared test, P burns and of superficial burns showed no significant differences between 2005 and 2006. However, in deep partial thickness burns, a significant reduction was present (2006, 19; 2005, 29 days; Student's t-test, P dressings, paraffin gauzes had the shortest healing times in superficial burns (5 days); with silver-based dressings in deep burns, the healing times were nanocrystalline silver (16 days) and silver carboxymethylcellulose (21 days). Results of our retrospective study would suggest that paraffin gauzes are a valuable option in superficial burns, while silver-based dressings are preferable in deep burns.

  9. Treatment in an outpatient setting for a patient with an infected, surgical wound with hypergranulation tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Nicole M; Shultz, Terry; Mizner, Ryan L; Gersh, Meryl

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a multifaceted approach to wound care in an outpatient setting for a patient with an infected, nonhealing surgical wound with hypergranulation tissue following fasciotomy for acute compartment syndrome. A 44-year-old male underwent an anterior and lateral lower extremity compartment fasciotomy and developed a persistent right anterolateral lower leg wound. Thirty-six days after fasciotomy he came to the authors' clinic after 2 failed skin grafts with an infected wound covered in hypergranulation tissue. Treatment included sharp debridement, saline irrigation, patient education, and dressing changes during 9 treatment sessions. The patient's total wound surface area decreased from 5.2 cm x 17.3 cm to 4 cm x 15 cm with increased epithelialization from approximately 40% to 85% after 29 days of treatment. This article demonstrates the positive effect of a multifaceted approach for facilitation of wound healing in a lower extremity wound following fasciotomy.

  10. Effectiveness of medical hypnosis for pain reduction and faster wound healing in pediatric acute burn injury: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Stephen J; Stockton, Kellie; De Young, Alexandra; Kipping, Belinda; Tyack, Zephanie; Griffin, Bronwyn; Chester, Ralph L; Kimble, Roy M

    2016-04-29

    Burns and the associated wound care procedures can be extremely painful and anxiety-provoking for children. Burn injured children and adolescents are therefore at greater risk of experiencing a range of psychological reactions, in particular posttraumatic stress disorder, which can persist for months to years after the injury. Non-pharmacological intervention is critical for comprehensive pain and anxiety management and is used alongside pharmacological analgesia and anxiolysis. However, effective non-pharmacological pain and anxiety management during pediatric burn procedures is an area still needing improvement. Medical hypnosis has received support as a technique for effectively decreasing pain and anxiety levels in adults undergoing burn wound care and in children during a variety of painful medical procedures (e.g., bone marrow aspirations, lumbar punctures, voiding cystourethrograms, and post-surgical pain). Pain reduction during burn wound care procedures is linked with improved wound healing rates. To date, no randomized controlled trials have investigated the use of medical hypnosis in pediatric burn populations. Therefore this study aims to determine if medical hypnosis decreases pain, anxiety, and biological stress markers during wound care procedures; improves wound healing times; and decreases rates of traumatic stress reactions in pediatric burn patients. This is a single-center, superiority, parallel-group, prospective randomized controlled trial. Children (4 to 16 years, inclusive) with acute burn injuries presenting for their first dressing application or change are randomly assigned to either the (1) intervention group (medical hypnosis) or (2) control group (standard care). A minimum of 33 participants are recruited for each treatment group. Repeated measures of pain, anxiety, stress, and wound healing are taken at every dressing change until ≥95 % wound re-epithelialization. Further data collection assesses impact on posttraumatic stress

  11. Biofilm Production in Carbapenem Resistant Isolates from Chronic Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarna SR

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofilms are communities of microorganisms covered with extracellular polymeric substances. Such biofilm phenotype makes the microorganism resistant to antibiotics and plays a role in wound chronicity. This results in prolonged hospital stays in ICU, greater cost, and increased mortality. Methods: Pus swabs (59 were collected from a tertiary care hospital near Chennai were processed and identified using standard procedure followed by antibiotic susceptibility testing and identification of carbapenem resistance by Modified Hodge test as per CLSI guidelines. The biofilm formation was tested using plastic microtiter plate method. Results: Out of 59 pus swabs, 51 yielded growth with 69 isolates and 8 yielded no growth. Among the 69 isolates, 51 were GNB and 18 were GPC. Biofilm detection was noted in 84.31% (43/51 GNB isolates with 0.1% crystal violet whereas 100% (51/51 showed biofilm positive with 0.1% safranin. About 74.50% (38/51 isolates of GNB were carbapenem resistant by screening with disk diffusion method. Only 24% (6/25 of GNB isolates among Enterobacteriaceae were positive by Modified Hodge test method. Conclusion: The result shows the association of biofilm production among carbapenem resistant isolates obtained from chronic wound infections.

  12. Antimicrobial Activity of Artemisia absinthium Against Surgical Wounds Infected by Staphylococcus aureus in a Rat Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslemi, Hamid Reza; Hoseinzadeh, Hesamoddin; Badouei, Mahdi Askari; Kafshdouzan, Khatereh; Fard, Ramin Mazaheri Nezhad

    2012-12-01

    The wound infection is one of the frequent complications in patients undergoing surgical operations. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of surgical wounds. Artemisia absinthium has been shown to bear strong antimicrobial activity, especially against Gram-positive pathogens. This study was designed to investigate the antimicrobial effects of A. absinthium against surgical wounds infected by S. aureus in a rat model. Twenty male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided randomly into two equal groups of treated and control rats. A circular incision was created on the dorsal inter-scapular region of each rat. After skin wounding, rats were inoculated locally with 1 × 10(4) CFU of S. aureus at sites of skin wounds. The extract was applied topically twice a day throughout the experiment. Animals of the control group were left untreated. Results have revealed that topical application of A. absinthium extract on the infected wound sites produced significant antibacterial activity against S. aureus.

  13. Electromagnetic radiation influence on clinical course of experimental wound infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pronina Е.А.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The article gives close attention to the study of electromagnetic radiation influence (EMR at the frequency of molecular spectrum absorption and radiation (MSAR of nitric oxide (150 GHz and atmospheric oxygen (129 GHz on the clinical course of experimental wound infection caused by antibiotic-sensitive and antibiotic-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The panoramic spectrometric measuring complex, developed in Saratov Scientific Research Institute of Measuring Equipment was used while carrying out the research. Electromagnetic vibrations of extremely high frequencies were stimulated in this complex imitating the atmospheric oxygen and nitric oxide absorption and radiation molecular spectrum structure. The experiments proved the fact that exposure to radiation at the frequency of molecular spectrum absorption and radiation (MSAR of nitric oxide and atmospheric oxygen had positive impact on the course of traumatic process

  14. Local medicamentous treatment of wound infection in patients with diabetic foot syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bugaeva I.O.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the parameters and comparison of wound healing in patients with diabetic foot syndrome using modern dressings and traditional scheme of local treatment of chronic wounds. Materials and methods: Clinical part of the work has been based on the results of a comprehensive investigation of the parameters of wound healing in 154 diabetic foot patients. Results: Optimum results are obtained by treatment of wound infection in patients with neuropathic diabetic foot shape using highly technological dressings. Conclusion: The modern interactive dressings may actively interfere to all phases of wound healing in patients with purulent-necrotic complications of diabetes mellitus

  15. Randomized clinical trial of intestinal ostomy takedown comparing pursestring wound closure vs conventional closure to eliminate the risk of wound infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho-Mauries, Daniel; Rodriguez-Díaz, José Luis; Salgado-Nesme, Noel; González, Quintín H; Vergara-Fernández, Omar

    2013-02-01

    The use of temporary stomas has been demonstrated to reduce septic complications, especially in high-risk anastomosis; therefore, it is necessary to reduce the number of complications secondary to ostomy takedowns, namely wound infection, anastomotic leaks, and intestinal obstruction. To compare the rates of superficial wound infection and patient satisfaction after pursestring closure of ostomy wound vs conventional linear closure. Patients undergoing colostomy or ileostomy closure between January 2010 and February 2011 were randomly assigned to linear closure (n = 30) or pursestring closure (n = 31) of their ostomy wound. Wound infection within 30 days of surgery was defined as the presence of purulent discharge, pain, erythema, warmth, or positive culture for bacteria. Patient satisfaction, healing time, difficulty managing the wound, and limitation of activities were analyzed with the Likert questionnaire. The infection rate for the control group was 36.6% (n = 11) vs 0% in the pursestring closure group (p ostomy wound closure (shorter healing time and improved patient satisfaction).

  16. Tilapia Piscidin 4 (TP4 Stimulates Cell Proliferation and Wound Closure in MRSA-Infected Wounds in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hang-Ning Huang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are endogenous antibiotics that directly affect microorganisms, and also have a variety of receptor-mediated functions. One such AMP, Tilapia piscidin 4 (TP4, was isolated from Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus; TP4 has antibacterial effects and regulates the innate immune system. The aim of the present study was to characterize the role of TP4 in the regulation of wound closure in mice and proliferation of a keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT and fibroblast cell line (Hs-68. In vitro, TP4 stimulated cell proliferation and activated collagen I, collagen III, and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF gene expression in Hs-68 cells, which induces keratin production by HaCaT cells. This effect was detectable at TP4 concentrations of 6.25 µg/mL in both cell lines. In vivo, TP4 was found to be highly effective at combating peritonitis and wound infection caused by MRSA in mouse models, without inducing adverse behavioral effects or liver or kidney toxicity. Taken together, our results indicate that TP4 enhances the survival rate of mice infected with the bacterial pathogen MRSA through both antimicrobial and wound closure activities mediated by epidermal growth factor (EGF, transforming growth factor (TGF, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. The peptide is likely involved in antibacterial processes and regulation of tissue homeostasis in infected wounds in mice. Overall, these results suggest that TP4 may be suitable for development as a novel topical agent for wound dressing.

  17. Bacterial cellulose/acrylic acid hydrogel synthesized via electron beam irradiation: accelerated burn wound healing in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Najwa; Mohd Amin, Mohd Cairul Iqbal; Pandey, Manisha; Ahmad, Naveed; Rajab, Nor Fadilah

    2014-12-19

    Natural polymer-based hydrogels are of interest to health care professionals as wound dressings owing to their ability to absorb exudates and provide hydration for healing. The aims of this study were to develop and characterize bacterial cellulose/acrylic acid (BC/AA) hydrogels synthesized by electron beam irradiation and investigate its wound healing potential in an animal model. The BC/AA hydrogels were characterized by SEM, tensile strength, water absorptivity, and water vapor transmission rate (WVTR). The cytotoxicity of the hydrogels was investigated in L929 cells. Skin irritation and wound healing properties were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. BC/AA hydrogels had a macroporous network structure, high swelling ratio (4000-6000% at 24h), and high WVTR (2175-2280 g/m(2)/day). The hydrogels were non-toxic in the cell viability assay. In vivo experiments indicated that hydrogels promoted faster wound-healing, enhanced epithelialization, and accelerated fibroblast proliferation compared to that in the control group. These results suggest that BC/AA hydrogels are promising materials for burn dressings. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Triclosan-coated sutures reduce wound infections after spinal surgery: a retrospective, nonrandomized, clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Masaki; Saito, Wataru; Yamagata, Megumu; Imura, Takayuki; Inoue, Gen; Nakazawa, Toshiyuki; Takahira, Naonobu; Uchida, Kentaro; Fukahori, Nobuko; Shimomura, Kiyomi; Takaso, Masashi

    2015-05-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a serious postoperative complication. The incidence of SSIs is lower in clean orthopedic surgery than in other fields, but it is higher after spinal surgery, reaching 4.15% in high-risk patients. Several studies reported that triclosan-coated polyglactin 910 sutures (Vicryl Plus; Ethicon, Inc., Somerville, NJ, USA) significantly reduced the infection rate in the general surgical, neurosurgical, and thoracic surgical fields. However, there have been no studies on the effects of such coated sutures on the incidence of SSIs in orthopedics. To compare the incidence of wound infections after spinal surgery using triclosan-coated suture materials with that of noncoated ones. A retrospective, nonrandomized, and clinical study. From May 2010 to April 2012, 405 patients underwent a spinal surgical procedure in the Department of Orthopedic Surgery of two university hospitals. The primary outcome was the number of wound infections and dehiscences. Two hundred five patients had a conventional wound closure with polyglactin 910 suture (Vicryl) between May 2010 and April 2011 (Time Period 1 [TP1]), and 200 patients underwent wound closure with triclosan-coated polyglactin 910 suture (Vicryl Plus) between May 2011 and April 2012 (TP2). Statistical comparisons of wound infections, dehiscence, and risk factors for poor wound healing or infection were performed. None of the authors has any conflict of interest associated with this study. There were two cases of wound dehiscence in TP1 and one in TP2 (p=.509). Using noncoated sutures in TP1, eight patients (3.90%) had wound infections, whereas one patient (0.50%) had wound infections in TP2 (using triclosan-coated sutures); the difference was significant (p=.020). The use of triclosan-coated polyglactin 910 sutures instead of polyglactin 910 sutures may reduce the number of wound infections after spinal surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid enzyme analysis as a diagnostic tool for wound infection: Comparison between clinical judgment, microbiological analysis, and enzyme analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arkes, Miriam; Haalboom, Marieke; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Heinzle, Andrea; Sigi, Eva; Guebitz, Georg; Beuk, Roland

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, diagnosis of wound infection is based on the classical clinical signs of infection. When infection is suspected, wounds are often swabbed for microbiological culturing. These methods are not accurate (clinical judgment in chronic wounds) or provide results after several days

  20. Morphometric evaluation of wound healing in burns treated with Ulmo (Eucryphia cordifolia) honey alone and supplemented with ascorbic acid in guinea pig (Cavia porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schencke, Carolina; Vasconcellos, Adriana; Sandoval, Cristian; Torres, Paulina; Acevedo, Francisca; Del Sol, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    In the context of the search for cost-efficient treatments, Ulmo (Eurcyphia cordifolia) honey is an excellent alternative for treating burn wounds and could have a profound medical, social, and economic impact. Ascorbic acid is an enzymatic co-factor necessary for the synthesis of collagen and the proliferation of fibroblasts and has been proposed as a coadjuvant to strengthen the healing effects of honey. The aim of this work was to evaluate by morphometric studies the healing wounds caused by burns treated with Ulmo honey alone and supplemented with ascorbic acid in guinea pig (Cavia porcellus). Fifteen guinea pigs were used and divided randomly into three groups: positive control (C+), experimental with unsupplemented honey (H), and experimental with supplemented honey (SH). A uniform deep burn covering 1 cm(2) of the back skin was performed. The following indices were calculated for the morphometric study: superficial contraction index of the wound, deep contraction index of the wound, wound severity index, global healing index, global contraction index, and dermal proliferation area. The superficial contraction index of the wound, global healing index, global contraction, and dermal proliferation area values of the experimental with supplemented honey group were higher than the other groups (P ascorbic acid) promotes an appropriate action to support the healing effect. This study showed that by supplementing the Ulmo honey with ascorbic acid, the healing and contraction effects can be strengthened in burn wounds compared to unsupplemented honey. These results were proof of the synergy between honey and ascorbic acid in healing burn wounds.

  1. Wound healing: biological effects of Nd:YAG laser on collagen metabolism in pig skin in comparison to thermal burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, D J; Abergel, R P; Johnston, K J; Adomian, G E; Dwyer, R M; Uitto, J; Lesavoy, M A

    1983-08-01

    Pig skin was treated with the Nd:YAG laser at 1,060 nm or electrocautery, at energy densities of 649 +/- 20 J/cm2 and 612 J/cm2, respectively. Biopsies of treated areas and of normal skin were performed at 7, 14, and 60 days after treatment and processed for histology, electron microscopy and biochemical assays. Wound healing, as shown histologically, was similar in both treated groups. Depth of injury appeared to reach reticular dermis at day 7 in each treated group. However, thermal burn was more destructive of regular collagen, whereas the laser appeared to damage deep dermal blood vessels without destroying surrounding connective tissue. Biochemical assays revealed increased collagen production and increased collagenolytic activity 7 days after laser injury. However, by day 60, there was a reduction in total collagen content in laser treated skin below that of normal skin, which correlated with decreased collagen synthesis and unchanged collagenolytic activity. In burn specimens there was an initial decrease in total collagen content which reverted to normal by day 60. Active collagen degradation occurred at all 3 time points, but a marked increase in synthetic activity occurred as the burn scar was laid down. Laser treatment resulted in reduction of the amount of collagen below that in burn scarred or normal skin, suggesting that classical scar formation may be inhibited. These results indicate that the Nd:YAG laser may be useful for the treatment of keloids and hypertrophic scars.

  2. Rapidly developed squamous cell carcinoma after laser therapy used to treat chemical burn wound: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyung-Rok; Kwon, Soon-Sung; Chung, Seum; Kie, Jeong-Hae

    2015-02-07

    In chronic wounds, especially burn scars, malignant tumors can arise. However, it is rare for a subacute burn injury to change to a malignant lesion within one month. Moreover, a case of squamous cell carcinoma arising from HeNe laser therapy after a chemical burn has never been reported. In this report, we examine a rare case of squamous cell carcinoma arising from HeNe laser therapy after a chemical burn. Because pathologic investigations were made from the first operation, both early detection of the squamous cell carcinoma and consideration of the HeNe laser therapy as a risk factor for the skin cancer were possible. The cancer was completely removed and reconstruction of the defect was successfully achieved in a timely manner. Although there has as yet been no reported case of squamous cell carcinoma induced by laser therapy, it is important for clinicians to recognize both the possibility of laser-induced cancer and the rapid change of cancer, so they can provide appropriate and timely treatment.

  3. Topical Modulation of the Burn Wound Inflammatory Response to Improve Short and Long Term Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-15

    hypertrophic scar, p38, combat casualty, treatment, organ failure, systemic inflammatory response syndrome , thermal injury, wound model, intervention 3...follicle apoptosis.  We will complete our wound closure data for Pg004, Pg005, and Pg008. We will also examine the H&E slides and complete the data for

  4. In Vitro Assessment of the Antibacterial Potential of Silver Nano-Coatings on Cotton Gauzes for Prevention of Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Paladini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant organisms are increasingly implicated in acute and chronic wound infections, thus compromising the chance of therapeutic options. The resistance to conventional antibiotics demonstrated by some bacterial strains has encouraged new approaches for the prevention of infections in wounds and burns, among them the use of silver compounds and nanocrystalline silver. Recently, silver wound dressings have become widely accepted in wound healing centers and are commercially available. In this work, novel antibacterial wound dressings have been developed through a silver deposition technology based on the photochemical synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The devices obtained are completely natural and the silver coatings are characterized by an excellent adhesion without the use of any binder. The silver-treated cotton gauzes were characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA in order to verify the distribution and the dimension of the silver particles on the cotton fibers. The effectiveness of the silver-treated gauzes in reducing the bacterial growth and biofilm proliferation has been demonstrated through agar diffusion tests, bacterial enumeration test, biofilm quantification tests, fluorescence and SEM microscopy. Moreover, potential cytotoxicity of the silver coating was evaluated through 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay (MTT and the extract method on fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS was performed in order to determine the silver release in different media and to relate the results to the biological characterization. All the results obtained were compared with plain gauzes as a negative control, as well as gauzes treated with a higher silver percentage as a positive control.

  5. In Vitro Assessment of the Antibacterial Potential of Silver Nano-Coatings on Cotton Gauzes for Prevention of Wound Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paladini, Federica; Di Franco, Cinzia; Panico, Angelica; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Sannino, Alessandro; Pollini, Mauro

    2016-05-25

    Multidrug-resistant organisms are increasingly implicated in acute and chronic wound infections, thus compromising the chance of therapeutic options. The resistance to conventional antibiotics demonstrated by some bacterial strains has encouraged new approaches for the prevention of infections in wounds and burns, among them the use of silver compounds and nanocrystalline silver. Recently, silver wound dressings have become widely accepted in wound healing centers and are commercially available. In this work, novel antibacterial wound dressings have been developed through a silver deposition technology based on the photochemical synthesis of silver nanoparticles. The devices obtained are completely natural and the silver coatings are characterized by an excellent adhesion without the use of any binder. The silver-treated cotton gauzes were characterized through scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) in order to verify the distribution and the dimension of the silver particles on the cotton fibers. The effectiveness of the silver-treated gauzes in reducing the bacterial growth and biofilm proliferation has been demonstrated through agar diffusion tests, bacterial enumeration test, biofilm quantification tests, fluorescence and SEM microscopy. Moreover, potential cytotoxicity of the silver coating was evaluated through 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay (MTT) and the extract method on fibroblasts and keratinocytes. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was performed in order to determine the silver release in different media and to relate the results to the biological characterization. All the results obtained were compared with plain gauzes as a negative control, as well as gauzes treated with a higher silver percentage as a positive control.

  6. Short- and long-term outcomes of small auto- and cryopreserved allograft skin grafting in those with >60%TBSA deep burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizhao, Ji; Yongjun, Zheng; Lisen, Zhang; Pengfei, Luo; Xiaopeng, Zheng; Guangyi, Wang; Shihui, Zhu; Xiaoyan, Hu; Shichu, Xiao; Zhaofan, Xia

    2017-02-01

    The shortage of autologous skin sources not only adds difficulty to the repair of extremely large-area deep burn wounds but affects the healing quality. The aim of the present study is to explore an ideal method for repairing large-areas burn wounds with low scar formation. Between 2002 and 2014, we used grafting of small auto- and cryopreserved allo-skin to repair large-area residual burn wounds in wounds after 21 days 21 patients, and after early excision in 17 patients. The wound healing rate and quality were observed. The skin expansion rate was 1:9-1:16, and the mean area of wounds repaired after three weeks was 64.8±7.3%TBSA, the wound healing rate was 91.8±3.7%. The mean area of the early excision group was 65.9±9.8 TBSA, where the healing rate was 94.5±5.6%. After small auto- and cryopreserved allograft skin grafting, the epidermis of the auto-skin gradually replaced the allo-epidermis, and the allo-dermis persisted for a prolonged period. The dermal collagen fibers at the allo-skin grafting sites were well arranged. At 1-2-year follow-up, observation showed that the Vancouver Scar Scale total score was 4·304±2·363, and we did not discern significant contracture and dysfunction in the large joints of the four extremities. Small auto- and cryopreserved allograft skin grafting of small auto- and allo-skin not only raised the graft expansion rate but offers a stable wound healing rate. This new technique may provide an option for repair of large-area deep burn wounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  7. [Analysis on the prevalence of central venous catheter-related infection in burn patients and its risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li; Wang, Fan; Sun, Kedai; Zhou, Tao; Gong, Yali; Peng, Yizhi

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of central venous catheter-related infection (CRI) in burn patients and its risk factors, so as to guide the clinical practice. Clinical data of 5 026 days of 480 cases of central venous catheterization altogether in 228 burn patients admitted to our ward from June 2011 to December 2014, conforming to the study criteria, were retrospectively analyzed. (1) The incidence of CRI and that of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in patients (the infection rates per thousand days were calculated) and mortality due to them, and detection of concerning bacteria were recorded after each case of catheterization. (2) The incidence of CRI after each case of catheterization in patients was recorded according to the classification of their gender, age, total burn area, full-thickness burn area, cause of injury, severity of inhalation injury, location of catheterization, whether catheterization through wound or not, duration of catheterization, and the data were processed with chi-square test. Indexes with statistically significant differences were selected, and they were processed with multivariate logistic stepwise regression analysis to screen the independent risk factors of CRI. (3) To all cases of catheterization and cases with catheterization through wound, incidence of CRI after each case of catheterization in patients at each time period was recorded according to the sorting of duration of catheterization. Data were processed with chi-square test and Fisher's exact test, and the values of P were adjusted by Bonferroni. (1) Infection rate of CRI per thousand days was 50.14‰ (252/5 026), resulting in the mortality rate of 3.51% (8/228). Infection rate of CRBSI per thousand days was 18.70‰ (94/5 026), resulting in the mortality rate of 2.19% (5/228). Respectively 319 and 105 strains of pathogens were detected in CRI and CRBSI, in which the top four bacteria detected were Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa

  8. [Efficacy of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy for wound flora and wound healing of pressure sore with pathogen infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaoliang; Huang, Sufang; Zhu, Tao; Sun, Xuesheng; Zou, Yong; Wang, Yingzhen

    2014-08-19

    To explore the efficacy of photodynamic antimicrobial therapy in the treatment of pressure sore with pathogen infection. A total of 42 pressure sore patients with pathogen infection were divided randomly into experimental and control groups (n = 21 each). Fufanghuangbai liquid was used for external application with control group. In the experimental group, wound was treated with Fufanghuangbai liquid wet dressing and irradiated by semiconductor laser 30 min late. The distance from semiconductor laser probe to wound site was 10-15 cm, 20 min twice daily, continuous exposure to 7 days for 1 course. The results of bacterial culture and epidermal growth factor (EGF) expression of wound granulation tissue were observed before and after treatment. And the changes of healing rate of pressure sore were measured at post-treatment in each group. The positive rates of bacterial culture, rates of change around wound inflammation, healing rate of days 7 and 14, the high expression of EGF on healing wound granulation tissue was 9.75%, (32.2% ± 5.8%), (89.1% ± 5.6%), (12.4% ± 2.9%), (34.7% ± 3.6%), 14/21 in the treatment group versus 51.2%, (17.8% ± 2.0%), (57.3% ± 2.6%), (5.1% ± 1.1%), (10.5% ± 2.4%), 2/21 in the control group respectively. The inter-group differences were statistically significant (P Photodynamic antimicrobial therapy is an effective method for pressure sore with pathogen infection. Wound healing is promoted through an up-regulation of EGF.

  9. Effects of ketanserin on hypergranulation tissue formation, infection, and healing of equine lower limb wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, Marc; Besche, Béatrice; Lefay, Marie-Paul; Hare, Jonathan; Vlaminck, Kathleen

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this multicentre, randomized, controlled field study was to determine the efficacy of ketanserin gel in preventing exuberant granulation tissue formation (hypergranulation) and infection in equine lower limb wounds. Horses and ponies (n = 481) with naturally occurring wounds were randomized to either topical treatment with ketanserin gel (n = 242) or a positive control (Belgium, Germany: ethacridin lactate solution, n = 120; France, United Kingdom: malic, benzoic, and salicylic acid [MBS] cream, n = 119). Treatment continued until the wound healed (success), formed hypergranulation tissue (failure), or became infected (failure). Treatment was terminated after 6 months in all remaining animals. Ketanserin was successful in 88% of cases. Wounds treated with ketanserin were 2 and 5 times more likely to heal successfully than were those treated with MBS or ethacridin lactate, respectively. Ketanserin gel is thus more effective than these standard treatments in preventing hypergranulation tissue and infection of equine lower limb wounds.

  10. Investigating the effects of Hydroalcoholic extract of jujube fruit (Zizyphus vulgaris L.) on second degree burn wound healing in Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vafaei, F; Abdollahzadeh, F

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: Two thirds of all accidents and injuries leading to death all around the world occur in developing countries like Iran. One of these accidents is burn that can have unpleasant effects on the individual's body and soul. Skin wound healing is a process that happens as a result of coordination between tissues, cells, and different factors. The remaining inflammation and insufficient amount of vessel construction are among the most important causes of delayed wound healing. In recent years, jujube fruit (Zizyphus vulgaris L.) has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects as a traditional therapeutic agent. Therefore, the present study was conducted in order to investigate the effects of jujube fruit extract on second-degree burn wound among Balb/c mice. Materials and Methods: The present empirical-interventional study included 48 Balb/c mice weighing approximately 30 +/- 3 gr. After burn wounds of 1.5 cm2 were created and second-degree burns was affirmed by a pathologist, the mice were divided into four control groups; one treated with Vaseline, one treated with silver sulfadiazine ointment, one treated with jujube fruit extract 1%, and a control group. Results: In treatment groups, 1 gr ointment containing hydroalcoholic extract of jujube fruit was utilized twice a day until complete recovery. Afterwards, the four groups were compared with regard to the wound area and histopathology. The collected data were analyzed through one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests by using SPSS software. Conclusion: There was a significant difference between the intervention group and the Vaseline and control groups with regard to the percentage of wound recovery (P smaller than 0.05). The results of the study indicated that the jujube fruit extract could accelerate burn wound healing among Balb/c mice. It is recommended that further research is conducted on the effects of different doses of this medicine on laboratory animals and then on humans.

  11. Rapid enzyme analysis as a diagnostic tool for wound infection: Comparison between clinical judgment, microbiological analysis, and enzyme analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokhuis-Arkes, Miriam H E; Haalboom, Marieke; van der Palen, Job; Heinzle, Andrea; Sigl, Eva; Guebitz, Georg; Beuk, Roland

    2015-01-01

    In clinical practice, diagnosis of wound infection is based on the classical clinical signs of infection. When infection is suspected, wounds are often swabbed for microbiological culturing. These methods are not accurate (clinical judgment in chronic wounds) or provide results after several days (wound swab). Therefore, there is an urgent need for an easy-to-use diagnostic tool for fast detection of wound infection, especially in chronic wounds. This study determined the diagnostic properties of the enzymes myeloperoxidase, human neutrophil elastase (HNE), lysozyme and cathepsin-G in detecting wound infection when compared to wound swabs. Both chronic and acute wounds of 81 patients were assessed through clinical judgment, enzyme analysis and wound swab. Three promising enzyme models for detecting wound infection were identified. A positive test was defined as: at least one enzyme positive after 30 minutes (model 1), lysozyme and HNE positive after 30 minutes (model 2), myeloperoxidase positive after 5 minutes, and HNE or lysozyme positive after 30 minutes (model 3). All models were significant (p≤0.001). There was no correlation between clinical judgment and wound swab, indicating the need for novel diagnostic systems. Enzyme analysis is fast, easy to use and superior to clinical judgment when compared to wound swabs. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  12. First case of Chlorella wound infection in a human in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hart

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old man developed an infected knee wound 2 days after jumping his bicycle into a freshwater dam. He required repeated debridement and tissue grew bright green colonies typical of the alga Chlorella plus Aeromonas hydrophila. This, and one previously reported case, responded to surgical debridement and careful wound management.

  13. A study of wound infections in two health institutions in Ile-Ife, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The microbiological analysis of wound infection in 102 patients was undertaken in the outpatient departments of the University Teaching Hospital and the Health Centre in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. The location and type of wound was considered and identification of bacterial isolates was determined by standard microbiological ...

  14. The healing effect of combined hydroalcoholic extract of Teocurium polium and the seed hull of Quercus brantii on burn wounds in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammadi Jamshid

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Plants and their extracts have considerable potential for wound healing. So, The aim of this study was to evaluate the wound healing effect of combined hydroalcoholic extract of Teocurium Polium (TP and the seed hull of Quercus brantii (Persian oak (QB and comparing with silver sulfadiazine (SSD ointment (1% in rats. Animals were divided into six groups consist of normal (untreated, physiologic serum, TP, seed hulls of Quercus brantii (QB, combination of TP and QB and the other group was SSD. Burn area size, epidermal and dermal diameter, number of hair follicle, histopathology of the burn skin and concentration of plasma malondialdehide (MDA were determined in different groups. Animals treated with QB and TP, SSD and combination of two extracts (QB +TP showed a significant reduction in the burn area. Serum MDA decreased significantly in animals treated with QB, TP and QB+TP. Histological comparison has shown that TP, QB and combination of them significantly increased reepithelialization in burn wounds, as compared to normal group. In conclusion, our results demonstrated that topical application of TP and QB has a significant effect on the burn wound healing.

  15. Prophylactic antibiotic use in pediatric burn units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergün, O; Celik, A; Ergün, G; Ozok, G

    2004-12-01

    Prophylactic antibiotic use in childhood burns is controversial. The efficiency of antibiotic prophylaxis in 77 pediatric burn patients was evaluated. Forty-seven patients received prophylactic antibiotics (Group AP), while 30 patients received no prophylaxis (Group NP). Age, wound depth, day of admission, mechanism of burn injury, type of dressings were similar for both groups (p > 0.05). Wound infection rates were 21.3 % in Group AP and 16.7 % in Group NP (p > 0.05). S. aureus, Enterobacter spp., P. aeruginosa, and E. coli were the most common microorganisms. Patients with wound colonization and infection had a larger burned total body surface area (BTBSA) in both groups (p beneficial and cost-effective results in the treatment of childhood burns is recommended.

  16. The pH of wound fluid in diabetic foot ulcers -- the way forward in detecting clinical infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, Carla; Lagan, Katie M; McDowell, David A

    2014-05-01

    Infections within diabetic foot ulcers are often hard to detect and extremely difficult to treat. The normal signs and symptoms of infection including purulence, erythema, pain, tenderness, warmth and induration are frequently absent in such wounds necessitating exploration of other ways of rapidly and accurately detecting infection. This study considers diabetic wound fluid pH as a possible alternative means of monitoring infection status. CINAHL, Ovid SP and MEDLINE were searched for papers in English published between January 2004 to May 2014. Key search terms included wound fluid, exudate, wound, ulcer, diabetes, pH, healing, infection, bacteria. This paper considers the potential benefits of augmenting and supporting current clinical practice in the early determination of wound healing trajectory and infection status, by monitoring wound fluid pH. The evidence collected highlights the need for further research and suggests the potential of wound fluid analysis as a possible surrogate marker for detecting infection in diabetic foot ulcers.

  17. Outcomes of outpatient management of pediatric burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Matthew; Coffee, Tammy; Adenuga, Paul; Yowler, Charles J

    2014-01-01

    The literature surrounding pediatric burns has focused on inpatient management. The goal of this study is to characterize the population of burned children treated as outpatients and assess outcomes validating this method of burn care. A retrospective review of 953 patients treated the burn clinic and burn unit of a tertiary care center. Patient age, burn etiology, burn characteristics, burn mechanism, and referral pattern were recorded. The type of wound care and incidence of outcomes including subsequent hospital admission, infection, scarring, and surgery served as the primary outcome data. Eight hundred and thirty children were treated as outpatients with a mean time of 1.8 days for the evaluation of burn injury in our clinic. Scalds accounted for 53% of the burn mechanism, with burns to the hand/wrist being the most frequent area involved. The mean percentage of TBSA was 1.4% for the outpatient cohort and 8% for the inpatient cohort. Burns in the outpatient cohort healed with a mean time of 13.4 days. In the outpatient cohort, nine (1%) patients had subsequent admissions and three (0.4%) patients had concern for infection. Eight patients from the outpatient cohort were treated with excision and grafting. The vast majority of pediatric burns are small, although they may often involve more critical areas such as the face and hand. Outpatient wound care is an effective treatment strategy which results in low rates of complications and should become the standard of care for children with appropriate burn size and home support.

  18. Surgical Site Infection Rate Drops to 0% Using a Vacuum-Assisted Closure in Contaminated/Dirty Infected Laparotomy Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Balderas, Gerardo; Ruiz-Velasco-Santacruz, Alejandro; Díaz-Elizondo, José Antonio; Gómez-Navarro, Juan Antonio; Flores-Villalba, Eduardo

    2017-05-01

    Wound site infections increase costs, hospital stay, morbidity, and mortality. Techniques used for wounds management after laparotomy are primary, delayed primary, and vacuum-assisted closures. The objective of this study is to compare infection rates between those techniques in contaminated and dirty/infected wounds. Eighty-one laparotomized patients with Class III or IV surgical wounds were enrolled in a three-arm randomized prospective study. Patients were allocated to each group with the software Research Randomizer® (Urbaniak, G. C., & Plous, S., Version 4.0). Presence of infection was determined by a certified board physician according to Centers for Disease Control's Criteria for Defining a Surgical Site Infection. Twenty-seven patients received primary closure, 29 delayed primary closure, and 25 vacuum-assisted closure, with no exclusions for analysis. Surgical site infection was present in 10 (37%) patients treated with primary closure, 5 (17%) with primary delayed closure, and 0 (0%) patients receiving vacuum-assisted closure. Statistical significance was found between infection rates of the vacuum-assisted group and the other two groups. No significant difference was found between the primary and primary delayed closure groups. The infection rate in contaminated/dirty-infected laparotomy wounds decreases from 37 and 17 per cent with a primary and delayed primary closures, respectively, to 0 per cent with vacuum-assisted systems.

  19. Personalized Therapeutic Cocktail of Wild Environmental Phages Rescues Mice from Acinetobacter baumannii Wound Infections

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Regeimbal, James M; Jacobs, Anna C; Corey, Brendan W; Henry, Matthew S; Thompson, Mitchell G; Pavlicek, Rebecca L; Quinones, Javier; Hannah, Ryan M; Ghebremedhin, Meron; Crane, Nicole J; Zurawski, Daniel V; Teneza-Mora, Nimfa C; Biswas, Biswajit; Hall, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    .... In this work, we isolated and assembled a five-member cocktail of wild phages against Acinetobacter baumannii and demonstrated therapeutic efficacy in a mouse full-thickness dorsal infected wound model...

  20. Antibiotic consumption to detect epidemics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a burn centre: A paradigm shift in the epidemiological surveillance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Anne; Voirol, Pierre; Krähenbühl, Marie; Bonnemain, Claire-Lise; Fournier, Camille; Pantet, Olivier; Pagani, Jean-Luc; Revelly, Jean-Pierre; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Sadeghipour, Farshid; Pannatier, André; Eggimann, Philippe; Que, Yok-Ai

    2016-05-01

    The control of antibiotic resistance and nosocomial infections are major challenges for specialized burn centres. Early detection of those epidemic outbreaks is crucial to limit the human and financial burden. We hypothesize that data collected by antibiotic consumption medico-economic surveys could be used as warning signal to detect early nosocomial outbreaks. A retrospective analysis was conducted that included all burn patients staying >48h on the Lausanne BICU (Burn Intensive Care Unit) between January 2001 and October 2012 who received systemic therapeutic antibiotics. Infection episodes were characterized according to predefined criteria. Antibiotic consumption data, obtained from the quarterly surveillance of drug consumption surveys, were translated into defined daily doses (DDDs). In total, 297 out of 414 burn patients stayed >48h, giving a total of 7458 'burn-days'. We identified 610 infection episodes (burn wound [32.0%], respiratory [31.1%], and catheter [21.8%]), from 774 microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26.2%), Staphylococcus aureus (11.5%), and Candida albicans (7.0%) were the main pathogens. We observed three distinct outbreaks of P. aeruginosa infections in 2002-2003, 2006, and 2009-2011. These outbreaks correlated with an increase in the DDDs of anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics. Our data support a paradigm shift in the epidemiological surveillance of nosocomial P. aeruginosa epidemics in burn centres, using the rise in antibiotic consumption as an early trigger to initiate the molecular typing of P. aeruginosa strains and the reinforcement of standard infection control procedures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Antiseptic compounds still active against bacterial strains isolated from surgical wound infections despite increasing antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacometti, A; Cirioni, O; Greganti, G; Fineo, A; Ghiselli, R; Del Prete, M S; Mocchegiani, F; Fileni, B; Caselli, F; Petrelli, E; Saba, V; Scalise, G

    2002-07-01

    The in vitro activities of povidone iodine, potassium peroxymonosulfate, and dimethyldidecylammonium chloride were investigated against 379 nosocomial isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa responsible for surgical wound infections in patients operated on between July 1995 and June 2001. Overall, the isolates were inhibited by the antiseptics at concentrations below those used routinely. In spite of increasing resistance to the various antibiotics used to treat surgical wound infections, no significant variation in the susceptibility to antiseptics was demonstrated during this 6-year study.

  2. Omental Herniation: A Rare Complication of Vacuum-Assisted Closure of Infected Sternotomy Wound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon Gukop

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vacuum-assisted closure (VAC has recently been adopted as an acceptable modality for management of sternotomy wound infections. Although generally efficacious, the use of negative pressure devices has been associated with complications such as bleeding, retention of sponge, and empyema. We report the first case of greater omental hernia as a rare complication of vacuum-assisted closure of sternal wound infection following coronary artery bypass grafting.

  3. An evaluation of nutritional practice in a paediatric burns unit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Vijfhuize; M. Verburg (Melissa); L. Marino; M. van Dijk (Monique); H. Rode (Heinz)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction. Burn injuries evoke a systemic metabolic response with profound effects on organ function, susceptibility to infection, wound healing, growth and development, and mortality. Children are especially vulnerable to nutritional deficiencies owing to their limited energy

  4. Efficacy of a children’s procedural preparation and distraction device on healing in acute burn wound care procedures: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Nadia J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The intense pain and anxiety triggered by burns and their associated wound care procedures are well established in the literature. Non-pharmacological intervention is a critical component of total pain management protocols and is used as an adjunct to pharmacological analgesia. An example is virtual reality, which has been used effectively to dampen pain intensity and unpleasantness. Possible links or causal relationships between pain/anxiety/stress and burn wound healing have previously not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to investigate these relationships, specifically by determining if a newly developed multi-modal procedural preparation and distraction device (Ditto™ used during acute burn wound care procedures will reduce the pain and anxiety of a child and increase the rate of re-epithelialization. Methods/design Children (4 to 12 years with acute burn injuries presenting for their first dressing change will be randomly assigned to either the (1 Control group (standard distraction or (2 Ditto™ intervention group (receiving Ditto™, procedural preparation and Ditto™ distraction. It is intended that a minimum of 29 participants will be recruited for each treatment group. Repeated measures of pain intensity, anxiety, stress and healing will be taken at every dressing change until complete wound re-epithelialization. Further data collection will aid in determining patient satisfaction and cost effectiveness of the Ditto™ intervention, as well as its effect on speed of wound re-epithelialization. Discussion Results of this study will provide data on whether the disease process can be altered by reducing stress, pain and anxiety in the context of acute burn wounds. Trial registration ACTRN12611000913976

  5. Superthin Abdominal Wall Glove-Like Flap Combined With Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy for Soft Tissue Reconstruction in Severely Burned Hands or With Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Liu, Sheng; Qiu, Le; Ma, Ben; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong-Jie; Peszel, April; Chen, Xu-Lin

    2015-12-01

    Severe burn and infection to hands always involves the deep structures, such as tendons, joints, and bones. These wounds cannot be closed immediately and therefore creates a high risk for complication. We presented 9 cases with deep dermal burns to the dorsal of the hand (6 electrical burns and 3 thermal crush injuries) with wound infections in 2 cases. The vacuum-assisted closure system was used continuously until the flap reconstruction was performed. A random pattern and superthin abdominal wall skin flap-like glove was designed. The flap was transferred to the defected portion of the dorsum of the hand and resected from the abdominal wall about 3 weeks later. The flaps in 8 of the patients treated by this technique survived completely and partial necrosis of the distal flap occurred in 1 patient. The defect resolved after operative treatment and the function of the hands and fingers were successfully salvaged. All patients resulted in having a satisfactory aesthetic outcome with no or minor discomfort at the abdominal donor area. Integration of the vacuum-assisted closure system and the superthin abdominal wall glove-like flap reconstruction appeared to be successful and should be considered in patients with severely burned hands.

  6. Predictors of wound infection in elective colorectal surgery. Multicenter observational case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraccalvieri, Doménico; Kreisler Moreno, Esther; Flor Lorente, Blas; Torres García, Antonio; Muñoz Calero, Alberto; Mateo Vallejo, Francisco; Biondo, Sebastiano

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of Vicryl Plus(®) suture in reducing the rate of postoperative wound infection in elective colorectal surgery. A prospective case-control multicenter study with 480 patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery was performed between 2006 and 2007. Patients were divided in 2 groups of equal sample size: group 1, closure of the abdominal wall using Vicryl Plus(®) and group 2 where PDS II(®) was used. The study involved 5 hospitals in the Spanish State. Wound infection was classified into superficial and deep. All patients diagnosed of wound infection during the hospital stay and up to 30 days after discharge were studied. For the statistical analysis Chi-square test and Fisher exact were used for bivariate analysis and logistic regression model for multivariate analysis. Wound infection rates were significantly lower in group 1: 14.6 vs. 29.2. Multivariate analysis showed that risk of wound infection was higher in patients with cancer, lung disease, anemia, operative time greater than 2 h, lack of second dose intra-operative prophylactic antibiotic and laparotomy closure with PDS suture II(®). The use of suture coated with triclosan can be an effective prophylactic tool in reducing wound infection rate in patients undergoing elective colorectal surgery. Copyright © 2013 AEC. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Immune Modulating Topical S100A8/A9 Inhibits Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Mitigates Biofilm Infection in Chronic Wounds

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    Hannah Trøstrup

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm maintains and perturbs local host defense, hindering timely wound healing. Previously, we showed that P. aeruginosa suppressed S100A8/A9 of the murine innate host defense. We assessed the potential antimicrobial effect of S100A8/A9 on biofilm-infected wounds in a murine model and P. aeruginosa growth in vitro. Seventy-six mice, inflicted with a full-thickness burn wound were challenged subcutaneously (s.c. by 106 colony-forming units (CFUs of P. aeruginosa biofilm. Mice were subsequently randomized into two treatment groups, one group receiving recombinant murine S100A8/A9 and a group of vehicle controls (phosphate-buffered saline, PBS all treated with s.c. injections daily for up to five days. Wounds were analyzed for quantitative bacteriology and contents of key inflammatory markers. Count of blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes was included. S100A8/A9-treatment ameliorated wound infection, as evaluated by quantitative bacteriology (p ≤ 0.05. In vitro, growth of P. aeruginosa was inhibited dose-dependently by S100A8/A9 in concentrations from 5 to 40 μg/mL, as determined by optical density-measurement (OD-measurement and quantitative bacteriology. Treatment slightly augmented key inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α, but dampened interferon-γ (IFN-γ levels and blood polymorphonuclear count. In conclusion, topical S100A8/A9 displays remarkable novel immune stimulatory and anti-infective properties in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, treatment by S100A8/A9 provides local infection control. Implications for a role as adjunctive treatment in healing of chronic biofilm-infected wounds are discussed.

  8. Immune Modulating Topical S100A8/A9 Inhibits Growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Mitigates Biofilm Infection in Chronic Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Lerche, Christian Johann; Christophersen, Lars; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2017-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm maintains and perturbs local host defense, hindering timely wound healing. Previously, we showed that P. aeruginosa suppressed S100A8/A9 of the murine innate host defense. We assessed the potential antimicrobial effect of S100A8/A9 on biofilm-infected wounds in a murine model and P. aeruginosa growth in vitro. Seventy-six mice, inflicted with a full-thickness burn wound were challenged subcutaneously (s.c.) by 106 colony-forming units (CFUs) of P. aeruginosa biofilm. Mice were subsequently randomized into two treatment groups, one group receiving recombinant murine S100A8/A9 and a group of vehicle controls (phosphate-buffered saline, PBS) all treated with s.c. injections daily for up to five days. Wounds were analyzed for quantitative bacteriology and contents of key inflammatory markers. Count of blood polymorphonuclear leukocytes was included. S100A8/A9-treatment ameliorated wound infection, as evaluated by quantitative bacteriology (p ≤ 0.05). In vitro, growth of P. aeruginosa was inhibited dose-dependently by S100A8/A9 in concentrations from 5 to 40 μg/mL, as determined by optical density-measurement (OD-measurement) and quantitative bacteriology. Treatment slightly augmented key inflammatory cytokine Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), but dampened interferon-γ (IFN-γ) levels and blood polymorphonuclear count. In conclusion, topical S100A8/A9 displays remarkable novel immune stimulatory and anti-infective properties in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, treatment by S100A8/A9 provides local infection control. Implications for a role as adjunctive treatment in healing of chronic biofilm-infected wounds are discussed. PMID:28672877

  9. Interactions of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in polymicrobial wound infection.

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    Irena Pastar

    Full Text Available Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections.

  10. Development of technology for manufacture of cream with wild carrot seeds lipophilic extract for burn wounds treatment

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    Вікторія Ігорівна Горлачова

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of our research was to substantiate and to develop the optimal composition and technology for manufacture of the soft dosage form as a combined wound healing and anti-inflammatory cream with Wild carrot seeds lipophilic extract applied for burn wounds treatment.Methods. Pharmaco-technological, physical, chemical, microscopic, and structural and mechanical methods of research have been used.Results. According to the results, the ointment base type – the 1st type emulsion base, – as well as its optimal composition: butylhydroxytoluene – 0,02, Euxyl РЕ 9010 – 0,500, creambase № 6,00, cetylstearyl alcohol – 3,00, corn oil – 15,00, purified water – to 100,00 have been determined. Colloid stability and thermo stability, organoleptic and physico-chemical properties have been studied. As a result of research the main active ingredient concentration of the remedy – Wild carrot seeds lipophilic extract – has been selected: 5%.All active ingredients were administered to the drug gradually. The results of structural and mechanical research have shown the influence of the active ingredients on rheological parameters of the remedy.By microscopic research an optimal speed and time for homogenization of the cream with Wild carrot seeds lipophilic extract have been substantiated – 5000 rpm during 10 minutes.On the grounds of physico-chemical research the optimal technology for manufacture of cream, providing maintenance of specific temperature, procedure for administration of the ingredients of the remedy, as well as mixing conditions and cooling dynamics, has been substantiated and to developed.Conclusion. The optimal composition and technology for manufacture of the soft dosage form as a combined wound healing and anti-inflammatory cream with Wild carrot seeds lipophilic extract applied for burn wounds treatment, and manufacturing technology scheme have been theoretically and experimentally substantiated; stepwise procedure

  11. Comparative effectiveness of different wound dressings for patients with partial-thickness burns: study protocol of a systematic review and a Bayesian framework network meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiong; Chen, Zhao-Hong; Wang, Shun-Bin; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Selecting a suitable wound dressing for patients with partial-thickness burns (PTBs) is important in wound care. However, the comparative effectiveness of different dressings has not been studied. We report the protocol of a network meta-analysis designed to combine direct and indirect evidence of wound dressings in the management of PTB. Methods and analysis We will search for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the wound-healing effect of a wound dressing in the management of PTB. Searches will be conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register and CINAHL. A comprehensive search strategy is developed to retrieve articles reporting potentially eligible RCTs. Besides, we will contact the experts in the field and review the conference proceedings to locate non-published studies. The reference lists of articles will be reviewed for any candidate studies. Two independent reviewers will screen titles and abstracts of the candidate articles. All eligible RCTs will be obtained in full text to perform a review. Disagreement on eligibility of an RCT will be solved by group discussion. The information of participants, interventions, comparisons and outcomes from included RCTs will be recorded and summarised. The primary outcome is time to complete wound healing. Secondary outcomes include the proportion of burns completely healed at the end of treatment, change in wound surface area at the end of treatment, incidence of adverse events, etc. Ethics and dissemination The result of this review will provide evidence for the comparative effectiveness of different wound dressings in the management of PTB. It will also facilitate decision-making in choosing a suitable wound dressing. We will disseminate the review through a peer-review journal and conference abstracts or posters. Trial registration number PROSPERO CRD42016041574; Pre-results. PMID:28336737

  12. Comparative effectiveness of different wound dressings for patients with partial-thickness burns: study protocol of a systematic review and a Bayesian framework network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiong; Chen, Zhao-Hong; Wang, Shun-Bin; Chen, Xiao-Dong

    2017-03-22

    Selecting a suitable wound dressing for patients with partial-thickness burns (PTBs) is important in wound care. However, the comparative effectiveness of different dressings has not been studied. We report the protocol of a network meta-analysis designed to combine direct and indirect evidence of wound dressings in the management of PTB. We will search for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the wound-healing effect of a wound dressing in the management of PTB. Searches will be conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, the Cochrane Wounds Group Specialised Register and CINAHL. A comprehensive search strategy is developed to retrieve articles reporting potentially eligible RCTs. Besides, we will contact the experts in the field and review the conference proceedings to locate non-published studies. The reference lists of articles will be reviewed for any candidate studies. Two independent reviewers will screen titles and abstracts of the candidate articles. All eligible RCTs will be obtained in full text to perform a review. Disagreement on eligibility of an RCT will be solved by group discussion. The information of participants, interventions, comparisons and outcomes from included RCTs will be recorded and summarised. The primary outcome is time to complete wound healing. Secondary outcomes include the proportion of burns completely healed at the end of treatment, change in wound surface area at the end of treatment, incidence of adverse events, etc. The result of this review will provide evidence for the comparative effectiveness of different wound dressings in the management of PTB. It will also facilitate decision-making in choosing a suitable wound dressing. We will disseminate the review through a peer-review journal and conference abstracts or posters. PROSPERO CRD42016041574; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please

  13. Vacuum-assisted closure versus closure without vacuum assistance for preventing surgical site infections and infections of chronic wounds: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansarli, Giannoula S; Vardakas, Konstantinos Z; Stratoulias, Constantinos; Peppas, George; Kapaskelis, Anastasios; Falagas, Matthew E

    2014-08-01

    We sought to examine whether vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) is associated with fewer surgical site infections (SSIs) or infections of chronic wounds than other management procedures for surgical wounds. The PubMed and Scopus databases were searched systematically. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the development of SSIs or infections of chronic wounds between patients treated with VAC for acute or chronic wounds and those whose wounds were treated without VAC were considered eligible for inclusion in the study. Eight RCTs met the inclusion criteria for the study. Four of the studies included chronic or diabetic lower extremity wounds and four included fractures. In three of four studies reporting on fractures, the wounds were not closed post-operatively, whereas in one study primary closure of the wound was performed. With regard to wounds left open after the stabilization of fractures, patients whose wounds were treated with VAC developed fewer SSIs than those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([367 patients (196 with VAC; 171 without VAC) relative risk [RR], 0.47; 95% CI 0.28-0.81]). On the contrary, no difference in the development of SSIs occurred among patients with chronic or diabetic lower-extremity wounds treated with VAC and those whose wounds were treated without VAC ([638 patients (320 with VAC; 318 without VAC) RR 1.67; 95% CI: 0.71-3.94]). The available evidence suggests that the development of infections in wounds treated with VAC depends on the type of wound being treated.

  14. Nutrition Support in Burn Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cem Aydoğan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Severe burn trauma causes serious metabolic derangements. Increased metabolic rate which is apart of a pathophysiologic characteristic of burn trauma results in protein-energy malnutrition. This situation causes impaired wound healing, muscle and fat tissue’s breakdown, growth retardation in children and infections. Nutrition support is vital in the treatment strategies of burn victims to prevent high mortal and disabling complications in this devastating trauma. Our aim in this study is to review management of nutrition in burn victims. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 74-83

  15. Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae uses proteasome inhibitor syringolin A to colonize from wound infection sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johana C Misas-Villamil

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Infection of plants by bacterial leaf pathogens at wound sites is common in nature. Plants defend wound sites to prevent pathogen invasion, but several pathogens can overcome spatial restriction and enter leaf tissues. The molecular mechanisms used by pathogens to suppress containment at wound infection sites are poorly understood. Here, we studied Pseudomonas syringae strains causing brown spot on bean and blossom blight on pear. These strains exist as epiphytes that can cause disease upon wounding caused by hail, sand storms and frost. We demonstrate that these strains overcome spatial restriction at wound sites by producing syringolin A (SylA, a small molecule proteasome inhibitor. Consequently, SylA-producing strains are able to escape from primary infection sites and colonize adjacent tissues along the vasculature. We found that SylA diffuses from the primary infection site and suppresses acquired resistance in adjacent tissues by blocking signaling by the stress hormone salicylic acid (SA. Thus, SylA diffusion creates a zone of SA-insensitive tissue that is prepared for subsequent colonization. In addition, SylA promotes bacterial motility and suppresses immune responses at the primary infection site. These local immune responses do not affect bacterial growth and were weak compared to effector-triggered immunity. Thus, SylA facilitates colonization from wounding sites by increasing bacterial motility and suppressing SA signaling in adjacent tissues.

  16. Active antioxidants in ex-vivo examination of burn wound healing by means of IR and Raman spectroscopies-Preliminary comparative research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, Anna; Biniaś, Dorota; Sarna, Ewa; Bobiński, Rafał; Kawecki, Marek; Glik, Justyna; Klama-Baryła, Agnieszka; Kitala, Diana; Łabuś, Wojciech; Paluch, Jadwiga; Kraut, Małgorzata

    2017-02-01

    Being a complex traumatic event, burn injury also affects other organ systems apart from the skin. Wounds undergo various pathological changes which are accompanied by alterations in the molecular environment. Information about molecules may be obtained with the use of Raman spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, and when combined, both methods are a powerful tool for providing material characterization. Alterations in the molecular environment may lead to identifying objective markers of acute wound healing. In general, incubation of samples in solutions of L-ascorbic acid and 5% and 7% orthosilicic acid organizes the collagen structure, whereas the increased intensity of the Raman bands in the region of 1500-800 cm- 1 reveals regeneration of the burn tissue. Since oxidative damage is one of the mechanisms responsible for local and distant pathophysiological events after burn, antioxidant therapy can prove to be beneficial in minimizing burn wounds, which was examined on the basis of human skin samples and chicken skin samples, the latter being subject to modification when heated to a temperature sufficient for the simulation of a burn incident.

  17. PMN Leukocytes and Fibroblasts Numbers on Wound Burn Healing on the Skin of White Rat after Administration of Ambonese Plantain Banana

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    Juniarti

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A study of ambonese plantain banana (Musa paradisiaca var sapientum Lamb treatment in burn wound healing on the skin of white rats (Rattus novergicus has been conducted. The wound healing of burn injuries was evaluated by counting the number of PMN leukocytes and fibroblasts at the 7th, 14th, and 21st days following the treatment. The study showed that the decrease in number of PMN leukocytes of subjects treated with ambonese plantain banana was relatively more significant compared to both negative and positive control (Bioplacenton ®. In contrast, an increasing number of fibroblasts was significantly demonstrated at the 14th and 21st days after treatment. In conclusion, ambonese plantain banana treatment in burn injuries will provide better results compared to both positive and negative controls.

  18. [Nosocomial infection due to Trichosporon asahii in a critical burned patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo Lomas, Luis; Domínguez-Gil González, Marta; Martín Luengo, Ana Isabel; Eiros Bouza, José María; Piqueras Pérez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection is an important cause of morbimortality in patients with severe burns. The advances in burn care therapy have considerably extended the survival of seriously burned patients, exposing them to infectious complications, notably fungal infections, with increased recognition of invasive infections caused by Candida species. However, some opportunistic fungi, like Trichosporon asahii, have emerged as important causes of nosocomial infection. A case of nosocomial infection due to T. asahii in a severely ill burned patient successfully treated with voriconazole is presented. The management of invasive fungal infections in burned patients, from diagnosis to selection of the therapeutic protocol, is often a challenge. Early diagnosis and treatment are associated with a better prognosis. In this case report, current treatment options are discussed, and a review of previously published cases is presented. Due to the difficulty in the diagnosis of invasive mycoses and their high associated mortality rates, it is advisable to keep a high degree of clinical suspicion of trichosporonosis in susceptible patients, including burned patients. The isolation of T. asahii in clinical specimens of this type of host must raise clinical alert, since it may precede an invasive infection. Copyright © 2014 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Preliminary results in single-step wound closure procedure of full-thickness facial burns in children by using the collagen-elastin matrix and review of pediatric facial burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircan, Mehmet; Cicek, Tugrul; Yetis, Muhammed Ikbal

    2015-09-01

    Management of full-thickness facial burns remains one of the greatest challenges. Controversy exists among surgeons regarding the use of early excision for facial burns. Unfortunately, delayed excision of deeper burns often results in more scarring and subsequent reconstruction becomes more difficult. A collagen-elastin matrix is used to improve the quality of the reconstructed skin, to reduce scarring and to prevent wound contraction. It serves as a foundation for split thickness skin graft and enhances short and long-term results. We report the usage of a collagen-elastin matrix during single-step wound closure technique of severe full-thickness facial burns in 15 children with large burned body surface area, and also we review the literature about pediatric facial burns. There were 15 pediatric patients with severe facial burns, 8 girls and 7 boys ranging in age from 10 months to 12 years, mean age 7 years and 6 months old. The facial burn surface area (FBSA) among the patients includes seven patients with 100%, five with 75%, and three with 50%. The average total body surface area (TBSA) for the patients was 72%, ranging between 50 and 90%. 5 of the patients' admissions were late, more than four days after burns while the rest of the patients were admitted within the first four days (acute admission time). The burns were caused by flame in eight of the patients, bomb blast in four, and scalding in three. All patients were treated by the simultaneous application of the collagen-elastin matrix and an unmeshed split thickness skin graft at Turgut Özal Medical Center, Pediatric Burn Center, Malatya, Turkey. After the treatment only two patients needed a second operation for revision of the grafts. All grafts transplanted to the face survived. The average Vancouver scar scales (VSS) were 2.55±1.42, ranging between one and six, in the first 10 of 15 patients at the end of 6 months postoperatively. VSS measurements of the last 5 patients were not taken since the 6

  20. Surgical wound infection in urology. Analysis of risk factors and associated microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Isa, M; Medina-Polo, J; Lara-Isla, A; Pérez-Cadavid, S; Arrébola-Pajares, A; Sopeña-Sutil, R; Benítez-Sala, R; Justo-Quintas, J; Gil-Moradillo, J; Passas-Martínez, J B; Tejido-Sánchez, A

    2017-03-01

    Open surgery continues to have a fundamental role in urology, and one of its main complications is surgical wound infection. Our objective was to analyse surgical wound infection in patients who underwent surgery in our Department of Urology and to assess the risk factors, microorganisms and resistances by type of surgery. This was a prospective observational study that included 940 patients: 370 abdominal/open lumbar surgeries and 570 genitoperineal surgeries. We analysed age, sex, comorbidities, stay and type of surgery, as well as the causal microorganisms and antibiotic resistances. For genitoperineal surgery, we found 15 cases (2.6%) of surgical wound infection associated with previous urinary catheterisation. Most of the isolated microorganisms corresponded to enterobacteriaceae, highlighting the resistance to beta-lactam. In abdominal/lumbar surgery, we found 41 cases (11.1%) of surgical wound infection. The incidence rate was 3.3% in prostate surgery; 9.8% in renal surgery; and 45.0% in cystectomy. Heart disease was associated with a higher incidence rate of surgical wound infection. The most common microorganisms were Enterococcus spp. (27.1%), E.coli (22.9%) and Staphylococcus aureus (14.6%). Enterococcus and beta-lactamase-producing E.coli are resistant to ampicillin in 37.5% and 41.7% of cases, respectively. We found a low incidence rate of surgical wound infection in genitoperineal surgery, compared with renal surgery and cystectomy. The presence of heart disease and carrying a previous urinary catheter are factors associated with surgical wound infection. Enterococcus and E.coli are the most common pathogens, with high rates of resistance. Copyright © 2016 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Spectroscopic Biomarkers for Monitoring Wound Healing and Infection in Combat Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    MRSA , Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter). For Acinetobacter, we have collected Raman spectra of 30 unique strains. For preliminary...combat wounds ( MRSA , Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, and Acinetobacter). For Acinetobacter, we have collected Raman spectra of 30 unique strains. - We...images ensure orthogonality of factors and a unique basis set. 2.5 Statistical Analysis Differences in band area ratios were assessed using a

  2. Nutritional Therapy in Burns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Durmuş

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A burn is characterized by the damage to one’s body tissues caused by heat, chemicals, electricity, or radiation. The incidence of burn injuries has recently been decreasing. However, it is a fact that burns constitute a significant problem all over the world, with a few million people being affected by burns each year. A burn is an extensive trauma that affects the whole organism and determines the prognosis through its physiopathology. The case of the burn patient is also characterized by the acute phase response. Since burn patients have a non-functional skin barrier, they experience loss of liquids, minerals, proteins and electrolytes. They can also develop protein, energy and micro-nutrition deficiencies due to intense catabolic processes, infections and increased bodily needs in case of wound healing. Therefore, nutritional therapy is one of the major steps that need to be monitored from the initial moments of the burn injury through to the end of the burn treatment. This study focuses on the significance of nutritional therapy for burn patients in the light of current literature.

  3. Prospective Molecular Characterization of Burn Wound Colonization: Novel Tools and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    and validated culture-independent molecular tools for quantifying and identifying wound fungi . We also initiated a prospective study to elucidate the...Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR); Fungi ; Bacteria 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...1) Isolate and purify total DNA, RNA, and Protein from each sample 2) Analyze the microbial community composition by sequencing analysis a. 16S

  4. Burn Injuries in Children and the Use of Biological Dressings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    through the subcuta- neous tissue into underlying structures such as fascia, muscle, and bone are sometimes termed fourth-degree burns. BURN SURFACE...the drug of choice for bacterial burn wound infections. It has the disadvantages of pain on application, no antifungal TABLE 4. Dressings for...mesh structure that allows drainage of exudate from the burned surface Mepitel (Mölnlycke Health Care US) Biosynthetic skin substitutes Dressings

  5. Nosocomial Infections in Iranian Pediatric Patients With Burn Injuries: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Sadegh Rezai; Soheila Shahmohammadi

    2015-01-01

    Context: Nosocomial infections (NIs) are the most common life-threatening complications and leading cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients with burn injuries. It is estimated that annually two million infections, 90000 deaths, and 4.5 billion USD in excess healthcare costs are imposed by NIs. Herein, we reviewed the articles related to NIs in Iranian pediatric patients with burn injuries. Evidence Acquisition: A re...

  6. Polypragmasia in the therapy of infected wounds - conclusions drawn from the perspectives of low temperature plasma technology for plasma wound therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Axel; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lademann, Jürgen; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter; Assadian, Ojan

    2008-11-03

    As long as a wound is infected, the healing process cannot begin. The indication for wound antiseptic is dependent on the interaction between the wound, the causative micro-organisms, and the host immune system. An uncritical colonisation is a condition whereby micro-organisms on a wound will proliferate, yet the immune system will not react excessively. Wound antiseptic is most often not necessary unless for epidemiologic reasons like colonisation with multi-resistant organisms. In most instances of a microbial contamination of the wound and colonisation, thorough cleaning will be sufficient.Bacterial counts above 10(5) to 10(6) cfu per gram tissue (critical colonisation) might decrease wound healing due to release of toxins, particularly in chronic wounds. Traumatic and heavily contaminated wounds therefore will require anti-infective measures, in particular wound antiseptic. In such situations, even a single application of an antiseptic compound will significantly reduce the number of pathogens, and hence, the risk of infection. If a wound infection is clinically manifest, local antiseptics and systemic antibiotics are therapeutically indicated.The prophylactic and therapeutic techniques for treatment of acute and chronic wounds (chemical antiseptics using xenobiotics or antibiotics, biological antiseptic applying maggots, medical honey or chitosan, physical antiseptic using water-filtered infrared A, UV, or electric current) mostly have been empirically developed without establishing a fundamental working hypothesis for their effectiveness.The most important aspect in controlling a wound infection and achieving healing of a wound is meticulous debridement of necrotic material. This is achieved by surgical, enzymatic or biological means e.g. using maggots. However, none of these methods (with some exception for maggots) is totally gentle to vital tissue and particularly chemical methods possess cytotoxicity effects.DERIVED FROM THE GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF

  7. Polypragmasia in the therapy of infected wounds – conclusions drawn from the perspectives of low temperature plasma technology for plasma wound therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Axel; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Lademann, Jürgen; Ekkernkamp, Axel; Hinz, Peter; Assadian, Ojan

    2008-01-01

    As long as a wound is infected, the healing process cannot begin. The indication for wound antiseptic is dependent on the interaction between the wound, the causative micro-organisms, and the host immune system. An uncritical colonisation is a condition whereby micro-organisms on a wound will proliferate, yet the immune system will not react excessively. Wound antiseptic is most often not necessary unless for epidemiologic reasons like colonisation with multi-resistant organisms. In most instances of a microbial contamination of the wound and colonisation, thorough cleaning will be sufficient. Bacterial counts above 105 to 106 cfu per gram tissue (critical colonisation) might decrease wound healing due to release of toxins, particularly in chronic wounds. Traumatic and heavily contaminated wounds therefore will require anti-infective measures, in particular wound antiseptic. In such situations, even a single application of an antiseptic compound will significantly reduce the number of pathogens, and hence, the risk of infection. If a wound infection is clinically manifest, local antiseptics and systemic antibiotics are therapeutically indicated. The prophylactic and therapeutic techniques for treatment of acute and chronic wounds (chemical antiseptics using xenobiotics or antibiotics, biological antiseptic applying maggots, medical honey or chitosan, physical antiseptic using water-filtered infrared A, UV, or electric current) mostly have been empirically developed without establishing a fundamental working hypothesis for their effectiveness. The most important aspect in controlling a wound infection and achieving healing of a wound is meticulous debridement of necrotic material. This is achieved by surgical, enzymatic or biological means e.g. using maggots. However, none of these methods (with some exception for maggots) is totally gentle to vital tissue and particularly chemical methods possess cytotoxicity effects. Derived from the general principles of

  8. The management of perineal wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh k Sharma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of perineal wounds can be very frustrating as these invariably get contaminated from the ano-genital tracts. Moreover, the apparent skin defect may be associated with a significant three dimensional dead space in the pelvic region. Such wounds are likely to become chronic and recalcitrant if appropriate wound management is not instituted in a timely manner. These wounds usually result after tumor excision, following trauma or as a result of infective pathologies like hideradenitis suppurativa or following thermal burns. Many options are available for management of perineal wounds and these have been discussed with illustrative case examples. A review of literature has been done for listing commonly instituted options for management of the wounds in perineum.

  9. [How do I prevent caesarean wound infections in obese patients in 2017?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripamonti, B; Raia-Barjat, T; Chauleur, C; Mathevet, P

    2017-11-01

    Obesity is an important risk factor of cesarean section and is associated with an increased risk of wound complications such as infections. This review focuses on the available strategies to limit complications in this population. Choice of antiseptic solution, appropriate dose and type of antibiotic prophylaxy, suture closure of subcutaneous fat, suture skin closure and closed incision negative pressure wound therapy may reduce the risk of wound infections associated with cesarean section in obese patients. Vaginal desinfection, plastic adhesive draps, high-concentration supplemental perioperative oxygen, use of a barrier retractor, wound drainage and type of skin incision are discussed in this review. Clinical trials of good quality are needed to improve our clinical practice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. [Extensive burns complicated with infective endocarditis and septic pulmonary embolism: case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, T S; Qi, Y; Wang, Y; Wang, Y X; Liu, F Y; Dai, L; Xia, G G

    2016-10-12

    Objective: To improve the clinical recognition of infective endocarditis (IE) and septic pulmonary embolism (SPE) in patients with extensive burns. Methods: A case of large area burn complicated with IE and SPE confirmed by blood cultures and echocardiography was described. A literature review was performed with "burn" and "infective endocarditis" as the Chinese key words in Wanfang database; with "burn" and "infective endocarditis" as Mesh terms in PubMed. Results: The patient was a 37-year-old male with large area burn, who presented with fever and hemoptysis. Blood cultures were positive for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Echocardiography disclosed vegetations located in the tricuspid valve. Multiple wedge-shaped lesions were found on chest CT. From January 1978 to December 2015, 26 related articles were retrieved and 134 burned patients complicated with endocarditis were reported, of which, 97 cases were IE and 1 case with SPE. Of the 134 cases, 120 cases were dead, 12 cases cured and 2 cases unknown. The mortality was 89.6%. Conclusions: There was a high mortality of burned patients complicated with IE. SPE should be considered for patients with multiple peripheral nodules in both lungs and a positive blood culture. Combination and prolonged anti-infective therapy may increase the treatment success and reduce the risk of recurrence.

  11. Effects of irrigation with different solution on Incidence of Wound Infection

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    Majid Zamani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Management of acute and chronic wounds has significantly altered in the last decade but little attention has been paid to the solution used for cleansing the wounds. Therefore, the present study aimed to compare the effects of tap water, distilled water, and normal saline for wound cleansing in emergency department. Methods: This is a double-blind randomized clinical trial with a 10-day follow up. Patients who had superficial wounds were randomly divided into 3 treatment groups: normal saline, distilled water, and tap water. The wounds were cleansed using a 20 - 60 milliliter syringe with an 18 gauge needle. All the patients were discharged with the same antibiotic and were followed 48 hours and 10-day to determine the presence or absence of infection symptoms. The evaluated outcomes were infection incidence in the first 48 hours and 10 days after being discharged. Results: 1200 patients were included in the present study (57% male, average age 25.5 ± 11.0 years. 43 (3.5% patients showed infection symptoms in the first 48 hours. Ten (2.5% patients were in normal saline treated group, 15 (3.7% patients were in distilled water group, and 18 (4.4% patients were in tap water treated group (p=0.32. 13 (3.2% patients in normal saline group, 20 (4.9% patients in distilled water group and 23 (5.6% in the tap water group did not take their antibiotics. Prevalence of infection were higher in patients who did not take antibiotics (p < 0.001. The 10-day follow-up revealed that all the patients were recovered and showed no infection symptoms. Conclusion: The results of the present study showed that the prevalence of infection in using the 3 agents (normal saline, distilled water and tap water for cleansing wounds was similar. Therefore, drinking water could be considered as an alternative for cleansing wounds.

  12. Microbiology and management of post-surgical wounds infection in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Itzhak

    2002-01-01

    The recent increased recovery of anaerobic bacteria from children has led to greater appreciation of their role in paediatric infections at all body sites, including post-surgical wounds (PSW). In studies that employed adequate method for recovery of aerobic and anaerobic bacteria polymicrobial, aerobic and anaerobes were isolated from over half of the patients with PSW. The wounds studied were those that developed following these surgical procedures: head and neck surgery for malignancies, post-thoracotomy, spinal fusion and gastrostomy tube insertion. Staphylococcus aureus and aerobic gram-negative bacilli were found at all sites. However, a correlation was generally found between the site of the wounds and microbial flora recovered from the wound. Organisms that resided in the mucous membranes close to the surgical site predominated in the wound next to these areas. Enteric Gram-negative rods, Group D enterococcus and Bacteroides fragilis group predominated in wounds relating to the gut flora, while Streptococcus spp., pigmented Prevotella and Porphyromonas spp. and Fusobacterium spp. were most frequently recovered in wounds proximal to the oral area. Management of PSW should include administration of antimicrobials effective against the polymicrobial bacterial flora adjacent to the anatomic site of the wound.

  13. Effects of ketanserin on hypergranulation tissue formation, infection, and healing of equine lower limb wounds

    OpenAIRE

    Engelen, Marc; Besche, Béatrice; Lefay, Marie-Paul; Hare, Jonathan; Vlaminck, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this multicentre, randomized, controlled field study was to determine the efficacy of ketanserin gel in preventing exuberant granulation tissue formation (hypergranulation) and infection in equine lower limb wounds. Horses and ponies (n = 481) with naturally occurring wounds were randomized to either topical treatment with ketanserin gel (n = 242) or a positive control (Belgium, Germany: ethacridin lactate solution, n = 120; France, United Kingdom: malic, benzoic, and salicyl...

  14. Effects of low intensity laser in in vitro bacterial culture and in vivo infected wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pâmela Rosa Pereira

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to compare the effects of low intensity laser therapy on in vitro bacterial growth and in vivo in infected wounds, and to analyze the effectiveness of the AsGa Laser technology in in vivo wound infections. METHODS: in vitro: Staphylococcus aureus were incubated on blood agar plates, half of them being irradiated with 904 nm wavelength laser and dose of 3J/cm2 daily for seven days. In vivo: 32 male Wistar rats were divided into control group (uninfected and Experimental Group (Infected. Half of the animals had their wounds irradiated. RESULTS: in vitro: there was no statistically significant variation between the experimental groups as for the source plates and the derived ones (p>0.05. In vivo: there was a significant increase in the deposition of type I and III collagen in the wounds of the infected and irradiated animals when assessed on the fourth day of the experiment (p=0.034. CONCLUSION: low-intensity Laser Therapy applied with a wavelength of 904nm and dose 3J/cm2 did not alter the in vitro growth of S. aureus in experimental groups; in vivo, however, it showed significant increase in the deposition of type I and III collagen in the wound of infected and irradiated animals on the fourth day of the experiment.

  15. A CLINICAL STUDY ON POSTOPERATIVE WOUND INFECTIONS IN RIMS, KADAPA- 3 YEARS EXPERIENCE

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    J. Ramanaiah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Surgical wound infections continue to consume a considerable portion of healthcare finance. Even though, the complete elimination of wound infections is not possible, a reduction of the observed wound infection rate to a minimum level could have marked benefits in terms of both patient comfort and resources used. 1 MATERIALS AND METHODS The clinical study of postoperative wound infection conducted at RIMS General Hospital, Kadapa, during the period of 2013 to 2016. RESULTS In this clinical study, 150 patients were clinically diagnosed of having SSIs out of 925 patients who underwent major surgeries in Department of General Surgery, an incidence of 16.2%. Dirty type of surgeries have high incidence of SSI at 63.6%. SSI occurred more in patients who didn’t receive preoperative antibiotic within 2 hrs. prior to surgery, i.e. 32.1%. Most of the patients presented with discharge through the wound (81.3%. The most common type of discharge was purulent (52.5%. CONCLUSION Preoperative preparation <24 hrs., preoperative bathing and preoperative antibiotic within 2 hrs. before surgery help in reducing surgical site infections. Early diagnosis of SSI and prompt management by isolation of organism causing SSI using sensitive antibiotics and regular dressing help in reducing morbidity for the patients.

  16. Application of Numerical Analysis of the Shape of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Spectra for Determination of the Number of Different Groups of Radicals in the Burn Wounds

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    Paweł Olczyk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The evidence exists that radicals are crucial agents necessary for the wound regeneration helping to enhance the repair process. Materials and methods. The lineshape of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectra of the burn wounds measured with the low microwave power (2.2 mW was numerically analyzed. The experimental spectra were fitted by the sum of two and three lines. Results. The number of the lines in the EPR spectrum corresponded to the number of different groups of radicals in the natural samples after thermal treatment. The component lines were described by Gaussian and Lorentzian functions. The spectra of the burn wounds were superposition of three lines different in shape and in linewidths. The best fitting was obtained for the sum of broad Gaussian, broad Lorentzian, and narrow Lorentzian lines. Dipolar interactions between the unpaired electrons widened the broad Gaussian and broad Lorentzian lines. Radicals with the narrow Lorentzian lines existed mainly in the tested samples. Conclusions. The spectral shape analysis may be proposed as a useful method for determining the number of different groups of radicals in the burn wounds.

  17. Antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans burn infection in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunsong; Wang, Yucheng; Murray, Clinton K.; Hamblin, Michael R.; Gu, Ying; Dai, Tianhong

    2015-05-01

    In this preclinical study, we investigated the utility of antimicrobial blue light therapy for Candida albicans infection in acutely burned mice. A bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was used. The susceptibilities to blue light inactivation were compared between C. albicans and human keratinocyte. In vitro serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure was performed to evaluate the potential development of resistance to blue light inactivation. A mouse model of acute thermal burn injury infected with the bioluminescent strain of C. albicans was developed. Blue light (415 nm) was delivered to mouse burns for decolonization of C. albicans. Bioluminescence imaging was used to monitor in real time the extent of fungal infection in mouse burns. Experimental results showed that C. albicans was approximately 42-fold more susceptible to blue light inactivation in vitro than human keratinocyte (P=0.0022). Serial passaging of C. albicans on blue light exposure implied a tendency for the fungal susceptibility to blue light inactivation to decrease with the numbers of passages. Blue light reduced fungal burden by over 4-log10 (99.99%) in acute mouse burns infected with C. albicans in comparison to infected mouse burns without blue light therapy (P=0.015).

  18. Isolates from wound infections at federal medical centre, bida ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 589 wound swabs from 334 patients in Federal Medical Centre, Bida were studied. Samples were collected between Jan 2002 to Dec. 2003. Swabs were plated within one hour after collection unto blood, chocolate and Mac Conkey after plate, and incubated aerobically for 24hrs. The chocolate plated swabs were ...

  19. Burn Wound gammadelta T-Cells Support a Th2 and Th17 Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    penicillin and 50 μg/ml streptomycin (GIBCO, Grand Island, NY). Skin tissues were collected in a 60-mm petri dish (Corning, Tewksbury, MA) and minced...U/ml penicillin and 50 μg/ml strep- tomycin (GIBCO) supplemented with 10 U/ml murine recombinant IL-2 (BD Biosciences, San Jose, CA). Cells were...Bhavsar D, Mailänder P. The biology of burn in- jury. Exp Dermatol 2010;19:777–83. 6. Romagnani S. T-cell subsets (Th1 versus Th2). Ann Allergy Asthma

  20. Cost Analysis of a Novel Enzymatic Debriding Agent for Management of Burn Wounds

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    Giuseppe Giudice

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Given its efficacy and safety, NexoBrid™ (NXB has become part of our therapeutic options in burns treatment with satisfactory results. However, no cost analysis comparing NXB to the standard of care (SOC has been carried out as of today. Aim. To assess the cost of treatment with NXB and compare it to the SOC cost. Methods. 20 patients with 14–22% of TBSA with an intermediate-deep thermal burn related injury were retrospectively and consecutively included. 10 of these patients were treated with the SOC, while the other 10 with NXB. The cost analysis was performed in accordance with the weighted average Italian Health Ministry DRGs and with Conferenza Stato/Regioni 2003 and the study by Tan et al. For each cost, 95% confidence intervals have been evaluated. Results. Considering the 10 patients treated with NXB, the overall savings (total net saving amounted to 53300 euros. The confidence interval analysis confirmed the savings. Discussion. As shown by our preliminary results, significant savings are obtained with the use of NXB. The limit of our study is that it is based on Italian health care costs and assesses a relative small cohort of patients. Further studies on larger multinational cohorts are warranted.

  1. Nanoparticle-Based Therapies for Wound Biofilm Infection: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Clinical data from human chronic wounds implicates biofilm formation with the onset of wound chronicity. Despite the development of novel antimicrobial agents, the cost and complexity of treating chronic wound infections associated with biofilms remain a serious challenge, which necessitates the development of new and alternative approaches for effective anti-biofilm treatment. Recent advancement in nanotechnology for developing a new class of nanoparticles that exhibit unique chemical and physical properties holds promise for the treatment of biofilm infections. Over the last decade, nanoparticle-based approaches against wound biofilm infection have been directed toward developing nanoparticles with intrinsic antimicrobial properties, utilizing nanoparticles for controlled antimicrobials delivery, and applying nanoparticles for antibacterial hyperthermia therapy. In addition, a strategy to functionalize nanoparticles towards enhanced penetration through the biofilm matrix has been receiving considerable interest recently by means of achieving an efficient targeting to the bacterial cells within biofilm matrix. This review summarizes and highlights the recent development of these nanoparticle-based approaches as potential therapeutics for controlling wound biofilm infection, along with current challenges that need to be overcome for their successful clinical translation.

  2. Interventions for wound healing among diabetic patients infected with Staphylococcus aureus: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacássia Fonseca Lima

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Staphylococcus aureus is the most frequent agent isolated in diabetic foot infections and may be associated with changes to wound healing times. The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the literature, including studies that assessed the efficacy of any clinical or surgical intervention, as well as oral or topical therapy for diabetic ulcers infected with S. aureus. DESIGN AND SETTING: Systematic review with a search conducted in databases. METHODS: We conducted a systematic review with a comprehensive search in the Lilacs, SciELO, PubMed/Medline, Old Medline, Embase and Cochrane Library databases, for articles published from 1966 to 2010. The articles selected were limited to studies on diabetic patients with wounds infected with S. aureus for whom their healing was followed up, with the use of either antibiotics or experimental treatments. Animal studies and those that did not report the wound healing, as well as review articles, were excluded. RESULTS: Five studies that met the inclusion and exclusion criteria were analyzed. CONCLUSIONS: There are few studies reporting the healing of wounds infected with S. aureus in diabetic patients, although this is the most commonly found pathogen in this type of wound and it frequently consists of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA. There is insufficient evidence to support early use of broad-spectrum antibiotics against MRSA to promote healing of diabetic ulcers, since antibiotic resistance may develop from such treatment. This highlights the need for further studies on the subject.

  3. Suction-irrigation drainage: an underestimated therapeutic option for surgical treatment of deep sternal wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschka, Heinz; Erler, Stefan; El-Ayoubi, Lemir; Vogel, Cordula; Vöhringer, Luise; Wimmer-Greinecker, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    Deep sternal wound infections are significant and severe complications following cardiac surgery and substantially influence perioperative morbidity and mortality. We present the experience of our department using two different surgical treatments over a three-year period. Between January 2009 and December 2011, a total of 3274 cardiac procedures with complete median sternotomy were performed in our department. In 94 patients (3%), a deep sternal wound infection occurred, including sternal instability with consecutive surgical treatment. The patients either received wound debridement with sternum refixation and suction-irrigation drainage (SID; n = 72) or sternum refixation only (RF; n = 22) if there was sternal instability with limited signs of infection. SID was routinely installed for 7 days: the irrigation solution contained neomycin. In all cases, swabs were taken and analysed. The different methods were evaluated in respect of their clinical outcomes. The success rate-defined as single, uncomplicated procedure-of the SID treatment was 74%, compared with 59% of the isolated sternum refixation. Complications included continuous infection, recurrence of sternal instability and wound necrosis. Eighty-eight percent of the swabs in the SID group were positive, compared with 32% in the sternal refixation only group. The dominating pathogenic germs were coagulase-negative staphylococci and staphylococcus aureus. Mortality was 10% for the SID group and 5% for the RF group. Contrary to accepted opinion, the suction-irrigation drainage is an appropriate therapy for deep sternal wound infections. Nevertheless, deep sternal wound infections after cardiac surgery remain severe complications and are related to increased morbidity and mortality.

  4. Quantitative Assessment of Graded Burn Wounds in a Porcine Model using Spatial Frequency Domain Imaging (SFDI) and Laser Speckle Imaging (LSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-08

    employs spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) and laser speckle imaging (LSI) as non- invasive technologies to characterize in-vivo burn severity. We...debridement (days 0 and 4 respectively), the pig was premedicated with glycopyrrolate (0.01mg/kg, IM) to minimize salivation and bradycardia during...was used to mark areas for burn wound placement. These were located 1.5 cm from the spine and 2.5 cm away from each other (Fig. 2(a)) in order to

  5. A retrospective review of burn dressings on a porcine burn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue-Qing; Kravchuk, Olena; Kimble, Roy M

    2010-08-01

    This is a study to compare wound healing among three types of dressings on a porcine model with deep-dermal-partial-thickness burns. The burns in this study were from eight animal trials conducted in the past for other purposes and only burns with a uniform pale appearance that had served as controls in original experiments were selected. In total, there were 57 burns in 33 pigs, using one of following three dressings: Acticoat (Silver) (3 trials), Jelonet (Gauze) (3 trials), and Solosite Gel/Jelonet (Gel/Gauze) (2 trials). The wound healing assessments included wound re-epithelialisation during a 6-week period, clinical and histological scar assessments at week 6 after burn. Of all wound healing/scar assessments, only re-epithelialisation showed statistical difference between dressings. Earlier re-epithelialisation was observed in Gel/Gauze dressings compared to Silver and/or Gauze dressings. However, this study revealed huge variation in wound healing outcome between 3 trials within both Silver and/or Gauze dressings, supported by significant differences on re-epithelialisation, clinical and histological scar measurements. In addition, it was found that larger animals healed better than smaller ones, based on weights from 21 pigs. Of all dressings, Silver delivers the best protection for wound colonization/infection. Wound colonization/infection was found to confine wound healing and lead to thinner RND in scars. From this study, we cannot find enough evidence to suggest the beneficial effect of one dressing(s) over others on burn wound healing outcome on a porcine model with small deep-dermal-partial-thickness burns with a relative small sample size.

  6. Use of gentamicin–collagen sponges in closure of sternal wounds in cardiothoracic surgery to reduce wound infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Gauri; Pai, Vasudev; Kolvekar, Shyam; Wilson, Andrew P.R.

    2012-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: Are antibiotic implants like gentamicin–collagen implants useful in preventing sternal wound infections (SWIs)? Altogether, more than 484 papers were found using the reported search; of these, 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that most randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been performed with gentamicin–collagen sponges for sternal closure. Two out of four RCTs showed a significant benefit of the implant in a reduction in superficial and deep SWIs in routine and emergency cardiac surgery. One RCT showed a significant reduction in superficial infections in 2005, a follow-up trial by the same group in 2009 showed a reduction in deep infections as well. Another group has shown a reduction in deep and superficial SWI with gentamicin implant, in an RCT on 800 patients, however have not published details of the complete trial. The third trial on 542 patients showed no benefit of the implant, but was not adequately powered. However, the most recent multicentre RCT conducted on 1052 patients showed no benefit of gentamicin–collagen sponges in elective surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting and/or valve surgery) in high-risk patients with diabetes, obesity or both. Concerns were raised that gentamicin sponges dipped in saline 1–2 s prior to application may have lost the gentamicin into the saline, thereby reducing their efficacy and that some surgeons may have been unfamiliar with wound closure with sponges. However, these were robustly refuted by the authors. One RCT showed that gentamicin sponges may cause increased sternal rebleeding if used in double layers. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were predominantly isolated from infected wounds in all the

  7. Use of gentamicin-collagen sponges in closure of sternal wounds in cardiothoracic surgery to reduce wound infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godbole, Gauri; Pai, Vasudev; Kolvekar, Shyam; Wilson, Andrew P R

    2012-04-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was: Are antibiotic implants like gentamicin-collagen implants useful in preventing sternal wound infections (SWIs)? Altogether, more than 484 papers were found using the reported search; of these, 7 represented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. We conclude that most randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have been performed with gentamicin-collagen sponges for sternal closure. Two out of four RCTs showed a significant benefit of the implant in a reduction in superficial and deep SWIs in routine and emergency cardiac surgery. One RCT showed a significant reduction in superficial infections in 2005, a follow-up trial by the same group in 2009 showed a reduction in deep infections as well. Another group has shown a reduction in deep and superficial SWI with gentamicin implant, in an RCT on 800 patients, however have not published details of the complete trial. The third trial on 542 patients showed no benefit of the implant, but was not adequately powered. However, the most recent multicentre RCT conducted on 1052 patients showed no benefit of gentamicin-collagen sponges in elective surgery (coronary artery bypass grafting and/or valve surgery) in high-risk patients with diabetes, obesity or both. Concerns were raised that gentamicin sponges dipped in saline 1-2 s prior to application may have lost the gentamicin into the saline, thereby reducing their efficacy and that some surgeons may have been unfamiliar with wound closure with sponges. However, these were robustly refuted by the authors. One RCT showed that gentamicin sponges may cause increased sternal rebleeding if used in double layers. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were predominantly isolated from infected wounds in all the trials

  8. Wound management with vacuum assisted closure in surgical site infection after ankle surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Ya-Ke; Chen, Hong-Lin; Liu, Fan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of vacuum assisted closure (VAC) with standard moist wound care (SMWC) in surgical site infection after ankle surgery. A prospective cohort was performed among patients with surgical site infection after ankle surgery between 2012 and 2013. The follow-up period was three month, and the efficacy end point was complete wound closure rate. Ninety-four patients were analyzed, with 61 patients in the VAC group and 33 in the SMWC group. The complete wound closure rate in the VAC group was higher than that in the SMWC group at 3 month follow up (90.2% Vs. 72.7%, p = 0.028). The median time to complete wound closure was 31 days (95% CI 20.2-41.8) for VAC, and 63 days (95% CI 46.9-79.1) for SMWC (χ(2) = 4.023, p = 0.045). In the superficial infection subgroup, the median times to complete wound closure were 20 days (95% CI 14.2-35.1) in the VAC group and 42 days (95% CI 35.4-69.4) in SMWC group (χ(2) = 4.331, p = 0.041). In the deep subgroup, the median times to complete wound closure were 46 days (95% CI 28.2-65.9) in the VAC group and 75 days (95% CI 43.2-79.6) in SMWC group (χ(2) = 6.475, p = 0.026). Our result showed that vacuum assisted closure was more effective than standard moist wound care in surgical site infection after ankle surgery. Copyright © 2015 IJS Publishing Group Limited. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Murine model imitating chronic wound infections for evaluation of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy efficacy

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    Grzegorz Fila

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available It is generally acknowledged that the age of antibiotics could come to an end, due to their widespread and inappropriate use. Particularly for chronic wounds alternatives are being thought. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy is a potential candidate, and while approved for some indications, such as periodontitis, chronic sinusitis and other niche indications, its use in chronic wounds is not established. To further facilitate the development of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy in chronic wounds we present an easy to use animal model exhibiting the key hallmarks of chronic wounds, based on full-thickness skin wounds paired with an optically transparent cover. The moisture-retaining wound exhibited rapid expansion of pathogen colonies up to 8 days while not jeopardizing the host survival. Use of two bioluminescent pathogens; methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa permits real time monitoring of the pathogens.The murine model was employed to evaluate the performance of four different photosensitizers as mediators in Photodynamic Therapy. While all four photosensitizers, Rose Bengal, porphyrin TMPyP, New Methylene Blue and TLD1411 demonstrated good to excellent antimicrobial efficacy in planktonic solutions at 1 to 50 µM concentrations, whereas in in vivo the growth delay was limited with 24-48 hr delay in pathogen expansion for methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and we noticed longer growth suppression of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with TLD1411 mediated Photodynamic Therapy. The murine model will enable developing new strategies for enhancement of Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy for chronic wound infections.

  10. In Vivo Modeling of Biofilm-Infected Wounds: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-15

    difficult to faithfully model wound biofilms. Human studies are logisti cally and ethically prohibitive, leaving animal models as the sole practical...alternative for systematic investigation and modulation of clinically relevant biofilms. The use of an animal model allows for multiple iterations of...Effectiveness of acupuncture , special dressings and simple, low adherence dressings for healing venous leg ulcers in primary healthcare: study protocol for

  11. Cross Sectional Study of Burn Infections and Antibiotic Susceptibility Pattern for the Improvement of Treatment Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Pirbonyeh

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: By evaluating the infectious agents during the period of the study, it was found that due to the focus on treatment of Gram negative bacteria, Gram positive bacteria especially Staphylococcus aureus and Coagulase Negative Staphylococcus have at least doubled. This increase in two important nosocomial infections is a next threat of infection and septicemia for burn victims.

  12. Nosocomial Wound Infection amongst Post Operative Patients and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nosocomial infection constitutes a major public health problem worldwide. Increasing antibiotic resistance of pathogens associated with nosocomial infections also becomes a major therapeutic challenge for physicians. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify post operative bacterial infections in the patients developing ...

  13. Burn mouse models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calum, Henrik; Høiby, Niels; Moser, Claus

    2014-01-01

    Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third-degree b......Severe thermal injury induces immunosuppression, involving all parts of the immune system, especially when large fractions of the total body surface area are affected. An animal model was established to characterize the burn-induced immunosuppression. In our novel mouse model a 6 % third......-degree burn injury was induced with a hot-air blower. The third-degree burn was confirmed histologically. At 48 h, a decline in the concentration of peripheral blood leucocytes was observed in the group of mice with burn wound. The reduction was ascribed to the decline in concentration of polymorphonuclear...... neutrophil leucocytes and monocytes. When infecting the skin with Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a dissemination of bacteria was observed only in the burn wound group. Histological characterization of the skin showed an increased polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes dominated inflammation in the group of mice...

  14. Fast Blue RR-Siloxane Derivatized Materials Indicate Wound Infection Due to a Deep Blue Color Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Doris; Tegl, Gregor; Vielnascher, Robert; Weber, Hansjoerg; Schoeftner, Rainer; Wiesbauer, Herfried; Sigl, Eva; Heinzle, Andrea; Guebitz, Georg M

    2015-09-25

    There is a strong need for simple and fast methods for wound infection determination. Myeloperoxidase, an immune system-derived enzyme was found to be a suitable biomarker for wound infection. Hence, alkoxysilane-derivatized Fast Blue RR was immobilized via simple hydrolytic polymerization. The resulting enzyme-responsive siloxane layers were incubated with myeloperoxidase, wound fluid or hemoglobin. The reaction was monitored via HPLC measurements and the color development quantified spectrophotometrically. Myeloperoxidase was indeed able to oxidize immobilized Fast Blue RR leading to a blue colored product. No conversion was detected in non-infected wound fluids. The visible color changes of these novel materials towards blue enable an easy distinction between infected and non-infected wound fluids.

  15. Fast Blue RR—Siloxane Derivatized Materials Indicate Wound Infection Due to a Deep Blue Color Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Schiffer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a strong need for simple and fast methods for wound infection determination. Myeloperoxidase, an immune system-derived enzyme was found to be a suitable biomarker for wound infection. Hence, alkoxysilane-derivatized Fast Blue RR was immobilized via simple hydrolytic polymerization. The resulting enzyme-responsive siloxane layers were incubated with myeloperoxidase, wound fluid or hemoglobin. The reaction was monitored via HPLC measurements and the color development quantified spectrophotometrically. Myeloperoxidase was indeed able to oxidize immobilized Fast Blue RR leading to a blue colored product. No conversion was detected in non-infected wound fluids. The visible color changes of these novel materials towards blue enable an easy distinction between infected and non-infected wound fluids.

  16. Spectroscopic Biomarkers for Monitoring Wound Healing and Infection in Combat Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Additionally, substantial potential for impaired renal function, bleeding, and stress gastritis have precluded widespread use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory...include age, stress, nutrition , tissue perfusion and oxygenation, infection, and other comorbidities, such as obesity, diabetes mellitus

  17. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S L Rajasekhar Karna

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection-first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome. This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs, comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts

  18. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karna, S L Rajasekhar; D'Arpa, Peter; Chen, Tsute; Qian, Li-Wu; Fourcaudot, Andrea B; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J; You, Tao; Leung, Kai P

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection-first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome). This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected) of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts of multiple

  19. [Surgical wound infection in patients undergoing extra-anatomical arterial surgery. A retrospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monreal, M; Callejas, J M; Lisbona, C; Martorell, A; Lerma, R; Boabaid, R; Mejía, S

    1993-01-01

    We present a retrospective review of a series of patients from our Service submitted to surgical extra-anatomical grafts. Correlation between diverse variants and ulterior obliteration by thrombosis or infection of the surgical wounds is analyzed. The series included 133 patients surgically treated between 1986 and 1991. The studied variants were: sex, age, type of graft, the material used, length and type of anesthesia, presentation of hypotension during the surgical intervention, diabetes, platelet recount. Fourteen patients (11%) presented early graft obliteration and 15 (11%) presented an infection of their surgical wound. Only the platelet variant showed statistical differences in patients presenting infection. A high recount of platelets could be a factor risk of infection.

  20. Antioxidant, antibacterial and phytochemical properties of two medicinal plants against the wound infecting bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idowu Jonas Sagbo

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: These results indicated that the ethanol leaf extracts of these plants have antioxidant and antibacterial activity against the tested bacteria possibly due to the presence of bioactive compounds and therefore could be used as alternative therapy against wound infection caused by these bacteria in diabetic patients.

  1. Biliary obstruction and wound healing, infection, renal function and bloodcoagulation : an experimental study in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.P. Snellen

    1984-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of the study reported in this thesis, was to investigate the effects of biliary obstruction on wound healing, resistance to infection, renal function and blood coagulation. Disturbances in these processes are often reported in patients with obstructive jaundice, and may lead

  2. Wound infections following open reduction and internal fixation of calcaneal fractures with an extended lateral approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Backes, Manouk; Schepers, Tim; Beerekamp, M. Suzan H.; Luitse, Jan S. K.; Goslings, J. Carel; Schep, Niels W. L.

    2014-01-01

    Post-operative wound infections (PWI) following calcaneal fracture surgery can lead to prolonged hospital stay and additional treatment with antibiotics, surgical debridement or implant removal. Our aim was to determine the incidence of superficial and deep PWI and to identify risk factors (RF).

  3. Nontuberculous Mycobacterium Infection in a Burn ICU Patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    infection, the clinical and microbiologic criteria set forth by the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and Infectious Disease Society of America (IDSA) were... endocarditis [11], and bacteremia [12]. Although infections with this group of organisms may occur sporadically, outbreaks have also been reported...6 e 1 3 9 e137 [11] Galil K, Turner R, Glatter K, Bariam T. Disseminated Mycobacterium chelonae infection resulting in endocarditis . Clin Infect Dis

  4. Inhibition of NLRP3 Inflammasome Pathway by Butyrate Improves Corneal Wound Healing in Corneal Alkali Burn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Fang; Xiao, Yangyan; Zaheer, Mahira; Volpe, Eugene A; Pflugfelder, Stephen C; Li, De-Quan; de Paiva, Cintia S

    2017-03-05

    Epithelial cells are involved in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity in response to different stresses. The purpose of this study was to investigate if alkali-injured corneal epithelia activate innate immunity through the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-containing protein (NOD)-like receptor family pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome pathway. A unilateral alkali burn (AB) was created in the central cornea of C57BL/6 mice. Mice received either no topical treatment or topical treatment with sodium butyrate (NaB), β-hydroxybutyric acid (HBA), dexamethasone (Dex), or vehicle (balanced salt solution, BSS) quater in die (QID) for two or five days (d). We evaluated the expression of inflammasome components including NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein (ASC), and caspase-1, as well as the downstream cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β. We found elevation of NLRP3 and IL-1β messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts, as well as levels of inflammasome component proteins in the alkali-injured corneas compared to naïve corneas. Treatment with NLRP3 inhibitors using NaB and HBA preserved corneal clarity and decreased NLRP3, caspase-1, and IL-1β mRNA transcripts, as well as NLRP3 protein expression on post-injury compared to BSS-treated corneas. These findings identified a novel innate immune signaling pathway activated by AB. Blocking the NLRP3 pathway in AB mouse model decreases inflammation, resulting in greater corneal clarity. These results provide a mechanistic basis for optimizing therapeutic intervention in alkali injured eyes.

  5. Review of Subcutaneous Wound Drainage in Reducing Surgical Site Infections after Laparotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Manzoor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Surgical site infections (SSIs remain a significant problem after laparotomies. The aim of this review was to assess the evidence on the efficacy of subcutaneous wound drainage in reducing SSI. Methods. MEDLINE database was searched. Studies were identified and screened according to criteria to determine their eligibility for meta-analysis. Meta-analysis was performed using the Mantel-Haenszel method and a fixed effects model. Results. Eleven studies were included with two thousand eight hundred and sixty-four patients. One thousand four hundred and fifty patients were in the control group and one thousand four hundred and fourteen patients were in the drain group. Wound drainage in all patients shows no statistically significant benefit in reducing SSI incidence. Use of drainage in high risk patients, contaminated wound types, and obese patients appears beneficial. Conclusion. Using subcutaneous wound drainage after laparotomy in all patients is unnecessary as it does not reduce SSI risk. Similarly, there seems to be no benefit in using it in clean and clean contaminated wounds. However, there may be benefit in using drains in patients who are at high risk, including patients who are obese and/or have contaminated wound types. A well designed trial is needed which examines these factors.

  6. EARLY POST-OPERATIVE WOUND INFECTION IN ORTHOPAEDIC IMPLANT SURGERY AND ITS COMPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh; Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Bone infections after implant surgery leading to non union and implant failure is one of the most challenging Ortho paedic complications. This study is done to find out relation of type of pathogens causing postope rative infection with that of fracture nonunion, chronic osteomylities and implant failure. METHODOLOGY: This is a retrograde study of 20 cases, in which post operative wound infe ction occurred after implant surgery from ...

  7. RNA-Seq Transcriptomic Responses of Full-Thickness Dermal Excision Wounds to Pseudomonas aeruginosa Acute and Biofilm Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsute; Qian, Li-Wu; Fourcaudot, Andrea B.; Yamane, Kazuyoshi; Chen, Ping; Abercrombie, Johnathan J.; You, Tao; Leung, Kai P.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections of wounds in clinical settings are major complications whose outcomes are influenced by host responses that are not completely understood. Herein we evaluated transcriptomic changes of wounds as they counter P. aeruginosa infection—first active infection, and then chronic biofilm infection. We used the dermal full-thickness, rabbit ear excisional wound model. We studied the wound response: towards acute infection at 2, 6, and 24 hrs after inoculating 106 bacteria into day-3 wounds; and, towards more chronic biofilm infection of wounds similarly infected for 24 hrs but then treated with topical antibiotic to coerce biofilm growth and evaluated at day 5 and 9 post-infection. The wounds were analyzed for bacterial counts, expression of P. aeruginosa virulence and biofilm-synthesis genes, biofilm morphology, infiltrating immune cells, re-epithelialization, and genome-wide gene expression (RNA-Seq transcriptome). This analysis revealed that 2 hrs after bacterial inoculation into day-3 wounds, the down-regulated genes (infected vs. non-infected) of the wound edge were nearly all non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), comprised of snoRNA, miRNA, and RNU6 pseudogenes, and their down-regulation preceded a general down-regulation of skin-enriched coding gene expression. As the active infection intensified, ncRNAs remained overrepresented among down-regulated genes; however, at 6 and 24 hrs they changed to a different set, which overlapped between these times, and excluded RNU6 pseudogenes but included snRNA components of the major and minor spliceosomes. Additionally, the raw counts of multiple types of differentially-expressed ncRNAs increased on post-wounding day 3 in control wounds, but infection suppressed this increase. After 5 and 9 days, these ncRNA counts in control wounds decreased, whereas they increased in the infected, healing-impaired wounds. These data suggest a sequential and coordinated change in the levels of transcripts of multiple

  8. Biomaterials and Nanotherapeutics for Enhancing Skin Wound Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhamoy Das

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is an intricate process that requires complex coordination between many cells and an appropriate extracellular microenvironment. Chronic wounds often suffer from high protease activity, persistent infection, excess inflammation, and hypoxia. While there has been intense investigation to find new methods to improve cutaneous wound care; the management of chronic wounds, burns, and skin wound infection remain challenging clinical problems. Ideally, advanced wound dressings can provide enhanced healing and bridge the gaps in the healing processes that prevent chronic wounds from healing. These technologies have great potential for improving outcomes in patients with poorly healing wounds but face significant barriers in addressing the heterogeneity and clinical complexity of chronic or severe wounds. Active wound dressings aim to enhance the natural healing process and work to counter many aspects that plague poorly healing wounds including excessive inflammation, ischemia, scarring and wound infection. This review paper discusses recent advances in the development of biomaterials and nanoparticle therapeutics to enhance wound healing. In particular, this review focuses on the novel cutaneous wound treatments that have undergone significant preclinical development or currently used in clinical practice.

  9. Epidemiology of nosocomial fungal infections in the National Center for Burns in Casablanca, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafik, A; Diouri, M; Bahechar, N; Chlihi, A

    2016-06-30

    Fungal infection is a leading cause of death in burns patients and incurs significant costs for burn units. Our aim was to determine epidemiology of these infections, and analyze risk factors in the burns intensive care unit of the National Center for Burns and Plastic Surgery at Ibn-Rochd University Hospital, Casablanca. It is a retrospective review of all patients admitted from 2011-2014 who developed cultures positive for fungal organisms. Criteria for nosocomial fungal infections were those of the Center for Disease Control in Atlanta (1988, revised 1992, 2004). Microbiological surveillance was carried out daily. Patient demographic data, % TBSA, type of infection, site(s), species and number of cultures, and risk factors for fungal infections were collected. Mean age of patients was 24.5 +/- 27.3 years; 63% were female. Mean % TBSA was 30.7 +/- 23.4%, and % FTSA was 21.7 +/- 20.1%. Injury due to flame was most common (82%), followed by scald (10%), contact (4%), electrical (3%) and chemical (1%). Incidence of nosocomial fungal infection was 10%. The fungal pathogen most frequently isolated was Candida albicans (65.7%), followed by other Candida species (18.6%). Aspergillus spp was present in 3.9% and was statistically associated with mortality (3.2%) and morbidity. In our study, risk factors for these infections were mostly degree of burn (mean TBSA = 30.7%) and prolonged broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. These two factors were associated with a higher incidence of multiple positive cultures, and significantly increased mortality (21.6%). Amphotericin B and fluconazole were the most frequently used antifungal agents. Fungi are emerging as important nosocomial pathogens. The main clinical implications are thinking faster about fungi infections and being more careful with antibiotic prescriptions.

  10. A Comparison of Tissue versus Swab Culturing of Infected Diabetic Foot Wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare the efficacy of swabbing versus tissue biopsy for microbiological diagnosis of diabetic foot infection. Methods. This was a prospective trial. Fifty-six patients with diabetic foot infection were divided into the following 3 groups according to the PEDIS grading system: grade 2 (n=10, grade 3 (n=29, and grade 4 (n=17. Two specimens were collected from each wound for microbial culturing after debridement, including a superficial swab and a deep tissue punch biopsy specimen. Results. Swab culturing identified all of the microorganisms isolated from the corresponding deep tissue specimens in 9/10 of grade 2 wounds (90.0%, and this proportion decreased to 12/29 (41.4% and 7/17 (41.2% for grades 3 and 4 wounds, respectively (p=0.02. Moreover, the sensitivity for identifying Gram-negative bacteria, such as E. coli and Citrobacter, by swabbing was low (33.3%. In addition, some Gram-negative bacteria, such as Serratia and Ralstonia pickettii, were isolated from deep tissues but not from swabs. Conclusions. Swab culturing may be reliable for identification of pathogens in diabetic foot wounds classified as grade 2. However, it is advisable to culture deep tissue specimens for wounds of grade ≥3 because swab culturing is associated with a high risk of missing pathogens, especially Gram-negative bacteria.

  11. A modern method of treatment: The role of silver dressings in promoting healing and preventing pathological scarring in patients with burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, A; Florescu, I P; Nitescu, C

    2016-01-01

    Burn wounds are a global public health problem, which affects all countries, no matter the development stage and occurs in all age groups, from toddlers to elderly. In spite of burns being the cause of numerous household and work accidents, there are still no clear stated unanimous rules for their treatment. Every day new products appear on the market, each of them trying to prove more effective. Since ancient times, silver has been known for its antimicrobial properties, so it has been used for a long time in the treatment of burns and other types of wounds. One of the relatively modern methods of treatment is applying silver sheets on the scald lesions. In this paper, which was part of a larger study (research for a PhD thesis), concerning prevention and treatment of the post-burn pathological scars, the cases of some patients with burns, who were treated by using the above mentioned method were presented and analyzed. The results obtained by applying silver sheets were then commented and interpreted, pointing out the advantages and disadvantages compared to silver sulfadiazine creams and ointments, which have already been used at a large scale. The prevention and treatment of post-burn pathological (hypertrophic and keloid) scars is a field in which still little is known and in which there are also no clearly set therapy plans. We hope that through this research and the following ones we will manage to establish some major guidelines concerning the prevention of pathological scars, which are not only disabling, but also a major aesthetic issue for any patient, in order to obtain better outcomes.

  12. An in vitro study on the burn wound healing activity of cotton fabrics incorporated with phytosynthesized silver nanoparticles in male Wistar albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannerselvam, Balashanmugam; Dharmalingam Jothinathan, Mukesh Kumar; Rajenderan, Murugan; Perumal, Palani; Pudupalayam Thangavelu, Kalaichelvan; Kim, Hyung Joo; Singh, Vijay; Rangarajulu, Senthil Kumaran

    2017-03-30

    In modern therapeutics, chemically synthesized drugs have been reported as causing adverse effects including allergies, rashes, itches, and swelling. For the past few decades, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have widely been applied in medical domains due to their antimicrobial and wound healing properties. In the present study, different concentrations of phytosynthesized AgNPs-saturated cotton dress fabrics - in comparison to cotton fabrics treated with commercial ointment - were tested for 18days to assess their ability to speed the healing of rats' burn wounds. No significant difference in body weight was observed during the course of treatment as compared to the normal rat group. The cotton fabrics observed under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) confirmed the distribution of AgNPs in the cotton fibers. Energy-Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) spectrum also authenticated the AgNPs' distribution. At the end of the experimental period, the wound healing efficacy of dressing containing commercial ointment (Burn Heal) was slightly lower than that of treatment containing 100μg/kg of body weight (kg b.w.) of AgNPs. Additionally, it was also observed that the wound contraction area was higher than that of the positive drug 100μg/kg b.w. treated group, which indicates comparatively better-quality activity of ointments with AgNPs with regards to their burn healing properties. The histological and SEM observations showed better fibril alignments in repaired skin when compared with the negative and positive control groups. Perhaps due to the tensile strength of the comparatively higher concentration of nanoparticles, Groups IV and V (which contained the most nanoparticles out of all the groups) showed much better healing properties than did the positive drug treated group VI. Altogether, increased-concentration AgNPs show increased recovery action in comparison to the positive drug treated group. This study provides additional insight into the incorporation of AgNPs in

  13. Study on the pathogenesis of pathophysiological changes of burn systemic infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ao (Ngao

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available The present prospective study showed that incidence of systemic infection in severe burn patients was 30.9%. Toxic shock and multiple organ failure (MOF developed in all patients with uncontrolled systemic infection. Both morbidity and mortality of MOF were 76.5%. In the infection group, plasma TXB2 and TXB2/6-keto-PGF1α ratio increased markedly. Their changes were closely correlated with the clinical course and deterioration of systemic infection. Circulatory platelet aggregate ratio decreased significantly, while myocardiac enzyme spectrum greatly increased. Thrombi were observed in visceral tissues from patients dying of systemic infection. These suggested that TXA2/PGI2. imbalance promoting microaggregate and thrombus formation may be one of the pathogenic effects of toxic shock and MOF in burn patients.

  14. Nitrosoglutathione generating nitric oxide nanoparticles as an improved strategy for combating Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouake, Jason; Schairer, David; Kutner, Allison; Sanchez, David A; Makdisi, Joy; Blecher-Paz, Karin; Nacharaju, Parimala; Tuckman-Vernon, Chaim; Gialanella, Phil; Friedman, Joel M; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Friedman, Adam J

    2012-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a community-acquired, nosocomial pathogen that is an important cause of human morbidity and mortality; it is intrinsically resistant to several antibiotics and is capable of developing resistance to newly developed drugs via a variety of mechanisms. P aeruginosa's ubiquity and multidrug resistance (MDR) warrants the development of innovative methods that overcome its ability to develop resistance. We have previously described a nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticle (NO-np) platform that effectively kills gram-positive and gram-negative organisms in vitro and accelerates clinical recovery in vivo in murine wound and abscess infection models. We have also demonstrated that when glutathione (GSH) is added to NO-np, the nitroso intermediate S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) is formed, which has greater activity against P aeruginosa and other gram-negative organisms compared with NO-np alone. In the current study, we evaluate the potential of NO-np to generate GSNO both in vitro and in vivo in a murine excisional wound model infected with an MDR clinical isolate of P aeruginosa. Whereas NO-np alone inhibited P aeruginosa growth in vitro for up to 8 hours, NO-np+GSH completely inhibited P aeruginosa growth for 24 hours. Percent survival in the NO-np+GSH-treated isolates was significantly lower than in the NO-np (36.1% vs 8.3%; P=.004). In addition, NO-np+GSH accelerated wound closure in P aeruginosa-infected wounds, and NO-np+GSH-treated wounds had significantly lower bacterial burden when compared to NO-np-treated wounds (P<.001). We conclude that GSNO is easily generated from our NO-np platform and has the potential to be used as an antimicrobial agent against MDR organisms such as P aeruginosa.

  15. Development and Preclinical Testing of Laser-Generated Shockwave Therapy for Infected Wounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Nathan Craig

    or wound area. As a result, LGS also showed no deleterious effects on the tissue which would hinder wound healing. With these results, LGS therapy shows promise as an alternative infected wound treatment, and a system capable of completing thorough animal trials is available for future researchers.

  16. [Incidence of infected surgical wound and prophylaxis with cefotaxime in cesarean section].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemus Rocha, Roberto; García Gutiérrez, Laura Bertilda; Basavilvazo Rodríguez, María Antonia; Cruz Avelar, Agles; Peralta Pedrero, María Luisa; Hernández Valencia, Marcelino

    2005-10-01

    Surgical wound infection after cesarean section varies from 2.5 to 16.1%, thus the utilization of antibiotic prophylaxis has increased routinely and irrationally. Despite this, we can still see cases of infections. To determine if the antibiotic prophylaxis with cefotaxime is associated with the decreased incidence of wound infection in patients submitted to cesarean section without risk factors. This study was carried out as a randomized clinical trial in patients submitted to cesarean section. Two groups were formed: in the first group we administered cefotaxime and the other one did not receive prophylaxis. The follow-up lasted 30 days to evaluate clinical data of infection. We performed 3,300 cesarean in the studied period; 1,000 patients had the inclusion criteria to participate in the study. A surgical wound infection was observed in 31 (0.96%) patients without risk factors. In 14 of these patients we administered cefotaxime, and in 17 patients we did not use prophylaxis. The highest frequency of infection was observed in the group of 24 to 30 years old, with 16 patients (51.6%). The clinical data of infection were: dehiscence in 29 patients (93.5%), pus secretion in 23 (74.2%), and fever in only 3 (9.7%) of them. The hospital stay after the infection was of five days in 75% of the cases. When the use of cefotaxime as prophylaxis was analyzed in both groups we had an odds ratio of 0.82, which was not significant. The use of cefotaxime in patients operated of cesarean does not have great transcendence since it does not reduce the infection incidence. The use of antibiotics in an irrational way implies a high cost, since the majority of the post-operation infections are not complicated, involving exclusively the skin and cellular subcutaneous tissue. Then, the cases with risk factors should be analyzed carefully for the cefotaxime administration.

  17. The Development and Content Validation of a Multidisciplinary, Evidence-based Wound Infection Prevention and Treatment Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakhary, Sammy A; Davey, Chris; Bari, Rebecca; Bean, Jordan; Reber, Tyler; Gallagher, Kathy; Couch, Kara; Hurlow, Jennifer; Laforet, Karen; McIssac, Corrine; Napier, Karen; Vilar-Compte, Diana; Zakhary, Emily; Hermans, Michel; Bolton, Laura

    2017-11-01

    Acute and chronic wound infections create clinical, economic, and patient-centered challenges best met by multidisciplinary wound care teams providing consistent, valid, clinically relevant, safe, evidence-based management across settings. To develop an evidence-based wound infection guideline, PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature databases were searched from inception through August 1, 2017 using the terms (or synonyms) wound infection and risk factor, significant, diagnosis, prevention, treatment, or surveillance. Studies on parasitic infections, in vitro studies, and non-English publications were excluded. The 19-member International Consolidated Wound Infection Guideline Task Force (ICWIG TF), hosted by the Association for the Advancement of Wound Care (AAWC), reviewed publications/assessed levels of evidence, developed recommendations, and verified representation of all major recommendations from 27 multidisciplinary wound infection documents. Using a web-based survey, practitioners were invited to assess the clinical relevance and strength of each recommendation using standardized scores. Survey responses from 42 practitioners, including registered nurses (RNs), Wound Care Certified and advanced practice RNs, physical therapists, physicians, podiatrists, and scientists from 6 countries were returned to AAWC staff, tabulated in a spreadsheet, and analyzed for content validity. Respondents had a median of >15 years of military or civilian practice and managed an average of 15.9 ± 23 patients with infected wounds per week. Recommendations supported by strong evidence and/or content validated as relevant by at least 75% of respondents qualified for guideline inclusion. Most (159, 88.8%) of the 179 ICWIG recommendations met these criteria and were summarized as a checklist to harmonize team wound infection management across specialties and settings. Most of the 20 recommendations found not to be valid were related

  18. Catheter-related infections in a northwestern São Paulo reference unit for burned patients care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Penido Campos Júnior

    Full Text Available Despite improvements in care and rehabilitation of burned patients, infections still remain the main complication and death cause. Catheter-related infections are among the four most common infections and are associated with skin damage and insertion site colonization. There are few studies evaluating this kind of infection worldwide in this special group of patients. Padre Albino Hospital Burn Care Unit (PAHBCU is the only reference center in the Northwestern São Paulo for treatment of burned patients. This paper presents the results of a retrospective study aiming at describing the epidemiological and clinical features of catheter-related infections at PAHBCU.

  19. Bacteriophage Therapy for Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm-Infected Wounds: A New Approach to Chronic Wound Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    durability and virulence of biofilm in the face of host defenses, a continued effort toward innovative treatment principles and solutions is needed. There...in tryptic soy broth at 37°C until log-phase was achieved. Bacteria were harvested and washed in phosphate-buffered sa- line three times by...biofilm- dominant infection, an antimicrobial , absorbent dressing containing polyhexamethylene bigua- nide (Telfa AMD; Tyco Healthcare Group, Mans

  20. Ultraviolet C Light for Acinetobacter baumannii Wound Infections in Mice: Potential Use for Battlefield Wound Decontamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    access to food and water ad libitum. They were maintained on a 12-hour light and dark cycle at room temperature. For skin abrasion infections, 19 mice...deparaffinized, and rehydrated with distilled water . Skin sections were incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature with antithymine dimer monoclonal anti...by in vivo bioluminescence imaging. Photochem Photobiol. 2002;75:51 57. 15. Jett BD, Hatter KL, Huycke MM, et al. Simplified agar plate method for

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm hampers murine central wound healing by suppression of vascular epithelial growth factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trøstrup, Hannah; Lerche, Christian J; Christophersen, Lars J

    2018-01-01

    Biofilm-infected wounds are clinically challenging. Vascular endothelial growth factor and host defence S100A8/A9 are crucial for wound healing but may be suppressed by biofilms. The natural course of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infection was compared in central and peripheral zones of burn......-wounded, infection-susceptible BALB/c mice, which display delayed wound closure compared to C3H/HeN mice. Wounds were evaluated histopathologically 4, 7 or 10 days post-infection. Photoplanimetry evaluated necrotic areas. P. aeruginosa biofilm suppressed vascular endothelial growth factor levels centrally in BALB......100A8/A9 in BALB/c and centrally and peripherally later on in C3H/HeN wounds as compared to uninfected mice. Peripheral polymorphonuclear-dominated inflammation and larger necrosis were observed in BALB/c wounds. In conclusion, P. aeruginosa biofilm modulates wounds by suppressing central...

  2. Effects of herbal ointment containing the leaf extracts of Madeira vine (Anredera cordifolia (Ten.) Steenis) for burn wound healing process on albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuniarti, Wiwik Misaco; Lukiswanto, Bambang Sektiari

    2017-07-01

    Skin burn is a health problem that requires fast and accurate treatment. If not well-treated, the burn will cause various damaging conditions for the patient. The leaf extract of Madeira vine (Anredera cordifolia (Ten.) Steenis), or popularly known as Binahong in Indonesia, has been used to treat various diseases. The purpose of this research is to determine the effects of leaf extracts of Madeira vine (A. cordifolia (Ten.) Steenis) on skin burn healing process in rats as an animal model. In this research, there were four treatment groups: G0, G1, G2, and G3, each consisting of five rats. All these rats were given skin burns, using hot metal plates. Then, sulfadiazine was given to G0, 2.5% leaf extract of Madeira vine was given to G1, 5% extract was given to G2, and 10% extract was given to G3, for straight 14 days topically, 3 times a day. At the end of the treatment period, skin excisions were conducted, and histopathological examination was carried out. Microscopic observation on the wound healing process on the collagen deposition, polymorphonuclear infiltration, angiogenesis, and fibrosis showed that G2 had a significant difference with G0, G1, and G3 (pvine, which have the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial effects. The ointment from the 5% leaf extract of Madeira vine (A. cordifolia (Ten.) Steenis) has been proven to be effective to be used for topical burn therapy.

  3. Herpes simplex virus infection in burned patients: epidemiology of 11 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdarias, B; Perro, G; Cutillas, M; Castede, J C; Lafon, M E; Sanchez, R

    1996-06-01

    Burned patients suffer significant immunosuppression during the first 3 or 4 weeks after hospitalization. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections are commonly seen in immunosuppressed patients and may account for considerable morbidity and some mortality. We studied retrospectively 11 patients with severe burn injury who became infected with HSV. We determined the prevalence of viral infection in this group of patients. Serological testing and viral culture was used to diagnose HSV infection. No general complications appeared in these 11 patients in association with HSV but two patients died of multiorgan failure. Locally, areas of active epidermal regeneration were most commonly affected. Acyclovir therapy was not used and the duration of hospitalization was normal in these 11 patients.

  4. ASSISTANCE FOR BURNED SINK PATIENTS AT HOSPITAL BY THE PERSPECTIVE OF INFECTION CONTROL: A CASE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Pires Damaceno

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The infection in burnings is very common, involve of the main mechanism of defense: the skin. Thus,this study aimed to identify and to analyze the measures adopted for the prevention and control of the infectionsrelated to this area. The research was constituted by a case study and data were obtained from systemizeobservation and of a questionnaire applied to the teams medical and of nursing of a unit of handling of burnnings ofthe city of Goiânia. The results showed deficiencies related to the infection control and pointed to the need of thetrainmen and update in infection control as direct patient’s care as in articles processing used for this care.Therefore the adequacy of procedure to the prevention and control of the nosocomial infections becomesnecessary.

  5. [The present status, counter-measures and new trends on burn infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guang-xia

    2007-04-01

    In recent fifty years, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus were continuously the predominant in burn infections, the only change seen was a rapid increase in their drug-resistance. Under the pressure of antibiotics, Some opportunistic bacteria that were resistant to all available antibiotics emerged, such as Acinetobacter baumanii and Maltophilia stenotrophomonas. For critically burn patients, basing on early surgical intervention, early and short-term use of broad-spectrum antibiotic is advisable, and it may control the infection promptly, prevent further inflammatory reaction, as well as minimize the emergence of antibacterial resistance. To control infections due to pandrug-resistant bacteria, cyclic use of some old antibiotics may be helpful. In dealing with severe infection, a combination of anti-pathogen and anti-inflammatory reaction measures should be considered.

  6. [Significance of bacteria detection with filter paper method on diagnosis of diabetic foot wound infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, X H; Zhu, Y P; Ren, G Q; Li, G C; Zhang, J; Zou, L J; Feng, Z B; Li, B H

    2017-02-20

    Objective: To evaluate the significance of bacteria detection with filter paper method on diagnosis of diabetic foot wound infection. Methods: Eighteen patients with diabetic foot ulcer conforming to the study criteria were hospitalized in Liyuan Hospital Affiliated to Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology from July 2014 to July 2015. Diabetic foot ulcer wounds were classified according to the University of Texas diabetic foot classification (hereinafter referred to as Texas grade) system, and general condition of patients with wounds in different Texas grade was compared. Exudate and tissue of wounds were obtained, and filter paper method and biopsy method were adopted to detect the bacteria of wounds of patients respectively. Filter paper method was regarded as the evaluation method, and biopsy method was regarded as the control method. The relevance, difference, and consistency of the detection results of two methods were tested. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy of filter paper method in bacteria detection were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was drawn based on the specificity and sensitivity of filter paper method in bacteria detection of 18 patients to predict the detection effect of the method. Data were processed with one-way analysis of variance and Fisher's exact test. In patients tested positive for bacteria by biopsy method, the correlation between bacteria number detected by biopsy method and that by filter paper method was analyzed with Pearson correlation analysis. Results: (1) There were no statistically significant differences among patients with wounds in Texas grade 1, 2, and 3 in age, duration of diabetes, duration of wound, wound area, ankle brachial index, glycosylated hemoglobin, fasting blood sugar, blood platelet count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, aspartate aminotransferase, serum creatinine, and

  7. The year in burns 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Steven E; Phelan, Herbert A; Arnoldo, Brett D

    2014-12-01

    Approximately 3415 research articles were published with burns in the title, abstract, and/or keyword in 2013. We have continued to see an increase in this number; the following reviews articles selected from these by the Editor of one of the major journals (Burns) and colleagues that in their opinion are most likely to have effects on burn care treatment and understanding. As we have done before, articles were found and divided into the following topic areas: epidemiology of injury and burn prevention, wound and scar characterization, acute care and critical care, inhalation injury, infection, psychological considerations, pain and itching management, rehabilitation and long-term outcomes, and burn reconstruction. The articles are mentioned briefly with notes from the authors; readers are referred to the full papers for details. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  8. How wounds heal

    Science.gov (United States)

    How cuts heal; How scrapes heal; How puncture wounds heal; How burns heal; How pressure sores heal; How lacerations heal ... For major wounds, follow your doctor's instructions on how to care for your injury. Avoid picking at ...

  9. Effects of the nephrilin peptide on post-burn glycemic control, renal function, fat and lean body mass, and wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascarenhas, Desmond D; Ayadi, Amina El; Wetzel, Michael; Prasai, Anesh; Mifflin, Randy; Jay, Jayson; Herndon, David N; Finnerty, Celeste C

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the effects of severe burn trauma are not well understood. We previously demonstrated the ability of nephrilin peptide (an iron-binding peptide believed to enter cells through iron-uptake pathways) to suppress aspects of the neuroinflammatory response in a rat scald model, as well as sepsis mortality in a mouse model. This study explores the effect of nephrilin on other clinically relevant outcomes in the rat scald model. In a rat scald model, animals were treated with nephrilin either in week 1 or week 2 post-burn. Measurements were made of serum glucose and creatinine as well as wound area by planimetry and body composition by DEXA. Given the potential role of iron, results were analyzed both for the entire cohort of animals and for the normoferremic (>100 ug/dL serum iron) subset of animals. Nephrilin improved body composition, wound healing, kidney function, and glycemic control. The first two effects were significant in normoferremic but not in hypoferremic animals suggesting an effect of iron status on burn injury outcomes. Nephrilin treatment modulates a number of relevant variables in the rat scald model.

  10. The use of liposomal solutions of antibiotics in treatment of infected and festering wounds in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олег Владимирович Спахи

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of research. To study the use of liposomal solutions of antibiotics in the complex treatment of infected and festering wounds in children.Materials and methods of research: The results of clinical and laboratory examinations of 77 children 3-18 years old with infected and festering wounds were analyzed. All children were distributed into groups of observation by the character of the treatment: in 37 sick children (the main group liposomal preparations were used in the complex treatment. Patients of the control group (40 children get the generally accepted complex treatment. The groups of comparison were statistically similar by the character and localization of pathological process, age, prescription of disease. In the main group an antibacterial-liposomal mixture was injected into the wound alongside with the generally accepted methods. The dynamics of the clinical, laboratory, cytological, bacteriological and morphological indicators was defined using the generally accepted technics. The general condition of patient’s organism was assessed with a help of laboratory methods of research (general clinical and biochemical analyses.Results. In the main group it was observed a persistent tendency to normalization of leukocytal formula and of the number of leukocytes in peripheral blood that reached normal values (p < 0,05 on 7th day. In 36 patients of the control group leukocytosis remained for 7 days. Evident differences of indicators of leukocytal index of intoxication and of an index of the shift of leukocytal formula in the main and the control groups were observed on 3-4th day. In addition its decrease was combined with diminution of an intensity of clinical symptoms and with decrease of manifestations of the local pathological process.Bacteriological examination of the nidus of inflammation in patients of examined groups revealed that in the main group the diminution of the degree of infectious contamination passed faster (p<0,05 – on

  11. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy With Instillation and Dwell Time Used to Treat Infected Orthopedic Implants: A 4-patient Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettmers, Robert; Brekelmans, Wouter; Leijnen, Michiel; van der Burg, Boudewijn; Ritchie, Ewan

    2016-09-01

    Infection following orthopedic implants for bone fixation or joint replacement is always serious and may require removal of the osteosynthetic material. Negative pressure wound therapy with instillation and dwell time (NPWTi-d) is an emerging therapy for the treatment of complex wounds, including infected wounds with osteosynthetic material. The purpose of this case study was to evaluate the outcomes of 4 patients (1 man, 3 women; age range 49 to 71 years) with a postoperative wound infection (POWI) following fracture repair and internal fixation. All patients were at high risk for surgical complications, including infections. Standard infection treatments (antibiotics) had been unsuccessful. Based on the available literature, a NPWTi-d protocol was developed. Following surgical debridement, wounds were instilled with polyhexanide biguanide with a set dwell time of 15 minutes, followed by continuous NPWTi-d of -125 mm Hg for 4 hours. The system was changed every 3 to 4 days until sufficient granulation tissue was evident and negative pressure without instillation could be used. Systemic antibiotics were continued in all patients. Granulation tissue was found to be sufficient in 12 to 35 days in the 4 cases, no recurrence of infection was noted, and the osteosynthesis material remained in place. No adverse events were observed. Research is needed to compare the safety and effectiveness of this adjunct treatment in the management of challenging wounds to other patient and wound management approaches.

  12. Hypertonic Glucose Combined with Negative Pressure Wound Therapy to Prepare Wounds with Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection for Skin Grafting: A Report of 3 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing-Chun; Xian, Chun-Jing; Yu, Jia-Ao; Shi, Kai; Hong, Lei

    2015-06-01

    Soft tissue losses from acute or chronic trauma are a challenge for surgeons. To explore a method to expedite granulation tissue formation in preparation for a split-thickness skin graft (STSG), the medical records of 3 patients - 2 adult men with wounds related to trauma injury and 1 infant with necrotizing fasciitis, all infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa - were reviewed. All wounds were surgically debrided and managed by applying gauze soaked in 50% glucose followed by continuous negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) before definitive skin grafting. NPWT pressure was applied at -80 mm Hg for the 2 adult males (ages 39 and 25 years) and -50 mm Hg for the 7-month-old male infant. The dressings were changed every 2 to 3 days. No adverse events occurred, and wounds were successfully closed with a STSG after an average of 7 days. In 1 case, NPWT was able to help affix dressings in a difficult-to-dress area (genital region). The combination of hypertonic glucose and hand-made, gauze-based NPWT was found to be safe, well-tolerated, and effective in preparing the wound bed for grafting. Prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies are needed to compare the safety, effectiveness, and efficacy of this method to other treatment approaches for P. aeruginosa-infected wounds.

  13. Prevalence of Post-operative Wound Infections in Rural area of Latur District

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikram Rajput

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical site infection (SSI continues to be a major source of morbidity following operative procedures. The modern surgeon cannot escape the responsibility of dealing with infections, having the knowledge for the appropriate use of aseptic and antiseptic technique, proper use of prophylactic and therapeutic antibiotics, and adequate monitoring and support with novel surgical and pharmacologic as well as nonpharmacologic aids. Objective: To study the most common organisms encountered in postoperative wound infections and to find out the most effective Antibiotics in case of Post Operative Wound Infections. Methodology: It is an Observational study done on 50 operated cases of post operative wounds. Results: Most common microorganism encountered in present series was E. coli in 13 cases (26%. Least common micro organism was Proteus (2%. E. coli was also encountered in mixed culture with Kleibsiella, Pseudomonas and Citrobacter. Most effective antibiotic in present series was Imipenem. Other common effective antibiotics were Amikacin, Netillin, Piperacillin, Tetracycline and Gentamycin. Least effective antibiotics were Penicillin, Cefotaxime, Cefuroxime and Cefoxitin. Conclusion: E. coli was the most common organism cultured. Imipenem and Amikacin were the most effective antibiotics.

  14. [Inventory building of phages against extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii isolated from wounds of patients with severe burn and related characteristic analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z C; Deng, L Y; Gong, Y L; Yin, S P; Jiang, B; Huang, G T; Peng, Y Z; Hu, F Q

    2016-09-20

    To build inventory of phages against extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii isolated from wounds of inpatients of burn ICU and analyze related characteristics. In 2014 and 2015, 131 strains of extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii were isolated from wounds of inpatients of burn ICU from one hospital in Chongqing. In 2015, 98 strains of extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter Baumannii were isolated from wounds of inpatients of burn ICU from 6 hospitals in Guangdong province. Above-mentioned 229 strains were collected for conducting experiments as follows: (1) Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of strains isolated from Chongqing and Guangdong province was analyzed. (2) Sewage co-culture method was applied for isolation of phages with above-mentioned strains and sewage from Chongqing and Guangdong province. Numbers of isolated phages and times of successful isolation and unsuccessful isolation were recorded. (3) The most prevalent subtypes of strains from Chongqing and Guangdong province in 2015 were collected, and their phages respectively underwent cross infection with all strains from Chongqing and those from Guangdong province. The lysis ability of phage was observed when phage underwent cross infection with the same subtype of strain or not the same, and the lytic ratio was calculated. (4) Fluid of phage in one type was randomly selected and equally divided into 3 parts, and its titer was determined by double dilution method. Then each part of phage fluid was subdivided into 3 small parts, which were cultured with LB fluid medium and respectively stored under the condition of -20 ℃, 4 ℃, and room temperature. After being stored for 1 month and 2 months, the titer of phage was determined for evaluating stability of phage. Data were processed with Fisher's exact test, chi-square test, and one-way analysis of variance. (1) The major type of strains from Chongqing in 2014 was ST368 (45%, 31/69), and major types of strains from Chongqing

  15. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy as a point-of-care diagnostic for infection in wound effluent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghebremedhin, Meron; Yesupriya, Shubha; Crane, Nicole J.

    2016-03-01

    In military medicine, one of the challenges in dealing with large combat-related injuries is the prevalence of bacterial infection, including multidrug resistant organisms. This can prolong the wound healing process and lead to wound dehiscence. Current methods of identifying bacterial infection rely on culturing microbes from patient material and performing biochemical tests, which together can take 2-3 days to complete. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS) is a powerful vibrational spectroscopy technique that allows for highly sensitive structural detection of analytes adsorbed onto specially prepared metal surfaces. In the past, we have been able to discriminate between bacterial isolates grown on solid culture media using standard Raman spectroscopic methods. Here, SERS is utilized to assess the presence of bacteria in wound effluent samples taken directly from patients. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt for the application of SERS directly to wound effluent. The utilization of SERS as a point-of-care diagnostic tool would enable physicians to determine course of treatment and drug administration in a matter of hours.

  16. Efficacy of Nano Germicidal Light Therapy on Wound Related Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-12

    al., eds. Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine . 16th ed. New York: McGraw Hill; 2004. 24. Evans HL, Lefrak SN, Lyman J, et al. Cost of Gram...Hospital Acquired Infections. In: Kasper D, Braunwald E, Fauci A, et al., eds. Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine . 16th ed. New York...Laboratory Animal Care (AAALAC). During the initial acclimation period of six days, the rats received a comprehensive veterinary health inspection to

  17. Clinical safety and effectiveness evaluation of a new antimicrobial wound dressing designed to manage exudate, infection and biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Daniel G; Parsons, David; Bowler, Philip G

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a next-generation antimicrobial wound dressing (NGAD; AQUACEL ® Ag+ Extra™ dressing) designed to manage exudate, infection and biofilm. Clinicians were requested to evaluate the NGAD within their standard protocol of care for up to 4 weeks, or as long as deemed clinically appropriate, in challenging wounds that were considered to be impeded by suspected biofilm or infection. Baseline information and post-evaluation dressing safety and effectiveness data were recorded using standardised evaluation forms. This data included wound exudate levels, wound bed appearance including suspected biofilm, wound progression, skin health and dressing usage. A total of 112 wounds from 111 patients were included in the evaluations, with a median duration of 12 months, and biofilm was suspected in over half of all wounds (54%). After the introduction of the NGAD, exudate levels had shifted from predominantly high or moderate to low or moderate levels, while biofilm suspicion fell from 54% to 27% of wounds. Wound bed coverage by tissue type was generally shifted from sloughy or suspected biofilm towards predominantly granulation tissue after the inclusion of the NGAD. Stagnant (65%) and deteriorating wounds (27%) were shifted to improved (65%) or healed wounds (13%), while skin health was also reported to have improved in 63% of wounds. High levels of clinician satisfaction with the dressing effectiveness and change frequency were accompanied by a low number of dressing-related adverse events (n = 3; 2·7%) and other negative observations or comments. This clinical user evaluation supports the growing body of evidence that the anti-biofilm technology in the NGAD results in a safe and effective dressing for the management of a variety of challenging wound types. © 2016 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Major bleeding during negative pressure wound/V.A.C.® - therapy for postsurgical deep sternal wound infection - a critical appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segers Patrique

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Negative-pressure wound therapy, commercially known as vacuum-assisted closure (V.A.C.® therapy, has become one of the most popular (and efficacious interim (prior to flap reconstruction or definite methods of managing deep sternal wound infection. Complications such as profuse bleeding, which may occur during negative-pressure therapy but not necessarily due to it, are often attributed to a single factor and reported as such. However, despite the wealth of clinical experience internationally available, information regarding certain simple considerations is still lacking. Garnering information on all the factors that could possibly influence the outcome has become more difficult due to a (fortunate decrease in the incidence of deep sternal wound infection. If more insight is to be gained from fewer clinical cases, then various potentially confounding factors should be fully disclosed before complications can be attributed to the technique itself or improvements to negative-pressure wound therapy for deep sternal wound infection can be accepted as evidence-based and the guidelines for its use adapted. The authors propose the adoption of a simple checklist in such cases.

  19. Healing Potentials of Oral Moringa Oleifera Leaves Extract and Tetracycline on Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infected Wounds of Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyarefe, Oghenemega D; Idowu, Aderayo; Afolabi, Jeremiah M

    2015-12-20

    The effects of oral dose of aqueous extract of Moringa oleifera and tetracycline antibiotics on cutaneous wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus were studied in eighteen adult wistar rats (159±31.5g) randomized into three groups: Group A, n = 6, Moringa oleifera-(300 mg/kg). Group B, n = 6, tetracycline (9.4 mg/kg) and Group C, n = 6, Sterile water (control). Six millimetres diameter nape wound, created on each rat under 2% xylazine (5 mg/kg) and 5% ketamine (35 mg/kg), was contaminated with Staphylococcus aureus (108 Colony Forming Unit (CFU). Following infection, treatment was commenced with daily oral dose of test preparations and the wounds were evaluated every other day i.e., day 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13 and 15 for wetness (wound exudation), wound edge oedema, hyperaemia, granulation tissues and contraction (diameter). Severe wound exudation existed in all the groups between days 0-3 (p = 1.00). A significantly less wound exudation was observed at days 3-5 (p = 0.000) and 5-9 (p = 0.003) (ControlMoringa). Wound edge oedema was significantly less on days 5-9 (p = 0.000) and 9-15 (p = 0.001) (ControlMoringaMoringa Moringa> Tetracycline). Differences in wound diameter was not significant except at days 5-9 (p = 0.013) (Control> Moringa >Tetracycline). Oral doses of Moringa oleifera extract (300mg/kg) and tetracycline (9.4mg/kg) are not effective as antimicrobial or immune-boosting agents to enhance healing of wounds infected with Staphylococcus aureus and hence not recommended for rapid clearance of Staphylococcus aureus infected wounds.

  20. Biofilms and Persistent Wound Infections in United States Military Trauma Patients: a Case-control Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-08

    and maturation on medically-relevant abiotic surfaces (e.g., polypropylene, polystyrene , and titanium) has been suggested [42]. The bap gene carriage...implantation was the same site of in- fection. Nonetheless, in the absence of medical hardware, contamination of soft-tissue wounds by foreign bodies...biofilm-associated infections: a review of the available clinical evidence . Drugs 2009, 69(10):1351–1361. 29. Trampuz A, Piper KE, Jacobson MJ

  1. Improved Surgical Site Infection (SSI) rate through accurately assessed surgical wounds

    OpenAIRE

    John, Honeymol; Nimeri, Abdelrahman; Ellahham, Samer

    2015-01-01

    Sheikh Khalifa Medical City's (SKMC) Surgery Institute was identified as a high outlier in Surgical Site Infections (SSI) based on the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) - Semi-Annual Report (SAR) in January 2012. The aim of this project was to improve SSI rates through accurate wound classification. We identified SSI rate reduction as a performance improvement and safety priority at SKMC, a tertiary referral center. We used the American Col...

  2. The surgical team as a source of postoperative wound infections caused by Streptococcus pyogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, H J; Svendsen, R N; Nielsen, S V

    1997-01-01

    Postoperative wound infection, caused by Streptococcus pyogenes transmitted during the operation from members of the surgical team, is a rare but serious complication of surgery. This study describes three cases, which could be traced to an orthopaedic surgeon, who carried the epidemic strain...... to be the most efficient treatment for anal and vaginal carriage. Relapse of carriage could occur several months after apparent eradication, and was often associated with a carrier in the family household....

  3. Intracavity lavage and wound irrigation for prevention of surgical site infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Gill; Atkinson, Ross A; Smith, Tanya A; Rowlands, Ceri; Rithalia, Amber D; Crosbie, Emma J; Dumville, Jo C

    2017-01-01

    Background Surgical site infections (SSIs) are wound infections that occur after an operative procedure. A preventable complication, they are costly and associated with poorer patient outcomes, increased mortality, morbidity and reoperation rates. Surgical wound irrigation is an intraoperative technique, which may reduce the rate of SSIs through removal of dead or damaged tissue, metabolic waste, and wound exudate. Irrigation can be undertaken prior to wound closure or postoperatively. Intracavity lavage is a similar technique used in operations that expose a bodily cavity; such as procedures on the abdominal cavity and during joint replacement surgery. Objectives To assess the effects of wound irrigation and intracavity lavage on the prevention of surgical site infection (SSI). Search methods In February 2017 we searched the Cochrane Wounds Specialised Register; the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); Ovid MEDLINE; Ovid Embase and EBSCO CINAHL Plus. We also searched three clinical trials registries and references of included studies and relevant systematic reviews. There were no restrictions on language, date of publication or study setting. Selection criteria We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of participants undergoing surgical procedures in which the use of a particular type of intraoperative washout (irrigation or lavage) was the only systematic difference between groups, and in which wounds underwent primary closure. The primary outcomes were SSI and wound dehiscence. Secondary outcomes were mortality, use of systemic antibiotics, antibiotic resistance, adverse events, re-intervention, length of hospital stay, and readmissions. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion at each stage. Two review authors also undertook data extraction, assessment of risk of bias and GRADE assessment. We calculated risk ratios or differences in means with 95% confidence intervals where

  4. Development of a tissue-engineered human oral mucosa equivalent based on an acellular allogeneic dermal matrix: a preliminary report of clinical application to burn wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Takuya; Takami, Yoshihiro; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Shimazaki, Shuji; Harii, Kiyonori

    2005-01-01

    Tissue-engineered skin equivalents composed of epidermal and dermal components have been widely investigated for coverage of full-thickness skin defects. We developed a tissue-engineered oral mucosa equivalent based on an acellular allogeneic dermal matrix and investigated its characteristics. We also tried and assessed its preliminary clinical application. Human oral mucosal keratinocytes were separated from a piece of oral mucosa and cultured in a chemically-defined medium. The keratinocytes were seeded on to the acellular allogeneic dermal matrix and cultured. Histologically, the mucosa equivalent had a well-stratified epithelial layer. Immunohistochemical study showed that it was similar to normal oral mucosa. We applied this equivalent in one case with an extensive burn wound. The equivalent was transplanted three weeks after the harvest of the patient's oral mucosa and about 30% of the graft finally survived. We conclude that this new oral mucosa equivalent could become a therapeutic option for the treatment of extensive burns.

  5. Antibiotic prophylaxis adequacy in knee arthroplasty and surgical wound infection: Prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Moral-Luque, J A; Checa-García, A; López-Hualda, Á; Villar-Del-Campo, M C; Martínez-Martín, J; Moreno-Coronas, F J; Montejo-Sancho, J; Rodríguez-Caravaca, G

    Antibiotic prophylaxis is the most suitable tool for preventing surgical wound infection. This study evaluated adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis in surgery for knee arthroplasty and its effect on surgical site infection. Prospective cohort study. We assessed the degree of adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis, the causes of non-adequacy, and the effect of non-adequacy on surgical site infection. Incidence of surgical site infection was studied after a maximum incubation period of a year. To assess the effect of prophylaxis non-adequacy on surgical site infection we used the relative risk adjusted with the aid of a logistic regression model. The study covered a total of 1749 patients. Antibiotic prophylaxis was indicated in all patients and administered in 99.8% of cases, with an overall protocol adequacy of 77.6%. The principal cause of non-compliance was the duration of prescription of the antibiotics (46.5%). Cumulative incidence of surgical site infection was 1.43%. No relationship was found between prophylaxis adequacy and surgical infection (RR=1.15; 95% CI: .31-2.99) (P>.05). Surveillance and infection control programs enable risk factors of infection and improvement measures to be assessed. Monitoring infection rates enables us to reduce their incidence. Adequacy of antibiotic prophylaxis was high but could be improved. We did not find a relationship between prophylaxis adequacy and surgical site infection rate. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Well-promising outcomes with vacuum-assisted closure in an infected wound following laparotomy: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Daskalaki

    2016-09-01

    Conclusion: The simultaneous use of instillation and constant pressure seemed to be superior in comparison with NPWT alone. Compared to conventional methods, the use of VAC ends to better outcomes, in cases of infected wounds following laparotomy.

  7. Well-promising outcomes with vacuum-assisted closure in an infected wound following laparotomy: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalaki, A; Xenaki, S; Venianaki, M; Topalidou, A; Athanasakis, E; Chrysos, E; Chalkiadakis, G

    2016-09-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) represents an alternative method to optimize conditions for wound healing. Delayed wound closure is a significant health problem, which is directly associated with pain and suffering from patient's aspect, as well with social and financial burden. We report a case of vacuum-assisted wound therapy with hypertonic solution distillation and continuous negative pressure application, in an infected wound after laparotomy for incisional hernia reconstruction with mesh placement. Negative pressure was initiated at the wound margins after failure of conventional treatment with great outcomes, achieving a total closure of the incision within two weeks. Each wound has particular characteristics which must be managed. Vacuum assisted closure (VAC) with continuous negative pressure and simultaneous wound instillation and cleanse can provide optimum results, reducing the cavity volume, by newly produced granulated tissue. The simultaneous use of instillation and constant pressure seemed to be superior in comparison with NPWT alone. Compared to conventional methods, the use of VAC ends to better outcomes, in cases of infected wounds following laparotomy.

  8. Therapy of acute and delayed spinal infections after spinal surgery treated with negative pressure wound therapy in adult patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Zwolak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the treatment of infected primary or delayed spine wounds after spinal surgery using negative pressure wound therapy. In our institution (University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland nine patients (three women and six men; mean age 68.6, range 43- 87 years were treated in the period between January to December 2011 for non-healing spinal wounds. The treatment consisted of repeated debridements, irrigation and temporary closure with negative pressure wound therapy system. Three patients were admitted with a spinal epidural abscess; two with osteoporotic lumbar fracture; two with pathologic vertebra fracture and spinal cord compression, and two with vertebra fracture after trauma. All nine patients have been treated with antibiotic therapy. In one case the hardware has been removed, in three patients laminectomy was performed without instrumentation, in five patients there was no need to remove the hardware. The average hospital stay was 16.6 days (range 11-30. The average follow-up was 3.8, range 0.5-14 months. The average number of negative pressure wound therapy procedures was three, with the range 1-11. Our retrospective study focuses on the clinical problems faced by the spinal surgeon, clinical outcomes after spinal surgery followed by wound infection, and negative pressure wound therapy. Moreover, we would like to emphasize the importance for the patients and their relatives to be fully informed about the increased complications of surgery and about the limitations of treatment of these wounds with negative pressure wound therapy.

  9. Honey as an antimicrobial agent against Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds

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    Vishnu Prasad Shenoy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As natural products garner attention in the medical field due to emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, honey is valued for its antibacterial activity. Objective: Fifty strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds were evaluated for their antibacterial action using honey in comparison with different antibiotics and Dettol. Methodology and Results: All the strains were found to be sensitive to honey at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 20% in comparison with Dettol at 10% using agar dilution method. In the second step, the time kill assay was performed on five isolates of P. aeruginosa to demonstrate the bactericidal activity of honey at different dilutions of honey ranging from 20% to 100% at regular time intervals. All the isolates of P. aeruginosa tested were killed in 12-24 h depending on the dilutions of the honey tested. Thus, honey could prevent the growth of P. aeruginosa even if it was diluted by deionized water by fivefolds in vitro. Honey had almost uniform bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa irrespective of their susceptibility to different classes of antibiotics. Conclusion: Honey which is a natural, non-toxic, and an inexpensive product has activity against the P. aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds may make it an alternative topical choice in the treatment of wound infections.

  10. Honey as an antimicrobial agent against pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoy, Vishnu Prasad; Ballal, Mamatha; Shivananda, Pg; Bairy, Indira

    2012-04-01

    As natural products garner attention in the medical field due to emergence of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria, honey is valued for its antibacterial activity. Fifty strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds were evaluated for their antibacterial action using honey in comparison with different antibiotics and Dettol. All the strains were found to be sensitive to honey at a minimum inhibitory concentration of 20% in comparison with Dettol at 10% using agar dilution method. In the second step, the time kill assay was performed on five isolates of P. aeruginosa to demonstrate the bactericidal activity of honey at different dilutions of honey ranging from 20% to 100% at regular time intervals. All the isolates of P. aeruginosa tested were killed in 12-24 h depending on the dilutions of the honey tested. Thus, honey could prevent the growth of P. aeruginosa even if it was diluted by deionized water by fivefolds in vitro. Honey had almost uniform bactericidal activity against P. aeruginosa irrespective of their susceptibility to different classes of antibiotics. Honey which is a natural, non-toxic, and an inexpensive product has activity against the P. aeruginosa isolated from infected wounds may make it an alternative topical choice in the treatment of wound infections.

  11. Effectiveness of Natural Antifungal Compounds in Controlling Infection by Grapevine Trunk Disease Pathogens through Pruning Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Rebeca; Mateos, Rosa María; Álvarez-Pérez, José Manuel; Olego, Miguel Angel; Sevillano, Silvia; González-García, Sandra; Garzón-Jimeno, Enrique; Coque, Juan José R

    2015-09-01

    Grapevine trunk fungal pathogens, such as Diplodia seriata and Phaeomoniella chlamydospora, can infect plants through pruning wounds. They cause grapevine trunk diseases and are involved in grapevine decline. Accordingly, the protection of pruning wounds is crucial for the management of grapevine trunk diseases. The efficacy of different natural antifungals in inhibiting the growth of several fungi causing grapevine trunk diseases was evaluated in vitro. The fungi showing greater in vitro efficacy were tested on autoclaved grape wood assays against D. seriata and P. chlamydospora. Based on results from these assays, chitosan oligosaccharide, vanillin, and garlic extract were selected for further evaluation on pruning wounds inoculated with D. seriata and P. chlamydospora in field trials. A significant decrease in plant mortality was observed after 2 years of growth in the plants treated with the different natural antifungals compared to the mortality rate observed in infected plants that were not treated with antifungals. Also, the infection rate for the inoculated pathogens was significantly reduced in plants treated with the selected natural antifungals. Therefore, natural antifungals represent a promising alternative for disease control and could provide significant economic benefits for the grape-growing industry. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.