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Sample records for buried cathodically protected

  1. Real-time corrosion control system for cathodic protection of buried pipes for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ki Tae; Kim, Hae Woong; Kim, Young Sik; Chang, Hyun Young; Lim, Bu Taek; Park, Heung Bae

    2015-01-01

    Since the operation period of nuclear power plants has increased, the degradation of buried pipes gradually increases and recently it seems to be one of the emerging issues. Maintenance on buried pipes needs high quality of management system because outer surface of buried pipe contacts the various soils but inner surface reacts with various electrolytes of fluid. In the USA, USNRC and EPRI have tried to manage the degradation of buried pipes. However, there is little knowledge about the inspection procedure, test and manage program in the domestic nuclear power plants. This paper focuses on the development and build-up of real-time monitoring and control system of buried pipes. Pipes to be tested are tape-coated carbon steel pipe for primary component cooling water system, asphalt-coated cast iron pipe for fire protection system, and pre-stressed concrete cylinder pipe for sea water cooling system. A control system for cathodic protection was installed on each test pipe which has been monitored and controlled. For the calculation of protection range and optimization, computer simulation was performed using COMSOL Multiphysics (Altsoft co.)

  2. Real-time corrosion control system for cathodic protection of buried pipes for nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Tae; Kim, Hae Woong; Kim, Young Sik [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyun Young; Lim, Bu Taek; Park, Heung Bae [Power Engineering Research Institute, KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    Since the operation period of nuclear power plants has increased, the degradation of buried pipes gradually increases and recently it seems to be one of the emerging issues. Maintenance on buried pipes needs high quality of management system because outer surface of buried pipe contacts the various soils but inner surface reacts with various electrolytes of fluid. In the USA, USNRC and EPRI have tried to manage the degradation of buried pipes. However, there is little knowledge about the inspection procedure, test and manage program in the domestic nuclear power plants. This paper focuses on the development and build-up of real-time monitoring and control system of buried pipes. Pipes to be tested are tape-coated carbon steel pipe for primary component cooling water system, asphalt-coated cast iron pipe for fire protection system, and pre-stressed concrete cylinder pipe for sea water cooling system. A control system for cathodic protection was installed on each test pipe which has been monitored and controlled. For the calculation of protection range and optimization, computer simulation was performed using COMSOL Multiphysics (Altsoft co.)

  3. An assessment of the present criteria for cathodic protection of buried steel pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barlo, T.J.; Berry, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental laboratory study has been conducted to assess the criteria for cathodic protection of a buried pipeline. The specific cathodicprotection potential requirements to prevent pitting and general corrosion of steel were determined in six natural soils with various amounts of moisture and oxygen (aerated or deaerated), and were compared to the criteria values of -0.85 V (Cu/CuSO 4 ), 100 mV polarization, 300 mV voltage shift, and Tafel potential. The effects of temperature 60 0 C (140 0 F) anaerobic bacteria, and steel surface condition (bare or mill scaled) on the specific requirements in selected soils were assessed also. Overall, the research concluded the present criteria were generally valid in concept; however, the critical values for the present criteria could vary with the environment, but with one noted exception. This experimental study concluded that the 100 mV polarization criterion was the most generally valid and applicable criterion

  4. Corrosion and cathodic protection of buried pipes: study, simulation and application of solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laoun, Brahim; Serir, Lazhar; Niboucha, Karima

    2006-01-01

    Cathodic protection is intensively used on steel pipes in petroleum and gas industries. It is a technique used to prevent corrosion which transforms the whole pipe into a cathode of a corrosion cell. Two types of cathodic protection systems are usually used: 1) the galvanic protection systems which use galvanic anodes, also called sacrificial anodes being electrochemically more electronegative than the structure to be protected and 2) the imposed current systems, which through a current generator will deliver a direct current from the anode to the structure to be protected. The aim of this work is to design a cathodic protection system of a pipe by imposed current with auxiliary electric solar energy. (O.M.)

  5. Protection Performance Simulation of Coal Tar-Coated Pipes Buried in a Domestic Nuclear Power Plant Using Cathodic Protection and FEM Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, H. Y.; Lim, B. T.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, J. W.; Park, H. B. [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Gimcheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y. S.; Kim, K. T. [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Coal tar-coated pipes buried in a domestic nuclear power plant have operated under the cathodic protection. This work conducted the simulation of the coating performance of these pipes using a FEM method. The pipes, being ductile cast iron have been suffered under considerably high cathodic protection condition beyond the appropriate condition. However, cathodic potential measured at the site revealed non-protected status. Converting from 3D CAD data of the power plant to appropriate type for a FEM simulation was conducted and cathodic potential under the applied voltage and current was calculated using primary and secondary current distribution and physical conditions. FEM simulation for coal tar-coated pipe without defects revealed over-protection condition if the pipes were well-coated. However, the simulation for coal tar-coated pipes with many defects predict that the coated pipes may be severely degraded. Therefore, for high risk pipes, direct examination and repair or renewal of pipes are strongly recommended.

  6. Study of criterion for assuring the effectiveness of cathodic protection of buried steel pipelines being interfered with alternative current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, X.; Jiang, G.; Qiu, Y.; Tang, H. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Zhang, G.; Jin, X.; Xiang, Z. [Huazhong Natural Gas Subsidiary of PetroChina Pipeline Company, Wuhan (China); Zhang, Z. [Dwell Company Limited, PetroChina Engineering Company, Ltd, Beijing (China)

    2012-06-15

    Interference of alternative current (AC) on corrosion of X65 steel was investigated in soil. It was observed that the unfavorable effect of interfering AC was able to be effectively inhibited by increasing the direct current density of the cathodic protection (CP) system. A clear correlation was established between the CP current density and the tolerable AC current density. This led to a new criterion for assuring the effectiveness of CP of buried pipelines being interfered with AC. Field experimental results on a buried pipeline running below a 500 kV transmission line showed that the criterion could satisfactorily predict the risk of AC interfering on the CP system. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Experimental Study on the Influence of AC Stray Current on the Cathodic Protection of Buried Pipe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingmiao Ding

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The size of the damaged area of the coating and its position on the pipeline impacted the cathodic protection potential, and there was a damaged area of the greatest impact value. When damaged area was 300 mm2, the IR drop was the largest, and this situation could easily lead to inadequate protection; when the parallel spacing between pipeline and interference source was unchanged, the measured value curves of cathodic protection potential presented “U” shaped trend with the increasing stray current interference intensity. Under certain parallel spacing between pipeline and interference source, high alternating stray current intensity would cause serious negative offsets, so that the overprotection of the pipeline occurred, and make the coating crack; there was a parallel threshold length. When less than the threshold, the pipe-ground potential increases rapidly with the parallel length increasing. In order to judge whether a pipeline was interference by AC stray current and the risk of stray current corrosion, we should make a comprehensive analysis of the cathodic protection energizing potential, the switch-off potential, AC pipe-soil potential, IR drops, and so on.

  8. Hydrogen cracking susceptibility evaluation of buried steel pipe under cathodic protection. Cathode boshokuka ni okeru maisetsu kokan no suisoware kanjusei hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Y.; Nonaka, H. (Osaka Gas Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)); Yamakawa, K. (University of Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan). College of Engineering)

    1992-12-01

    An evaluation was given on effects of hydrogen on pipeline materials in order to determine a most base value in an optimal cathodic protection potential in cathodic protection of buried pipelines. Protection potentials were estimated from the relation between critical hydrogen amount and the potentials in marine clays and sodium acetate as electrolyte. The materials were evaluated using a strain rate tensile experiment method. The following results were obtained: The more base the potential, the elongation was somewhat less than the result in air, while the tensile strength increased slightly; difference in water content in soils varies the cross section contraction rate; the rate does not change in a marine clay containing water at 20%, but it decreases in a 30%-content soil; an SEM observation revealed pseudo cleavage faces; and the critical hydrogen amount that causes hydrogen cracking is 10 ppb, which corresponds to -1.4V in a marine clay containing water at 30%, and -1.2V at 14%. A loading experiment with actual loads verified that no fracture due to hydrogen cracking occurs even under an overprotection environment when a load imposed on an actual pipeline is kept constant. 16 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 46

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms on the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste

  10. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 47

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms at the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste

  11. Cathodic Protection Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs Navy design and engineering of ship and submarine impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for underwater hull corrosion control and...

  12. Cost analysis of teg-powered and solar-powered cathodic protection system for a-50 km long buried natural gas pipeline located in Sindh, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.; Inam, F.; Farooq, M.; Khan, F.N.

    2005-01-01

    Corrosion leaks are of significant concern to oil and gas industry and is considered to be the largest controllable factor in pipeline safety. Cathodic Protection (CP) is a well-established method for preventing corrosion of metallic materials. Electrical power is required and it is usually difficult and expensive to install conventional power lines in remote areas for readily available power supply. Oil/gas organizations make use of thermo-electric generators (TEG), which is relatively expensive in terms of running expenditures. Utilization of renewable energies is now being widely explored due to potential danger of running out of natural resources and dates back mid of 20th century [I]. However, use of solar powered CP system for oil/gas pipelines hasn't been encouraged much in Pakistan, probably due to lack of understanding. A project was undertaken for designing a solar powered CP system for a 52.4 km buried gas pipeline located at Sui/Sara gas fields (Latitude 27.5) of Tullow Pakistan (Dev.) Ltd. in Dharki, Sindh, Pakistan. After detailed analysis of soil condition, electrochemical testing, local climatic variation and cost analysis, it has been revealed that use of solar power is quite feasible for the above-mentioned pipeline section. Cost analysis and comparison have also favored this system since the maintenance cost of the solar-powered system is much less compared to TEG system. Installation cost of the solar system is about 1.57 times the cost of TEG; however, the maintenance cost is only -20% of that for TEG system. The higher installation cost has been estimated to be recoverable in less than one year of service. (author)

  13. Smart cathodic protection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Leggedoor, J.; Schuten, G.; Sajna, S.; Kranjc, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cathodic protection delivers corrosion protection in concrete structures exposed to aggressive environments, e.g. in de-icing salt and marine climates. Working lives of a large number of CP systems are at least more than 13 years and probably more than 25 years, provided a minimum level of

  14. Cathodic protection of a nuclear fuel facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbett, R.A.

    1989-01-01

    This article discusses corrosion on buried process piping and tanks at a nuclear fuel facility and the steps taken to design a system to control underground corrosion. Collected data have indicated that cathodic protection is needed to supplement the regular use of high-integrity, corrosion-resistant coatings; wrapping systems; special backfills; and insulation material. The technical approach discussed in this article is generally applicable to other types of power and/or industrial plants with extensive networks of underground steel piping

  15. Cathodic corrosion protection of steel pipes; Kathodischer Korrosionsschutz von Rohrleitungsstaehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Markus [SGK Schweizerische Gesellschaft fuer Korrosionsschutz, Zuerich (Switzerland); Schoeneich, Hanns-Georg [Open Grid Europe, Essen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The cathodic corrosion protection has been proven excellently in the practical use for buried steel pipelines. This is evidenced statistically by a significantly less frequency of loss compared to non-cathodically protected pipelines. Based on thermodynamic considerations, the authors of the contribution under consideration describe the operation of the cathodic corrosion protection and regular adjustment of the electrochemical potential at the interface steel / soil in practical use. Subsequently, the corrosion scenarios are discussed that may occur when an incorrect setting of the potential results from an operation over several decades. This incorrect setting also can be caused by the failure of individual components of the corrosion protection.

  16. Design Of Photovoltaic Powered Cathodic Protection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golina Samir Adly

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion caused by chemical reaction between metallic structures and surrounding mediums such as soil or water .the CP cathodic protection system is used to protect metallic structure against corrosion. Cathodic protection CP used to minimize corrosion by utilizing an external source of electrical current which forces the entire structure to become a cathode. There are two Types of cathodic protection system Galvanic current Impressed current.the Galvanic current is called a sacrificial anode is connected to the protected structure cathode through a DC power supply. In Galvanic current system a current passes from the sacrificing anode to the protected structure .the sacrificial anode is corroded rather than causing the protected structure corrosion .protected structure requires a constant current to stop the corrosion which determined by area structure metal and the surrounding medium. The rains humidity are decrease soil resistivity and increase the DC current .The corrosion and over protection resulting from increase in the DC current is harmful for the metallic structure. This problem can be solved by conventional cathodic protection system by manual adjustment of DC voltage periodically to obtain a constant current .the manual adjustment of DC voltage depends on experience of the technician and using the accuracy of the measuring equipment. The errors of measuring current depend on error from the technician or error from the measuring equipment. the corrosion of structure may occur when the interval between two successive adjustment is long .An automatically regulated cathodic protection system is used to overcome problems from conventional cathodic protection system .the regulated cathodic protection system adjust the DC voltage of the system automatically when it senses the variations of surrounding medium resistivity so the DC current is constant at the required level.

  17. Research to develop guidelines for cathodic protection of concentric neutral cables, volume 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanck, J. A.; Nekoksa, G.

    1982-08-01

    Data associated with the corrosion of concentric neutral (CN) wires of direct buried primary cables were statistically analyzed, and guidelines for cathodic protection of CN wires for the electric utility industry were developed. The cathodic protection are reported. Field tests conducted at 36 bellholes excavated in California, Oklahoma, and North Carolina are described. Details of the electrochemical, chemical, bacteriological, and sieve analyses of native soil and imported backfill samples are also included.

  18. Pipelines cathodic protection design methodologies for impressed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several inadequate designs of cathodically polarized offshore and onshore pipelines have been reported in Nigeria owing to design complexity and application of the cathodic protection system. The present study focused on critical and detailed approach in impressed current and sacrificial anode design calculation ...

  19. Cathode protection for underground steel tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelovski, Zoran

    1998-01-01

    Cathodic protection of underground petroleum storage tanks and piping systems is acceptable for both economic and ecological reasons. With out the cathodic protection of underground steel reservoirs, short time after the exploitation, there was a bore as a result of underground corrosion. The bore causes ecological consequences and at the same time its repair needs big investments. Furthermore, there are great number of tanks placed near cities, so in the future this problem needs a special attention in order to preserve ecological surrounding. The topic of this paper is underground corrosion as well as cathodic protection of steel tanks for oil derivatives storage. (author)

  20. Concentration changes due to cathodic protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gellings, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    By solving the appropriate diffusion equations the concentration changes are calculated in the environment of underground structures protected cathodically. It is shown that these changes are negligible under all practical circumstances.

  1. Renovation of the cathodic protection system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuten, G.; Leggedoor, J.; Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.

    2003-01-01

    The first system for Cathodic Protection of concrete in the Netherlands was applied to a one bicycle lane of a bridge suffering corrosion due to de-icing salt penetration in 1986. This CP system was based on the Ferex 100S conducting polymer cable anode in a cementitious overlay. Its functioning was

  2. Impressed current cathodic protection of deep water structures

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.

    that the cathodic protection design approaches for shallow water may not be adequate for deeper water. This paper discusses on environmental factors encountered in deep water and their effect on cathodic protection behaviour of steel. Further, current CP design...

  3. A definitive criterion for cathodic protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Roger [Cathodic Protection Network International Ltd., Reading (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    The corrosion reaction is defined using the Pourbaix Diagram and includes consideration of the pH, temperature, pressure, nobility of the metal and conductivity of the electrolyte. The passive zone can be established in a laboratory by creating a closed circuit condition in which the voltages can be measured. Natural corrosion cells occurring in simple conditions can be evaluated for the purpose of monitoring the performance of cathodic protection. Metal pipelines are complex networks of conductors submerged in electrolyte of infinitely variable qualities. The present method used to ascertain the effectiveness of cathodic protection has many inherent errors and results in costly and unpredictable corrosion failures. An electrode has been devised to define the exact electrical status of the corrosion reaction at its location. The design allows a closed circuit measurement of the corrosion current that can determine whether or not corrosion has been stopped by cathodic protection. This has allowed the development of software that can calculate the condition and corrosion status throughout a network of pipelines, using electrical circuit analysis common in the electronics industry. (author)

  4. Reliability centred maintenance of the cathodic protection system of the Bolivia-Brazil gas pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Jorge Fernando Pereira [Transportadora Brasileira Gasoduto, TBG, Bolivia-Brasil S.A (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents the results of the Reliability-Centred Maintenance study performed on the Cathodic Protection System of the Bolivia -Brazil Gas Pipeline. The Cathodic Protection installation for the north spread (from Corumba to Guararema, 1413 km) was commissioned in March 1999 and for the south spread (from Campinas to Porto Alegre, 1180 km) one year after. The protection against corrosion of the buried external surface of our gas pipeline is provided, primarily, by an high-efficient external coating, complemented by a impressed current cathodic protection system consisting of: - Forty-one rectifiers and respective anodes ground beds; - One solar panel and respective anodes ground beds; - Fifty-nine insulating joints and respective protective devices; - Nine hundred and ninety pipe-to-soil test stations; - Thirty-six pipe-to-soil remote monitoring devices; - Forty-one electrical power feeder network to the rectifiers. The rectifiers/anodes ground beds are installed at each 50 km approximately, including the solar panel, and the pipe-to-soil test stations at each 2.5 km, under different environment conditions. The insulating joints and theirs protective devices are installed inside stations (launch and receive scrapers, compression and metering) and city-gates, as well, the pipe-to-soil remote monitoring devices. The cathodic protection system and electrical power feeder network are inspected and maintained by a TBG third part Contractor.

  5. Cathodic protection -- Addition of 6 anodes to existing rectifier 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system additions are installed, connected, and function as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms on the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive wastes

  6. Research to develop guidelines for cathodic protection of concentric neutral cables, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanck, J. A.; Nekoksa, G.

    1981-08-01

    Data associated with corrosion of concentric neutrals (CN) of direct buried cables from field tests conducted at 36 bellholes excavated in California, Oklahoma, and North Carolina are presented. The electrochemical, chemical, bacteriological, and sieve analyses of native soil and imported backfill samples are included. Up to 129 values were determined for each bellhole and stored on cards as a data bank. All values were statistically analyzed and correlated with corrosion found. The severity of corrosion correlated best with CN corrosion potentials, CN resistance measurements, coarseness of backfill, and soil resistivity. The guidelines for installation of cathodic protection on CN cables are to be based upon the evaluation of over 100 experimental cathodic protection systems and upon laboratory testing for protection criteria with and without ac effects.

  7. Permanent cathodic protection monitoring systems for offshore pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, Jim [Deepwater Corrosion Services Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    2009-07-01

    Historically offshore pipeline cathodic protection monitoring has relied on the use of portable survey techniques. This has typically relied on ROV assisted or surface deployed survey methods. These methods have been shown to have technical as well as economic shortcomings, this is particularly true of buried offshore pipelines where accuracy is always questionable. As more focus is being placed on offshore pipeline integrity, it was time for a new method to emerge. The technology discussed involves the retro-placement of permanent clamp-on monitors onto the pipeline which can measure pipeline to seawater potential as well as current density. The sensors can be interrogated locally using light powered subsea voltage readouts. Application of the technology can be either during pipeline construction, during installation of life extension CP systems, or during routine subsea pipeline interventions. The new method eliminates the need for long cables or expensive acoustic or modulated data transfer and provides all the information required to fully verify CP system performance, thus eliminating the need for expensive close-interval surveys. Some deployment case histories will be presented along with feasibility of application on deep water pipelines and comparative economics. (author)

  8. Cathodic protection for the bottoms of above ground storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, John P. [Tyco Adhesives, Norwood, MA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Impressed Current Cathodic Protection has been used for many years to protect the external bottoms of above ground storage tanks. The use of a vertical deep ground bed often treated several bare steel tank bottoms by broadcasting current over a wide area. Environmental concerns and, in some countries, government regulations, have introduced the use of dielectric secondary containment liners. The dielectric liner does not allow the protective cathodic protection current to pass and causes corrosion to continue on the newly placed tank bottom. In existing tank bottoms where inadequate protection has been provided, leaks can develop. In one method of remediation, an old bottom is covered with sand and a double bottom is welded above the leaking bottom. The new bottom is welded very close to the old bottom, thus shielding the traditional cathodic protection from protecting the new bottom. These double bottoms often employ the use of dielectric liner as well. Both the liner and the double bottom often minimize the distance from the external tank bottom. The minimized space between the liner, or double bottom, and the bottom to be protected places a challenge in providing current distribution in cathodic protection systems. This study examines the practical concerns for application of impressed current cathodic protection and the types of anode materials used in these specific applications. One unique approach for an economical treatment using a conductive polymer cathodic protection method is presented. (author)

  9. Reduce operational cost and extend the life of pipeline infrastructure by automating remote cathodic protection systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosado, Elroy [Freewave Technologies, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States). Latin America

    2009-07-01

    Energy and Pipeline Companies wrestle to control operating costs largely affected by new government regulations, ageing buried metal assets, rising steel prices, expanding pipeline operations, new interference points, HCA encroachment, restrictive land use policies, heightened network security, and an ageing soon-to-retire work force. With operating costs on the rise, seemingly out of control, many CP and Operations Professionals look to past best practices in cost containment through automation. Many companies achieve solid business results through deployment of telemetry and SCADA automation of remote assets and now hope to expand this success to further optimize operations by automating remote cathodic protection systems. This presentation will provide examples of how new remote cathodic protection systems are helping energy and pipeline companies address the growing issue of the aging pipeline infrastructure and reduce their costs while optimizing their operations. (author)

  10. Developments in cathodic protection. Ontwikkelingen in de kathodische bescherming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Bruchem, H. (VEG-Gasinstituut NV, Apeldoorn (Netherlands))

    1990-07-01

    Developments in cathodic protection of underground steel pipelines used for the transport of natural gas in the Netherlands are outlined. Besides criteria like applied negative potential in relation to ohmic resistances of soil, overprotection and the influence of stray currents, for instance in the vicinity of railroad tracks, are discussed. Control measurements of cathodic protection are described; a new method, wave form analysis, is outlined. 5 figs., 4 refs., 5 ills.

  11. Study on pulsed current cathodic protection in a simulated system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Milin; Li, Helin [Xi' an Jiao Tong Universitiy (China)]|[Tubular Goods Research Center of China National Petroleum Corp. (China); Qiu, Yubing; Guo, Xingpeng [Hua Zhong University of Science and Techonology (China)

    2004-07-01

    The pulsed current cathodic protection (PCCP) is a new cathodic protection (CP) technology and shows more advantages over the conventional DC cathodic protection (DCCP) in oil well casing system. However, little information about PCCP is reported. In this research, a simulated CP system was set up in a pool of 3.5 m x 2.0 m x 3.0 m size, in which the effects of the square wave pulsed current (SWPC) parameters (amplitude: IA, frequency: f, duty cycle: P), auxiliary anode distance (d) and media conductivity ({mu}) on the cathodic potential (E) distribution were studied, and the protection effects of PCCP and DCCP were compared. The results show that with increase of the square wave parameters (IA, f, P), the E distribution becomes more negative and the effects of each current parameter are relate closely to the cathode polarizing state. Only with suitable square wave parameters can the whole cathode be effectively protected. With increase of d and {mu}, the E distribution becomes more uniform. Compared with DCCP system, PCCP system has much more uniform E distribution, costs less average current, and gains much better protection effects. Further, the mechanism of PCCP was analyzed. (authors)

  12. Characterisation of corrosion products on pipeline steel under cathodic protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanarde, Lise [Gaz de France Research and Development Division, 361 avenue du President Wilson, BP33, 93211 Saint Denis La Plaine (France)]|[UPR15 du CNRS, Laboratoire des Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, C.P. 133, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Campaignolle, Xavier; Karcher, Sebastien; Meyer, Michel [Gaz de France Research and Development Division, 361 avenue du President Wilson, BP33, 93211 Saint Denis La Plaine (France); Joiret, Suzanne [UPR15 du CNRS, Laboratoire des Interfaces et Systemes Electrochimiques, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, C.P. 133, 4 Place Jussieu 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2004-07-01

    Onshore gas transmission lines are conjointly protected against external corrosion by cathodic protection (CP) and organic coatings. If both protection systems are simultaneously faulty, the pipe may be subjected to local loss of protection criteria. Consequently, the development of a corrosion due to the ground intrinsic corrosiveness may occur. To guarantee an optimal and safe use of its 31000 km buried gas transmission network, Gaz de France regularly inspects its pipelines. When indications of metal damage are suspected, excavations are realized to carry out a finer diagnosis and, if necessary, to repair. Whenever, corrosions are encountered, although it occurs very scarcely, it is necessary to evaluate its degree of gravity: activity, mechanism, and kinetics. Among corrosion defects, it is indeed essential to differentiate those active, from those older inactive at the time of excavation, since those last ones may possibly have been annihilated, by a PC reinforcement for instance. Eventually, the identification of the corrosion mechanism and its associated rate will provide an assessment of the risks encountered by other sections of the pipeline similar to that excavated. This study investigates to what extent the degree of gravity (activity, kinetics) of a corrosion can be determined by the characterization and identification of its associated corrosion products. Moreover, it will attempt to relate it to the close environment features as well as to the operating conditions of the pipe. The preliminary results presented in this paper consist in a laboratory study of the time evolution of corrosion products formed on the surface of ordinary low carbon steel samples. The specimens have been previously subjected to various polarization conditions in various aqueous media. The selected solutions are characteristic of ground waters. The main parameters considered for the definition of the media were its initial chemical composition, pH and dissolved gas composition

  13. Protection of Buried Pipe under Repeated Loading by Geocell Reinforcement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaj, Omid; Joz Darabi, N.; Moghaddas Tafreshi, S. N.; Mašek, Bohuslav

    2017-12-01

    With increase in cities’ population and development of urbane life, passing buried pipelines near ground’s surface is inevitable in urban areas, roads, subways and highways. This paper presents the results of three-dimensional full scale model tests on high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe with diameter of 250 mm in geocell reinforced soil, subjected to repeated loading to simulate the vehicle loads. The effect of geocell’s pocket size (55*55 mm and 110*110 mm) and embedment depth of buried pipe (1.5 and 2 times pipe diameter) in improving the behaviour of buried pipes was investigated. The geocell’s height of 100 mm was used in all tests. The repeated load of 800 kPa was applied on circular loading plate with diameter of 250 mm. The results show that the pipe displacement, soil surface settlement and transferred pressure on the pipe’s crown has been influenced significantly upon the use of geocells. For example, the vertical diametric strain (VDS) and soil surface settlement (SSS), in a way that using a geocell with pocket size of 110*110 mm reduces by 27% and 43%, respectively, compared with the unreinforced one. Meanwhile, by increasing buried depth of pipe from 1.5D to 2D, the use of geocell of 110*110 mm delivers about 50% reduction in SSS and VDS, compared with the unreinforced soil.

  14. Cathodic Protection Design Algorithms for Refineries Aboveground Storage Tanks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosay Abdul sattar Majbor

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Storage tanks condition and integrity is maintained by joint application of coating and cathodic protection. Iraq southern region rich in oil and petroleum product refineries need and use plenty of aboveground storage tanks. Iraq went through conflicts over the past thirty five years resulting in holding the oil industry infrastructure behind regarding maintenance and modernization. The primary concern in this work is the design and implementation of cathodic protection systems for the aboveground storage tanks farm in the oil industry. Storage tank external base area and tank internal surface area are to be protected against corrosion using impressed current and sacrificial anode cathodic protection systems. Interactive versatile computer programs are developed to provide the necessary system parameters data including the anode requirements, composition, rating, configuration, etc. Microsoft-Excel datasheet and Visual Basic.Net developed software were used throughout the study in the design of both cathodic protection systems. The case study considered in this work is the eleven aboveground storage tanks farm situated in al-Shauiba refinery in southern IRAQ. The designed cathodic protection systems are to be installed and monitored realistically in the near future. Both systems were designed for a life span of (15-30 years, and all their parameters were within the internationally accepted standards.

  15. Operational test report - Project W-320 cathodic protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, T.J.

    1998-01-01

    Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 specifies that corrosion protection must be designed into tank systems that treat or store dangerous wastes. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), utilizes underground encased waste transfer piping between tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Corrosion protection is afforded to the encasements of the WRSS waste transfer piping through the application of earthen ionic currents onto the surface of the piping encasements. Cathodic protection is used in conjunction with the protective coatings that are applied upon the WRSS encasement piping. WRSS installed two new two rectifier systems (46 and 47) and modified one rectifier system (31). WAC 173-303-640 specifies that the proper operation of cathodic protection systems must be confirmed within six months after initial installation. The WRSS cathodic protection systems were energized to begin continuous operation on 5/5/98. Sixteen days after the initial steady-state start-up of the WRSS rectifier systems, the operational testing was accomplished with procedure OTP-320-006 Rev/Mod A-0. This operational test report documents the OTP-320-006 results and documents the results of configuration testing of integrated piping and rectifier systems associated with the W-320 cathodic protection systems

  16. ICCP cathodic protection of tanks with photovoltaic power supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janowski Mirosław

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosion is the result of the electrochemical reaction between a metal or composite material usually having conducting current properties. Control of corrosion related defect is a very important problem for structural integrity in ground based structures. Cathodic protection (CP is a technique to protect metallic structures against corrosion in an aqueous environment, it is employed intense on the steel drains in oil and gas industry, specifically to protect underground tanks and pipelines. CP is commonly applied to a coated structure to provide corrosion control to areas where the coating may be damaged. It may be applied to existing structures to prolong their life. There are two types of cathodic protection systems: sacrificial (galvanic anode cathodic protection (SACP; the other system is Impressed Current Cathodic Protection (ICCP. Majority of the structures protected employ impressed current system. The main difference between the two is that SACP uses the galvanic anodes which are electrochemically more electronegative than the structure to be protected - the naturally occurring electrochemical potential difference between different metallic elements to provide protection; ICCP uses an external power source (electrical generator with D.C. with inert anodes, and this system is used for larger structures, or where electrolyte resistivity is high and galvanic anodes cannot economically deliver enough current to provide protection. The essential of CP is based on two parameters, the evolution of the potential and the current of protection. A commonly accepted protection criterion used for steel is a potential value of minus 850 mV. ICCP system consist of anodes connected to a DC power source. As power sources may be used such as solar panels, wind turbines, etc. The object of this study is analysis of the possibilities and operating parameters of ICCP system supplied with photovoltaic solar panels. Photovoltaic generator made up of the

  17. Soil characteristics as criteria for cathodic protection of a nuclear fuel production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, C.F.; Corbett, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    The fact that buried metallic structures corrode is well documented. It has been postulated that the extent and rate of attack is controlled predominantly by the characteristics of the surrounding soil. Therefore, prior to constructing a new facility designed to process accumulated nuclear waste, consideration was given to protecting its underground pipelines against corrosion. Leak frequency curves from other nearby plantsites, extensive soil resistivity surveys, and geochemical analyses, were used to evaluate the onsite soil characteristics for corrosion susceptibility. Analysis of the data collected over a three-year period indicated that although the soil is not overly aggressive, substantial heterogeneity existed so as to establish galvanic cells along pipe lengths passing through the soil. To limit the extent of corrosion on underground piping, the application of an impressed current cathodic protection system was recommended to supplement a high integrity, corrosion resistant coating and wrap system

  18. Early stage beneficial effects of cathodic protection in concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.; Neeft, E.A.C.; Stoop, B.T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 25 years, cathodic protection (CP) of reinforced concrete structures suffering from chloride induced reinforcement corrosion has shown to be successful and durable. CP current causes steel polarisation, electrochemical reactions and ion transport in the concrete. CP systems are

  19. Cathodic Protection Field Trials on Prestressed Concrete Components, Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This is the final report in a study to demonstrate the feasibility of using cathodic protection (CP) on concrete bridge structures containing prestressed steel. The interim report, FHWA-RD-95-032, has more details on the installation of selected CP s...

  20. Bacterial corrosion in marine sediments: influence of cathodic protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Therene, Martine

    1988-01-01

    In order to protect offshore structures from marine corrosion, cathodic protection is widely applied via sacrificial anodes (for example zinc or aluminium) or impressed current. In aerated seawater, steel is considered to be protected when a potential of -8050 mV/Cu.CuSO 4 is achieved. In many cases, however this potential must be lowered, due to the activity of microorganisms and more specially sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). SRB are obligate anaerobes using sulphate as electron acceptor with resultant production of sulphide. Some of them are also able to use hydrogen as energy source, causing cathodic depolarization of steel surfaces. An experiment was performed to analyze the relation between SRB activity and use of different cathodic potentials applied to mild steel samples in marine sediments. Analytical techniques employed included lipid bio-markers and electrochemical methods. Results indicated an evolution of the bacterial community structure both on the steel and in the sediment, as a function of time and potential. The results also show that cathodically produced hydrogen promotes the growth of SRB (author) [fr

  1. Study on dinamic behavior and least burying depth of underground protective pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Tetsuyuki; Kokusyo, Goji; Tanaka, Yukihisa; Kobayashi, Seiichi

    1988-03-30

    Effect of unit load per travel wheel on the protective pipe was studied when electricity cable distribution lines were buried in the depth less than the present standard for electric equipment, and logical burying depth was investigated. Test items were material test of the protective pipe, indoor load test, and field test at loamy ground. Impact resistance hard PVC pipe was used as the protective pipe, and its strength and elastic modulus were measured. Along with these tests, it was confirmed that there was no problem of cracking by repeated flattening or breakage by fatigue. By indoor test, it was observed that, in case of shallow burying, creap deformation was small, stress concentrate occured at the middle of axial direction, and that flattening ratio was seriously affected by the method of backfilling. Field test was conducted by applying the static load of a 20 ton dump truck, and the deformation, stress, and subsidence of the protective pipe, were measured. As the conclusion of those experiments, it was found that burying of protective pipe in the depth of not less than 30 cm is allowable, as long as sufficient bakfilling is made. (14 figs, 3 tabs, 3 refs)

  2. Cathodic protection of reinforced concrete structures in the Netherlands - Experience and developments: Cathodic protection of concrete - 10 years experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    Cathodic protection (CP) of reinforcing steel in concrete structures has been used successfully for over 20 years. CP is able to stop corrosion in a reliable and economical way where chloride contamination has caused reinforcement corrosion and subsequent concrete damage. To new structures where

  3. Development of Nb2O5|Cu composite as AISI 1020 steel thermal spray coating for protection against corrosion by soil in buried structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regis Junior, Oscar; Silva, Jose Maurilio da; Portella, Kleber Franke; Paredes, Ramon Sigifredo Cortes

    2012-01-01

    An Nb 2 O|Cu corrosion-resistant coating was developed and applied onto AISI 1020 steel substrate by Powder Flame Spray. A galvanostatic electrochemical technique was employed, with and without ohmic drop, in four different soils (two corrosively aggressive and two less aggressive). Behavior of coatings in different soils was compared using a cathodic hydrogen reduction reaction (equilibrium potential, overvoltage and exchange current density) focusing on the effect of ohmic drop. Results allow recommendation of Nb 2 O 5 |Cu composite for use in buried structure protection. (author)

  4. Cathodic protection beneath thick external coating on flexible pipeline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Festy, Dominique; Choqueuse, Dominique; Leflour, Denise; Lepage, Vincent [Ifremer - Centre de Brest, BP 70 29280 Plouzane (France); Condat, Carol Taravel; Desamais, Nicolas [Technip- FLEXIFRANCE - PED/PEC - Rue Jean Hure, 76580 Le Trait (France); Tribollet, Bernard [UPR 15 du CNRS, Laboratoire LISE, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    Flexible offshore pipelines possess an external polymer sheath to protect the structure against seawater. In case of an accidental damage of the outer sheath, the annulus of the flexible pipe is flooded with seawater. Far from the damage, corrosion and/or corrosion fatigue of armour steel wires in the annulus occur in a strictly deaerated environment; this has been studied for a few years. At the damage location, the steel wires are in direct contact with renewed seawater. In order to protect them against corrosion, a cathodic protection is applied using sacrificial anodes located at the end fittings. The goal of this work is to evaluate the extent of the cathodic protection as well as the electrolyte oxygen concentration beneath the coating around the damage, to know whether or not there is a non protected area with enough oxygen where corrosion and corrosion fatigue can occur. The experimental work was performed with a model cell (2000 x 200 mm{sup 2}), composed of a mild steel plate and a PMMA coat (transparent poly-methyl-methacrylate). The thickness of the gap between the steel plate and the PMMA coat was 0.5 mm. The potential and current density were monitored all along the cell (70 sensors). The oxygen concentration was also recorded. The experiments were performed with natural sea water, and cathodic protection was applied in a reservoir at one extremity of the cell. Another reservoir at the other cell extremity enabled carbon dioxide bubbling to simulate pipeline annular conditions. PROCOR software was used to simulate potential and current density within the gap and a mathematical model was developed to model oxygen concentration evolution. Both model and experimental results show that the extent of the cathodic protection is much greater than that of oxygen. Oxygen depletion is very quick within the gap when seawater fills it and the oxygen concentration is close to zero a few milli-metres from the gap opening. On the other hand, the cathodic protection

  5. Impacts of cathodic protection on waste package performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkins, J.E.; Lee, J.H.; Andrews, R.W.

    1996-01-01

    The current design concept for a multi-barrier waste container for the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, calls for an outer barrier of 100 mm thick corrosion-allowance material (CAM) (carbon steel) and an inner barrier of 20 mm thick corrosion-resistant material (CRM) (Alloy 825). Fulfillment of the NRC subsystem requirements (10 CFR 60.113) of substantially complete containment and controlled release of radionuclides from the engineered barrier system (EBS) will rely mostly upon the robust waste container design, among other EBS components. In the current waste container design, some degree of cathodic protection of CRM will be provided by CAM. This paper discusses a sensitivity case study for the impacts of cathodic protection of the inner barrier by the outer barrier on the performance of waste package

  6. Tool successfully detects changes in cathodic protection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-05-15

    A new oil and gas industry tool has been developed to check if an operator's cathodic protection (CP) is effective. This inline inspection tool developed, by Baker Hughes, is called cathodic protection current measurement (CPCM). It measures how much CP current the pipeline is receiving and shows the direction of the current flowing back to the CP source. This system was used to successfully perform a full CP current inspection on a 43 mile-long pipeline in the Eastern United States. Tests identified that one rectifier was flowing current in the reverse direction from that expected and that a few areas had high current densities. The operator then changed the CP system to test the tool and results showed that the tool correctly detected the changes.

  7. Corrosion and protection in reinforced concrete : Pulse cathodic protection: an improved cost-effective alternative

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Corrosion and protection in reinforced concrete. Pulse cathodic protection: an improved cost-effective alternative. The aim of the research project was to study the possibilities for establishing a new or improved electrochemical method for corrosion prevention/protection for reinforced concrete.

  8. Effects of cathodic protection on cracking of high-strength pipeline steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elboujdaini, M.; Revie, R. W.; Attard, M. [CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory, Ottawa, ON(Canada)], email: melboujd@nrcan.gc.ca

    2010-07-01

    Four strength levels of pipeline steels, ranging from X-70 to X-120, were compared to determine whether higher strength materials are more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement under cathodic protection. Ductility was measured in a solution at four protection levels, going from no cathodic protection to 500 mV of overprotection. All four steels showed loss of ductility under cathodic protection. Under cathodic polarization, the loss of ductility increased with the strength of the steel and the activity of the potential. After slow-strain-rate experiments conducted in air and examination of fracture surfaces, it is concluded that application of cathodic potentials, cathodic overprotection, higher strength of steel, and exposure to aqueous solution are factors that decrease the ductility of steel. Hydrogen reduction seems to be an important factor in ductility reduction and fractures. Observations suggest that high-strength pipelines need better control of cathodic protection than lower-strength pipelines.

  9. Fabrication of sacrificial anode cathodic protection through casting method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Sharif Sattar; Muhamad Daud; Siti Radiah Mohd Kamarudin; Azali Muhamad; Zaiton Selamat; Rusni Rejab

    2007-01-01

    Aluminum is one of the few metals that can be cast by all of the processes used in casting metals. These processes consist of die casting, permanent mold casting, sand casting (green sand and dry sand), plaster casting, investment casting, and continuous casting. Other processes such as lost foam, squeeze casting, and hot isostatic pressing are also used. Permanent mold casting method was selected in which used for fabricating of sacrificial anode cathodic protection. This product was ground for surface finished and fabricated in the cylindrical form and reinforced with carbon steel at a center of the anode. (Author)

  10. Applications of cathodic protection for the protection of aqueous and soil corrosion of power plant components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, A.K.; Mitra, A.K.; Bhakta, U.C.; Sanyal, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    Power plant components exposed to environments such as water and soil are susceptible to severe corrosion. Many times the effect of corrosion in power plant components can be catastrophic. The problem is aggravated for underground pipelines due to additional factors such as large network of pipelines, proximity to earth mat, high voltage transmission lines, corrosive chemicals, inadequate approach etc. Other components such as condenser water boxes, internals of pipelines, clarifier bridge structures, cooling water inlet gates and pipes etc. which are in continuous contact with water, are subjected to severe corrosion. The nature and locations of all such components are at places which are not accessible for routine maintenance and hence they require long term reliable protection against corrosion. Experience has shown that anti-corrosive coatings are inadequate in preventing corrosion and due to their location regular maintenance coatings are also not feasible. Under such circumstances the applications of cathodic protection provides a long term solution the design of cathodic protection, for such applications differs from the commonly employed cathodic protection for cross-country pipelines and submerged structures due to other complexities in the plant region and maintenance of the applied system. The present paper intends to discuss the applications of cathodic protection with suitable anti-corrosive coatings for protection of various power plant components and the specific features of each type of application. (author)

  11. Corrosion Potential Profile Simulation in a Tube under Cathodic Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Ohanian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential distribution in tubes of a heat exchanger is simulated when applying cathodic polarization to its extremes. The comparison of two methods to achieve this goal is presented: a numeric solution based on boundary elements carried out with the commercial software Beasy-GID and a semianalytical method developed by the authors. The mathematical model, the simplifications considered, and the problem solving are shown. Since both approaches use polarization curves as a boundary condition, experimental polarization curves (voltage versus current density were determined in the laboratory under flow conditions and cylindrical cell geometry. The results obtained suggest the impossibility of extending the protection along the whole tube length; therefore, other protection methods are considered.

  12. Developments in national and international regulation in the field of ''corrosion protection of buried pipes''; Entwicklung im Bereich nationaler und internationaler Regelsetzung im Fachgebiet ''Korrosionsschutz erdverlegter Rohrleitungen''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoeneich, H.G. [E.ON Ruhrgas AG, Essen (Germany). Kompetenz-Center Korrosionsschutz

    2007-06-15

    This article summarizes the most important national and international rules for cathodic anti-corrosion protection of buried installations. The codes examined are those published by DIN (German Standardization Institute), the DVGW (German Association of Gas and Water Engineers) and AfK (Corrosion Protection Work Group). DIN publishes the results achieved by ISO (International Standardisation Organisation), CEN (Comite Europeen de Normalisation) and CENELEC (Comite Europeen de Normalisation Electrotechnique). The guidelines published by CEOCOR (European Committee for the Study of Corrosion and Protection of Pipes) are also briefly examined. Details of technical significance of a number of selected standards and revision projects are also stated and discussed. (orig.)

  13. 1999 Annual Cathodic Protection Survey Report for PFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOWMAN, T.J.

    2000-01-01

    This cathodic protection (CP) report documents the results of the 1999 annual CP survey of the underground piping within PFP property. An annual survey of CP systems is required by Washington Administrative Code (WAC). A spreadsheet to document the 1999 annual survey polarization data is included in this report. Graphs are included to trend the cathodic voltages and the polarization voltages at each test station on PFP property. The trending spans from 1994 to 1999. Graphs are also included to trend voltage and amperage outputs of each rectifier during the annual surveys. During the annual survey, resistance testing between the underground piping was conducted at each test station. The testing showed that all piping (with test leads into the test stations) was continuous with every pipe represented in the test stations. The resistance data is not documented in this report but can be accessed in work package 22-99-01003. During the annual survey, the wiring configurations of anode junction boxes AJB(R45-1) and AJB(45-1) were documented. The sketches can be accessed from the JCS work record of work package 22-99-01003. Analysis, conclusions, and recommendations of the 1999 annual CP survey results are included in this report

  14. Efficiency control of cathodic protection measured using passivation verification technique in different concrete structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez, I.; Andrade, C.; Vennesland, O.; Evensen, U.; Polder, R.B.; Leggedor, J.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that cathodic protection is the most useful method for stopping corrosion when the deterioration process has started, but the most important issue that is still missing in the cathodic protection studies is how to check its efficiency in a reliable way. This paper presents results

  15. The change of pH under a paint film due to cathodic protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gellings, P.J.; Ekama, H.C.

    1975-01-01

    The diffusion of OH−-ions and H2 formed during cathodic protection through a paint film is studied. The diffusion equation is solved for non-stationary conditions and from this the steady state is also derived. It is shown that under usual operating conditions of cathodic protection of ships the

  16. Application of Direct Assessment Approaches and Methodologies to Cathodically Protected Nuclear Waste Transfer Lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, Megan M.; Pikas, Joseph; Edgemon, Glenn L.; Philo, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is responsible for the safe storage, retrieval, treatment, and disposal of approximately 54 million gallons (204 million liters) of radioactive waste generated since the site's inception in 1943. Today, the major structures involved in waste management at Hanford include 149 carbon steel single-shell tanks, 28 carbon-steel double-shell tanks, plus a network of buried metallic transfer lines and ancillary systems (pits, vaults, catch tanks, etc.) required to store, retrieve, and transfer waste within the tank farm system. Many of the waste management systems at Hanford are still in use today. In response to uncertainties regarding the structural integrity of these systems,' an independent, comprehensive integrity assessment of the Hanford Site piping system was performed. It was found that regulators do not require the cathodically protected pipelines located within the Hanford Site to be assessed by External Corrosion Direct Assessment (ECDA) or any other method used to ensure integrity. However, a case study is presented discussing the application of the direct assessment process on pipelines in such a nuclear environment. Assessment methodology and assessment results are contained herein. An approach is described for the monitoring, integration of outside data, and analysis of this information in order to identify whether coating deterioration accompanied by external corrosion is a threat for these waste transfer lines

  17. Photovoltaic power without batteries for continuous cathodic protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muehl, W. W., Sr.

    1994-02-01

    The COASTSYSTA designed, installed, and started up on 20 Jan. 1990, a state-of-the-art stand alone photovoltaic powered impressed current cathodic protection system (PVCPSYS) not requiring any auxiliary/battery backup power for steel and iron submerged structures. The PVCPSYS installed on 775' of steel sheet piling of a Navy bulkhead is continuing to provide complete, continuous corrosion protection. This has been well documented by COASTSYSTA and verified on-site by the U.S. Army Civil Engineering Research Laboratory, Champaign, Illinois and the Navy Energy Program Office-Photovoltaic Programs, China Lake, California. The Department of Defense (DoD) Photovoltaic Review Committee and Sandia National Laboratories consider this successful and cost effective system a major advance in the application of photovoltaic power. The PVCPSYS uses only renewable energy and is environmentally clean. A patent is pending on the new technology. Other possible PVCPSYS applications are mothballed ships, docks, dams, locks, bridges, marinas, offshore structures, and pipelines. The initial cost savings by installing a PVCPSYS vs. a conventional CP system was in excess of $46,000.00.

  18. A proposed alternative approach for protection of inadvertent human intruders from buried Department of Energy low level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The burial of radioactive wastes creates a legacy. To limit the impact of this legacy on future generations, we establish and comply with performance objectives. This paper reviews performance objectives for the long-term isolation of buried radioactive wastes; identifies regulatorly-defined performance objectives for protecting the inadvertent human intruder (IHI) from buried low-level radioactive waste (LLW); (3) discusses a shortcoming of the current approach; and (4) offers an alternative approach for protecting the IHI. This alternative approach is written specifically for the burial of US Department of Energy (DOE) wastes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), although the approach might be applied at other DOE burial sites

  19. APPLIED OF IMPRESSED CURRENT CATHODIC PROTECTION DESIGN FOR FUEL PIPELINE NETWORK AT NAVAL BASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    k. Susilo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Indonesian Navy (TNI AL is the main component for Maritime Security and Defence. Because of that, TNI AL needs Indonesian Warship (KRI to covered Maritime area. The main requirement from KRI is fulfilled by demand. To pock of fuel demand from KRI at Naval Base, it needs a new pipeline of fuel distribution network system. The pipeline network system used for maximum lifetime must be protected from corrosion. Basically, there are five methods of corrosion control such as change to a more suitable material, modification to the environment, use of protective coating, design modification to the system or component, and the application of cathodic or anodic protection. Cathodic protection for pipeline available in two kinds, namely Sacrifice Anode and Impressed Current Cathodic Protection (ICCP. This paper makes analysis from design of Impressed Current Cathodic Protection and total current requirement in the method. This paper showed both experimental from speciment test and theoritical calculation. The result showed that design of Impressed Current Cathodic Protection on fuel distribution pipeline network system requires voltage 33,759 V(DC, protection current 6,6035 A(DC by theoritical calculation and 6,544 A(DC from pipeline specimen test, with 0,25 mpy for corrosion rate. Transformer Rectifier design needs requirements 45 V with 10 A for current. This research result can be made as literature and standardization for Indonesian Navy in designing the Impressed Current Cathodic Protection for fuel distribution pipeline network system.

  20. The risk of hydrogen embrittlement in high-strength prestressing steels under cathodic protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isecke, B.; Mietz, J. (Bundesanstalt fuer Materialforschung und -pruefung (BAM), Berlin (Germany))

    1993-01-01

    High strength prestressing steels in prestressed concrete structures are protected against corrosion due to passivation resulting from the high alkalinity of the concrete. If depassivation of the prestressing steel occurs due to the ingress of chlorides the corrosion risk can be minimized by application of cathodic protection with impressed current. The risk of hydrogen embrittlement of the prestressing steel is especially pronounced if overprotection is applied due to hydrogen evolution in the cathodic reaction. The present work considers this risk by hydrogen activity measurements under practical conditions and application of different levels of cathodic protection potentials. Information on threshold potentials in prestressed concrete structures is provided, too. (orig.).

  1. E.M.I Effects of Cathodic Protection on Electromagnetic Flowmeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Sahin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic flowmeters are used to measure the speed of water flow in water distribution systems. Corrosion problem in metal pipelines can be solved by cathodic protection methods. This paper presents a research on corruptive effects of the cathodic protection system on electromagnetic flowmeter depending on its measuring principle. Experimental measurements are realized on the water distribution pipelines of the Izmir Municipality, Department of Water and Drainage Administration (IZSU in Turkey and measurement results are given. Experimental results proved that the values measured by the electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF are affected by cathodic protection system current. Comments on the measurement results are made and precautions to be taken are proposed.

  2. Designing cathodic protection systems for marine structures and vehicles. ASTM special technical publication 1370

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hack, H.P. [ed.

    1999-07-01

    Cathodic protection is an important method of protecting structures and ships from the corrosive effects of seawater. Poor designs can be far more costly to implement than optimal designs, Improper design can cause overprotection, with resulting paint blistering and accelerated corrosion of some alloys, underprotection, with resultant structure corrosion, or stray current corrosion of nearby structures. The first ASTM symposium specifically aimed at cathodic protection in seawater was intended to compile all the criteria and philosophy for designing both sacrificial and impressed current cathodic protection systems for structures and vehicles in seawater. The papers which are included in this STP are significant in that they summarize the major seawater cathodic protection system design philosophies. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  3. 1998 Annual Cathodic Protection Survey Report for the 242-A Evaporator Area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOWMAN, T.J.

    1999-01-01

    This report is the second annual cathodic protection report for the 242-A evaporator. The report documents and trends annual polarization survey data, rectifier inspection data, and continuity data from 1994 through mid-1999

  4. Investigation of Corrosion and Cathodic Protection in Reinforced Concrete. II : Properties of Steel Surface Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Van Breugel, K.; Lodhi, Z.F.; Ye, G.

    2007-01-01

    The present study explores the formation of corrosion products on the steel surface (using as-received low carbon construction steel) in reinforced concrete in conditions of corrosion and subsequent transformation of these layers in conditions of cathodic protection (CP).

  5. Investigation of Corrosion and Cathodic Protection in Reinforced Concrete. I : Application of Electrochemical Techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Van Breugel, K.; Lodhi, Z.F.; Van Westing, E.

    2007-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of steel reinforcement in conditions of corrosion and cathodic protection was studied, using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and compared to reference (noncorroding) conditions. Polarization resistance (PR) method and potentiodynamic polarization (PDP) were

  6. Cathodic Protection for Above Ground Storage Tank Bottom Using Data Acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naseer Abbood Issa Al Haboubi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Impressed current cathodic protection controlled by computer gives the ideal solution to the changes in environmental factors and long term coating degradation. The protection potential distribution achieved and the current demand on the anode can be regulated to protection criteria, to achieve the effective protection for the system. In this paper, cathodic protection problem of above ground steel storage tank was investigated by an impressed current of cathodic protection with controlled potential of electrical system to manage the variation in soil resistivity. Corrosion controller has been implemented for above ground tank in LabView where tank's bottom potential to soil was manipulated to the desired set point (protection criterion 850 mV. National Instruments Data Acquisition (NI-DAQ and PC controllers for tank corrosion control system provides quick response to achieve steady state condition for any kind of disturbances.

  7. Relation between the cathodic protection and the diagnosis of DCVG; Relacion entre la proteccion catodica y el diagnostico de DCVG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez N, Miguel A; Malo Tamayo, Jose Maria [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Chavarria M, Rosalba; Duran E, Pablo [Petroleos Mexicanos (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    The concern of the corrosion in buried pipes has increased with the course of time, the aging of the mechanical protection of the piping, results in defects in the coating, exposing the metal to the corrosive ground, in which the piping is lodged. If suitable levels of cathodic protection do not exist, the corrosion phenomenon in these defects is presented originating unexpected faults in the piping, increasing the costs of maintenance and repair, as well as the diminution in the safety during the operation, as much for the workers as for the communities near the installation of ducts. The technique of Direct Current Voltage Gradient (DCVG), besides locating the defects of the coating in a buried pipe (which are corrosion potential sites), determines corrosion status of the defects and its severity as far as the consumption of protection current that each of these absorbs. Nevertheless, all this information acquires a greater relevance, when it is correlated with the operating conditions of the cathodic protection systems, to be able to emit recommendations that lead to the mitigation or eradication of the corrosion problems, together with a good operation of the protection systems. [Spanish] La preocupacion por la corrosion en tuberias enterradas ha ido en aumento con el transcurso del tiempo, debido al envejecimiento de la proteccion mecanica de las tuberias, el cual da como resultado defectos en el recubrimiento, dejando expuesto el metal en suelo corrosivo, en el que se encuentra alojada la tuberia. Si no existen niveles de proteccion catodica adecuados, se propicia el fenomeno de corrosion en estos defectos, originando fallas inesperadas en las tuberias, incrementando a su vez los costos de mantenimiento y reparacion, asi como la disminucion en la seguridad durante la operacion, tanto para los trabajadores como para las comunidades cercanas a las instalaciones de ductos. La tecnica de Gradiente de Voltaje de Corriente Continua (DCVG), ademas de localizar los

  8. Photogenerated cathode protection properties of nano-sized TiO2/WO3 coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Minjie; Zeng Zhenou; Zhong Li

    2009-01-01

    Nano-sized TiO 2 /WO 3 bilayer coatings were prepared on type 304 stainless steel substrate by sol-gel method. The performance of photo-electrochemical and photogenerated cathode protection of the coating was investigated by the electrochemical method. The results show that the bilayer coating with four TiO 2 layers and three WO 3 layers exhibits the highest photo-electrochemical efficiency and the best corrosion resistance property. Type 304 stainless steel with the coating can maintain cathode protection for 6 h in the dark after irradiation by UV illumination for 1 h. In addition, the mechanism of the photogenerated cathode protection for the bilayer coating was also explored.

  9. Feasibility of applying cathodic protection to double-wall waste storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.L.

    1977-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of applying impressed current cathodic protection to double-wall storage tanks containing terminal waste solutions. Norton Corrosion Limited concluded that such a system could be designed for installation on the tanks. Under their direction, Battelle Northwest Laboratories conducted a laboratory study to develop necessary data for design of the system. A separate study conducted by Battelle Columbus Laboratories indicated that, while terminal waste solutions by themselves do not promote stress corrosion cracking, cathodic protection may promote this type of corrosion under certain conditions. As a result of these findings, the recommendation was made not to install cathodic protection on the double-wall tanks containing terminal waste solutions

  10. Direct current voltage gradient (DCVG) technique as a nondestructive testing tool for locating coating defect of buried pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamad Daud; Mohd Shariff Sattar

    2009-04-01

    Protection of buried steel pipelines relies upon coating backed up by cathodic protection. All coatings are prone to general deterioration. Coating defects commonly occur as a result of construction damage, and ongoing degradation by environmental factors. Good maintenance and monitoring of protection system is important. (author)

  11. Experimental study of cathodic protection of concrete from a 30 year old bridge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Nerland, O.C.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental study of cathodic protection (CP) was carried out with a conductive primer anode applied to specimens from a concrete bridge. The bridge was demolished after 30 years of service due to severe delaminations and reinforcement corrosion. Four specimens of approximately 1 m2 each were

  12. Short-term benefits of Cathodic Protection of steel in concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, J.; Polder, R.B.; Fraaij, A.L.A.; Mol, J.M.C.

    2012-01-01

    Cathodic Protection (CP) of steel in concrete has been used over the past decades in order to increase the remaining service life of concrete infrastructure. CP involves the application of an electrical current to the corroding reinforcing bars, thus stopping and preventing further corrosion. The

  13. Influence of soil on St3 surface spectroscopic characteristics under cathode protection conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsova, E.G.; Lazorenko-Manevich, R.M.; Sokolova, L.A.; Remezkova, L.V.

    1992-01-01

    Using electroreflection spectra it is shown, that St3 surface following long holding in cold clay without cathode protection is less heterogeneous relative to water absorption, than surface of initial specimens, as well as, of specimens holded in wet clay. This variation of distribution of adsorption centres by heats of water absorption results from stable absorption of surface-and-active components of clayed soil and is accompanied by increase of St3 corrosion stability. Long-term cathode polarization reduces initial distribution and decreases corrosion stability of St3

  14. Interface control of atomic layer deposited oxide coatings by filtered cathodic arc deposited sublayers for improved corrosion protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Härkönen, Emma, E-mail: emma.harkonen@helsinki.fi [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Tervakangas, Sanna; Kolehmainen, Jukka [DIARC-Technology Inc., Espoo (Finland); Díaz, Belén; Światowska, Jolanta; Maurice, Vincent; Seyeux, Antoine; Marcus, Philippe [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie des Surfaces, CNRS (UMR 7075) – Chimie ParisTech (ENSCP), F-75005 Paris (France); Fenker, Martin [FEM Research Institute, Precious Metals and Metals Chemistry, D-73525 Schwäbisch Gmünd (Germany); Tóth, Lajos; Radnóczi, György [Research Centre for Natural Sciences HAS, (MTA TKK), Budapest (Hungary); Ritala, Mikko [Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-10-15

    Sublayers grown with filtered cathodic arc deposition (FCAD) were added under atomic layer deposited (ALD) oxide coatings for interface control and improved corrosion protection of low alloy steel. The FCAD sublayer was either Ta:O or Cr:O–Ta:O nanolaminate, and the ALD layer was Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}–Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} nanolaminate, Al{sub x}Ta{sub y}O{sub z} mixture or graded mixture. The total thicknesses of the FCAD/ALD duplex coatings were between 65 and 120 nm. Thorough analysis of the coatings was conducted to gain insight into the influence of the FCAD sublayer on the overall coating performance. Similar characteristics as with single FCAD and ALD coatings on steel were found in the morphology and composition of the duplex coatings. However, the FCAD process allowed better control of the interface with the steel by reducing the native oxide and preventing its regrowth during the initial stages of the ALD process. Residual hydrocarbon impurities were buried in the interface between the FCAD layer and steel. This enabled growth of ALD layers with improved electrochemical sealing properties, inhibiting the development of localized corrosion by pitting during immersion in acidic NaCl and enhancing durability in neutral salt spray testing. - Highlights: • Corrosion protection properties of ALD coatings were improved by FCAD sublayers. • The FCAD sublayer enabled control of the coating-substrate interface. • The duplex coatings offered improved sealing properties and durability in NSS. • The protective properties were maintained during immersion in a corrosive solution. • The improvements were due to a more ideal ALD growth on the homogeneous FCAD oxide.

  15. Effect of Alternating Current on the Cathodic Protection and Interface Structure of X80 Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huiru Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This study employs potential-monitoring techniques, cyclic voltammetry tests, alternating current (AC voltammetry methods, and surface characterization to investigate the AC corrosion of cathodically protected X80 pipeline steel. In a non-passive neutral solution at pH 7.2, a sufficiently negative potential completely protects steel at an AC current density of 100 A/m2. In an alkaline solution at pH 9.6, more serious AC corrosion occurs at more negative cathodic protection (CP potential, whereas without CP the steel suffers negligible corrosion. In addition, the interface capacitance increases with AC amplitude. Based on these results, the AC corrosion mechanisms that function under various conditions are analyzed and described.

  16. Cathodic protection simulation of above ground storage tank bottom: Experimental and numerical results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, Marcelo [Inspection Department, Rio de Janeiro Refinery - REDUC, Petrobras, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Brasil, Simone L.D.C. [Chemistry School, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Baptista, Walmar [Corrosion Department, Research Centre - CENPES, Petrobras (Brazil); Miranda, Luiz de [Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Program, COPPE, UFRJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Brito, Rosane F. [Corrosion Department, Research Centre, CENPES, Petrobras, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    The deterioration history of Above ground Storage Tanks (AST) of Petrobras' refineries - shows that the great incidence of corrosion in the AST bottom is at the external side. This is a problem in the disposability of storage crude oil and other final products. At this refinery, all AST's are built over a concrete base with a lot of pile to support the structure and distribute the charge homogeneously. Because of this it is very difficult to use cathodic protection as an anti-corrosive method for each one of these tanks. This work presents an alternative cathodic protection system to protect the external side of the tank bottom using a new metallic bottom, placed at different distance from the original one. The space between the two bottoms was filled with one of two kinds of soils, sand or clay, more conductive than the concrete. Using a prototype tank it was studied the potential distributions over the new tank bottom for different system parameters, as soil resistivity, number and position of anodes localized in the old bottom. These experimental results were compared to numerical simulations, carried out using a software based on the Boundary Element Method. The computer simulation validates this protection method, confirming to be a very useful tool to define the optimized cathodic protection system configuration. (authors)

  17. The polarising processes by cathodic protection and their effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu¾cha Ján

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available For the determination of appropriate protection against the corrosion of metal materials it is necessary to understand in details the principle of the corrosion. The corrosion is the oxidation of metal material which results in the change of its chemical composition. This chemical change is greatly influenced by the electrical current flowing in metal depending on electrical current flowing direction and intensity.

  18. Cathodic protection of mild steel and copper in deep waters of the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sawant, S.S.; Venkat, K.; Wagh, A.B.

    Performance of cathodic protection system to mild steel and copper in deep (> 1000 m) oceanic waters of the Arabian Sea and Bay of Bengal has been assessed using aluminium and mild steel sacrificial anodes. The corrosion rates of unprotected metals...

  19. Cathodic protection of carbon steel in natural seawater: Effect of sunlight radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetti, Alessandro [Istituto per l' Energetica e le Interfasi, IENI - CNR, Milano, via Roberto Cozzi 53 20125 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: alessandro.benedetti@cnr.it; Magagnin, Luca [Dip. Chimica, Materiali e Ing. Chimica G. Natta, Politecnico di Milano, via Mancinelli 7, 20131 Milano (Italy); Passaretti, Francesca [Istituto per l' Energetica e le Interfasi IENI - CNR, Lecco, c.so Promessi Sposi 29, 23900 Lecco (Italy); Chelossi, Elisabetta; Faimali, Marco [Istituto di Scienze Marine, ISMAR- CNR - Via De Marini 6, 16149, Genova (Italy); Montesperelli, Giampiero [Universita di Roma - Tor Vergata, Dipartimento di Scienze e Tecnologie Chimiche, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 00133, Roma (Italy)

    2009-11-01

    Cathodic protection of metals in seawater is known to be influenced by chemical-physical parameters affecting cathodic processes (oxygen discharge, hydrogen evolution and calcareous deposit precipitation). In shallow seawater, these parameters are influenced by sunlight photoperiod and photosynthetic activity. The results presented here represent the first step in studies dedicated to cathodic protection in shallow photic seawater. This paper reports on carbon steel protected at -850 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (oxygen limiting current regime) in the presence of sunlight radiation but in the absence of biological and photosynthetic activity, the role of which deserves future research. Comparison of results obtained by exposing electrochemical cells to daylight cycles in both biologically inactivated natural seawater and in NaCl 3.5 wt.% solutions showed that sunlight affects current densities and that calcareous deposit interfere with light-currents effects. Sunlight radiation and induced heating of the solution have been separated, highlighting results not otherwise obvious: (1) observed current waves concomitant with sunlight radiation depend fundamentally on solar radiation, (2) solar radiation can determine current enhancements from early to late phases of aragonite crystal growth, (3) a three-day-old CaCO{sub 3} layer reduces but does not eliminate the amplitude of the current waves. Theoretical calculations for oxygen limiting currents and additional field tests showed that sunlight, rather than bulk solution heating, is the main cause of daily current enhancements. This was confirmed by polarizations performed at -850 and -1000 mV vs. Ag/AgCl (constant bulk temperature), during which the electrode was irradiated with artificial lighting. This test also confirmed O{sub 2} discharge to be the cathodic process involved. A mechanism of radiation conversion to heat in the oxygen diffusion layer region is proposed.

  20. Experimental Study of Thermoelectric Generator as Electrical Source of Impressed Current Cathodic Protection for Ship Hull

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Kurniawan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Impressed Current Cathodic Protection (ICCP is a method to protect metallic material such as ship hull from corrosion by using electric current. In this research, a prototype of thermoelectric generator is developed in order to supply the ICCP system. This thermoelectric generator is planned to utilize the exhaust gas from main engine of the ship. Method carried in this research is assembling the prototype of thermoelectric generator followed by conducted experiment to observe the potential energy of the prototype. After that, the required number of thermoelectric generator is calculated to supply the ICCP system to protect the ship from corrosion. The object in this research is live fish carrier “Wellboat” which has 396.08 m2 wetted area. The required voltage and current to protect the ship from corrosion for three years are 16.67 Volt and 2.66 Ampere. Based on the experiment, a prototype of thermoelectric generator can generate 0.34 Ampere and 4.43 Volt, causing the need of 8 series and 4 parallels connection. It can be concluded that the corrosion rate on the ship hull can be decelerated by using impressed current cathodic protection method without needing additional cost or fuel consumption to produce electric energy.  

  1. Development of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}|Cu composite as AISI 1020 steel thermal spray coating for protection against corrosion by soil in buried structures; Desenvolvimento e uso do composito de Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}|Cu como revestimento aplicado por aspersao termica sobre o aco AISI 1020 para protecao contra a corrosao pelo solo em estruturas enterradas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regis Junior, Oscar [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Mecanica; Silva, Jose Maurilio da; Portella, Kleber Franke [Instituto de Tecnologia para o Desenvolvimento, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Pesquisa em Engenharia Civil; Paredes, Ramon Sigifredo Cortes, E-mail: regis@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Mecanica

    2012-07-01

    An Nb{sub 2}O|Cu corrosion-resistant coating was developed and applied onto AISI 1020 steel substrate by Powder Flame Spray. A galvanostatic electrochemical technique was employed, with and without ohmic drop, in four different soils (two corrosively aggressive and two less aggressive). Behavior of coatings in different soils was compared using a cathodic hydrogen reduction reaction (equilibrium potential, overvoltage and exchange current density) focusing on the effect of ohmic drop. Results allow recommendation of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}|Cu composite for use in buried structure protection. (author)

  2. Corrosion protection of Arctic offshore structures: Final report. [Effects of temperature and salinity on required cathodic protection current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Rogers, J.C.; Feyk, C.; Theuveny, B.

    1985-10-01

    Results are presented for a research program on corrosion prevention for Arctic offshore structures which are in contact with sea ice for a significant portion of the year. The electrical method most adaptable for structure protection involves the injection of impressed current from several remote anodes buried just beneath the sea floor. The electrical resistivity of annual sea ice as a function of temperature and salinity is presented. Details of the interface layers formed between sea ice and steel in the presence of current injection are shown. A computer program was developed to enable the calculation of protective current density into the structure, in the presence of ice rubble and ridges around the structure. The program and the results of an example calculation are given for a caisson- retained island structure. 81 refs., 103 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Cathodic protection of steel by electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, K.R.; Smith, C.J.E. [Defence Research Agency, Farnborough (United Kingdom). Structural Materials Centre; Robinson, M.J. [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Industrial and Manufacturing Science

    1995-12-01

    The ability of electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings to cathodically protect steel was studied in dilute chloride solutions. The potential distribution along steel strips partly electroplated with zinc-nickel alloys was determined, and the length of exposed steel that was held below the minimum protection potential (E{sub prot}) was taken as a measure of the level of cathodic protection (CP) provided by the alloy coatings. The level of CP afforded by zinc alloy coatings was found to decrease with increasing nickel content. When nickel content was increased to {approx} {ge} 21 wt%, no CP was obtained. Surface analysis of uncoupled zinc-nickel alloys that were immersed in sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions showed the concentration of zinc decreased in the surface layers while the concentration of nickel increased, indicating that the alloys were susceptible to dezincification. The analysis of zinc-nickel alloy coatings on partly electroplated steel strips that were immersed in chloride solution showed a significantly higher level of dezincification than that found for uncoupled alloy coatings. This effect accounted for the rapid loss of CP afforded to steel by some zinc alloy coatings, particularly those with high initial nickel levels.

  4. Humectants To Augment Current From Metallized Zinc Cathodic Protection Systems on Concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino Jr., Bernard S.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Russell, James H. Russell; Bullard, Sophie J.; Collins, W. Keith; Bennett, Jack E. (J.E. Bennett Consulting, Inc.); Soltesz, Steven M. (ODOT); Laylor, H. Martin (ODOT)

    2002-12-01

    Cathodic protection (CP) systems using thermal-sprayed zinc anodes are employed to mitigate the corrosion process in reinforced concrete structures. However, the performance of the anodes is improved by moisture at the anode-concrete interface. Research was conducted to investigate the effect of hydrophilic chemical additives, humectants, on the electrical performance and service life of zinc anodes. Lithium bromide and lithium nitrate were identified as feasible humectants with lithium bromide performing better under galvanic CP and lithium nitrate performing better under impressed current CP. Both humectants improved the electrical operating characteristics of the anode and increased the service life by up to three years.

  5. Hydrogen Assisted Crack in Dissimilar Metal Welds for Subsea Service under Cathodic Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, Desmond

    Dissimilar metal welds (DMWs) are routinely used in the oil and gas industries for structural joining of high strength steels in order to eliminate the need for post weld heat treatment (PWHT) after field welding. There have been reported catastrophic failures in these DMWs, particularly the AISI 8630 steel - Alloy 625 DMW combination, during subsea service while under cathodic protection (CP). This is due to local embrittlement that occurs in susceptible microstructures that are present at the weld fusion boundary region. This type of cracking is known as hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) and it is influenced by base/filler metal combination, and welding and PWHT procedures. DMWs of two material combinations (8630 steel -- Alloy 625 and F22 steel -- Alloy 625), produced with two welding procedures (BS1 and BS3) in as welded and PWHT conditions were investigated in this study. The main objectives included: 1) evaluation of the effect of materials composition, welding and PWHT procedures on the gradients of composition, microstructure, and properties in the dissimilar transition region and on the susceptibility to HAC; 2) investigation of the influence of microstructure on the HAC failure mechanism and identification of microstructural constituents acting as crack nucleation and propagation sites; 3) assessment of the applicability of two-step PWHT to improve the resistance to HAC in DMWs; 4) establishment of non-failure criterion for the delayed hydrogen cracking test (DHCT) that is applicable for qualification of DMWs for subsea service under cathodic protection (CP).

  6. Cathodic protection of XL 52 steel under the influence of sulfate reducing bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, R. Garcia [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico, D.F. 07730 (Mexico); Departamento de lngenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Olivares, G. Zavala; Gayosso, M.J. Hernandez; Trejo, A. Gayosso [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, Mexico, D.F. 07730 (Mexico)

    2011-01-15

    The effect of sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) upon the cathodic protection of XL 52 steel was determined, in order to identify if the potential value of -0.950 V versus copper/copper sulfate electrode is good enough to protect the metal surface. During the experiments, different operational parameters were monitored: hydrogen sulfide production, iron concentration, electrolyte alkalinity, microorganisms' population, as well as the metal surface damage. At the same time, the corrosion rate was determined using two electrochemical techniques: polarization resistance (PR) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). According to the results, it was observed that the protection potential of -0.950 V versus copper/copper sulfate electrode is not enough to control the microbiologically induced corrosion. This situation is reinforced by the fact that significant iron concentration was found in the electrolyte. The microbiological activity is not affected by the protection potential. On the contrary, the population growth is slightly strengthened. The alkalinity generated by the applied potential did not stop the SRB growth. A type of localized corrosion was developed during the experiments with microorganisms, even when the protection potential was applied to the system. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Strategies for the optimization of cathodic protection of pipelines under AC influence; Strategien fuer die Optimierung des kathodischen Korrosionsschutzes von Rohrleitungen unter Wechselspannungsbeeinflussung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Markus [SGK Schweizerische Gesellschaft fuer Korrosionsschutz, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The newly determined values for the protection of cathodically protected pipelines against AC corrosion cannot be readily applied to all pipelines. From this perspective, the author of the contribution under consideration reports on strategies for the optimization of cathodic protection of pipelines under AC influence. It is hardly possible to define general strategies. Rather, an examination of the entire pipeline is essential. Is a compliance with the prescribed limits not possible or only possible with unreasonable effort, an active cathodic corrosion protection in combination with remote-controlled monitoring and protection devices can reduce the current corrosion risk.

  8. Magnesium-Based Sacrificial Anode Cathodic Protection Coatings (Mg-Rich Primers for Aluminum Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Blanton

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium is electrochemically the most active metal employed in common structural alloys of iron and aluminum. Mg is widely used as a sacrificial anode to provide cathodic protection of underground and undersea metallic structures, ships, submarines, bridges, decks, aircraft and ground transportation systems. Following the same principle of utilizing Mg characteristics in engineering advantages in a decade-long successful R&D effort, Mg powder is now employed in organic coatings (termed as Mg-rich primers as a sacrificial anode pigment to protect aerospace grade aluminum alloys against corrosion. Mg-rich primers have performed very well on aluminum alloys when compared against the current chromate standard, but the carcinogenic chromate-based coatings/pretreatments are being widely used by the Department of Defense (DoD to protect its infrastructure and fleets against corrosion damage. Factors such as reactivity of Mg particles in the coating matrix during exposure to aggressive corrosion environments, interaction of atmospheric gases with Mg particles and the impact of Mg dissolution, increases in pH and hydrogen gas liberation at coating-metal interface, and primer adhesion need to be considered for further development of Mg-rich primer technology.

  9. A Study of Calcareous Deposits on Cathodically Protected Mild Steel in Artificial Seawater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Yang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcareous deposits were formed on steel under conditions of cathodic protection in artificial seawater at applied constant current densities ranging from 50 to 400 mA·m−2. The calcareous layers were characterized using a Field Emission Gun Scanning Electron Microscope (FEG SEM in conjunction with Energy Dispersive X-Ray Analysis (EDX, and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS. At cathodic current densities of 50–100 mA·m−2 where corrosion was still occurring, a clear correlation existed between the iron containing corrosion product and the overlying magnesium hydroxide layer. This revealed that the mapping of magnesium rich areas on a steel surface can be used in the identification of local corrosion sites. At current densities of 150–200 mA·m−2, a layered deposit was shown to occur consisting of an inner magnesium-containing layer and an outer calcium-containing layer. At current densities of 300–400 mA·m−2, intense hydrogen bubbling through macroscopic pores in the deposits gave rise to cracking of the deposited film. Under such conditions deposits do not have a well-defined double layer structure. There is also preferential formation of magnesium-rich compounds near the steel surface at the early stages of polarisation and within the developing pores and cracks of calcareous deposits later on. Based on SEM/EDX investigation of calcareous depositions the impedance model was proposed and used to monitor in situ variations in steel corrosion resistance, and to calculate the thickness of formed deposits using the length of oxygen diffusion paths.

  10. Promoting Barrier Performance and Cathodic Protection of Zinc-Rich Epoxy Primer via Single-Layer Graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingrong Liu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of single-layer graphene sheets (Gr on the corrosion protection of zinc-rich epoxy primers (ZRPs was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS were used to characterize morphology and composition of the coatings after immersion for 25 days. The cross-sectional SEM images and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS confirmed that the addition of single-layer graphene facilitated assembling of zinc oxides on the interface between the coating and the steel. The open circuit potential (OCP, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS measurements revealed that both the cathodic protection and barrier performance of the ZRP were enhanced after addition of 0.6 wt. % Gr (Gr0.6-ZRP. In addition, the cathodic protection property of the Gr0.6-ZRP was characterized quantitatively by localized electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (LEIS in the presence of an artificial scratch on the coating. The results demonstrate that moderate amounts of single-layer graphene can significantly improve corrosion resistance of ZRP, due to the barrier protection and cathodic protection effects.

  11. CdTe/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite material for photogenerated cathodic protection of 304 stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiu-tong, E-mail: xiutongwang@gmail.com [Institutes of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071 China (China); Wei, Qin-yi, E-mail: weiqiny200@163.com [Institutes of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071 China (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 (Jia) Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Liang, E-mail: zzll20081988@126.com [CNOOC Information Technology co., Ltd. Beijing Branch, Beijing 100029 China (China); Sun, Hao-fen, E-mail: fyqfyx@163.com [School of Environmental and Municipal Engineering Qingdao, Qingdao Technological University, Qingdao 266033 China (China); Li, Hong, E-mail: lhqdio1987@163.com [Institutes of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071 China (China); Zhang, Qiao-xia, E-mail: qiaoxiazhang1989@163.com [Institutes of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071 China (China)

    2016-06-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The photoelectric properties of TiO{sub 2} could greatly improve by doping with CdTe. • The cathodic protection property of the CdTe/TiO{sub 2} was superior to that of pure TiO{sub 2}. • The protective action of the CdTe/TiO{sub 2} for 304SS could be maintained in the dark. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanotubes were fabricated by the anodization method, and CdTe was deposited on them via electrochemical deposition method. The optimal performance of the CdTe/TiO{sub 2} composites was achieved via changing the acidity of the electrolyte. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the surface morphology, elemental analysis and phase characteristics of the composite materials. Some electrochemical tests, such as open-circuit potential, current variation versus time were carried out to investigate the photogenerated cathodic protection of 304 stainless steel by CdTe/TiO{sub 2}. The results indicated that the cathodic protection performance of the CdTe/TiO{sub 2} composite was superior to that of pure TiO{sub 2} in the wavelength of visible light. The CdTe/TiO{sub 2} composite exhibited optimal photogenerated cathodic protection properties under visible light for the corrosion potential of 304 stainless steel shifted negatively to −850 mV when the concentration of HCl in the deposition electrolyte was 1 mol/L.

  12. Cathodic corrosion protection in a gas distribution grid. Operational experience in five years of operation; Kathodischer Korrosionsschutz in einem Gasverteilungsnetz. Betriebserfahrung nach fuenf Jahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poka, Werner [Stadtwerke Straubing (Germany); Gaugler, Hans; Steiger, Oliver [Stadtwerke Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In late 2001, Stadtwerke Straubing in Bavaria decided on cathodic corrosion protection of the Straubing low-pressure grid, with about 120 km of steel pipes. Planning started in early 2002 in cooperation with Stadtwerke Munich (SWM). Three years later, in December 2005, the last of the 25 grid sections was integrated in the cathodic corrosion protection system. This was followed by two years of monitoring, documentation, and measurements. The effectiveness of the cathodic corrosion protection system was proved for the whole low-pressure grid. Cost was reduced and availability enhanced. The project is discussed in detail, including economic efficiency, leak frequency and condition monitoring on the basis of measurements.

  13. Sol-gel prepared active ternary oxide coating on titanium in cathodic protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR V. PANIC

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of a ternary oxide coating, on titanium, which consisted of TiO2, RuO2 and IrO2 in the molar ratio 0.6:0.3:0.1, calculated on the metal atom, were investigated for potential application for cathodic protection in a seawater environment. The oxide coatings on titanium were prepared by the sol gel procedure from a mixture of inorganic oxide sols, which were obtained by forced hydrolysis of metal chlorides. The morphology of the coating was examined by scanning electron microscopy. The electrochemical properties of activated titanium anodes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry and polarization measurements in a H2SO4- and NaCl-containing electrolyte, as well as in seawater sampled on the Adriatic coast in Tivat, Montenegro. The anode stability during operation in seawater was investigated by the galvanostatic accelerated corrosion stability test. The morphology and electrochemical characteristics of the ternary coating are compared to that of a sol-gel-prepared binary Ti0.6Ru0.4O2 coating. The activity of the ternary coating was similar to that of the binary Ti0.6Ru0.4O2 coating in the investigated solutions. However, the corrosion stability in seawater is found to be considerably greater for the ternary coating.

  14. Investigation on the Cathodic Protection Effect of Low Pressure Cold Sprayed AlZn Coating in Seawater via Numerical Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guosheng Huang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Cold spray can deposit a composite coating simply by spraying mechanically-mixed Al and Zn powders, while no quantitative data has been reported on the anti-corrosion performance of different composite cold-sprayed coatings. In the present work, the finite element method was used to estimate the cathodic protection effect by simulating the potential distribution on a damaged cold-sprayed AlZn coating on Q235 steel. The results indicate that AlZn coating can only provide a limiting cathodic protection for substrate, because it can only polarize a very narrow zone negative to −0.78 V (vs. SCE, saturated calomel electrode. The remaining area of the steel substrate still has a very high residual corrosion rate. Computational methods can be used to predict the corrosion rate of AlZn coating, and the simulation results were validated by the results of a weight loss experiment.

  15. Protection of drinking water reservoirs in buried glacial valleys in the ice-marginal landscape for securing future demand in the European perspective (ENCORE-Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, F. W. H.; Bregman, E. P. H.

    2012-04-01

    Quaternary glaciations have left a significant sedimentological fingerprint in the subsurface of north Europe, in the form of buried glacial valleys. These structures are important drinking water reservoirs for millions of people in the ice-marginal landscape, but are increasingly threatened by anthropogenic pollution (nitrate, sulphate and organic pollutants) and geogenic pollution (salinization). That is one of the conclusion of a recent overview study in the IML of northern Europe from the North Sea to the southern Baltic area. Adequate policy making is yet not possible for several reasons: - Large amounts of data are needed to get a good grip on the lateral continuity of the complex infill. - The BurVal Working Group (2006) has shown that a combination of high resolution seismic survey, together with transient electromagnetic (TEM) surveys can provide realistic data for 3D hydrogeological models. However, these data have not yet been retrieved on a European scale. - Available borehole data can only be used as control points in 3D hydrological models, since the infill of buried glacial valleys is often lateral too complex to make sound interpolations possible. Pollution in buried glacial valleys crosses national borders in northern Europe and therefore national geological surveys have to cooperate in a newly formed European project on protection of these structures. The ENCORE - project (Environmental Conference of the European Regions) has shown in the past that it can facilitate fruitful European cooperation, which is urgently needed due to the costs of gathering data and due to knowledge gaps between different countries. By working together in a European context, these problems can be reduced so that better policy making is possible in order to secure our future drinking water availability.

  16. Wireless monitor for cathodic protection in remote sites: a case study for a university spin-out company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hale, J M

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes how a new spin-out company managed to develop a product and bring it to market. The product, a wireless monitor system for use on cathodic protection equipment, is described briefly with emphasis on the main technical challenge of ultra low power demand. The rest of the paper is devoted to the real challenges facing a new spin-out company: ensuring that its product has a market and obtaining the finance to develop it. It shows how government grants and collaboration with an established company can help

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis and photoelectrochemical performance enhancement of TiO{sub 2}/graphene composite in photo-generated cathodic protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weiwei, E-mail: vivizhg@yahoo.com [College of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); State Key Laboratory of Mining Disaster Prevention and Control Co-founded by Shandong Province and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); Guo, Hanlin; Sun, Haiqing [College of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); Zeng, Rong-Chang [College of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); State Key Laboratory of Mining Disaster Prevention and Control Co-founded by Shandong Province and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China)

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • TiO{sub 2}/graphene composites were synthesized through one-step hydrothermal method. • A bicrystalline framework of anatase and brookite formed. • Electrons transfer in the biphasic TiO{sub 2} results in electron-hole separation. • Graphene lead to a negative shift of the Fermi level. • The transfer barrier in the TiO{sub 2} and 304 stainless steel interface is decreased. - Abstract: TiO{sub 2}/graphene composites were synthesized through one-step hydrothermal method. The composites show an enhancement in photo-generated cathodic protection as the time-dependent profiles of photocurrent responses has confirmed. XRD data show that a bicrystalline framework of anatase and brookite formed as graphene provided donor groups in the hydrothermal process. The transfer of photoinduced electrons in the biphasic TiO{sub 2} results in effective electron-hole separation. Moreover, graphene lead to a negative shift of the Fermi level as evidenced by Mott–Schottky analysis, which decreases the Schottky barrier formed in the TiO{sub 2} and 304 stainless steel interface and results in the enhancement of photo-generated cathodic protection.

  18. The effect of cathodic protection on the behaviour of API-5LX 65 line-pipe weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenz de Santamaria, M.; Procter, R.P.

    1987-01-01

    The results of studies of the loss of ductility shown by X65 linepipe steel weldments during slow strain rate testing in 3.5% NaCl solution, under conditions of cathodic protection/overprotection are reported. Two types of specimens have been used; the first type was extracted longitudinally from along the weld seam while the second type was taken perpendicular to the weld and contained in its gauge length, weld metal, heat affected zone and parent metal. The weld metal shows hardness values higher than those of the parent plate and the heat affected zone. Therefore, it could be expected to be more susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement under cathodic protection and overprotection conditions. However, in the second type of specimens, fracture actually takes place through the parent plate, or at lack of fusion flaws. This behaviour is related to the fact that the net sections stresses in the specimen are plastic in the parent plate but elastic in the weld metal and heat affected zone. (author)

  19. Buried piping integrity management at fossil power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shulder, Stephen J. [Structural Integrity Associates, Annapolis, MD (United States); Biagiotti, Steve [Structural Integrity Associates, Inc., Centennial, CO (United States)

    2011-07-15

    In the last decade several industries (oil and gas pipelines, nuclear power, and municipal water) have experienced an increase in the frequency and public scrutiny of leaks and failures associated with buried piping and tank assets. In several industries, regulatory pressure has resulted in the mandated need for databases and inspection programs to document and ensure the continued integrity of these assets. Power plants are being extended beyond their design life and the condition of below grade assets is essential toward continued operation. This article shares the latest advances in managing design, operation, process, inspection, and historical data for power plant piping. Applications have also been developed to help with risk prioritization, inspection method selection, managing cathodic protection data for external corrosion control, and a wide variety of other information. This data can be managed in a GIS environment allowing two and three dimensional (2D and 3D) access to the database information. (orig.)

  20. Effects of cathodic protection potential and stress ratio on fatigue thresholds of structured steels in sea water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolphin, A.S.; Tice, D.R.

    1987-09-01

    The results reported here suggest that the very high thresholds found under reducing {Delta}K conditions may be inapplicable under the increasing {Delta}K conditions likely to be more relevant to real structures. This conclusion is based on just two tests at - 0.85V SCE, and so requires confirmation over a range of R ratios and at free corrosion and overprotection potentials. Crack growth thresholds appear to be higher under cathodic over-protection conditions (-1.05V SCE) than at more positive potentials, due to calcareous scale formation. Tests at negative R ratios are required to ensure this calcareous scale would remain intact under compressive loading. Due to the large observed influence of calcareous scale on crack growth, and particularly on the arrest of growing cracks, more detailed microstructural examination is recommended on the specimens tested in this programme. (author).

  1. Constructing ternary polyaniline-graphene-TiO{sub 2} hybrids with enhanced photoelectrochemical performance in photo-generated cathodic protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weiwei, E-mail: vivizhg@yahoo.com [College of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); State Key Laboratory of Mining Disaster Prevention and Control Co-founded by Shandong Province and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao, 266590 (China); Guo, Hanlin; Sun, Haiqing [College of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); Zeng, Rongchang [College of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266590 (China); State Key Laboratory of Mining Disaster Prevention and Control Co-founded by Shandong Province and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao, 266590 (China)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • Ternary polyaniline-graphene-TiO{sub 2} hybrids were synthesized. • Flat band potential shift facilitates electron injection to the coupled metal. • Electrons and holes transfer in the hybrids promotes electron–hole separation. • Synergistic effects of the ternary components make the hybrids photo-chargeable. - Abstract: Ternary polyaniline-graphene-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposites were constructed through a stepwise synthetic route. The hybrids exhibit remarkable enhancement in photoelectrochemical performance. The transfer of photo-excited carriers in the ternary composites facilitates the photo-induced electron-hole separation. Meanwhile, the flat band potential shift of the hybrids increases the inner electric field intensity that drives the photo-excited electron migration from the composites to the coupled metal. Furthermore, the ternary hybrids were found firstly to be photo-chargeable, which shows application potentials in photo-generated cathodic protection in dark.

  2. Effect of Microstructure on Hydrogen Diffusion in Weld and API X52 Pipeline Steel Base Metals under Cathodic Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Souza

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to evaluate the influence of microstructure on hydrogen permeation of weld and API X52 base metal under cathodic protection. The microstructures analyzed were of the API X52, as received, quenched, and annealed, and the welded zone. The test was performed in base metal (BM, quenched base metal (QBM, annealed base metal (ABM, and weld metal (WM. Hydrogen permeation flows were evaluated using electrochemical tests in a Devanathan cell. The potentiodynamic polarization curves were carried out to evaluate the corrosion resistance of each microstructure. All tests were carried out in synthetic soil solutions NS4 and NS4 + sodium thiosulfate at 25°C. The sodium thiosulfate was used to simulate sulfate reduction bacteria (SRB. Through polarization, assays established that the microstructure does not influence the corrosion resistance. The permeation tests showed that weld metal had lower hydrogen flow than base metal as received, quenched, and annealed.

  3. Alternating current corrosion of cathodically protected pipelines: Discussion of the involved processes and their consequences on the critical interference values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, M. [SGK Swiss Society for Corrosion Protection, Technoparkstr. 1, CH-8005 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-12-15

    Based on laboratory studies and model concepts, a profound understanding of the involved processes in ac corrosion and the required limits has been obtained in the last years. But there was no information whether these thresholds can be effectively applied to pipelines or whether operational constraints make their implementation impossible. Therefore, an extensive field test was carried out. Thereby, the relevance of the laboratory tests for field application could be demonstrated and all threshold values were confirmed. Detailed analysis made it possible to explain the observed threshold values based on thermodynamic and kinetic considerations. The results summarized in the present work are the basis for the normative work defining the thresholds for the operation conditions of cathodically protected pipelines. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Effect of RuCl{sub 3} Concentration on the Lifespan of Insoluble Anode for Cathodic Protection on PCCP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, H. W.; Kim, Y. S. [Materials Research Center for Energy and Clean Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Chang, H. Y.; Lim, B. T.; Park, H. B. [Power Engineering Research Institute, KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    Prestressed Concrete steel Cylinder Pipe (PCCP) is extensively used as seawater pipes for cooling in nuclear power plants. The internal surface of PCCP is exposed to seawater, while the external surface is in direct contact with underground soil. Therefore, materials and strategies that would reduce the corrosion of its cylindrical steel body and external steel wiring need to be employed. To prevent against the failure of PCCP, operators provided a cathodic protection to the pre-stressing wires. The efficiency of cathodic protection is governed by the anodic performance of the system. A mixed metal oxide (MMO) electrode was developed to meet criteria of low over potential and high corrosion resistance. Increasing coating cycles improved the performance of the anode, but cycling should be minimized due to high materials cost. In this work, the effects of RuCl{sub 3} concentration on the electrochemical properties and lifespan of MMO anode were evaluated. With increasing concentration of RuCl{sub 3}, the oxygen evolution potential lowered and polarization resistance were also reduced but demonstrated an increase in passive current density and oxygen evolution current density. To improve the electrochemical properties of the MMO anode, RuCl{sub 3} concentration was increased. As a result, the number of required coating cycles were reduced substantially and the MMO anode achieved an excellent lifespan of over 80 years. Thus, we concluded that the relationship between RuCl{sub 3} concentration and coating cycles can be summarized as follows: No. of coating cycle = 0.48{sup *}[RuCl{sub 3} concentration, M]{sup -0.97}.

  5. Composition and Morphology of Product Layers in the Steel/Cement Paste Interface in Conditions of Corrosion and Cathodic Protection in Reinforced Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.; De Wit, J.H.W.; Fraaij, A.L.A.; Boshkov, N.

    2007-01-01

    The present study explores the formation of corrosion products on the steel surface in reinforced concrete in conditions of corrosion and subsequent transformation of these layers in conditions of cathodic protection (CP). Of particular interest was to investigate if the introduced pulse CP (as

  6. The influence of time-variable cathodic corrosion protection on a.c. corrosion; Einfluss von zeitlich variierendem kathodischem Korrosionsschutz auf die Wechselstromkorrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Markus; Voute, Carl-Heinz; Joos, David [SGK Schweizerische Gesellschaft fuer Korrosionsschutz, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    The current limiting values for corrosion of pipelines under a.c. current stress may be difficult to apply to pipelines, owing to the very heterogeneous bedding of the pipeline, poor jacket quality, or high short-term a.c. voltages. In principle, periodic alternation between very high and very low protective currents may optimize cathodic corrosion protection. This pulsed current strategy was found to be effective in laboratory tests if the operating parameters are set accurately.

  7. Low-temperature liquid phase deposited TiO{sub 2} films on stainless steel for photogenerated cathodic protection applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, C.X.; Zhou, H. [College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Feng, Z.D., E-mail: zdfeng@xmu.edu.cn [College of Materials, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zhu, Y.F.; Du, R.G. [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2011-06-01

    The low-temperature synthesis of anatase TiO{sub 2} films was an imperative requirement for their application to corrosion prevention of metals. In this paper, a liquid phase deposition (LPD) technique was developed to prepare TiO{sub 2} films on SUS304 stainless steel (304SS) at a relatively low temperature (80 deg. C). The as-prepared films were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS). It was observed that a dense and crack-free anatase TiO{sub 2} film with a thickness about 300 nm was obtained. The film contained some fluorine and nitrogen elements, and the amounts of these impurities were greatly decreased upon calcination. Under the white light illumination, the electrode potential of TiO{sub 2} coated 304SS rapidly shifted to a more negative direction. Moreover, the photopotential of TiO{sub 2}/304SS electrode showed more negative values with increased film thickness. In conclusion, the photogenerated cathodic protection of 304SS was achieved by the low-temperature LPD-derived TiO{sub 2} film.

  8. Demonstration of Ice-Free Cathodic Protection Systems for Water Storage Tanks at Fort Drum: Final Report on Project AR-F-318 for FY05

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    16-inch diameter ductile iron pipe, where inlet and outlet pressures are nominally 100 psi and 50 psi, respectively. A local contractor will hot...P-641-G -- Primer Coating ; Zinc Dust- Zinc Oxide (for Galvanized Surfaces) 1.1.3. Federal Technical Reports. ETL 1110-9-10(FR) – Cathodic Protection...American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standards. ANSI C80.1 -- Rigid Steel Conduit - Zinc Coated 1.1.6. American Society for Testing

  9. State of the art, to protect lines that transport hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carta Petrolera

    1998-01-01

    Personnel's periodic and forced displacement for monitoring the buried pipe and to obtain reports on the state of the lines, it will no longer be necessary in some tracts of the pipeline in Colombia, now the remote supervision exists for the control of the systems of cathodic protection, a technology that ECOPETROL is applying in its lines of transport. This technique facilitates the preventive maintenance to the systems to the corrosion protection

  10. In situ vitrification of buried waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shade, J.W.; Thompson, L.E.; Kindle, C.H.

    1991-04-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is a remedial technology initially developed to treat soils contaminated with a variety of organics, heavy metals, and/or radioactive materials. Recent tests have indicated the feasibility of applying the process to buried wastes including containers, combustibles, and buried metals. In addition, ISV is being considered for application to the emplacement of barriers and to the vitrification of underground tanks. This report provides a review of some of the recent experiences of applying ISV in engineering-scale and pilot-scale tests to wastes containing organics, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic metals buried in sealed containers, and buried ferrous metals, with emphasis on the characteristics of the vitrified product and adjacent soil. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  11. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that offer promising solutions to the problems associated with the remediation of buried waste. BWID addresses the difficult remediation problems associated with DOE complex-wide buried waste, particularly transuranic (TRU) contaminated buried waste. BWID has implemented a systems approach to the development and demonstration of technologies that will characterize, retrieve, treat, and dispose of DOE buried wastes. This approach encompasses the entire remediation process from characterization to post-monitoring. The development and demonstration of the technology is predicated on how a technology fits into the total remediation process. To address all of these technological issues, BWID has enlisted scientific expertise of individuals and groups from within the DOE Complex, as well as experts from universities and private industry. The BWID mission is to support development and demonstration of a suite of technologies that, when integrated with commercially-available technologies, forms a comprehensive, remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste throughout the DOE Complex. BWID will evaluate and validate demonstrated technologies and transfer this information and equipment to private industry to support the Office of Environmental Restoration (ER), Office of Waste Management (WM), and Office of Facility Transition (FT) remediation planning and implementation activities

  12. Cathodic corrosion protection for the inside areas of metallic plants (KKS-I); Kathodischer Korrosionsschutz fuer die Innenflaechen von metallischen Anlagen (KKS-I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tenzer, Norbert [TZ-International Corrosion Consulting, Hagen (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    Cathodic corrosion protection for the inside areas of metallic plants (KKS-I) is a worldwide used technology in order to afford a safe protection of metallic plans against corrosion. This technology is used for plants in the treatment and storage of drinking water, for containers and reaction vessels in the chemical industry, for plants in the oil and gas industry as well as for containers and large-dimension pipelines containing seawater for the cooling of air liquefaction plants, power plants and seawater desalination plants, for examples. Furthermore, there exist further special applications for wastewater systems and biogas plants. The general description of the KKS-I shall supply the information to the operators of appropriate plants, that the cathodic corrosion protection also offers a wide range of applications for the protection of the inside areas of the plants against corrosion. Beside the previously mentioned standard areas of application there exist manifold further possibilities of application for metallic plants. It has to be emphasized that there are application possibilities not only for unalloyed or low alloy steels but also for stainless steels, aluminium, lead, copper, titanium and zinc. The regulation DIN EN 12499 firstly edited in 2003 contains the fundamentals, areas of application and specifications.

  13. Buried Craters of Utopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-365, 19 May 2003Beneath the northern plains of Mars are numerous buried meteor impact craters. One of the most heavily-cratered areas, although buried, occurs in Utopia Planitia, as shown in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image. The history of Mars is complex; impact craters provide a tool by which to understand some of that history. In this case, a very ancient, cratered surface was thinly-buried by younger material that is not cratered at all. This area is near 48.1oN, 228.2oW; less than 180 km (112 mi) west of the Viking 2 lander site. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  14. Mechanisms of LiCoO2 Cathode Degradation by Reaction with HF and Protection by Thin Oxide Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebbe, Jonathon L; Holder, Aaron M; Musgrave, Charles B

    2015-11-04

    Reactions of HF with uncoated and Al and Zn oxide-coated surfaces of LiCoO2 cathodes were studied using density functional theory. Cathode degradation caused by reaction of HF with the hydroxylated (101̅4) LiCoO2 surface is dominated by formation of H2O and a LiF precipitate via a barrierless reaction that is exothermic by 1.53 eV. We present a detailed mechanism where HF reacts at the alumina coating to create a partially fluorinated alumina surface rather than forming AlF3 and H2O and thus alumina films reduce cathode degradation by scavenging HF and avoiding H2O formation. In contrast, we find that HF etches monolayer zinc oxide coatings, which thus fail to prevent capacity fading. However, thicker zinc oxide films mitigate capacity loss by reacting with HF to form a partially fluorinated zinc oxide surface. Metal oxide coatings that react with HF to form hydroxyl groups over H2O, like the alumina monolayer, will significantly reduce cathode degradation.

  15. Detection of Buried Objects : The MUD Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quesson, B.A.J.; Vossen, R. van; Zampolli, M.; Beckers, A.L.D.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the Mine Underwater Detection (MUD) project at TNO is to experimentally investigate the acoustic and magnetic detection of explosives underwater, buried in a soft sediment layer. This problem is relevant for the protection of harbors and littoral assets against terrorist attacks and for

  16. The effect of cerium-based conversion treatment on the cathodic delamination and corrosion protection performance of carbon steel-fusion-bonded epoxy coating systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramezanzadeh, B., E-mail: ramezanzadeh@aut.ac.ir [Department of Surface Coatings and Corrosion, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rostami, M. [Department of Nanomaterials and Nanocoatings, Institute for Color Science and Technology (ICST), 16765-654, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Steel surface was treated by Ce and acid phosphoric solutions. • Ce treatment considerably enhanced the surface energy and produce nanoscale roughness. • Ce treated samples showed enhanced adhesion to FBE coating. • Ce treatment of steel significantly reduced the FBE cathodic delamination rate. • Ce treated sample showed enhanced corrosion resistance. - Abstract: The effect of surface pre-treatment of pipe surface by green cerium compound and phosphoric acid solution on the fusion-bonded epoxy (FBE) coating performance was studied. The composition and surface morphology of the steel samples treated by acid and Ce solutions were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Also, the surface free energy was evaluated on these samples through contact angle measurements. In addition, the effect of Ce and acid washing procedures on the adhesion properties and corrosion protection performance of the FBE was examined by pull-off, salt spray and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) tests. Results showed that compared to acid washing, the chemical treatment by Ce solution noticeably increased the surface free energy of steel, improved the adhesion properties of FBE, decreased the cathodic delamination rate of FBE, and enhanced the coating corrosion resistance compared to the acid washed samples.

  17. Microbial corrosion and cracking in steel. A concept for evaluation of hydrogen-assisted stress corrosion cracking in cathodically protected high-pressure gas transmission pipelines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Vendelbo

    An effort has been undertaken in order to develop a concept for evaluation of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking in cathodically protected gas transmission pipelines. The effort was divided into the following subtasks: A. Establish a correlation between the fracture mechanical properties...... crack propagation. This resulted in threshold curves that can be used for assessment of the risk of hydrogen-assisted cracking as a function of operating pressure and hydrogen content - having the flaw size as discrete parameter. The results are to be used mainly on a conceptual basis......, but it was indicated that the requirements for crack propagation include an overprotective CP-condition, a severe sulphate-reducing environment, as well as a large flaw (8 mm or a leak in the present case). A 1 mm flaw (which may be the maximum realistic flaw size) is believed to be unable to provoke crack propagation...

  18. Contemporary Management of Adult Acquired Buried Penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, M S; Gallegos, M A; Santucci, R A

    2018-04-06

    In 2014, The World Health Organization reported that 1.9 billion adults, 39% of the population, were overweight or obese [1]. Unlike most complications of obesity, adult acquired buried penis is an uncomfortable topic which may be overlooked. Patients are often encouraged to lose weight, but this is futile. Simple weight loss will not cure buried penis, as it is a multifactorial condition caused by a combination of: a) overhanging escutcheon from overweight, b) lichen sclerosus, which often contracts and destroys the penile shaft skin, and c) loss of normal penile shaft attachments to the penile skin. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanistic Insight in the Function of Phosphite Additives for Protection of LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 Cathode in High Voltage Li-Ion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Meinan; Su, Chi-Cheung; Peebles, Cameron; Feng, Zhenxing; Connell, Justin G; Liao, Chen; Wang, Yan; Shkrob, Ilya A; Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2016-05-11

    Triethlylphosphite (TEP) and tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite (TTFP) have been evaluated as electrolyte additives for high-voltage Li-ion battery cells using a Ni-rich layered cathode material LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 (NCM523) and the conventional carbonate electrolyte. The repeated charge/discharge cycling for cells containing 1 wt % of these additives was performed using an NCM523/graphite full cell operated at the voltage window from 3.0-4.6 V. During the initial charge process, these additives decompose on the cathode surface at a lower oxidation potential than the baseline electrolyte. Impedance spectroscopy and post-test analyses indicate the formation of protective coatings by both additives on the cathode surface that prevent oxidative breakdown of the electrolyte. However, only TTFP containing cells demonstrate the improved capacity retention and Coulombic efficiency. For TEP, the protective coating is also formed, but low Li(+) ion mobility through the interphase layer results in inferior performance. These observations are rationalized through the inhibition of electrocatalytic centers present on the cathode surface and the formation of organophosphate deposits isolating the cathode surface from the electrolyte. The difference between the two phosphites clearly originates in the different properties of the resulting phosphate coatings, which may be in Li(+) ion conductivity through such materials.

  20. Crystalline TiO2: A Generic and Effective Electron-Conducting Protection Layer for Photoanodes and -cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mei, Bastian Timo; Pedersen, Thomas; Malacrida, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Stabilizing efficient photoabsorbers for solar water splitting has recently shown significant progress with the development of various protection layers. Suitable protection layers for tandem devices should be conductive, transparent, and stable in strongly acidic or alkaline solutions. This paper......O2 generally applicable for photoanode assemblies, and thus for protecting tandem devices, are outlined and quantitatively shown by band diagram calculations. The results presented here provide the understanding required for the design of highly efficient and stable photoelectrochemical water...

  1. The buried waste integrated demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, K.M.

    1991-01-01

    There are numerous locations throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex where wastes have been buried in the ground or stored for future disposal. Much of this buried waste is contaminated with hazardous and radioactive materials. An extensive research program has been initiated at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop and demonstrate advanced remediation techniques for DOE Complex buried waste. The purpose of the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID), is to develop a scientifically sound and deployable remediation system consisting of advanced technologies which address the buried waste characteristics of the DOE Complex. This comprehensive remediation system win include technologies for the entire remediation cycle (cradle-to-grave). Technologies developed and demonstrated within the BWID will be transferred to the DOE Complex sites with buried waste, to private industry, and to universities. Multidirectional technology transfer is encouraged by the BWID. Identification and evaluation of plausible technological solutions are an ongoing activity of the BWID. A number of technologies are currently under development throughout the DOE Complex, private industry, and universities. Technology integration mechanisms have been established by BWID to facilitate collaborative research and demonstration of applicable remedial technologies for buried waste. Successful completion of the BWID will result in the development of a proven and deployable system at the INEL and other DOE Complex buried waste sites, thereby supporting the DOE Complex's environmental restoration objectives

  2. Catalysts, Protection Layers, and Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chorkendorff, Ib

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest solar fuel to produce and in this presentation we shall give a short overview of the pros and cons of various tandem devices [1]. The large band gap semiconductor needs to be in front, but apart from that we can chose to have either the anode in front or back using either...... acid or alkaline conditions. Since most relevant semiconductors are very prone to corrosion the advantage of using buried junctions and using protection layers offering shall be discussed [2-4]. Next we shall discuss the availability of various catalysts for being coupled to these protections layers...... and how their stability may be evaluated [5, 6]. Examples of half-cell reaction using protection layers for both cathode and anode will be discussed though some of recent examples under both alkaline and acidic conditions. Si is a very good low band gap semiconductor and by using TiO2 as a protection...

  3. Investigation of Corrosion of Buried Oil Pipeline by the Electrical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL

    ABSTRACT: The delineation of possible areas of corrosion along an underground oil pipeline in Ubeji, ... prevention of pipeline failure with its attendant environmental, human and economic consequences. @ JASEM .... Cathodic protection as.

  4. Monitoring Cathodic Shielding and Corrosion under Disbonded Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varela, F.; Tan, M. Y. J.; Hinton, B.; Forsyth, M. [Deakin University, Victoria (Australia)

    2017-06-15

    Monitoring of corrosion is in most cases based on simulation of environmental conditions on a large and complex structure such as a buried pipeline using a small probe, and the measurement of thermodynamics and kinetics of corrosion processes occurring on the probe surface. This paper presents a hybrid corrosion monitoring probe designed for simulating deteriorating conditions wrought by disbonded coatings and for measuring current densities and distribution of such densities on a simulated pipeline surface. The concept of the probe was experimentally evaluated using immersion tests under cathodic protection (CP) in high resistivity aqueous solution. Underneath the disbonded area, anodic currents and cathodic currents were carefully measured. Anodic current densities were used to calculate metal loss according to Faraday’s law. Calculated corrosion patterns were compared with corrosion damage observed at the surface of the probe after a series of stringent tests. The capability of the probe to measure anodic current densities under CP, without requiring interruption, was demonstrated in high resistivity aqueous solution. The pattern of calculated metal loss correlated well with corrosion products distribution observed at the array surface. Working principles of the probe are explained in terms of electrochemistry.

  5. Performance of buried pipe installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of geometric and mechanical parameters : characterizing the soil structure interaction developed in a buried pipe installation located under : roads/highways. The drainage pipes or culverts instal...

  6. Failure analysis of buried tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watkins, R.K.

    1994-01-01

    Failure of a buried tank can be hazardous. Failure may be a leak through which product is lost from the tank; but also through which contamination can occur. Failures are epidemic -- because buried tanks are out of sight, but also because designers of buried tanks have adopted analyses developed for pressure tanks. So why do pressure tanks fail when they are buried? Most failures of buried tanks are really soil failures. Soil compresses, or slips, or liquefies. Soil is not only a load, it is a support without which the tank deforms. A high water table adds to the load on the tank. It also reduces the strength of the soil. Based on tests, structural analyses are proposed for empty tanks buried in soils of various quality, with the water table at various levels, and with internal vacuum. Failure may be collapse tank. Such collapse is a sudden, audible inversion of the cylinder when the sidefill soil slips. Failure may be flotation. Failure may be a leak. Most leaks are fractures in the welds in overlap seams at flat spots. Flat spots are caused by a hard bedding or a heavy surface wheel load. Because the tank wall is double thick at the overlap, shearing stress in the weld is increased. Other weld failures occur when an end plate shears down past a cylinder; or when the tank is supported only at its ends like a beam. These, and other, failures can be analyzed with justifiable accuracy using basic principles of mechanics of materials. 10 figs

  7. A photoelectrochemical study of CdS modified TiO2 nanotube arrays as photoanodes for cathodic protection of stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L, Jing; Lin Changjian; Li Juntao; Lin Zequan

    2011-01-01

    An electrodeposited CdS nanoparticles-modified highly-ordered TiO 2 nanotube arrays (CdS-TNs) photoelectrode and its performance of photocathodic protection are reported. The self-organized TiO 2 nanotube arrays are fabricated by electrochemical anodization in an organic-inorganic mixed electrolyte and sensitized with CdS nanoparticles by electrodeposition via a single-step direct current. The morphology, crystalline phase, and composition of the CdS-TNs films were characterized systematically by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, respectively. The photoelectrochemical performances of the CdS-TNs film under illumination and dark conditions in 0.5 M NaCl solution were evaluated through the electrochemical measurements. It is indicated that the TNs incorporated by CdS effectively harvest solar light in the UV as well as the visible light (up to 480 nm) region. It is supposed that the high photoelectro-response activity of the CdS-TNs is attributed to the increased efficiency of charge separation and transport of electrons. The electrode potentials of 304 stainless steel coupled with the CdS-TNs is found to be negatively shifted for about 246 mV and 215 mV under UV and white light irradiation, respectively, which can be remained for 24 h even in darkness. It is implied that the CdS-TNs are able to effectively function a photogenerated cathodic protection for metals both under the UV and visible light illumination.

  8. A photoelectrochemical study of CdS modified TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays as photoanodes for cathodic protection of stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L, Jing; Lin Changjian, E-mail: cjlin@xmu.edu.cn; Li Juntao; Lin Zequan

    2011-06-01

    An electrodeposited CdS nanoparticles-modified highly-ordered TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (CdS-TNs) photoelectrode and its performance of photocathodic protection are reported. The self-organized TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays are fabricated by electrochemical anodization in an organic-inorganic mixed electrolyte and sensitized with CdS nanoparticles by electrodeposition via a single-step direct current. The morphology, crystalline phase, and composition of the CdS-TNs films were characterized systematically by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, respectively. The photoelectrochemical performances of the CdS-TNs film under illumination and dark conditions in 0.5 M NaCl solution were evaluated through the electrochemical measurements. It is indicated that the TNs incorporated by CdS effectively harvest solar light in the UV as well as the visible light (up to 480 nm) region. It is supposed that the high photoelectro-response activity of the CdS-TNs is attributed to the increased efficiency of charge separation and transport of electrons. The electrode potentials of 304 stainless steel coupled with the CdS-TNs is found to be negatively shifted for about 246 mV and 215 mV under UV and white light irradiation, respectively, which can be remained for 24 h even in darkness. It is implied that the CdS-TNs are able to effectively function a photogenerated cathodic protection for metals both under the UV and visible light illumination.

  9. Combined Effect of Alternating Current Interference and Cathodic Protection on Pitting Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of X70 Pipeline Steel in Near-Neutral pH Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Influence of alternating current (AC on pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking (SCC behavior of X70 pipeline steel in the near-neutral pH environment under cathodic protection (CP was investigated. Both corrosion and SCC are inhibited by −0.775 VSCE CP without AC interference. With the superimposition of AC current (1–10 mA/cm2, the direct current (DC potential shifts negatively under the CP of −0.775 VSCE and the cathodic DC current decreases and shifts to the anodic direction. Under the CP potential of −0.95 VSCE and −1.2 VSCE, the applied AC current promotes the cathodic reaction and leads to the positive shift of DC potential and increase of cathodic current. Local anodic dissolution occurs attributing to the generated anodic current transients in the positive half-cycle of the AC current, resulting in the initiation of corrosion pits (0.6–2 μm in diameter. AC enhances the SCC susceptibility of X70 steel under −0.775 VSCE CP, attributing to the promotion of anodic dissolution and hydrogen evolution. Even an AC current as low as 1 mA/cm2 can enhance the SCC susceptibility.

  10. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  11. Lipon coatings for high voltage and high temperature Li-ion battery cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudney, Nancy J.; Liang, Chengdu; Nanda, Jagjit; Veith, Gabriel M.; Kim, Yoongu; Martha, Surendra Kumar

    2017-12-05

    A lithium ion battery includes an anode and a cathode. The cathode includes a lithium, manganese, nickel, and oxygen containing compound. An electrolyte is disposed between the anode and the cathode. A protective layer is deposited between the cathode and the electrolyte. The protective layer includes pure lithium phosphorus oxynitride and variations that include metal dopants such as Fe, Ti, Ni, V, Cr, Cu, and Co. A method for making a cathode and a method for operating a battery are also disclosed.

  12. Nanotube cathodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  13. Nanotube cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  14. Locating a buried magnetic dipole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffey, T.W.H.

    1977-01-01

    The theoretical basis and required computations for locating a buried magnetic dipole are outlined. The results are compared with measurements made with a tiltable coil lowered to a depth of 20 m in a vertical borehole within a three-layered earth. this work has application to the rescue of trapped miners. 3 figures, 1 table. (RWR)

  15. The Buried Town of Beaver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jostad, Karen

    Local history as source material for environmental education is uniquely portrayed in this resource kit. Utilizing a Winona County Historical Society publication, "The Beaver Story" and accompanied by a teacher's guide, "The Buried Town of Beaver," and other teaching aids, a case study of the area can be developed. Based on the reminiscences of…

  16. Estimation of overprotection region on the painted steel plate under impressed-current cathodic protection. Gaibu dengenho ni yoru inkyoku boshoku ka no toso kohan ni okeru kaboshoku iki ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iwata, M.; Huang, Y.; Fujimoto, Y. (Hiroshima Univ., hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1992-09-04

    Painting and cathodic protection are used in combination as a corrosion resisting measure for ship hull. n analytic method which uses the boundary element method for protection electric field by impressed-current method is proposed to show that rational determination is possible for the arrangement and current of the anode, and the arrangement and set voltage of the reference electrode used to control the current. However, repetitive calculation is necessary until overprotection voltage disappears from the surface of the painted steel plate while giving optional insulated area because the insulated area of adequate dimension is unknown. To decrease the number of this repetitive calculation, a study is made on a method of estimating the magnitude of the insulated area to be input as the initial value in the electric field analysis by the boundary element method. Although the insulated area has been empirically obtained, such formurization may be useful for automatic optimization using a computer of the location and number of anode, anode current, arrangement and set voltage of the reference electrode, magnitude of the insulated area, etc. in the impressed-current cathodic protection system. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Cathodic corrosion protection in jacket tube steel pipes. Practical experience after five years of operation, a summary; Kathodischer Korrosionsschutz von Stahlrohrleitungen in Mantelrohren. Praxishinweise nach 5 Jahren - eine Zusammenfassung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemkemeyer, Marc [RWE Westfalen-Weser-Ems Netz-service GmbH, Dortmund (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    In november 2006, the completely revised AfK recommendation No. 1 came into force. It was the first of its kind to contain concrete calculation methods for calculating the effects of cathodic corrosion protection in jacket tubes. In the five years that followed, a large number of jacket tubes was investigated by this method. It was found that some input parameters that are only estimated still require further specification. Further, some further calculation algorithms have been defined. Some of the specifications are described in more detail in this article.

  18. Remote monitoring of cathodic protection rectifiers of the Bolivia-Brazil Gas Pipeline using low orbit satellite telephone; Monitoracao remota de retificadores de protecao catodica do Gasoduto Bolivia-Brasil utilizando telefone via satelite de baixa orbita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Jorge Fernando Pereira [TBG - Transportadora Brasileira Gasoduto Bolivia Brasil S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    The present paper has for objective to present the information collected during definitions, development, implementation, testing and operation phases of the Pilot System for monitoring of the Cathodic Protection Rectifiers MS-10 and SP-09, installed on the Bolivia-Brazil Gas Pipeline. The adopted solution for the Pilot System includes, basically, communication through low-earth satellite telephone, inter linked to the public telephone net, acquisition and data transmission system (Remote Terminal Unit) and data reception in the Supervision and Control Room. (author)

  19. Design of buried concrete encasements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drake, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    The operation of many Department of Energy (DOE) sites requires the transfer of radioactive liquid products from one location to another. DOE Order 6430.1A requires that the transfer pipelines be designed and constructed so that any leakage can be detected and contained before it reaches the environment. One design option often considered to meet this requirement is to place the pipeline in a stainless steel-lined, buried concrete encasement. This provides the engineer with the design challenge to integrate standard structural design principles with unique DOE requirements. The complete design of a buried concrete encasement must consider seismic effects, leak detection, leak confinement, radiation shielding, thermal effects, pipe supports, and constructability. This paper contains a brief discussion of each of these design considerations, based on experience gained during the design of concrete encasements for the Process Facilities Modifications (PFM) project at Hanford

  20. Electromagnetic scattering from buried objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brock, B.C.; Sorensen, K.W.

    1994-10-01

    Radar imaging and detection of objects buried in soil has potentially important applications in the areas of nonproliferation of weapons, environmental monitoring, hazardous-waste site location and assessment, and even archeology. In order to understand and exploit this potential, it is first necessary to understand how the soil responds to an electromagnetic wave, and how targets buried within the soil scatter the electromagnetic wave. We examine the response of the soil to a short pulse, and illustrate the roll of the complex dielectric permittivity of the soil in determining radar range resolution. This leads to a concept of an optimum frequency and bandwidth for imaging in a particular soil. We then propose a new definition for radar cross section which is consistent with the modified radar equation for use with buried targets. This radar cross section plays the same roll in the modified radar equation as the traditional radar cross section does in the free-space radar equation, and is directly comparable to it. The radar cross section of several canonical objects in lossy media is derived, and examples are given for several object/soil combinations

  1. Méthodes de calcul pour la conception des systèmes de protection cathodique des structures longilignes Computing Methods for Designing Cathodic Protection Systemes for Elongate Stuctures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roche M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Les différentes structures longilignes qu'utilise l'industrie des hydrocarbures sont, dans la plupart des cas, soumises à un système de protection cathodique par anodes sacrificielles ou par courant imposé. La conception de ces systèmes doit être basée sur l'étude de la variation du potentiel et de l'intensité le long de la structure causée par la chute ohmique. La méthode classique de calcul résoud couramment le cas des structures longilignes à diamètre constant traversant un terrain dont la résistivité est considérée comme constante sur toute la longueur. Dans le cas où la constitution de la structure varie, comme celui des casings de puits de forage, ou quand celle-ci traverse plusieurs types de terrain, le problème se complique. Nous proposons une méthode générale permettant de traiter rapidement tout problème de ce type, le nombre de tronçons n'étant pas limité. Cette méthode fait appel à des notions de facteur de réflexion et de résistance équivalente déjà exposées dans la littérature mais dont l'usage ne semble pas s'être répandu. The different elongate structures used by the hydrocarbon industry are, in most cases, subjected ta a cathodic protection system consisting of sacrificial anodes or an impressed current. Desings of such systems must be boséd on an analysis of variations in the potential and intensity along the structure as the result of the ohm drop. The conventional computing method commonly solves cases of elongote structures with a constant diameter, running through ground whose resistivity is considéred to be constant over the entire length. When the~nake-up of the structure varies, as is the case for borehole casings, or when it goes through several types of formations, the problem gets more complicated. We propose a general method for quickly dealing with any problem of this type, with no limit ta the number of lengths involved. This method makes use of reflection factor and

  2. BATATA: a buried muon hodoscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, F.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Paic, G.; Salazar, M. E. Patino; D'Olivo, J. C.; Molina, R. Alfaro

    2009-01-01

    Muon hodoscopes have several applications, ranging from astrophysics to fundamental particle physics. In this work, we present a detector dedicated to the study, at ground level, of the main signals of cosmic-ray induced showers above 6 PeV. The whole detector is composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes buried at fix depths ranging from 120 g/cm 2 to 600 g/cm 2 and by a triangular array of water cerenkov detectors located nearby on ground.

  3. Melter development needs assessment for RWMC buried wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.D.; Carpenedo, R.J.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report presents a survey and initial assessment of the existing state-of-the-art melter technology necessary to thermally treat (stabilize) buried TRU waste, by producing a highly leach resistant glass/ceramic waste form suitable for final disposal. Buried mixed transuranic (TRU) waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) represents an environmental hazard requiring remediation. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed the INEL on the National Priorities List in 1989. Remediation of the buried TRU-contaminated waste via the CERCLA decision process is required to remove INEL from the National Priorities List. A Waste Technology Development (WTD) Preliminary Systems Design and Thermal Technologies Screening Study identified joule-heated and plasma-heated melters as the most probable thermal systems technologies capable of melting the INEL soil and waste to produce the desired final waste form [Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) glass/ceramic]. The work reported herein then surveys the state of existing melter technology and assesses it within the context of processing INEL buried TRU wastes and contaminated soils. Necessary technology development work is recommended

  4. Nanašanje trdih zaščitnih prevlek s katodnim lokom: Cathodic arc plasma deposition of hard protective coatings:

    OpenAIRE

    Panjan, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The cathodic arc evaporation process is based upon the vacuum arc, the physics of which is still under investigation. This method is using almost exclusively for the deposition of wear-resistant coatings onto cutting and forming tools. The method is fast, effective, and relatively cost efficient. This paper reviews the arc evaporation process. Naparevanje s katodnim lokom temelji na plazemskem loku, ki ga prižegmo v vakuumu. Postopek se uporablja skoraj izključno za pripravo trdih zaščitni...

  5. Inspection device for buried equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanawa, Jun.

    1994-01-01

    In an inspection device for a buried equipment, a rail is suspended at the upper portion of a vessel of a pit-vessel type pump buried in a plant building floor, and a truck movable vertical in the vessel along the rail, and an ultrasonic wave probe contained in the truck and urged to the vessel by an electromagnet are disposed. In addition, an elevator moving vertically along a shaft is disposed, and an arm having the ultrasonic probe disposed at the end portion and driven by a piston are disposed to the elevator. The ultrasonic wave probe moves vertically together with the truck along the rail in the vessel while being urged to the vessel by the electromagnet to inspect and measure the state at the inner and outer surfaces of the vessel. Further, the length of the arm is controlled so as to set a predetermined distance between the ultrasonic wave probe and the vessel. Subsequently, the elevator is moved vertically along a shaft passing through a shaft hole of a mount, and the shaft is rotated thereby enabling to inspect and measure the state of the inner and outer surfaces of the vessel. (N.H.)

  6. Permanent burying method for product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Goro; Sakata, Noboru; Hironaka, Yoshikazu; Shigematsu, Kazuo; Yurugi, Masahiro; Minami, Masayoshi; Yoshisaki, Masato.

    1995-01-01

    In a method of permanently burying an object by filling and solidifying a cement mortar in gaps between each of objects to be buried underground, cement mortar is filled into gaps, which comprises water at a unit amount determined as from 200 to 250kg/m 3 , a cement at low water/cement ratio (%) of from 70 to 400%, and contains fine powder having an average grain size of not greater than 100μm (not containing cement) of 50 to 800kg/m 3 , fine aggregates of 800 to 1200kg/m 3 , UERAN gum (a bio-gum powder produced by aerobic fermentation of alcaligenes-bacteria) of 20g/m 3 to 1.3kg/m 3 , a dispersing agent of 0 to 40kg/m 3 , a swelling agent of 0 to 40kg/m 3 . Then if the mortar blended with the UERAN gum is injected, any gaps can be filled tightly, no breeding is caused and since the amount of cement is small, it does not suffer from temperature cracking. Therefore, the state of filling is kept permanently, and environmental pollution caused by radioactive wastes can be prevented. (N.H.)

  7. Buried penis: classification surgical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadidi, Ahmed T

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe morphological classification of congenital buried penis (BP) and present a versatile surgical approach for correction. Sixty-one patients referred with BP were classified into 3 grades according to morphological findings: Grade 1-29 patients with Longer Inner Prepuce (LIP) only, Grade II-20 patients who presented with LIP associated with indrawn penis that required division of the fundiform and suspensory ligaments, and Grade III-12 patients who had in addition to the above, excess supra-pubic fat. A ventral midline penile incision extending from the tip of prepuce down to the penoscrotal junction was used in all patients. The operation was tailored according to the BP Grade. All patients underwent circumcision. Mean follow up was 3 years (range 1 to 10). All 61 patients had an abnormally long inner prepuce (LIP). Forty-seven patients had a short penile shaft. Early improvement was noted in all cases. Satisfactory results were achieved in all 29 patients in grade I and in 27 patients in grades II and III. Five children (Grades II and III) required further surgery (9%). Congenital buried penis is a spectrum characterized by LIP and may include in addition; short penile shaft, abnormal attachment of fundiform, and suspensory ligaments and excess supra-pubic fat. Congenital Mega Prepuce (CMP) is a variant of Grade I BP, with LIP characterized by intermittent ballooning of the genital area. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, K.M.

    1991-12-01

    This document presents the plan of activities for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program which supports the environmental restoration (ER) objectives of the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Discussed in this plan are the objectives, organization, roles and responsibilities, and the process for implementing and managing BWID. BWID is hosted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), but involves participants from throughout the DOE Complex, private industry, universities, and the international community. These participants will support, demonstrate, and evaluate a suite of advanced technologies representing a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for applicability and maturity, selecting appropriate technologies for demonstration, field demonstrating, evaluation of results and transferring technologies to environmental restoration programs are also presented. This document further describes the elements of project planning and control that apply to BWID. It addresses the management processes, operating procedures, programmatic and technical objectives, and schedules. Key functions in support of each demonstration such as regulatory coordination, safety analyses, risk evaluations, facility requirements, and data management are presented

  9. Cobalt, titanium or cerium oxide protective coatings for the nickel cathode of the molten carbonate fuel cells; Revetements protecteurs a base d'oxyde de cobalt, de titane ou de cerium pour la cathode de nickel des piles a combustible a carbonates fondus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza Blanco, L.

    2003-10-15

    The aim of this work is to combine the MCFC cathode Li{sub x}Ni{sub 1-x}O properties to those of the protective coatings of LiCoO{sub 2}, Li{sub 2}TiO{sub 3} or of CeO{sub 2}, less soluble in the molten carbonates. In the cases of LiCoO{sub 2}, have been carried out by controlled potential coulometry in aqueous solution, a deposition of Co{sub 3}O{sub 4} on dense Ni. The cobalt oxide reacts rapidly in the Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} medium at 650 C to give LiCoO{sub 2}, a spinel cubic phase revealed by Raman spectroscopy. (O.M.)

  10. Enhanced photoelectrochemical cathodic protection performance of the C{sub 3}N{sub 4}@In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocomposite with quasi-shell–core structure under visible light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Mengmeng; Chen, Zhuoyuan, E-mail: zychen@qdio.ac.cn; Bu, Yuyu

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • The C{sub 3}N{sub 4}@In{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite with quasi-shell–core structure is prepared. • Photoelectrochemical cathodic protection performance of this composite was studied. • C{sub 3}N{sub 4} coating on In{sub 2}O{sub 3} dramatically enhances its light absorption capability. • C{sub 3}N{sub 4} coating on In{sub 2}O{sub 3} dramatically enhances its photoelectrochemical properties. • C{sub 3}N{sub 4} coating on In{sub 2}O{sub 3} dramatically enhances its electron transfer capability. - Abstract: Carbon nitride@Indium oxide (C{sub 3}N{sub 4}@In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) composite with quasi-shell–core structure was successfully prepared in this work. The photoinduced open circuit potential and current density results show that the C{sub 3}N{sub 4}@In{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite with quasi-shell–core structure could provide the optimal photoelectrochemical cathodic protection capability for 304 stainless steel under visible light when the adding amount of C{sub 3}N{sub 4} in the C{sub 3}N{sub 4}@In{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite is 3 wt%. The light absorption capability of the C{sub 3}N{sub 4}@In{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite was enhanced due to the synergistic effect of heterojunction structure. According to the HRTEM images, photoinduced Volt–Ampere characteristic curves and electrochemical impedance spectra, the ultrathin coating layer of C{sub 3}N{sub 4} on the surface of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} helps to form a heterojunction electric field at the interface between C{sub 3}N{sub 4} and In{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which enhances the separation efficiency of the photogenerated electron–hole pairs. Excessive C{sub 3}N{sub 4} will decline the photoelectrochemical cathodic protection of this composite due to the lower intrinsic electronic mobility and the lower photoelectric conversion property of C{sub 3}N{sub 4}.

  11. Post-heat treatment of arc-sprayed coating prepared by the wires combination of Mg-cathode and Al-anode to form protective intermetallic layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Rongzheng; Song Gang

    2011-01-01

    A Mg-Al intermetallic compounds coating was prepared on the surface of Mg-steel lap joint by arc-sprayed Al-Mg composite coating (Mg-cathode and Al-anode) and its post-heat treatment (PHT). The effect of PHT temperature on the phase transition, microstructure and mechanical properties of the coating was investigated by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, optical microscope and microhardness test. The result shows that the intermetallic compounds layer that is mainly composed of Al 3 Mg 2 and Mg 17 Al 12 is formed by the self-diffusion reaction of Mg and Al splats in the coating after PHT for 4 h at 430 deg. C.

  12. Cathodic disbonding of organic coatings on submerged steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, Ole oeystein

    1998-12-31

    In offshore oil production, submerged steel structures are commonly protected by an organic coating in combination with cathodic protection. The main advantage is that the coating decreases the current demand for cathodic protection. But the coating degrades with time. This thesis studies one of the most important mechanisms for coating degradation in seawater, cathodic disbonding. Seven commercial coatings and two model coatings with various pigmentations have been studied. Parameter studies, microscopy and studies of free films were used in the mechanism investigations. Exposure to simulated North Sea conditions was used in the performance studies. The effect of aluminium and glass barrier pigments on cathodic disbonding was investigated. The mechanism for the effect of the aluminium pigments on cathodic disbonding was also investigated. The transport of charge and oxygen to the steel/coating interface during cathodic disbonding was studied for two epoxy coatings. Cathodic disbonding, blistering and current demand for cathodic protection was measured for nine commercial coatings for submerged steel structures, using the ASTM-G8 standard test and a long term test under simulated North Sea conditions. The relevance of the ASTM-G8 test as a prequalification test was evaluated. 171 refs., 40 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Buried Waste Program (BWP) data qualification manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casey, C.; Larson, R.A.; Harris, G.A.

    1989-06-01

    The Data Qualification Manual (DQM) has been developed to discuss the process required to qualify data generated for the Buried Waste Program (BWP). The data from the BWP tasks conducted at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) and elsewhere will lead to remedial decisions being made which are governed by federal regulations administered by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Data qualification is the process of insuring that only data of planned and known qualities are used to make a decision or answer a question. Although it is the Data Integrity Review Committee's (DIRC) responsibility to insure that the quality of all BWP data is ultimately verified and validated, all personnel who participate in the data gathering process will affect the quality of the data and must be responsible for knowing what is required to produce data of the planned quality. Therefore this manual is addressed to all participants in a data-gathering task. This manual discusses requirements to support data qualification in several areas, including: the sampling and analysis plan; data quality objectives and PARCC goals; sample custody documentation; quality assurance; assembly of the data qualification package; and existing data. 23 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs

  14. Buried waste containment system materials. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, J.R.; Shaw, P.G.

    1997-10-01

    This report describes the results of a test program to validate the application of a latex-modified cement formulation for use with the Buried Waste Containment System (BWCS) process during a proof of principle (POP) demonstration. The test program included three objectives. One objective was to validate the barrier material mix formulation to be used with the BWCS equipment. A basic mix formula for initial trials was supplied by the cement and latex vendors. The suitability of the material for BWCS application was verified by laboratory testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A second objective was to determine if the POP BWCS material emplacement process adversely affected the barrier material properties. This objective was met by measuring and comparing properties of material prepared in the INEEL Materials Testing Laboratory (MTL) with identical properties of material produced by the BWCS field tests. These measurements included hydraulic conductivity to determine if the material met the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requirements for barriers used for hazardous waste sites, petrographic analysis to allow an assessment of barrier material separation and segregation during emplacement, and a set of mechanical property tests typical of concrete characterization. The third objective was to measure the hydraulic properties of barrier material containing a stop-start joint to determine if such a feature would meet the EPA requirements for hazardous waste site barriers

  15. Surgical treatment of buried penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipszyc, E; Pfister, C; Liard, A; Mitrofanoff, P

    1997-10-01

    The buried penis is a rare congenital entity, whose treatment is surgical. There are few publications concerning this matter. The authors report on their experience in 10 cases (1990-1995). In this abnormality, the tip of the glans does not project from the pubic or scrotal skin. It is due to: 1) an excessive development of the penile fascia which retracts the penis; 2) insufficient attachment of the penile skin at the base of the penis; 3) often excessive prepubic fat worsens the appearance of the abnormality but does not by itself totally explain it; 4) a tight phimosis is often present. Surgical treatment is necessary because this aspect tends to persist even after puberty. One cannot indeed count on the development at the age of puberty, neither on the diminution of the fat, nor on the simple cure of the phimosis. One must above all ban circumcision which causes the risk of eliminating the skin necessary for reconstruction. The surgical procedure will comprise: 1) a longitudinal dorsal incision extended circumferentially; 2) resection of the thickened fascia penis; 3) anchoring of the deep face of the dermis to the proximal part of the fascia penis at the base of the penis. This surgical procedure has always brought a significant improvement to the appearance of the penis.

  16. Standard guide for three methods of assessing buried steel tanks

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1998-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers procedures to be implemented prior to the application of cathodic protection for evaluating the suitability of a tank for upgrading by cathodic protection alone. 1.2 Three procedures are described and identified as Methods A, B, and C. 1.2.1 Method A—Noninvasive with primary emphasis on statistical and electrochemical analysis of external site environment corrosion data. 1.2.2 Method B—Invasive ultrasonic thickness testing with external corrosion evaluation. 1.2.3 Method C—Invasive permanently recorded visual inspection and evaluation including external corrosion assessment. 1.3 This guide presents the methodology and the procedures utilizing site and tank specific data for determining a tank's condition and the suitability for such tanks to be upgraded with cathodic protection. 1.4 The tank's condition shall be assessed using Method A, B, or C. Prior to assessing the tank, a preliminary site survey shall be performed pursuant to Section 8 and the tank shall be tightness test...

  17. [Congenital buried penis in the child: about a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rami, Mohamed; Bakkaly, Achraf El; Bouljrouf, Jaouad; Lafia, Toualouth; Bouhafs, Mohammed Amine; Belkacem, Rachid

    2017-01-01

    Congenital buried penis in the child is a congenital malformation where the penis appears small in size while all the parts of the organ are normal (the urethra, the erectile tissue and the glans penis). Our study aimed to describe our experience in the surgical treatment of this abnormality. We report the case of a 18-months old infant with bilateral hydrocele initially admitted to the Emergency Department and then referred to our Department. Clinical examination showed buried penis with tight foreskin and a dilation of the preputial reservoir due to urine. Surgical procedure included several steps: Z-shaped incision, pulling back of the foreskin of the penis, release of the adhesions surrounding the corpus cavernosum and ventral penile skin coverage using bladder catheter kept for a week to protect the wound healing. Aesthetic and functional result was satisfactory after 1-year follow-up. Congenital buried penis is a very debated subject in the literature. Our technique was simple and easily reproducible. Voiding difficulties and urinary infection are the main indications of this surgical procedure.

  18. Performance evaluation of buried pipe installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effects of geometric and mechanical parameters characterizing the soil structure interaction developed in a buried pipe installation located under roads/highways. The drainage pipes or culverts installed ...

  19. 47 CFR 32.2423 - Buried cable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2423 Buried cable. (a... of cleaning manholes and ducts in connection with construction work and the cost of permits and...

  20. Implementation of the buried waste integrated demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, K.M.; Merrill, S.K.

    1992-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Technology Development (OTD) has initiated the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) to resolve technological deficiencies associated with the remediation of radioactive and hazardous buried waste. The BWID mission is to identify, demonstrate, and transfer innovative technologies for the remediation of DOE buried waste. To accomplish the mission, BWID is using a systems approach which supports the development of a suite of advanced and innovative technologies for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. This systems approach includes technologies for theentire remediation cycle. Specifically, BWID sponsors technology development in the following technology categories: site and waste characterization, retrieval, preprocessing, ex situ treatment, packaging, transportation, storage, disposal, and post-disposal monitoring

  1. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  2. TNX Burying Ground: Environmental information document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunaway, J.K.W.; Johnson, W.F.; Kingley, L.E.; Simmons, R.V.; Bledsoe, H.W.

    1987-03-01

    The TNX Burying Ground, located within the TNX Area of the Savannah River Plant (SRP), was originally built to dispose of debris from an experimental evaporator explosion at TNX in 1953. This evaporator contained approximately 590 kg of uranyl nitrate. From 1980 to 1984, much of the waste material buried at TNX was excavated and sent to the SRP Radioactive Waste Burial Grounds for reburial. An estimated 27 kg of uranyl nitrate remains buried at TNX. The TNX Burying Ground consists of three sites known to contain waste and one site suspected of containing waste material. All four sites are located within the TNX security fenceline. Groundwater at the TNX Burying Ground was not evaluated because there are no groundwater monitoring wells installed in the immediate vicinity of this waste site. The closure options considered for the TNX Burying Ground are waste removal and closure, no waste removal and closure, and no action. The predominant pathways for human exposure to chemical and/or radioactive constituents are through surface, subsurface, and atmospheric transport. Modeling calculations were made to determine the risks to human population via these general pathways for the three postulated closure options. An ecological assessment was conducted to predict the environmental impacts on aquatic and terrestrial biota. The relative costs for each of the closure options were estimated

  3. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  4. Remote technologies for buried waste retrieval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.M.; Rice, P.

    1995-01-01

    The DOE is evaluating what should be done with this buried waste. Although the radioactive waste is not particularly mobile unless airborne, some of it was buried with volatile organics and/or other substances that tend to spread easily to surrounding soil or water tables. Volatile organics are hazardous materials (such as trichloroethylene) and require clean-up at certain levels in drinking water. There is concern that the buried volatile organics will spread into the water table and contaminate drinking water. Because of this, the DOE is considering options for handling this buried waste and reducing the risks of spreading or exposure. There are two primary options: containment and stabilization, or retrieval. Containment and stabilization systems would include systems that would leave the waste where it is, but contain and stabilize it so that the radioactive and hazardous materials would not spread to the surrounding soil, water, or air. For example, an in situ vitrification system could be used to melt the waste into a composite glass-like material that would not leach into the surrounding soil, water, or air. Retrieval systems are those that would remove the waste from its burial location for treatment and/or repackaging for long term storage. The objective of this project was to develop and demonstrate remote technologies that would minimize dust generation and the spread of airborne contaminants during buried waste retrieval. Remote technologies are essential for the retrieval of buried waste because they remove workers from the hazardous environment and provide greater automation, reducing the chances of human error. Minimizing dust generation is also essential to increased safety for the workers and the environment during buried waste retrieval. The main contaminants within the waste are micron-sized particles of plutonium and americium oxides, chlorides, and hydroxides, which are easily suspended in air and spread if disturbed

  5. The Blackfoot 111 buried geophone experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cieslewicz, D.; Lawton, D.C. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1999-07-01

    As an important difference between a VSP and a conventional survey is the presence of the near-surface layer in the latter, it is possible that overburden materials are particularly attenuative to shear waves, causing an observed narrower bandwidth of converted waves in a seismic experiment conducted in the Blackfoot oil field. The Blackfoot III buried geophone experiment tested this hypothesis by recording data with three component geophones buried to various depths in the near surface. By avoiding a portion of the near surface, buried geophones might avoid a certain amount of attenuation, resulting in a better bandwidth and hence vertical resolution for P-S reflections in particular. Accessory seismic studies of near-surface velocity and impedance were made using the buried geophone data, made possible by the unique geometry of the experiment. The P-P processed data had comparable data quality at all geophone depths, whereas the processed surface P-S data had superior quality over data from the buried phones. This was a result of greater amounts of mode leakage and lower raw reflection amplitudes in the buried phones. No systematic improvement in P-S or P-P reflection bandwidth was noted for deeper geophones; inconsistent geophone coupling was partly a factor in this observation. Raw reflection amplitudes through the near surface are controlled mainly by the impedance of near-surface sediments. Near-surface velocities are typical for unconsolidated overburden for the western 2/3 of the buried receiver line, but increases to values more typical of unweathered bedrock for the eastern 1/3. This probably shows a thinning of the overburden layer in this area. 2 refs.

  6. Solution-deposited F:SnO₂/TiO₂ as a base-stable protective layer and antireflective coating for microtextured buried-junction H₂-evolving Si photocathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Matthew G; Enman, Lisa J; Gurnon, Nicholas J; Nadarajah, Athavan; Boettcher, Shannon W

    2014-12-24

    Protecting Si photocathodes from corrosion is important for developing tandem water-splitting devices operating in basic media. We show that textured commercial Si-pn(+) photovoltaics protected by solution-processed semiconducting/conducting oxides (plausibly suitable for scalable manufacturing) and coupled to thin layers of Ir yield high-performance H2-evolving photocathodes in base. They also serve as excellent test structures to understand corrosion mechanisms and optimize interfacial electrical contacts between various functional layers. Solution-deposited TiO2 protects Si-pn(+) junctions from corrosion for ∼24 h in base, whereas junctions protected by F:SnO2 fail after only 1 h of electrochemical cycling. Interface layers consisting of Ti metal and/or the highly doped F:SnO2 between the Si and TiO2 reduce Si-emitter/oxide/catalyst contact resistance and thus increase fill factor and efficiency. Controlling the oxide thickness led to record photocurrents near 35 mA cm(-2) at 0 V vs RHE and photocathode efficiencies up to 10.9% in the best cells. Degradation, however, was not completely suppressed. We demonstrate that performance degrades by two mechanisms, (1) deposition of impurities onto the thin catalyst layers, even from high-purity base, and (2) catastrophic failure via pinholes in the oxide layers after several days of operation. These results provide insight into the design of hydrogen-evolving photoelectrodes in basic conditions, and highlight challenges.

  7. Cathode materials review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Mohanty, Debasish, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Li, Jianlin, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Wood, David L., E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS6472 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6472 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  8. Cathode materials review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO 2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research

  9. Cathode materials review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  10. Concealed epispadias associated with a buried penis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sol Melgar, Ricardo; Gorduza, Daniela; Demède, Delphine; Mouriquand, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The aim was to describe the clinical presentation and the surgical management of penile epispadias associated with a buried penis in five children. This is a 5-year retrospective review of patients presenting with a buried penis, a congenital defect of the penile skin shaft associated with an unretractable foreskin for whom a penile epispadias was found at the time of surgery. All had undergone surgery combining a Cantwell-Ransley procedure and refashioning of the penile skin following the authors' technique. Three children had a glanular epispadias and two had a midshaft epispadias. Four had a satisfactory outcome, and one required a complementary urethroplasty for glanular dehiscence. Buried penis and epispadias are usually isolated congenital anomalies, although they can be associated. It is therefore recommended to warn parents about the possibility of underlying penile anomaly in children with buried penises and unretractable foreskin. Careful palpation of the dorsum of the glans through the foreskin looking for a dorsal cleft could indicate an associated epispadiac urethra. Surgical correction of both anomalies can be done at the same time. Parents of boys with buried penises should be warned that underlying penile anomaly may exist. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. In situ vitrification: Application to buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Callow, R.A.; Thompson, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    Two in situ vitrification field tests were conducted in June and July 1990 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification is a technology for in-place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form and is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to assess the general suitability of the process to remediate buried waste structures found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests were designed as part of a treatability study to provide essential information on field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes, and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology provided valuable operational control for successfully processing the high metal content waste. The results indicate that in situ vitrification is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 2 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Filtered cathodic arc source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45 degree to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures

  13. Ground Shock Resistant of Buried Nuclear Power Plant Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornai, D.; Adar, A.; Gal, E.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) might be subjected to hostile attacks such as Earth Penetrating Weapons (EPW) that carry explosive charges. Explosions of these weapons near buried NPP facility might cause collapse, breaching, spalling, deflection, shear, rigid body motion (depending upon the foundations), and in-structure shock. The occupants and the equipment in the buried facilities are exposed to the in-structure motions, and if they are greater than their fragility values than occupants might be wounded or killed and the equipment might be damaged, unless protective measures will be applied. NPP critical equipment such as pumps are vital for the normal safe operation since it requires constant water circulation between the nuclear reactor and the cooling system, including in case of an immediate shut down. This paper presents analytical- semi empirical formulation and analysis of the explosion of a penetrating weapon with a warhead of 100kgs TNT (Trinitrotoluene) that creates ground shock effect on underground NPP structure containing equipment, such as a typical pump. If the in-structure spectral shock is greater than the pump fragility values than protective measures are required, otherwise a real danger to the NPP safety might occur

  14. A corrosion detection system for buried pipeline (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Yoon Seok; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jung Gu

    2005-01-01

    In order to develop a new corrosion sensor for detecting and monitoring the corrosion of buried pipeline, the electrochemical property of sensors and the correlation of its output to corrosion rate of steel pipe, were evaluated by electrochemical methods in synthetic groundwater, two soils of varying resistivity (5,000 ohm-cm, 10,000 ohm-cm), and synthetic tap water. In this paper, two types of electrochemical probes were used: galvanic cells containing of pipeline steel-copper and pipeline steel-stainless steel (Type 304). The results of EIS measurement indicated that the sensor current was inversely related to sensor resistance, which was governed by the corrosion behavior of cathode. In galvanic corrosion tests, the galvanic current of Cu-CS probe was higher than that of SS-CS probe. The comparison of the sensor output and corrosion rates revealed that a linear relationship was found between the probe current and the corrosion rates. A good linear quantitative relationship was found between the Cu-CS probe current and the corrosion rate of pipeline steel coupons in the soil resistivity of 5,000 ohm-cm, and synthetic tap water. In the case of the soil resistivity of 10,000 ohm-cm, although the SS-CS probe showed a better linear correlation than that of Cu-CS probe, the Cu-CS probe is more suitable than SS-CS probe, due to the high current output

  15. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration stakeholder involvement model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaupanger, R.M.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Milam, L.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Stakeholder participation in the DOE Environmental Management decision-making process is critical to remediation efforts. Appropriate mechanisms for communication with the public, private sector, regulators, elected officials, and others are being aggressively pursued by BWID to permit informed participation. This document summarizes public outreach efforts during FY-93 and presents a strategy for expanded stakeholder involvement during FY-94

  16. Buried Landmines in Libya and Detection Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Bakkoush, F.A.

    2015-01-01

    In this Article, presentation and discussion of the impact of detonated buried land mines in vast areas of land in Libya are given, especially from economical and social point of view. The methods and techniques which are currently used to allocate the positions of buried land mines during de mining operations are mentioned and discussed with emphasize on their strength and weakness. These include mechanical removing methods, prodders, metal detectors, ground penetrating radar and sniffing dogs. Furthermore, the novel and most developed detection techniques invented to detect land mines using SQUDS and neutron techniques based on thermal neutron backscattering and elemental analysis by fast and thermal neutrons are given and discussed.

  17. The development of a ballistic method for simulating fragments from buried explosive devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jagt-Deutekom, M.J. van der

    2016-01-01

    No standard scientific methodology currently exists to assess the performance of personal protection equipment (PPE) against secondary debris, such as soil, grit and stones, ejected when a buried improvised explosive device (IED) detonates. Different test methods are used for this evaluation. The

  18. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  19. In situ vitrification on buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, S.O.

    1992-01-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is being evaluated as a remedial treatment technology for buried mixed and transuranic (TRU) wastes at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and can be related to buried wastes at other Department of Energy (DOE) sites. There are numerous locations around the DOE Complex where wastes were buried in the ground or stored for future burial. The Buried Waste Program (BWP) is conducting a comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the Department of Energy - Field Office Idaho (DOE-ID). As part of the RI/FS, an ISV scoping study on the treatability of the SDA mixed low-level and mixed TRU waste is being performed for applicability to remediation of the waste at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). The ISV project being conducted at the INEL by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. consists of a treatability investigation to collect data to satisfy nine CERCLA criteria with regards to the SDA. This treatability investigation involves a series of experiments and related efforts to study the feasibility of ISV for remediation of mixed and TRU waste disposed of at the SDA

  20. 7 CFR 1755.505 - Buried services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... using the recommendations in RUS Bulletin 1751F-640, “Design of Buried Plant—Physical Considerations... water, oil, sewer) and structures 4 2 [50.8] Wires or cables of another communications system 2 [50.8] 1... wire or cable size and type of surface shall be in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendation...

  1. Analysis of buried pipelines at Kozloduy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asfura, A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes the analysis of the buried pipelines at Kozloduy NPP. It involves the description of the studied pipelines, their properties, a detailed description of the methodology applied, and the evaluation of the soil strain field as well as the graphical representation of the results obtained

  2. Micromachining of buried micro channels in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Meint J.; Tjerkstra, R.W.; Berenschot, Johan W.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Burger, G.J.; Burger, G.J.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Elwenspoek, Michael Curt; van den Berg, Albert

    A new method for the fabrication of micro structures for fluidic applications, such as channels, cavities, and connector holes in the bulk of silicon wafers, called buried channel technology (BCT), is presented in this paper. The micro structures are constructed by trench etching, coating of the

  3. Tests of a system to exclude roots from buried radioactive waste in a warm, humid climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Corey, J.C.; Adriano, D.C.; Decker, O.D.; Griggs, R.D.

    1989-01-01

    Vegetation is commonly used to stabilize the ground covering buried waste sites. However, constituents of buried waste can be brought to the surface if the waste is penetrated by plant roots. An ideal waste burial system would allow the use of vegetation to stabilize the soil above the buried waste but would exclude roots from the waste. One system that shows considerable promise is a slow release encapsulation of a root growth inhibitor (Trifluralin). Projected lifetimes of the capsule are in the order of 100 years. The capsule is bonded to a geotextile, which provides an easy means of distributing the capsule evenly over the area to be protected. Vegetation grown in the soil above the barrier has provided good ground cover, although some decrease in growth has been found in some species. Of the species tested the sensitivity to the biobarrier, as measured by the distance root growth stops near the barrier, is bamboo> bahia grass> bermuda grass> soybean. Potential uses for the biobarrier at the Savannah River Site (SRS) include the protection of clay caps over buried, low-level saltstone and protection of gravel drains and clay caps over decommissioned seepage basins. Trails of the biobarrier as part of waste site caps are scheduled to begin during the next 12 months

  4. Field-scale permeation testing of jet-grouted buried waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.; Zdinak, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) conducted field-scale hydraulic conductivity testing of simulated buried waste sites with improved confinement. The improved confinement was achieved by jet grouting the buried waste, thus creating solid monoliths. The hydraulic conductivity of the monoliths was determined using both the packer technique and the falling head method. The testing was performed on simulated buried waste sites utilizing a variety of encapsulating grouts, including high-sulfate-resistant Portland cement, TECT, (a proprietary iron oxide cement) and molten paraffin. By creating monoliths using in-situ jet grouting of encapsulating materials, the waste is simultaneously protected from subsidence and contained against further migration of contaminants. At the INEL alone there is 56,000 m 3 of buried transuranic waste commingled with 170,000--224,000 m 3 of soil in shallow land burial. One of the options for this buried waste is to improve the confinement and leave it in place for final disposal. Knowledge of the hydraulic conductivity for these monoliths is important for decision-makers. The packer tests involved coring the monolith, sealing off positions within the core with inflatable packers, applying pressurized water to the matrix behind the seal, and observing the water flow rate. The falling head tests were performed in full-scale 3-m-diameter, 3-m-high field-scale permeameters. In these permeameters, both water inflow and outflow were measured and equated to a hydraulic conductivity

  5. Evidence for aeolian origins of heuweltjies from buried gravel layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Cramer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Although heuweltjies (19–32 m diameter dominate the surface of much of the southwestern Cape of South Africa, their origins, distribution and age remain controversial. Current hypotheses are that the heuweltjies are (1 constructed by the excavation and mounding habits of burrowing animals; (2 the result of erosion by water of areas between patches protected from fluvial action by denser vegetation or (3 the product of localised aeolian sediment accumulation beneath denser vegetation associated with termitaria. At a site where quartz-containing gravels occur on the soil surface in areas between heuweltjies, these gravels were found to extend as a relatively intact layer of uniform concentration from the inter-mound area into the mound at the same plane as the surrounding soil surface. This buried layer suggests that heuweltjies were either built-up by deposition on a previous soil surface layer or eroded from sediment accumulated above the buried gravel layer. Mounds contain a relatively large proportion of silt consistent with sediment deposition. Mound sediment elemental composition was strongly correlated with that of local shale, indicating a local source of sediment. Pedogenesis was considerably more advanced off- than on-mound. There was no evidence of extensive regional aeolian sediment mantling over the vast area in which the heuweltjies occur. These findings and observations support the aeolian deposition hypothesis of heuweltjie origins combined with a degree of erosion, rather than a termite bioturbation hypothesis or a predominantly erosion-based hypothesis.

  6. Performance Enhancement of Small Molecular Solar Cells by Bilayer Cathode Buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qinjun; Zhao, Huanbin; Zhou, Miao; Gao, Liyan; Hao, Yuying

    2016-04-01

    An effective composite bilayer cathode buffer structure is proposed for use in small molecular solar cells. CsF was doped in Alq3 to form the first cathode buffer, leading to small serial resistances. BCP was used as the second cathode buffer to block the holes to the electrode. The optimized bilayer cathode buffer significantly increased the short circuit and fill factor of devices. By integrating this bilayer cathode buffer, the CuPc/C60 small molecular heterojunction cell exhibited a power conversion efficiency of up to 0.8%, which was an improvement of 56% compared to a device with only the Alq3 cathode buffer. Meanwhile, the bilayer cathode buffer still has a good protective effect on the performance of the device.

  7. Air cathode structure manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  8. Cathode ray tube screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockayne, B.; Robbins, D.J.; Glasper, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An improved cathode ray tube screen is described which consists of a single- or a poly-crystalline slice of a material such as yttrium aluminium garnet in which dopants such as Tb 3 + , Eu 3 + , Ce 3 + or Tm 3 + are ion implanted to different depths or in different areas of the screen. Annealing the screen removes lattice damage caused by the ion implanting and assists the diffusion of the dopant into the crystal. (U.K.)

  9. Arc cathode spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrade, H.O.

    1989-01-01

    Arc spots are usually highly unstable and jump statistically over the cathode surface. In a magnetic field parallel to the surface, preferably they move in the retrograde direction; i.e., opposite to the Lorentzian rule. If the field is inclined with respect to the surface, the spots drift away at a certain angle with respect to the proper retrograde direction (Robson drift motion). These well-known phenomena are explained by one stability theory

  10. Cathode ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A cathode ray tube comprises two electron lens means in combination to crossover the electron beam at a second crossover between the two electron lens means with one of the two lens means having a variable voltage applied thereto to control the location of the beam crossover in order to focus the beam onto a display screen at any location away from the screen center. (Auth.)

  11. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Strategy Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) needs and objectives. The present focus of BWID is to support retrieval and ex situ treatment configuration options. Future activities will explore and support containment and stabilization efforts in addition to the retrieval/ex situ treatment options. Long and short term strategies of the BWID are provided. Processes for identifying technological needs, screening candidate technologies for BWID applicability, researching technical issues, field demonstrating technologies, evaluating demonstration results to determine each technology's threshold of capability, and commercializing successfully demonstrated technologies for implementation for environmental restoration also are presented in this report

  12. Seismic induced earth pressures in buried vaults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, C.A.; Costantino, C.J.

    1994-01-01

    The magnitude and distribution of earth pressures acting on buried structures and induced by a seismic event are considered in this paper. A soil-structure-interaction analysis is performed for typical Department of Energy high level waste storage tanks using a lumped parameter model. The resulting soil pressure distributions are determined and compared with the static soil pressure to assess the design significance of the seismic induced soil pressures. It is found that seismic pressures do not control design unless the peak ground acceleration exceeds about 0.3 G. The effect of soil non linearities (resulting from local soil failure) are also found to have little effect on the predictions of the seismic response of the buried structure. The seismic induced pressures are found to be very similar to those predicted using the elastic model in ASCE 4-86

  13. Detection and mapping of buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, G.; Odenweller, J.; Huff, D.

    1996-01-01

    A major environmental concern today is the characterization, remediation, and monitoring of Federal waste sites, such as those operated by the Department of Energy (DOE). A significant amount of hazardous waste is buried at known sites on DOE reservations. Determining the exact location of buried waste trenches is an important step in the characterization and remediation of these sites. Remotely sensed imagery offers a rich source of information for accomplishing this task. This paper presents a case study conducted at Solid Waste Storage Area 4 (SWSA 4) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Historical aerial photography and recently collected multispectral imagery were analyzed to determine the precise locations of the buried trenches. A comparison of the results to recent ground measurements indicates the strengths and weaknesses of the remote sensing approach. Further analysis of these ground data also provides an understanding of the phenomenology that gives rise to the imagery signatures associated with the trenches. Application of these techniques can significantly reduce the costs of site remediation. By knowing the trench locations precisely, rather than the general locations, remediation alternatives to contain and isolate the waste materials can be tailored appropriately

  14. DOE complex buried waste characterization assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaae, P.S.; Holter, G.M.; Garrett, S.M.K.

    1993-01-01

    The work described in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to provide information to the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. The information in this report is intended to provide a complex-wide planning base for th.e BWID to ensure that BWID activities are appropriately focused to address the range of remediation problems existing across the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This report contains information characterizing the 2.1 million m 3 of buried and stored wastes and their associated sites at six major DOE facilities. Approximately 85% of this waste is low-level waste, with about 12% TRU or TRU mixed waste; the remaining 3% is low-level mixed waste. In addition, the report describes soil contamination sites across the complex. Some of the details that would be useful in further characterizing the buried wastes and contaminated soil sites across the DOE complex are either unavailable or difficult to locate. Several options for accessing this information and/or improving the information that is available are identified in the report. This document is a companion to Technology Needs for Remediation: Hanford and Other DOE Sites, PNL-8328 (Stapp 1993)

  15. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  16. pipelines cathodic protection design methodologies for impressed

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    oil and gas pipelines corrosion in the United State of. American alone ... or preventing external corrosion of pipeline steels and other metallic .... 2.1 Materials and Impressed Current Design. Carbon steel ..... Research Analysis, Vol. 2, pp 2277 ...

  17. Production of conductive coke for cathodic protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mogollon, E.G.; Henao, L.E.; Pacheco, L.A.; Ortiz, J.L.; Diaz, J.J. [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota (Colombia). Departamento de Quimica

    1999-07-01

    The reduction of resistivity of coke by means of the cocarbonization of mixtures of coking coals was studied using coal tar as an additive. Optimum temperature and blending conditions for decreased resistivity were investigated. The effect of particle size on the dependency of coal rank was investigated. 2 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Contribution of buried aspartic acid to the stability of the PDZ2 protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayasimha, Pruthvi; Shanmuganathan, Aranganathan; Suladze, Saba; Makhatadze, George I.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Buried Asp residues on average form 2.5 to 3 hydrogen bonds and/or 0.8 salt bridges. ► Contribution of buried Asp to stability was estimated using model protein PDZ2. ► The energetic contribution of Asp56 to PDZ2 stability estimated to be 18 kJ · mol −1 . ► Findings are discussed in terms of contribution of Asp residues to protein stability. - Abstract: Statistical analysis of protein structures shows that buried aspartic acid residues on average form 2.5 to 3 hydrogen bonds and/or 0.8 potential ionic interactions with other protein groups. To estimate the energetic contribution of such buried groups to the Gibbs free energy of proteins, we measured the effects of amino acid substitutions of D56 in a model protein PDZ2 on its stability. We used temperature-induced unfolding monitored by DSC and denaturant-induced unfolding monitored by the changes in fluorescence intensity. We find that all substitutions of D56 lead to protein unfolding, thus suggesting that this buried hydrogen bonded aspartic acid has a significant contribution to the stability. To quantify the changes in the Gibbs free energy, one of the variants, D56N was stabilized by addition of the protective osmolyte TMAO. Comparison of the stability of the D56N variant with the wild-type PDZ2 in the presence and absence of TMAO allowed us to estimate the contribution of D56 to the protein stability to be 18 kJ · mol −1 . These findings are discussed in terms of contribution of buried ionizable groups to protein stability.

  19. Depression cathode structure for cathode ray tubes having surface smoothness and method for producing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rychlewski, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    Depression cathode structures for cathode ray tubes are produced by dispensing liquid cathode material into the depression of a metallic supporting substrate, removing excess cathode material by passing a doctor blade across the substrate surface and over the depression, and drying the cathode layer to a substantially immobile state. The cathode layer may optionally be further shaped prior to substantially complete drying thereof

  20. Stabilization of ancient organic matter in deep buried paleosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.; Chaopricha, N. T.; Mueller, C.; Diefendorf, A. F.; Plante, A. F.; Grandy, S.; Mason, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    terrestrial vegetation biomarkers. The strong presence of vascular plant-derived terpenoids and long-chain n-alkyl lipids suggest a grassland origin. Respiration rates of the buried soil in a laboratory incubation were negligible compared to modern surface A and B horizons, and responded little to wetting. These results suggest that moisture alone does not limit decomposition in the buried soil, at least over the 120-day incubation. Solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy reveals that the Brady soil is enriched in aromatic C, with high contributions of char, especially in the oPOM-small fraction. Thermal analysis showed high thermal stability of oPOM-small and bulk soils in the Brady soil compared to modern surface horizons. Radiocarbon ages and chemical composition of OM isolated from a deep paleosol suggest little modification since burial and may indicate rapid stabilization of plant-derived organic C by burial. The accumulation of char in the aggregate-protected fraction of the Brady soil provides additional evidence for warming and drying conditions during the time of loess deposition at this site. Developing a better understanding of the mechanisms that control long-term SOM stabilization is important for understanding how soil C is sequestered over millennia and for predicting how future disturbances may affect deep soil C.

  1. Is overprotection of the sulfur cathode good for Li-S batteries?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Tian; Shao, Jie; Li, Xingxing; Zhu, Guobin; Lu, Qiujian; Han, Yuyao; Qu, Qunting; Zheng, Honghe

    2015-08-11

    How to restrain the dissolution of polysulfides from the sulfur cathode is the current research focus of Li-S batteries. Here, we find that moderate dissolution of polysulfides is of great importance for high-efficiency and stable discharge/charge cycling. Both overprotection and inadequate protection of the sulfur cathode are unfavorable for the cycling of Li-S batteries.

  2. Nanostructured lanthanum manganate composite cathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei Guo; Liu, Yi-Lin; Barfod, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    that the (La1-xSrx)(y)MnO3 +/-delta (LSM) composite cathodes consist of a network of homogenously distributed LSM, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and pores. The individual grain size of LSM or YSZ is approximately 100 nm. The degree of contact between cathode and electrolyte is 39% on average. (c) 2005...

  3. Testing Iodine as a New Fuel for Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glad, Harley; Branam, Richard; Rogers, Jim; Warren, Matthew; Burleson, Connor; Siy, Grace

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this research is to demonstrate the viability of using iodine as an alternative space propulsion propellant. The demonstration requires the testing of a cathode with xenon and then the desired element iodine. Currently, cathodes run on noble gases such as xenon which must be stored in high pressure canisters and is very expensive. These shortcomings have led to researching possible substitutes. Iodine was decided as a suitable candidate because it's cheaper, can be stored as a solid, and has similar mass properties as xenon. In this research, cathodes will be placed in a vacuum chamber and operated on both gases to observe their performance, allowing us to gain a better understanding of iodine's behavior. Several planned projects depend on the knowledge gained from this project, such as larger scaled tests and iodine fed hall thrusters. The tasks of this project included protecting the stainless-steel vacuum chamber by gold plating and Teflon® coating, building a stand to hold the cathode, creating an anode resistant to iodine, and testing the cathode once setup was complete. The successful operation of the cathode was demonstrated. However, the experimental setup proved ineffective at controlling the iodine flow. Current efforts are focused on this problem. REU Site: Fluid Mechanics with Analysis using Computations and Experiments NSF Grant EEC 1659710.

  4. Field application of innovative grouting agents for in situ stabilization of buried waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.; Farnsworth, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents field applications for two innovative grouting agents that were used to in situ stabilize buried waste sites, via jet grouting. The two grouting agents include paraffin and a proprietary iron oxide based cement grout called TECT. These materials were tested in specially designed cold test pits that simulate buried transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The field demonstrations were performed at the INEL in an area referred to as the Cold Test Pit, which is adjacent to the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). At the RWMC, 56,000 m 3 of transuranic (TRU) waste is co-mingled with over 170,000 m 3 of soil in shallow land burial. Improving the confinement of this waste is one of the options for final disposition of this waste. Using jet-grouting technology to inject these materials into the pore spaces of buried waste sites results in the creation of buried monolithic waste forms that simultaneously protect the waste from subsidence, while eliminating the migratory potential of hazardous and radioactive contaminants in the waste

  5. Virtual environmental applications for buried waste characterization technology evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The project, Virtual Environment Applications for Buried Waste Characterization, was initiated in the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program in fiscal year 1994. This project is a research and development effort that supports the remediation of buried waste by identifying and examining the issues, needs, and feasibility of creating virtual environments using available characterization and other data. This document describes the progress and results from this project during the past year

  6. Virtual environmental applications for buried waste characterization technology evaluation report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    The project, Virtual Environment Applications for Buried Waste Characterization, was initiated in the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program in fiscal year 1994. This project is a research and development effort that supports the remediation of buried waste by identifying and examining the issues, needs, and feasibility of creating virtual environments using available characterization and other data. This document describes the progress and results from this project during the past year.

  7. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.

    1987-01-01

    This task is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34,000 liters of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. The grout was also completely contained within the two trenches as no grout constituents were observed in the 12 perimeter ground water monitoring wells. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over polyacrylate grout because of its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty of controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization process in the presence of potassium ferricyanide. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 115 years in the test soil. However, this calculated value is likely to be conservatively low because microbial degradation of the grout set accelerator or residual monomer may be contributing most to the measured microbial respiration. Addition work, using 14 C-labeled acrylate and acrylamide grouts, is being carried out to more accurately estimate the grouts' microbiological half-life

  8. Retrieval of buried waste using conventional equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentich, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    A field test was conducted to determine the effectiveness of using conventional type construction equipment for the retrieval of buried transuranic (TRU) waste. A cold (nonhazardous and nonradioactive test pit 841 m 3 in volume) was constructed with boxes and drums filled with simulated waste materials, such as metal, plastic, wood, concrete, and sludge. Large objects, including truck beds, vessels, vaults, pipes, and beams were also placed in the pit. These materials were intended to simulate the type of waste found in existing TRU buried waste pits and trenches. A series of commercially available equipment items, such as excavators and tracked loaders outfitted with different end effectors, were used to remove the simulated waste. Work was performed from both the abovegrade and belowgrade positions. During the demonstration, a number of observations, measurements, and analyses were performed to determine which equipment was the most effective in removing the waste. The retrieval rates for the various excavation techniques were recorded. The inherent dust control capabilities of the excavation methods used were also observed

  9. Electron emission from pseudospark cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Gundersen, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The pseudospark cathode has the remarkable property of macroscopically homogeneous electron emission at very high current density (>1 kA/cm 2 ) over a large area (some cm 2 ). The model of electron emission presented here is based on the assumption that the pseudospark microscopically utilizes explosive arc processes, as distinct from earlier models of ''anomalous emission in superdense glow discharges.'' Explosive emission similar to vacuum are cathode spots occurs rapidly when the field strength is sufficiently high. The plasma remains macroscopically homogeneous since the virtual plasma anode adapts to the cathode morphology so that the current is carried by a large number of homogeneously distributed cathode spots which are similar to ''type 1'' and ''type 2'' spots of vacuum arc discharges. The net cathode erosion is greatly reduced relative to ''spark gap-type'' emission. At very high current levels, a transition to highly erosive spot types occurs, and this ''arcing'' leads to a significant reduction in device lifetime. Assuming vacuum-arc-like cathode spots, the observed current density and time constants can be easily explained. The observed cathode erosion rate and pattern, recent fast-camera data, laser-induced fluorescence, and spectroscopic measurements support this approach. A new hypothesis is presented explaining current quenching at relatively low currents. From the point of view of electron emission, the ''superdense glow'' or ''superemissive phase'' of pseudosparks represents an arc and not a glow discharge even if no filamentation or ''arcing'' is observed

  10. Long-range plan for buried transuranic waste studies at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low, J.O.

    1985-12-01

    This document presents a plan to perform detailed studies of alternatives considered for the long-term management of buried transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The studies will provide the technical basis for DOE to make a decision on the future management of that waste. Although the waste is currently being handled in an acceptable manner, new solutions are continually being researched to improve management techniques. Three alternatives are being considered: (a) leave the waste as is; (b) improve in situ confinement of the waste; and (c) retrieve, process, and certify the waste for disposal at a federal repository. Fourteen studies are described in this plan for Alternatives 2 and 3. The leave-as-is alternative involves continuing present procedures for managing the buried waste. An ongoing environmental surveillance program, a low-level-waste stabilization program, and enhanced subsurface migration studies begun in FY-1984 at the INEL will provide data for the decision-making process for the INEL buried TRU waste. These ongoing studies for the leave-as-is alternative are summarized in this plan in limited detail. The improved-confinement alternative involves leaving the waste in place, but providing additional protection against wind, water penetration, erosion, and plant and animal intrusion. Several studies proposed under this alternative will examine special techniques to immobilize or encapsulate the buried waste. An in situ grouting study was implemented at the INEL starting in FY-1985 and will be completed at the end of FY-1986 with the grouting of a simulated INEL buried TRU waste trench. Studies of the third alternative will investigate improved retrieval, processing, and certification techniques. New equipment, such as industrial manipulators and excavating machinery, will be tested in the retrieval studies. Processing and certification studies will examine rapidly changing or new technologies

  11. Buried waste integrated demonstration technology integration process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.S.; Ferguson, J.E.

    1992-04-01

    A Technology integration Process was developed for the Idaho National Energy Laboratories (INEL) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) Program to facilitate the transfer of technology and knowledge from industry, universities, and other Federal agencies into the BWID; to successfully transfer demonstrated technology and knowledge from the BWID to industry, universities, and other Federal agencies; and to share demonstrated technologies and knowledge between Integrated Demonstrations and other Department of Energy (DOE) spread throughout the DOE Complex. This document also details specific methods and tools for integrating and transferring technologies into or out of the BWID program. The document provides background on the BWID program and technology development needs, demonstrates the direction of technology transfer, illustrates current processes for this transfer, and lists points of contact for prospective participants in the BWID technology transfer efforts. The Technology Integration Process was prepared to ensure compliance with the requirements of DOE's Office of Technology Development (OTD)

  12. Method of burying vessel containing radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Yoshihito.

    1989-01-01

    A float having an inert gas sealed therein is attached to a tightly closed vessel containing radioactive wastes. The vessel is inserted and kept in a small hole for burying the tightly closed vessel in an excavated shaft in rocks such as of granite or rock salts, while filling bentonite as shielding material therearound. In this case, the float is so adjusted that the apparent specific gravity is made equal or nearer between the tightly closed vessel and the bentonite, so that the rightly closed vessel does not sink and cause direct contact with the rocks even if bentonite flows due to earthquakes, etc. This can prevent radioactivity contamination through water in the rocks. (S.K.)

  13. Research on an improved explosive emission cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guozhi; Sun Jun; Shao Hao; Chen Changhua; Zhang Xiaowei

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a physical description of the cathode plasma process of an explosive emission cathode (EEC) and experimental results on a type of oil-immersed graphite EEC. It is believed that the generation of a cathode plasma is mainly dependent on the state of the cathode surface, and that adsorbed gases and dielectrics on the cathode surface play a leading role in the formation of the cathode plasma. Based on these ideas, a type of oil-immersed graphite EEC is proposed and fabricated. The experiments indicate that the oil-immersed cathodes have improved emissive properties and longer lifetimes.

  14. The surgical correction of buried penis: a new technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boemers, T. M.; de Jong, T. P.

    1995-01-01

    We report a new surgical technique for the correction of buried penis. The study comprised 10 boys with buried penis. The technique consisted of resection of abnormal dartos attachments, unfurling of the prepuce and correction of the deficient shaft skin by reapproximation of the preputial skin

  15. Buried injector logic, a vertical IIL using deep ion implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mouthaan, A.J.

    1987-01-01

    A vertically integrated alternative for integrated injection logic has been realized, named buried injector logic (BIL). 1 MeV ion implantations are used to create buried layers. The vertical pnp and npn transistors have thin base regions and exhibit a limited charge accumulation if a gate is

  16. Buried nodules from the central Indian Ocean basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Parthiban, G.

    . Of these, 13 buried nodules are from two sediment cores in siliceous ooze and seven from two sediment cores in a red clay area. The morphology, size, surface texture and chemical composition of buried nodules from two different sediment type have been...

  17. Integrated test schedule for buried waste integrated demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J.T.; McDonald, J.K.

    1992-05-01

    The Integrated Test Schedule incorporates the various schedules the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports into one document. This document contains the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order schedules for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Hanford Reservation, Oak Ridge Reservation, and Fernald Environmental Materials Center. Included in the Integrated Test Schedule is the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration ''windows of opportunity'' schedule. The ''windows of opportunity'' schedule shows periods of time in which Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program-sponsored technology demonstrations could support key decisions in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order. Schedules for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration-sponsored technology task plans are categorized by technology area and divided by current fiscal year and out-year. Total estimated costs for Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration-sponsored Technology Task Plans for FY-92 through FY-97 are $74.756M

  18. The feasibility and application of PPy in cathodic polarization antifouling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Meng-Yang; Zhang, Zhi-Ming; Yu, Liang-Min; Wang, Jia; Zheng, Tong-Tong

    2018-04-01

    Cathodic polarization antifouling deserves attention because of its environmentally friendly nature and good sustainability. It has been proven that cathodic voltages applied on metal substrates exhibit outstanding antifouling effects. However, most metals immersed in marine environment are protected by insulated anticorrosive coatings, restricting the cathodic polarization applied on metals. This study developed a conducting polypyrrole (PPy)/acrylic resin coating (σ = 0.18 Scm -1 ), which can be applied in cathodic polarization antifouling. The good stability and electro-activity of PPy in the negative polarity zone in alkalescent NaCl solution were verified by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), chronoamperometry (CA), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), demonstrating the feasibility of PPy as cathodic polarization material. Furthermore, the antifouling effects of PPy/acrylicresin coating on 24-h old Escherichia coli bacteria (E. coli) which formed on PPy/acrylic resin-coated plastic plate were measured under different cathodic potentials and treatment time, characterized by fluorescent microscope. The results suggest that at cathodic potential around -0.5 V (vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE)), there was little trace of attached bacteria on the substrate after 20 min of treatment. PPy/acrylicresin-coated substrates were also subjected to repeated cycles of biofilm formation and electrochemical removal, where high removal efficiencies were maintained throughout the total polarization process. Under these conditions, the generation of hydrogen peroxide is believed to be responsible for the antifouling effects because of causing oxidative damage to cells, suggesting the potential of the proposed technology for application on insulated surfaces in various industrial settings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Plan for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, S.

    1994-05-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. This document describes the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality requirements for conducting BWID activities at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Topics discussed in this report, as they apply to BWID operations, include Federal, State of Idaho, and Environmental Protection Agency regulations, Health and Safety Plans, Quality Program Plans, Data Quality Objectives, and training and job hazard analysis. Finally, a discussion is given on CERCLA criteria and System and Performance audits as they apply to the BWID Program

  20. Protective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessam M. Abdel-Wahab

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Many active ingredients extracted from herbal and medicinal plants are extensively studied for their beneficial effects. Antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging properties of thymoquinone (TQ have been reported. The present study evaluated the possible protective effects of TQ against the toxicity and oxidative stress of sodium fluoride (NaF in the liver of rats. Rats were divided into four groups, the first group served as the control group and was administered distilled water whereas the NaF group received NaF orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 4 weeks, TQ group was administered TQ orally at a dose of 10 mg/kg for 5 weeks, and the NaF-TQ group was first given TQ for 1 week and was secondly administered 10 mg/kg/day NaF in association with 10 mg/kg TQ for 4 weeks. Rats intoxicated with NaF showed a significant increase in lipid peroxidation whereas the level of reduced glutathione (GSH and the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione S-transferase (GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx were reduced in hepatic tissues. The proper functioning of the liver was also disrupted as indicated by alterations in the measured liver function indices and biochemical parameters. TQ supplementation counteracted the NaF-induced hepatotoxicity probably due to its strong antioxidant activity. In conclusion, the results obtained clearly indicated the role of oxidative stress in the induction of NaF toxicity and suggested hepatoprotective effects of TQ against the toxicity of fluoride compounds.

  1. DOE's plan for buried transuranic (TRU) contaminated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, J.; D'Ambrosia, J.; Sease, J.

    1987-01-01

    Prior to 1970, TRU-contaminated waste was buried as low-level radioactive waste. In the Defense Waste Management Plan issued in 1983, the plan for this buried TRU-contaminated waste was to monitor the buried waste, take remedial actions, and to periodically evaluate the safety of the waste. In March 1986, the General Accounting Office (GAO) recommended that the Department of Energy (DOE) provide specific plans and cost estimates related to buried TRU-contaminated waste. This plan is in direct response to the GAO request. Buried TRU-contaminated waste and TRU-contaminated soil are located in numerous inactive disposal units at five DOE sites. The total volume of this material is estimated to be about 300,000 to 500,000 m 3 . The DOE plan for TRU-contaminated buried waste and TRU-contaminated soil is to characterize the disposal units; assess the potential impacts from the waste on workers, the surrounding population, and the environment; evaluate the need for remedial actions; assess the remedial action alternatives; and implement and verify the remedial actions as appropriate. Cost estimates for remedial actions for the buried TRU-contaminated waste are highly uncertain, but they range from several hundred million to the order of $10 billion

  2. Dual-band infrared capabilities for imaging buried object sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Del Grande, N.K.; Durbin, P.F.; Gorvad, M.R.; Perkins, D.E.; Clark, G.A.; Hernandez, J.E.; Sherwood, R.J.

    1993-04-02

    We discuss dual-band infrared (DBIR) capabilities for imaging buried object sizes. We identify physical features affecting thermal contrast needed to distinguish buried object sites from undisturbed sites or surface clutter. Apart from atmospheric transmission and system performance, these features include: object size, shape, and burial depth; ambient soil, disturbed soil and object site thermal diffusivity differences; surface temperature, emissivity, plant-cover, slope, albedo and roughness variations; weather conditions and measurement times. We use good instrumentation to measure the time-varying temperature differences between buried object sites and undisturbed soil sites. We compare near surface soil temperature differences with radiometric infrared (IR) surface temperature differences recorded at 4.7 {plus_minus} 0.4 {mu}m and at 10.6 {plus_minus} 1.0 {mu}m. By producing selective DBIR image ratio maps, we distinguish temperature-difference patterns from surface emissivity effects. We discuss temperature differences between buried object sites, filled hole site (without buried objects), cleared (undisturbed) soil sites, and grass-covered sites (with and without different types of surface clutter). We compare temperature, emissivity-ratio, visible and near-IR reflectance signatures of surface objects, leafy plants and sod. We discuss the physical aspects of environmental, surface and buried target features affecting interpretation of buried targets, surface objects and natural backgrounds.

  3. Compact Buried Ducts in a Hot-Humid Climate House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallay, Dave [Home Innovation Research Labs, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2016-01-07

    "9A system of compact, buried ducts provides a high-performance and cost-effective solution for delivering conditioned air throughout the building. This report outlines research activities that are expected to facilitate adoption of compact buried duct systems by builders. The results of this research would be scalable to many new house designs in most climates and markets, leading to wider industry acceptance and building code and energy program approval. The primary research question with buried ducts is potential condensation at the outer jacket of the duct insulation in humid climates during the cooling season. Current best practices for buried ducts rely on encapsulating the insulated ducts with closed-cell spray polyurethane foam insulation to control condensation and improve air sealing. The encapsulated buried duct concept has been analyzed and shown to be effective in hot-humid climates. The purpose of this project is to develop an alternative buried duct system that performs effectively as ducts in conditioned space - durable, energy efficient, and cost-effective - in a hot-humid climate (IECC warm-humid climate zone 3A) with three goals that distinguish this project: 1) Evaluation of design criteria for buried ducts that use common materials and do not rely on encapsulation using spray foam or disrupt traditional work sequences; 2) Establishing design criteria for compact ducts and incorporate those with the buried duct criteria to further reduce energy losses and control installed costs; 3) Developing HVAC design guidance for performing accurate heating and cooling load calculations for compact buried ducts.

  4. Buried plastic scintillator muon telescope (BATATA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfaro, R.; De Donato, C.; D'Olivo, J.C.; Guzman, A.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Moreno Barbosa, E.; Paic, G.; Patino Salazar, E.; Salazar Ibarguen, H.; Sanchez, F.A.; Supanitsky, A.D.; Valdes-Galicia, J.F.; Vargas Trevino, A.D.; Vergara Limon, S.; Villasenor, L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Muon telescopes have multiple applications in the area of cosmic ray research. We are currently building such a detector with the objective of comparing the ground penetration of muon vs. electron-gamma signals originated in cosmic ray showers. The detector is composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes, buried at fixed depths ranging from 120 to 600g/cm 2 . Each layer is 4m 2 and is composed by 49 rectangular strips of 4cmx2m, oriented at a 90 0 angle with respect to its companion layer, which gives an xy-coincidence pixel of 4x4cm 2 . The scintillators are MINOS extruded polystyrene strips, with an embedded Bicron BC92 wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers, of 1.5 mm in diameter. Light is collected by Hamamatsu H7546B multi-anode PMTs of 64 pixels. The front-end (FE) electronics works in counting mode and signals are transmitted to the surface DAQ stage using low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS). Any strip signal above threshold opens a GPS-tagged 2μs data collection window. Data, including signal and background, are acquired by a system of FPGA (Spartan 2E) boards and a single-board computer (TS7800).

  5. Buried plastic scintillator muon telescope (BATATA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfaro, R. [Inst. de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); De Donato, C.; D' Olivo, J.C.; Guzman, A.; Medina-Tanco, G. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Moreno Barbosa, E. [Fac. de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Paic, G.; Patino Salazar, E. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Salazar Ibarguen, H. [Fac. de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Sanchez, F.A., E-mail: federico.sanchez@nucleares.unam.m [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Supanitsky, A.D. [Inst. de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Valdes-Galicia, J.F. [Inst. de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F., C.P. 04510 (Mexico); Vargas Trevino, A.D.; Vergara Limon, S. [Fac. de Ciencias de la Electronica, Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Villasenor, L.M. [Inst. de Fisica y Matematicas, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas Hidalgo Morelia (Mexico); Observatorio Pierre Auger, Av. San Martin Norte 304 (5613) Malarguee, Prov. Mendoza (Argentina)

    2010-05-21

    Muon telescopes have multiple applications in the area of cosmic ray research. We are currently building such a detector with the objective of comparing the ground penetration of muon vs. electron-gamma signals originated in cosmic ray showers. The detector is composed by a set of three parallel dual-layer scintillator planes, buried at fixed depths ranging from 120 to 600g/cm{sup 2}. Each layer is 4m{sup 2} and is composed by 49 rectangular strips of 4cmx2m, oriented at a 90{sup 0} angle with respect to its companion layer, which gives an xy-coincidence pixel of 4x4cm{sup 2}. The scintillators are MINOS extruded polystyrene strips, with an embedded Bicron BC92 wavelength shifting (WLS) fibers, of 1.5 mm in diameter. Light is collected by Hamamatsu H7546B multi-anode PMTs of 64 pixels. The front-end (FE) electronics works in counting mode and signals are transmitted to the surface DAQ stage using low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS). Any strip signal above threshold opens a GPS-tagged 2{mu}s data collection window. Data, including signal and background, are acquired by a system of FPGA (Spartan 2E) boards and a single-board computer (TS7800).

  6. Remediating the INEL's buried mixed waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhns, D.J.; Matthern, G.E.; Reese, C.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), formerly the National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS), encompasses 890 square miles and is located in southeast Idaho. In 1949, the United States Atomic Energy Commission, now the Department of Energy (DOE), established the NRTS as a site for the building and testing of nuclear facilities. Wastes generated during the building and testing of these nuclear facilities were disposed within the boundaries of the site. These mixed wastes, containing radionuclides and hazardous materials, were often stored in underground tanks for future disposal. The INEL has 11 buried mixed waste storage tanks regulated under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) ranging in size from 400 to 50,000 gallons. These tanks are constructed of either stainless or carbon steel and are located at 3 distinct geographic locations across the INEL. These tanks have been grouped based on their similarities in an effort to save money and decrease the time required to complete the necessary remediation. Environmental Restoration and Technology Development personnel are teaming in an effort to address the remediation problem systematically

  7. ISV technology development plan for buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickelson, D.F.; Callow, R.A.; Luey, J.K.

    1992-07-01

    This report identifies the main technical issues facing the in situ vitrification (ISV) application to buried waste, and presents a plan showing the top-level schedule and projected resources needed to develop and demonstrate the technology for meeting Environmental Restoration Department (ERD) needs. The plan also proposes a model strategy for the technology transfer from the Department of Energy's Office of Technology Development (DOE-OTD) to the Office of Environmental Restoration (DOE-ER) as the technology proceeds from issues resolution (development) to demonstration and remedial readiness. Implementation of the plan would require $34,91 1K in total funding to be spread in the years FY-93 through FY-98. Of this amount, $10,183K is planned to be funded by DOE-OTD through the ISV Integrated Program. The remaining amount, $24,728K, is recommended to be split between the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development ($6,670K) and DOE Office of Environmental Restoration ($18,058K)

  8. Electron emission mechanism of carbon fiber cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lie; Li Limin; Wen Jianchun; Wan Hong

    2005-01-01

    Models of electron emission mechanism are established concerning metal and carbon fiber cathodes. Correctness of the electron emission mechanism was proved according to micro-photos and electron scanning photos of cathodes respectively. The experimental results and analysis show that the surface flashover induces the electron emission of carbon fiber cathode and there are electron emission phenomena from the top of the carbon and also from its side surface. In addition, compared with the case of the stainless steel cathode, the plasma expansion velocity for the carbon fiber cathode is slower and the pulse duration of output microwave can be widened by using the carbon fiber cathode. (authors)

  9. protective relay studies for the nigerian national electric 330 kv

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    1985-09-01

    Sep 1, 1985 ... protective relay schemes of the National Electric Power Authority. Some of the basic ... Nigerian special system characteristics, schemes to correct existing protection inadequacies .... relays buried in the transformer. A reach of ...

  10. Evaluation of overweight load routing on buried utility facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    Overweight traffic movements can negatively affect pavement integrity and quality. However, it is less : known to what degree buried utility plant along and across the right of way is affected by these overweight : loads, especially if the utility fa...

  11. Detection of Buried Mines and Unexploded Ordnance (UXO)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heberlein, David; Balko, Bohdan; Chappell, Isaac; Biddle, John

    2007-01-01

    ... [and/or their explosive-related compounds (ERCs)] concentrated in the top soil, and radiation techniques, which uses radiation to probe beneath the earth's surface to provide bulk detection of buried explosive devices...

  12. Reliability-based management of buried pipelines considering external corrosion defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miran, Seyedeh Azadeh

    Corrosion is one of the main deteriorating mechanisms that degrade the energy pipeline integrity, due to transferring corrosive fluid or gas and interacting with corrosive environment. Corrosion defects are usually detected by periodical inspections using in-line inspection (ILI) methods. In order to ensure pipeline safety, this study develops a cost-effective maintenance strategy that consists of three aspects: corrosion growth model development using ILI data, time-dependent performance evaluation, and optimal inspection interval determination. In particular, the proposed study is applied to a cathodic protected buried steel pipeline located in Mexico. First, time-dependent power-law formulation is adopted to probabilistically characterize growth of the maximum depth and length of the external corrosion defects. Dependency between defect depth and length are considered in the model development and generation of the corrosion defects over time is characterized by the homogenous Poisson process. The growth models unknown parameters are evaluated based on the ILI data through the Bayesian updating method with Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation technique. The proposed corrosion growth models can be used when either matched or non-matched defects are available, and have ability to consider newly generated defects since last inspection. Results of this part of study show that both depth and length growth models can predict damage quantities reasonably well and a strong correlation between defect depth and length is found. Next, time-dependent system failure probabilities are evaluated using developed corrosion growth models considering prevailing uncertainties where three failure modes, namely small leak, large leak and rupture are considered. Performance of the pipeline is evaluated through failure probability per km (or called a sub-system) where each subsystem is considered as a series system of detected and newly generated defects within that sub

  13. Record Blizzard Buries U.S. Northeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    After two days of blustery weather, the skies cleared over Massachusetts on January 24, 2005. Along with other northeastern U.S. states, Massachusetts was slammed with a powerful blizzard on January 22 and 23 that shut down travel and businesses and extinguished power. The storm brought record snow to many places, but Massachusetts topped the list. The cities of Salem and Plymouth were buried in 38 inches (96.5 cm) of snow, and strong winds created drifts up to seven feet (2 meters) high, according to the National Weather Service. For Boston, the storm was the fifth worst blizzard to hit the city since 1892, dumping 22.5 inches (57 cm) of snow in two days. Of that, 13.4 inches (34 cm) fell on January 23' the most snow to fall on the city in a single day since records began. These totals gave Boston nearly twice its average snowfall for January (the average is 13.5 inches, 34.3 cm), and over half its annual average snow of 41.8 inches (106 cm). This Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) image, taken on January 24 by NASA's Terra satellite, shows the effects of the storm on Massachusetts and its southern neighbors, Connecticut (left) and Rhode Island (right). New York's Long Island is in the lower left corner of the image. The entire region is coated with snow, though clouds obscure the ground on the left side of the image. The snow was accompanied by powerful hurricane-force winds that helped create white-out conditions and large snowdrifts. The wind also churned ocean waters around Cape Cod, leaving them milky with sediment. NASA image courtesy the MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC.

  14. Response of buried pipes to missile impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vardanega, C.; Cremonini, M.G.; Mirone, M.; Luciani, A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the methodology and results of the analyses carried out to determine an effective layout and the dynamic response of safety related cooling water pipes, buried in backfill, for the Alto Lazio Nuclear Power Plant in Italy, subjected to missile impact loading at the backfill surface. The pipes are composed of a steel plate encased in two layers of high-quality reinforced concrete. The methodology comprises three steps. The first step is the definition of the 'free-field' dynamic response of the backfill soil, not considering the presence of the pipes, through a dynamic finite element direct integration analysis utilizing an axisymmetric model. The second step is the pipe-soil interaction analysis, which is conducted by utilizing the soil displacement and stress time-histories obtained in the previous steps. Soil stress time-histories, combined with the geostatic and other operational stresses (such as those due to temperature and pressure), are used to obtain the actions in the pipe walls due to ring type deformation. For the third step, the analysis of the beam type response, a lumped parameter model is developed which accounts for the soil stiffness, the pipe characteristics and the position of the pipe with respect to the impact area. In addition, the effect of the presence of large concrete structures, such as tunnels, between the ground surface and the pipe is evaluated. The results of the structural analyses lead to defining the required steel thickness and also allow the choice of appropriate embedment depth and layout of redundant lines. The final results of the analysis is not only the strength verification of the pipe section, but also the definition of an effective layout of the lines in terms of position, depth, steel thickness and joint design. (orig.)

  15. Decomposition of forest products buried in landfills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoming; Padgett, Jennifer M.; Powell, John S.; Barlaz, Morton A.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • This study tracked chemical changes of wood and paper in landfills. • A decomposition index was developed to quantify carbohydrate biodegradation. • Newsprint biodegradation as measured here is greater than previous reports. • The field results correlate well with previous laboratory measurements. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the decomposition of selected wood and paper products in landfills. The decomposition of these products under anaerobic landfill conditions results in the generation of biogenic carbon dioxide and methane, while the un-decomposed portion represents a biogenic carbon sink. Information on the decomposition of these municipal waste components is used to estimate national methane emissions inventories, for attribution of carbon storage credits, and to assess the life-cycle greenhouse gas impacts of wood and paper products. Hardwood (HW), softwood (SW), plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium-density fiberboard (MDF), newsprint (NP), corrugated container (CC) and copy paper (CP) were buried in landfills operated with leachate recirculation, and were excavated after approximately 1.5 and 2.5 yr. Samples were analyzed for cellulose (C), hemicellulose (H), lignin (L), volatile solids (VS), and organic carbon (OC). A holocellulose decomposition index (HOD) and carbon storage factor (CSF) were calculated to evaluate the extent of solids decomposition and carbon storage. Samples of OSB made from HW exhibited cellulose plus hemicellulose (C + H) loss of up to 38%, while loss for the other wood types was 0–10% in most samples. The C + H loss was up to 81%, 95% and 96% for NP, CP and CC, respectively. The CSFs for wood and paper samples ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 and 0.02 to 0.27 g OC g −1 dry material, respectively. These results, in general, correlated well with an earlier laboratory-scale study, though NP and CC decomposition measured in this study were higher than

  16. Decomposition of forest products buried in landfills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaoming, E-mail: xwang25@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Padgett, Jennifer M. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States); Powell, John S. [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Campus Box 7905, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7905 (United States); Barlaz, Morton A. [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, Campus Box 7908, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-7908 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • This study tracked chemical changes of wood and paper in landfills. • A decomposition index was developed to quantify carbohydrate biodegradation. • Newsprint biodegradation as measured here is greater than previous reports. • The field results correlate well with previous laboratory measurements. - Abstract: The objective of this study was to investigate the decomposition of selected wood and paper products in landfills. The decomposition of these products under anaerobic landfill conditions results in the generation of biogenic carbon dioxide and methane, while the un-decomposed portion represents a biogenic carbon sink. Information on the decomposition of these municipal waste components is used to estimate national methane emissions inventories, for attribution of carbon storage credits, and to assess the life-cycle greenhouse gas impacts of wood and paper products. Hardwood (HW), softwood (SW), plywood (PW), oriented strand board (OSB), particleboard (PB), medium-density fiberboard (MDF), newsprint (NP), corrugated container (CC) and copy paper (CP) were buried in landfills operated with leachate recirculation, and were excavated after approximately 1.5 and 2.5 yr. Samples were analyzed for cellulose (C), hemicellulose (H), lignin (L), volatile solids (VS), and organic carbon (OC). A holocellulose decomposition index (HOD) and carbon storage factor (CSF) were calculated to evaluate the extent of solids decomposition and carbon storage. Samples of OSB made from HW exhibited cellulose plus hemicellulose (C + H) loss of up to 38%, while loss for the other wood types was 0–10% in most samples. The C + H loss was up to 81%, 95% and 96% for NP, CP and CC, respectively. The CSFs for wood and paper samples ranged from 0.34 to 0.47 and 0.02 to 0.27 g OC g{sup −1} dry material, respectively. These results, in general, correlated well with an earlier laboratory-scale study, though NP and CC decomposition measured in this study were higher than

  17. Plasma Deposition of Oxide-Coated Cathodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Umstattd, Ryan

    1998-01-01

    ...; such cathodes may also have applicability for lower current density continuous wave devices. This novel approach to manufacturing an oxide cathode eliminates the binders that may subsequently (and unpredictably...

  18. Compact Buried Ducts in a Hot-Humid Climate House

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallay, D. [Home Innovation Research Labs, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A system of compact, buried ducts provides a high-performance and cost-effective solution for delivering conditioned air throughout the building. This report outlines research activities that are expected to facilitate adoption of compact buried duct systems by builders. The results of this research would be scalable to many new house designs in most climates and markets, leading to wider industry acceptance and building code and energy program approval.

  19. Long-range plan for buried transuranic waste studies at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berreth, P.D.; Fischer, D.K.; Suckel, R.A.

    1984-11-01

    This document presents a plan to perform detailed studies of alternatives considered for the long-term management of buried transuranic waste at the INEL. The studies will provide the technical basis for DOE to make a decision on the future management of that waste. Although the waste is currently being handled in an acceptable manner, new solutions are continually being researched to improve handling techniques. Three alternatives are being considered: (a) leave the waste as is; (b) improve in situ confinement of the waste; (c) retrieve, process, and certify the waste for disposal at a federal repository. Fifteen studies are described in this plan for the latter two alternatives. The leave-as-is alternative involves continuing present procedures for managing the buried waste. An ongoing environmental surveillance program, a low-level-waste stabilization program, and enhanced subsurface migration studies begun in FY-1984 at the INEL will provide data for the decision-making process for INEL buried TRU waste. These ongoing studies for the leave-as-is alternative are summarized in this plan in limited detail. The improved-confinement alternative involves leaving the waste in place, but providing additional protection against wind water penetration, erosion, and plant and animal intrusion. Several studies proposed will examine special techniques to immobilize or encapsulate the buried waste. Studies of the third alternative will investigate improved retrieval, processing and certification techniques. New equipment, such as industrial manipulators and excavating machinery, will be tested in the retrieval studies. Processing and certification studies will examine rapidly changing or new technologies. 19 references, 8 figures, 4 tables

  20. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsman, Eric [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  1. Evaluation and diagnosis of the cathodic protection of ducts in the left margin of the Tonala River of the Superintendencia General de Ductos Minatitlan; Evaluacion y diagnostico de la proteccion catodica en la margen izquierda del Rio Tonala de la Superintendencia General de Ductos Minatitlan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez N, Miguel A; Malo T, Jose M; Munoz Ledo C, Ramon; Uruchurtu C, Jorge; Castrejon G, Rafael [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Sanchez G, Luis; Algarra M, Raul; Abreu L, Emilio [Gerencia de Mantenimiento, Pemex (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The present study contains the measurements obtained as a part of the evaluation of the protection system of ducts located in the left margin of the Tonal River, made by the Gerencia de Materiales y Procesos Quimicos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) during the last trimester of year 2001. Also, the measurements of potential in conditions of instantaneous ignition and extinguished in measuring posts of the duct in Rights of Way (DDV) Tonala-Nudo Teapa 23 are studied, in order to determine the real protection level reached by the cathodic protection system, the possible unprotected zones and the possible corrective measures that lead to a safe operation of the ducts. [Spanish] El presente estudio contiene las mediciones obtenidas como parte de la evaluacion del sistema de proteccion de los ductos ubicados en la margen izquierda del rio Tonala, realizadas por la Gerencia de Materiales y Procesos Quimicos del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) durante el ultimo trimestre del ano 2001. Asimismo, se tratan las mediciones de potencial en condiciones de encendido y apagado instantaneo en postes de medicion del ducto en los Derechos De Via (DDV) Tonala-Nudo Teapa 23, con el proposito de determinar el nivel real de proteccion alcanzado por el sistema de proteccion catodica, las posibles zonas desprotegidas y las posibles medidas correctivas que conduzcan a una operacion segura de los ductos.

  2. Buried bumber syndrome (internal button buried of the gastrostomy): Unearthing the solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Nelson; Otero, William; Gomez, Martin; Bula, Rodrigo; Otero, Elder

    2006-01-01

    The Buried bumper syndrome is a major complication of percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy and the literature of in of having described of rarely. The physiopathology is the gastric isquemy of the mucous one for an excessive pressure for the ends that fix the gastrostomy. Their clinical manifestations that depend on the depth of migration of the end go from the absence of symptoms, spill of the nutrition enteral being the most frequent, until peritonitis. The diverse described treatment modalities are based on the depth of migration of the end valued endoscopically. The successful use of the ecoendosonography is described for the estimate of the depth of the migration, when you cannot visualize the end internal endoscopically and we propose a handling .algorithm based on this technique

  3. Synopsis of Cathode No.4 Activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, Joe; Ekdahl, C.; Harrison, J.; Kwan, J.; Leitner, M.; McCruistian, T.; Mitchell, R.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the activation of the fourth cathode installed in the DARHT-II Injector. Appendices have been used so that an extensive amount of data could be included without danger of obscuring important information contained in the body of the report. The cathode was a 612 M type cathode purchased from Spectra-Mat. Section II describes the handling and installation of the cathode. Section III is a narrative of the activation based on information located in the Control Room Log Book supplemented with time plots of pertinent operating parameters. Activation of the cathode was performed in accordance with the procedure listed in Appendix A. The following sections provide more details on the total pressure and constituent partial pressures in the vacuum vessel, cathode heater power/filament current, and cathode temperature

  4. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is

  5. Buried waste remediation: A new application for in situ vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kindle, C.H.; Thompson, L.E.

    1991-04-01

    Buried wastes represent a significant environmental concern and a major financial and technological challenge facing many private firms, local and state governments, and federal agencies. Numerous radioactive and hazardous mixed buried waste sites managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) require timely clean up to comply with state or federal environmental regulations. Hazardous wastes, biomedical wastes, and common household wastes disposed at many municipal landfills represent a significant environmental health concern. New programs and regulations that result in a greater reduction of waste via recycling and stricter controls regarding generation and disposal of many wastes will help to stem the environmental consequences of wastes currently being generated. Groundwater contamination, methane generation, and potential exposures to biohazards and chemically hazardous materials from inadvertent intrusion will continue to be potential environmental health consequences until effective and permanent closure is achieved. In situ vitrification (ISV) is being considered by the DOE as a permanent closure option for radioactive buried waste sites. The results of several ISV tests on simulated and actual buried wastes conducted during 1990 are presented here. The test results illustrate the feasibility of the ISV process for permanent remediation and closure of buried waste sites in commercial landfills. The tests were successful in immobilizing or destroying hazardous and radioactive contaminants while providing up to 75 vol % waste reduction. 6 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Experimental investigation of buried tritium in plant and animal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. B.; Workman, W. J. G.; Davis, P. A.

    2008-01-01

    Buried exchangeable tritium appears as part of organically bound tritium (OBT) in the traditional experimental determination of OBT. Since buried tritium quickly exchanges with hydrogen atoms in the body following ingestion, assuming that it is part of OBT rather than part of tritiated water (HTO) could result in a significant overestimate of the ingestion dose. This paper documents an experimental investigation into the existence, amount and significance of buried tritium in plant and fish samples. OBT concentrations in the samples were determined in the traditional way and also following denaturing with five chemical solutions that break down large molecules and expose buried tritium to exchange with free hydrogen atoms. A comparison of the OBT concentrations before and after denaturing, together with the concentration of HTO in the supernatant obtained after denaturing, suggests that buried OBT may exist but makes up less than 5% of the OBT concentration in plants and at most 20% of the OBT concentration in fish. The effects of rinse time and rinse water volumes were investigated to optimize the removal of exchangeable OBT from the samples. (authors)

  7. Barium-Dispenser Thermionic Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Green, M.; Feinleib, M.

    1989-01-01

    Improved reservoir cathode serves as intense source of electrons required for high-frequency and often high-output-power, linear-beam tubes, for which long operating lifetime important consideration. High emission-current densities obtained through use of emitting surface of relatively-low effective work function and narrow work-function distribution, consisting of coat of W/Os deposited by sputtering. Lower operating temperatures and enhanced electron emission consequently possible.

  8. End effectors and attachments for buried waste excavation equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, R.H.

    1993-09-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Their efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER ampersand WM) Department's needs and objectives. The present focus of BWID is to support retrieval and ex-situ treatment configuration options. Future activities will explore and support containment, and stabilization efforts in addition to the retrieval/ex situ treatment options. This report presents a literature search on the state-of-the-art in end effectors and attachments in support of excavator of buried transuranic waste. Included in the report are excavator platforms and a discussion of the various attachments. Also included is it list of vendors and specifications

  9. Buried waste integrated demonstration FY 94 deployment plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, R.A.; Walker, S.; Garcia, M.M.

    1994-05-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The fiscal year (FY) 1994 effort will fund thirty-eight technologies in five areas of buried waste site remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, treatment, and containment/stabilization. This document is the basic operational planning document for deployment of all BWID projects. Discussed in this document are the BWID preparations for INEL field demonstrations, INEL laboratory demonstrations, non-INEL demonstrations, and paper studies. Each technology performing tests will prepare a test plan to detail the specific procedures, objectives, and tasks of each test. Therefore, information specific to testing each technology is intentionally omitted from this document

  10. Thermal tests of a transport / Storage cask in buried conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, H.; Gomi, Y.; Saegusa, T.; Ito, C.

    1998-01-01

    Thermal tests for a hypothetical accident which simulated accidents caused by building collapse in case of an earthquake were conducted using a full-scale dry type transport and storage cask (total heat load: 23 kW). The objectives of these tests were to clarify the heat transfer features of the buried cask under such accidents and the time limit for maintaining the thermal integrity of the cask. Moreover, thermal analyses of the test cask under the buried conditions were carried out on basis of experimental results to establish methodology for the thermal analysis. The characteristics of the test cask are described as well as the test method used. The heat transfer features of the buried cask under such accidents and a time for maintaining the thermal integrity of the cask have been obtained. (O.M.)

  11. Method of forming buried oxide layers in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2000-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  12. Soil organic matter stabilization in buried paleosols of the Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaopricha, N. T.; Marin-Spiotta, E.; Mason, J. A.; Mueller, C. W.

    2010-12-01

    Understanding the mechanisms that control soil organic matter (SOM) stabilization is important for understanding how soil carbon is sequestered over millennia, and for predicting how future disturbances may affect soil carbon stocks. We are studying the mechanisms controlling SOM stabilization in the Brady Soil, a buried paleosol in Holocene loess deposits spanning much of the central Great Plains of the United States. The Brady Soil developed 9,000-13,500 years ago during a time of warming and drying that resulted in a shift from C3 to C4 dominated plants. The Brady soil is unusual in that it has very dark coloring, although it contains less than separate particulate organic matter associated with minerals from that within and outside of soil aggregates. We found the largest and darkest amounts of organic C in aggregate-protected SOM greater than 20 µm in diameter. Density and textural fractionation revealed that much of the SOM is bound within aggregates, indicating that protection within aggregates is a major contributor to SOM- stabilization in the Brady Soil. We are conducting a long-term lab soil incubation with soils collected from the modern A horizon and the Brady Soil to determine if the buried SOM becomes microbially available when exposed to the modern atmosphere. We are measuring potential rates of respiration and production of CH4 and N2O. Results so far show respiration rates at field moisture for both modern and buried horizons are limited by water, suggesting dry environmental conditions may have helped to preserve SOM in the Brady Soil. We are investigating the potential for chemical stabilization of the dark SOM preserved in the buried paleosol by characterizing C chemistry using solid-state 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Furthermore, we plan to use lipid analyses and pyrolysis GC/MS to determine likely sources for the SOM: microbial vs plant. Combining information on the physical location of SOM in the soil, its chemical composition, decomposability

  13. Electron beam generation form a superemissive cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, T.-Y.; Liou, R.-L.; Kirkman-Amemiya, G.; Gundersen, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of electron beams produced by a superemissive cathode in the Back-Lighted Thyratron (BLT) and the pseudospark is presented. This work is motivated by experiments demonstrating very high current densities (≥10 kA/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 ) from the pseudospark and BLT cathode. This high-density current is produced by field-enhanced thermionic emission from the ion beam-heated surface of a molybdenum cathode. This work reports the use of this cathode as a beam source, and is to be distinguished from previous work reporting hollow cathode-produced electron beams. An electron beam of more than 260 A Peak current has been produced with 15 kV applied voltage. An efficiency of ∼10% is estimated. These experimental results encourage further investigation of the super-emissive cathode as an intense electron beam source for applications including accelerator technology

  14. Reflective article having a sacrificial cathodic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Buchanan, Michael J.; Scott, Matthew S.; Rearick, Brian K.; Medwick, Paul A.; McCamy, James W.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention relates to reflective articles, such as solar mirrors, that include a sacrificial cathodic layer. The reflective article, more particularly includes a substrate, such as glass, having a multi-layered coating thereon that includes a lead-free sacrificial cathodic layer. The sacrificial cathodic layer includes at least one transition metal, such as a particulate transition metal, which can be in the form of flakes (e.g., zinc flakes). The sacrificial cathodic layer can include an inorganic matrix formed from one or more organo-titanates. Alternatively, the sacrificial cathodic layer can include an organic polymer matrix (e.g., a crosslinked organic polymer matrix formed from an organic polymer and an aminoplast crosslinking agent). The reflective article also includes an outer organic polymer coating, that can be electrodeposited over the sacrificial cathodic layer.

  15. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/23/15 - 04/22/16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction...Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith

  16. Hollow cathode for positive ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechter, D.E.; Kim, J.; Tsai, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    Development to incorporate hollow cathodes into high power ion sources for neutral beam injection systems is being pursued. Hollow tube LaB 6 -type cathodes, similar to a UCLA design, have been constructed and tested in several ORNL ion source configurations. Results of testing include arc discharge parameters of >1000 and 500 amps for 0.5 and 10 second pulse lengths, respectively. Details of cathode construction and additional performance results are discussed

  17. Cold cathode arc model in mercury discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.M.; Byszewski, W.W.; Budinger, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    Voltage/current characteristics measured during the starting of metal halide lamps indicate a low voltage discharge when condensates (mainly mercury) are localized on the electrodes. In this case, even with a cold cathode which does not emit electrons, the current is very high and voltage across the lamp drops to about 15 to 20 V. This type of discharge is similar to the cold cathode mercury vapor arc found in mercury pool rectifiers. The cathode sheath in the mercury vapor arc is characterized by very small cathode spot size, on the order of 10 -c cm 2 , very high current density of about 10 6 A/cm 2 and very low cathode fall of approximately 10 volts. The discharge is modified and generalized to describe the cathode phenomena in the cold cathode mercury vapor arc. The sensitivity of calculated discharge parameters with respect to such modifications were examined. Results show that the cathode fall voltage remains fairly constant (7-8 volts) with large fractional variations of metastable mercury atoms bombarding the cathode. This result compares very well with experimental waveforms when anode fall and plasma voltage approximations are incorporated

  18. Two-beam virtual cathode accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, W.

    1992-01-01

    A proposed method to control the motion of a virtual cathode is investigated. Applications to collective ion acceleration and microwave generation are indicated. If two counterstreaming relativistic electron beams of current I are injected into a drift tube of space-charge-limiting current I L = 2I, it is shown that one beam can induce a moving virtual cathode in the other beam. By dynamically varying the current injected into the drift tube region, the virtual cathode can undergo controlled motion. For short drift tubes, the virtual cathodes on each end are strongly-coupled and undergo coherent large-amplitude spatial oscillations within the drift tube

  19. Ground Penetrating Radar Imaging of Buried Metallic Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polat, A. Burak; Meincke, Peter

    2001-01-01

    During the past decade there has been considerable research on ground penetrating radar (GPR) tomography for detecting objects such as pipes, cables, mines and barrels buried under the surface of the Earth. While the earlier researches were all based on the assumption of a homogeneous background...

  20. Detection and characterization of buried lunar craters with GRAIL data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Rohan; Chappaz, Loic; Melosh, Henry J.; Howell, Kathleen C.; Milbury, Colleen; Blair, David M.; Zuber, Maria T.

    2017-06-01

    We used gravity mapping observations from NASA's Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) to detect, characterize and validate the presence of large impact craters buried beneath the lunar maria. In this paper we focus on two prominent anomalies detected in the GRAIL data using the gravity gradiometry technique. Our detection strategy is applied to both free-air and Bouguer gravity field observations to identify gravitational signatures that are similar to those observed over buried craters. The presence of buried craters is further supported by individual analysis of regional free-air gravity anomalies, Bouguer gravity anomaly maps, and forward modeling. Our best candidate, for which we propose the informal name of Earhart Crater, is approximately 200 km in diameter and forms part of the northwestern rim of Lacus Somniorum, The other candidate, for which we propose the informal name of Ashoka Anomaly, is approximately 160 km in diameter and lies completely buried beneath Mare Tranquillitatis. Other large, still unrecognized, craters undoubtedly underlie other portions of the Moon's vast mare lavas.

  1. Classification System for Individualized Treatment of Adult Buried Penis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausch, Timothy J; Tachibana, Isamu; Siegel, Jordan A; Hoxworth, Ronald; Scott, Jeremy M; Morey, Allen F

    2016-09-01

    The authors present their experience with reconstructive strategies for men with various manifestations of adult buried penis syndrome, and propose a comprehensive anatomical classification system and treatment algorithm based on pathologic changes in the penile skin and involvement of neighboring abdominal and/or scrotal components. The authors reviewed all patients who underwent reconstruction of adult buried penis syndrome at their referral center between 2007 and 2015. Patients were stratified by location and severity of involved anatomical components. Procedures performed, demographics, comorbidities, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. Fifty-six patients underwent reconstruction of buried penis at the authors' center from 2007 to 2015. All procedures began with a ventral penile release. If the uncovered penile skin was determined to be viable, a phalloplasty was performed by anchoring penoscrotal skin to the proximal shaft, and the ventral shaft skin defect was closed with scrotal flaps. In more complex patients with circumferential nonviable penile skin, the penile skin was completely excised and replaced with a split-thickness skin graft. Complex patients with severe abdominal lipodystrophy required adjacent tissue transfer. For cases of genital lymphedema, the procedure involved complete excision of the lymphedematous tissue, and primary closure with or without a split-thickness skin graft, also often involving the scrotum. The authors' overall success rate was 88 percent (49 of 56), defined as resolution of symptoms without the need for additional procedures. Successful correction of adult buried penis often necessitates an interdisciplinary, multimodal approach. Therapeutic, IV.

  2. Mutation choice to eliminate buried free cysteines in protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xue; Longo, Liam M; Blaber, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Buried free-cysteine (Cys) residues can contribute to an irreversible unfolding pathway that promotes protein aggregation, increases immunogenic potential, and significantly reduces protein functional half-life. Consequently, mutation of buried free-Cys residues can result in significant improvement in the storage, reconstitution, and pharmacokinetic properties of protein-based therapeutics. Mutational design to eliminate buried free-Cys residues typically follows one of two common heuristics: either substitution by Ser (polar and isosteric), or substitution by Ala or Val (hydrophobic); however, a detailed structural and thermodynamic understanding of Cys mutations is lacking. We report a comprehensive structure and stability study of Ala, Ser, Thr, and Val mutations at each of the three buried free-Cys positions (Cys16, Cys83, and Cys117) in fibroblast growth factor-1. Mutation was almost universally destabilizing, indicating a general optimization for the wild-type Cys, including van der Waals and H-bond interactions. Structural response to Cys mutation characteristically involved changes to maintain, or effectively substitute, local H-bond interactions-by either structural collapse to accommodate the smaller oxygen radius of Ser/Thr, or conversely, expansion to enable inclusion of novel H-bonding solvent. Despite the diverse structural effects, the least destabilizing average substitution at each position was Ala, and not isosteric Ser. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  3. Burying Nutrition Myths and Activating Choices for our Children's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burying Nutrition Myths and Activating Choices for our Children's Development. Lawrence Haddad. Abstract. (Af. J. of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development: 2003 3(1): 56-59). Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  4. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Technology Preparedness and Status Report Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blacker, P.B.; Bonnenberg, R.W.; Cannon, P.G.; Hyde, R.A.; Watson, L.R.

    1994-04-01

    A Technology Preparedness and Status Report is required for each Technical Task Plan funded by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration. This document provides guidance for the preparation of that report. Major sections of the report will include a subset of the need for the technology, objectives of the demonstration, technology description and readiness evaluation, demonstration requirements, and preparedness checklist and action plan

  5. Risk and cost tradeoffs for remote retrieval of buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyde, R.A.; Grienbenow, B.E.; Nickelson, D.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration is supporting the development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of technologies that, when integrated with commercially available technologies, form a comprehensive system for the remediation of radioactive and hazardous buried waste. As a part of the program's technology development, remote retrieval equipment is being developed and tested for the remediation of buried waste. During remedial planning, several factors are considered when choosing remote versus manual retrieval systems. Time that workers are exposed to radioactivity, chemicals, air particulate, and industrial hazards is one consideration. The generation of secondary waste is also a consideration because it amounts to more waste to treat and some wastes may require special handling or treatment. Cost is also a big factor in determining whether remote or manual operations will be used. Other considerations include implementability, effectiveness, and the number of required personnel. This paper investigates each of these areas to show the risk and cost benefits and limitations for remote versus manual retrieval of buried waste

  6. Identification of buried victims in natural disaster with GPR method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewi, Rianty Kusuma; Kurniawan, Adityo; Taqwantara, Reyhan Fariz; Iskandar, Farras M.; Naufal, Taufiq Ziyan; Widodo

    2017-07-01

    Indonesian is one of the most seismically active regions in the world and has very complicated plate convergence because there is meeting point of several tectonic plates. The complexity of tectonic features causes a lot of natural disasters such as landslides, tsunamis, earth quakes, volcanoes eruption, etc. Sometimes, the disasters occurs in high populated area and causing thousands to millions of victim been buried under the rumble. Unfortunately, the evacuation still uses the conventional method such using rescue dogs whereas the sensitivity of smell is decrease when the victims buried under the level of the ground. The purpose of this study is to detect buried bodies using GPR method, so it can enhance the effectiveness and the efficiency in looking for the disaster victims. GPR method is used because it can investigate things under the ground. A detailed GPR research has been done in Cikutra Graveyard, Bandung, with corpse buried two week until two years before the research. The radar profiles from this research showed amplitude contras anomaly between the new corpse and the old ones. We obtained the amplitude contras at 1.2-1.4 meters under the surface. This method proved to be effective but still need more attention on undulated surface and non-soil areas.

  7. Risk and cost tradeoffs for remote retrieval of buried waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, R.A.; Grienbenow, B.E.; Nickelson, D.F.

    1994-12-31

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration is supporting the development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of technologies that, when integrated with commercially available technologies, form a comprehensive system for the remediation of radioactive and hazardous buried waste. As a part of the program`s technology development, remote retrieval equipment is being developed and tested for the remediation of buried waste. During remedial planning, several factors are considered when choosing remote versus manual retrieval systems. Time that workers are exposed to radioactivity, chemicals, air particulate, and industrial hazards is one consideration. The generation of secondary waste is also a consideration because it amounts to more waste to treat and some wastes may require special handling or treatment. Cost is also a big factor in determining whether remote or manual operations will be used. Other considerations include implementability, effectiveness, and the number of required personnel. This paper investigates each of these areas to show the risk and cost benefits and limitations for remote versus manual retrieval of buried waste.

  8. Evaluating the movement of active faults on buried pipelines | Parish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the earthquake, a buried pipeline may be experienced extreme loading that is the result of the relatively large displacement of the Earth along the pipe. Large movements of ground could occur by faulting, liquefaction, lateral spreading, landslides, and slope failures. Since the pipelines are widely spread, and in ...

  9. Examination of faults active motion on buried pipelines | Parish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... lateral spreading, landslides and slope failures. Since the pipelines are widely spread, and in some areas necessarily cross through the areas with faults, therefore, improvement study of pipelines in areas with faults is very important. This article explores faults active motion on buried pipelines. Keywords: water utilities ...

  10. Behaviour of nature and technogenic radioisotopes in buried geochemical barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.A.; Onoshko, M.P.; Generalova, V.A.

    1998-01-01

    Behaviour of potassium 40, radium 226, thorium 232, strontium 90 and cesium 137 on geochemical barriers connected with buried soils and cut-off meander sediments of the Holocene age of the Sozh river valley are examined. Some sides of the barrier geochemical structure caused by syngeneic and epigenetic processes have been taken into consideration

  11. Cathode materials: A personal perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, ETC 9.102, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-1063 (United States)

    2007-12-06

    A thermodynamically stable rechargeable battery has a voltage limited by the window of the electrolyte. An aqueous electrolyte has a window of 1.2 eV, which prevents achieving the high energy density desired for many applications. A non-aqueous electrolyte with a window of 5 eV requires Li{sup +} rather than H{sup +} as the working ion. Early experiments with Li{sub x}TiS{sub 2} cathodes showed competitive capacity and rate capability, but problems with a lithium anode made the voltage of a safe cell based on a sulfide cathode too low to be competitive with a nickel/metal-hydride battery. Transition-metal oxides can give voltages of 4.5 V versus Li{sup +}/Li{sup 0}. However, the challenge with oxides has been to obtain a competitive capacity and rate capability while retaining a high voltage with low-cost, environmentally friendly cathode materials. Comparisons will be made between layered Li{sub 1-x}MO{sub 2}, spinels Li{sub 1-x}[M{sub 2}]O{sub 4}, and olivines Li{sub 1-x}MPO{sub 4} having 0 < x < 1. Although higher capacities can be obtained with layered Li{sub 1-x}MO{sub 2} compounds, which have enabled the wireless revolution, their metastability makes them unlikely to be used in power applications. The spinel and olivine framework structures have been shown to be capable of charge/discharge rates of over 10C with a suitable temperature range for plug-in hybrid vehicles. (author)

  12. Development of a teleoperated backhoe for buried waste excavation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burks, B.L.; Killough, S.M.; Thompson, D.H.

    1992-01-01

    For nearly five decades the United States (US) Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have engaged in broad-based research and development activities as well as nuclear weapons component production. As a by-product of these activities, large quantities of waste materials have been granted. One of the most common approaches used for solid waste storage was to bury waste containers in pits and trenches. With the current emphasis on environmental restoration, DOE now plans to either retrieve much of the legacy of buried waste or stabilize the waste in place via in situ vitrification or other means. Because of the variety of materials that have been buried over the years, the hazards of retrieval are significant if performed using conventional manned operations. The potential hazards, in addition to radiation exposure, include pyrophorics, toxic chemicals, and explosives. Although manifests exist for much of the buried waste, these records are often incomplete compared to today's requirements. Because of the potential hazards and uncertainty about waste contents and container integrity, it is highly desirable to excavate these wastes using remotely operated equipment. In this paper the authors describe the development of a teleoperated military tractor called the Small Emplacement Excavator (SEE). Development of the SEE is being funded jointly by both DOE and the US Army. The DOE sponsor is the Office of Technology Development (OTD) Robotics Program. The US Army sponsor is the Program Manager for Ammunition Logistics, Picatinny Arsenal. The primary interest for DOE is in the application to remote excavation of buried waste, while the primary emphasis for the US Army is in the remote retrieval of unexploded ordnance. Technical requirements for these two tasks are very similar and, therefore, justify a joint development project. 1 ref

  13. Test plan for buried waste containment system materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, J.; Shaw, P.

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of the FY 1997 barrier material work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory are to (1) select a waste barrier material and verify that it is compatible with the Buried Waste Containment System Process, and (2) determine if, and how, the Buried Waste Containment System emplacement process affects the material properties and performance (on proof of principle scale). This test plan describes a set of measurements and procedures used to validate a waste barrier material for the Buried Waste Containment System. A latex modified proprietary cement manufactured by CTS Cement Manufacturing Company will be tested. Emplacement properties required for the Buried Waste Containment System process are: slump between 8 and 10 in., set time between 15 and 30 minutes, compressive strength at set of 20 psi minimum, and set temperature less than 100 degrees C. Durability properties include resistance to degradation from carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates. A set of baseline barrier material properties will be determined to provide a data base for comparison with the barrier materials when tested in the field. The measurements include permeability, petrographic analysis to determine separation and/or segregation of mix components, and a set of mechanical properties. The measurements will be repeated on specimens from the field test material. The data will be used to determine if the Buried Waste Containment System equipment changes the material. The emplacement properties will be determined using standard laboratory procedures and instruments. Durability of the barrier material will be evaluated by determining the effect of carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates on the compressive strength of the barrier material. The baseline properties will be determined using standard ASTM procedures. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  14. Fundamental aspects of cathodic sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, R.

    1979-01-01

    The main fundamental aspects and problems of cathodic sputtering used mainly for thin film deposition and sputter etching are discussed. Among many types of known sputtering techniques the radiofrequency /RF/ diode sputtering is the most universal one and is used for deposition of metals, alloys, metallic compounds, semiconductors and insulators. It seems that nowadays the largest number of working sputtering systems is of diode type. Sometimes also the dc or rf triode sputtering systems are used. The problems in these processes are practically equivalent and comparable with the problems in the diode method and therefore our discussion will be, in most cases applicable for both, the diode and triode methods

  15. Cathode-follower power amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, S.; Puglisi, M.

    1983-01-01

    In circular accelerators and particularly in storage rings it is essential that the total impedance, as seen by the beam, be kept below some critical value. A model of the accelerating system was built using a single-ended cathode-follower amplifier driving a ferrite-loaded cavity. The system operated at 234.5 kHz with a peak output voltage of +-10 kV on the gap. The dynamic output impedance, as measured on the gap, was < 15 ohms

  16. Bearing and Range Estimation Algorithm for Buried Object in Underwater Acoustics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Han

    2009-01-01

    (DOA of objects and objects-sensors distances, is used in MUSIC algorithm instead of classical model. The influence of the depth of buried objects is discussed. Finally, the numerical results are given in the case of buried cylindrical shells.

  17. Electrical properties and radiation hardness of SOI systems with multilayer buried dielectric

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barchuk, I.P.; Kilchitskaya, V.I.; Lysenko, V.S.

    1997-01-01

    In this work SOI structures with buried SiO 2 -Si 3 N 4 -SiO 2 layers have been fabricated by the ZMR-technique with the aim of improving the total dose radiation hardness of the buried dielectric layer. To optimize the fabrication process, buried layers were investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry before and after the ZMR process, and the obtained results were compared with electrical measurements. It is shown that optimization of the preparation processes of the initial buried dielectric layers provides ZMR SOI structures with multilayer buried isolation, which are of high quality for both Si film interfaces. Particular attention is paid to the investigation of radiation-induced charge trapping in buried insulators. Buried isolation structures with a nitride layer exhibit significant reduction of radiation-induced positive charge as compared to classical buried SiO 2 layers produced by either the ZMR or the SIMOX technique

  18. Seismic response of buried pipelines: a state-of-the-art review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, T.K.

    1999-01-01

    A state-of-the-art review of the seismic response of buried pipelines is presented. The review includes modeling of soil-pipe system and seismic excitation, methods of response analysis of buried pipelines, seismic behavior of buried pipelines under different parametric variations, seismic stresses at the bends and intersections of network of pipelines. pipe damage in earthquakes and seismic risk analysis of buried pipelines. Based on the review, the future scope of work on the subject is outlined. (orig.)

  19. External coatings for buried pipelines - a project approach; Revestimento externo para dutos enterrados - uma abordagem de projeto

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunes, Laerce de P.; Gomes, Luiz Paulo; Nunes, Alessandra de M. [IEC - Instalacoes e Engenharia de Corrosao Ltda., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    The transport of liquid or gas fluids, such as water, fuel, chemical products, minerals, among others, through underground pipelines, is becoming more significant in the whole world, specially in Brazil, due to low cost, operational security and low physical interference at the surface. By the other hand, the ambient matters, the population's security in pipeline tracing and economic aspects lead to greater requirements in relation to the integrity of those installations. Corrosion is one of the most important causes of underground pipelines' deterioration and coating and cathodic protection are recommended to prevent it from occurring. However, both techniques must be considered in the pipeline project for it to be successful. At the present work the most important kinds of coating for underground pipelines are presented, as well as the applications, limitations, reference norms and the interface with the cathodic protection systems in relation to the efficiencies to be adopted and the expected performance. Is it also discussed the welded piping joints confection and the protection difficulties when the efficiencies are not corresponded to those foreseen in the cathodic protection systems project. (author)

  20. Cathodic hydrogen charging of zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panagopoulos, C.N.; Georgiou, E.P.; Chaliampalias, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Incorporation of hydrogen into zinc and formation of zinc hydrides. •Investigation of surface residual stresses due to hydrogen diffusion. •Effect of hydrogen diffusion and hydride formation on mechanical properties of Zn. •Hydrogen embrittlement phenomena in zinc. -- Abstract: The effect of cathodic hydrogen charging on the structural and mechanical characteristics of zinc was investigated. Hardening of the surface layers of zinc, due to hydrogen incorporation and possible formation of ZnH 2 , was observed. In addition, the residual stresses brought about by the incorporation of hydrogen atoms into the metallic matrix, were calculated by analyzing the obtained X-ray diffraction patterns. Tensile testing of the as-received and hydrogen charged specimens revealed that the ductility of zinc decreased significantly with increasing hydrogen charging time, for a constant value of charging current density, and with increasing charging current density, for a constant value of charging time. However, the ultimate tensile strength of this material was slightly affected by the hydrogen charging procedure. The cathodically charged zinc exhibited brittle transgranular fracture at the surface layers and ductile intergranular fracture at the deeper layers of the material

  1. Ion source with plasma cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabe, E.

    1987-01-01

    A long lifetime ion source with plasma cathode has been developed for use in ion implantation. In this ion source, a plasma of a nonreactive working gas serves as a cathode in place of a thermionic tungsten filament used in the Freeman ion source. In an applied magnetic field, the plasma is convergent, i.e., filamentlike; in zero magnetic field, it turns divergent and spraylike. In the latter case, the plasma exhibits a remarkable ability when the working gas has an ionization potential larger than the feed gas. By any combination of a working gas of either argon or neon and a feed gas of AsF 5 or PF 5 , the lifetime of this ion source was found to be more than 90 h with an extraction voltage of 40 kV and the corresponding ion current density 20 mA/cm 2 . Mass spectrometry results show that this ion source has an ability of generating a considerable amount of As + and P + ions from AsF 5 and PF 5 , and hence will be useful for realizing a fully cryopumped ion implanter system. This ion source is also eminently suitable for use in oxygen ion production

  2. Determining the resolution of scanning microwave impedance microscopy using atomic-precision buried donor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrymgeour, D. A.; Baca, A.; Fishgrab, K.; Simonson, R. J.; Marshall, M.; Bussmann, E.; Nakakura, C. Y.; Anderson, M.; Misra, S.

    2017-11-01

    To quantify the resolution limits of scanning microwave impedance microscopy (sMIM), we created scanning tunneling microscope (STM)-patterned donor nanostructures in silicon composed of 10 nm lines of highly conductive silicon buried under a protective top cap of silicon, and imaged them with sMIM. This dopant pattern is an ideal test of the resolution and sensitivity of the sMIM technique, as it is made with nm-resolution and offers minimal complications from topography convolution. It has been determined that typical sMIM tips can resolve lines down to ∼80 nm spacing, while resolution is independent of tip geometry as extreme tip wear does not change the resolving power, contrary to traditional scanning capacitance microscopy (SCM). Going forward, sMIM is an ideal technique for qualifying buried patterned devices, potentially allowing for quantitative post-fabrication characterization of donor structures, which may be an important tool for the study of atomic-scale transistors and state of the art quantum computation schemes.

  3. Model of dopant action in oxide cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelsen, Daniel den; Gaertner, Georg

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes an electrochemical model, which largely explains the formation of Ba in the oxide cathode at activation and normal operation. In a non-doped oxide cathode electrolysis of BaO is, besides the exchange reaction from the activators in the cathode nickel, an important source of Ba. By doping with rare earth oxides the conductivity of the oxide layer increases, which implies that the potential difference during current drawing over the oxide layer becomes lower and electrolysis of BaO is suppressed. This implies that the part of the electronic conductivity of the (Ba,Sr)O layer induced by the dopants also controls the sensitivity for poisoning: the higher the dopant level, the larger the sensitivity for poisoning. Furthermore, the suppression of electrolysis during normal operation largely explains why doped oxide cathodes have a better life performance than non-doped cathodes. Finally a hypothesis on the enhancement of sintering upon doping is presented

  4. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  5. Effect of cathode gas humidification on performance and durability of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Hagen, Anke; Liu, Yi-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The effect of cathode inlet gas humidification was studied on single anode supported Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC's). The studied cells were Risø 2 G and 2.5 G. The former consists of a LSM:YSZ composite cathode, while the latter consists of a LSCF:CGO composite cathode on a CGO protection layer....... The humidification effect was found to be dependent on both the degree of humidification and the cathode polarization. No significant effect of humidification was found at OCV which rules out the possibility of a traditional poisoning effect with a blocking of active sites. Post-mortem high resolution FEG......-SEM analysis showed clear changes at and around the cathode/electrolyte contact area. In contrast to Risø 2 G cells, a very high tolerance towards humidification of cathode gas air was observed for Risø 2.5 G cells with no detectable effect of humidification even when the humidification was as high as 12.8 mol%...

  6. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration lessons learned: 1993 technology demonstrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostelnik, K.M.; Owens, K.J.

    1994-01-01

    An integrated technology demonstration was conducted by the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cold Test Pit in the summer of 1993. This program and demonstration was sponsored by the US Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. The demonstration included six technologies representing a synergistic system for the characterization and retrieval of a buried hazardous waste site. The integrated technology demonstration proved very successful and a summary of the technical accomplishments is presented. Upon completion of the integrated technology demonstration, cognizant program personnel participated in a lessons learned exercise. This exercise was conducted at the Simplot Decision Support Center at Idaho State University and lessons learned activity captured additional information relative to the integration of technologies for demonstration purposes. This information will be used by BWID to enhance program planning and strengthen future technology demonstrations

  7. FY-94 buried waste integrated demonstration program report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies. These technologies are being integrated to form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER/WM) needs and objectives. This document summarizes previous demonstrations and describes the FY-94 BWID technology development and demonstration activities. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development (OTD), BWID works with universities and private industry to develop these technologies, which are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. A public participation policy has been established to provide stakeholders with timely and accurate information and meaningful opportunities for involvement in the technology development and demonstration process

  8. Field test plan: Buried waste technologies, Fiscal Year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heard, R.E.; Hyde, R.A.; Engleman, V.S.; Evans, J.D.; Jackson, T.W.

    1995-06-01

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development, supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that, when integrated with commercially available baseline technologies, form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The Fiscal Year 1995 effort is to deploy and test multiple technologies from four functional areas of buried waste remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, and treatment. This document is the basic operational planning document for the deployment and testing of the technologies that support the field testing in Fiscal Year 1995. Discussed in this document are the scope of the tests; purpose and objective of the tests; organization and responsibilities; contingency plans; sequence of activities; sampling and data collection; document control; analytical methods; data reduction, validation, and verification; quality assurance; equipment and instruments; facilities and utilities; health and safety; residuals management; and regulatory management

  9. Continuum soil modeling in the static analysis of buried structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julyk, L.J.; Marlow, R.S.; Moore, C.J.; Day, J.P.; Dyrness, A.D.

    1993-10-01

    Soil loading traditionally has been modeled as a hydrostatic pressure, a practice acceptable for many design applications. In the analyses of buried structure with predictive goals, soil compliance and load redistribution in the presence of soil plasticity are important factors to consider in determining the appropriate response of the structure. In the analysis of existing buried waste-storage tanks at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site, three soil-tank interaction modeling considerations are addressed. First, the soil interacts with the tank as the tank expands and contracts during thermal cycles associated with changes in the heat generated by the waste material as a result of additions and subtractions of the waste. Second, the soil transfers loads from the surface to the tank and provides support by resisting radial displacement of the tank haunch. Third, conventional finite-element mesh development causes artificial stress concentrations in the soil associated with differential settlement

  10. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste with polyacrylamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Farmer, C.D.; Hyder, L.K.; Supaokit, P.

    1987-01-01

    This project is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34.000 L of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. No evidence of grout constituents were observed in twelve perimeter groundwater monitoring wells indicating that grout was contained completely within the two trenches. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over the polyacrylate grout due to its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty in controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, the polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 362 years in the test soil. 15 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs

  11. Radiotoxic hazard measure for buried solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamstra, J.

    1975-01-01

    The radiotoxic hazards resulting from the disposal of highlevel reprocessing wastes into a deep geological formation are reviewed. The term radiotoxic hazard measure (RHM), used to measure the hazard from buried radioactive wastes, is based on the maximum radionuclide concentration permissible in water. Calculations are made of the RHM levels for the high-level reprocessing wastes of both light-water-reactor and fast breeder reactor fuels. In comparing these RHM levels with that for the natural activity of an equivalent amount of uranium ore and its mill tailings, it is concluded that an actual additional radiotoxic hazard for buried high-level reprocessing waste only exists for the first 300 to 500 years after burial. (U.S.)

  12. In situ grouting of buried transuranic waste with polyacrylamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalding, B.P.; Lee, S.Y.; Farmer, C.D.; Hyder, L.K.; Supaokit, P.

    1987-01-01

    This project is a demonstration and evaluation of the in situ hydrologic stabilization of buried transuranic waste at a humid site via grout injection. Two small trenches, containing buried transuranic waste, were filled with 34.000 L of polyacrylamide grout. Initial field results have indicated that voids within the trenches were totally filled by the grout and that the intratrench hydraulic conductivity was reduced to below field-measurable values. No evidence of grout constituents were observed in twelve perimeter groundwater monitoring wells indicating that grout was contained completely within the two trenches. Polyacrylamide grout was selected for field demonstration over the polyacrylate grout due to its superior performance in laboratory degradation studies. Also supporting the selection of polyacrylamide was the difficulty in controlling the set time of the acrylate polymerization. Based on preliminary degradation monitoring, the polyacrylamide was estimated to have a microbiological half-life of 362 years in the test soil. 15 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

  13. Buried Porous Silicon-Germanium Layers in Monocrystalline Silicon Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathauer, Robert W. (Inventor); George, Thomas (Inventor); Jones, Eric W. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    Monocrystalline semiconductor lattices with a buried porous semiconductor layer having different chemical composition is discussed and monocrystalline semiconductor superlattices with a buried porous semiconductor layers having different chemical composition than that of its monocrystalline semiconductor superlattice are discussed. Lattices of alternating layers of monocrystalline silicon and porous silicon-germanium have been produced. These single crystal lattices have been fabricated by epitaxial growth of Si and Si-Ge layers followed by patterning into mesa structures. The mesa structures are strain etched resulting in porosification of the Si-Ge layers with a minor amount of porosification of the monocrystalline Si layers. Thicker Si-Ge layers produced in a similar manner emitted visible light at room temperature.

  14. Strategic management of health risks posed by buried transuranic wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jump, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    A strategy is presented for reducing health risks at sites contaminated with buried transuranic (TRU) wastes by first taking measures to immobilize the contaminants until the second step, final action, becomes cost-effective and poses less risk to the remediation workers. The first step of this strategy does not preclude further action if it is warranted and is in harmony with environmental laws and regulations

  15. Detection of Buried Inhomogeneous Elliptic Cylinders by a Memetic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Caorsi, Salvatore; Massa, Andrea; Pastorino, Matteo; Raffetto, Mirco; Randazzo, Andrea

    2003-01-01

    The application of a global optimization procedure to the detection of buried inhomogeneities is studied in the present paper. The object inhomogeneities are schematized as multilayer infinite dielectric cylinders with elliptic cross sections. An efficient recursive analytical procedure is used for the forward scattering computation. A functional is constructed in which the field is expressed in series solution of Mathieu functions. Starting by the input scattered data, the iterative minimiza...

  16. Exhumation of radioactive solid wastes buried for fourteen years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, J.H.

    1977-03-01

    Twenty-five linear feet of a low-level beta-gamma waste trench was excavated fourteen years after the waste was buried. The waste included wood, steel, plastics, cotton cloth, rubber, and paper. Cardboard boxes not enclosed in plastic were the only materials to deteriorate visibly. Apparently, decades would be required for all cellulose materials to decompose, and plastics and metals would survive indefinitely

  17. Descriptive summary of airblast effects for buried cratering detonations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, C.M.

    1976-01-01

    Detonation of a buried nuclear or high-explosive charge induces an airblast signal in the air above the explosion site. The waveform of this signal may be complex, involving features created by ground surface motion effects, venting and expansion of gas from the explosive cavity, and energy release through an unstemmed or partly stemmed emplacement hole. The basic physical mechanisms responsible for the airblast pulse and some of the techniques commonly used to predict airblast effects are described

  18. The Thermal Regime Around Buried Submarine High-Voltage Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emeana, C. J.; Dix, J.; Henstock, T.; Gernon, T.; Thompson, C.; Pilgrim, J.

    2015-12-01

    The expansion of offshore renewable energy infrastructure and the desire for "trans-continental shelf" power transmission, all require the use of submarine High Voltage (HV) cables. These cables have maximum operating surface temperatures of up to 70oC and are typically buried at depths of 1-2 m beneath the seabed, within the wide range of substrates found on the continental shelf. However, the thermal properties of near surface shelf sediments are poorly understood and this increases the uncertainty in determining the required cable current ratings, cable reliability and the potential effects on the sedimentary environments. We present temperature measurements from a 2D laboratory experiment, designed to represent a buried, submarine HV cable. We used a large (2.5 m-high) tank, filled with water-saturated ballotini and instrumented with 120 thermocouples, which measured the time-dependent 2D temperature distributions around the heat source. The experiments use a buried heat source to represent a series of realistic cable surface temperatures with the aim for identifying the thermal regimes generated within typical non-cohesive shelf sediments: coarse silt, fine sand and very coarse sand. The steady state heat flow regimes, and normalised and radial temperature distributions were assessed. Our results show that at temperatures up to 60°C above ambient, the thermal regimes are conductive for the coarse silt sediments and convective for the very coarse sand sediments even at 7°C above ambient. However, the heat flow pattern through the fine sand sediment shows a transition from conductive to convective heat flow at a temperature of approximately 20°C above ambient. These findings offer an important new understanding of the thermal regimes associated with submarine HV cables buried in different substrates and has huge impacts on cable ratings as the IEC 60287 standard only considers conductive heat flow as well as other potential near surface impacts.

  19. Investigation of guided waves propagation in pipe buried in sand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leinov, Eli; Cawley, Peter; Lowe, Michael J.S.

    2014-01-01

    The inspection of pipelines by guided wave testing is a well-established method for the detection of corrosion defects in pipelines, and is currently used routinely in a variety of industries, e.g. petrochemical and energy. When the method is applied to pipes buried in soil, test ranges tend to be significantly compromised because of attenuation of the waves caused by energy radiating into the soil. Moreover, the variability of soil conditions dictates different attenuation characteristics, which in-turn results in different, unpredictable, test ranges. We investigate experimentally the propagation and attenuation characteristics of guided waves in pipes buried in fine sand using a well characterized full scale experimental apparatus. The apparatus consists of an 8 inch-diameter, 5.6-meters long steel pipe embedded over 3 meters of its length in a rectangular container filled with fine sand, and an air-bladder for the application of overburden pressure. Longitudinal and torsional guided waves are excited in the pipe and recorded using a transducer ring (Guided Ultrasonics Ltd). Acoustic properties of the sand are measured independently in-situ and used to make model predictions of wave behavior in the buried pipe. We present the methodology and the systematic measurements of the guided waves under a range of conditions, including loose and compacted sand. It is found that the application of overburden pressure modifies the compaction of the sand and increases the attenuation, and that the measurement of the acoustic properties of sand allows model prediction of the attenuation of guided waves in buried pipes with a high level of confidence

  20. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration FY-95 Deployment Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, D.E.

    1995-03-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The FY-95 effort will fund 24 technologies in five areas of buried waste site remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, treatment, and containment/stabilization. Ten of these technologies will take part in the integrated field demonstration that will take place at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities in the summer of 1995. This document is the basic operational planning document for deployment of all BWID projects funded in FY-95. Discussed in this document are the BWID preparations for the INEL integrated field demonstration, INEL research and development (R&D) demonstrations, non-INEL R&D demonstrations, and office research and technical review meetings. Each project will have a test plan detailing the specific procedures, objectives, and tasks of the test. Therefore, information that is specific to testing each technology is intentionally limited in this document.

  1. New Technique for the Treatment of Buried Penis in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Lin, Tao; He, Dawei; Wei, Guanghui; Liu, Junhong; Liu, Xing; Hua, Yi; Zhang, Deying; Lu, Peng; Wu, Shengde; Li, Xuliang

    2016-02-01

    To present our treatment experience of buried penis, which has no consensus therapeutic technique for all cases of buried penis, by using a new technique for the repair of this condition, in which the approach is through the ventral penile root. We performed a retrospective review of 153 patients (median age: 6.5 years) who underwent repair of a buried penis between March 2005 and March 2013. The technique involves the creation of a wedge-shaped cut of the ventral penile skin, followed by fixation of the subcutaneous penile skin at the base of the degloved penis to the Buck fascia at the 2- and 10-o'clock positions. The ventral outer preputial skin is split down the midline, and the dorsal inner preputial skin is cut with oblique incision. All patients were followed for an average of 12 months after repair. Other than 2 cases (1.3%) of trapped penis with a ring of scar tissue, which required subsequent excision, there were no complications and the cosmetic appearance was satisfactory. The described ventral penile approach is a simple and effective procedure with good cosmetic outcomes and few complications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantification of Methamphetamine in Mouse Thighbones Buried in Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Ken-Ichiro; Tatara, Yuki; Kibayashi, Kazuhiko

    2017-11-01

    Bone samples are used for analysis of drugs in decomposed or skeletonized bodies. Toxicological analyses of buried bones are important for determining the causes and circumstances of death. In this study, methamphetamine and amphetamine concentrations in heart blood, thigh muscles, and thighbones were analyzed using solid-phase extraction with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Methamphetamine concentrations in heart blood, thigh muscle, and thighbone ranged from 0.041 to 0.873 μg/mL, 0.649 to 2.623 μg/g, and 56.543 to 643.371 μg/g, respectively. Thighbone concentrations were significantly higher than those in heart blood or thigh muscles were. Methamphetamine concentrations in buried thighbone (4.010-45.785 μg/g) were significantly lower than those of unburied thighbones were (56.543-643.371 μg/g). Methamphetamine and amphetamine were detected in thighbones buried for 7-180 days. These findings indicate that the methamphetamine concentrations in bone are higher and decrease after burial in soil. © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  3. FY-95 technology catalog. Technology development for buried waste remediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The US Department of Energy's (DOE) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program, which is now part of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area (LSFA), supports applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies dealing with underground radioactive and hazardous waste remediation. These innovative technologies are being developed as part of integrated comprehensive remediation systems for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste sites throughout the DOE complex. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) and Waste Management (EM-30) needs and objectives. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development (EM-50), BWID and LSFA work with universities and private industry to develop technologies that are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. This report contains the details of the purpose, logic, and methodology used to develop and demonstrate DOE buried waste remediation technologies. It also provides a catalog of technologies and capabilities with development status for potential users. Past FY-92 through FY-94 technology testing, field trials, and demonstrations are summarized. Continuing and new FY-95 technology demonstrations also are described

  4. Tabernaemontana divaricata leaves extract exacerbate burying behavior in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj Chanchal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Tabernaemontana divaricata (TD from Apocynaceae family offers the traditional folklore medicinal benefits such as an anti-epileptic, anti-mania, brain tonic, and anti-oxidant. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of ethanolic extract of TD leaves on burying behavior in mice. Materials and Methods:Mice were treated with oral administration (p.o. of ethanolic extract of TD (100, 200, and 300 mg/kg. Fluoxetine (FLX, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor was used as a reference drug. Obsessive-compulsive behavior was evaluated using marble-burying apparatus. Results:TD at doses of 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg dose-dependently inhibited the obsessive and compulsive behavior. The similar results were obtained from 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg of FLX. TD and FLX did not affect motor activity. Conclusion: The results indicated that TD and FLX produced similar inhibitory effects on marble-burying behavior.

  5. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration FY-95 Deployment Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, D.E.

    1995-03-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The FY-95 effort will fund 24 technologies in five areas of buried waste site remediation: site characterization, waste characterization, retrieval, treatment, and containment/stabilization. Ten of these technologies will take part in the integrated field demonstration that will take place at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities in the summer of 1995. This document is the basic operational planning document for deployment of all BWID projects funded in FY-95. Discussed in this document are the BWID preparations for the INEL integrated field demonstration, INEL research and development (R ampersand D) demonstrations, non-INEL R ampersand D demonstrations, and office research and technical review meetings. Each project will have a test plan detailing the specific procedures, objectives, and tasks of the test. Therefore, information that is specific to testing each technology is intentionally limited in this document

  6. A metallic buried interconnect process for through-wafer interconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, Chang-Hyeon; Herrault, Florian; Allen, Mark G

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design, fabrication process and experimental results of electroplated metal interconnects buried at the bottom of deep silicon trenches with vertical sidewalls. A manual spray-coating process along with a unique trench-formation process has been developed for the electroplating of a metal interconnection structure at the bottom surface of the deep trenches. The silicon etch process combines the isotropic dry etch process and conventional Bosch process to fabricate a deep trench with angled top-side edges and vertical sidewalls. The resulting trench structure, in contrast to the trenches fabricated by wet anisotropic etching, enables spray-coated photoresist patterning with good sidewall and top-side edge coverage while maintaining the ability to form a high-density array of deep trenches without excessive widening of the trench opening. A photoresist spray-coating process was developed and optimized for the formation of electroplating mold at the bottom of 300 µm deep trenches having vertical sidewalls. A diluted positive tone photoresist with relatively high solid content and multiple coating with baking between coating steps has been experimentally proven to provide high quality sidewall and edge coverage. To validate the buried interconnect approach, a three-dimensional daisy chain structure having a buried interconnect as the bottom connector and traces on the wafer surface as the top conductor has been designed and fabricated

  7. FY-95 technology catalog. Technology development for buried waste remediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program, which is now part of the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area (LSFA), supports applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a multitude of advanced technologies dealing with underground radioactive and hazardous waste remediation. These innovative technologies are being developed as part of integrated comprehensive remediation systems for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste sites throughout the DOE complex. These efforts are identified and coordinated in support of Environmental Restoration (EM-40) and Waste Management (EM-30) needs and objectives. Sponsored by the DOE Office of Technology Development (EM-50), BWID and LSFA work with universities and private industry to develop technologies that are being transferred to the private sector for use nationally and internationally. This report contains the details of the purpose, logic, and methodology used to develop and demonstrate DOE buried waste remediation technologies. It also provides a catalog of technologies and capabilities with development status for potential users. Past FY-92 through FY-94 technology testing, field trials, and demonstrations are summarized. Continuing and new FY-95 technology demonstrations also are described.

  8. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration FY-93 Deployment Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnenberg, R.W.; Heard, R.E.; Milam, L.M.; Watson, L.R.

    1993-02-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. The fiscal year 1993 effort will deploy seven major field demonstrations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL's) Radioactive Waste Management Complex Cold Test Pit. These major demonstrations are Remote Characterization System, Remote Excavation System, Overburden Removal, Waste Isolation, Contamination Control Unit, Rapid Monitoring Unit, and Fixation of Soil Surface Contamination. This document is the basic operational planning document for BWID deployment of the INEL field demonstrations. Additional sections deal briefly with four nonINEL field and laboratory demonstrations (Buried Waste Retrieval, Arc Melter Vitrification, Graphite DC Plasma Arc Melter, and Fixed Hearth Plasma Process) and with four INEL laboratory demonstrations (Electrostatic Curtain, Thermal Kinetics, Multiaxis Crane Control System, and Dig-Face Characterization)

  9. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causa, Federica [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Universita degli studi di Messina, 98122 Messina (Italy); Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dellasega, David [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  10. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as

  11. Strategies for managing rival bacterial communities: Lessons from burying beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Ana; Welch, Martin; Swannack, Chris; Wagner, Josef; Kilner, Rebecca M

    2018-03-01

    The role of bacteria in animal development, ecology and evolution is increasingly well understood, yet little is known of how animal behaviour affects bacterial communities. Animals that benefit from defending a key resource from microbial competitors are likely to evolve behaviours to control or manipulate the animal's associated external microbiota. We describe four possible mechanisms by which animals could gain a competitive edge by disrupting a rival bacterial community: "weeding," "seeding," "replanting" and "preserving." By combining detailed behavioural observations with molecular and bioinformatic analyses, we then test which of these mechanisms best explains how burying beetles, Nicrophorus vespilloides, manipulate the bacterial communities on their carcass breeding resource. Burying beetles are a suitable species to study how animals manage external microbiota because reproduction revolves around a small vertebrate carcass. Parents shave a carcass and apply antimicrobial exudates on its surface, shaping it into an edible nest for their offspring. We compared bacterial communities in mice carcasses that were either fresh, prepared by beetles or unprepared but buried underground for the same length of time. We also analysed bacterial communities in the burying beetle's gut, during and after breeding, to understand whether beetles could be "seeding" the carcass with particular microbes. We show that burying beetles do not "preserve" the carcass by reducing bacterial load, as is commonly supposed. Instead, our results suggest they "seed" the carcass with bacterial groups which are part of the Nicrophorus core microbiome. They may also "replant" other bacteria from the carcass gut onto the surface of their carrion nest. Both these processes may lead to the observed increase in bacterial load on the carcass surface in the presence of beetles. Beetles may also "weed" the bacterial community by eliminating some groups of bacteria on the carcass, perhaps through

  12. Cathodic behavior of zirconium in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hine, F.; Yasuda, M.; Sato, H.

    1977-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Zr was studied by polarization measurements. The surface oxide and zirconium hydride formed by cathodic polarization of Zr have been examined by X-ray, SEM, and a hardness tester. Zirconium hydride would form on Zr cathode after the surface oxide is reduced at the potential, which is several hundred mV more noble than the predicted value shown by the Pourbaix diagram. The parameters for the hydrogen evolution reaction on the hydride formed Zr cathode differs from that on the oxide covered surface, which means that hydrogen evolution takes place on both surfaces under a different mechanism, while details are still veiled at present

  13. Rechargeable lithium/polymer cathode batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Toshiki; Shiota, Koh; Owens, Boone B.

    1989-06-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) and polyaniline (PAn) were investigated for cathode materials of rechargeable lithium batteries. PPy films prepared with PF6(-) anion and/or platinum substrate precoated with nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) were excellent cathode materials because of rough and/or highly oriented film structure. PAn films were successfully prepared from non-aqueous propylene carbonate solution containing aniline, CF3COOH and lithium perchlorate. Its acidity strongly affects the anion doping-undoping behavior. The PAn cathode prepared in high acidic solution (e.g., 4:1 ratio of acid:aniline) gives the excellent battery performance.

  14. Numerical study on rectangular microhollow cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shoujie; Ouyang Jiting; He Feng; Li Shang

    2011-01-01

    Rectangular microhollow cathode discharge in argon is investigated by using two-dimensional time-dependent self-consistent fluid model. The electric potential, electric field, particle density, and mean electron energy are calculated. The results show that hollow cathode effect can be onset in the present configuration, with strong electric field and high mean electron energy in the cathode fall while high density and quasineutral plasma in the negative glow. The potential well and electric filed reversal are formed in the negative glow region. It is suggested that the presence of large electron diffusion flux necessitates the field reversal and potential well.

  15. Cold cathode diode X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperstein, G.; Lanza, R.C.; Sohval, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    A cold cathode diode X-ray source for radiation imaging, especially computed tomography, comprises a rod-like anode and a generally cylindrical cathode, concentric with the anode. The spacing between anode and cathode is so chosen that the diode has an impedance in excess of 100 ohms. The anode may be of tungsten, or of carbon with a tungsten and carbon coating. An array of such diodes may be used with a closely packed array of detectors to produce images of rapidly moving body organs, such as the beating heart. (author)

  16. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.

    1996-01-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution

  17. Cyclotron resonance in a cathode ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gherbanovschi, N.; Tanasa, M.; Stoican, O.

    2002-01-01

    Absorption of the RF energy by the electron beam in a cathode ray tube due to the cyclotron resonance is described. The cathode ray tube is placed within a Helmholtz coils system supplied by a sawtooth current generator. In order to generate RF field and to detect RF absorption a gate dip-meter equipped with a FET transistor is used. The bias voltage variations of the FET transistors as a function of the magnetic field are recorded. The operating point of the cathode ray tube has been chosen so that the relaxation oscillations of the detection system can be observed. (authors)

  18. 40 CFR 261.40 - Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Conditional Exclusion for Used, Intact Cathode Ray Tubes (CRTs) Exported for Recycling. 261.40 Section 261.40 Protection of Environment...) Exported for Recycling. Used, intact CRTs exported for recycling are not solid wastes if they meet the...

  19. Modeling High Pressure Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boeuf, Jean-Pierre; Pitchford, Leanne

    2004-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking CPAT as follows: The Grantee will perform theoretical modeling of point, surface, and volume high-pressure plasmas created using Micro Hollow Cathode Discharge sources...

  20. RF Electron Gun with Driven Plasma Cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, Igor

    2005-01-01

    It's known that RF guns with plasma cathodes based on solid-state dielectrics are able to generate an intense electron beam. In this paper we describe results of experimental investigation of the single cavity S-band RF gun with driven plasma cathode. The experimental sample of the cathode based on ferroelectric ceramics has been designed. Special design of the cathode permits to separate spatially processes of plasma development and electron acceleration. It has been obtained at RF gun output electron beam with particle energy ~500 keV, pulse current of 4 A and pulse duration of 80 ns. Results of experimental study of beam parameters are referred in. The gun is purposed to be applied as the intense electron beam source for electron linacs.

  1. Rare earth oxide doping in oxide cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelsen, Daniel den; Gaertner, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The effect on life performance and poisoning with O 2 by doping oxide cathodes with rare earth oxides and pseudo rare earth oxides, notably yttria, is qualitatively explained in terms of electrolysis of BaO during emission of electrons. Doped cathodes show less electrolysis and consume therefore less Ba during life: consequently, doped cathodes have a better life performance. However, the lower Ba-production makes doped cathodes more sensitive to oxygen poisoning. The experimentally found relation between conductivity and yttria concentration was the motive to propose a new model for the crystal imperfections in BaO. In this new imperfection model most Y 3+ -ions will combine with barium vacancies, therefore, the increase of the conductivity is modest and also the effect on the position of the Fermi level is modest. By assuming a combination of bulk and surface conductivity, the agreement between experiment and theory can be improved further

  2. Electrodeposition of uranium in stirred liquid cadmium cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, T.; Tanaka, H.

    1997-01-01

    The electrodeposition of U in a liquid Cd cathode was known to be hampered by the formation of dendritic U on the Cd surface. Electrotransports of uranium to the stirred liquid Cd cathode were carried out at 773 K for different cathode current densities and different Reynolds number of stirring. The maximum amount of U taken in the liquid Cd cathode without forming dendrites was found to increase with an increasing Reynolds number of stirring and decrease with increasing cathode current density. (orig.)

  3. Plasma generation using the hollow cathod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    A hollow cathode of tungsten was adapted to an University of California, Berkely, LBL bucket ion source to investigate ion density fluctuations at the extractior grid. Fluctuations in plasma ion density are observed to range between 100kHz to 2 MHz. The observed fluctuation frequencies of plasma ion density are found to be inversely proportional to the square root of ion masses. It is guessed that the plasma fluctuation are also correlated with the hollow cathode length. (Author)

  4. Nanoporous silver cathode surface treated by atomic layer deposition of CeO_x for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neoh, Ke Chean; Han, Gwon Deok; Kim, Manjin; Kim, Jun Woo; Choi, Hyung Jong; Park, Suk Won; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with a 50 nm thin silver (Ag) cathode surface treated with cerium oxide (CeO_x) by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The performances of bare and ALD-treated Ag cathodes were evaluated on gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) electrolyte supporting cells with a platinum (Pt) anode over 300 °C–450 °C. Our work confirms that ALD CeO_x treatment enhances cathodic performance and thermal stability of the Ag cathode. The performance difference between cells using a Ag cathode optimally treated with an ALD CeO_x surface and a reference Pt cathode is about 50% at 450 °C in terms of fuel cell power output in our experiment. The bare Ag cathode completely agglomerated into islands during fuel cell operation at 450 °C, while the ALD CeO_x treatment effectively protects the porosity of the cathode. We also discuss the long-term stability of ALD CeO_x-treated Ag cathodes related to the microstructure of the layers. (paper)

  5. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis of cathode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajun; Wang, Shijun; Whittingham, M. Stanley

    A number of cathodes are being considered for the next generation of lithium ion batteries to replace the expensive LiCoO 2 presently used. Besides the layered oxides, such as LiNi yMn yCo 1-2 yO 2, a leading candidate is lithium iron phosphate with the olivine structure. Although this material is inherently low cost, a manufacturing process that produces electrochemically active LiFePO 4 at a low cost is also required. Hydrothermal reactions are one such possibility. A number of pure phosphates have been prepared using this technique, including LiFePO 4, LiMnPO 4 and LiCoPO 4; this method has also successfully produced mixed metal phosphates, such as LiFe 0.33Mn 0.33Co 0.33PO 4. Ascorbic acid was found to be better than hydrazine or sugar at preventing the formation of ferric ions in aqueous media. When conductive carbons are added to the reaction medium excellent electrochemical behavior is observed.

  7. Plasma processes inside dispenser hollow cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model of the plasma and neutral gas inside dispenser orificed hollow cathodes has been developed to quantify plasma processes that ultimately determine the life of the porous emitters inserted in these devices. The model self-consistently accounts for electron emission from the insert as well as for electron and ion flux losses from the plasma. Two cathodes, which are distinctively different in size and operating conditions, have been simulated numerically. It is found that the larger cathode, with outer tube diameter of 1.5 cm and orifice diameter of 0.3 cm, establishes an effective emission zone that spans approximately the full length of the emitter when operated at a discharge current of 25 A and a flow rate of 5.5 sccm. The net heating of the emitter is caused by ions that are produced by ionization of the neutral gas inside the tube and are then accelerated by the sheath along the emitter. The smaller cathode, with an outer diameter of 0.635 cm and an orifice diameter of 0.1 cm, does not exhibit the same operational characteristics. At a flow rate of 4.25 sccm and discharge current of 12 A, the smaller cathode requires 4.5 times the current density near the orifice and operates with more than 6 times the neutral particle density compared to the large cathode. As a result, the plasma particle density is almost one order of magnitude higher compared to the large cathode. The plasma density in this small cathode is high enough such that the Debye length is sufficiently small to allow 'sheath funneling' into the pores of the emitter. By accessing areas deeper into the insert material, it is postulated that the overall emission of electrons is significantly enhanced. The maximum emission current density is found to be about 1 A/mm 2 in the small cathode, which is about one order of magnitude higher than attained in the large cathode. The effective emission zone in the small cathode extends to about 15% of the emitter length only, and the

  8. Remote Excavation System technology evaluation report: Buried Waste Robotics Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This document describes the results from the Remote Excavation System demonstration and testing conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory during June and July 1993. The purpose of the demonstration was to ascertain the feasibility of the system for skimming soil and removing various types of buried waste in a safe manner and within all regulatory requirements, and to compare the performances of manual and remote operation of a backhoe. The procedures and goals of the demonstration were previously defined in The Remote Excavation System Test Plan, which served as a guideline for evaluating the various components of the system and discussed the procedures used to conduct the tests

  9. Mathematical model and simulations of radiation fluxes from buried radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad Saat

    1999-01-01

    A mathematical model and a simple Monte Carlo simulations were developed to predict radiation fluxes from buried radionuclides. The model and simulations were applied to measured (experimental) data. The results of the mathematical model showed good acceptable order of magnitude agreement. A good agreement was also obtained between the simple simulations and the experimental results. Thus, knowing the radionuclide distribution profiles in soil from a core sample, it can be applied to the model or simulations to estimate the radiation fluxes emerging from the soil surface. (author)

  10. High ion temperatures from buried layers irradiated with Vulcan Petawatt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karsch, S.; Schreiber, J.; Willingale, L.; Lancaster, K.; Habara, H.; Nilson, P.; Gopal, A.; Wei, M. S.; Stoeckl, C.; Evans, R.; Clarke, R.; Heathcote, R.; Najmudin, Z.; Krushelnick, K.; Neely, D.; Norreys, P. A.

    2005-01-01

    Deuteron acceleration from CH/CD/CH layer targets irradiated with PW laser pulses has been studied using. Thomson parabola spectrometers and neutron TOF spectroscopy. The measured ion and neutron spectra reveal significant MeV deuteron acceleration from the deeply buried CD layer, which scales with the thickness of the overlying CH layer. While the neutron spectra reveal the scaling of the thermal heating with target thickness, the ion spectra indicate the presence of an efficient nonthermal acceleration mechanism inside. the bulk. Possible explanations will be discussed. (Author)

  11. Response of Buried Vertically Oriented Cylinders to Dynamic Loading,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-01

    BALSARA • , . / ,, _,-, -. 1i S ,LESPONSE OF BURIED VERTICALLY 9RIENTED CYLINDERS 𔃺 .-TO DINAMIC LOADING_ 9AYLE E. LRTOrwW&-N JIIMY P./BALSARA Nk...1.7, 2,8, and 4.0 inches). The end caps for the cylinders consisted of a steel shell filled with high- strength concrete; however, the end caps were...not designed to be test articles. The average concrete compressive strength of the cylinders on test day was 44.0 MPa (6,380 psi). The three DEOT

  12. Sexual and Overall Quality of Life Improvements After Surgical Correction of "Buried Penis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Duncan B; Perez, Edgar; Garcia, Ryan M; Aragón, Oriana R; Erdmann, Detlev

    2016-05-01

    "Buried penis" is an increasing burden in our population with many possible etiologies. Although surgical correction of buried penis can be rewarding and successful for the surgeon, the psychological and functional impact of buried penis on the patient is less understood. The study's aim was to evaluate the sexual satisfaction and overall quality of life before and after buried penis surgery in a single-surgeon's patient population using a validated questionnaire (Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire short-form). Using Likert scales generated from the questionnaire and 1-tailed paired t test analysis, we found that there was significantly improved sexual function after correction of a buried penis. Variables individually showed that there was significant improvement with sexual pleasure, urinating, and with genital hygiene postoperatively. There were no significant differences concerning frequency of pain with orgasms. Surgical correction of buried penis significantly improves the functional, sexual, and psychological aspects of patient's lives.

  13. Oxygen dynamics around buried lesser sandeels Ammodytes tobianus (Linnaeus 1785): mode of ventilation and oxygen requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrens, Jane W; Stahl, Henrik J; Steffensen, John F

    2007-01-01

    The oxygen environment around buried sandeels (Ammodytes tobianus) was monitored by planar optodes. The oxygen penetration depth at the sediment interface was only a few mm. Thus fish, typically buried at 1-4 cm depth, were generally in anoxic sediment. However, they induced an advective transport...... down along the body, referred to as ;plume ventilation'. Yet, within approximately 30 min the oxic plume was replenished by oxygen-depleted water from the gills. The potential for cutaneous respiration by the buried fish was thus of no quantitative importance. Calculations derived by three independent...... methods (each with N=3) revealed that the oxygen uptake of sandeel buried for 6-7 h was 40-50% of previous estimates on resting respirometry of non-buried fish, indicating lower O(2) requirements during burial on a diurnal timescale. Buried fish exposed to decreasing oxygen tensions gradually approached...

  14. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  15. Thermal Interference Fit Anode Assembly for Cathodic Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-22

    April 2018 The below identified patent application is available for licensing. Requests for information should be addressed to: TECHNOLOGY...royalties thereon or therefor. CROSS REFERENCE TO OTHER PATENT APPLICATIONS [0002] None. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (1) Field of the Invention

  16. AT on Buried LPG Tanks Over 13 m3: An Innovative and Practical Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Fratta, Crescenzo; Ferraro, Antonio; Tscheliesnig, Peter; Lackner, Gerald; Correggia, Vincenzo; Altamura, Nicola

    In Italy, since 2005, techniques based on Acoustic Emission have been introduced for testing of underground LPG tanks up to 13 m3, according to the European standard EN 12818:2004. The testing procedure for these tanks plans to install one or more pairs of sensors inside the "dome" suited for the access to the valves and fittings of the tank, directly on the accessible metal shell. This methodology is not applicable for the underground LPG buried tanks, where it is necessary to install a larger number of AE sensors, in order to cover at 100% the whole tank shell, even at very deep positions. Already in 2004, the European standard EN 12820 (Appendix C - Informative)give the possibility to use Acoustic Emission testing of LPG underground or buried tanks with a capacity exceeding 13 m3, but no technique was specified for the application. In 2008, TÜV AUSTRIA ITALIA - BLU SOLUTIONS srl - Italian company of TÜV AUSTRIA Group - has developed a technique to get access at tank shell, where tank capacity is greater than 13 m3 and its' diameter greater than 3,5 m. This methodology was fully in comply with the provisions of the European Standard EN 12819:2010, becoming an innovative solution widely appreciated and is used in Italy since this time. Currently, large companies and petrochemical plants, at the occurrence of the tank's requalification, have engaged TÜV AUSTRIA ITALIA - BLU SOLUTIONS to install such permanent predispositions, which allow access to the tank shell - test object - with diameters from 4 to 8 m. Through this access, you can install the AE sensors needed to cover at 100% the tank surface and then to perform AE test. In an economic crisis period, this technique is proving a valid and practically applicable answer, in order to reduce inspection costs and downtime by offering a technically advanced solution (AT), increasing the safety of the involved operators, protecting natural resources and the environment.

  17. Basic prerequisites and the practice of using deep water tables for burying liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Pimenov, M.K.; Balukova, V.D.; Leontichuk, A.S.; Kokorin, I.N.; Yudin, F.P.; Rakov, N.A.

    In the USSR, creating reservoirs for liquid radioactive wastes is one of the promising methods of safely disposing of them in deep water tables, in zones with a standing regime or a slow rate of subterranean water exchange. The results of investigations and the practice of burying (the wastes) indicate the reliability and effectiveness of such a method of final waste disposal when the basic requirements of environmental protection are observed. Geological formations and collector strata that guarantee the localization of the liquid radioactive wastes placed in them for many tens and even hundreds of thousands of years can be studied and chosen in different regions. The basic requirements and criteria to which the geological structures and collector strata must correspond for ensuring the safe burial of wastes have been formulated. Wastes are buried only after a comprehensive, scientifically based evaluation of the sanitary-radiation safety for this generation and future ones, taking into account the burial regime and the physico-chemical processes that accompany combining wastes with rocks and stratal waters, as well as the time of holding wastes to maximum permissible concentrations. Positive and negative factors that characterize the method are analyzed. Possible emergency situations with subterranean burial are evaluated. The composition and methods of the geological survey, hydrodynamic, geophysical, physico-chemical and sanitary-radiation investigations; methods of calculating and predicting the movement of wastes underground;methods of preparing wastes for burial and chemical methods of restoring the suitability of wells; design characteristics and conditions of preparing wells for use; methods of estimating heating and processes of radiolysis for a medium containing highly radioactive wastes; methods of operational and remote control of the burial process and the condition of the ambient medium, etc. are briefly examined

  18. Note: Laser ablation technique for electrically contacting a buried implant layer in single crystal diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, M. P.; Baldwin, J. W.; Butler, J. E.; Pate, B. B.; Feygelson, T. I.

    2011-01-01

    The creation of thin, buried, and electrically conducting layers within an otherwise insulating diamond by annealed ion implantation damage is well known. Establishing facile electrical contact to the shallow buried layer has been an unmet challenge. We demonstrate a new method, based on laser micro-machining (laser ablation), to make reliable electrical contact to a buried implant layer in diamond. Comparison is made to focused ion beam milling.

  19. 2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Mohanty, Debasish [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL; Wood III, David L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  20. High dose implantations of antimony for buried layer applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gailliard, J.P.; Dupuy, M.; Garcia, M.; Roussin, J.C.

    1978-01-01

    Electrical and physical properties of high dose implantations of antimony in silicon have been studied for use in buried layer applications. The results have been obtained both on and oriented silicon wafers. Following implantations which lead to amorphization we perform an annealing at 600 0 C for 10 mn in order to recrystallize the layer. The observed electrical properties (μ, R) show that the concentration of electrically active antimony ions is greater than that predicted from the solubility of antimony in silicon. Further annealing (in the range 1050 0 - 1200 0 ) induces: firstly a precipitation of the Sb and secondly a diffusion and dissolution of the precipitates. There is a different evolution of the defects in the and silicon slices. T.E.M. reveals no defects in the wafers after one hour annealing at 1200 0 C, whereas defects and twins remain in wafers. Having obtained the evolution of R with time and temperature it is then determined the implantation and annealing conditions which lead to the low resistivity (R = 10) needed for buried layer applications. Results with very many industrially made devices are discussed

  1. Gamma ray energy spectrum of a buried radioactive source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massey, N B

    1957-07-01

    Because of current attempts to utilize airborne gamma-ray scintillation spectrometers as a means of detecting and identifying buried radioactive mineral deposits, it has become important to study the effects of multiple scattering on the gamma-ray energy spectrum of a source buried in a semi-infinite medium. A series of ten experiments was made. First a scintillation detector was located in air at a fixed distance above a 250 microcurie cobalt-60 source suspended in a large tank. The level of water was raised from 25 cm below the source to 50 cm above, and the gamma-ray energy spectrum was observed. It was found that the high energy portion of the cobalt-60 spectrum remained identifiable even when the source was submerged more than five half-lengths. Further, the ratio of the counting rate of the total incident gamma radiation to the counting rate of the primary 1.33 MeV radiation was found to be very nearly linearly proportional to the depth of water cover. This leads to an empirical method for determining the depth of burial of a cobalt-60 point source. (author)

  2. Dynamic model of open shell structures buried in poroelastic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordón, J. D. R.; Aznárez, J. J.; Maeso, O.

    2017-08-01

    This paper is concerned with a three-dimensional time harmonic model of open shell structures buried in poroelastic soils. It combines the dual boundary element method (DBEM) for treating the soil and shell finite elements for modelling the structure, leading to a simple and efficient representation of buried open shell structures. A new fully regularised hypersingular boundary integral equation (HBIE) has been developed to this aim, which is then used to build the pair of dual BIEs necessary to formulate the DBEM for Biot poroelasticity. The new regularised HBIE is validated against a problem with analytical solution. The model is used in a wave diffraction problem in order to show its effectiveness. It offers excellent agreement for length to thickness ratios greater than 10, and relatively coarse meshes. The model is also applied to the calculation of impedances of bucket foundations. It is found that all impedances except the torsional one depend considerably on hydraulic conductivity within the typical frequency range of interest of offshore wind turbines.

  3. Methods to Evaluate Corrosion in Buried Steel Structures: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena-de Arriba-Rodriguez

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Around the world, there are thousands of metal structures completely or partially buried in the soil. The main concern in their design is corrosion. Corrosion is a mechanism that degrades materials and causes structural failures in infrastructures, which can lead to severe effects on the environment and have direct impact on the population health. In addition, corrosion is extremely complex in the underground environment due to the variability of the local conditions. The problem is that there are many methods to its evaluation but none have been clearly established. In order to ensure the useful life of such structures, engineers usually consider an excess thickness that increases the economic cost of manufacturing and does not satisfy the principles of efficiency in the use of resources. In this paper, an extended revision of the existing methods to evaluate corrosion is carried out to optimize the design of buried steel structures according to their service life. Thus, they are classified into two categories depending on the information they provide: qualitative and quantitative methods. As a result, it is concluded that the most exhaustive methodologies for estimating soil corrosion are quantitative methods fed by non-electrochemical data based on experimental studies that measure the mass loss of structures.

  4. Full-scale retrieval of simulated buried transuranic waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentich, D.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report describes the results of a field test conducted to determine the effectiveness of using conventional type construction equipment for the retrieval of buried transuranic (TRU) waste. A cold (nonhazardous and nonradioactive) test pit (1,100 yd 3 volume) was constructed with boxes and drums filled with simulated waste materials, such as metal, plastic, wood, concrete, and sludge. Large objects, including truck beds, tanks, vaults, pipes, and beams, were also placed in the pit. These materials were intended to simulate the type of wastes found in TRU buried waste pits and trenches. A series of commercially available equipment items, such as excavators and tracked loaders outfitted with different end effectors, were used to remove the simulated waste. Work was performed from both the abovegrade and belowgrade positions. During the demonstration, a number of observations, measurements, and analyses were performed to determine which equipment was the most effective in removing the waste. The retrieval rates for the various excavation techniques were recorded. The inherent dust control capabilities of the excavation methods used were observed. The feasibility of teleoperating reading equipment was also addressed

  5. Effect of Pseudomonas fluorescens on Buried Steel Pipeline Corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spark, Amy J; Law, David W; Ward, Liam P; Cole, Ivan S; Best, Adam S

    2017-08-01

    Buried steel infrastructure can be a source of iron ions for bacterial species, leading to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Localized corrosion of pipelines due to MIC is one of the key failure mechanisms of buried steel pipelines. In order to better understand the mechanisms of localized corrosion in soil, semisolid agar has been developed as an analogue for soil. Here, Pseudomonas fluorescens has been introduced to the system to understand how bacteria interact with steel. Through electrochemical testing including open circuit potentials, potentiodynamic scans, anodic potential holds, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy it has been shown that P. fluorescens increases the rate of corrosion. Time for oxide and biofilms to develop was shown to not impact on the rate of corrosion but did alter the consistency of biofilm present and the viability of P. fluorescens following electrochemical testing. The proposed mechanism for increased corrosion rates of carbon steel involves the interactions of pyoverdine with the steel, preventing the formation of a cohesive passive layer, after initial cell attachment, followed by the formation of a metal concentration gradient on the steel surface.

  6. Ion beam synthesis of buried single crystal erbium silicide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golanski, A.; Feenstra, R.; Galloway, M.D.; Park, J.L.; Pennycook, S.J.; Harmon, H.E.; White, C.W.

    1990-01-01

    High doses (10 16 --10 17 /cm 2 ) of 170 keV Er + were implanted into single-crystal left-angle 111 right-angle Si at implantation temperatures between 350 degree C and 520 degree C. Annealing at 800 degree C in vacuum following the implant, the growth and coalescence of ErSi 2 precipitates leads to a buried single crystalline ErSi 2 layer. This has been studied using Rutherford backscattering/channeling, X-ray diffraction, cross-sectional TEM and resistance versus temperature measurements. Samples implanted at 520 degree C using an Er dose of 7 x 10 16 /cm 2 and thermally annealed were subsequently used as seeds for the mesoepitaxial growth of the buried layer during a second implantation and annealing process. Growth occurs meso-epitaxially along both interfaces through beam induced, defect mediated mobility of Er atoms. The crystalline quality of the ErSi 2 layer strongly depends on the temperature during the second implantation. 12 refs., 4 figs

  7. Response of steel buried pipeline to the three dimensional fault movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zia Tohidi, R.; Shakib, H.

    2003-01-01

    Fault movement during an earthquake may have severe effect on buried pipelines as a lifeline element. A few studies are carried out on the behaviour of buried pipelines to this kind of damage and disruption. In most of these studies, the fault movements are modeled as two-dimensional. In this study, by modeling the pipe as a beam and the surrounding soil as nonlinear springs, the effect of three dimensional movement of fault on buried pipelines is investigated. Some important parameters such as; fault movement, depth of buried, geometrical characteristics of the pipe, angle of pipe- soil friction, angle of pipe- fault crossing, and the fault slip are considered in this study

  8. In situ vitrification of buried waste: Containment issues and suppression systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luey, J.; Powell, T.D.

    1992-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing a remedial action technology for buried waste through the adaptation of the in situ vitrification (ISV) process. The ISV process is a thermal treatment process originally developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to stabilize soils contaminated with transuranic waste. ISV tests with buried waste forms have demonstrated that the processing of buried waste is more dynamic than the processing of soils. This paper will focus on the issue of containment of the gases released during the processing of buried waste and on engineered suppression systems to alleviate transient events associated with dynamic off-gassing from the ISV melt

  9. Aging management and life assessment of buried commodities in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. H.; Jung, I. S.; Jo, H. S.; Kim, M. G.; Kim, S. T.; Lee, S. S.

    2000-01-01

    General field survey, inspection and life assessment were performed to establish effective aging management program of buried commodities in nuclear power plant. Basic informations on material characteristics, aging degradation experiences and maintenance history were gathered. Considering their degradation effects on power operation or safety, buried commodities were screened for the aging management priority. Various inspection techniques were applied in field survey and inspection, and their results were incorporated in the life assessment of buried commodities. In the aspect of aging degradation, general status of buried commodities were considered still sound while some revealed local degradation

  10. Total dose hardening of buried insulator in implanted silicon-on-insulator structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, B.Y.; Chen, C.E.; Pollack, G.; Hughes, H.L.; Davis, G.E.

    1987-01-01

    Total dose characteristics of the buried insulator in implanted silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates have been studied using MOS transistors. The threshold voltage shift of the parasitic back channel transistor, which is controlled by charge trapping in the buried insulator, is reduced by lowering the oxygen dose as well as by an additional nitrogen implant, without degrading the front channel transistor characteristics. The improvements in the radiation characteristics of the buried insulator are attributed to the decrease in the buried oxide thickness or to the presence of the interfacial oxynitride layer formed by the oxygen and nitrogen implants

  11. Analyses of SRS waste glass buried in granite in Sweden and salt in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.P.; Wicks, G.G.; Clark, D.E.; Lodding, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    Simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste glass forms have been buried in the granite geology of the Stirpa mine in Sweden for two years. Analyses of glass surfaces provided a measure of the performance of the waste glasses as a function of time. Similar SRS waste glass compositions have also been buried in salt at the WIPP facility in Carlsbad, New Mexico for a similar time period. Analyses of the SRS waste glasses buried in-situ in granite will be presented and compared to the performance of these same compositions buried in salt at WIPP

  12. Beryllium electrodeposition on aluminium cathode from chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichkov, I.F.; Novikov, E.A.; Serebryakov, G.A.; Kanashin, Yu.P.; Sardyko, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    Cathodic processes during beryllium deposition on liquid and solid aluminium cathodes are investigated. Mixture of sodium, potassium and beryllium chloride melts served as an lectrolyte. Beryllium ion discharge at the expense of alloy formation takes place at more positive potentials than on an indifferent cathode at low current densities ( in the case of liquid aluminium cathode). Metallographic analysis and measurements of microhardness have shown, that the cathodic product includes two phases: beryllium solid solution in aluminium and metallic beryllium. It is concluded, that aluminium-beryllium alloys with high cathodic yield by current can be obtained by the electrolytic method

  13. Comparison of hollow cathode discharge plasma configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnell, Casey C; Farnell, Cody C; Williams, John D

    2011-01-01

    Hollow cathodes used in plasma contactor and electric propulsion devices provide electrons for sustaining plasma discharges and enabling plasma bridge neutralization. Life tests show erosion on hollow cathodes exposed to the plasma environment produced in the region downstream of these devices. To explain the observed erosion, plasma flow field measurements are presented for hollow cathode generated plasmas using both directly immersed probes and remotely located plasma diagnostics. Measurements on two cathode discharge configurations are presented: (1) an open, no magnetic field configuration and (2) a setup simulating the discharge chamber environment of an ion thruster. In the open cathode configuration, large amplitude plasma potential oscillations, ranging from 20 to 85 V within a 34 V discharge, were observed using a fast response emissive probe. These oscillations were observed over a dc potential profile that included a well-defined potential hill structure. A remotely located electrostatic analyzer (ESA) was used to measure the energy of ions produced within the plasma, and energies were detected that met, and in some cases exceeded, the peak oscillatory plasma potentials detected by the emissive probe. In the ion thruster discharge chamber configuration, plasma potentials from the emissive probe again agreed with ion energies recorded by the remotely located ESA; however, much lower ion energies were detected compared with the open configuration. A simplified ion-transit model that uses temporal and spatial plasma property measurements is presented and used to predict far-field plasma streaming properties. Comparisons between the model and remote measurements are presented.

  14. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, T. W. H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2003-06-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed.

  15. Manganese Dioxide As Rechargeable Magnesium Battery Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Chen; Zhang, Ruigang

    2017-01-01

    Rechargeable magnesium battery (rMB) has received increased attention as a promising alternative to current Li-ion technology. However, the lack of appropriate cathode that provides high-energy density and good sustainability greatly hinders the development of practical rMBs. To date, the successful Mg 2+ -intercalation was only achieved in only a few cathode hosts, one of which is manganese dioxide. This review summarizes the research activity of studying MnO 2 in magnesium cells. In recent years, the cathodic performance of MnO 2 was impressively improved to the capacity of >150–200 mAh g −1 at voltage of 2.6–2.8 V with cyclability to hundreds or more cycles. In addition to reviewing electrochemical performance, we sketch a mechanistic picture to show how the fundamental understanding about MnO 2 cathode has been changed and how it paved the road to the improvement of cathode performance.

  16. Manganese Dioxide As Rechargeable Magnesium Battery Cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Chen, E-mail: chen.ling@toyota.com; Zhang, Ruigang [Toyota Research Institute of North America, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-11-03

    Rechargeable magnesium battery (rMB) has received increased attention as a promising alternative to current Li-ion technology. However, the lack of appropriate cathode that provides high-energy density and good sustainability greatly hinders the development of practical rMBs. To date, the successful Mg{sup 2+}-intercalation was only achieved in only a few cathode hosts, one of which is manganese dioxide. This review summarizes the research activity of studying MnO{sub 2} in magnesium cells. In recent years, the cathodic performance of MnO{sub 2} was impressively improved to the capacity of >150–200 mAh g{sup −1} at voltage of 2.6–2.8 V with cyclability to hundreds or more cycles. In addition to reviewing electrochemical performance, we sketch a mechanistic picture to show how the fundamental understanding about MnO{sub 2} cathode has been changed and how it paved the road to the improvement of cathode performance.

  17. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, T.W.H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D.R.; Bilek, M.M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed

  18. Remote Monitoring of Cathodic Protection and Cathodic Protection System Upgrades for Tanks and Pipelines at Fort Carson

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    4 Flush T/S PROPOSED RMU SITE 17 IN Front of Golf Clubhouse x FH -Yl TL -477 13516677 4285195 Glen 4 Flush T/S - Anode Not Connected...Every investigation should include an action plan. Focus on causes and hazards. Develop an analysis of what happened, how it happened and how it...could have been prevented. Determine what caused the accident itself, not just the injury. If a third party or defective product contributed to

  19. Contemporary Typologic Alternatives of Burying and the Principles of Burying Architecture Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia Augustinaitė

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The context of the concept of modern burial traditions is an inseparable from religion, which is a base to convey natural customs of the unique culture using numinous values. In the sense of allegory, burial character conveys immortality vision. Therefore there are many variations of interpretation in different cultures at a different time. A fundamental change of burial typology and architecture happens due to the changes of the life style. Scientific advance is the most fateful thing, which changes the attitude towards the functionality as well as to creativity in the burial sector. Due to the postmodernism, an exceptional, relatively separate form of the burial – virtual information bases of the dead, also actual as an alternative direction of the applied art to visual expression, have been formed on the basis of digital technologies. Essential objects of today‘s burial space topic are identified as a holistic optimisation of the consumerism, full-fledged integration of burial spaces in modern urbanistic structures and formation of multicultures. The solutions of this topic usually come through the multifunction of burial territories, burial nature and multifunction of architecture, as well as universal application, the priority of stable creation of the environment, including the search of the new typological alternatives of the burial. The components of burial space formation, significant to Lithuania, more or less match the global situation. Therefore, it is favourable for the state to take more objective account of the viable long-term juridical base and policy of burial space planning, the strategy of which would not lack of national features of heritage protection, however, using architecture as a means, would convey memorial persistent value and significance of the commemoration of the dead in a modern and creative way.

  20. The influence of cathode excavation of cathodic arc evaporator on thickness uniformity and erosion products angle distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Duhopel'nikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathodic arc evaporators are used for coating with functional films. Prolonged or buttend evaporators may be used for this purposes. In butt-end evaporator the cathode spots move continuously on the cathode work surface and evaporate cathode material. High depth excavation profile forms on the cathode work surface while the thick coating precipitation (tens or hundreds of microns. The cathode excavation profile is shaped like a “cup” with high walls for electrostatic discharge stabilization systems with axial magnetic fields. Cathode spots move on the bottom of the “cup”. It is very likely that high “cup” walls are formed as a result of lasting work time influence on the uniformity of precipitated films.In the present work the influence of excavation profile walls height on the uniformity of precipitated coating was carried out. The high profile walls are formed due to lasting work of DC vacuum arc evaporator. The cathode material used for tests was 3003 aluminum alloy. The extended substrate was placed parallel to the cathode work surface. Thickness distribution along the substrate length with the new cathode was obtained after 6 hours and after 12 hours of continuous operation.The thickness distribution of precipitated coating showed that the cathode excavation has an influence on the angular distribution of the matter escaping the cathode. It can be clearly seen from the normalized dependence coating thickness vs the distance from the substrate center. Also the angular distribution of the matter flow from the cathode depending on the cathode working time was obtained. It was shown that matter flow from the cathode differs from the LambertKnudsen law. The more the cathode excavation the more this difference.So, cathode excavation profile has an influence on the uniformity of precipitated coating and it is necessary to take in account the cathode excavation profile while coating the thick films.

  1. How Burying Biomass Can Contribute to CO2 Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, B.; Zeng, N.; Zaitchik, B.; Gregg, J.

    2008-12-01

    To mitigate global climate change, a portfolio of strategies will be needed to keep the atmospheric CO2 concentration below a dangerous level. Here a carbon sequestration strategy is proposed in which certain dead or live trees are harvested via collection or selective cutting, then buried in trenches or stowed away in above-ground shelters. The largely anaerobic condition under a sufficiently thick layer of soil will prevent the decomposition of the buried wood. Because a large flux of CO2 is constantly being assimilated into the world's forests via photosynthesis, cutting off its return pathway to the atmosphere forms an effective carbon sink. It is estimated that a sustainable long-term carbon sequestration potential for wood burial is 10 ± 5 GtC y-1, and currently about 65 GtC is on the world's forest floors in the form of coarse woody debris suitable for burial. The potential is largest in tropical forests (4.2 GtC y-1), followed by temperate (3.7 GtC y-1) and boreal forests (2.1 GtC y-1). Burying wood has other benefits including minimizing CO2 source from deforestation, extending the lifetime of reforestation carbon sink, and reducing fire danger. There are possible environmental impacts such as nutrient lock-up which nevertheless appears manageable, but other environmental concerns and factors will likely set a limit so that only part of the full potential can be realized. Based on data from North American logging industry, the cost for wood burial is estimated to be 14/tCO2 (50/tC), lower than the typical cost for power plant CO2 capture with geological storage. The low cost for carbon sequestration with wood burial is possible because the technique uses the natural process of photosynthesis to remove carbon from the atmosphere. The technique is low tech, distributed, safe, and can be stopped at any time, thus an attractive option for large-scale implementation in a world-wide carbon market.

  2. Oxide cathodes produced by plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G.; Pi, T.; Umstattd, R.; Brown, I.; Montiero, O.

    1997-01-01

    These are two distinct applications for high-current-density, long-life thermionic cathodes. The first application is as a substitute for explosive emission cathodes used in high-power microwave (HPM) devices being developed for Air Force programs. The second application is in SLAC's X-band klystrons for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). SLAC, UCD, and LBL are developing a plasma deposition process that eliminates the problems with binders, carbonate reduction, peeling, and porosity. The emission layer is deposited using plasma deposition of metallic barium in vacuum with an oxygen background gas. An applied bias voltage drives the oxide plasma into the nickel surface. Since the oxide is deposited directly, it does not have problems with poisoning from a hydrocarbon binder. The density of the oxide layer is increased from the 40--50% for standard oxide cathodes to nearly 100% for plasma deposition

  3. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  4. Hot zirconium cathode sputtered layers for useful surface modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duckworth, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    It has been found that multilayer zirconium based sputtered coatings can greatly improve the wear properties of a wide variety of mechanical components, machine tools, and metal surfaces. Although a hot (approximately 1000 0 C) cathode is employed, temperature sensitive components can be beneficially treated, and for precision parts a total coating thickness of only 0.5μm is often perfectly effective. Even at the highest coating rates substrate temperatures are below 300 0 C. For the corrosion protection of less well finished surfaces thicker layers are usually required and it is important that relatively stress free layers are produced. The authors employed a variety of tailored zirconium/zirconium nitride/zirconium oxide mixed layers to solve a number of tribological problems for some 5 or 6 years. However, it is only recently that they designed, built, and commissioned rapid cycle, multiple cathode, load-lock plant for economic production of such coatings. This paper provides an introduction to this method of depositing pure zirconium and pure synthetic zirconium nitride films

  5. Corrosion and protection of aluminum alloys in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisancioglu Kemal [Department of Materials Technology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2004-07-01

    The paper deals with pitting and uniform corrosion and effectiveness of cathodic protection in reducing these corrosion forms. In stagnant waters or presence of low flow rates, pitting may occur. However, pitting corrosion, driven by the Fe-rich cathodic intermetallic compounds, is often of superficial nature. The pits tend to passivate as a result of etching or passivation of the intermetallics with time. Cathodic protection is an effective way of preventing pitting. It also requires low current densities since the cathodic area, defined by the Fe-rich intermetallics, is small in contrast to steel, which is uniformly accessible to the cathodic reaction. Although thermodynamic calculations suggest possible instability of the oxide in slightly alkaline solutions, such as seawater, protective nature of the oxide in practice is attributed to the presence of alloying elements such as Mg and Mn. Thus, the passivity of both the aluminum matrix alloy (the anode) and the intermetallics (cathodes) have to be considered in evaluating the corrosion and protection of aluminum alloys. With increasing flow rate, the possibility of pitting corrosion reduces with increase in the rate of uniform corrosion, which is controlled by the flow dependent chemical dissolution of the oxide. Cathodic protection does not stop this phenomenon, and coatings have to be used. (authors)

  6. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-01-01

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode

  7. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  8. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

    2009-03-09

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm{sup 2} of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm{sup 2}. The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10{sup -8} Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function

  9. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

    2009-01-01

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm 2 of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm 2 . The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10 -8 Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function value). We reexamined

  10. Studies on pulsed hollow cathode capillary discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, P; Dumitrescu-Zoita, C; Larour, J; Rous, J [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises; Favre, M; Moreno, J; Chuaqui, H; Wyndham, E [Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Zambra, M [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile); Wong, C S [Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Plasma Research Lab

    1997-12-31

    Preliminary results on radiation characteristics of pulsed hollow cathode capillary discharges are presented. The device combines the on axis electron beam assisted ionization capabilities of the transient hollow cathode discharge with a novel high voltage low inductance geometrical design, which integrates the local energy storage into the electrode system. A nanosecond regime high temperature plasma is produced in a long, high aspect ratio capillary, with light emission in the UV to XUV region. The discharge is operated from near vacuum to pressure in the 1000 mTorr range. (author). 2 figs., 7 refs.

  11. Hanford site implementation plan for buried, transuranic-contaminated waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The GAO review of DOE's Defense Waste Management Plan (DWMP) identified deficiencies and provided recommendations. This report responds to the GAO recommendations with regard to the Hanford Site. Since the issuance of the DWMP, an extensive planning base has been developed for all high-level and transuranic waste at the Hanford Site. Thirty-three buried sites have been identified as possibly containing waste that can be classified as transuranic waste. Inventory reports and process flowsheets were used to provide an estimate of the radionuclide and hazardous chemical content of these sites and approximately 370 additional sites that can be classified as low-level waste. A program undertaken to characterize select sites suspected of having TRU waste to refine the inventory estimates. Further development and evaluation are ongoing to determine the appropriate remedial actions, with the objectives of balancing long-term risks with costs and complying with regulations. 18 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs

  12. Bryophytes of beach forests in Chon Buri Province, Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phiangphak Sukkharak

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of bryophyte diversity of three beach forests including Had Tung Prong, Had Tein Talay, and the beach forest in Thai Island and Sea Natural History Museum in Chon Buri Province, Thailand, was carried out. From 137 enumerated specimens, 16 species (6 mosses, 10 liverworts in 12 genera (5 mosses, 7 liverworts and eight families (5 mosses, 3 liverworts were found. Among those the most common families of mosses are Fissidentaceae (2 species and the most common families of liverwort are Lejeuneaceae (8 species. A comparison of species richness among the three areas revealed that the highest species richness of bryophytes was found in Had Tung Prong. Moreover, of all bryophyte species found, Weissia edentula Mitt. was the most common one.

  13. Friction, slip and structural inhomogeneity of the buried interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Y; Wu, J; Martini, A; Li, Q

    2011-01-01

    An atomistic model of metallic contacts using realistic interatomic potentials is used to study the connection between friction, slip and the structure of the buried interface. Incommensurability induced by misalignment and lattice mismatch is modeled with contact sizes that are large enough to observe superstructures formed by the relative orientations of the surfaces. The periodicity of the superstructures is quantitatively related to inhomogeneous shear stress distributions in the contact area, and a reduced order model is used to clarify the connection between friction and structural inhomogeneity. Finally, the movement of atoms is evaluated before, during and after slip in both aligned and misaligned contacts to understand how the interfacial structure affects the mechanisms of slip and the corresponding frictional behavior

  14. Cathode characterization system: preliminary results with (Ba,Sr,Ca) O coated cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nono, M.C.A.; Goncalves, J.A.N.; Barroso, J.J.; Dallaqua, R.S.; Spassovsky, I.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of a cathode characterization system for studying the emission parameters of thermal electron emitters is reported. The system consists of vacuum chamber, power supplies and equipment for measuring and control. Measurements have been taken of the emission current as function of cathode temperature and anode voltage. Several (Ba, Sr) O coated cathodes were tested and the results have shown good agreement with Child's and Richardson's laws. The experimental work function is between 1.0 and 2.0 e V. All emission parameters measured are consistent with international literature data. (author)

  15. A Novel Cathode Material for Cathodic Dehalogenation of 1,1-Dibromo Cyclopropane Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gütz, Christoph; Selt, Maximilian; Bänziger, Markus; Bucher, Christoph; Römelt, Christina; Hecken, Nadine; Gallou, Fabrice; Galvão, Tomás R; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2015-09-28

    Leaded bronze turned out to be an excellent cathode material for the dehalogenation reaction of cyclopropanes without affecting the strained molecular entity. With this particular alloy, beneficial properties of lead cathodes are conserved, whereas the corrosion of cathode is efficiently suppressed. The solvent in the electrolyte determines whether a complete debromination reaction is achieved or if the process can be selectively stopped at the monobromo cyclopropane intermediate. The electroorganic conversion tolerates a variety of functional groups and can be conducted at rather complex substrates like cyclosporine A. This approach allows the sustainable preparation of cyclopropane derivatives. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Location of Buried Mineshafts and Adits Using Reconnaissance Geophysical Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culshaw, Martin; Donnelly, Laurance; McCann, David

    Britain has a long history of mining activity, which stretches back some 3000 years to the excavation of flint in East Anglia. The legacy of this long period of activity is the presence of many buried mineshafts and adits, whose location is often unknown precisely and in many cases not even recorded in historical mining records. As has been shown by Donnelly et al (2003) the discovery of a mineshaft in an area of housing development can have a profound effect on property values in its vicinity. Hence, urgent action must be taken to establish at the site investigation stage of a development to determine whether any mineshafts are present at the site so that remedial action can be taken before construction commences. A study of historical information and the drilling may well enable the developer to locate any suspected mineshafts and adits on his site. However, the use of geophysical reconnaissance methods across the whole site may well provide sufficient information to simplify the drilling programme and reduce its cost to a minimum. In this paper a number of rapid reconnaissance geophysical methods are described and evaluated in terms of their success in the location of buried mineshafts and adits. It has shown that a combination of ground conductivity and magnetic surveys provides a most effective approach on open sites in greenfield and brownfield areas. Ground penetrating radar and micro-gravity surveys have proved to be a valuable approach in urban areas where the use of many geophysical methods is prevented by the presence of various types of cultural noise. On a regional scale the infrared thermography method is being increasingly used but care must be taken to overcome certain environmental difficulties. The practical use of all these geophysical methods in the field is illustrated by a number of appropriate case histories.

  17. Buried paleosols of the Upper Paleolithic multilayered site Kostenki-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparin, B. F.; Platonova, N. I.; Sukhacheva, E. Yu.; Dudin, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    The morphology and chemical and physicochemical properties of paleosols buried at the Upper Paleolithic multilayered site Kostenki-1 in Kostenki-Borshchevo district of Voronezh oblast were studied. Four in situ paleosols formed 20-40(45) ka ago were separated in the archaeological excavation. Together with the surface soils, they characterized two different epochs of pedogenesis—the interstadial and interglacial (Holocene) epochs—and three shorter cycles of pedogenesis. The traces of human occupation in the studied hollow in the Late Paleolithic were found in the layers corresponding to the interstadial epoch. The buried paleosols had a simple horizonation: A(W)-C. A shallow thickness of the soil profiles could be due to relatively short periods of pedogenesis and to the shallow embedding by the carbonate geochemical barrier. The degree of the organic matter humification in the paleosols varied from 0.6 to 1.5, which corresponded to the mean duration of the period of biological activity of 60 to 150 days per year characterizing the climatic conditions of the tundra, taiga, forest-steppe, and steppe natural zones. In the excavation Kostenki-1 (2004-2005), soil-sediment sequences composed of five series of lithological layers with soil layers on top of them were found. Their deposition proceeded in two phases—the water phase and the aerial phase—that predetermined the morphology and composition of the soil-sediment sequences. The history of sediment accumulation in the studied hollow consisted of five stages. Similar morphologies and compositions of the soil-sediment sequences corresponding to these stages attest to the cyclic pattern of their development. The stages of sedimentation and soil formation corresponded to cyclic climate fluctuations with changes in the temperature and moisture conditions. A comparative analysis of the morphology and properties of the paleosols and soil-sediment sequences made it possible to characterize the environmental

  18. Searching for the Source of Salt Marsh Buried Mercury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, C. G.; Nelson, D. C.; Fleming, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    Salt marshes provide a barrier between upstream mercury contamination and coastal ecosystems. Mercury is sorbed, transported, and deposited in estuarine systems. Once the upstream mercury source has been remediated, the downstream mercury contaminated salt marsh sediments should become "capped" or buried by uncontaminated sediments preventing further ecosystem contamination. Downstream from a remediated mercury mine, an estuarine intertidal marsh in Tomales Bay, CA, USA, scavengers/predators (e.g. Pachygrapsus crassipes, Lined Shore Crab) have leg mercury concentrations as high as 5.5 ppm (dry wt./dry wt.), which increase significantly with crab size, a surrogate for trophic level. These elevated mercury concentrations suggests that "buried" mercury is rereleased into the environment. To locate possible sources of mercury release in Walker Marsh, we sampled a transect across the marsh that included diverse micro-environments (e.g. rhizoshere, stratified sediments, faunal burrows). From each location we determined the sediment structure, sediment color, total sediment mercury, total sediment iron, and microbial composition (n = 28). Where flora or fauna had perturbed the sediment, mercury concentrations were 10% less than undisturbed stratified sediments (1025 ppb vs. 1164 ppb, respectively). High-throughput SSU rRNA gene sequencing and subsequent co-occurrence network analysis genera indicated that in flora- or fauna- perturbed sediments there was an increased likelihood that microbial genera contained mercury mobilizing genes (94% vs 57%; in perturbed vs stratified sediments, respectively). Our observations are consistent with findings by others that in perturbed sites mercury mobility increased. We did however identify a microbial and geochemical profile with increased mercury mobility. For future work we plan to quantify the role these micro-environments have on mercury-efflux from salt marshes.

  19. SEM based overlay measurement between resist and buried patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Osamu; Okagawa, Yutaka; Hasumi, Kazuhisa; Shao, Chuanyu; Leray, Philippe; Lorusso, Gian; Baudemprez, Bart

    2016-03-01

    With the continuous shrink in pattern size and increased density, overlay control has become one of the most critical issues in semiconductor manufacturing. Recently, SEM based overlay of AEI (After Etch Inspection) wafer has been used for reference and optimization of optical overlay (both Image Based Overlay (IBO) and Diffraction Based Overlay (DBO)). Overlay measurement at AEI stage contributes monitor and forecast the yield after formation by etch and calibrate optical measurement tools. however those overlay value seems difficult directly for feedback to a scanner. Therefore, there is a clear need to have SEM based overlay measurements of ADI (After Develop Inspection) wafers in order to serve as reference for optical overlay and make necessary corrections before wafers go to etch. Furthermore, to make the corrections as accurate as possible, actual device like feature dimensions need to be measured post ADI. This device size measurement is very unique feature of CDSEM , which can be measured with smaller area. This is currently possible only with the CD-SEM. This device size measurement is very unique feature of CD-SEM , which can be measured with smaller area. In this study, we assess SEM based overlay measurement of ADI and AEI wafer by using a sample from an N10 process flow. First, we demonstrate SEM based overlay performance at AEI by using dual damascene process for Via 0 (V0) and metal 1 (M1) layer. We also discuss the overlay measurements between litho-etch-litho stages of a triple patterned M1 layer and double pattern V0. Second, to illustrate the complexities in image acquisition and measurement we will measure overlay between M1B resist and buried M1A-Hard mask trench. Finally, we will show how high accelerating voltage can detect buried pattern information by BSE (Back Scattering Electron). In this paper we discuss the merits of this method versus standard optical metrology based corrections.

  20. Li- and Mn-Rich Cathode Materials: Challenges to Commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jianming [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Myeong, Seungjun [School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Green Energy Materials Development Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea 689-798; Cho, Woongrae [School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Green Energy Materials Development Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea 689-798; Yan, Pengfei [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Xiao, Jie [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Cho, Jaephil [School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Green Energy Materials Development Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea 689-798; Zhang, Ji-Guang [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-12-14

    The lithium- and manganese-rich (LMR) layered structure cathode exhibit one of the highest specific energy (~900 Wh kg-1) among all the cathode materials. However, the practical applications of LMR cathodes are still hindered by several significant challenges including voltage fade, large initial capacity loss, poor rate capability and limited cycle life. Herein, we review the recent progresses and understandings on the application of LMR cathode materials from practical point of view. Several key parameters of LMR cathodes that affect the LMR/graphite full cell operation are systematically analysed. These factors include the first cycle capacity loss, voltage fade, powder tap density, electrode density of LMR based cathode etc. New approaches to minimize the detrimental effect of these factors are highlighted in this work. We also provided the perspectives for the future research on LMR cathode materials, focusing on addressing the fundamental problems of LMR cathodes while always keeping practical considerations in mind.

  1. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a hollow reservoir cathode to improve performance in ion and Hall thrusters. We will adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this purpose....

  2. Long Life Cold Cathodes for Hall effect Thrusters, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electron source incorporating long life, high current density cold cathodes inside a microchannel plate for use with ion thrusters is proposed. Cathode lifetime...

  3. The acute and long-term neurotoxic effects of MDMA on marble burying behaviour in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadat, Kathryn S; Elliott, J Martin; Colado, M Isabel; Green, A Richard

    2006-03-01

    When mice are exposed to harmless objects such as marbles in their cage they bury them, a behaviour sometimes known as defensive burying. We investigated the effect of an acute dose of MDMA (èecstasy') and other psychoactive drugs on marble burying and also examined the effect of a prior neurotoxic dose of MDMA or p-chloroamphetamine (PCA) on burying. Acute administration of MDMA produced dose-dependent inhibition of marble burying (EC50: 7.6 micro mol/kg). Other drugs that enhance monoamine function also produced dose-dependent inhibition: methamphetamine PCA paroxetine MDMA GBR 12909 methylphenidate. None of these drugs altered locomotor activity at a dose that inhibited burying. A prior neurotoxic dose of MDMA, which decreased striatal dopamine content by 60%, but left striatal 5-HT content unaltered, did not alter spontaneous marble burying 18 or 40 days later. However, a neurotoxic dose of PCA which decreased striatal dopamine by 60% and striatal 5-HT by 70% attenuated marble burying 28 days later. Overall, these data suggest that MDMA, primarily by acutely increasing 5-HT function, acts like several anxiolytic drugs in this behavioural model. Long-term loss of cerebral 5-HT content also produced a similar effect. Since this change was observed only after 28 days, it is probably due to an adaptive response in the brain.

  4. The initiation and linkage of surface fractures above a buried strike ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a buried strike-slip fault: An experimental approach. N Ghosh and A ... conditions viz., (i) heterogeneous simple shear of the cover rocks above a buried strike slip fault. (wrench .... (iii) study of fracture types in the damage zones from Gozo .... was dominant, the results may vary from a true ... For example, as shown in figure 5 ...

  5. Detection of a buried wire with two resistively loaded wire antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, S.H.J.A.; Tijhuis, A.G.; Lepelaars, E.S.A.M.; Zwamborn, A.P.M.

    2002-01-01

    The use of two identical straight thin-wire antennas for the detection of a buried wire is analyzed with the aid of numerical calculations. The buried wire is located below an interface between two homogeneous half-spaces. The detection setup, which is formed by a transmitting and a receiving wire,

  6. Detection of a buried object with pulse-compensated wire antennas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, S.H.J.A.; Tijhuis, A.G.; Lepelaars, E.S.A.M.; Zwamborn, A.P.M.

    2003-01-01

    For the detection of a buried object we consider two straight thin-wire antennas above an interface between two homogeneous dielectric half spaces. One antenna is a transmitting wire and the other is a receiving wire. Our aim is to use this simple antenna set up for the detection of buried objects

  7. Direct Measurement of the Band Structure of a Buried Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miwa, Jill; Hofmann, Philip; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2013-01-01

    We directly measure the band structure of a buried two dimensional electron gas (2DEG) using angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy. The buried 2DEG forms 2 nm beneath the surface of p-type silicon, because of a dense delta-type layer of phosphorus n-type dopants which have been placed there...

  8. Electron spin resonance characterization of trapping centers in Unibond reg-sign buried oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, J.F. Jr.; Lenahan, P.M.; Wallace, B.D.

    1996-01-01

    Electron spin resonance and capacitance vs. voltage measurements are used to evaluate the radiation response of Unibond buried oxides. When damaged by hole injection, it is found that Unibond reg-sign buried oxides exhibit a rough correspondence between E' centers and positive charge as well as generation of P b centers at the Unibond buried oxide/Si interface. In these respects, Unibond buried oxides qualitatively resemble thermal SiO 2 . However, a hydrogen complexed E' center known as the 74 G doublet is also detected in the Unibond buried oxides. This defect is not detectable in thermal SiO 2 under similar circumstances. Since the presence of 74 G doublet center is generally indicative of very high hydrogen content and since hydrogen is clearly a significant participant in radiation damage, this result suggests a qualitative difference between the radiation response of Unibond and thermal SiO 2 . Unibond results are also compared and contrasted with similar investigations on separation-by-implanted-oxygen (SIMOX) buried oxides. Although the charge trapping response of Unibond buried oxides may be inferior to that of radiation hardened thermal SiO 2 , it appears to be more simple and superior to that of SIMOX buried oxides

  9. Efficient calculation of broadband acoustic scattering from a partially, obliquely buried cylinder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, M.J.J.; Espana, A.; Williams, K.

    2013-01-01

    An efficient model for the Target In Environment Response (TIER) of buried/half buried, mine-like objects and UXOs is essential for the development and training of automatic target detection and classification methods and for use in sonar performance prediction models. For instance, to investigate

  10. Numerical Modeling of Mechanical Behavior for Buried Steel Pipelines Crossing Subsidence Strata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Zhang

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the mechanical behavior of buried steel pipeline crossing subsidence strata. The investigation is based on numerical simulation of the nonlinear response of the pipeline-soil system through finite element method, considering large strain and displacement, inelastic material behavior of buried pipeline and the surrounding soil, as well as contact and friction on the pipeline-soil interface. Effects of key parameters on the mechanical behavior of buried pipeline were investigated, such as strata subsidence, diameter-thickness ratio, buried depth, internal pressure, friction coefficient and soil properties. The results show that the maximum strain appears on the outer transition subsidence section of the pipeline, and its cross section is concave shaped. With the increasing of strata subsidence and diameter-thickness ratio, the out of roundness, longitudinal strain and equivalent plastic strain increase gradually. With the buried depth increasing, the deflection, out of roundness and strain of the pipeline decrease. Internal pressure and friction coefficient have little effect on the deflection of buried pipeline. Out of roundness is reduced and the strain is increased gradually with the increasing of internal pressure. The physical properties of soil have a great influence on the mechanical properties of buried pipeline. The results from the present study can be used for the development of optimization design and preventive maintenance for buried steel pipelines.

  11. Dynamic behaviour of interphases and its implication on high-energy-density cathode materials in lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wangda; Dolocan, Andrei; Oh, Pilgun; Celio, Hugo; Park, Suhyeon; Cho, Jaephil; Manthiram, Arumugam

    2017-01-01

    Undesired electrode–electrolyte interactions prevent the use of many high-energy-density cathode materials in practical lithium-ion batteries. Efforts to address their limited service life have predominantly focused on the active electrode materials and electrolytes. Here an advanced three-dimensional chemical and imaging analysis on a model material, the nickel-rich layered lithium transition-metal oxide, reveals the dynamic behaviour of cathode interphases driven by conductive carbon additives (carbon black) in a common nonaqueous electrolyte. Region-of-interest sensitive secondary-ion mass spectrometry shows that a cathode-electrolyte interphase, initially formed on carbon black with no electrochemical bias applied, readily passivates the cathode particles through mutual exchange of surface species. By tuning the interphase thickness, we demonstrate its robustness in suppressing the deterioration of the electrode/electrolyte interface during high-voltage cell operation. Our results provide insights on the formation and evolution of cathode interphases, facilitating development of in situ surface protection on high-energy-density cathode materials in lithium-based batteries. PMID:28443608

  12. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    . However, they have the potential of being useful as an interface on the anode side of the electrolyte. NexTech has focused much of its effort during the past few months on establishing tape casting methods for porous LSM substrates. This work, performed under a separate DOE-funded program, involved tape casting formulations comprising LSM powders with bi-modal particle size distributions and fugitive pore forming additives. Sintered LSM substrates with porosities in the 30 to 40 vol% range, and pore sizes of 10 {approx} 20 microns have been prepared. In addition, tape casting formulations involving composite mixtures of LSM and Sm-doped ceria (SDC) have been evaluated. The LSM/SDC cathode substrates are expected to provide better performance at low temperatures. Characterization of these materials is currently underway.

  13. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2001-09-30

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. In this portion of study we have focused on producing YSZ films on porous LSM substrates. When using the polymer precursor there are a number of obstacles to overcome in order to form dense electrolyte layers on porous substrates (cathode or anode). Probably the most difficult problems are: (1) Extreme penetration of the polymer into the substrate must be prevented. (2) Shrinkage cracking must be avoided. (3) Film thickness in the 1 to 5{micro}m range must be achieved. We have demonstrated that cracking due to shrinkage involved during the elimination of solvents and organic matter and densification of the remaining oxide is not a problem as long as the resulting oxide film is < {approx} 0.15 {micro}m in thickness. We have also shown that we can make thicker films by making multiple depositions if the substrate is smooth (roughness {le} 0.1 {micro}m) and contains no surface pores > 0.2 {micro}m. The penetration of the polymer into the porous substrate can be minimized by increasing the viscosity of the polymer and reducing the largest pore at the surface of the substrate to {le} 0.2 {micro}m. We have shown that this can be done, but we have also shown that it is difficult to make dense films that are defect free with areas > 1 cm{sup 2}. This is because of the roughness of the substrate and the difficulty in making a substrate which does not have surface voids > 0.2 {micro}m. Thus the process works well for dense, smooth substrates for films < 1 {micro}m thick, but is difficult to apply to rough, porous surfaces and to make film thickness > 1 {micro}m. As a result of these problems, we have been addressing the issue of how to make dense films in the thickness range of 1 to 5 {micro}m on sintered porous substrates without introducing cracks and holes due to shrinkage and surface voids? These

  14. Technical Review on Fitness-for-Service for Buried Pipe by ASME Code Case N-806

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sang Kyu; Lee, Yo Seop; So, Il Su; Lim, Bu Taek

    2012-01-01

    Fitness-for-Service is a useful technology to determine replacement timing, next inspection timing or in-service when nuclear power plant's buried pipes are damaged. If is possible for buried pipes to be aged by material loss, cracks and occlusion as operating time goes by. Therefore Fitness-for-Service technology for buried pipe is useful for plant industry to perform replacement and repair. Fitness-for-Service for buried pipe is studied in terms of existing code and standard for Fitness-for-Service and a current developing code case. Fitness-for-Service for buried pipe was performed according to Code Case N-806 developed by ASME (American Society of Mechanical Engineers)

  15. Buried topography of Utopia, Mars: Persistence of a giant impact depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGill, G.E.

    1989-01-01

    Knobs, partially buried craters, ring fractures, and some mesas permit a qualitative determination of the topography buried beneath younger northern plains materials. These features are widely distributed in the Utopia area but are absent in a large, roughly circular region centered at about 48 degree N, 240 degree W. This implies the existence of a circular depression about 3,300 km in diameter buried beneath Utopia Planitia that is here interpreted to represent the central part of a very large impact basin. The presence of buried curved massifs around part of this depression, and a roughly coincident mascon, lend further support. Present topography, areal geology, and paleotopography of buried surfaces all point to the persistence of this major depression for almost the entire history of Mars

  16. A fully coupled finite element model for stress distribution in buried gas pipeline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahya Sukirman; Zainal Zakaria; Woong Soon Yue

    2001-01-01

    The study of stress-strain relationship is very important in many designs of buried structures over the years. The behavior and mechanism between the interaction of soil and buried structures such as a natural pipeline will mostly contributes to the integrity of the pipeline. This paper presents a fully coupled finite element of consolidation analysis model to study the stress-strain distribution along a buried pipeline before it excess its maximum deformation limit. The behavior of the soil-pipeline system can be modelled by a non-linear elasto-plastic based on Mohr-Coulomb and critical state yield surfaces. The deformation and deflection of the pipeline due to drained and external loading condition will be considered here. Finally the stress-strain distribution of the buried pipeline will be utilised to obtain the maximum deformation limit and the deflection of the buried pipeline. (Author)

  17. Image restoration techniques using Compton backscatter imaging for the detection of buried land mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehlburg, Joseph C.; Keshavmurthy, Shyam P.; Watanabe, Yoichi; Dugan, Edward T.; Jacobs, Alan M.

    1995-06-01

    Earlier landmine imaging systems used two collimated detectors to image objects. These systems had difficulty in distinguishing between surface features and buried features. Using a combination of collimated and uncollimated detectors in a Compton backscatter imaging (CBI) system, allows the identification of surface and buried features. Images created from the collimated detectors contain information about the surface and the buried features, while the uncollimated detectors respond (approximately 80%) to features on the surface. The analysis of surface features are performed first, then these features can be removed and the buried features can be identified. Separation of the surface and buried features permits the use of a globbing algorithm to define regions of interest that can then be quantified [area, Y dimension, X dimension, and center location (xo, yo)]. Mine composition analysis is also possible because of the properties of the four detector system. Distinguishing between a pothole and a mine, that was previously very difficult, can now be easily accomplished.

  18. Determining localized anode condition to maintain effective corrosion protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Thermal sprayed zinc anodes used for impressed current cathodic protection of reinforced concrete deteriorate over time. : Two different technologies, ultrasound and electrical circuit resistance combined with water permeability, were : investigated ...

  19. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.; Saito, Tomonori; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge

  20. Coating for lithium anode, thionyl chloride active cathode electrochemical cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catanzarite, V.O.

    1983-01-04

    Electrochemical power cells having a cathode current collector, a combination liquid active cathode depolarizer electrolyte solvent and an anode that forms surface compounds when in intimate contact with the liquid cathode are enhanced by the addition of a passivation limiting film contiguous to said anode. The passivating film is a member of the cyanoacrilate family of organic compounds.

  1. Coating for lithium anode, thionyl chloride active cathode electrochemical cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catanzarite, V.O.

    1981-10-20

    Electrochemical power cells having a cathode current collector, a combination liquid active cathode depolarizer electrolyte solvent and an anode that forms surface compounds when in intimate contact with the liquid cathode are enhanced by the addition of a passivation limiting film contiguous to said anode. The passivating film is a member of the cyanoacrilate family of organic compounds.

  2. Cold cathodes on ultra-dispersed diamond base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimova, A.N.; Zhirnov, V.V.; Chubun, N.N.; Belobrov, P.I.

    1998-01-01

    Prospects of application of nano diamond powders for fabrication of cold cathodes are discussed.Cold cathodes based on silicon pointed structures with nano diamond coatings were prepared.The deposition technique of diamond coating was dielectrophoresis from suspension of nano diamond powder in organic liquids.The cathodes were tested in sealed prototypes of vacuum electronic devices

  3. Explosive-emission cathode fabricated using track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akap'ev, G.N.; Korenev, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Fabrication technique for large area multipoint cathodes is described. The technique is based on channels filling with metal in the ion-irradiated dielectric film producted after channel etching. It is shown, that cathode may be used under explosive emission conditions. Characteristics of diode with the mentioned type cathodes are measured

  4. On the development of polypyrrole coatings with self-healing properties for iron corrosion protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paliwoda-Porebska, G.; Stratmann, M.; Rohwerder, M.; Potje-Kamloth, K.; Lu, Y.; Pich, A.Z.; Adler, H.-J.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents studies on the efficacy and on the limits of polypyrrole (Ppy) doped with either MoO 4 2- or [PMo 12 O 40 ] 3- as self-healing corrosion protecting coatings. The kinetics of the cathodic delamination were studied by means of the Scanning Kelvin Probe (SKP). This method, in combination with cyclic voltammetry, UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), shows a potential driven anion release from the Ppy coating that results in an inhibition of the corrosion process taking place in the defect. Thus, an intelligent release of inhibitor occurs only when the potential at the interface decreases. Inhibitor anions are released only due to an active defect. However, the release mechanism can be easily negatively affected by the presence of small cations and/or by too high pH values at the buried interface. Hence, such a self-healing coating has to be carefully designed in order to ensure an effective performance

  5. RF Photoelectric injectors using needle cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewellen, J.W.; Brau, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Photocathode RF guns, in various configurations, are the injectors of choice for both current and future applications requiring high-brightness electron beams. Many of these applications, such as single-pass free-electron lasers, require beams with high brilliance but not necessarily high charge per bunch. Field-enhanced photoelectric emission has demonstrated electron-beam current density as high as 10 10 A/m 2 , with a quantum efficiency in the UV that approaches 10% at fields on the order of 10 10 V/m. Thus, the use of even a blunt needle holds promise for increasing cathode quantum efficiency without sacrificing robustness. We present an initial study on the use of needle cathodes in photoinjectors to enhance beam brightness while reducing beam charge. Benefits include lower drive-laser power requirements, easier multibunch operation, lower emittance, and lower beam degradation due to charge-dependent effects in the postinjector accelerator. These benefits result from a combination of a smaller cathode emission area, greatly enhanced RF field strength at the cathode, and the charge scaling of detrimental postinjector linac effects, e.g., transverse wakefields and CSR

  6. RF Photoelectric injectors using needle cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewellen, J. W.; Brau, C. A.

    2003-07-01

    Photocathode RF guns, in various configurations, are the injectors of choice for both current and future applications requiring high-brightness electron beams. Many of these applications, such as single-pass free-electron lasers, require beams with high brilliance but not necessarily high charge per bunch. Field-enhanced photoelectric emission has demonstrated electron-beam current density as high as 10 10 A/m 2, with a quantum efficiency in the UV that approaches 10% at fields on the order of 10 10 V/m. Thus, the use of even a blunt needle holds promise for increasing cathode quantum efficiency without sacrificing robustness. We present an initial study on the use of needle cathodes in photoinjectors to enhance beam brightness while reducing beam charge. Benefits include lower drive-laser power requirements, easier multibunch operation, lower emittance, and lower beam degradation due to charge-dependent effects in the postinjector accelerator. These benefits result from a combination of a smaller cathode emission area, greatly enhanced RF field strength at the cathode, and the charge scaling of detrimental postinjector linac effects, e.g., transverse wakefields and CSR.

  7. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al 2 O 3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values

  8. Cathode follower RF system with frequency modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Y.; Yano, Y.; Kaneko, N.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A model RF system with a cathode follower was tested under frequency modulation in the 1-3.5 MHz range. The repetition rate was 40 Hz. The oscillation was stable, and the output impedance was measured to be around 20 ohm. (author)

  9. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 430, buried depleted uranium artillery round No. 1, Tonopah test range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This plan addresses actions necessary for the restoration and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 430, Buried Depleted Uranium (DU) Artillery Round No. 1 (Corrective Action Site No. TA-55-003-0960), a buried and unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) artillery test projectile with high explosives (HE), at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in south-central Nevada. It describes activities that will occur at the site as well as the steps that will be taken to gather adequate data to obtain a notice of completion from Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan.

  10. Streamlined approach for environmental restoration plan for corrective action unit 430, buried depleted uranium artillery round No. 1, Tonopah test range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    This plan addresses actions necessary for the restoration and closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 430, Buried Depleted Uranium (DU) Artillery Round No. 1 (Corrective Action Site No. TA-55-003-0960), a buried and unexploded W-79 Joint Test Assembly (JTA) artillery test projectile with high explosives (HE), at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in south-central Nevada. It describes activities that will occur at the site as well as the steps that will be taken to gather adequate data to obtain a notice of completion from Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). This plan was prepared under the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) concept, and it will be implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Industrial Sites Quality Assurance Project Plan

  11. Progress of air-breathing cathode in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zejie; Mahadevan, Gurumurthy Dummi; Wu, Yicheng; Zhao, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an emerging technology to produce green energy and vanquish the effects of environmental contaminants. Cathodic reactions are vital for high electrical power density generated from MFCs. Recently tremendous attentions were paid towards developing high performance air-breathing cathodes. A typical air-breathing cathode comprises of electrode substrate, catalyst layer, and air-diffusion layer. Prior researches demonstrated that each component influenced the performance of air-breathing cathode MFCs. This review summarized the progress in development of the individual component and elaborated main factors to the performance of air-breathing cathode.

  12. Cathode Composition in a Saltwater Metal-Air Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Shen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-air batteries consist of a solid metal anode and an oxygen cathode of ambient air, typically separated by an aqueous electrolyte. Here, simple saltwater-based models of aluminum-air and zinc-air cells are used to determine the differences between theoretical cell electric potentials and experimental electric potentials. A substantial difference is observed. It is also found that the metal cathode material is crucial to cell electric potential, despite the cathode not participating in the net reaction. Finally, the material composition of the cathode appears to have a more significant impact on cell potential than the submerged surface area of the cathode.

  13. Emission ability of La-Sc-Mo cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jiancan; Nie Zuoren; Xi Xiaoli; Wang Yiman

    2004-01-01

    In this paper La-Sc-Mo cathode has been prepared and its electron emission ability was measured. This type of cathode shows good electron emission performance that the saturated current density is 6.74 A cm -1 and the work function is about 2.59 eV at 1300 deg. C, which is much lower than thoriated tungsten cathode (Th-W). So it is a potential cathode to replace the Th-W cathode with radioactive pollution. Surface analysis shows that good emission ability due to the 20 nm surplus La layer and the element Sc may do good to the La diffusion to the surface

  14. Explosive emission cathode on the base of carbon plastic fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.; Baranov, A.M.; Kostyuchenko, S.V.; Chernenko, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    A fabrication process for explosive emission cathodes on the base of carbon plastic fibre of practically any geometrical shape and dimensions is developed. Experimental studies of electron beam current collection from cathodes, 2cm in diameter, at voltages across the diode of 10 and 150-250kV. It is shown that the ignition voltage for cathode plasma is ∼2kV at the interelectrode diode gap of 5mm and residual gas pressure of ∼5x10 -5 Torr. The carbon-fibre cathode, fabricated in this way, provides more stable current collection of an electron beam (without oscillations) than other cathodes

  15. Co-deposition of metallic actinides on a solid cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limmer, S. J.; Williamson, M. A.; Willit, J. L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States)

    2008-08-15

    The amount of rare earth contamination that will be found in a co-deposit of actinides is a function of the type of cathode used. A non-alloying solid cathode will result in a significantly lower rare earth contamination in the actinide co-deposit than a liquid cadmium cathode. With proper control of the cathode potential vs. a stable reference electrode, co-deposition of uranium with other more electroactive metals has been demonstrated using a non-alloying solid cathode.

  16. Co-deposition of metallic actinides on a solid cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limmer, S. J.; Williamson, M. A.; Willit, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    The amount of rare earth contamination that will be found in a co-deposit of actinides is a function of the type of cathode used. A non-alloying solid cathode will result in a significantly lower rare earth contamination in the actinide co-deposit than a liquid cadmium cathode. With proper control of the cathode potential vs. a stable reference electrode, co-deposition of uranium with other more electroactive metals has been demonstrated using a non-alloying solid cathode

  17. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cathodic behaviour of stainless steel in coastal Indian seawater: calcareous deposits overwhelm biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eashwar, M; Subramanian, G; Palanichamy, S; Rajagopal, G; Madhu, S; Kamaraj, P

    2009-01-01

    Type-316 stainless steel (SS) was investigated as the cathode in galvanic couples in full-strength seawater from the Gulf of Mannar on the southeast coast of India. Tests were devised to examine the impact of SS cathodes on anode materials with or without the accrual of marine biofilms. Biofilmed SS cathodes significantly enhanced the rate of corrosion of nickel, causing noble shifts in the couple potentials. With mild steel and zinc as the anodes, calcareous deposits developed quite rapidly on the SS cathodes and led to a significant reduction of bacterial numbers. The calcareous deposits also caused substantial reduction of galvanic corrosion rates for mild steel, whereas there was no difference for zinc. The deposits were identified by XRD as essentially carbonates, oxides and hydroxides of calcium and magnesium. Potentiodynamic polarization performed on the actual couples after disconnection and equilibration provided reasonable interpretations of the galvanic corrosion trends. Data from this work suggest that a potential of about -0.70 V vs. saturated calomel electrode (SCE) should provide optimum protection of SS in warmer, full-strength seawater that supports the precipitation of calcareous deposits. The criterion commonly recommended for temperate conditions of lower water temperature and estuarine waters of lower alkalinity is -1.0 V (SCE).

  19. Grain Entrapment Pressure on the Torso: Can You Breathe while Buried in Grain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kevin G; Jones, Carol L

    2017-04-26

    The pressure applied to the chest and back of a simulated grain entrapment victim was measured. Pressure sensors were attached to the chest and back of a manikin that was buried in grain in the vertical position. Measurements were made in four grain types at four grain depths ranging from the top of the manikin's shoulders to 0.61 m (24 in.) over the head. The pressure ranged from 1.6 to 4.0 kPa (0.23 to 0.57 psi). Based on available physiological information, this amount of pressure is unlikely to limit the respiration of an otherwise healthy adult male victim. However, other factors, such as the victim's age, gender, and body position in the grain, may influence respiration. The aspiration of grain appears to be the most likely asphyxiation risk during grain bin entrapment. Entering a grain storage bin is inherently dangerous, and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) guidelines for permit-required confined spaces and grain handling facilities must be followed. Due to the risk of grain aspiration during engulfment, the development of safety equipment that could help protect the airway of a victim should be investigated. Copyright© by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers.

  20. Buried Object Detection Method Using Optimum Frequency Range in Extremely Shallow Underground

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Tsuneyoshi; Abe, Touma

    2011-07-01

    We propose a new detection method for buried objects using the optimum frequency response range of the corresponding vibration velocity. Flat speakers and a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) are used for noncontact acoustic imaging in the extremely shallow underground. The exploration depth depends on the sound pressure, but it is usually less than 10 cm. Styrofoam, wood (silver fir), and acrylic boards of the same size, different size styrofoam boards, a hollow toy duck, a hollow plastic container, a plastic container filled with sand, a hollow steel can and an unglazed pot are used as buried objects which are buried in sand to about 2 cm depth. The imaging procedure of buried objects using the optimum frequency range is given below. First, the standardized difference from the average vibration velocity is calculated for all scan points. Next, using this result, underground images are made using a constant frequency width to search for the frequency response range of the buried object. After choosing an approximate frequency response range, the difference between the average vibration velocity for all points and that for several points that showed a clear response is calculated for the final confirmation of the optimum frequency range. Using this optimum frequency range, we can obtain the clearest image of the buried object. From the experimental results, we confirmed the effectiveness of our proposed method. In particular, a clear image of the buried object was obtained when the SLDV image was unclear.

  1. Cathode R&D for Future Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, D.H.; /SLAC; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Harkay, K.; /Argonne; Hernandez-Garcia; /Jefferson Lab; Legg, R.; /Wisconsin U., SRC; Padmore, H.; /LBL, Berkeley; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; /Brookhaven; Wan, W.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-26

    This paper reviews the requirements and current status of cathodes for accelerator applications, and proposes a research and development plan for advancing cathode technology. Accelerator cathodes need to have long operational lifetimes and produce electron beams with a very low emittance. The two principal emission processes to be considered are thermionic and photoemission with the photocathodes being further subdivided into metal and semi-conductors. Field emission cathodes are not included in this analysis. The thermal emittance is derived and the formulas used to compare the various cathode materials. To date, there is no cathode which provides all the requirements needed for the proposed future light sources. Therefore a three part research plan is described to develop cathodes for these future light source applications.

  2. Cathode R and D for future light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, D.H., E-mail: dowell@slac.stanford.ed [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B. [Cornell University, Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education (CLASSE) Wilson Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Harkay, K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Il 60439 (United States); Hernandez-Garcia, C. [Thomas Jefferson Laboratory, 12000 Jefferson Ave, Free Electron Laser Suite 19 Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Legg, R. [University of Wisconsin, SRC, 3731 Schneider Dr., Stoughton, WI 53589 (United States); Padmore, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Rao, T.; Smedley, J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, 20 Technology Street, Bldg. 535B, Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Wan, W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Rd, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2010-10-21

    This paper reviews the requirements and current status of cathodes for accelerator applications, and proposes a research and development plan for advancing cathode technology. Accelerator cathodes need to have long operational lifetimes and produce electron beams with a very low emittance. The two principal emission processes to be considered are thermionic and photoemission with the photocathodes being further subdivided into metal and semi-conductors. Field emission cathodes are not included in this analysis. The thermal emittance is derived and the formulas used to compare the various cathode materials. To date, there is no cathode which provides all the requirements needed for the proposed future light sources. Therefore a three part research plan is described to develop cathodes for these future light source applications.

  3. Emission mechanism in high current hollow cathode arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, M.

    1976-01-01

    Large (2 cm-diameter) hollow cathodes have been operated in a magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arc over wide ranges of current (0.25 to 17 kA) and mass flow (10 -3 to 8 g/sec), with orifice current densities and mass fluxes encompassing those encountered in low current steady-state hollow cathode arcs. Detailed cathode interior measurements of current and potential distributions show that maximum current penetration into the cathode is about one diameter axially upstream from the tip, with peak inner surface current attachment up to one cathode diameter upstream of the tip. The spontaneous attachment of peak current upstream of the cathode tip is suggested as a criterion for characteristic hollow cathode operation. This empirical criterion is verified by experiment

  4. Statistical survey of the buried waters in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carugo, Oliviero

    2016-01-01

    The structures of buried water molecules were studied in an ensemble of high-quality and non-redundant protein crystal structures. Buried water molecules were clustered and classified in lake-like clusters, which are completely isolated from the bulk solvent, and bay-like clusters, which are in contact with the bulk solvent through a surface water molecule. Buried water molecules are extremely common: lake-like clusters are found in 89 % of the protein crystal structures and bay-like clusters in 93 %. Clusters with only one water molecule are much more common than larger clusters. Both cluster types incline to be surrounded by loop residues, and to a minor extent by residues in extended secondary structure. Helical residues on the contrary do not tend to surround clusters of buried water molecules. One buried water molecule is found every 30-50 amino acid residues, depending on the secondary structures that are more abundant in the protein. Both main- and side-chain atoms are in contact with buried waters; they form four hydrogen bonds with the first water and 1-1.5 additional hydrogen bond for each additional water in the cluster. Consequently, buried water molecules appear to be firmly packed and rigid like the protein atoms. In this regard, it is remarkable to observe that prolines often surround water molecules buried in the protein interior. Interestingly, clusters of buried water molecules tend to be just beneath the protein surface. Moreover, water molecules tend to form a one-dimensional wire rather than more compact arrangements. This agrees with recent evidence of the mechanisms of solvent exchange between internal cavities and bulk solvent.

  5. The Panther Mountain circular structure, a possible buried meteorite crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isachsen, Y. W.; Wright, S. F.; Revetta, F. A.; Duneen, R. J.

    Panther Mountain, located near Phoenicia, New York, is part of the Catskill Mountains, which form the eastern end of the Allegheny Plateau in New York. It is a circular mass defined physiographically by an anomalous circular drainage pattern produced by Esopus Creek and its tributary Woodland Creek. The circular valley that rings the mountain is fracture-controlled; where bedrock is exposed, it shows a joint density 5 to 10 times greater than that on either side of the valley. Where obscured by alluvial valley fill, the bedrock's low seismic velocity suggests that this anomalous fracturing is continuous in the bedrock underlying the rim valley. North-south and east-west gravity and magnetic profiles were made across the structure. Terrane-corrected, residual gravity profiles show an 18-mgal negative anomaly, and very steep gradients indicate a near-surface source. Several possible explanations of the gravity data were modeled. We conclude that the Panther Mountain circular structure is probably a buried meteorite crater that formed contemporaneously with marine or fluvial sedimentation during Silurian or Devonian time. An examination of drill core and cuttings in the region is underway to search for ejecta deposits and possible seismic and tsunami effects in the sedimentary section. Success would result in both dating the impact and furnishing a chronostratigraphic marker horizon.

  6. In-situ containment and stabilization of buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, M.L.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1993-10-01

    In FY 1993 research continued on development and testing of grout materials for in-situ containment and stabilization of buried waste. Specifically, the work was aimed at remediation of the Chemical Waste Landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, New Mexico as part of the Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). The work on grouting materials was initiated in FY 1992 and the accomplishments for that year are documented in the previous annual report (Allan, Kukacka and Heiser, 1992). The remediation plan involves stabilization of the chromium plume, placement of impermeable vertical and horizontal barriers to isolate the landfill and installation of a surface cap. The required depth of subsurface barriers is approximately 33 m (100 ft). The work concentrated on optimization of grout formulations for use as grout and soil cement barriers and caps. The durability of such materials was investigated, in addition to shrinkage cracking resistance, compressive and flexural strength and permeability. The potential for using fibers in grouts to control cracking was studied. Small scale field trials were conducted to test the practicality of using the identified formulations and to measure the long term performance. Large scale trials were conducted at Sandia as part of the Subsurface Barrier Emplacement Technology Program. Since it was already determined in FY 1992 that cementitious grouts could effectively stabilize the chromium plume at the CWL after pre-treatment is performed, the majority of the work was devoted to the containment aspect

  7. Thermal processing system concepts and considerations for RWMC buried waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, T.L.; Kong, P.C.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report presents a preliminary determination of ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for application to remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated buried wastes (TRUW) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Beginning with top-level thermal treatment concepts and requirements identified in a previous Preliminary Systems Design Study (SDS), a more detailed consideration of the waste materials thermal processing problem is provided. Anticipated waste stream elements and problem characteristics are identified and considered. Final waste form performance criteria, requirements, and options are examined within the context of providing a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic, final waste form material. Thermal processing conditions required and capability of key systems components (equipment) to provide these material process conditions are considered. Information from closely related companion study reports on melter technology development needs assessment and INEL Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) research are considered. Five potentially practicable thermal process system design configuration concepts are defined and compared. A scenario for thermal processing of a mixed waste and soils stream with essentially no complex presorting and using a series process of incineration and high temperature melting is recommended. Recommendations for applied research and development necessary to further detail and demonstrate the final waste form, required thermal processes, and melter process equipment are provided.

  8. Polyenergy ion beam synthesis of buried oxynitride layer in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barabanenkov, M.Yu. E-mail: barab@ipmt-hpm.ac.ru; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Mordkovich, V.N.; Pustovit, A.N.; Vyatkin, A.F.; Zinenko, V.I

    2000-11-01

    The efficiency of silicon oxynitride synthesis in silicon crystals implanted with substoichiometric doses of oxygen and nitrogen ions is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Si crystals are implanted with oxygen and nitrogen ions with doses of 1.5 and 4.5x10{sup 17} cm{sup -2}, respectively, at fixed oxygen ion energy of 150 keV and nitrogen ion energies varied from 80 to 180 keV. The samples annealed at 1200 deg C for 2 h were analysed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Theoretically, a `diffusion-alternative sinks' model is applied to the annealing stage of ion beam synthesis of a buried layer of a new phase in solids. It is shown that the maximum of the ternary phase production is attained when nitrogen ions are implanted deeper than oxygen ions. An explanation of this fact is given in terms of that (i) the segregation of oxygen and nitrogen species on the surface of oxide nuclei removes the kinetic restriction of nuclei growth, characteristic of oxide growth, at the expense of only oxygen atoms, and (ii) the higher the implantation energy the smoother the shape of ion range distribution in the target, which, in its turn, causes the predominance of the impurity sink over the impurity diffusion.

  9. Polyenergy ion beam synthesis of buried oxynitride layer in silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabanenkov, M.Yu.; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Mordkovich, V.N.; Pustovit, A.N.; Vyatkin, A.F.; Zinenko, V.I.

    2000-01-01

    The efficiency of silicon oxynitride synthesis in silicon crystals implanted with substoichiometric doses of oxygen and nitrogen ions is investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Si crystals are implanted with oxygen and nitrogen ions with doses of 1.5 and 4.5x10 17 cm -2 , respectively, at fixed oxygen ion energy of 150 keV and nitrogen ion energies varied from 80 to 180 keV. The samples annealed at 1200 deg C for 2 h were analysed by secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Theoretically, a `diffusion-alternative sinks' model is applied to the annealing stage of ion beam synthesis of a buried layer of a new phase in solids. It is shown that the maximum of the ternary phase production is attained when nitrogen ions are implanted deeper than oxygen ions. An explanation of this fact is given in terms of that (i) the segregation of oxygen and nitrogen species on the surface of oxide nuclei removes the kinetic restriction of nuclei growth, characteristic of oxide growth, at the expense of only oxygen atoms, and (ii) the higher the implantation energy the smoother the shape of ion range distribution in the target, which, in its turn, causes the predominance of the impurity sink over the impurity diffusion

  10. Parental care improves offspring survival and growth in burying beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggert; Reinking; MULLER

    1998-01-01

    Burying beetles (genus Nicrophorus) provide elaborate parental care to their offspring. Parental beetles defend a small vertebrate carcass, which constitutes the sole food source for the larvae. They also manipulate the carcass in various ways and directly regurgitate pre-digested carrion to the young. The benefits of carcass manipulation and regurgitation have been the subject of a few small-scale studies that have yielded conflicting results. In this study, we investigated the benefits of these behaviours and tested for possible beneficial effects on larval survival rates and final body mass in N. vespilloides. In this species: (1) larval survival and mass were significantly higher in broods receiving parental care throughout larval development on the carcass than in broods developing in the absence of adults; (2) parental presence immediately subsequent to larval hatching greatly improved larval survival rates; (3) continued parental presence for several days further improved larval growth, leading to a greater final mass of individual larvae; (4) larval survival and growth were improved by parental preparation of carcasses and by an excision made in the integument of the carcass surface by the parents that allows the larvae ready access to their food; (5) positive effects of parental feeding on larval survival and growth were not mediated by the transfer of symbionts. Copyright 1998 The Association for the Study of Animal Behaviour.

  11. Parental care buffers against inbreeding depression in burying beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilakouta, Natalie; Jamieson, Seonaidh; Moorad, Jacob A; Smiseth, Per T

    2015-06-30

    When relatives mate, their inbred offspring often suffer a reduction in fitness-related traits known as "inbreeding depression." There is mounting evidence that inbreeding depression can be exacerbated by environmental stresses such as starvation, predation, parasitism, and competition. Parental care may play an important role as a buffer against inbreeding depression in the offspring by alleviating these environmental stresses. Here, we examine the effect of parental care on the fitness costs of inbreeding in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides, an insect with facultative parental care. We used a 2 × 2 factorial design with the following factors: (i) the presence or absence of a caring female parent during larval development and (ii) inbred or outbred offspring. We examined the joint influence of maternal care and inbreeding status on fitness-related offspring traits to test the hypothesis that maternal care improves the performance of inbred offspring more than that of outbred offspring. Indeed, the female's presence led to a higher increase in larval survival in inbred than in outbred broods. Receiving care at the larval stage also increased the lifespan of inbred but not outbred adults, suggesting that the beneficial buffering effects of maternal care can persist long after the offspring have become independent. Our results show that parental care has the potential to moderate the severity of inbreeding depression, which in turn may favor inbreeding tolerance and influence the evolution of mating systems and other inbreeding-avoidance mechanisms.

  12. Multiple-beam LDV system for buried landmine detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Amit K.; Zhang, Hansheng; Aranchuk, Vyacheslav; Hurtado, Ernesto; Hess, Cecil F.; Burgett, Richard D.; Sabatier, James M.

    2003-09-01

    This paper discusses the performance and experimental results of a multiple beam laser Doppler vibrometer designed to locate buried landmines with the laser-acoustic technique. The device increases the speed of landmine detection by simultaneously probing 16 positions on the ground over a span of 1 meter, and measuring the ground velocity at each of these positions. Experimental results are presented from controlled laboratory experiments as well as from landmine test lanes at the University of Mississippi. In the mine lanes, the multiple beam system is raised to a height of 2.5 meters with a forklift, with the 16 beams spread over a 1 meter line along the mine lane. A motor system then allows the 16 beams to be translated across the mine lane, enabling the system to scan a 1 x 1 meter area in a much shorter time than with previous scanning techniques. The effects of experimental parameters such as platform motion, angle of incidence, speckle dropout, and system depth-of-field will be presented and discussed.

  13. Thermal processing system concepts and considerations for RWMC buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, T.L.; Kong, P.C.; Raivo, B.D.; Anderson, G.L.

    1992-02-01

    This report presents a preliminary determination of ex situ thermal processing system concepts and related processing considerations for application to remediation of transuranic (TRU)-contaminated buried wastes (TRUW) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). Beginning with top-level thermal treatment concepts and requirements identified in a previous Preliminary Systems Design Study (SDS), a more detailed consideration of the waste materials thermal processing problem is provided. Anticipated waste stream elements and problem characteristics are identified and considered. Final waste form performance criteria, requirements, and options are examined within the context of providing a high-integrity, low-leachability glass/ceramic, final waste form material. Thermal processing conditions required and capability of key systems components (equipment) to provide these material process conditions are considered. Information from closely related companion study reports on melter technology development needs assessment and INEL Iron-Enriched Basalt (IEB) research are considered. Five potentially practicable thermal process system design configuration concepts are defined and compared. A scenario for thermal processing of a mixed waste and soils stream with essentially no complex presorting and using a series process of incineration and high temperature melting is recommended. Recommendations for applied research and development necessary to further detail and demonstrate the final waste form, required thermal processes, and melter process equipment are provided

  14. Visualizing excitations at buried heterojunctions in organic semiconductor blends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakowetz, Andreas C; Böhm, Marcus L; Sadhanala, Aditya; Huettner, Sven; Rao, Akshay; Friend, Richard H

    2017-05-01

    Interfaces play a crucial role in semiconductor devices, but in many device architectures they are nanostructured, disordered and buried away from the surface of the sample. Conventional optical, X-ray and photoelectron probes often fail to provide interface-specific information in such systems. Here we develop an all-optical time-resolved method to probe the local energetic landscape and electronic dynamics at such interfaces, based on the Stark effect caused by electron-hole pairs photo-generated across the interface. Using this method, we found that the electronically active sites at the polymer/fullerene interfaces in model bulk-heterojunction blends fall within the low-energy tail of the absorption spectrum. This suggests that these sites are highly ordered compared with the bulk of the polymer film, leading to large wavefunction delocalization and low site energies. We also detected a 100 fs migration of holes from higher- to lower-energy sites, consistent with these charges moving ballistically into more ordered polymer regions. This ultrafast charge motion may be key to separating electron-hole pairs into free charges against the Coulomb interaction.

  15. Removal of overburden soils from buried waste sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, P.M.

    1994-01-01

    Transuranic (TRU) waste buried in pits and trenches is covered with a soil cap, or overburden, to shed water. During retrieval operations, the overburden (expected to be clean) must be removed carefully to avoid breaching the soil/waste matrix within a pit or trench and to confine any possible local spot contamination. This necessitates removal in precise (7.6- to 15.25-cm) increments with a high degree of accuracy. In addition, during overburden removal the overburden must be characterized to a depth that exceeds each cut of soil. A field demonstration was conducted to evaluate a technology for removing overburden soils a the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The demonstration evaluated equipment performance and techniques for removing overburden soil and controlling contamination and dust. To evaluate the performance of these techniques during removal operations, personnel took air particulate samples, physical measurements of the soil cuts, maneuverability measurements, and rate of soil removal data. The overburden was spiked at specific locations and depths with rare earth tracers to provide a medium for evaluating samples. Analysis to determine the precision and accuracy of the soil removal, amount of dust generated, and potential spread of contamination was performed

  16. Surface wave propagation effects on buried segmented pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixin Shi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with surface wave propagation (WP effects on buried segmented pipelines. Both simplified analytical model and finite element (FE model are developed for estimating the axial joint pullout movement of jointed concrete cylinder pipelines (JCCPs of which the joints have a brittle tensile failure mode under the surface WP effects. The models account for the effects of peak ground velocity (PGV, WP velocity, predominant period of seismic excitation, shear transfer between soil and pipelines, axial stiffness of pipelines, joint characteristics, and cracking strain of concrete mortar. FE simulation of the JCCP interaction with surface waves recorded during the 1985 Michoacan earthquake results in joint pullout movement, which is consistent with the field observations. The models are expanded to estimate the joint axial pullout movement of cast iron (CI pipelines of which the joints have a ductile tensile failure mode. Simplified analytical equation and FE model are developed for estimating the joint pullout movement of CI pipelines. The joint pullout movement of the CI pipelines is mainly affected by the variability of the joint tensile capacity and accumulates at local weak joints in the pipeline.

  17. Graphite electrode DC arc technology program for buried waste treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wittle, J.K.; Hamilton, R.A.; Cohn, D.R.; Woskov, P.P.; Thomas, P.; Surma, J.E.; Titus, C.H.

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the program is to apply EPI's Arc Furnace to the processing of Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) waste from Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This is being facilitated through the Department of Energy's Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) program. A second objective is to apply the diagnostics capability of MIT's Plasma Fusion Center to the understanding of the high temperature processes taking place in the furnace. This diagnostics technology has promise for being applicable in other thermal treatment processes. The program has two parts, a test series in an engineering-scale DC arc furnace which was conducted in an EPI furnace installed at the Plasma Fusion Center and a pilot-scale unit which is under construction at MIT. This pilot-scale furnace will be capable of operating in a continuous feed and continuous tap mode. Included in this work is the development and implementation of diagnostics to evaluate high temperature processes such as DC arc technology. This technology can be used as an effective stabilization process for Superfund wastes

  18. The effect of cathode geometry on barium transport in hollow cathode plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of barium transport on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in numerical modeling of a cathode with two different orifice sizes. Despite large differences in cathode emitter temperature, emitted electron current density, internal xenon neutral and plasma densities, and size of the plasma-surface interaction region, the barium transport in the two geometries is qualitatively very similar. Barium is produced in the insert and flows to the surface through the porous structure. A buildup of neutral Ba pressure in the plasma over the emitter surface can suppress the reactions supplying the Ba, restricting the net production rate. Neutral Ba flows into the dense Xe plasma and has a high probability of being ionized at the periphery of this zone. The steady state neutral Ba density distribution is determined by a balance between pressure gradient forces and the drag force associated with collisions between neutral Ba and neutral Xe atoms. A small fraction of the neutral Ba is lost upstream. The majority of the neutral Ba is ionized in the high temperature Xe plasma and is pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field. The steady state Ba + ion density distribution results from a balance between electrostatic and pressure forces, neutral Xe drag and Xe + ion drag with the dominant forces dependent on location in the discharge. These results indicate that hollow cathodes are very effective at recycling Ba within the discharge and therefore maintain a high coverage of Ba on the emitter surface, which reduces the work function and sustains high electron emission current densities at moderate temperatures. Barium recycling is more effective in the cathode with the smaller orifice because the Ba is ionized in the dense Xe plasma concentrated just upstream of the orifice and pushed back into the hollow cathode. Despite a lower emitter temperature, the large orifice cathode has a higher Ba loss rate through the orifice because the Xe

  19. Computer simulation of explosion crater in dams with different buried depths of explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhichao; Ye, Longzhen

    2018-04-01

    Based on multi-material ALE method, this paper conducted a computer simulation on the explosion crater in dams with different buried depths of explosive using LS-DYNA program. The results turn out that the crater size increases with the increase of buried depth of explosive at first, but closed explosion cavity rather than a visible crater is formed when the buried depth of explosive increases to some extent. The soil in the explosion cavity is taken away by the explosion products and the soil under the explosion cavity is compressed with its density increased. The research can provide some reference for the anti-explosion design of dams in the future.

  20. Distinguishing Buried Objects in Extremely Shallow Underground by Frequency Response Using Scanning Laser Doppler Vibrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touma Abe,; Tsuneyoshi Sugimoto,

    2010-07-01

    A sound wave vibration using a scanning laser Doppler vibrometer are used as a method of exploring and imaging an extremely shallow underground. Flat speakers are used as a vibration source. We propose a method of distinguishing a buried object using a response range of a frequencies corresponding to a vibration velocities. Buried objects (plastic containers, a hollow steel can, an unglazed pot, and a stone) are distinguished using a response range of frequencies. Standardization and brightness imaging are used as methods of discrimination. As a result, it was found that the buried objects show different response ranges of frequencies. From the experimental results, we confirmed the effectiveness of our proposed method.

  1. Ultra thin buried oxide layers formed by low dose Simox process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aspar, B.; Pudda, C.; Papon, A.M. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Grenoble, 38 (France). Lab. d`Electronique et d`Instrumentation; Auberton Herve, A.J.; Lamure, J.M. [SOITEC, 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1994-12-31

    Oxygen low dose implantation is studied for two implantation energies. For 190 keV, a continuous buried oxide layer is obtained with a high dislocation density in the top silicon layer due to SiO{sub 2} precipitates. For 120 keV, this silicon layer is free of SiO{sub 2} precipitate and has a low dislocation density. Low density of pin-holes is observed in the buried oxide. The influence of silicon islands in the buried oxide on the breakdown electric fields is discussed. (authors). 6 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Pannus Is the New Prepuce? Penile Cancer in a Buried Phallus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Manwaring

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Two males presented to our urology department with complaints of bleeding and malodor from buried phallus within a suprapubic fat pad. Although both men had neonatal circumcisions, advanced penile carcinoma was found in both men. Formal penectomies showed high grade, poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma invading the corporal bodies and urethra. Buried penis represents a difficulty in early detection of suspicious lesions but may also provide an environment susceptible to poor hygiene and subsequent chronic inflammation. Patients with buried penis may be at a higher risk for development of invasive penile cancer and may benefit from regular and thorough genital exams.

  3. Imaging of buried phosphorus nanostructures in silicon using scanning tunneling microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberbeck, Lars [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); TOTAL Marketing Services, New Energies, La Défense 10, 92069 Paris La Défense Cedex (France); Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Hallam, Toby; Simmons, Michelle Y., E-mail: n.curson@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Schofield, Steven R. [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCL, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Curson, Neil J., E-mail: n.curson@ucl.ac.uk, E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); London Centre for Nanotechnology, UCL, London WC1H 0AH (United Kingdom); Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, UCL, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-23

    We demonstrate the locating and imaging of single phosphorus atoms and phosphorus dopant nanostructures, buried beneath the Si(001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. The buried dopant nanostructures have been fabricated in a bottom-up approach using scanning tunneling microscope lithography on Si(001). We find that current imaging tunneling spectroscopy is suited to locate and image buried nanostructures at room temperature and with residual surface roughness present. From these studies, we can place an upper limit on the lateral diffusion during encapsulation with low-temperature Si molecular beam epitaxy.

  4. Ultra thin buried oxide layers formed by low dose Simox process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspar, B.; Pudda, C.; Papon, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    Oxygen low dose implantation is studied for two implantation energies. For 190 keV, a continuous buried oxide layer is obtained with a high dislocation density in the top silicon layer due to SiO 2 precipitates. For 120 keV, this silicon layer is free of SiO 2 precipitate and has a low dislocation density. Low density of pin-holes is observed in the buried oxide. The influence of silicon islands in the buried oxide on the breakdown electric fields is discussed. (authors). 6 refs., 5 figs

  5. Imaging of buried phosphorus nanostructures in silicon using scanning tunneling microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberbeck, Lars; Reusch, Thilo C. G.; Hallam, Toby; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Schofield, Steven R.; Curson, Neil J.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the locating and imaging of single phosphorus atoms and phosphorus dopant nanostructures, buried beneath the Si(001) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. The buried dopant nanostructures have been fabricated in a bottom-up approach using scanning tunneling microscope lithography on Si(001). We find that current imaging tunneling spectroscopy is suited to locate and image buried nanostructures at room temperature and with residual surface roughness present. From these studies, we can place an upper limit on the lateral diffusion during encapsulation with low-temperature Si molecular beam epitaxy.

  6. New discharge tube with virtual cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidelmann, L.; Aubrecht, L.

    2003-01-01

    Till this time known methods of the excitation of the discharge between electrodes are using either secondary or thermo emission of electrons by the cathode. Usually we speak about the self-maintained discharge. Lifetime of the cathode, that is shortened by the emission, limits in principle, the lifetime of the whole discharge tube. The discharge can, according to the present state of the art, be induced also by the inductive way. Arrangement for excitation of such discharge is rather expensive. The construction of the inductive excited discharge tube is considerably influenced by the necessity of the limitation of the losses in excitation magnetic circuits. Especially length of the discharge and pressure of the working gas are limited by the economic standpoints. Function of the discharge is always connected with unwanted electromagnetic radiation, whose restraint is expensive and represents limiting factor for arrangement of the discharge tube (Authors)

  7. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  8. Long pulse, plasma cathode E-gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, D.M.; Schumacher, R.W.; Watkins, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    A unique, long-pulse E-gun has been developed for high-power tube applications. The Hollow-Cathode-Plasma (HCP) E-gun overcomes the limitations of conventional thermionic-cathode guns that have limited current density (typically ≤ 10 A/cm 2 ) or field-emission guns that offer high current density but suffer from short pulsewidth capability (typically 50 A/cm 2 ), long-pulse operation without gap closure, and also requires no cathode-heater power. The gun employs a low-pressure glow discharge inside a hollow cathode (HC) structure to provide a stable, uniform plasma surface from which a high current-density electron beam can be extracted. The plasma density is controlled by a low-voltage HC discharge pulser to produce the desired electron current density at the first grid of a multi-grid accelerator system. A dc high-voltage electron-beam supply accelerates the electrons across the gap, while the HC pulser modulates the beam current to generate arbitrary pulse waveforms. The electron accelerator utilizes a multi-aperture array that produces a large area, high perveance (>35 μpervs) beam consisting initially of many individual beamlets. The E-beam is normally operated without an applied magnetic field in the ion-focused regime, where the plasma produced by beam ionization of a background gas space-charge neutralizes the beam, and the Bennett self-pinch compresses the beamlets and increases the current density. The self-pinched beam has been observed to propagate over a meter without beam breakup or instabilities. The HCP E-gun has been operated at voltages up to 150 kV, currents up to 750 A, and pulse lengths of up to 120 μsec

  9. Bi-metallic nanoparticles as cathode electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Amine, Khalil; Wang, Xiaoping; Luo, Xiangyi; Myers, Deborah J.

    2018-03-27

    A lithium-air battery cathode catalyst includes core-shell nanoparticles on a carbon support, wherein: a core of the core-shell nanoparticles is platinum metal; and a shell of the core-shell nanoparticles is copper metal; wherein: the core-shell nanoparticles have a weight ratio of the copper metal to the platinum metal from about 4% to about 6% copper to from about 2% to about 12% platinum, with a remaining percentage being the carbon support.

  10. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhiltsov, V.E.

    1995-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. (orig.)

  11. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V. N.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Novikov, E. A.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Shafranov, M. D.; Zhiltsov, V. E.

    1995-12-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented.

  12. Method to evaluate stress and deformation of small-sized buried pipe induced by wheel loads. Shokokei maisetsukan no rinkaju ni okeru oryoku henkei hyokaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Y.; Kataoka, T.; Kokusho, T.; Yoshida, Y. (Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan))

    1994-03-21

    In order to establish a practical method to evaluate safety of buried pipes, which were generally used as cable-protection pipes, at shallow depth and under vehicle loads, a series of experiments and analyses were performed. Based on the results, a simplified method to evaluate stress and deformation of the buried pipes in pavement were proposed. In the experiments, hard PVC pipes, light steel conduit pipes, and corrugated hard PE pipes in nominal diameters from 75 to 200 mm were applied as specimens for representative flexible pipes, and field load tests in actual size as well as laboratory load tests using soil vessels were carried out. The calculated results by the proposed method were compared to the experimental results, finding that the calculated values gave a satisfactory agreement with measured values which were obtained by the field tests. As a result, it was confirmed that the practical method to evaluate circumferential stresses at the top of pipes and flat-deflection ratios of small-sized buried Pipes induced by wheel loads under various conditions were presented. 20 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 545: Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfred Wickline

    2007-01-01

    Corrective Action Unit 545, Dumps, Waste Disposal Sites, and Buried Radioactive Materials, consists of seven inactive sites located in the Yucca Flat area and one inactive site in the Pahute Mesa area. The eight CAU 545 sites consist of craters used for mud disposal, surface or buried waste disposed within craters or potential crater areas, and sites where surface or buried waste was disposed. The CAU 545 sites were used to support nuclear testing conducted in the Yucca Flat area during the 1950s through the early 1990s, and in Area 20 in the mid-1970s. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, this Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Fieldwork will be conducted following approval

  14. Overwintering biology and tests of trap and relocate as a conservation measure for burying beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Burying beetles are carrion beetles and utilize dead animal carcasses for feeding : and reproductive efforts. They assist with decomposition, prevent the spread of disease, : and reduce the number of pest species. The largest species of carrion beetl...

  15. Direct measurements of the velocity and thickness of ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowndes, D.H.; Jellison, G.E. Jr.; Pennycook, S.J.; Withrow, S.P.; Mashburn, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous infrared (1152 nm) and visible (633 nm) reflectivity measurements with nanosecond resolution were used to study the initial formation and subsequent motion of pulsed KrF laser-induced ''explosively'' propagating buried molten layers in ion implantation-amorphized silicon. The buried layer velocity decreases with depth below the surface, but increases with KrF laser energy density; a maximum velocity of about 14 m/s was observed, implying an undercooling-velocity relationship of approx. 14 K/(m/s). Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy was used to form a direct chemical image of implanted Cu ions transported by the buried layer and showed that the final buried layer thickness was <15 nm

  16. In situ vitrification of buried waste: Containment issues and suppression systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luey, J.; Powell, T.D.

    1992-01-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are developing a remedial action technology for buried waste through the adaptation of the in situ vitrification (ISV) process. The ISV process is a thermal treatment process originally developed for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to stabilize soils contaminated with transuranic waste. ISV tests with buried waste forms have demonstrated that the processing of buried waste is more dynamic than the processing of soils. This paper will focus on the issue of containment of the gases released during the processing of buried waste and on engineered suppression systems to alleviate transient events associated with dynamic off-gassing from the ISV melt. (author)

  17. Predicting arsenic concentrations in porewaters of buried uranium mill tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langmuir, D.; Mahoney, J.; MacDonald, A.; Rowson, J.

    1999-10-01

    The proposed JEB Tailings Management Facility (TMF) to be emplaced below the groundwater table in northern Saskatchewan, Canada, will contain uranium mill tailings from McClean Lake, Midwest and Cigar Lake ore bodies, which are high in arsenic (up to 10%) and nickel (up to 5%). A serious concern is the possibility that high arsenic and nickel concentrations may be released from the buried tailings, contaminating adjacent groundwaters and a nearby lake. Laboratory tests and geochemical modeling were performed to examine ways to reduce the arsenic and nickel concentrations in TMF porewaters so as to minimize such contamination from tailings buried for 50 years and longer. The tests were designed to mimic conditions in the mill neutralization circuit (3 hr tests at 25 C), and in the TMF after burial (5--49 day aging tests). The aging tests were run at 50, 25 and 4 C (the temperature in the TMF). In order to optimize the removal of arsenic by adsorption and precipitation, ferric sulfate was added to tailings raffinates having Fe/As ratios of less than 3--5. The acid raffinates were then neutralized by addition of slaked lime to nominal pH values of 7, 8, or 9. Analysis and modeling of the test results showed that with slaked lime addition to acid tailings raffinates, relatively amorphous scorodite (ferric arsenate) precipitates near pH 1, and is the dominant form of arsenate in slake limed tailings solids except those high in Ni and As and low in Fe, in which cabrerite-annabergite (Ni, Mg, Fe(II) arsenate) may also precipitate near pH 5--6. In addition to the arsenate precipitates, smaller amounts of arsenate are also adsorbed onto tailings solids. The aging tests showed that after burial of the tailings, arsenic concentrations may increase with time from the breakdown of the arsenate phases (chiefly scorodite). However, the tests indicate that the rate of change decreases and approaches zero after 72 hrs at 25 C, and may equal zero at all times in the TMF at 4 C

  18. Review Of Concrete Biodeterioration In Relation To Buried Nuclear Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turick, C.

    2012-01-01

    Long-term storage of low level radioactive material in below ground concrete disposal units (DUs) (Saltstone Disposal Facility) is a means of depositing wastes generated from nuclear operations of the U.S. Department of Energy. Based on the currently modeled degradation mechanisms, possible microbial induced effects on the structural integrity of buried low level wastes must be addressed. Previous international efforts related to microbial impacts on concrete structures that house low level radioactive waste showed that microbial activity can play a significant role in the process of concrete degradation and ultimately structural deterioration. This literature review examines the recent research in this field and is focused on specific parameters that are applicable to modeling and prediction of the fate of concrete vaults housing stored wastes and the wastes themselves. Rates of concrete biodegradation vary with the environmental conditions, illustrating a need to understand the bioavailability of key compounds involved in microbial activity. Specific parameters require pH and osmotic pressure to be within a certain range to allow for microbial growth as well as the availability and abundance of energy sources like components involved in sulfur, iron and nitrogen oxidation. Carbon flow and availability are also factors to consider in predicting concrete biodegradation. The results of this review suggest that microbial activity in Saltstone, (grouted low level radioactive waste) is unlikely due to very high pH and osmotic pressure. Biodegradation of the concrete vaults housing the radioactive waste however, is a possibility. The rate and degree of concrete biodegradation is dependent on numerous physical, chemical and biological parameters. Results from this review point to parameters to focus on for modeling activities and also, possible options for mitigation that would minimize concrete biodegradation. In addition, key chemical components that drive microbial

  19. Solving the sulphur situation : research assesses viability of burying sulphur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proce, B.

    2006-01-01

    Oil sands mining companies are looking for ways to manage growing levels of sulphur production from the Athabasca region. Infrastructure is not in place to economically transport the sulphur even though there is a global market for it. Sulphur cannot be stockpiled indefinitely as it can react with air to produce sulphur dioxide. Although above-ground sulphur storage has been regulated for more than 30 years, the underground storage of sulphur is still in a research and development phase. Alberta Sulphur Research Ltd. is currently conducting an ongoing experiment in which 100 tonne test blocks have been buried above and below the water table so that surrounding areas could be monitored over a period of years. A series of tests is being conducted to examine changes in pH in water and sulphate levels. A multi-layered engineering casing to contain the sulphur and prevent seepage is also being investigated. Once stored underground, operators also have to consider how the sulphur will be accessed in the future, as it is subject to government royalties. The storage of sulphur may have economic benefits as the product can be sold when prices are high. Most sulphur produced in Alberta is sold as an export product in the United States for use in products such as fertilizer. Shell Canada penetrated the Chinese market in 2001 and has since become one of Canada's largest sulphur exporters. Shell has also introduced a number of products using sulphur, including fertilizers, enhanced asphalt, and concrete. It was concluded that companies must take action now to mitigate future losses and to utilize current markets in order to remain competitive. 3 figs

  20. Isotope hydrogeochemistry in exploration for buried and blind mineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrew, A.S.; Carr, G.R.; Giblin, A.M.; Whitford, D.J.

    2000-01-01

    Buried and blind deposits, with no direct geological or geochemical manifestation at the surface, are becoming increasingly important targets in Australia. One of the key exploration challenges relates to assessing and ranking targets established from geophysical and other remotely sensed surveys. Sub-surface geology is reflected in the geochemistry of groundwaters (Giblin, 1996) and hydrogeochemical methods provide a particularly powerful technique in areas of poor surface exposure, deep weathering and where transported overburden obscures the underlying geology (Giblin, 1997). In such areas several hundred samples are used to define locally prospective areas although how these relate to a specific mineralization style may be difficult to determine. The question of proximity to an orebody is fundamental to mineral exploration and isotopic (S, Pb, Sr) methods are uniquely capable of contributing to an answer. The isotopic composition of ores and waters that interact with ores carries important information about the elemental source; S and Pb are direct ore indicators allowing straight-forward interpretation of possible ore associations. The isotopic methods also provide unequivocal evidence for mixing. The isotopic compositions of S, Pb and Sr in rocks are unaffected by weathering and in natural waters are unaffected by precipitation, evaporation or dilution. Isotopic methods provide information that is complementary to that obtainable from major and trace element abundances. The application of integrated isotopic studies to conventional hydrogeochemical interpretations was tested in several areas (Fig. 1); Menninnie Dam (Pb, Zn; Eyre Peninsula SA), Abra (Ag, Pb; Bangemall Basin WA), Benambra (Cu, Zn, Pb: Lachlan Fold Belt Vic), Goonumbla (Cu, Au; Lachlan Fold Belt NSW) and Kanmantoo (Cu, Pb, Zn, Au; Kanmantoo Fold Belt SA). These were chosen to include different deposit types, tectonic regimes, climatic and topographic environments and groundwater chemistry

  1. Review of Concrete Biodeterioration in Relation to Buried Nuclear Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Berry, C.

    2012-10-15

    Long-term storage of low level radioactive material in below ground concrete disposal units (DUs) (Saltstone Disposal Facility) is a means of depositing wastes generated from nuclear operations of the U.S. Department of Energy. Based on the currently modeled degradation mechanisms, possible microbial induced effects on the structural integrity of buried low level wastes must be addressed. Previous international efforts related to microbial impacts on concrete structures that house low level radioactive waste showed that microbial activity can play a significant role in the process of concrete degradation and ultimately structural deterioration. This literature review examines the recent research in this field and is focused on specific parameters that are applicable to modeling and prediction of the fate of concrete vaults housing stored wastes and the wastes themselves. Rates of concrete biodegradation vary with the environmental conditions, illustrating a need to understand the bioavailability of key compounds involved in microbial activity. Specific parameters require pH and osmotic pressure to be within a certain range to allow for microbial growth as well as the availability and abundance of energy sources like components involved in sulfur, iron and nitrogen oxidation. Carbon flow and availability are also factors to consider in predicting concrete biodegradation. The results of this review suggest that microbial activity in Saltstone, (grouted low level radioactive waste) is unlikely due to very high pH and osmotic pressure. Biodegradation of the concrete vaults housing the radioactive waste however, is a possibility. The rate and degree of concrete biodegradation is dependent on numerous physical, chemical and biological parameters. Results from this review point to parameters to focus on for modeling activities and also, possible options for mitigation that would minimize concrete biodegradation. In addition, key chemical components that drive microbial

  2. Post-liquefaction soil-structure interaction for buried structures: Sensitivity analysis studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pires, J.A.; Ang, H.S.; Katayama, I.; Satoh, M.

    1993-01-01

    The post liquefaction behavior of buried conduits is analyzed and sensitivity analysis is conducted to investigate the damage potential of the forces induced in the buried lifelines following seismically induced liquefaction of the surrounding soil. Various lifeline configurations and loading conditions are considered. The loading conditions considered are: buoyancy forces and permanent ground displacements parallel to the lifeline axis. Pertinent parameters for the soil-lifeline interaction following liquefaction are identified. (author)

  3. Exposed versus buried intramedullary implants for pediatric forearm fractures: a comparison of complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian A; Miller, Patricia; Shore, Benjamin J; Waters, Peter M; Bae, Donald S

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the rate of complications between buried and exposed intramedullary implants after fixation of pediatric forearm fractures. A retrospective comparative cohort study of 339 children treated with intramedullary fixation for displaced forearm fractures between 2004 and 2009 was performed. Implants were left exposed in 128 patients (37.8%) and buried beneath the skin in 208 patients (61.4%); 3 patients had buried and exposed hardware (0.9%). Data on demographics, injury, surgical technique, and complications were analyzed. The buried implant group was older (mean 10.3 vs. 8.5 y; P exposed implant group. The buried group had their implants removed later than the exposed group (median 3.5 vs. 1.2 mo; P exposed implants were successfully removed in the office. Complications were seen in 56 patients (16.5%). There were 16 patients (4.7%) with refracture and 12 patients (3.5%) with infection. The buried and exposed implant groups did not differ significantly with respect to refracture (3.1% vs. 7.0%; P = 0.20), infection (3.5% vs. 2.3%; P = 0.66), or overall complications (14.5% vs. 17.2%; P = 0.87). There was also no difference between groups with respect to loss of reduction, nondelayed or delayed union, loss of motion, hypertrophic granuloma, or tendon rupture. Buried implants were also associated with penetration through the skin (3.9%). Injury to the dominant arm and need for open reduction were significant predictors of complication (OR = 1.01; 95% CI, 1.001-1.012; P = 0.02 and OR = 0.51; 95% CI, 0.264-0.974; P = 0.04, respectively). There were no significant differences seen in number of infections, refractures, or overall complications based on whether implants were left exposed or buried beneath the skin after surgery. Level III, therapeutic.

  4. Seismic fragility analysis of buried steel piping at P, L, and K reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wingo, H.E.

    1989-10-01

    Analysis of seismic strength of buried cooling water piping in reactor areas is necessary to evaluate the risk of reactor operation because seismic events could damage these buried pipes and cause loss of coolant accidents. This report documents analysis of the ability of this piping to withstand the combined effects of the propagation of seismic waves, the possibility that the piping may not behave in a completely ductile fashion, and the distortions caused by relative displacements of structures connected to the piping

  5. Geophysical research results of buried relief and distribution groundwater runoff of the Aragats massif

    OpenAIRE

    V.P. Vardanyan; A.H. Hovhannisyan

    2017-01-01

    Based on the synthesis and reinterpretation of long-term data of geophysical studies together with the hydrology - hydrological materials it has been received new data about the buried topography and spatial distribution of groundwater runoff of the Aragats massif. First of all, it requires to determine the structure of its buried relief, which is basically a regional relief aquitard. The underground water sources are considered to be precipitation on the massif (approximately 83% of the tota...

  6. Imaging of Au nanoparticles deeply buried in polymer matrix by various atomic force microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kuniko; Kobayashi, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi; Yamada, Hirofumi

    2013-01-01

    Recently, some papers reported successful imaging of subsurface features using atomic force microscopy (AFM). Some theoretical studies have also been presented, however the imaging mechanisms are not fully understood yet. In the preceeding papers, imaging of deeply buried nanometer-scale features has been successful only if they were buried in a soft matrix. In this paper, subsurface features (Au nanoparticles) buried in a soft polymer matrix were visualized. To elucidate the imaging mechanisms, various AFM techniques; heterodyne force microscopy, ultrasonic atomic force microscopy (UAFM), 2nd-harmonic UAFM and force modulation microscopy (FMM) were employed. The particles buried under 960 nm from the surface were successfully visualized which has never been achieved. The results elucidated that it is important for subsurface imaging to choose a cantilever with a suitable stiffness range for a matrix. In case of using the most suitable cantilever, the nanoparticles were visualized using every technique shown above except for FMM. The experimental results suggest that the subsurface features buried in a soft matrix with a depth of at least 1 µm can affect the local viscoelasticity (mainly viscosity) detected as the variation of the amplitude and phase of the tip oscillation on the surface. This phenomenon presumably makes it possible to visualize such deeply buried nanometer-scale features in a soft matrix. - Highlights: • We visualized subsurface features buried in soft matrix, and investigated its imaging mechanism. • AFM techniques; UAFM, FMM, HFM and 2nd-harmonic UAFM were applied to elucidate the mechanism. • Au nanoparticles buried under 960 nm from surface were visualized, which has never been achieved. • Imaging at contact resonance using a cantilever of suitable stiffness is important. • Subsurface features in a soft matrix affect surface viscoelasticity, which are detected by AFM

  7. Detection of buried land mines using back scattered neutron induced γ-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, M.; Megahd, R.

    2003-01-01

    The application of nuclear technique to detection buried land mine is examined. MCNP code was used to design a computer model that calculate the back scattered neutron induced γ rays from buried simulate explosive materials. The characteristic γ rays for each isotopes were used to distinguish materials. The advantage of the nuclear technique was discussed. The results were compared with experimental measurements which show good agreement

  8. Thin films and buried interfaces characterization with X-ray standing waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagomarsino, S [CNR, Rome (Italy). Istituto Elettronica Stato Solido

    1996-09-01

    The X-ray standing wave techniques is a powerful, non destructive method to study interfaces at the atomic level. Its basic features are described here together with the peculiarities of its applications to epitaxial films and buried interfaces. As examples of applications, experiments carried out on Si/silicide interfaces, on GaAs/InAs/GaAs buried interfaces and on Si/Ge superlattices are shown.

  9. Studies of phase formation in CoSi2 buried layers fabricated using ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaev, A.A.; Parkhomenko, Yu.N.; Podgornyi, D.A.; Shcherbachev, K.D.

    1998-01-01

    The processes of the formation of cobalt disilicide buried layers in silicon are studied under different conditions of implantation with Co. In particular, the effects of the implantation dose and the postimplantation annealing temperature on the state of the Co-implanted layer are considered. Two types of heteroepitaxial Si/CoSi 2 /Si structures are obtained with the conducting layers of thicknesses 70 and 90 nm buried at the depths 80 and 10 nm, respectively

  10. FOREWORD: Special section on electromagnetic characterization of buried obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesselier, Dominique; Chew, Weng Cho

    2004-12-01

    This Inverse Problems special section on electromagnetic characterization of buried obstacles contains a selection of 14 invited papers, involving 41 authors and 19 research groups worldwide. (Though this section consists of invited papers, the standard refereeing procedures of Inverse Problems have been rigorously observed.) We do not claim to have reached all the high-level researchers in the field, but we believe that we have made a fair attempt. As illustrated by the variety of contributions included, the aim of this special section is to address theoretical and practical inversion problems (and the solutions thereof) that arise in the field of electromagnetic characterization of obstacles (artificial or natural) buried on the Earth or in planetary subsoil. Civil and military engineering, archaeological and environmental issues are typically among those within the scope of the investigation. An example is the characterization of a single (or multiple) obstacle(s) located near the interface or at shallow depths via electromagnetic means operating within relevant frequency bands. However, we also welcomed novel and thought-provoking investigations, even though their direct application to the real world, or even to laboratory-controlled settings, may still be far off. Within this general mathematical and applied framework, the submitted papers focused on a combination of theoretical, computational and experimental developments. They either reviewed the most recent advances in a particular area of research or were an original and specialized contribution. Let us now take the opportunity to remind the readers that this special section harks back (in addition to sharing some common contributors) to two special sections already published in the journal which possessed the same flavour of wave-field inversion and its many applications. They were `Electromagnetic imaging and inversion of the Earth's subsurface', which was published in October 2000 (volume 16, issue 5

  11. Surface studies of thermionic cathodes and the mechanism of operation of an impregnated tungsten cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, R.

    1976-09-01

    The surface properties of conventional impregnated cathodes were investigated by the use of Auger spectroscopy and work function measurements, and these were compared with a synthesized barium- or barium oxide coated tungsten surface. The barium- and barium oxide coated surfaces were prepared by evaporating barium onto a tungsten surface that can be heated to elevated temperatures. Multilayer or monolayer coverages can be investigated using this technique. The results of this study show that the surface of an impregnated tungsten cathode is identical to that observed for a synthesized monolayer or partial monolayer of barium on partially oxidized tungsten, using the criteria of identical Auger patterns and work functions. Desorption measurements of barium from a tungsten surface were also made. These results in conjunction with Auger and work function data were interpreted to show that throughout most of its life an impregnated cathode operating in the range of 1100 C has a partial monolayer rather than a monolayer of barium on its surface

  12. Comprehensive Review and Case Study on the Management of Buried Penis Syndrome and Related Panniculectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Hadley; Chowdhry, Saeed; Lee, Thomas; Schulz, Steven; Wilhelmi, Bradon J.

    2018-01-01

    Objective: This paper discusses the various surgical techniques and outcomes associated with management of buried penis syndrome. Methods: Presented is the case of a 49-year-old man with morbid obesity, leading to massive panniculus and buried penis. We review our technique for reconstruction of the buried penis and treatment of the overlying large panniculus. Literature search was conducted to review current techniques in correcting buried penis syndrome. Results: The patient underwent a successful panniculectomy with removal of all excess skin and tissue. Thoughtful planning and coordination between plastic surgery and urology were paramount to externalize the penis for an excellent functional and cosmetic result. Conclusions: Management of a buried, hidden penis is complex and difficult. Patients are often obese and have poor hygiene due to the inability to cleanse areas that are entrapped by excessive fat. Following removal of the overhanging panniculus, satisfactory reconstruction of a hidden penis is possible when proper care is taken to adhere the base of the penis to the pubis. Split-thickness skin grafts are often necessary but depend on the viability of the penile skin and whether it is restricting penile length. Complications with wound dehiscence and infection are not uncommon; however, patients generally recover well, are satisfied with results, and are reported to have fully regained urinary and sexual functions following surgical correction of the buried penis. PMID:29467914

  13. A process for ensuring regulatory compliance at the INEL`s buried waste integrated demonstrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannon, P.G.; Watson, L.R.; Blacker, P.B. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

    1993-03-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program is funded by the Department of Energy Office of Technology Development. The mission of this Integrated Demonstration is to identify, evaluate, and demonstrate a suite of innovative technologies for the remediation of radioactive and hazardous waste buried throughout the DOE complex between 1950 and 1970. The program approach to development of a long-range strategy for improving buried waste remediation capabilities is to combine systems analysis with already identified remediation needs for DOE complex buried waste. The systems analysis effort has produced several configuration options (a top-level block diagram of a cradle-to-grave remediation system) capable of remediating the transuranic-contaminated waste pits and trenches at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Technologies for demonstration are selected using three criteria: (a) the ability to satisfy a specific buried waste need, (b) the ability to satisfy functional and operational requirements defined for functional sub-elements in a configuration option, and (c) performance against Comprehensive Environmental Restoration and Compensation Liability Act selection criteria, such as effectiveness, implementability, and cost. Early demonstrations experienced problems with missed requirements, prompting the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program Office to organize a Corrective Action Team to identify the cause and recommend corrective actions. The result of this team effort is the focus of this paper.

  14. Luminance enhancement in quantum dot light-emitting diodes fabricated with Field’s metal as the cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basilio, Carlos; Oliva, Jorge; Lopez-Luke, Tzarara; Pu, Ying-Chih; Zhang, Jin Z.; Rodriguez, C. E.; de la Rosa, E.

    2017-03-01

    This work reports the fabrication and characterization of blue-green quantum dot light-emitting diodes (QD-LEDs) by using core/shell/shell Cd1-x Zn x Se/ZnSe/ZnS quantum dots. Poly [(9,9-bis(3‧-(N,N-dimethylamino)propyl)-2,7-fluorene)-alt-2,7-(9,9-dioctylfluorene)] (PFN) was introduced in order to enhance the electron injection and also acted as a protecting layer during the deposition of the cathode (a Field’s metal sheet) on the organic/inorganic active layers at low temperature (63 °C). This procedure permitted us to eliminate the process of thermal evaporation for the deposition of metallic cathodes, which is typically used in the fabrication of OLEDs. The performance of devices made with an aluminum cathode was compared with that of devices which employed Field’s metal (FM) as the cathode. We found that the luminance and efficiency of devices with FM was ~70% higher with respect to those that employed aluminum as the cathode and their consumption of current was similar up to 13 V. We also demonstrated that the simultaneous presence of 1,2-ethanedethiol (EDT) and PFN enhanced the luminance in our devices and improved the current injection in QD-LEDs. Hence, the architecture for QD-LEDs presented in this work could be useful for the fabrication of low-cost luminescent devices.

  15. Cathode power distribution system and method of using the same for power distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mark A; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Koehl, Eugene R; Bailey, James L; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2014-11-11

    Embodiments include a cathode power distribution system and/or method of using the same for power distribution. The cathode power distribution system includes a plurality of cathode assemblies. Each cathode assembly of the plurality of cathode assemblies includes a plurality of cathode rods. The system also includes a plurality of bus bars configured to distribute current to each of the plurality of cathode assemblies. The plurality of bus bars include a first bus bar configured to distribute the current to first ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies and a second bus bar configured to distribute the current to second ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies.

  16. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-01-01

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  17. Degradation factors of a new long life cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mingchen; Zhang Honglai; Liu Pukun; Li Yutao

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses the degradation factors of a new long life coated impregnated cathode after accelerated life test. The surface state of the cathode is investigated with scanning electron microscope (SEM) as well as the content and variation of the various elements on the surface and the longitudinal section of the cathode are analyzed with Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) before and after the life test. The analyzing results with SEM show that the cathode coating shrinks at the life end and leads to a rise in its work function. The analyzing results with AES show that the percent of the W increases and the active materials Ba decreases on the cathode surface at the life end. Furthermore, there is less Ba underneath the cathode surface but still a lot of Ba in the tungsten matrix at the life end.

  18. Cathode plasma expansion in diode with explosive emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuo Yinghong; Fan Ruyu; Wang Jianguo; Zhu Jinhui

    2012-01-01

    The evolution characteristics of the cathode plasma in a planar diode with explosive emission were analyzed. Be- sides the axial expansion which can reduce the effective anode-cathode gap, the radial expansion of the cathode plasma which can affect the effective emitting area was also taken into account. According to the Child-Langmuir law and the experimental data of current and voltage with a electron vacuum diode under four-pulse mode, the dynamics of the cathode plasma was investigated, on the assumption that the radial speeds of the cathode plasma was approximately equal to the axial speed. The results show that the radial and axial expansion speeds of the cathode plasma are 0.9-2.8 cm/μs. (authors)

  19. Cathodic corrosion: Part 2. Properties of nanoparticles synthesized by cathodic corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanson, A.I.; Yanson, Yu.I.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate how cathodic corrosion in concentrated aqueous solutions enables one to prepare nanoparticles of various metals and metal alloys. Using various characterization methods we show that the composition of nanoparticles remains that of the starting material, and the resulting size distribution remains rather narrow. For the case of platinum we show how the size and possibly even the shape of the nanoparticles can be easily controlled by the parameters of corrosion. Finally, we discuss the advantages of using the nanoparticles prepared by cathodic corrosion for applications in (electro-)catalysis.

  20. Theory of hollow cathode arc discharges. II. Metastable state balance inside the cathode. Application to argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, C.M.; Delcroix, J.L.

    1975-01-01

    In the hollow cathode the metastable species are created by fast electrons, which are emitted by the cathode wall and injected in the plasma across a space-charge sheath, and destroyed by Maxwellian electrons. A detailed analysis of the different electronic destruction mechanisms in argon shows that the re-excitation up to 3p 5 4p states plays a very important role. Solutions of the metastable balance equation were obtained in a wide range of variation of the discharge parameters displaying the best conditions of operation to obtain high concentrations [fr

  1. Molten carbonate fuel cell cathode with mixed oxide coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmi, Abdelkader; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2013-05-07

    A molten carbonate fuel cell cathode having a cathode body and a coating of a mixed oxygen ion conductor materials. The mixed oxygen ion conductor materials are formed from ceria or doped ceria, such as gadolinium doped ceria or yttrium doped ceria. The coating is deposited on the cathode body using a sol-gel process, which utilizes as precursors organometallic compounds, organic and inorganic salts, hydroxides or alkoxides and which uses as the solvent water, organic solvent or a mixture of same.

  2. Ultra High Energy Density Cathodes with Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    a) Carbon nanotube paper coated with NCA cathode composite for testing as positive electrode in Li-ion battery (b) Comparison of NCA specific...received and purified CNT electrodes coated with NCA cathode composite. (b) Discharge capacities as a function of rate and cycle for NCA on Al and...thickness increases. The first approach was to cast SOA NCA cathode composites onto CNT current collectors using an adjustable blade coater. The

  3. Knife-edge thin film field emission cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, B.; Demroff, H.P.; Drew, M.M.; Elliott, T.S.; Mazumdar, T.K.; McIntyre, P.M.; Pang, Y.; Smith, D.D.; Trost, H.J.

    1993-01-01

    Cathodes made of thin-film field emission arrays (FEA) have the advantages of high current density, pulsed emission, and low bias voltage operation. The authors have developed a technology to fabricate knife-edge field emission cathodes on (110) silicon wafers. The emitter geometry is optimized for efficient modulation at high frequency. Cathode fabrication progress and preliminary analysis of their applications in RF power sources are presented

  4. Structured electron beams from nano-engineered cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueangaramwong, A. [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, D. [NICADD, DeKalb; Andonian, G. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Piot, P. [Fermilab

    2017-03-07

    The ability to engineer cathodes at the nano-scale have open new possibilities such as enhancing quantum eciency via surface-plasmon excitation, forming ultra-low-emittance beams, or producing structured electron beams. In this paper we present numerical investigations of the beam dynamics associated to this class of cathode in the weak- and strong-field regimes.We finally discuss the possible applications of some of the achievable cathode patterns when coupled with other phase space manipulations.

  5. Geiger counters of gamma rays with a bismuth cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meunier, R.; Legrand, J.P.

    1953-01-01

    Geiger Muller counters present a lake of efficiency of some per cent, for the γ radiations. In the region 0,3 - 1 MeV, a substantial growth of their output can be obtained by a special construction of their cathode. In accordance with previous works, we constructed some counter of formed cathode by a pleated copper wire fencing covered of Bi by electrolysis. The successive modifications brought to a cylindrical conventional cathode in sheet metal of copper, that succeeds to this type of cathode, drive to an improvement of the output. (M.B.) [fr

  6. Surface Characterization of the LCLS RF Gun Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachmann, Axel; Decker, Franz-Josef; Ding, Yuantao; Dowell, David; Emma, Paul; Frisch, Josef; Gilevich, Sasha; Hays, Gregory; Hering, Philippe; Huang, Zhirong; Iverson, Richard; Loos, Henrik; Miahnahri, Alan; Nordlund, Dennis; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Pianetta, Piero; Turner, James; Welch, James; White, William; Wu, Juhao; Xiang, Dao

    2012-01-01

    The first copper cathode installed in the LCLS RF gun was used during LCLS commissioning for more than a year. However, after high charge operation (> 500 pC), the cathode showed a decline of quantum efficiency within the area of drive laser illumination. They report results of SEM, XPS and XAS studies that were carried out on this cathode after it was removed from the gun. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal surface contamination by various hydrocarbon compounds. In addition they report on the performance of the second installed cathode with emphasis on the spatial distribution of electron emission.

  7. Large area dispenser cathode applied to high current linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Anmin; China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang; Wu Dengxue; Liu Chenjun; Xia Liansheng; Wang Wendou; Zhang Kaizhi

    2005-01-01

    The paper introduced a dispenser cathode (411 M) which was 55 mm in diameter. A 200 kV long pulsed power generator with 2 μs flattop based on Marx-PEN and system with heat and voltage insulation were built. A 52 A space charge limited current was gained, when the temperature was 1165 degree C and the filament current was 18 A on the cathode and the voltage of the pulse was 75 kV at the cathode test stand. Experimental results show that the current values are consistent with the numerical simulation. The experiment reveals that the deflated gas will influence the cathode emission ability. (authors)

  8. Cathode fall measurement in a dielectric barrier discharge in helium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yanpeng; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Yaoge [School of Electric Power, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2013-11-15

    A method based on the “zero-length voltage” extrapolation is proposed to measure cathode fall in a dielectric barrier discharge. Starting, stable, and discharge-maintaining voltages were measured to obtain the extrapolation zero-length voltage. Under our experimental conditions, the “zero-length voltage” gave a cathode fall of about 185 V. Based on the known thickness of the cathode fall region, the spatial distribution of the electric field strength in dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric helium is determined. The strong cathode fall with a maximum field value of approximately 9.25 kV/cm was typical for the glow mode of the discharge.

  9. Measuring current emission and work functions of large thermionic cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortgang, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    As one component of the nations Stockpile Stewardship program, Los Alamos National Laboratory is constructing a 20 MeV, 2 kA (with a 4 kA upgrade capability), 3ps induction linac for doing x-ray radiography of explosive devices. The linac is one leg of a facility called the Dual-Axis Radiography Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT). The electron gun is designed to operate at 3.2 MV. The gun is a Pierce type design and uses a 6.5' cathode for 2 kA operation and an 8' cathode for 4 kA operation. We have constructed a small facility called the Cathode Test Stand (CTS) to investigate engineering and physics issues regarding large thermionic dispenser-cathodes. In particular, we have looked at the issues of temperature uniformity on the cathode surface and cathode quality as measured by its work function. We have done thermal imaging of both 8' and 6.5' cathodes. Here we report on measurements of the cathode work function, both the average value and how it vanes across the face of the cathode.

  10. Explosive-emission cathode fabricated from superconducting cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavra, I.; Korenev, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    The authors describe on explosive-emission cathode that is based on stock superconducting cable - type NT-50, for example - that is bunched and held in a copper matrix. The copper matrix is partially etched away to create a multipoint structure for the cathode-plasma initiators. With 100-300 kV on the diode and a distance of 1 cm between the anode and cathode, electron currents of 20-80 and 60-300 A are obtained with cathode diameters of 0.5 and 1 cm, respectively

  11. MCNP Modeling Results for Location of Buried TRU Waste Drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinman, D K; Schweitzer, J S

    2006-01-01

    In the 1960's, fifty-five gallon drums of TRU waste were buried in shallow pits on remote U.S. Government facilities such as the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (now split into the Idaho National Laboratory and the Idaho Completion Project [ICP]). Subsequently, it was decided to remove the drums and the material that was in them from the burial pits and send the material to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Several technologies have been tried to locate the drums non-intrusively with enough precision to minimize the chance for material to be spread into the environment. One of these technologies is the placement of steel probe holes in the pits into which wireline logging probes can be lowered to measure properties and concentrations of material surrounding the probe holes for evidence of TRU material. There is also a concern that large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOC) are also present that would contaminate the environment during removal. In 2001, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) built two pulsed neutron wireline logging tools to measure TRU and VOC around the probe holes. The tools are the Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) and the Pulsed Neutron Gamma (PNG), respectively. They were tested experimentally in surrogate test holes in 2003. The work reported here estimates the performance of the tools using Monte-Carlo modelling prior to field deployment. A MCNP model was constructed by INEEL personnel. It was modified by the authors to assess the ability of the tools to predict quantitatively the position and concentration of TRU and VOC materials disposed around the probe holes. The model was used to simulate the tools scanning the probe holes vertically in five centimetre increments. A drum was included in the model that could be placed near the probe hole and at other locations out to forty-five centimetres from the probe-hole in five centimetre increments. Scans were performed with no chlorine in the

  12. Position resolution of MSGCs with cathode readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, N.; Cremaldi, L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Gobbi, B.; Ng, K.K.; Manzella, V.; Peskov, V.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rubinov, P.; Schamberger, D.; Sellberg, G.; Steffens, J.; Tilden, R.; Wang, P.; Yu, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a telescope of micro-strip gas chambers (MSGC) has been studied in a beam of pions. Detectors with different anode pitch and with different substrates have been operated using several gas mixtures. The position resolutions obtained by reading out the cathodes for the 200 μm pitch is 42 μm. For the 400 μm pitch detectors the resolution is 42 μm after correcting the centroid positions with a function derived from the data. (orig.)

  13. Coated particles for lithium battery cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohit; Eitouni, Hany Basam; Pratt, Russell Clayton; Mullin, Scott Allen; Wang, Xiao-Liang

    2017-07-18

    Particles of cathodic materials are coated with polymer to prevent direct contact between the particles and the surrounding electrolyte. The polymers are held in place either by a) growing the polymers from initiators covalently bound to the particle, b) attachment of the already-formed polymers by covalently linking to functional groups attached to the particle, or c) electrostatic interactions resulting from incorporation of cationic or anionic groups in the polymer chain. Carbon or ceramic coatings may first be formed on the surfaces of the particles before the particles are coated with polymer. The polymer coating is both electronically and ionically conductive.

  14. Low noise PWC cathode readout system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cisneros, E.; Hutchinson, D.; McShurley, D.; Richter, R.; Shapiro, S.

    1980-10-01

    A system has been developed, primarily to detect the induced charge deposited on PWC cathodes, which is versatile, fast and has a good signal to noise ratio for signals of greater than or equal to 10 -14 Coulomb input. The amplifier system, which is completely separated from the detector by 95 Ω coaxial cables, is followed by a new charge integrating, version of the SHAM/BADC system developed at SLAC. This SHAM IV system is CAMAC based, allowing for computer calibration of the entire system from amplifier through ADC

  15. Cathode Readout with Stripped Resistive Drift Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhil'tsov, V.E.

    1994-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with carbon layer of resistivity 0.5, 30 and 70 k Ohm/sq. The gas mixture used was Ar/CH 4 . Both the anode wire and cathode signals were detected in order to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  16. Regulatory issues and assumptions associated with polymers for subsurface barriers surrounding buried waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heiser, J.; Siskind, B.

    1993-01-01

    One of the options for control of contaminant migration from buried waste sites is the construction of a subsurface barrier that consists of a wall of low permeability material. Subsurface barriers will improve remediation performance by removing pathways for contaminant transport due to groundwater movement, meteorological water infiltration, vapor- and gas-phase transport, transpiration, etc. Subsurface barriers may be used to open-quotes directclose quotes contaminant movement to collection sumps/lysimeters in cases of unexpected remediation failures or transport mechanisms, to contain leakage from underground storage tanks, and to restrict in-situ soil cleanup operation and chemicals. Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently investigating advanced polymer materials for subsurface barriers. This report addresses the regulatory aspects of using of non-traditional polymer materials as well as soil-bentonite or cement-bentonite mixtures for such barriers. The regulatory issues fall into two categories. The first category consists of issues associated with the acceptability of subsurface barriers to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as a method for achieving waste site performance improvement. The second category encompasses those regulatory issues concerning health, safety and the environment which must be addressed regarding barrier installation and performance, especially if non-traditional materials are to be used. Since many of EPA's concerns regarding subsurface barriers focus on the chemicals used during installation of these barriers the authors discuss the results of a search of the Federal Register and the Code of Federal Regulations for references in Titles 29 and 40 pertaining to key chemicals likely to be utilized in installing non-traditional barrier materials. The use of polymeric materials in the construction industry has been accomplished with full compliance with the applicable health, safety, and environmental regulations

  17. Mapping Sargassum beds off, ChonBuri Province, Thailand, using ALOS AVNI2 image

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noiraksar, Thidarat; Komatsu, Teruhisa; Sawayama, Shuhei; Phauk, Sophany; Hayashizaki, Ken-ichi

    2012-10-01

    Sargassum species grow on rocks and dead corals and form dense seaweed beds. Sargassum beds play ecological roles such as CO2 uptake and O2 production through photosynthesis, spawning and nursery grounds of fish, feeding ground for sea urchins and abalones, and substrates for attached animals and plants on leaves and holdfasts. However, increasing human impacts and climate change decrease or degrade Sargassum beds in ASEAN countries. It is necessary to grasp present spatial distributions of this habitat. Thailand, especially its coastal zone along the Gulf of Thailand, is facing degradation of Sargassum beds due to increase in industries and population. JAXA launched non-commercial satellite, ALOS, providing multiband images with ultra-high spatial resolution optical sensors (10 m), AVNIR2. Unfortunately, ALOS has terminated its mission in April 2011. However, JAXA has archived ALOS AVNIR2 images over the world. They are still useful for mapping coastal ecosystems. We examined capability of remote sensing with ALOS AVNIR2 to map Sargassum beds in waters off Sattahip protected area as a natural park in Chon Buri Province, Thailand, threatened by degradation of water quality due to above-mentioned impacts. Ground truth data were obtained in February 2012 by using continual pictures taken by manta tow. Supervised classification could detect Sargassum beds off Sattahip at about 70% user accuracy. It is estimated that error is caused by mixel effect of bottom substrates in a pixel with 10 x 10 m. Our results indicate that ALOS AVNIR2 images are useful for mapping Sargassum beds in Southeast Asia.

  18. Displaced humeral lateral condyle fractures in children: should we bury the pins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das De, Soumen; Bae, Donald S; Waters, Peter M

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine if leaving Kirschner wires exposed is more cost-effective than burying them subcutaneously after open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) of humeral lateral condyle fractures. A retrospective cohort study of all lateral condyle fractures treated over a 10-year period at a single institution was performed. Data on surgical technique, fracture healing, and complications were analyzed, as well as treatment costs. A decision analysis model was then constructed to compare the strategies of leaving the pins exposed versus buried. Finally, sensitivity analyses were performed, assessing cost-effectiveness when infection rates and costs of treating deep infections were varied. A total of 235 children with displaced fractures were treated with ORIF using Kirschner wires. Pins were left exposed in 41 cases (17.4%) and buried in 194 cases (82.6%); the age, sex, injury mechanisms, and fracture patterns were similar in both the groups. The median time to removal of implants was shorter with exposed versus buried pins (4 vs. 6 wk, Pfracture union or loss of reduction rates. The rate of superficial infection was higher with exposed pins (9.8% vs. 3.1%), but this was not statistically significant (P=0.076). There were no deep infections with exposed pins, whereas the rate of deep infection was 0.5% with buried pins (P=1.00). Buried pins were associated with additional complications, including symptomatic implants (7.2%); pins protruding through the skin (16%); internal pin migration necessitating additional surgery (1%); and skin necrosis (1%). The decision analysis revealed that leaving pins exposed resulted in an average cost savings of $3442 per patient. This strategy remained cost-effective even when infection rates with exposed pins approached 40%. Leaving the pins exposed after ORIF of lateral condyle fractures is safe and more cost-effective than burying the pins subcutaneously. Retrospective cohort study (level III).

  19. Modelling the buried human body environment in upland climes using three contrasting field sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Andrew S; Janaway, Robert C; Holland, Andrew D; Dodson, Hilary I; Baran, Eve; Pollard, A Mark; Tobin, Desmond J

    2007-06-14

    Despite an increasing literature on the decomposition of human remains, whether buried or exposed, it is important to recognise the role of specific microenvironments which can either trigger or delay the rate of decomposition. Recent casework in Northern England involving buried and partially buried human remains has demonstrated a need for a more detailed understanding of the effect of contrasting site conditions on cadaver decomposition and on the microenvironment created within the grave itself. Pigs (Sus scrofa) were used as body analogues in three inter-related taphonomy experiments to examine differential decomposition of buried human remains. They were buried at three contrasting field sites (pasture, moorland, and deciduous woodland) within a 15 km radius of the University of Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK. Changes to the buried body and the effect of these changes on hair and associated death-scene textile materials were monitored as was the microenvironment of the grave. At recovery, 6, 12 and 24 months post-burial, the extent of soft tissue decomposition was recorded and samples of fat and soil were collected for gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) analysis. The results of these studies demonstrated that (1) soil conditions at these three burial sites has a marked effect on the condition of the buried body but even within a single site variation can occur; (2) the process of soft tissue decomposition modifies the localised burial microenvironment in terms of microbiological load, pH, moisture and changes in redox status. These observations have widespread application for the investigation of clandestine burial and time since deposition, and in understanding changes within the burial microenvironment that may impact on biomaterials such as hair and other associated death scene materials.

  20. Tailored Core Shell Cathode Powders for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, Scott [NexTech Materials, Ltd.,Lewis Center, OH (United States)

    2015-03-23

    In this Phase I SBIR project, a “core-shell” composite cathode approach was evaluated for improving SOFC performance and reducing degradation of lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode materials, following previous successful demonstrations of infiltration approaches for achieving the same goals. The intent was to establish core-shell cathode powders that enabled high performance to be obtained with “drop-in” process capability for SOFC manufacturing (i.e., rather than adding an infiltration step to the SOFC manufacturing process). Milling, precipitation and hetero-coagulation methods were evaluated for making core-shell composite cathode powders comprised of coarse LSCF “core” particles and nanoscale “shell” particles of lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) or praseodymium strontium manganite (PSM). Precipitation and hetero-coagulation methods were successful for obtaining the targeted core-shell morphology, although perfect coverage of the LSCF core particles by the LSM and PSM particles was not obtained. Electrochemical characterization of core-shell cathode powders and conventional (baseline) cathode powders was performed via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) half-cell measurements and single-cell SOFC testing. Reliable EIS testing methods were established, which enabled comparative area-specific resistance measurements to be obtained. A single-cell SOFC testing approach also was established that enabled cathode resistance to be separated from overall cell resistance, and for cathode degradation to be separated from overall cell degradation. The results of these EIS and SOFC tests conclusively determined that the core-shell cathode powders resulted in significant lowering of performance, compared to the baseline cathodes. Based on the results of this project, it was concluded that the core-shell cathode approach did not warrant further investigation.