WorldWideScience

Sample records for buprenorphine

  1. Buprenorphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated: 05/31/2016 Medications to Treat OPIOID ADDICTION Methadone Naltrexone Buprenorphine Related SAMHSA Resources Behavioral Health ... Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing ...

  2. Buprenorphine for managing opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M; Mbewe, Dalitso

    2017-02-21

    Managed withdrawal is a necessary step prior to drug-free treatment or as the endpoint of substitution treatment. To assess the effects of buprenorphine versus tapered doses of methadone, alpha 2 -adrenergic agonists, symptomatic medications or placebo, or different buprenorphine regimens for managing opioid withdrawal, in terms of the intensity of the withdrawal syndrome experienced, duration and completion of treatment, and adverse effects. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 11, 2016), MEDLINE (1946 to December week 1, 2016), Embase (to 22 December 2016), PsycINFO (1806 to December week 3, 2016), and the Web of Science (to 22 December 2016) and handsearched the reference lists of articles. Randomised controlled trials of interventions using buprenorphine to modify the signs and symptoms of withdrawal in participants who were primarily opioid dependent. Comparison interventions involved reducing doses of methadone, alpha 2 -adrenergic agonists (clonidine or lofexidine), symptomatic medications or placebo, and different buprenorphine-based regimens. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. We included 27 studies involving 3048 participants. The main comparators were clonidine or lofexidine (14 studies). Six studies compared buprenorphine versus methadone, and seven compared different rates of buprenorphine dose reduction. We assessed 12 studies as being at high risk of bias in at least one of seven domains of methodological quality. Six of these studies compared buprenorphine with clonidine or lofexidine and two with methadone; the other four studies compared different rates of buprenorphine dose reduction.For the comparison of buprenorphine and methadone in tapered doses, meta-analysis was not possible for the outcomes of intensity of withdrawal or adverse effects. However, information reported by the individual studies was suggestive of buprenorphine and methadone having similar capacity to

  3. Correlations of Maternal Buprenorphine Dose, Buprenorphine, and Metabolite Concentrations in Meconium with Neonatal Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacinko, SL; Jones, HE; Johnson, RE; Choo, RE; Huestis, MA

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, relationships among maternal buprenorphine dose, meconium buprenorphine and metabolite concentrations, and neonatal outcomes are reported. Free and total buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine, nicotine, opiates, cocaine, benzodiazepines, and metabolites were quantified in meconium from 10 infants born to women who had received buprenorphine during pregnancy. Neither cumulative nor total third-trimester maternal buprenorphine dose predicted meconium concentrations or neonatal outcomes. Total buprenorphine meconium concentrations and buprenorphine/norbuprenorphine ratios were significantly related to neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS ) scores >4. As free buprenorphine concentration and percentage free buprenorphine increased, head circumference decreased. Thrice-weekly urine tests for opiates, cocaine, and benzodiazepines and self-reported smoking data from the mother were compared with data from analysis of the meconium to estimate in utero exposure. Time of last drug use and frequency of use during the third trimester were important factors associated with drug-positive meconium specimens. The results suggest that buprenorphine and metabolite concentrations in the meconium may predict the onset and frequency of NAS. PMID:18701886

  4. Benefits of using intrathecal buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabiee, Seyed Mozaffar; Alijanpour, Ebrahim; Jabbari, Ali; Rostami, Sara

    2014-01-01

    General anesthesia draws attention to the most commonly used modalities for post cesarean delivery pain relief in systemic administration of opioids, while the administration of small dose of intrathecal opioid during spinal anesthesia can be a possible alternative. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of buprenorphine on cesarean section prescribed intrathecally. This double blind randomized clinical trial study was conducted in patients for cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. The patients were randomly divided into case and control groups. Case group (208 patients) received 65-70 mg of 5% lidocaine plus 0.2 ml of buprenorphine while the same amount of 5% lidocaine diluted with 0.2 ml of normal saline was given to 234 cases in the control group. Hemodynamic changes and neonatal APGAR scores (Appearance, Pulse, Grimace, Activity, Respiration) were recorded. Pain score was recorded according to the visual analog scale. This study was registered in the Iranian Registry of clinical Trials; IRCT2013022112552N1. The mean age of case and control groups was 24.4±5.38 and 26.84±5.42 years, respectively. Systolic blood pressure was not significantly different until the 45th minute but diastolic blood pressure showed a significant difference at the 15th and the 60th minutes (P<0.001). Heart rate changes were significantly different between cases and controls at the initial 5th, 15th and after 60th minutes (P<0.001). Pain-free period was significantly different between two groups (1.25 h versus 18.73 h) (P<0.001). The results show that prescription of intratechal buprenorphine prolongs the duration of analgesia without any significant considerable side effects.

  5. Maternal Buprenorphine Dose, Placenta Buprenorphine and Metabolite Concentrations and Neonatal Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concheiro, Marta; Jones, Hendreé E.; Johnson, Rolley E.; Choo, Robin; Shakleya, Diaa M.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2010-01-01

    Buprenorphine is approved as pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence in non-pregnant patients in multiple countries, and is currently under investigation for pregnant women in the US and Europe. This research evaluates the disposition of buprenorphine, opiates, cocaine, and metabolites in 5 term placentas from a US cohort. Placenta and matched meconium concentrations were compared, and relationships between maternal buprenorphine dose, placenta concentrations, and neonatal outcomes following controlled administration during gestation were investigated. Buprenorphine and/or metabolites were detected in all placenta specimens and were uniformly distributed across this tissue (CV<27.5%, 4 locations), except for buprenorphine in 3 placentas. In 2 of these, buprenorphine was not detected in some locations and, in the 3rd placenta, was totally absent. Median (range) concentrations were buprenorphine 1.6ng/g (not detected to 3.2), norbuprenorphine 14.9ng/g (6.2 to 24.2), buprenorphine-glucuronide 3ng/g (1.3 to 5.0) and norbuprenorphine-glucuronide 14.7ng/g (11.4 to 25.8). Placenta is a potential alternative matrix for detecting in utero buprenorphine exposure, but at lower concentrations (15–70 fold) than in meconium. Statistically significant correlations were observed for mean maternal daily dose from enrollment to delivery and placenta buprenorphine-glucuronide concentration, and for norbuprenorphine-glucuronide concentrations and time to neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) onset and duration, and for norbuprenorphine/norbuprenorphine-glucuronide ratio and maximum NAS score, and newborn length. Analysis of buprenorphine and metabolites in this alternative matrix, an abundant waste product available at the time of delivery, may be valuable for prediction of neonatal outcomes for clinicians treating newborns of buprenorphine-exposed women. PMID:20216119

  6. Buprenorphine and addiction: challenges for the pharmacist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatwright, Deborah E

    2002-01-01

    To present an analysis of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA) and its impact on the practice of pharmacy. Statutes, codes, regulations, newspaper articles, journal articles; search of articles posted on MEDLINE identified using the search terms methadone, buprenorphine, treatment, opioid abuse, and opioid addiction. Not applicable. Not applicable. DATA and Food and Drug Administration approval of sublingual tablets of buprenorphine and buprenorphine with naloxone (Reckitt and Benckiser) will dramatically expand opioid addicts' access to treatment and increase the number of opioid addicts receiving prescriptions for buprenorphine and buprenorphine with naloxone. The availability of buprenorphine will pose unique challenges to pharmacists and suggests the need for education on addiction and greater awareness of the unique needs of patients recovering from addiction. The stage is being set to expand access to treatment and reach more untreated opioid addicts in the United States. Professional organizations such as the American Pharmaceutical Association should work with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and its Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to develop training materials, curricula, and guidelines for pharmacists on substance abuse with a special focus on outpatient opioid treatment. Such materials could be used in continuing education programs and materials and in pharmacy schools.

  7. Buprenorphine Implants for Treatment of Opioid Dependence: Randomized Comparison to Placebo and Sublingual Buprenorphine/Naloxone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Richard N.; Ling, Walter; Casadonte, Paul; Vocci, Frank; Bailey, Genie L.; Kampman, Kyle; Patkar, Ashwin; Chavoustie, Steven; Blasey, Christine; Sigmon, Stacey; Beebe, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To evaluate safety and efficacy of buprenorphine implants (BI) versus placebo implants (PI) for the treatment of opioid dependence. A secondary aim compared BI to open-label sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablets (BNX). Design Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Subjects received either 4 buprenorphine implants (80 mg/implant) (n=114), 4 placebo implants (n=54), or open-label BNX (12–16 mg/d) (n=119). Setting 20 addiction treatment centers. Participants Adult outpatients (ages 18 to 65) with DSM-IV-TR opioid dependence. Measurements The primary efficacy endpoint was the percent of urine samples negative for opioids collected from weeks 1 to 24, examined as a cumulative distribution function (CDF). Findings The BI CDF was significantly different from placebo (P<.0001). Mean (95% CI) proportions of urines negative for opioids were: BI: 31.2% (25.3, 37.1) and PI: 13.4% (8.3, 18.6). BI subjects had a higher study completion rate relative to placebo (64% vs. 26%, P<.0001), lower clinician-rated (P<.0001) and patient-rated (P<.0001) withdrawal, lower patient-ratings of craving (P<.0001), and better subjects’ (P=.031) and clinicians’ (P=.022) global ratings of improvement. BI also resulted in significantly lower cocaine use (P=.0016). Minor implant-site reactions were comparable in the buprenorphine (27.2% [31/114]) and placebo groups (25.9% [14/54]). BI were non-inferior to BNX on percent urines negative for opioids [mean (95% CI): 33.5 (27.3, 39.6); CI for the difference of proportions, (−10.7, 6.2)]. Conclusions Compared with placebo, buprenorphine implants result in significantly less frequent opioid use, and are non-inferior to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone tablets. PMID:23919595

  8. Safety and tolerability of the switch from buprenorphine to buprenorphine/naloxone in an Italian addiction treatment centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimolo, Clementina; Favero, Valentina Del; Zecchinato, Giancarlo; Buson, Roberto; Cusin, Davide; Pellachin, Patrizia; Simonetto, Pamela

    2010-01-01

    Abuse and misuse of pharmacological therapies represent major challenges in the healthcare system, particularly in patients receiving long-acting opioid drugs for the treatment of heroin or opioid addiction. The partial mu-opioid receptor agonist buprenorphine is used to treat opioid dependence, but diversion and misuse may occur. The sublingual combination formulation of buprenorphine and the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (buprenorphine/naxolone) is associated with a reduced abuse potential, and has been shown to have promising efficacy for the treatment of opioid dependence. This observational study assessed the safety and efficacy of sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone combination therapy in patients with opioid dependence after therapeutic switch from buprenorphine monotherapy. A total of 94 patients being treated with buprenorphine monotherapy (average dose 8 mg/day; mean duration of therapy 840 days) were switched to buprenorphine/naloxone combination therapy. Patients were asked to rate their level of satisfaction with buprenorphine/naloxone combination treatment with respect to the management of withdrawal symptoms, and urinary toxicology tests were carried out before and 14 days after switching to combination therapy. Within 3 months, 75/94 patients (80%) previously treated with buprenorphine monotherapy had switched to sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone combination treatment (average dose buprenorphine 8 mg). Among patients receiving combination treatment for >3 months, 83% were receiving medication either weekly or fortnightly, based on the results of toxicological testing. A reduction in positive urinary toxicology tests was observed in patients within two weeks after being switched to combination treatment (before switch: 28, 9 and 2 positive tests for heroin, cocaine and heroin + cocaine, respectively vs 11, 3 and 1 after switch) and a total of 64 patients of the 75 who switched to combination therapy (85%) were satisfied with the management of

  9. High-dose buprenorphine: perioperative precautions and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D M; Meyer-Witting, M

    2005-02-01

    Buprenorphine has been in clinical use in anaesthesia for several decades. Recently, the high-dose sublingual formulation (Subutex, Reckitt Benckiser, Slough, U.K.) has been increasingly used as maintenance therapy in opioid dependence, as an alternative to methadone and other pharmacological therapies. Buprenorphine has unique pharmacological properties making it well suited for use as a maintenance therapy in opioid dependence. However, these same properties may cause difficulty in the perioperative management of pain. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist, attenuating the effects of supplemental illicit or therapeutic opioid agonists. As a result of its high receptor affinity, supplemental opioids do not readily displace buprenorphine from the opioid receptor in standard doses. High-dose buprenorphine has an extended duration of action that prolongs both of these effects. The perioperative management of patients stabilized on high-dose buprenorphine and undergoing surgery requires consideration of the likely analgesic requirements. Where possible the buprenorphine should be continued. Pain management should focus on maximizing non-opioid analgesia, local anaesthesia and non-pharmacological techniques. Where pain may not be adequately relieved by these methods, the addition of a full opioid agonist such as fentanyl or morphine at appropriate doses should be considered, accompanied by close monitoring in a high dependency unit. In situations where this regimen is unlikely to be effective, preoperative conversion to morphine or methadone may be an option. Where available, liaison with a hospital-based alcohol and drug service should always be considered.

  10. HIV-gp120 and physical dependence to buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, J; Abood, M E; Benamar, K

    2015-05-01

    Opioids are among the most effective and commonly used analgesics in clinical practice for severe pain. However, the use of opioid medications is clinically limited by several adverse properties including dependence. While opioid dependence is a complex health condition, the treatment of HIV-infected individuals with opioid dependence presents additional challenges. The goal of this study was to examine the physical dependence to buprenorphine in the context of HIV. Young adult male rats (Sprague-Dawley) were pretreated with HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120) injected into the periaqueductal gray area (PAG) and we examined the impact on physical dependence to opioid. It was found that the physical dependence to methadone occurred earlier than that to buprenorphine, and that gp120 did not enhance or precipitate the buprenorphine withdrawal. The results suggest that buprenorphine could be the better therapeutic option to manage opioid dependence in HIV. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  11. Predictive factors for relapse in patients on buprenorphine maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Michael; Finlayson, Alistair J Reid; Wang, Li; Martin, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Despite the dramatic increase in the use of buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid dependence, clinical outcomes of this treatment approach continue to need evaluation. This study examines factors associated with relapse and retention during buprenorphine treatment in a sample of opioid dependent outpatients. In a retrospective chart review of 62 patients with opioid dependence, relapse was determined by self-report, urine toxicology screens, and by checking the state controlled substance monitoring database. Data was analyzed using two-way tests of association and logistic regression. Patients with comorbid anxiety disorders, active benzodiazepine use (contrary to clinic policy), or active alcohol abuse, were significantly more likely to relapse. Patients who relapsed were also more likely to be on a higher buprenorphine maintenance dose. This study identifies relapse risk factors during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence. Future research is needed to determine whether modifying these factors may lead to improved treatment outcomes. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  12. Urinary Excretion of Buprenorphine, Norbuprenorphine, Buprenorphine-Glucuronide, and Norbuprenorphine-Glucuronide in Pregnant Women Receiving Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacinko, Sherri L.; Jones, Hendree E.; Johnson, Rolley E.; Choo, Robin E.; Concheiro-Guisan, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Buprenorphine (BUP) is under investigation as a medication therapy for opioid-dependent pregnant women. We investigated BUP and metabolite disposition in urine from women maintained on BUP during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy and postpartum. METHODS We measured BUP, norbuprenorphine (NBUP), buprenorphine glucuronide (BUP-Gluc), and NBUP-Gluc concentrations in 515 urine specimens collected thrice weekly from 9 women during pregnancy and postpartum. Specimens were analyzed using a fully validated liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method with limits of quantification of 5 µg/L for BUP and BUP-Gluc and 25 µg/L for NBUP and its conjugated metabolite. We examined ratios of metabolites across trimesters and postpartum to identify possible changes in metabolism during pregnancy. RESULTS NBUP-Gluc was the primary metabolite identified in urine and exceeded BUP-Gluc concentrations in 99% of specimens. Whereas BUP-Gluc was identified in more specimens than NBUP, NBUP exceeded BUP-Gluc concentrations in 77.9% of specimens that contained both analytes. Among all participants, the mean BUP-Gluc:NBUP-Gluc ratio was significantly higher in the second trimester compared to the third trimester, and there were significant intrasubject differences between trimesters in 71% of participants. In 3 women, the percent daily dose excreted was higher during pregnancy than postpregnancy, consistent with other data indicating increased renal elimination of drugs during pregnancy. CONCLUSIONS These data are the first to evaluate urinary disposition of BUP and metabolites in a cohort of pregnant women. Variable BUP excretion during pregnancy may indicate metabolic changes requiring dose adjustment during later stages of gestation. PMID:19325013

  13. Buprenorphine-naloxone therapy in pain management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kelly Yan; Chen, Lucy; Mao, Jianren

    2014-05-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (bup/nal in 4:1 ratio; Suboxone; Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals Incorporation, Richmond, VA) is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for outpatient office-based addiction treatment. In the past few years, bup/nal has been increasingly prescribed off-label for chronic pain management. The current data suggest that bup/nal may provide pain relief in patients with chronic pain with opioid dependence or addiction. However, the unique pharmacological profile of bup/nal confers it to be a weak analgesic that is unlikely to provide adequate pain relief for patients without opioid dependence or addiction. Possible mechanisms of pain relief by bup/nal therapy in opioid-dependent patients with chronic pain may include reversal of opioid-induced hyperalgesia and improvement in opioid tolerance and addiction. Additional studies are needed to assess the implication of bup/nal therapy in clinical anesthesia and perioperative pain management.

  14. [Addictive behavior after starting buprenorphine maintenance treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanello, Serge; Daoud, Sidi; Panici, Jean Yves; Parot, Elsa; Hitoto, Hicombo; Garnier, François

    2006-02-01

    This study of a cohort of drug addicts receiving buprenorphine maintenance treatment in a district in western France focused on changes in their drug use and their social and work lives. It also looked at the health consequences of their drug use before and after maintenance treatment (mean: four years). From the files of an agency providing services to drug addicts, we randomly selected 180 of the 236 patients receiving buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT). Usable questionnaires were returned by 118 subjects (66% response rate). This self-administered questionnaire included 32 items. The respondents accounted for half the population receiving drug maintenance treatment and were representative of the population for age and sex. The mean age was 30 +/- 5 years, mean BMT dose 6,5 mg/day, and mean duration of drug maintenance treatment 47 +/- 27 months. Other drug use diminished during the four years of maintenance treatment: three of every four heroin users had stopped, opiate users dropped from 31% to 5% of the population, and cocaine use followed a similar trend. Benzodiazepine use also fell, but remained relatively frequent (27%, compared with 68% four years earlier). Drinking patterns changed from strongly alcoholic beverages to lower-proof drinks. Arrest rates dropped from 70% to 25%. The percentage of persons seropositive for HIV (4%) and HCV (33%) remained low, but too many subjects had not been screened (35%). Roughly 10% of these subjects had returned to work, mainly those who had cut their drug use most. While our survey reveals some positive points, especially a reduction in illegal drug use, several negative observations appeared, including combined use of cannabis and benzodiazepines, inadequate screening, and misuse of BMD. These results underline how important it is for care providers to focus simultaneously on medical treatment and identification of co-morbidities and to provide social work when necessary. The employment rate remains too low.

  15. The effect of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine on rats subjected to surgically induced global cerebral ischaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto Henrik; Abelson, Klas; Koch, Janne

    2010-01-01

    in buprenorphine-treated and untreated animals. A part from a slightly higher hyperthermia immediately after surgery and typical opiate-associated behaviour, the buprenorphine treatment had no apparent adverse effects on the experimental model. In contrast, the analgesic treatment improved the model by minimizing......The effect of perioperatively administered buprenorphine analgesia on rats subjected to surgically induced global ischaemia was assessed. Rats supplied with buprenorphine, mixed in nut paste for voluntary ingestion, displayed significant reductions in postoperative excretions of faecal...

  16. Population pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine following a two-stage intravenous infusion in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Lykke; Foster, David J.R.; Upton, Richard N.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine following administration of an intravenous (i.v.) infusion. To date, the population kinetics of buprenorphine has been described for bolus administration only.......The aim of this investigation was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine following administration of an intravenous (i.v.) infusion. To date, the population kinetics of buprenorphine has been described for bolus administration only....

  17. Impact of opioid therapy on gonadal hormones: focus on buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Anjali; Sapra, Mamta; Iranmanesh, Ali

    2018-02-17

    Objective The USA is in the midst of an opioid crisis. Understanding the impact of opioids and commonly used treatments for opioid dependence is essential for clinicians and researchers in order to educate and treat the nation's growing population with opioid use disorders. As a relatively new treatment for opioid dependence, buprenorphine is gaining popularity to the extent of becoming not only a preferred approach to the maintenance of opiate addiction, but also an option for chronic pain management. The purpose of this report is to review the available evidence on the endocrine effects of buprenorphine, particularly as it relates to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, which is controversial and not fully defined. Method We conducted a Pubmed search (2000-2017) for human studies in the English language for articles that were available as full length regarding buprenorphine, endocrinopathy, hypogonadism, bone density, opioids. Case reports were also reviewed, although prospective studies and randomized controlled trials received more weight. Results Opioid induced hypogonadism is well established. Most studies report that buprenorphine being a partial agonist/antagonist may not be impacting the pituitary trophic hormones as much. There are reports of sexual dysfunction in subjects maintained on buprenorphine, some without hormonal correlation. Thus with the understanding that pertinent clinical studies are limited in number, varied in methodology, mostly cross sectional, predominantly in men and small number of participants, more research in this area is warranted. Conclusion Based on a comprehensive review of the available literature, we conclude that despite its increasing popularity, buprenorphine has not been adequately studied in respect to its long-term effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. There is a great need for longitudinal systematic trials to define the potential buprenorphine-induced endocrine consequences.

  18. Embolic stroke associated with injection of buprenorphine tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C C Tchoyoson; Lee, Sze Haur; Wong, Yee-Choon; Hui, Francis

    2009-09-15

    Drug users who crush, dissolve, and inject buprenorphine tablets parenterally may be at risk of severe thromboembolic complications or death. We describe patients with neurologic complications after injecting buprenorphine tablets. Brain MRI including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in patients admitted to the neurologic department after injecting buprenorphine tablets were reviewed. Seven men had neurologic complications after buprenorphine tablet injection. In 5 patients, multiple small scattered hyperintense lesions were detected on DWI in the cortex, white matter, and basal ganglia of the cerebral hemisphere; one patient had a single small lesion. The side of MRI abnormality corresponded to the side of needle marks on the neck except in one patient who had bilateral injections. One patient, who denied injecting into the neck, had DWI abnormalities in the middle cerebral artery territory on one side and occlusion of the ipsilateral internal carotid artery. Buprenorphine tablets can be intentionally or inadvertently injected into the carotid artery, causing a characteristic appearance on diffusion-weighted imaging, consistent with embolic cerebral infarction.

  19. Buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid addiction: opportunities, challenges and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Shorter, Daryl; Kosten, Thomas R

    2014-10-01

    Buprenorphine follows the success of methadone as another milestone in the history of treatment for opioid addiction. Buprenorphine can be used in an office-based setting where it is clearly effective, highly accepted by patients and has a favorable safety profile and less abuse potential. However, the adoption of buprenorphine treatment has been slow in the USA. This article first reviews the history of medication-assisted opioid addiction treatment and the current epidemic opioid addiction, followed by a review of the efficacy, pharmacology and clinical prescription of buprenorphine in office-based care. We then explore the possible barriers in using buprenorphine and the ways to overcome these barriers, including new formulations, educational programs and policy regulations that strike a balance between accessibility and reducing diversion. Buprenorphine can align addiction treatment with treatments for other chronic medical illnesses. However, preventing diversion will require graduate and continuing medical education and integrated care models for delivery of buprenorphine to those in need.

  20. Assessment of buprenorphine, carprofen, and their combination for postoperative analgesia in olive baboons (Papio anubis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sarah O; Halliday, Lisa C; French, Jeffrey A; Novikov, Dmitri D; Fortman, Jeffrey D

    2007-05-01

    This study compared the efficacy of buprenorphine, carprofen, and a combination of the 2 analgesics in female baboons. Physiologic and behavioral parameters were assessed at baseline and postoperatively for 6 d by use of continuous noninvasive physiologic monitoring and twice-daily videotaping. Prior to surgery, all animals received a pre-emptive dose of either 0.01 mg/kg buprenorphine intramuscularly, 2.2 mg/kg carprofen intramuscularly, or a combination of 0.01 mg/kg buprenorphine and 2.2 mg/kg carprofen intramuscularly. All animals in the carprofen (n = 4) and buprenorphine+carprofen (n = 4) treatment groups appeared to have sufficient analgesia. Three of 4 animals in the buprenorphine group had adequate analgesia. The fourth animal had an elevated heart rate and spent less time standing during the postoperative period. In this study, the use of carprofen or a combination of carprofen plus buprenorphine provided more reliable postoperative analgesia than buprenorphine alone.

  1. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of infants exposed prenatally to buprenorphine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahila, H.; Kivitie-Kallio, S.; Halmesmaki, E.; Valanne, L.; Autti, T.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the brains of newborns exposed to buprenorphine prenatally. Material and Methods: Seven neonates followed up antenatally in connection with their mothers' buprenorphine replacement therapy underwent 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain before the age of 2 months. The infants were born to heavy drug abusers. Four mothers were hepatitis C positive, and all were HIV negative. All mothers smoked tobacco and used benzodiazepines. All pregnancies were full term, and no perinatal asphyxia occurred. All but one neonate had abstinence syndrome and needed morphine replacement therapy. Results: Neither structural abnormalities nor abnormalities in signal intensity were recorded. Conclusion: Buprenorphine replacement therapy does not seem to cause any major structural abnormalities of the brain, and it may prevent known hypoxic-ischemic brain changes resulting from uncontrolled drug abuse. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess possible abnormalities in the brain maturation process

  2. Brain magnetic resonance imaging of infants exposed prenatally to buprenorphine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kahila, H.; Kivitie-Kallio, S.; Halmesmaki, E.; Valanne, L.; Autti, T. [Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dept. of Pediatrics, and Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)

    2007-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the brains of newborns exposed to buprenorphine prenatally. Material and Methods: Seven neonates followed up antenatally in connection with their mothers' buprenorphine replacement therapy underwent 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain before the age of 2 months. The infants were born to heavy drug abusers. Four mothers were hepatitis C positive, and all were HIV negative. All mothers smoked tobacco and used benzodiazepines. All pregnancies were full term, and no perinatal asphyxia occurred. All but one neonate had abstinence syndrome and needed morphine replacement therapy. Results: Neither structural abnormalities nor abnormalities in signal intensity were recorded. Conclusion: Buprenorphine replacement therapy does not seem to cause any major structural abnormalities of the brain, and it may prevent known hypoxic-ischemic brain changes resulting from uncontrolled drug abuse. Longitudinal studies are needed to assess possible abnormalities in the brain maturation process.

  3. Transdermal buprenorphine, opioid rotation to sublingual buprenorphine, and the avoidance of precipitated withdrawal: a review of the literature and demonstration in three chronic pain patients treated with butrans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornfeld, Howard; Reetz, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Buprenorphine is an opioid, used in the United States and abroad for both analgesia and addiction, with unique opioid receptor binding properties. There are several pharmacological features of buprenorphine that make it an emerging option for the long-term treatment of chronic pain-its respiratory suppression ceiling effect, its efficacy in neuropathic pain and hyperalgesic states, and its decreased suppression of the immune and endocrine systems compared with other long-acting opioids. Previous studies have shown that high-dose sublingual buprenorphine is an effective treatment of chronic pain patients not responding to other opioids. Guidelines for the introduction of sublingual buprenorphine, termed buprenorphine induction, include an opioid-free "withdrawal" period of 12-48 hours to avoid an anticipated and accelerated opioid withdrawal, a syndrome described in this article as precipitated withdrawal. The requirement of a period of opioid abstinence before buprenorphine use may present a significant barrier to its adoption for chronic pain. We present a case series of a novel method of sublingual buprenorphine introduction without an induction period, using the recently Food and Drug Administration-approved low-dose transdermal buprenorphine (Butrans; Purdue Pharma L.P.) as a bridge medication. In these cases, buprenorphine was started in opioid-dependent chronic noncancer pain patients who had taken short-acting opioid medications within hours of the initiation of the rotation. This method avoids the painful abstinence period and did not result in precipitated withdrawal or other significant adverse effects.

  4. The relationship between diversion-related attitudes and sharing and selling buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Shannon R; Anderson, Bradley J; Bailey, Genie L; Stein, Michael D

    2017-07-01

    Buprenorphine medication-assisted treatment (B-MAT) is an efficacious and popular outpatient treatment for opioid use disorder. However, the likelihood of buprenorphine diversion is a public health concern. We examined the relationship between attitudes toward diversion as predictors of both sharing and selling buprenorphine. Participants (n=476) were patients undergoing short-term inpatient opioid detoxification. Multinomial logistic regression was used to estimate the adjusted association of sharing and selling buprenorphine with demographics, substance use behaviors, and attitudes toward sharing and selling buprenorphine. Among the two hundred persons who had ever been prescribed buprenorphine (73.4% male, 89% heroin users), 50.5% reported they had shared buprenorphine and 28.0% reported they had sold buprenorphine. Controlling for other covariates, the odds of sharing buprenorphine were 3.17 (95% CI 1.21; 8.32) times higher for persons who agreed that it was "right to share buprenorphine with dope sick friends" than for those who did not agree with this attitude. Attitudes toward selling (OR 2.92; 95% CI 1.35; 6.21) and sharing (OR 4.12; 95% CI 1.64; 10.32) buprenorphine were the only significant correlates of selling, with the odds of selling exponentially greater among persons with favorable attitudes toward sharing or selling buprenorphine. Although considered diversion, sharing B-MAT is normative among B-MAT patients. Assessing B-MAT patients' attitudes about diversion may help identify patients requiring enhanced oversight, education, or intervention aimed at modifying attitudes to reduce their likelihood to share or sell buprenorphine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Buprenorphine implants in medical treatment of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavoustie, Steven; Frost, Michael; Snyder, Ole; Owen, Joel; Darwish, Mona; Dammerman, Ryan; Sanjurjo, Victoria

    2017-08-01

    Opioid use disorder is a chronic, relapsing disease that encompasses use of both prescription opioids and heroin and is associated with a high annual rate of overdose deaths. Medical treatment has proven more successful than placebo treatment or psychosocial intervention, and the partial µ-opioid receptor agonist and κ-opioid receptor antagonist buprenorphine is similar in efficacy to methadone while offering lower risk of respiratory depression. However, frequent dosing requirements and potential for misuse and drug diversion contribute to significant complications with treatment adherence for available formulations. Areas covered: This review describes the development of and preliminary data from clinical trials of an implantable buprenorphine formulation. Efficacy and safety data from comparative studies with other administrations of buprenorphine, including tablets and sublingual film, will be described. Key premises of the Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy program for safely administering buprenorphine implants, which all prescribing physicians must complete, are also discussed. Expert commentary: Long-acting implantable drug formulations that offer consistent drug delivery and lower risk of misuse, diversion, or accidental pediatric exposure over traditional formulations represent a promising development for the effective treatment of opioid use disorder.

  6. Opiate withdrawal syndrome in buprenorphine abusers admitted to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sex v time interaction and the mode of consumption of buprenorphine had significant ... and cancer patients. .... The anal- ysis of the main simple effects revealed a significant ef- fect of time on withdrawal scores for both men (F=65.4,.

  7. The Implementation of Buprenorphine/Naloxone in College Health Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMaria, Peter A., Jr.; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2008-01-01

    Opiate abuse and dependence have become important concerns for college healthcare providers. The passage of the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 and the approval of the combination buprenorphine/naloxone for office-based treatment of opiate dependence have increased the options available for college students and their healthcare providers. The…

  8. Dexamethasone hepatic induction in rats subsequently treated with high dose buprenorphine does not lead to respiratory depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hreiche, Raymond; Megarbane, Bruno; Pirnay, Stephane; Borron, Stephen W.; Monier, Claire; Risede, Patricia; Milan, Nathalie; Descatoire, Veronique; Pessayre, Dominique; Baud, Frederic J.

    2006-01-01

    In humans, asphyxic deaths and severe poisonings have been attributed to high-dosage buprenorphine, a maintenance therapy for heroin addiction. However, in rats, intravenous buprenorphine at doses up to 90 mg kg -1 was not associated with significant effects on arterial blood gases. In contrast, norbuprenorphine, the buprenorphine major cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A-derived metabolite, is a potent respiratory depressant. Thus, our aim was to study the consequences of CYP3A induction on buprenorphine-associated effects on resting ventilation in rats. We investigated the effects on ventilation of 30 mg kg -1 buprenorphine alone or following cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A induction with dexamethasone, using whole body plethysmography (N = 24) and arterial blood gases (N = 12). Randomized animals in 4 groups received sequential intraperitoneal dosing with: (dexamethasone [days 1-3] + buprenorphine [day 4]), (dexamethasone solvent [days 1-3] + buprenorphine [day 4]), (dexamethasone [days 1-3] + buprenorphine solvent [day 4]), or (dexamethasone solvent [days 1-3] + buprenorphine solvent [day 4]). Buprenorphine alone caused a significant rapid and sustained increase in the inspiratory time (P -1 buprenorphine on rat ventilation. Our results suggest a limited role of drug-mediated CYP3A induction in the occurrence of buprenorphine-attributed respiratory depression in addicts

  9. Advances in the delivery of buprenorphine for opioid dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenthal RN

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Richard N Rosenthal,1 Viral V Goradia2 1Department of Psychiatry, Addiction Institute at Mount Sinai, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, 2Department of Psychiatry, Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA Abstract: Opioid use disorders (OUDs have long been a global problem, but the prevalence rates have increased over 20 years to epidemic proportions in the US, with concomitant increases in morbidity and all-cause mortality, but especially opioid overdose. These increases are in part attributable to a several-fold expansion in the prescription of opioid pain medications over the same time period. Opioid detoxification and psychosocial treatments alone have each not yielded sufficient efficacy for OUD, but μ-opioid receptor agonist, partial agonist, and antagonist medications have demonstrated the greatest overall benefit in OUD treatment. Buprenorphine, a μ-opioid receptor partial agonist, has been used successfully on an international basis for several decades in sublingual tablet and film preparations for the treatment of OUD, but the nature of formulation, which is typically self-administered, renders it susceptible to nonadherence, diversion, and accidental exposure. This article reviews the clinical trial data for novel buprenorphine delivery systems in the form of subcutaneous depot injections, transdermal patches, and subdermal implants for the treatment of OUD and discusses both the clinical efficacy of longer-acting formulations through increasing consistent medication exposure and their potential utility in reducing diversion. These new delivery systems also offer new dosing opportunities for buprenorphine and strategies for dosing intervals in the treatment of OUD. Keywords: opioid use disorder, buprenorphine, drug diversion, drug implants, depot medications, maintenance therapy, treatment adherence

  10. Successful medical treatment of glans ischemia after voluntary buprenorphine injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecheteau, François; Grison, Pierre; Abraham, Pierre; Lebdai, Souhil; Kemgang, Steve; Souday, Vincent; Nedelcu, Cosmina; Culty, Thibaut; Larré, Stéphane; Azzouzi, Abdel Rahmene; Bigot, Pierre

    2013-11-01

    The diverted use of synthetic opioid buprenorphine by drug addicts can be responsible for serious ischemic and infectious complications, particularly in the case of intravenous injection. We present a case of serious glans ischemia after buprenorphine injection directly into the deep dorsal vein of the penis. Analysis using new medical imaging techniques and treatments is detailed below. A 26-year-old male drug addict presented with glans pain 4 days after self-injection of buprenorphine into the deep dorsal vein of the penis. The patient was apyretic and presented a urethral discharge. His glans was blue without discoloration on digital pressure. Additionally, his biologic and serologic tests were normal while bacteriology showed the presence of Enterobacter cloacae urethritis. After 48 hours of intravenous antibiotic treatment without improvement, a specific medical treatment using enoxaparin and ilomedin was initiated, with the assumption that there was an ischemic complication. Laser speckle contrast imaging allowed confirmation of the presence of distal penis ischemia and provided an accurate mapping of the ischemic zone. A 28-day treatment combining antibiotics, subcutaneous heparin at curative dose, antiplatelet drug, ilomedin, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy resulted in clinical improvement of the lesions with no functional complications. To date, no consensus exists on the proper diagnostic and treatment approach to severe glans ischemia due to buprenorphine injection into the deep dorsal vein of the penis. The results of laser speckle contrast imaging were of real interest during the process of diagnosis. In addition, the combination of ilomedin with hyperbaric oxygen therapy and anticoagulant and antiplatelet drugs appeared to be an effective therapy. © 2013 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  11. Depression-like effect of prenatal buprenorphine exposure in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Jen Hung

    Full Text Available Studies indicate that perinatal opioid exposure produces a variety of short- and long-term neurobehavioral consequences. However, the precise modes of action are incompletely understood. Buprenorphine, a mixed agonist/antagonist at the opioid receptors, is currently being used in clinical trials for managing pregnant opioid addicts. This study provides evidence of depression-like consequence following prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine and sheds light on potential mechanisms of action in a rat model involving administration of intraperitoneal injection to pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats starting from gestation day 7 and lasting for 14 days. Results showed that pups at postnatal day 21 but not the dams had worse parameters of depression-like neurobehaviors using a forced swimming test and tail suspension test, independent of gender. Neurobehavioral changes were accompanied by elevation of oxidative stress, reduction of plasma levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and serotonin, and attenuation of tropomyosin-related kinase receptor type B (TrkB phosphorylation, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK phosphorylation, protein kinase A activity, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB phosphorylation, and CREB DNA-binding activity. Since BDNF/serotonin and CREB signaling could orchestrate a positive feedback loop, our findings suggest that the induction of oxidative stress, reduction of BDNF and serotonin expression, and attenuation of CREB signaling induced by prenatal exposure to supra-therapeutic dose of buprenorphine provide evidence of potential mechanism for the development of depression-like neurobehavior.

  12. Analgesic Effect of Tramadol and Buprenorphin in Continuous Propofol Anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capík I.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to compare in clinical patients the analgesic effect of the centrally acting analgesics tramadol and buprenorphine in continuous intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA with propofol. Twenty dogs undergoing prophylactic dental treatment, aged 2−7 years, weighing 6−27 kg, were included in ASA I. and II. groups. Two groups of dogs received intravenous (IV administration of tramadol hydrochloride (2 mg.kg−1 or buprenorphine hydrochloride (0.2 mg.kg−1 30 minutes prior to sedation, provided by midazolam hydrochloride (0.3 mg.kg−1 and xylazine hydrochloride (0.5 mg.kg-1 IV. General anaesthesia was induced by propofol (2 mg.kg−1 and maintained by a 120 minutes propofol infusion (0.2 mg.kg−1min−1. Oscilometric arterial blood pressure (ABP measured in mm Hg, heart rate (HR, respiratory rate (RR, SAT, body temperature (BT and pain reaction elicited by haemostat forceps pressure at the digit were recorded in ten minute intervals. The tramadol group of dogs showed significantly better parameters of blood pressure (P < 0.001, lower tendency to bradycardia (P < 0.05, and better respiratory rate (P < 0.001 without negative influence to oxygen saturation. Statistically better analgesia was achieved in the tramadol group (P < 0.001. Tramadol, in comparison with buprenorphine provided significantly better results with respect to the degree of analgesia, as well as the tendency of complications arising during anaesthesia.

  13. Dental health of young children prenatally exposed to buprenorphine. A concern of child neglect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivistö, K; Alapulli, H; Tupola, S; Alaluusua, S; Kivitie-Kallio, S

    2014-06-01

    To study the oral health and dental neglect of prenatally buprenorphine-exposed 3-year-old children. The study consisted of 51 children who as newborns tested positive for buprenorphine in a urine screen. The control group comprised 68 children previously unexposed to narcotics. The dentist examined the children and interviewed their guardians. Buprenorphine-exposed children exhibited significantly more early childhood caries than did the control group. Caries indices, the number of decayed, missing and filled teeth or tooth surfaces and decayed teeth were greater in the buprenorphine-exposed children than the control children (p = 0.004, p = 0.004, p = 0.001, respectively). In the buprenorphine group, more children showed visible plaque (p = 0.003) and fewer children were caries-free (p = 0.009) than in the control group. The control children's teeth were also brushed more often than the buprenorphine-exposed children's teeth (p = 0.001) and the parents were more involved in their children's tooth brushing than were those in the buprenorphine-exposed group (p = 0.035). More caries and dental neglect were found in buprenorphine-exposed children than in controls. These findings highlight the importance of routine dental appointments, caries screening and preventive care for children in substance-abusing families.

  14. False-positive buprenorphine EIA urine toxicology results due to high dose morphine: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenore, Peter L

    2012-01-01

    In monitoring a patient with chronic pain who was taking high-dose morphine and oxycodone with weekly urine enzymatic immunoassay (EIA) toxicology testing, the authors noted consistent positives for buprenorphine. The patient was not taking buprenorphine, and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GCMS) testing on multiple samples revealed no buprenorphine, indicating a case of false-positive buprenorphine EIAs in a high-dose opiate case. The authors discontinued oxycodone for a period of time and then discontinued morphine. Urine monitoring with EIAs and GCMS revealed false-positive buprenorphine EIAs, which remained only when the patient was taking morphine. When taking only oxycodone and no morphine, urine samples became buprenorphine negative. When morphine was reintroduced, false-positive buprenorphine results resumed. Medical practitioners should be aware that high-dose morphine (with morphine urine levels turning positive within the 15,000 to 28,000 mg/mL range) may produce false-positive buprenorphine EIAs with standard urine EIA toxicology testing.

  15. Methadone, Buprenorphine, and Naltrexone for the Treatment of Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tran H; Griffin, Brooke L; Stone, Rebecca H; Vest, Kathleen M; Todd, Timothy J

    2017-07-01

    Pregnant women with opioid use disorder can be treated with methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone to reduce opioid use and improve retention to treatment. In this review, we compare the pregnancy outcomes of methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone in clinical trials and discuss the potential behavioral and developmental effects of these agents seen in offspring in animal studies. Important clinical considerations in the management of opioid use disorder in pregnant women and their infants are also discussed. Outside of pregnancy, buprenorphine is used in combination with naloxone to reduce opioid abuse and diversion. During pregnancy, however, the use of buprenorphine as a single agent is preferred to prevent prenatal naloxone exposure. Both methadone and buprenorphine are widely used to treat opioid use disorder; however, compared with methadone, buprenorphine is associated with shorter treatment duration, less medication needed to treat neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) symptoms, and shorter hospitalizations for neonates. Despite being the standard of care, medication-assisted treatment with methadone or buprenorphine is still underused, making it apparent that more options are necessary. Naltrexone is not a first-line treatment primarily because both detoxification and an opioid-free period are required. More research is needed to determine naltrexone safety and benefits in pregnant women. Animal studies suggest that changes in pain sensitivity, developmental processes, and behavioral responses may occur in children born to mothers receiving methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone and is an area that warrants future studies. © 2017 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  16. The New Kid on the Block--Incorporating Buprenorphine into a Medical Toxicology Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegand, Timothy J

    2016-03-01

    Buprenorphine represents a safe and effective therapy for treating opioid dependence, alleviating craving and withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent patients. Buprenorphine has a "blocking" effect against the action of other opioids at the mu-receptor, preventing not only opioid-induced euphoria, but CNS and respiratory depressant effects as well. Buprenorphine was approved for the treatment of opioid dependence in 2002 after the passage of Drug Abuse Treatment Act 2000 (DATA 2000) which allowed clinicians to treat opioid-dependent patients with specifically named opioid agonist therapies in an office setting. Buprenorphine programs reduce the prevalence of HIV and hepatitis C and reduce criminal behaviors associated with illicit drug use. Patients stabilized on buprenorphine have increased employment, enhanced engagement with social services, and better overall health and well-being.

  17. Serum concentrations of buprenorphine after oral and parenteral administration in male mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Hau, Jann

    2011-01-01

    Buprenorphine is the most commonly used drug for peri-operative pain relief in laboratory rodents. The systemic concentrations of buprenorphine were measured in mice following administration intravenously (IV), subcutaneously (SC), orally by gavage and by voluntary ingestion, to determine the post-administration...... serum concentration of buprenorphine. Voluntarily ingested buprenorphine resulted in long-lasting high serum concentrations, as did oral gavage administration (24h serum concentration: 110ngh/mL for both routes of administration). In contrast, buprenorphine administered parenterally remained...... in the circulation for a substantially shorter time (24h serum concentration for IV and SC were 40ngh/mL and 30ngh/mL, respectively). This marked difference was probably due to the higher dose used for oral administration, which is regarded necessary for sufficient analgesic effect, and to the slower absorption...

  18. Assessment of the sedative effects of buprenorphine administered with 20 microg/kg detomidine in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, E J; Taylor, P M; Murrell, J; Whay, H R; Waterman-Pearson, A E

    2011-04-16

    The aim of this randomised, observer-blinded, crossover study was to compare the effects of four treatments, administered intravenously to six horses: saline and saline; 10 µg/kg detomidine and 7.5 µg/kg buprenorphine; 20 µg/kg detomidine and 7.5 µg/kg buprenorphine; and 20 µg/kg detomidine and 10 µg/kg buprenorphine. Sedation was subjectively assessed and recorded on a visual analogue scale. Peak sedation and duration of sedation were investigated using a univariate general linear model with post-hoc Tukey tests (Pdetomidine from 10 to 20 µg/kg increased the degree of sedation when administered with the same dose of buprenorphine (7.5 µg/kg). When administered with 20 µg/kg detomidine, increasing the dose of buprenorphine from 7.5 to 10 µg/kg did not influence the degree of sedation achieved.

  19. Buprenorphine Maintenance for Opioid Dependence in Public Sector Healthcare: Benefits and Barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Laura G; Mendoza, Sonia; Hansen, Helena

    Since its U.S. FDA approval in 2002, buprenorphine has been available for maintenance treatment of opiate dependence in primary care physicians' offices. Though buprenorphine was intended to facilitate access to treatment, disparities in utilization have emerged; while buprenorphine treatment is widely used in private care setting, public healthcare integration of buprenorphine lags behind. Through a review of the literature, we found that U.S. disparities are partly due to a shortage of certified prescribers, concern of patient diversion, as well as economic and institutional barriers. Disparity of buprenorphine treatment dissemination is concerning since buprenorphine treatment has specific characteristics that are especially suited for low-income patient population in public sector healthcare such as flexible dosing schedules, ease of concurrently treating co-morbidities such as HIV and hepatitis C, positive patient attitudes towards treatment, and the potential of reducing addiction treatment stigma. As the gap between buprenorphine treatment in public sector settings and private sector settings persists in the U.S., current research suggests ways to facilitate its dissemination.

  20. Buprenorphine – an attractive opioid with underutilized potential in treatment of chronic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanna IK

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ish K Khanna, Sivaram PillarisettiNeuroPn Therapeutics, Alpharetta, GA, USAAbstract: Despite proven clinical utility, buprenorphine has not been used widely for the treatment of chronic pain. Questions about “ceiling effect” or bell-shaped curve observed for analgesia in preclinical studies and potential withdrawal issues on combining with marketed µ-agonists continue to hinder progress in expanding full potential of buprenorphine in the treatment of cancer and noncancer pain. Mounting evidence from clinical studies and conclusions drawn by a panel of experts strongly support superior safety and efficacy profile of buprenorphine vs marketed opioids. No ceiling on analgesic effect has been reported in clinical studies. The receptor pharmacology and pharmacokinetics profile of buprenorphine is complex but unique and contributes to its distinct safety and efficacy. The buprenorphine pharmacology also allows it to be combined with other µ-receptor opioids for additivity in efficacy. Transdermal delivery products of buprenorphine have been preferred choices for the management of pain but new delivery options are under investigation for the treatment of both opioid dependence and chronic pain.Keywords: buprenorphine, opioids, opioid dependence, partial agonist, hyperalgesia, neuropathic pain

  1. Reversal of Stress-Induced Social Interaction Deficits by Buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Caroline A; Falcon, Edgardo; Robinson, Shivon A; Berton, Olivier; Lucki, Irwin

    2018-02-01

    Patients with post-traumatic stress disorder frequently report persistent problems with social interactions, emerging after a traumatic experience. Chronic social defeat stress is a widely used rodent model of stress that produces robust and sustained social avoidance behavior. The avoidance of other rodents can be reversed by 28 days of treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, the only pharmaceutical class approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for treating post-traumatic stress disorder. In this study, the sensitivity of social interaction deficits evoked by 10 days of chronic social defeat stress to prospective treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder was examined. The effects of acute and repeated treatment with a low dose of buprenorphine (0.25 mg/kg/d) on social interaction deficits in male C57BL/6 mice by chronic social defeat stress were studied. Another cohort of mice was used to determine the effects of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine (10 mg/kg/d), the NMDA antagonist ketamine (10 mg/kg/d), and the selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist CERC-501 (1 mg/kg/d). Changes in mRNA expression of Oprm1 and Oprk1 were assessed in a separate cohort. Buprenorphine significantly reversed social interaction deficits produced by chronic social defeat stress following 7 days of administration, but not after acute injection. Treatment with fluoxetine for 7 days, but not 24 hours, also reinstated social interaction behavior in mice that were susceptible to chronic social defeat. In contrast, CERC-501 and ketamine failed to reverse social avoidance. Gene expression analysis found: (1) Oprm1 mRNA expression was reduced in the hippocampus and increased in the frontal cortex of susceptible mice and (2) Oprk1 mRNA expression was reduced in the amygdala and increased in the frontal cortex of susceptible mice compared to non-stressed controls and stress-resilient mice. Short-term treatment with buprenorphine and fluoxetine

  2. Association between gene variants and response to buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerra, Gilberto; Somaini, Lorenzo; Leonardi, Claudio; Cortese, Elena; Maremmani, Icro; Manfredini, Matteo; Donnini, Claudia

    2014-01-30

    A variety of studies were addressed to differentiate responders and non-responders to substitution treatment among heroin dependent patients, without conclusive findings. In particular, preliminary pharmacogenetic findings have been reported to predict treatment effectiveness in mental health and substance use disorders. Aim of the present study was to investigate the possible association of buprenorphine (BUP) treatment outcome with gene variants that may affect kappa-opioid receptors and dopamine system function. One hundred and seven heroin addicts (West European, Caucasians) who underwent buprenorphine maintenance treatment were genotyped and classified into two groups (A and B) on the basis of treatment outcome. Non-responders to buprenorphine (group B) have been identified taking into account early drop out, continuous use of heroin, severe behavioral or psychiatric problems, misbehavior and diversion during the 6 months treatment period. No difference was evidenced between responders and non-responders to BUP in the frequency of kappa opioid receptor (OPRK1) 36G>T SNP. The frequency of dopamine transporter (DAT) gene polymorphism (SLC6A3/DAT1), allele 10, was evidently much higher in "non-responder" than in "responder" individuals (64.9% vs. 55.93%) whereas the frequency of the category of other alleles (6, 7 and 11) was higher in responder than in non-responder individuals (11.02% vs. 2.13% respectively). On one hand, the hypothesis that possible gene-related changes in kappa-opioid receptor could consistently affect buprenorphine pharmacological action and clinical effectiveness was not confirmed in our study, at least in relation to the single nucleotide polymorphism 36G>T. On the other hand, the possibility that gene-related dopamine changes could have reduced BUP effectiveness and impaired maintenance treatment outcome was cautiously supported by our findings. DAT1 gene variants such as allele 10, previously reported in association with personality and

  3. Buprenorphine dose induction in non-opioid-tolerant pre-release prisoners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocci, Frank J; Schwartz, Robert P; Wilson, Monique E; Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Fitzgerald, Terrence T; O'Grady, Kevin E; Jaffe, Jerome H

    2015-11-01

    In a previously reported randomized controlled trial, formerly opioid-dependent prisoners were more likely to enter community drug abuse treatment when they were inducted in prison onto buprenorphine/naloxone (hereafter called buprenorphine) than when they received counseling without buprenorphine in prison (47.5% vs. 33.7%, p=0.012) (Gordon et al., 2014). In this communication we report on the results of the induction schedule and the adverse event profile seen in pre-release prisoners inducted onto buprenorphine. This paper examines the dose induction procedure, a comparison of the proposed versus actual doses given per week, and side effects reported for 104 adult participants who were randomized to buprenorphine treatment in prison. Self-reported side effects were analyzed using generalized estimated equations to determine changes over time in side effects. Study participants were inducted onto buprenorphine at a rate faster than the induction schedule. Of the 104 (72 males, 32 females) buprenorphine recipients, 64 (37 males, 27 females) remained on medication at release from prison. Nine participants (8.6%) discontinued buprenorphine because of unpleasant opioid side effects. There were no serious adverse events reported during the in-prison phase of the study. Constipation was the most frequent symptom reported (69 percent). Our findings suggest that buprenorphine administered to non-opioid-tolerant adults should be started at a lower, individualized dose than customarily used for adults actively using opioids, and that non-opioid-tolerant pre-release prisoners can be successfully inducted onto therapeutic doses prior to release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Buprenorphine Maintenance Subjects Are Hyperalgesic and Have No Antinociceptive Response to a Very High Morphine Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasos, Peter; Ling, Walter; Bochner, Felix; White, Jason M; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2018-03-05

    Acute pain management in opioid-dependent persons is complicated because of tolerance and opioid-induced hyperalgesia. Very high doses of morphine are ineffective in overcoming opioid-induced hyperalgesia and providing antinociception to methadone-maintained patients in an experimental setting. Whether the same occurs in buprenorphine-maintained subjects is unknown. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled. Subjects were tested on two occasions, at least five days apart, once with intravenous morphine and once with intravenous saline. Subjects were tested at about the time of putative trough plasma buprenorphine concentrations. Ambulatory. Twelve buprenorphine-maintained subjects: once daily sublingual dose (range = 2-22 mg); no dose change for 1.5-12 months. Ten healthy controls. Intravenous morphine bolus and infusions administered over two hours to achieve two separate pseudo-steady-state plasma concentrations one hour apart. Pain tolerance was assessed by application of nociceptive stimuli (cold pressor [seconds] and electrical stimulation [volts]). Ten blood samples were collected for assay of plasma morphine, buprenorphine, and norbuprenorphine concentrations until three hours after the end of the last infusion; pain tolerance and respiration rate were measured to coincide with blood sampling times. Cold pressor responses (seconds): baseline: control 34 ± 6 vs buprenorphine 17 ± 2 (P = 0.009); morphine infusion-end: control 52 ± 11(P = 0.04), buprenorphine 17 ± 2 (P > 0.5); electrical stimulation responses (volts): baseline: control 65 ± 6 vs buprenorphine 53 ± 5 (P = 0.13); infusion-end: control 74 ± 5 (P = 0.007), buprenorphine 53 ± 5 (P > 0.98). Respiratory rate (breaths per minute): baseline: control 17 vs buprenorphine 14 (P = 0.03); infusion-end: control 15 (P = 0.09), buprenorphine 12 (P < 0.01). Infusion-end plasma morphine concentrations (ng/mL): control 23 ± 1

  5. Comment on "a comparison of buprenorphine + naloxone to buprenorphine and methadone in the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Robert G; Gevertz, Susan G

    2013-01-01

    In a recent article, Lund et al sought to compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of various treatment regimens for opioid dependence during pregnancy.1 In their background, discussion the authors state that "In the United States buprenorphine plus naloxone [Suboxone(®)] … has been the preferred form of prescribed buprenorphine due to its reduced abuse liability relative to buprenorphine alone [Subutex(®)]." This claim is certainly consistent with the view of the firm that has manufactured and sold both products, Reckitt Benckiser. In September of 2011, the company announced that it was "… discontinuing distribution and sale of Subutex(®) tablets as we believe that mono product (product containing buprenorphine alone with no naloxone) creates a greater risk of misuse, abuse and diversion …".2 Supporting evidence for the alleged "reduced abuse liability" appears to be lacking, however, and evidence cannot be located in the two references cited by Dr. Lund and his co-authors, which in fact are silent on the subject of abuse potential.3,4 In contrast, it has been reported that the transition to buprenorphine/naloxone from the mono formulation has been associated with "… no reduction in injection risk behaviors among IDUs."5.

  6. Comment on “A Comparison of Buprenorphine + Naloxone to Buprenorphine and Methadone in the Treatment of Opioid Dependence during Pregnancy: Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert G. Newman M.D., M.P.H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a recent article, Lund et al sought to compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of various treatment regimens for opioid dependence during pregnancy. 1 In their background, discussion the authors state that “In the United States buprenorphine plus naloxone [Suboxone®] … has been the preferred form of prescribed buprenorphine due to its reduced abuse liability relative to buprenorphine alone [Subutex®].” This claim is certainly consistent with the view of the firm that has manufactured and sold both products, Reckitt Benckiser. In September of 2011, the company announced that it was “… discontinuing distribution and sale of Subutex® tablets as we believe that mono product (product containing buprenorphine alone with no naloxone creates a greater risk of misuse, abuse and diversion …”. 2 Supporting evidence for the alleged “reduced abuse liability” appears to be lacking, however, and evidence cannot be located in the two references cited by Dr. Lund and his co-authors, which in fact are silent on the subject of abuse potential. 3 , 4 In contrast, it has been reported that the transition to buprenorphine/naloxone from the mono formulation has been associated with “… no reduction in injection risk behaviors among IDUs.” 5

  7. Training rural practitioners to use buprenorphine; using The Change Book to facilitate technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Dennis; Rieckmann, Traci; Green, Carla; Gallon, Steve; Knudsen, Jeff

    2004-04-01

    The Opiate Medication Initiative for Rural Oregon Residents trained physicians and counselors in Central and Southwestern Oregon to use buprenorphine and develop service models that supported patient participation in drug abuse counseling. The Change Book from Addiction Technology Transfer Centers was used to structure the change process. Fifty-one individuals (17 physicians, 4 pharmacists, 2 nurse practitioners, and 28 drug abuse counselors and administrators) from seven counties completed the training and contributed to the development of community treatment protocols. A pre-post measure of attitudes and beliefs toward the use of buprenorphine suggested significant improvements in attitude after training, especially among counselors. Eight months after training, 10 of 17 physicians trained had received waivers to use buprenorphine and 29 patients were in treatment with six of the physicians. The Change Book facilitated development of county change teams and structured the planning efforts. The initiative also demonstrated the potential to concurrently train physicians, pharmacists, and counselors on the use of buprenorphine.

  8. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic evaluation of buprenorphine + samidorphan for the treatment of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragguett, Renee-Marie; Rong, Carola; Rosenblat, Joshua D; Ho, Roger C; McIntyre, Roger S

    2018-04-01

    Treatment resistant depression (TRD) represents approximately 20% of all individuals receiving care for major depressive disorder. The opioidergic system is identified as a novel target which hitherto has not been sufficiently investigated in adults with TRD. The combination product buprenorphine + samidorphan is an opioid modulatory agent which has demonstrated replicated evidence of efficacy in TRD without abuse liability. Areas covered: Databases Pubmed, Google Scholar and clinicaltrials.gov were searched from inception through December 2017 for clinical trial information, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of buprenorphine + samidorphan. Herein we provide a summary of the available information. Eight clinical trials were identified for inclusion, of the eight trials, five trials had available results and are included in detail in our review. Expert opinion: Buprenorphine + samidorphan has demonstrated efficacy in TRD. Extant evidence surrounding the safety and tolerability profile of buprenorphine + samidorphan does not identify any significant safety concerns. Additional studies are needed in order to assess the long-term safety and efficacy of this product.

  9. Buprenorphine vs methadone treatment: A review of evidence in both developed and developing worlds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Whelan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Heroin dependence is a major health and social problem associated with increased morbidity and mortality that adversely affects social circumstances, productivity, and healthcare and law enforcement costs. In the UK and many other Western countries, both methadone and buprenorphine are recommended by the relevant agencies for detoxification from heroin and for opioid maintenance therapy. However, despite obvious benefits due to its unique pharmacotherapy (eg, greatly reduced risk of overdose, buprenorphine has largely failed to overtake methadone in managing opioid addiction. The experience from the developing world (based on data from India is similar. In this article we compare the advantages and disadvantages of the use methadone and buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid addiction from both a developed and developing world perspective; and explore some of the reasons why buprenorphine has not fulfilled the expectations predicted by many in the addictions field.

  10. Pharmacokinetics of a concentrated buprenorphine formulation in red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleeson, Molly D; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon; Knych, Heather K; Kass, Philip H; Drazenovich, Tracy L; Hawkins, Michelle G

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the pharmacokinetics and sedative effects of 2 doses of a concentrated buprenorphine formulation after SC administration to red-tailed hawks (Buteo jamaicensis). ANIMALS 6 adult red-tailed hawks. PROCEDURES Concentrated buprenorphine (0.3 mg/kg, SC) was administered to all birds. Blood samples were collected at 10 time points over 24 hours after drug administration to determine plasma buprenorphine concentrations. After a 4-week washout period, the same birds received the same formulation at a higher dose (1.8 mg/kg, SC), and blood samples were collected at 13 time points over 96 hours. Hawks were monitored for adverse effects and assigned agitation-sedation scores at each sample collection time. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations were quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. RESULTS Mean time to maximum plasma buprenorphine concentration was 7.2 minutes and 26.1 minutes after administration of the 0.3-mg/kg and 1.8-mg/kg doses, respectively. Plasma buprenorphine concentrations were > 1 ng/mL for mean durations of 24 and 48 hours after low- and high-dose administration, respectively. Mean elimination half-life was 6.23 hours for the low dose and 7.84 hours for the high dose. Mean agitation-sedation scores were higher (indicating some degree of sedation) than the baseline values for 24 hours at both doses. No clinically important adverse effects were observed. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Concentrated buprenorphine was rapidly absorbed, and plasma drug concentrations considered to have analgesic effects in other raptor species were maintained for extended periods. Most birds had mild to moderate sedation. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of these doses of concentrated buprenorphine in red-tailed hawks.

  11. Hospital morphine preparation for abstinence syndrome in newborns exposed to buprenorphine or methadone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombini, Nathalie; Elias, Riad; Busuttil, Muriel; Dubuc, Myriam; Einaudi, Marie-Ange; Bues-Charbit, Martine

    2008-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the adequacy of a hospital formulated oral morphine preparation for management of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) and to compare clinical features in infants exposed to methadone or buprenorphine in utero. Between October 1998 and October 2004 all infants born to mothers treated with buprenorphine or methadone during pregnancy were enrolled into this prospective study. Morphine hydrochloride solution (0.2 mg/ml) was prepared without preservatives under a flow laminar air box (class 100). Morphine solution: quantitative and qualitative HPLC analysis and microbiological study at regular intervals during storage at 4 degrees C for 6 months. Maternal characteristics: age, opiate dose during pregnancy. Neonatal characteristics: gestational age at delivery, birth weight, Lipsitz scores. Morphine dose: daily morphine dose, maximum morphine dose, duration of NAS, and duration of treatment required to achieve stable Lipsitz scores below 4. Kruskal-Wallis test for comparison of median values. Microbiological and HPLC analysis showed that the morphine preparation remained stable for 6 months at 4 degrees C. Nine methadone-exposed infants and 13 buprenorphine-exposed infants were included in the study. All infants presented NAS requiring treatment with the morphine solution. Lipsitz scores at birth were significantly different in the methadone and buprenorphine groups (P methadone group required significantly higher doses of morphine preparation than the buprenorphine group during the first 38 days of treatment (P methadone-exposed infants (range 6-24 h) and within 48 h after birth in buprenorphine-exposed infants (range 24-168 h). Due to the possibility of delayed onset of NAS up to 7 days, infants born to mothers treated with buprenorphine should be kept in the hospital for an appropriate surveillance period. Treatment time was significantly longer (45 vs. 28 days) and the mean morphine doses were higher (1.7 fold) in methadone

  12. Buprenorphine is protective against the depressive effects of norbuprenorphine on ventilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megarbane, Bruno; Marie, Nicolas; Pirnay, Stephane; Borron, Stephen W.; Gueye, Papa N.; Risede, Patricia; Monier, Claire; Noble, Florence; Baud, Frederic J.

    2006-01-01

    High dose buprenorphine is used as substitution treatment in heroin addiction. However, deaths have been reported in addicts using buprenorphine. The role of norbuprenorphine, an N-dealkyl metabolite of buprenorphine, was hypothesized to explain these fatal cases. We determined the median intravenous lethal dose (LD 5 ) of norbuprenorphine in male Sprague-Dawley rats. The effects of a single intravenous dose of 3 or 9 mg/kg norbuprenorphine alone on arterial blood gases were studied. Finally, the effect of pre- and post-administrations of buprenorphine on norbuprenorphine-induced changes on arterial blood gases were analyzed. Norbuprenorphine's LD 5 was 10 mg kg -1 . Norbuprenorphine 3 mg kg -1 produces the rapid onset of sustained respiratory depression, as demonstrated at 20 min by a maximal significant increase in PaCO 2 (8.4 ± 0.9 versus 5.7 ± 0.1 kPa), decrease in arterial pH (7.25 ± 0.06 versus 7.44 ± 0.01), and hypoxia (8.3 ± 0.6 versus 11.1 ± 0.2 kPa). Buprenorphine not only protected against the effects of 3 mg kg -1 norbuprenorphine in a dose-dependent manner but also reversed the effects when given afterward. Binding experiments suggest a role for mu- and to a lesser extent for delta-opioid receptors in buprenorphine protective effect against norbuprenorphine-induced respiratory depression. In conclusion, our data clearly show that norbuprenorphine alone causes important deleterious effects on ventilation in rats. However, buprenorphine protective effect calls into question the role for norbuprenorphine in respiratory toxicity associated with buprenorphine use

  13. Pharmacokinetics of oral transmucosal and intramuscular dexmedetomidine combined with buprenorphine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porters, N; de Rooster, H; Bosmans, T; Baert, K; Cherlet, M; Croubels, S; De Backer, P; Polis, I

    2015-04-01

    Plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetics of dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine after oral transmucosal (OTM) and intramuscular (i.m.) administration of their combination in healthy adult cats were compared. According to a crossover protocol (1-month washout), a combination of dexmedetomidine (40 μg/kg) and buprenorphine (20 μg/kg) was given OTM (buccal cavity) or i.m. (quadriceps muscle) in six female neutered cats. Plasma samples were collected through a jugular catheter during a 24-h period. Plasma dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine concentrations were determined by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Plasma concentration-time data were fitted to compartmental models. For dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine, the area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC) and the maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax ) were significantly lower following OTM than following i.m. administration. For buprenorphine, time to reach Cmax was also significantly longer after OTM administration than after i.m. injection. Data suggested that dexmedetomidine (40 μg/kg) combined with buprenorphine (20 μg/kg) is not as well absorbed from the buccal mucosa site as from the intramuscular injection site. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Development of a radioimmunoassay for the determination of buprenorphine in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debrabandere, L.; Boven, M. Van; Daenens, P.

    1993-01-01

    The development of a specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay for the detection of buprenorphine in urine samples is described. With minor adjustments, the assay was also applied to the analysis for buprenorphine in plasma samples. The 2-diazobenzoic acid derivative of buprenorphine has been prepared as a hapten. The immunization of rabbits with the hapten-bovine serum albumin conjugate resulted in the production of antibodies, which cross-reacted with N-dealkylbuprenophine up to about the 90% level. The antibodies showed very low cross-reactivities with the 3-O-glucuronides and with the structural analogue etorphine. The assay was mainly used to prescreen for buprenorphine in urine samples of persons suspected of Temgesic misuse and to determine buprenorphine in plasma samples. A linear calibration graph for buprenorphine was obtained after logit-log regression. The spiking recovery study showed a linear regression. Intra-and inter-assay relative standard deviations were -1 (Student's t-distribution, p 0.01, degrees of freedom = 8). (Author)

  15. A randomized controlled trial of prison-initiated buprenorphine: prison outcomes and community treatment entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Schwartz, Robert P; Fitzgerald, Terrence T; O'Grady, Kevin E; Vocci, Frank J

    2014-09-01

    Buprenorphine is a promising treatment for heroin addiction. However, little is known regarding its provision to pre-release prisoners with heroin dependence histories who were not opioid-tolerant, the relative effectiveness of the post-release setting in which it is provided, and gender differences in treatment outcome in this population. This is the first randomized clinical trial of prison-initiated buprenorphine provided to male and female inmates in the US who were previously heroin-dependent prior to incarceration. A total of 211 participants with 3-9 months remaining in prison were randomized to one of four conditions formed by crossing In-Prison Treatment Condition (received buprenorphine vs. counseling only) and Post-release Service Setting (at an opioid treatment center vs. a community health center). Outcome measures were: entered prison treatment; completed prison treatment; and entered community treatment 10 days post-release. There was a significant main effect (p=.006) for entering prison treatment favoring the In-Prison buprenorphine Treatment Condition (99.0% vs. 80.4%). Regarding completing prison treatment, the only significant effect was Gender, with women significantly (pPrison buprenorphine Treatment Condition (47.5% vs. 33.7%). Buprenorphine appears feasible and acceptable to prisoners who were not opioid-tolerant and can facilitate community treatment entry. However, concerns remain with in-prison treatment termination due to attempted diversion of medication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of medetomidine, ketamine and buprenorphine for neutering feral cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Kelly A; Robertson, Sheilah A; Levy, Julie K; Isaza, Natalie M

    2011-12-01

    A combination of medetomidine (M, 100 μg/kg), ketamine (K, 10 mg/kg) and buprenorphine (B, 10 μg/kg), administered by intramuscular injection, was evaluated for spaying and castration (neutering) of feral cats (n = 101). Eleven animals (11%) required supplemental anesthesia (isoflurane by mask) to maintain an adequate plane of surgical anesthesia. Atipamezole (A, 125 μg/kg) was administered subcutaneously at the completion of surgery. All cats recovered from surgery and were released the following day. A hemoglobin saturation (SpO(2)) value of cats. This MKB combination can be used in a feral cat sterilization clinic, but isoflurane supplementation may be necessary. Further research is indicated to determine the clinical significance of the low SpO(2) values associated with this anesthetic regimen. Copyright © 2011 ISFM and AAFP. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A cluster-analytic profiling of heroin-dependent patients based on level, clinical adequacy, and patient-desired adjustment of buprenorphine dosage during buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance treatment in sixteen Spanish centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, Saul; González-Saiz, Francisco; Trujols, Joan; Vergara-Moragues, Esperanza; Siñol, Núria; Pérez de Los Cobos, José

    2018-06-01

    Buprenorphine dosage is a crucial factor influencing outcomes of buprenorphine treatment for heroin use disorders. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to identify naturally occurring profiles of heroin-dependent patients regarding individualized management of buprenorphine dosage in clinical practice of buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance treatment. 316 patients receiving buprenorphine-naloxone maintenance treatment were surveyed at 16 Spanish centers during the stabilization phase of this treatment. Patients were grouped using cluster analysis based on three key indicators of buprenorphine dosage management: dose, adequacy according to physician, and adjustment according to patient. The clusters obtained were compared regarding different facets of patient clinical condition. Four clusters were identified and labeled as follows (buprenorphine average dose and percentage of participants in each cluster are given in brackets): "Clinically Adequate and Adjusted to Patient Desired Low Dosage" (2.60 mg/d, 37.05%); "Clinically Adequate and Adjusted to Patient Desired High Dosage" (10.71 mg/d, 29.18%); "Clinically Adequate and Patient Desired Reduction of Low Dosage" (3.38 mg/d, 20.0%); and "Clinically Inadequate and Adjusted to Patient Desired Moderate Dosage" (7.55 mg/d, 13.77%). Compared to patients from the other three clusters, participants in the latter cluster reported more frequent use of heroin and cocaine during last week, lower satisfaction with buprenorphine-naloxone as a medication, higher prevalence of buprenorphine-naloxone adverse effects and poorer psychological adjustment. Our results show notable differences between clusters of heroin-dependent patients regarding buprenorphine dosage management. We also identified a group of patients receiving clinically inadequate buprenorphine dosage, which was related to poorer clinical condition. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of the Pharmacokinetics of Single- and Multiple-dose Buprenorphine Buccal Film in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Stephen A; Xiang, Qinfang; Finn, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    Buprenorphine, a partial μ-receptor agonist, is approved for the management of moderate to severe pain, but it has low oral bioavailability. Two open-label studies were performed to determine the pharmacokinetic profile of buprenorphine from buccal film formulations of buprenorphine. Both studies enrolled healthy volunteers, aged 18 to 55 years, who received concurrent oral naltrexone to reduce adverse events (AEs); subjects with a history or evidence of substance abuse or current use of any product affecting cytochrome P450 3A4 activity were excluded. The first study (n = 25) was a 5-period crossover trial with 4 single doses (75 and 300 and 300 and 1200 μg) of 2 formulations (F14 and F24) of buccal buprenorphine (BBUP) and a 300-μg intravenous dose of buprenorphine with a 7-day washout between periods. In the second study, each subject (n = 10) received 6 doses of 4 BBUP strengths (60, 120, 180, and 240 μg BID) in a dose-escalation design. Plasma concentrations of buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine were assayed, and pharmacokinetics were summarized with descriptive statistics and analyzed by using a linear mixed effects model (single-dose study). AEs were recorded. In the single-dose study, the 2 formulations exhibited comparable bioavailability of 46% to 51% that was independent of dose, with a single buprenorphine peak concentration from each BBUP dose occurring at 2.5 to 3 hours. The mean buprenorphine Cmax across the doses ranged from 0.17 ng/mL for the 75-µg dose to 1.43 ng/mL for the 1200-µg dose. AUC0-∞, AUC0-last, and Cmax were proportional to the dose of BBUP administered. Cmax of norbuprenorphine after BBUP administration was approximately one tenth that of buprenorphine Cmax. In the multiple-dose study, steady state was reached within 3 days of BID dosing. There was a linear increase in exposure across the dose range from 60 to 240 μg BID. Treatment-emergent AEs in both studies were consistent with those reported with opiate administration to

  19. Outcomes among buprenorphine-naloxone primary care patients after Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofighi, Babak; Grossman, Ellie; Williams, Arthur R; Biary, Rana; Rotrosen, John; Lee, Joshua D

    2014-01-27

    The extent of damage in New York City following Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 was unprecedented. Bellevue Hospital Center (BHC), a tertiary public hospital, was evacuated and temporarily closed as a result of hurricane-related damages. BHC's large primary care office-based buprenorphine clinic was relocated to an affiliate public hospital for three weeks. The extent of environmental damage and ensuing service disruption effects on rates of illicit drug, tobacco, and alcohol misuse, buprenorphine medication supply disruptions, or direct resource losses among office-based buprenorphine patients is to date unknown. A quantitative and qualitative semi-structured survey was administered to patients in BHC's primary care buprenorphine program starting one month after the hurricane. Survey domains included: housing and employment disruptions; social and economic support; treatment outcomes (buprenorphine adherence and ability to get care), and tobacco, alcohol, and drug use. Open-ended questions probed general patient experiences related to the storm, coping strategies, and associated disruptions. There were 132 patients enrolled in the clinic at the time of the storm; of those, 91 patients were recruited to the survey, and 89 completed (98% of those invited). Illicit opioid misuse was rare, with 7 respondents reporting increased heroin or illicit prescription opioid use following Sandy. Roughly half of respondents reported disruption of their buprenorphine-naloxone medication supply post-event, and self-lowering of daily doses to prolong supply was common. Additional buprenorphine was obtained through unscheduled telephone or written refills from relocated Bellevue providers, informally from friends and family, and, more rarely, from drug dealers. The findings highlight the relative adaptability of public sector office-based buprenorphine treatment during and after a significant natural disaster. Only minimal increases in self-reported substance use were reported

  20. Extended vs Short-term Buprenorphine-Naloxone for Treatment of Opioid-Addicted Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, George E.; Poole, Sabrina A.; Subramaniam, Geetha; Dugosh, Karen; Bogenschutz, Michael; Abbott, Patrick; Patkar, Ashwin; Publicker, Mark; McCain, Karen; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Forman, Robert; Vetter, Victoria; McNicholas, Laura; Blaine, Jack; Lynch, Kevin G.; Fudala, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Context The usual treatment for opioid-addicted youth is detoxification and counseling. Extended medication-assisted therapy may be more helpful. Objective To evaluate the efficacy of continuing buprenorphine-naloxone for 12 weeks vs detoxification for opioid-addicted youth. Design, Setting, and Patients Clinical trial at 6 community programs from July 2003 to December 2006 including 152 patients aged 15 to 21 years who were randomized to 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone or a 14-day taper (detox). Interventions Patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group were prescribed up to 24 mg per day for 9 weeks and then tapered to week 12; patients in the detox group were prescribed up to 14 mg per day and then tapered to day 14. All were offered weekly individual and group counseling. Main Outcome Measure Opioid-positive urine test result at weeks 4, 8, and 12. Results The number of patients younger than 18 years was too small to analyze separately, but overall, patients in the detox group had higher proportions of opioid-positive urine test results at weeks 4 and 8 but not at week 12 ( χ22 = 4.93, P = .09). At week 4, 59 detox patients had positive results (61%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 47%-75%) vs 58 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (26%; 95% CI = 14%-38%). At week 8, 53 detox patients had positive results (54%; 95% CI = 38%-70%) vs 52 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (23%; 95% CI = 11%-35%). At week 12, 53 detox patients had positive results (51%; 95% CI = 35%-67%) vs 49 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (43%; 95% CI = 29%-57%). By week 12, 16 of 78 detox patients (20.5%) remained in treatment vs 52 of 74 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (70%; χ12 = 32.90, P < .001). During weeks 1 through 12, patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group reported less opioid use ( χ12 = 18.45, P < .001), less injecting ( χ12 = 6.00, P = .01), and less nonstudy addiction treatment ( χ12 = 25.82, P < .001). High levels of opioid use

  1. QT-interval effects of methadone, levomethadyl, and buprenorphine in a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedam, Erich F; Bigelow, George E; Johnson, Rolley E; Nuzzo, Paul A; Haigney, Mark C P

    2007-12-10

    Levomethadyl acetate, methadone hydrochloride, and buprenorphine hydrochloride are equally effective treatments for opioid dependence. Each blocks the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG)-associated channel in vitro and represents a risk for QT prolongation. To compare the effects of 3 known hERG-associated channel blockers on the corrected QT (QTc), we conducted a randomized, controlled trial of opioid-addicted subjects. We analyzed 12-lead electrocardiograms collected at baseline and every 4 weeks from 165 opioid-addicted participants in a 17-week randomized double-blind clinical trial of equally effective doses of levomethadyl, methadone, and buprenorphine at a major referral center. Analyses were limited to the 154 patients with a normal baseline QTc = (QT/ radical R-R) who had at least 1 subsequent in-treatment electrocardiogram. Patients were randomized to receive treatment with levomethadyl, methadone, or buprenorphine (hereinafter, levomethadyl, methadone, and buprenorphine groups, respectively). The prespecified end points were a QTc greater than 470 milliseconds in men (or >490 milliseconds in women), or an increase from baseline in QTc greater than 60 milliseconds. Baseline QTc was similar in the 3 groups. The levomethadyl and methadone groups were significantly more likely to manifest a QTc greater than 470 or 490 milliseconds (28% for the levomethadyl group vs 23% for the methadone group vs 0% for the buprenorphine group; P methadone group [odds ratio, 8.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.9-36.4]) compared with the buprenorphine group (2% of subjects; P methadone remained fixed over at least 8 weeks, the QTc continued to increase progressively over time (P = .08 for the levomethadyl group, P = .01 for the methadone group). Buprenorphine is associated with less QTc prolongation than levomethadyl or methadone and may be a safe alternative.

  2. Retention in buprenorphine treatment is associated with improved HCV care outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, B L; Beitin, A; Glenn, M; DeLuca, J; Litwin, A H; Cunningham, C O

    2017-04-01

    Persons who inject drugs, most of whom are opioid dependent, comprise the majority of the HCV infected in the United States. As the national opioid epidemic unfolds, increasing numbers of people are entering the medical system to access treatment for opioid use disorder, specifically with buprenorphine. Yet little is known about HCV care in patients accessing buprenorphine-based opioid treatment. We sought to determine the HCV prevalence, cascade of care, and the association between patient characteristics and completion of HCV cascade of care milestones for patients initiating buprenorphine treatment. We reviewed electronic health records of all patients who initiated buprenorphine treatment at a primary-care clinic in the Bronx, NY between January 2009 and January 2014. Of the 390 patients who initiated buprenorphine treatment, 123 were confirmed to have chronic HCV infection. The only patient characteristic associated with achieving HCV care milestones was retention in opioid treatment. Patients retained (vs. not retained) in buprenorphine treatment were more likely to be referred for HCV specialty care (63.1% vs. 34.0%, p<0.01), achieve an HCV-specific evaluation (40.8% vs. 21.3%, p<0.05), be offered HCV treatment (22.4% vs. 8.5%, p<0.05), and initiate HCV treatment (9.2% vs. 6.4%, p=0.6). Given the current opioid epidemic in the US and the growing number of people receiving buprenorphine treatment, there is an unprecedented opportunity to access and treat persons with HCV, reducing HCV transmission, morbidity and mortality. Retention in opioid treatment may improve linkage and retention in HCV care; innovative models of care that integrate opioid drug treatment with HCV treatment are essential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine and hydromorphone in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, Christoph; Lahner, Lesanna L; Baker, Bridget B; Johnson, Stephen M; Sladky, Kurt K

    2012-09-01

    Despite the frequent clinical use of buprenorphine in reptiles, its antinociceptive efficacy is not known. In a randomized, complete cross-over study, the antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine (0.2 mg/kg s.c.) was compared with hydromorphone (0.5 mg/kg s.c.), and saline (0.9% s.c. equivalent volume) in 11 healthy red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta elegans). Additionally, buprenorphine at 0.1 and 1 mg/kg was compared with saline in six turtles. Hindlimb withdrawal latencies were measured after exposure to a focal, thermal noxious stimulus before and between 3 hr and up to 96 hr after drug administration. Buprenorphine did not significantly increase hindlimb withdrawal latencies at any time point compared with saline. In contrast, hydromorphone administration at 0.5 mg/kg significantly increased hindlimb withdrawal latencies for up to 24 hr. These results show that hydromorphone, but not buprenorphine, provides thermal antinociception in red-eared slider turtles.

  4. Methadone versus buprenorphine for the treatment of opioid abuse in pregnancy: science and stigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, Amber M

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen an increase in rates of opioid abuse during pregnancy. This clinical challenge has been met with debate regarding whether or not illicit and prescription opioid-dependent individuals require different treatment approaches; whether detoxification is preferable to maintenance; and the efficacy of methadone versus buprenorphine as treatment options during pregnancy. The clinical recommendations resulting from these discussions are frequently influenced by the comparative stigma attached to heroin abuse and methadone maintenance versus prescription opioid abuse and maintenance treatment with buprenorphine. While some studies have suggested that a subset of individuals who abuse prescription opioids may have different characteristics than heroin users, there is currently no evidence to suggest that buprenorphine is better suited to treatment of prescription opioid abuse than methadone. Similarly, despite its perennial popularity, there is no evidence to recommend detoxification as an efficacious approach to treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy. While increased access to treatment is important, particularly in rural areas, there are multiple medical and psychosocial reasons to recommend comprehensive substance abuse treatment for pregnant women suffering from substance use disorders rather than office-based provision of maintenance medication. Both methadone and buprenorphine are important treatment options for opioid abuse during pregnancy. Methadone may still remain the preferred treatment choice for some women who require higher doses for stabilization, have a higher risk of treatment discontinuation, or who have had unsuccessful treatment attempts with buprenorphine. As treatment providers, we should advocate to expand available treatment options for pregnant women in all States.

  5. Antinociceptive effects of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine in the hot-plate test in laboratory rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Sara Hestehave; Munro, Gordon; Brønnum Pedersen, Tina

    2017-01-01

    the animal to a thermal stimulus using a hot plate, significant antinociceptive effects of voluntarily ingested buprenorphine administered in Nutella® were demonstrated. This was evident at doses of 1.0 mg/kg 60 and 120 min post administration (Peffects were not as marked......Researchers performing experiments on animals should always strive towards the refinement of experiments, minimization of stress and provision of better animal welfare. An adequate analgesic strategy is important to improve post-operative recovery and welfare in laboratory rats and mice....... In addition, it is desirable to provide post-operative analgesia using methods that are minimally invasive and stressful. This study investigated the antinociceptive effects of orally administered buprenorphine ingested in Nutella® in comparison with subcutaneous buprenorphine administration. By exposing...

  6. A preliminary study comparing methadone and buprenorphine in patients with chronic pain and coexistent opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Anne M; Blondell, Richard D; Jaanimägi, Urmo; Giambrone, Amanda K; Homish, Gregory G; Lozano, Jacqueline R; Kowalik, Urszula; Azadfard, Mohammadreza

    2013-01-01

    Patients with opioid addiction who receive prescription opioids for treatment of nonmalignant chronic pain present a therapeutic challenge. Fifty-four participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction were randomized to receive methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone. At the 6-month follow-up examination, 26 (48.1%) participants who remained in the study noted a 12.75% reduction in pain (P = 0.043), and no participants in the methadone group compared to 5 in the buprenorphine group reported illicit opioid use (P = 0.039). Other differences between the two conditions were not found. Long-term, low-dose methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone treatment produced analgesia in participants with chronic pain and opioid addiction.

  7. Comparison of buprenorphine and methadone effects on opiate self-administration in primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, N K; Bree, M P; Mendelson, J H

    1983-05-01

    The effects of ascending and descending doses of buprenorphine (0.014-0.789 mg/kg/day) and methadone (0.179-11.86 mg/kg/day) on opiate and food intake were studied in Macaque monkeys over 195 to 245 days. Food (1-g banana pellets) and i.v. drug self-administration (heroin 0.01 or 0.02 mg/kg/injection or Dilaudid 0.02 mg/kg/injection) were maintained on a second-order schedule of reinforcement [FR 4 (VR 16:S)]. Buprenorphine (0.282-0.789 mg/kg/day) produced a significant suppression of opiate self-administration at 2.5 to 7 times the dose shown to be effective in human opiate abusers (P less than .05-.001). Methadone (1.43-11.86 mg/kg/day) did not suppress opiate self-administration in four of five monkeys across a dose range equivalent to 100 to 800 mg/day in man. The distribution of opiate self-administration across drug sessions did not account for the absence of methadone suppression as monkeys took 43% of the total daily opiate injections during the first daily drug session, 2.5 hr after methadone administration. During buprenorphine maintenance, food intake remained stable or increased significantly above base-line levels. Methadone maintenance was associated with significant decrements in food intake in four of five monkeys. Buprenorphine appeared to be significantly more effective in suppressing opiate self-administration than methadone across the dose range studied. Buprenorphine had none of the toxic side effects (seizures, respiratory depression, profound psychomotor retardation) associated with high doses of methadone over 6 to 8 months of daily drug treatment. These data are consistent with clinical studies of buprenorphine effects on heroin self-administration in human opiate addicts.

  8. Root causes, clinical effects, and outcomes of unintentional exposures to buprenorphine by young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavonas, Eric J; Banner, William; Bradt, Pamela; Bucher-Bartelson, Becki; Brown, Kimberly R; Rajan, Pradeep; Murrelle, Lenn; Dart, Richard C; Green, Jody L

    2013-11-01

    To characterize the rates, root causes, and clinical effects of unintentional exposures to buprenorphine sublingual formulations among young children and to determine whether exposure characteristics differ between formulations. Unintentional exposures to buprenorphine-containing products among children 28 days to less than 6 years old were collected from the Researched Abuse, Diversion, and Addiction-Related Surveillance System Poison Center Program and Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals' pharmacovigilance system from October 2009-March 2012. After adjustment for drug availability, negative binomial regression was used to estimate average exposure rates. Root cause assessment was conducted, and an expert clinician panel adjudicated causality and severity of moderate to severe adverse events (AEs). A total of 2380 cases were reviewed, including 4 deaths. Exposures to buprenorphine-naloxone combination film were significantly less frequent than exposures to buprenorphine tablets (rate ratio 3.5 [95% CI, 2.7-4.5]) and buprenorphine-naloxone combination tablets (rate ratio 8.8 [7.2-10.6]). The most commonly identified root causes were medication stored in sight, accessed from a bag or purse, and not stored in the original packaging. Among 536 panel review cases, the most common AEs reported for all formulations were lethargy, respiratory depression, miosis, and vomiting. The highest level AE severity did not differ significantly by formulation. Unintentional exposure to buprenorphine can cause central nervous system depression, respiratory depression, and death in young children. Exposure rates to film formulations are significantly less than to tablet formulations. Package and storage deficiencies contribute to unintentional exposures in young children. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Desipramine in opioid-dependent cocaine abusers maintained on buprenorphine vs methadone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveto, A H; Feingold, A; Schottenfeld, R; Jatlow, P; Kosten, T R

    1999-09-01

    Cocaine abuse occurs in 40% to 60% of patients entering opioid maintenance treatment, and effective pharmacotherapies are needed for this combined dependence. This 13-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of desipramine hydrochloride (0 or 150 mg/d) plus buprenorphine hydrochloride (12 mg/d) or methadone hydrochloride (65 mg/d) in 180 opioid-dependent cocaine abusers (124 men, 56 women). Supervised urine samples were obtained thrice weekly, and self-reported cocaine and heroin use was reported once weekly. Desipramine plasma levels were determined at weeks 4 and 10. In men, opioid abstinence was increased more rapidly over time when treated with methadone than with buprenorphine, whereas cocaine abstinence was increased more with buprenorphine than with methadone. In women, opioid abstinence was increased the least rapidly when treated with buprenorphine plus placebo, while cocaine abstinence was increased more rapidly over time when treated with methadone than with buprenorphine. Regardless of sex or opioid medication, desipramine increased opioid and cocaine abstinence more rapidly over time than placebo. Self-reported opioid use confirmed these findings. Desipramine plasma levels were higher in women than in men, particularly those on buprenorphine maintenance. Higher desipramine plasma levels were associated with greater opioid, but not cocaine, abstinence. Desipramine may be a useful adjunctive medication in facilitating opioid and cocaine abstinence in opioid-maintained patients. The efficacy of opioid medications to treat opioid or cocaine dependence may differ by sex. These findings highlight the importance of including sex as a factor when examining treatment outcome in these types of trials.

  10. A double blind, within subject comparison of spontaneous opioid withdrawal from buprenorphine versus morphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, D Andrew; Smith, Michael T; Mintzer, Miriam Z; Campbell, Claudia M; Strain, Eric C

    2014-02-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests that there is minimal withdrawal after the cessation of chronically administered buprenorphine and that opioid withdrawal symptoms are delayed compared with those of other opioids. The present study compared the time course and magnitude of buprenorphine withdrawal with a prototypical μ-opioid agonist, morphine. Healthy, out-of-treatment opioid-dependent residential volunteers (N = 7) were stabilized on either buprenorphine (32 mg/day i.m.) or morphine (120 mg/day i.m.) administered in four divided doses for 9 days. They then underwent an 18-day period of spontaneous withdrawal, during which four double-blind i.m. placebo injections were administered daily. Stabilization and spontaneous withdrawal were assessed for the second opioid using the same time course. Opioid withdrawal measures were collected eight times daily. Morphine withdrawal symptoms were significantly (P withdrawal as measured by mean peak ratings of Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS), Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS), all subscales of the Profile of Mood States (POMS), sick and pain (0-100) Visual Analog Scales, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and pupil dilation. Peak ratings on COWS and SOWS occurred on day 2 of morphine withdrawal and were significantly greater than on day 2 of buprenorphine withdrawal. Subjective reports of morphine withdrawal resolved on average by day 7. There was minimal evidence of buprenorphine withdrawal on any measure. In conclusion, spontaneous withdrawal from high-dose buprenorphine appears subjectively and objectively milder compared with that of morphine for at least 18 days after drug cessation.

  11. Morphine- and buprenorphine-induced analgesia and antihyperalgesia in a human inflammatory pain model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Secher, EL; Skram, U

    2013-01-01

    Opioid therapy is associated with the development of tolerance and paradoxically increased sensitivity to pain. It has been suggested that buprenorphine is associated with a higher antihyperalgesia/analgesia ratio than μ-opioid receptor agonists. The primary outcome of this study was therefore...... to investigate relative differences in antihyperalgesia and analgesia effects between morphine and buprenorphine in an inflammatory pain model in volunteers. The secondary outcome was to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity and opioid-induced effects on analgesia, antihyperalgesia, and descending...... pain modulation....

  12. Low-dose naloxone provides an abuse-deterrent effect to buprenorphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webster LR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lynn R Webster,1 Michael D Smith,1 Cemal Unal,2 Andrew Finn3 1PRA Health Sciences, Salt Lake City, UT, USA; 2Biometrical Solutions LLC, Raleigh, NC, USA; 3BioDelivery Sciences International, Inc., Raleigh, NC, USA Abstract: In developmental research, plasma buprenorphine concentrations comparable to a 2 mg buprenorphine–naloxone (BN sublingual tablet have been achieved with a 0.75 mg dose of BN buccal film, a small, bioerodible polymer film for application to mucosal membranes. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, single-dose, four-period crossover study in opioid-dependent subjects with chronic pain receiving >100 mg oral morphine equivalents daily who experienced withdrawal following a naloxone challenge dose. The objective of the study was to determine if intravenous (IV naloxone doses of 0.1 and 0.2 mg would produce a withdrawal response when coadministered with a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. Fifteen subjects receiving 90–1,260 mg oral morphine equivalents per day enrolled and completed the study. Precipitated withdrawal occurred in 13% (2/15 of placebo-treated subjects and 47% (7/15 of buprenorphine-treated subjects. When combined with the 0.75 mg dose of buprenorphine, a 0.1 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence of precipitated withdrawal to 60%, and a 0.2 mg dose of naloxone increased the incidence to 73%. By 15 minutes postdose, the mean change in Clinical Opioid Withdrawal Scale (COWS score from predose was 3.0 for placebo, 6.9 for buprenorphine, 9.8 for BN 0.1 mg, and 12.4 for BN 0.2 mg. The mean COWS score with each active treatment was significantly greater than placebo (P<0.001, and the mean COWS score for each of the naloxone-containing treatments was significantly greater than for buprenorphine alone (P<0.001. Naloxone doses as low as 0.1 mg added an abuse-deterrent effect to a 0.75 mg IV dose of buprenorphine. Keywords: opioid dependence, withdrawal symptoms, abuse-deterrent, buprenorphine

  13. Buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine treatment during pregnancy: behavioral effects on the offspring in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen HH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hwei-Hsien Chen,1,2,* Yao-Chang Chiang,3,4,* Zung Fan Yuan,5,6 Chung-Chih Kuo,5,6 Mei-Dan Lai,2 Tsai-Wei Hung,1 Ing-kang Ho,1,3,4 Shao-Tsu Chen2,7 1Center for Neuropsychiatric Research, National Health Research Institutes, Miaoli County, Taiwan; 2Master and PhD Program in Pharmacology and Toxicology, Tzu Chi University, Hualien, Taiwan; 3Center for Drug Abuse and Addiction, China Medical University Hospital, 4Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; 5Master Program in Physiological and Anatomical Medicine, 6Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Tzu Chi University, 7Department of Psychiatry, Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital, Hualien, Taiwan *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Methadone and buprenorphine are widely used for treating people with opioid dependence, including pregnant women. Prenatal exposure to opioids has devastating effects on the development of human fetuses and may induce long-term physical and neurobehavioral changes during postnatal maturation. This study aimed at comparing the behavioral outcomes of young rats prenatally exposed to buprenorphine, methadone, and morphine. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were administered saline, morphine, methadone, and buprenorphine during embryonic days 3–20. The cognitive function, social interaction, anxiety-like behaviors, and locomotor activity of offsprings were examined by novel object recognition test, social interaction test, light–dark transition test, elevated plus-maze, and open-field test between 6 weeks and 10 weeks of age. Prenatal exposure to methadone and buprenorphine did not affect locomotor activity, but significantly impaired novel object recognition and social interaction in both male and female offsprings in the same manner as morphine. Although prenatal exposure to methadone or buprenorphine increased anxiety-like behaviors in the light–dark transition in both male and female

  14. Effects of buprenorphine and meloxicam analgesia on induced cerebral ischemia in C57BL/6 male mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Fauerby, Natasha; Raida, Zindy

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory mice constitute an extensively used model to study the pathologic and functional outcomes of cerebral ischemic stroke. The middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model requires surgical intervention, which potentially can result in postsurgical pain and stress. In the present study, we...... investigated whether buprenorphine and meloxicam, at clinically relevant doses provided pain relief without altering infarct volume in male C57BL/6 mice. Common known side-effects of buprenorphine, including decreased food consumption, were noted after surgery in buprenorphine-treated mice, but these effects...

  15. Improved memory for reward cues following acute buprenorphine administration in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syal, Supriya; Ipser, Jonathan; Terburg, David; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Bos, Peter A; Montoya, Estrella R; Stein, Dan J; van Honk, Jack

    2015-03-01

    In rodents, there is abundant evidence for the involvement of the opioid system in the processing of reward cues, but this system has remained understudied in humans. In humans, the happy facial expression is a pivotal reward cue. Happy facial expressions activate the brain's reward system and are disregarded by subjects scoring high on depressive mood who are low in reward drive. We investigated whether a single 0.2mg administration of the mixed mu-opioid agonist/kappa-antagonist, buprenorphine, would influence short-term memory for happy, angry or fearful expressions relative to neutral faces. Healthy human subjects (n38) participated in a randomized placebo-controlled within-subject design, and performed an emotional face relocation task after administration of buprenorphine and placebo. We show that, compared to placebo, buprenorphine administration results in a significant improvement of memory for happy faces. Our data demonstrate that acute manipulation of the opioid system by buprenorphine increases short-term memory for social reward cues. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Developing and Implementing a New Prison-Based Buprenorphine Treatment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinlock, Timothy W.; Gordon, Michael S.; Schwartz, Robert P.; Fitzgerald, Terrence T.

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that buprenorphine treatment may be a promising intervention for incarcerated individuals with heroin addiction histories. However, its implementation varies from corrections-based methadone because of unique challenges regarding dosing, administration, and regulation. Describing the first randomized clinical trial of…

  17. Mobile phone use patterns and preferences in safety net office-based buprenorphine patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofighi, Babak; Grossman, Ellie; Buirkle, Emily; McNeely, Jennifer; Gourevitch, Marc; Lee, Joshua D

    2015-01-01

    Integrating mobile phone technologies in addiction treatment is of increasing importance and may optimize patient engagement with their care and enhance the delivery of existing treatment strategies. Few studies have evaluated mobile phone and text message (TM) use patterns in persons enrolled in addiction treatment, and none have assessed the use in safety net, office-based buprenorphine practices. A 28-item, quantitative and qualitative semistructured survey was administered to opiate-dependent adults in an urban, publicly funded, office-based buprenorphine program. Survey domains included demographic characteristics, mobile phone and TM use patterns, and preferences pertaining to their recovery. Surveyors approached 73 of the 155 eligible subjects (47%); 71 respondents completed the survey. Nearly all participants reported mobile phone ownership (93%) and TM use (93%), and most reported "very much" or "somewhat" comfort sending TM (79%). Text message contact with 12-step group sponsors, friends, family members, and counselors was also described (32%). Nearly all preferred having their providers' mobile phone number (94%), and alerting the clinic via TM in the event of a potential relapse to receive both supportive TM and a phone call from their buprenorphine provider was also well received (62%). Mobile phone and TM use patterns and preferences among this sample of office-based buprenorphine participants highlight the potential of adopting patient-centered mobile phone-based interventions in this treatment setting.

  18. Comparison of efficacy between buprenorphine and tramadol in the detoxification of opioid (heroin)-dependent subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Jatinder Mohan; Pal, Hemraj; Lal, Rakesh; Jain, Raka; Schooler, Nina; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2013-01-01

    Tramadol is a synthetic opiate and a centrally acting weak m-opioid receptor agonist. The potential advantages of tramadol include ease of administration, low abuse potential, and being nonscheduled. This study compared tramadol and buprenorphine for controlling withdrawal symptoms in patients with opioid dependence syndrome. Consenting male subjects between 20 and 45 years of age who fulfilled the ICD-10-DCR criteria for opiate dependence syndrome were randomly assigned in a double-blind, double-dummy placebo-controlled trial for detoxification. Those with multiple drug dependence, abnormal cardiac, renal and hepatic functions, psychosis, or organic mental illness were excluded. Assessments included Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS), Objective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (OOWS), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), and Side Effect Check List. Subjects were evaluated daily and study duration was 10 days. Sixty two subjects were enrolled. The mean SOWS and OOWS and VAS were significantly lower in the buprenorphine group on second and third day of detoxification as compared to the tramadol group. Although the retention rate was higher for buprenorphine group throughout the study, when compared with tramadol the difference was not significant on any day. Three subjects in the tramadol group had seizures. Tramadol was found to have limited detoxification efficacy in moderate to severe opioid withdrawal and substantial risk of seizures as compared to buprenorphine. Further studies are warranted to examine its efficacy in mild opioid withdrawal symptoms and its potential use in outpatient settings where its administration advantages may be valuable.

  19. The Presence or Absence of QTc Prolongation in Buprenorphine-Naloxone Among Youth with Opioid Dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Sabrina A.; Pecoraro, Anna; Subramaniam, Geetha; Woody, George; Vetter, Victoria L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate buprenorphine-naloxone effects on the QTc in youth with opioid dependence. Buprenorphine is a partial agonist that is an effective treatment for opioid dependence. Compared to methadone it has a lower risk of QTc prolongation in adults but is less well studied in youth. It may also reduce the risk for torsades de pointes (TdP) an uncommon variant of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, that can result in syncope, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. Methods Secondary analysis of ECG data from 95 subjects who participated in a multi-site trial for youth with opioid dependence. Subjects were randomized to a 2-week (DETOX), or a 12-week course of buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP). 12-lead ECGs were done at baseline, weeks 4 and 12, and QTc intervals were hand measured and calculated using Bazett's formula. Increases > 60 milliseconds (ms) were considered clinically significant, and readings > 450 ms (males) and 470 ms (females) indicated a prolonged QTc. Results Mean QTc intervals were higher for BUP than DETOX participants at baseline, week 4, and week 12 (p = 0.045), and females had longer mean QTc intervals than males (p DETOX patients. Minimal changes in the QTc were seen at 4 and 12-weeks in a few patients in both groups. There was no evidence that buprenorphine-naloxone alone increased the QTc to a level that increased the risk for TdP. PMID:26690291

  20. Presence or Absence of QTc Prolongation in Buprenorphine-Naloxone Among Youth With Opioid Dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Sabrina A; Pecoraro, Anna; Subramaniam, Geetha; Woody, George; Vetter, Victoria L

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate buprenorphine-naloxone effects on the QTc in youth with opioid dependence. Buprenorphine is a partial agonist that is an effective treatment for opioid dependence. Compared with methadone, it has a lower risk of QTc prolongation in adults, but is less studied in the youth. It may also reduce the risk of torsades de pointes (TdP)--an uncommon variant of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia--that can result in syncope, ventricular fibrillation, and sudden death. Secondary analysis of the electrocardiogram data from 95 individuals who participated in a multisite trial for youth with opioid dependence. The participants were randomized to a 2-week (DETOX) or a 12-week course of buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP). At baseline, 12-lead electrocardiograms were done at weeks 4 and 12, and QTc intervals were hand-measured and calculated using Bazett formula. Increases above 60 milliseconds were considered clinically significant, and readings above 450 milliseconds (in men) and 470 milliseconds (in women) indicated a prolonged QTc. Mean QTc intervals were higher for BUP than for DETOX participants at baseline, week 4, and week 12 (P = 0.045), and women had longer mean QTc intervals than men (P DETOX patients. Minimal changes in the QTc were seen at 4 and 12 weeks in a few patients in both groups. There was no evidence that buprenorphine-naloxone alone increased the QTc to a level that increased the risk for TdP.

  1. Neuropsychological functioning in buprenorphine maintained patients versus abstinent heroin abusers on naltrexone hydrochloride therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messinis, Lambros; Lyros, Epameinondas; Andrian, Virginia; Katsakiori, Paraskevi; Panagis, George; Georgiou, Vasileios; Papathanasopoulos, Panagiotis

    2009-10-01

    Methadone and buprenorphine are among the most widely employed pharmacological treatments currently available for opioid addiction. Cognitive effects of buprenorphine in abstinent heroin abusers are nevertheless far from being understood. Neuropsychological performance of 18 buprenorphine-maintained patients (BMP) was evaluated relative to that of 32 currently abstinent heroin abusers on naltrexone hydrochloride therapy (FHAN), and 34 non-drug dependent controls. The three groups were demographically balanced. Clinical groups reported histories of similar patterns of drug use and had increased periods of abstinence from any illicit substance use including heroin. The BMP group performed poorer than controls on the RAVLT (encoding and delayed recall of verbal information), CTT (conceptual flexibility, executive functions) and the RBANS figure copy (visual perception) and delayed recall of visual information. There were no significant differences in any of the cognitive measures between the BMP and FHAN groups or between the FHAN group and controls. Furthermore, the non-differing percentage of abnormal cases between the two patient groups led us to infer that treatment with either BPM or FHAN is not accompanied by qualitative differences in the cognitive profiles of these patients. Overall, results suggest that treatment with naltrexone in abstinent heroin abusers may result in less impairment of cognitive functions compared to treatment with buprenorphine. These findings are relevant for improved prognosis and treatment strategies in opioid dependence.

  2. Evaluation of sedation for standing clinical procedures in horses using detomidine combined with buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Polly; Coumbe, Karen; Henson, Frances; Scott, David; Taylor, Alan

    2014-01-01

    To examine the effect of including buprenorphine with detomidine for sedation of horses undergoing clinical procedures. Partially blinded, randomised, prospective clinical field trial. Eighty four client-owned horses scheduled for minor surgery or diagnostic investigation under standing sedation. The effects of buprenorphine (5 μg kg(-1) ) (Group B, n = 46) or placebo (5% glucose solution) (Group C, n = 38) in combination with detomidine (10 μg kg(-1) ) were compared in standing horses undergoing minor clinical procedures. The primary outcome measure was successful completion of the procedure. The degree of sedation and ataxia were scored using simple descriptive scales. Heart and respiratory rates were recorded at 15-30 minute intervals. Parametric data from each group were compared using anova or t-test and non parametric data using the Mann-Whitney U test. The procedure was carried out successfully in 91% of Group B and 63% of Group C (p detomidine, increased after buprenorphine but not glucose administration, was more profound in group B and lasted longer (60 versus 30 minutes) p detomidine 10 and 20 μg kg(-1) with minor side effects similar to other alpha2 agonist/opioid combinations. Detomidine-buprenorphine sedation is suitable for standing procedures in horses. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  3. A randomized clinical trial of buprenorphine for prisoners: Findings at 12-months post-release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Michael S; Kinlock, Timothy W; Schwartz, Robert P; O'Grady, Kevin E; Fitzgerald, Terrence T; Vocci, Frank J

    2017-03-01

    This study examined whether starting buprenorphine treatment prior to prison and after release from prison would be associated with better drug treatment outcomes and whether males and females responded differently to the combination of in-prison treatment and post-release service setting. Study design was a 2 (In-Prison Treatment: Condition: Buprenorphine Treatment: vs. Counseling Only)×2 [Post-Release Service Setting Condition: Opioid Treatment: Program (OTP) vs. Community Health Center (CHC)]×2 (Gender) factorial design. The trial was conducted between September 2008 and July 2012. Follow-up assessments were completed in 2014. Participants were recruited from two Baltimore pre-release prisons (one for men and one for women). Adult pre-release prisoners who were heroin-dependent during the year prior to incarceration were eligible. Post-release assessments were conducted at 1, 3, 6, and 12-month following prison release. Participants (N=211) in the in-prison treatment condition effect had a higher mean number of days of community buprenorphine treatment compared to the condition in which participants initiated medication after release (P=0.005). However, there were no statistically significant hypothesized effects for the in-prison treatment condition in terms of: days of heroin use and crime, and opioid and cocaine positive urine screening test results (all Ps>0.14) and no statistically significant hypothesized gender effects (all Ps>0.18). Although initiating buprenorphine treatment in prison compared to after-release was associated with more days receiving buprenorphine treatment in the designated community treatment program during the 12-months post-release assessment, it was not associated with superior outcomes in terms of heroin and cocaine use and criminal behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of buprenorphine and hepatitis C on liver enzymes in adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogenschutz, Michael P; Abbott, Patrick J; Kushner, Robert; Tonigan, J Scott; Woody, George E

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore changes in transaminase values associated with buprenorphine treatment and hepatitis C status among opioid dependent subjects aged 15-21. 152 subjects seeking treatment for opioid dependence were randomized to 2-week detoxification with buprenorphine/naloxone (DETOX) or 12 weeks buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP). Liver chemistries including transaminases were obtained baseline and at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. 111 patients had at least one set of transaminases during treatment and were included in analyses of treatment effects. Overall, 8/60 BUP participants vs. 12/51 DETOX participants had at least one elevated ALT value during follow-up (Chi-square n.s.). 5/60 BUP participants vs. 11/51 DETOX participants had at least one elevated AST value (Chi-square = 3.194, p = .048). Twenty-eight out of 152 participants were hepatitis C (HCV) positive at baseline, and 4 seroconverted within 12 weeks, 2 in each group. HCV status was significantly associated with transaminase abnormalities (p = .009 and p = .006 for ALT an AST, respectively). HCV status had a strong effect on transaminase abnormalities among participants assigned to DETOX, but not among those assigned to BUP. No evidence was found for hepatotoxicity of buprenorphine in this exploratory analysis. HCV was present in a significant minority of participants and was a significant predictor of transaminase elevation. Results suggest that stabilization on buprenorphine may decrease the frequency of transaminase abnormalities associated with HCV in opioid dependent young people. The high rate of seroconversion underscores the importance of effective treatment and prevention.

  5. Sublingual buprenorphine is effective in the treatment of chronic pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinoff, Herbert L; Barkin, Robert L; Wilson, Geoffrey

    2005-01-01

    Many patients with chronic pain have less than optimal therapeutic outcomes after prolonged treatment with opiate analgesics. Worsening of pain perception, functional capacity, and mood often result. Medical detoxification is often undertaken in this situation. Ninety-five consecutive patients (49 men and 46 women; age range, 26-84) with chronic noncancer pain (maldynia) were referred by local pain clinics for detoxification from long-term opiate analgesic (LTOA) therapy. All patients had failed treatment as manifest by increasing pain levels, worsening functional capacity, and, in 8%, the emergence of opiate addiction. Length of prior LTOA therapy ranged from 1.5 to 27 years (mean, 8.8 years). After a minimum of 12 hours of abstinence from all opiate analgesics, patients were given low doses of sublingual (SL) buprenorphine or buprenorphine/naloxone (Reckitt Benckiser). Maintenance dosing was individualized to treat chronic pain. Daily SL dose of buprenorphine ranged from 4 to 16 mg (mean, 8 mg) in divided doses. Mean duration of treatment is 8.8 months (range, 2.4-16.6 months). At clinic appointments, patients were assessed for pain reports, functional capacity, and mood inventory. Eighty-six percent of patients experienced moderate to substantial relief of pain accompanied by both improved mood and functioning. Patient and family satisfaction was robust. Only 6 patients discontinued therapy secondary to side effects and/or exacerbation of pain. In this open-label study, SL buprenorphine and buprenorphine/naloxone were well tolerated and safe and appeared to be effective in the treatment of chronic pain patients refractory to LTOA.

  6. Use of 0.5% bupivacaine with buprenorphine in minor oral surgical procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Varun; Kaur, Tejinder; Kapila, Sarika; Bhullar, Ramandeep Singh; Dhawan, Amit; Kaur, Yashmeet

    2017-01-01

    Minor oral surgical procedures are the most commonly performed procedures by oral and maxillofacial surgeons. Performance of painless surgical procedure is highly appreciated by the patients and is possible through the use of local anesthesia, conscious sedation or general anesthesia. Postoperative pain can also be controlled by the use of opioids, as opioid receptors exist in the peripheral nervous system and offers the possibility of providing postoperative analgesia in the surgical patient. The present study compares the efficacy of 0.5% bupivacaine versus 0.5% bupivacaine with 0.3 mg buprenorphine in minor oral surgical procedures. The present study was conducted in 50 patients who required minor oral surgical procedures under local anesthesia. Two types of local anesthetic solutions were used- 0.5% bupivacaine with 1:200000 epinephrine in group I and a mixture of 39 ml of 0.5% bupivacaine with epinephrine 1:200000 and 1 ml of 300 μg buprenorphine (3 μg/kg)in group II. Intraoperative and postoperative evaluation was carried out for both the anesthetic solutions. The mean duration of postoperative analgesia in bupivacaine group (508.92 ± 63.30 minutes) was quite less than the buprenorphine combination group (1840.84 ± 819.51 minutes). The mean dose of postoperative analgesic medication in bupivacaine group (1.64 ± 0.99 tablets) was higher than buprenorphine combination group (0.80 ± 1.08 tablets). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding the onset of action of the anesthetic effect and duration of anesthesia. Buprenorphine can be used in combination with bupivacaine for patients undergoing minor oral surgical procedures to provide postoperative analgesia for a longer duration.

  7. Cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine and naltrexone treatments for heroin dependence in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah; Chawarski, Marek; Mazlan, Mahmud; Ng, Nora; Schottenfeld, Richard

    2012-01-01

    To aid public health policymaking, we studied the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine, naltrexone, and placebo interventions for heroin dependence in Malaysia. We estimated the cost-effectiveness ratios of three treatments for heroin dependence. We used a microcosting methodology to determine fixed, variable, and societal costs of each intervention. Cost data were collected from investigators, staff, and project records on the number and type of resources used and unit costs; societal costs for participants' time were estimated using Malaysia's minimum wage. Costs were estimated from a provider and societal perspective and reported in 2004 US dollars. Muar, Malaysia. 126 patients enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in Malaysia (2003-2005) receiving counseling and buprenorphine, naltrexone, or placebo for treatment of heroin dependence. Primary outcome measures included days in treatment, maximum consecutive days of heroin abstinence, days to first heroin use, and days to heroin relapse. Secondary outcome measures included treatment retention, injection drug use, illicit opiate use, AIDS Risk Inventory total score, and drug risk and sex risk subscores. Buprenorphine was more effective and more costly than naltrexone for all primary and most secondary outcomes. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were below $50 for primary outcomes, mostly below $350 for secondary outcomes. Naltrexone was dominated by placebo for all secondary outcomes at almost all endpoints. Incremental treatment costs were driven mainly by medication costs, especially the price of buprenorphine. Buprenorphine appears to be a cost-effective alternative to naltrexone that might enhance economic productivity and reduce drug use over a longer term.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine and naltrexone treatments for heroin dependence in Malaysia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Prah Ruger

    Full Text Available To aid public health policymaking, we studied the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine, naltrexone, and placebo interventions for heroin dependence in Malaysia.We estimated the cost-effectiveness ratios of three treatments for heroin dependence. We used a microcosting methodology to determine fixed, variable, and societal costs of each intervention. Cost data were collected from investigators, staff, and project records on the number and type of resources used and unit costs; societal costs for participants' time were estimated using Malaysia's minimum wage. Costs were estimated from a provider and societal perspective and reported in 2004 US dollars.Muar, Malaysia.126 patients enrolled in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in Malaysia (2003-2005 receiving counseling and buprenorphine, naltrexone, or placebo for treatment of heroin dependence.Primary outcome measures included days in treatment, maximum consecutive days of heroin abstinence, days to first heroin use, and days to heroin relapse. Secondary outcome measures included treatment retention, injection drug use, illicit opiate use, AIDS Risk Inventory total score, and drug risk and sex risk subscores.Buprenorphine was more effective and more costly than naltrexone for all primary and most secondary outcomes. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratios were below $50 for primary outcomes, mostly below $350 for secondary outcomes. Naltrexone was dominated by placebo for all secondary outcomes at almost all endpoints. Incremental treatment costs were driven mainly by medication costs, especially the price of buprenorphine.Buprenorphine appears to be a cost-effective alternative to naltrexone that might enhance economic productivity and reduce drug use over a longer term.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and Paw Withdrawal Pressure in Female Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus) Treated with Sustained-Release Buprenorphine and Buprenorphine Hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian J; Wegenast, Daniel J; Hansen, Ryan J; Hess, Ann M; Kendall, Lon V

    2016-11-01

    Providing appropriate analgesia is essential in minimizing pain and maintaining optimal animal care and welfare in laboratory animals. Guinea pigs are common animal models in biomedical research, often requiring analgesic support. Here we evaluated the pharmacokinetics and efficacy of a sustained-release formulation of buprenorphine (Bup-SR) in this species. Guinea pigs (n = 7 each group) received either Bup-HCl (0.05 mg/kg BID for 3 d) or Bup-SR (0.3 mg/kg once). Plasma collection and measurement of paw-withdrawal pressure (PWP) was conducted at 0, 1, 3, 6, 12, 26, 48, and 72 h after treatment. Plasma levels of Bup-HCl peaked at 2331 pg/mL at 1 h after administration and declined to 165 pg/mL by 12 h. Plasma concentrations of Bup-SR peaked at 1344 pg/mL at 26 h after administration and declined to 429 pg/mL by 48 h. The PWP of the Bup-HCltreated guinea pigs peaked at 674 g at 1 h and declined to 402 g at 6 h, whereas that of Bup-SRtreated guinea pigs at 1 h was 361 g, 555 g at 6 h (significantly higher than that after Bup-HCl), and peaked at 680 g at 12 h. The PWP of both treatments was similar from 24 to 72 h and ranged from 348 to 450 g. The plasma concentration and PWP showed good correlation. These results suggest that Bup-SR provides consistent analgesia equivalent to that of Bup-HCl for a prolonged period of time and that Bup-SR is an alternative method of analgesia in guinea pigs.

  10. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Ghasem; Khorsand, Mahmood; Shamloo, Alireza Sepehri; Jarahi, Lida; Zirak, Nahid

    2015-10-01

    Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient's satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5µg/kg sublingually) and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously). Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes), and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours). SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P<0.05. Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics. Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P<0.001). Postoperative mean heart rate in the buprenorphine group was four beats lower than the morphine group (P<0.001). Also, in the buprenorphine 48.6% and in the morphine group 86.7% of cases were conscious in recovery (P=0.001) with a higher rate of pruritus in the latter group (P=0.001). Sublingual buprenorphine administration before anesthesia induction in closed reduction surgery can lead to better postoperative pain control in comparison to intravenous morphine. Due to simple usage and longer postoperative sedation, sublingual buprenorphine is recommended as a suitable drug in closed reduction surgery.

  11. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Ghasem Soltani; Mahmood Khorsand; ALireza Sepehri Shamloo; Lida Jarahi; Nahid Zirak

    2015-01-01

    Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They wer...

  12. At the Expense of a Life: Race, Class, and the Meaning of Buprenorphine in Pharmaceuticalized “Care”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatcher, Alexandrea E.; Mendoza, Sonia; Hansen, Helena

    2018-01-01

    Background/Objective Office-based buprenorphine maintenance has been legalized and promoted as a treatment approach that not only expands access to care, but also reduces the stigma of addiction treatment by placing it in a mainstream clinical setting. At the same time, there are differences in buprenorphine treatment utilization by race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Methods This article draws on qualitative data from interviews with 77 diverse patients receiving buprenorphine in a primary care clinic and two outpatient substance dependence clinics to examine differences in patients’ experiences of stigma in relation their need for psychosocial supports and services. Results Management of stigma and perception of social needs varied significantly by ethnicity, race and SES, with white educated patients best able to capitalize on the medical focus and confidentiality of office-based buprenorphine, given that they have other sources of support outside of the clinic, and Black or Latino/a low income patients experiencing office-based buprenorphine treatment as isolating. Conclusion Drawing on Agamben’s theory of “bare life,” and on the theory of intersectionality, the article argues that without attention to the multiple oppressions and survival needs of addiction patients who are further stigmatized by race and class, buprenorphine treatment can become a form of clinical abandonment. PMID:29161171

  13. Diversion and injection of buprenorphine-naloxone film two years post-introduction in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larance, Briony; Mattick, Richard; Ali, Robert; Lintzeris, Nicholas; Jenkinson, Rebecca; White, Nancy; Kihas, Ivana; Cassidy, Rosemary; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    We report 2 years of post-marketing surveillance of the diversion and injection of buprenorphine-naloxone (BNX) film following its introduction in 2011. Interviews were conducted with people who inject drugs regularly (PWID) (2004-2013), opioid substitution therapy clients (2013, n = 492) and key experts (n = 44). Key outcomes were unsanctioned removal of supervised doses, diversion, injection and street price. Prevalence of past 6-month injection among PWID was adjusted for background availability of opioid substitution therapy medications using sales data. Among out-of-treatment PWID, the levels of regular (weekly+) BNX film injection were comparable to methadone and BNX tablets, and lower than mono-buprenorphine, adjusting for background availability. Fewer BNX film clients [3%; 95% (CI) 1-5] regularly injected their medication than mono-buprenorphine clients (25%; 95% CI 11-39), but at levels equivalent to those among methadone (3%; 95% CI 1-6) and BNX tablet clients (2%; 95% CI 0-6). Key experts perceived BNX film needed less supervised dosing time as it dissolved rapidly and was harder to remove from the mouth than sublingual tablets; however, removal of supervised doses was higher among BNX film clients (15%; 95% CI: 10-20) than methadone clients (3%; 95% CI 1-6), and not significantly different from BNX tablet (11%; 95% CI 2-21) and mono-buprenorphine clients (31%; 95% CI 16-46). Two years post-introduction, levels of BNX film diversion and injection remained comparable with those for methadone and BNX tablets, and lower than mono-buprenorphine. We found no evidence that BNX film has lower non-adherence and diversion than the tablet formulation. [Larance B, Mattick R, Ali R, Lintzeris N, Jenkinson R, White N, Kihas I, Cassidy R, Degenhardt L. Diversion and injection of buprenorphine-naloxone film two years post-introduction in Australia. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  14. Extended vs short-term buprenorphine-naloxone for treatment of opioid-addicted youth: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woody, George E; Poole, Sabrina A; Subramaniam, Geetha; Dugosh, Karen; Bogenschutz, Michael; Abbott, Patrick; Patkar, Ashwin; Publicker, Mark; McCain, Karen; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Forman, Robert; Vetter, Victoria; McNicholas, Laura; Blaine, Jack; Lynch, Kevin G; Fudala, Paul

    2008-11-05

    The usual treatment for opioid-addicted youth is detoxification and counseling. Extended medication-assisted therapy may be more helpful. To evaluate the efficacy of continuing buprenorphine-naloxone for 12 weeks vs detoxification for opioid-addicted youth. Clinical trial at 6 community programs from July 2003 to December 2006 including 152 patients aged 15 to 21 years who were randomized to 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone or a 14-day taper (detox). Patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group were prescribed up to 24 mg per day for 9 weeks and then tapered to week 12; patients in the detox group were prescribed up to 14 mg per day and then tapered to day 14. All were offered weekly individual and group counseling. Opioid-positive urine test result at weeks 4, 8, and 12. The number of patients younger than 18 years was too small to analyze separately, but overall, patients in the detox group had higher proportions of opioid-positive urine test results at weeks 4 and 8 but not at week 12 (chi(2)(2) = 4.93, P = .09). At week 4, 59 detox patients had positive results (61%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 47%-75%) vs 58 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (26%; 95% CI = 14%-38%). At week 8, 53 detox patients had positive results (54%; 95% CI = 38%-70%) vs 52 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (23%; 95% CI = 11%-35%). At week 12, 53 detox patients had positive results (51%; 95% CI = 35%-67%) vs 49 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (43%; 95% CI = 29%-57%). By week 12, 16 of 78 detox patients (20.5%) remained in treatment vs 52 of 74 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone patients (70%; chi(2)(1) = 32.90, P < .001). During weeks 1 through 12, patients in the 12-week buprenorphine-naloxone group reported less opioid use (chi(2)(1) = 18.45, P < .001), less injecting (chi(2)(1) = 6.00, P = .01), and less nonstudy addiction treatment (chi(2)(1) = 25.82, P < .001). High levels of opioid use occurred in both groups at follow-up. Four of 83 patients who tested

  15. The introduction of buprenorphine-naloxone film in opioid substitution therapy in Australia: Uptake and issues arising from changing buprenorphine formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larance, Briony; Dietze, Paul; Ali, Robert; Lintzeris, Nicholas; White, Nancy; Jenkinson, Rebecca; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2015-11-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (BNX) film for opioid dependence treatment was introduced in Australia in 2011. A key difference in State policy approaches saw transfer from BNX tablets to BNX film mandated in South Australia (SA) with New South Wales (NSW) and Victoria (VIC) having less stringent policies. This study examined (i) how initiations and transfers were implemented, (ii) the profile and predictors of adverse effects as self-reported by BNX film clients, and (iii) dosing issues. Survey of 334 buprenorphine (BPN), BNX tablet and BNX film clients and semi-structured interviews with 39 key experts (KEs) in 2012. Comparisons are made between clients interviewed in SA versus NSW and VIC combined. Among the 180 current BNX film clients, 23% started treatment on BNX film, 18% requested a transfer to BNX film and 59% (n = 106) reported their clinic/prescriber recommended transfer to BNX film. Among clients who were offered but refused a transfer to BNX film (n = 66), the most common reason was 'I am happy with my current treatment and do not see a reason to change' (53%). Some opioid substitution therapy clients and KE viewed transfers as 'forced' (i.e. no choice of buprenorphine formulation). Multivariable regression showed residing in SA (vs. NSW/VIC) and a shorter length of current treatment episode were associated with more BNX film-attributed adverse effects but clinic/prescriber-recommended transfer was not. The introduction of BNX film in Australia varied across States. A perception of restricted choice in medication may have undermined initial acceptance in SA. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  16. Pharmacodynamic Modelling of Placebo and Buprenorphine Effects on Event-Related Potentials in Experimental Pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Rasmus V; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate placebo and buprenorphine effects on event-related potentials (ERPs) in experimental pain and the potential benefit of population pharmacodynamic modelling in data analysis. Nineteen healthy volunteers received transdermal placebo and buprenorphine...... in a cross-over study. Drug plasma concentrations and ERPs after electrical stimulation at the median nerve with intensity adjusted to pain detection threshold were recorded until 144 hrs after administration. Placebo and concentration-effect models were fitted to data using non-linear mixed......, pharmacodynamic modelling was successfully implemented to allow for placebo and variability correction in ERP of experimental pain. Improved outcome of ERP studies can be expected if variation between subjects and study occasions can be identified and described....

  17. [Understanding Oral and Nasal Mucosal Absorption of Fentanyl, and Rectal Absorption of Buprenorphine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, Naohito; Shimoyama, Megumi; Kubota, Yukino; Kato, Yoko

    2015-11-01

    One of the key issues in the treatment of pain is to choose the appropriate route and dosage form of analgesics for each individual patient in pain. New drug forms of fentanyl absorbed by oral or nasal mucosa, and buprenorphine absorbed by rectal mucosa are described in this chapter. Only lipophilic opioids such as fentanyl and buprenorphine can be absorbed via the mucosa of oral or nasal cavity of the human body. The T max of rapid onset opioids (ROO) such as fentanyl buccal or sublingual tablets is the fastest among various dosage forms of opioid analgesics. However, such rapid increase in plasma concentration of fentanyl by ROO formulations may cause the risk of respiratory depression. Safe ways to use ROO analgesics are described.

  18. New developments in managing opioid addiction: impact of a subdermal buprenorphine implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itzoe M

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available MariaLisa Itzoe, Michael Guarnieri Department of Neurological Surgery, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Opioid addiction to prescription and illicit drugs is a serious and growing problem. In the US alone, >2.4 million people suffer from opioid use disorder. Government and pharmaceutical agencies have begun to address this crisis with recently released and revised task forces and medication-assisted therapies (MAT. For decades, oral or intravenous (IV MATs have helped patients in their recovery by administration of opioid agonists (methadone, buprenorphine, oxycodone, antagonists (naltrexone, naloxone, and combinations of the two (buprenorphine/naloxone. While shown to be successful, particularly when combined with psychological counseling, oral and IV forms of treatment come with constraints and challenges. Patients can become addicted to the agonists themselves, and there is increased risk for diversion, abuse, or missed dosages. Consequently, long-acting implants have begun to be developed as a potentially preferable method of agonist delivery. To date, the newest implant approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (May 2016 is Probuphine®, which delivers steady-state levels of buprenorphine over the course of 6 months. Numerous studies have demonstrated its efficacy and safety. Yet, implants come with their own risks such as surgical site irritation, possible movement, and protrusion of implant out of skin. This review introduces the opioid abuse epidemic, examines existing medications used for therapy, and highlights Probuphine as a new treatment option. Costs associated with MATs are also discussed. Keywords: addiction, opioids, medication-assisted therapy, long-acting implant, buprenorphine, Probuphine®

  19. Motivational assessment of non-treatment buprenorphine research participation in heroin dependent individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papke, Gina; Greenwald, Mark K

    2012-06-01

    Heroin abuse remains an important public health problem, particularly in economically disadvantaged areas. Insight into this problem is gained from interviewing addicted individuals. However, we lack systematic data on factors that motivate heroin users to participate in non-treatment research that offers both financial incentives (compensation) and non-financial incentives (e.g., short-term medication). To better understand the relative importance of several types of personal motivations to participate in non-treatment buprenorphine research, and to relate self-motivations to social, economic, demographic and drug use factors. Heroin dependent volunteers (N=235 total; 57 female and 178 male; 136 African American, 86 Caucasian, and 13 Other) applied for non-therapeutic buprenorphine research in an urban outpatient setting from 2004 to 2008. We conducted a semi-structured behavioral economic interview, after which participants ranked 11 possible motivations for research participation. Although the study was repeatedly described as non-treatment research involving buprenorphine, participants often ranked some treatment-related motivations as important (wanting to reduce/stop heroin use, needing a medication to get stabilized/detoxify). Some motivations correlated with income, heroin use, and years since marketing of buprenorphine. Two dimensions emerged from principal component analysis of motivation rankings: (1) treatment motivation vs. greater immediate needs and (2) commitment to trying alternatives vs. a more accepting attitude toward traditional interventions. In summary, heroin addicts' self-motivations to engage in non-therapeutic research are complex--they value economic gain but not exclusively or primarily--and relate to variables such as socioeconomic factors and drug use. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Criminal charges prior to and after initiation of office-based buprenorphine treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Elizabeth E

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is little data on the impact of office-based buprenorphine therapy on criminal activity. The goal of this study was to determine the impact of primary care clinic-based buprenorphine maintenance therapy on rates of criminal charges and the factors associated with criminal charges in the 2 years after initiation of treatment. Methods We collected demographic and outcome data on 252 patients who were given at least one prescription for buprenorphine. We searched a public database of criminal charges and recorded criminal charges prior to and after enrollment. We compared the total number of criminal cases and drug cases 2 years before versus 2 years after initiation of treatment. Results There was at least one criminal charge made against 38% of the subjects in the 2 years after initiation of treatment; these subjects were more likely to have used heroin, to have injected drugs, to have had any prior criminal charges, and recent criminal charges. There was no significant difference in the number of subjects with any criminal charge or a drug charge before and after initiation of treatment. Likewise, the mean number of all cases and drug cases was not significantly different between the two periods. However, among those who were opioid-negative for 6 or more months in the first year of treatment, there was a significant decline in criminal cases. On multivariable analysis, having recent criminal charges was significantly associated with criminal charges after initiation of treatment (adjusted odds ratio 3.92; subjects who were on opioid maintenance treatment prior to enrollment were significantly less likely to have subsequent criminal charges (adjusted odds ratio 0.52. Conclusions Among subjects with prior criminal charges, initiation of office-based buprenorphine treatment did not appear to have a significant impact on subsequent criminal charges.

  1. Cost-Effectiveness of Buprenorphine and Naltrexone Treatments for Heroin Dependence in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah; Chawarski, Marek; Mazlan, Mahmud; Ng, Nora; Schottenfeld, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Aims To aid public health policymaking, we studied the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine, naltrexone, and placebo interventions for heroin dependence in Malaysia. Design We estimated the cost-effectiveness ratios of three treatments for heroin dependence. We used a microcosting methodology to determine fixed, variable, and societal costs of each intervention. Cost data were collected from investigators, staff, and project records on the number and type of resources used and unit costs; soci...

  2. Evaluation of the Tolerability of Switching Patients on Chronic Full ?-Opioid Agonist Therapy to Buccal Buprenorphine

    OpenAIRE

    Webster, Lynn; Gruener, Daniel; Kirby, Todd; Xiang, Qinfang; Tzanis, Evan; Finn, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Objective?Assess whether patients with chronic pain receiving 80 to 220?mg oral morphine sulfate equivalent of a full ?-opioid agonist could be transitioned to buccal buprenorphine at approximately 50% of their full dose without inducing opioid withdrawal or sacrificing analgesic efficacy. Methods.?A randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active-controlled, two-period crossover study in adult patients receiving around-the-clock full opioid agonist therapy and confirmed to be opioid dependent...

  3. Association between the DRD2 A1 allele and response to methadone and buprenorphine maintenance treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt, Daniel T; Coller, Janet K; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2006-06-05

    The TaqI A polymorphism (A(1)) of the dopamine D(2) receptor gene (DRD2), although not a specific predictor of opioid dependence, has been strongly associated with high levels of prior heroin use and poor treatment outcomes among methadone maintenance patients. The aims of this study were to confirm these findings via a retrospective analysis of A(1) allele frequency in methadone (n = 46) and buprenorphine (n = 25) patients, and non-opioid-dependent controls (n = 95). Subjects were genotyped at the DRD2 TaqI A locus using PCR amplification followed by TaqI restriction enzyme digestion and gel electrophoresis. For methadone and buprenorphine subjects, heroin use (prior to treatment), treatment outcomes, and withdrawal occurrence were determined from comprehensive case notes. No significant differences in A(1) allele frequency (%) were observed between: methadone (19.6%), buprenorphine (18.0%), and control (17.9%) groups (P > 0.7); successful and poor treatment outcome groups, methadone: 20.0% and 19.2%, respectively (P = 1.0); buprenorphine: 18.4% and 20.0%, respectively (P = 1.0). Also, there were no significant relationships between TaqI A genotype and prior heroin use (P = 0.47). However, among the successful methadone subjects, significantly fewer A(1) allele carriers experienced withdrawal than non-A(1) carriers (P = 0.04). In conclusion, the DRD2 genotype effects did not affect opioid maintenance treatment outcomes. This suggests the need for a further prospective investigation into the role of the DRD2 A(1) allele in heroin use and response to maintenance pharmacotherapies for opioid dependence.

  4. Sublingual Buprenorphine and Methadone Maintenance Treatment: A Three-Year Follow-Up of Quality of Life Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore M. Giacomuzzi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to compare long-term outcome effects on the quality of life (QOL of oral methadone with sublingual buprenorphine maintenance treatment. The QOL status of opioid-dependent patients was assessed using the German version (“Berlin Quality of Life Profile” of the Lancashire Quality of Life Profile. Physical symptoms were measured using the Opiate Withdrawal Scale (OWS. Urine tests were carried out randomly to detect additional consumption. In the first study period, 53 opioid-dependent subjects were enrolled and 25 could be reached after 3 years. The retention rate was 50% for methadone and 45% for buprenorphine (p = 0.786. Baseline values of the total sample (completers and noncompleters QOL and somatic complaints did not show significant differences between the two treatment groups. QOL characteristics at 6 months of treatment of the buprenorphine completer and noncompleter groups differed significantly regarding job (p = 0.013, family, and total score of physical symptoms (p = 0.002, in which the completer group showed the more favorable values. Concerning physical symptoms at 36 months, logistic regression revealed significantly less stomach cramps (p = 0.037 and fatigue and tiredness (p = 0.034 in buprenorphine compared to the methadone. Moreover, the buprenorphine-maintained group showed significantly less additional consumption of benzodiazepines (p = 0.015 compared with methadone participants. It is concluded that opioid addicts improved their QOL and health status when treated with methadone or buprenorphine. In summary, regarding QOL and health status, the present data indicate that buprenorphine is also a useful long-term alternative for maintenance treatment of opioid-dependent patients.

  5. Postoperative analgesic effects of dexketoprofen, buprenorphine and tramadol in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgaz, J; Navarrete, R; Muñoz-Rascón, P; Domínguez, J M; Fernández-Sarmiento, J A; Gómez-Villamandos, R J; Granados, M M

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the postoperative analgesic effects of dexketoprofen, tramadol, and buprenorphine in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Seventy-five adult female dogs were randomly assigned to receive an intravenous injection (IV) of 1mg/kg of dexketoprofen (D), 0.02 mg/kg of buprenorphine (B) or 2mg/kg of tramadol (T). Pain assessment was performed during 48 h after ovariohysterectomy using a dynamic interactive visual analogue scale (DIVAS) and Glasgow composite measure pain scale (CMPS-SF). Rescue analgesia was required in 43%, 21%, and 5% of dogs in the B, T, and D groups, respectively, with significant differences between B and D (p=0.010) groups. The DIVAS and CMPS-SF values of the B group were significantly higher than those of the T and D groups. The most common undesirable effect was dysphoria in dexketoprofen group. Tramadol and dexketoprofen provide superior postoperative analgesia compared with buprenorphine in dogs undergoing ovariohysterectomy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. New developments in managing opioid addiction: impact of a subdermal buprenorphine implant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzoe, MariaLisa; Guarnieri, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Opioid addiction to prescription and illicit drugs is a serious and growing problem. In the US alone, >2.4 million people suffer from opioid use disorder. Government and pharmaceutical agencies have begun to address this crisis with recently released and revised task forces and medication-assisted therapies (MAT). For decades, oral or intravenous (IV) MATs have helped patients in their recovery by administration of opioid agonists (methadone, buprenorphine, oxycodone), antagonists (naltrexone, naloxone), and combinations of the two (buprenorphine/naloxone). While shown to be successful, particularly when combined with psychological counseling, oral and IV forms of treatment come with constraints and challenges. Patients can become addicted to the agonists themselves, and there is increased risk for diversion, abuse, or missed dosages. Consequently, long-acting implants have begun to be developed as a potentially preferable method of agonist delivery. To date, the newest implant approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (May 2016) is Probuphine ® , which delivers steady-state levels of buprenorphine over the course of 6 months. Numerous studies have demonstrated its efficacy and safety. Yet, implants come with their own risks such as surgical site irritation, possible movement, and protrusion of implant out of skin. This review introduces the opioid abuse epidemic, examines existing medications used for therapy, and highlights Probuphine as a new treatment option. Costs associated with MATs are also discussed.

  7. Gender issues in the pharmacotherapy of opioid-addicted women: buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, Annemarie; Jung, Erika; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Fischer, Gabriele

    2010-04-01

    Gender, a biological determinant of mental health and illness, plays a critical role in determining patients' susceptibility, exposure to mental health risks, and related outcomes. Regarding sex differences in the epidemiology of opioid dependence, one third of the patients are women of childbearing age. Women have an earlier age of initiation of substance use and a more rapid progression to drug involvement and dependence than men. Generally few studies exist which focus on the special needs of women in opioid maintenance therapy. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of treatment options for opioid-dependent women, with a special focus on buprenorphine, and to look at recent findings related to other factors that should be taken into consideration in optimizing the treatment of opioid-dependent women. Issues addressed include the role of gender in the choice of medication assisted treatment, sex differences in pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine drug interactions, cardiac interactions, induction of buprenorphine in pregnant patients, the neonatal abstinence syndrome and breastfeeding. This paper aims to heighten the awareness for the need to take gender into consideration when making treatment decisions in an effort to optimize services and enhance the quality of life of women suffering from substance abuse.

  8. Pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine after single-dose subcutaneous administration in red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummrow, Maya S; Tseng, Florina; Hesse, Leah; Court, Michael

    2008-12-01

    Buprenorphine, a mu opioid receptor agonist, is expected to be a suitable analgesic drug for use in reptiles. However, to date, dosage recommendations have been based on anecdotal observations. The aim of this study was to provide baseline pharmacokinetic data in red-eared sliders (Trachemys scripta elegans) targeting a plasma level of 1 ng/ml reported effective for analgesia in humans. Serial blood samples were taken after subcutaneous injection of buprenorphine, and plasma buprenorphine levels were measured by radioimmunoassay. Pharmacokinetic parameters of a lower dose (0.02 mg/kg) injected into the forelimb were compared with a higher dose (0.05 mg/kg) given in the same forelimb as well as a lower dose (0.02 mg/kg) given in the hind limb of the same animals with 2 wk between studies. After administration of 0.05 mg/kg in the front limb, 85% of animals maintained the minimum effective plasma level for 24 hr, while only 43% of animals maintained this level after 0.02 mg/kg. After hind limb injection at 0.02 mg/kg, maximum plasma concentrations and areas under the buprenorphine concentration-time curve were less than 20% and 70%, respectively, of values after forelimb injection, consistent with substantial first pass extraction by the liver. Furthermore, a secondary rise in the buprenorphine level was found after having only a hind limb injection, probably from enterohepatic recirculation of glucuronidated drug. In conclusion, buprenorphine dosages of at least 0.075 mg/kg s.i.d. should be appropriate for evaluation of analgesia efficacy, and front limb administration may be preferable to hind limb administration for optimal drug exposure.

  9. Treatment readiness, attitudes toward, and experiences with methadone and buprenorphine maintenance therapy among people who inject drugs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Aishwarya; Bazazi, Alexander R; Yee, Ilias; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about attitudes toward and experiences with opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) among people who inject drugs in Malaysia, a country where people who inject drugs comprise 1.3% of the adult population. In 2010, 460 people who inject drugs in Greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were surveyed to evaluate attitudes toward and experiences with OMT and treatment readiness. Attitudes towards OMT with both methadone and buprenorphine were assessed using an opinions scale. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess correlates of treatment readiness, measured with the 19-item Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). All 460 participants used opioids and nearly all (99.1%) met criteria for opioid dependence. Few had had previous experience with methadone (9.3%) or buprenorphine (12.6%) maintenance therapy, yet many had used methadone (55.2%) or buprenorphine (51.7%) outside of treatment settings. Fifteen percent had injected buprenorphine in the past month, and of the few that were currently receiving buprenorphine maintenance therapy, almost all were injecting it. The majority of subjects exhibited a moderate level of treatment readiness and a preference for methadone over buprenorphine. Those with low treatment readiness scores were more likely to have previous experience with compulsory drug detention centers (polder age (ppeople who inject drugs that may be improved by addressing factors that influence patient attitudes. Those individuals with moderate treatment readiness may be targeted by brief motivational and cognitive interventions in primary care, prisons or OMT clinics aimed at improving entry into and retention in treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment readiness, attitudes toward, and experiences with methadone and buprenorphine maintenance therapy among people who inject drugs in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Aishwarya; Bazazi, Alexander R.; Yee, Ilias; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about attitudes toward and experiences with opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) among people who inject drugs in Malaysia, a country where people who inject drugs comprise 1.3% of the adult population. Methods In 2010, 460 people who inject drugs in Greater Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia were surveyed to evaluate attitudes toward and experience with OMT and treatment readiness. Attitudes towards OMT with both methadone and buprenorphine were assessed using an opinions scale. Multivariable linear regression was used to assess correlates of treatment readiness, measured with the 19-item Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES). Results All 460 participants used opioids and nearly all (99.1%) met criteria for opioid dependence. Few had had previous experience with methadone (9.3%) or buprenorphine (12.6%) maintenance therapy, yet many had used methadone (55.2%) or buprenorphine (51.7%) outside of treatment settings. Fifteen percent had injected buprenorphine in the past month, and of the few that were currently receiving buprenorphine maintenance therapy, almost all were injecting it. The majority of subjects exhibited a moderate level of treatment readiness and a preference for methadone over buprenorphine. Those with low treatment readiness scores were more likely to have previous experience with compulsory drug detention centers (p<0.01), needle/syringe exchange programs (p<0.005), or be of Indian ethnicity (p<0.001). Past use of methadone (p<0.01), older age (p<0.001), stress symptom severity (p<0.001), and sharing of needles or syringes (p<0.05) were associated with higher treatment readiness scores. Conclusion There are suboptimal levels of OMT experience among people who inject drugs that may be improved by addressing factors that influence patient attitudes. Those individuals with moderate treatment readiness may be targeted by brief motivational and cognitive interventions in primary care, prisons or OMT clinics

  11. Messages about methadone and buprenorphine in reality television: a content analysis of celebrity rehab with Dr. Drew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roose, Robert; Fuentes, Liza; Cheema, Mandeep

    2012-08-01

    Medication-assisted treatment for opioid dependence is safe and effective, yet negative perceptions about methadone and buprenorphine may discourage patients from entering treatment. One source of information that may influence viewers' perceptions is television. We performed a content analysis of a popular reality television program on addiction treatment. Although many patients had histories of opioid use, there were no positive messages about methadone or buprenorphine. The two main messages were that they (1) are primarily drugs of abuse, and (2) not acceptable treatment options. These messages reinforce negative stereotypes and may perpetuate stigma. There were multiple missed opportunities to provide evidence-based information.

  12. Preliminary investigation comparing a detomidine continuous rate infusion combined with either morphine or buprenorphine for standing sedation in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Joanna J; MacFarlane, Paul D; Love, Emma J; Tremaine, Henry; Taylor, Polly M; Murrell, Joanna C

    2016-03-01

    To compare sedative and analgesic properties of buprenorphine or morphine for standing procedures combined with a detomidine continuous rate infusion (CRI). Blinded, prospective, randomized clinical pilot study. Ten horses presented for dental or sinus procedures. Horses received 0.02 mg kg(-1) acepromazine intravenously (IV), followed 30 minutes later by detomidine 10 μg kg(-1) IV. Five minutes later, buprenorphine 0.01 mg kg(-1) (n = 6) or morphine 0.1 mg kg(-1) (n = 4) was administered IV. Detomidine was administered by CRI (0.2 μg kg(-1) minute(-1)) and adjusted to maintain appropriate sedation. Heart rate, respiratory frequency, gastrointestinal motility and rectal temperature were measured; pain, ataxia and sedation were scored. Sedation, pain scores and ataxia scores were analysed using a mixed linear model. Detomidine dose and procedure success scores were compared using Wilcoxon's rank sum test. Complications between groups were analysed using Fisher's exact test. Two horses had incomplete data. Weights and ages were not different between groups (p = 0.15 and p = 0.42, respectively). The dose rate for detomidine was not different between groups (0.33 ± 0.02 μg kg(-1) minute(-1) in the buprenorphine group and 0.33 ± 0.05 μg kg(-1) minute(-1), in the morphine group p = 0.89). Intraoperative visual analogue scale scores were greater after buprenorphine than morphine (mean ± SD, buprenorphine 48 ± 4, morphine 40 ± 5, p = 0.0497). Procedure duration was not different between groups (buprenorphine 142 ± 33, morphine 140 ± 12 minutes). All horses treated with buprenorphine experienced complications compared with none in the morphine group (p = 0.0286). At the doses used, buprenorphine produced greater sedation but more post-operative complications than morphine. However, Type I or Type II errors cannot be excluded and larger studies are required to confirm these findings. © 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of

  13. Sexual Dysfunction in Heroin Dependents: A Comparison between Methadone and Buprenorphine Maintenance Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Yee

    Full Text Available Methadone has long been regarded as an effective treatment for opioid dependence. However, many patients discontinue maintenance therapy because of its side effects, with one of the most common being sexual dysfunction. Buprenorphine is a proven alternative to methadone. This study aimed to investigate sexual dysfunction in opioid-dependent men on buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT and methadone maintenance treatment (MMT. The secondary aim was to investigate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and the quality of life in these patients.Two hundred thirty-eight men participated in this cross-sectional study. Four questionnaires were used, the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, Opiate Treatment Index, Malay version of the International Index of Erectile Function 15 (Mal-IIEF-15, and World Health Organization Quality of Life-BREF Scale. Multivariate analysis of covariance was used to examine the relationship between MMT and BMT and the Mal-IIEF 15 scores while controlling for all the possible confounders.The study population consisted of 171 patients (71.8% on MMT and 67 (28.2% on BMT. Patients in the MMT group who had a sexual partner scored significantly lower in the sexual desire domain (p < 0.012 and overall satisfaction (p = 0.043 domain compared with their counterparts in the BMT group. Similarly, patients in the MMT group without a sexual partner scored significantly lower in the orgasmic function domain (p = 0.008 compared with those in the BMT group without a partner. Intercourse satisfaction (p = 0.026 and overall satisfaction (p = 0.039 were significantly associated with the social relationships domain after adjusting for significantly correlated sociodemographic variables.Sexual functioning is critical for improving the quality of life in patients in an opioid rehabilitation program. Our study showed that buprenorphine causes less sexual dysfunction than methadone. Thus, clinicians may consider the former when

  14. Perioperative analgesia with a buprenorphine transdermal patch for hallux valgus surgery: a prospective, randomized, controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu C

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Can Xu, Mingqing Li, Chenggong Wang, Hui Li, Hua Liu Department of Orthopaedics, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan Province, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Hallux valgus surgery often results in significant postoperative pain. Adequate control of pain is essential for patient satisfaction and improves the outcome of the procedure. This study aimed to investigate the perioperative analgesic effect of a buprenorphine transdermal patch in patients who underwent hallux valgus surgery.Patients and methods: A total of 90 patients were randomly divided into the following three groups based on the perioperative analgesic method: flurbiprofen axetil intravenous injection (Group F, oral celecoxib (Group C, and buprenorphine transdermal delivery system (BTDS (Group BTDS. The pain status, degree of satisfaction, adverse effects, and administration of tramadol hydrochloride for uncontrolled pain were recorded on the night before surgery, postoperative day 1, postoperative day 2, and postoperative day 3.Results: The BTDS could effectively control perioperative pain for patients undergoing ­hallux valgus surgery. The analgesic effect of the BTDS was better than that of oral celecoxib. In addition, statistically significant differences were not observed in the visual analog scale (VAS scores, adverse effects, and rescue analgesia between the patients who received the BTDS and the patients who received the flurbiprofen axetil intravenous injection. However, the degree of patient satisfaction of the BTDS group was significantly higher (P<0.05 than that of the other two groups.Conclusion: The BTDS (a preemptive analgesia regimen could exert an analgesic effect during the perioperative period for patients who had received hallux valgus surgery, and this effect is beneficial for sustaining postoperative physiological and psychological states and promoting functional rehabilitation. Keywords: hallux valgus, buprenorphine transdermal

  15. Sedative and antinociceptive effects of dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine after oral transmucosal or intramuscular administration in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porters, Nathalie; Bosmans, Tim; Debille, Mariëlla; de Rooster, Hilde; Duchateau, Luc; Polis, Ingeborgh

    2014-01-01

    To compare sedation and antinociception after oral transmucosal (OTM) and intramuscular (IM) administration of a dexmedetomidine-buprenorphine combination in healthy adult cats. Randomized, 'blinded' crossover study, with 1 month washout between treatments. Six healthy neutered female cats, weighing 5.3-7.5 kg. A combination of dexmedetomidine (40 μg kg(-1) ) and buprenorphine (20 μg kg(-1) ) was administered by either the OTM (buccal cavity) or IM (quadriceps muscle) route. Sedation was measured using a numerical rating scale, at baseline and at various time points until 6 hours after treatment. At the same time points, analgesia was scored using a dynamic and interactive visual analogue scale, based on the response to an ear pinch, and by the cat's response to a mechanical stimulus exerted by a pressure rate onset device. Physiological and adverse effects were recorded, and oral pH measured. Signed rank tests were performed, with significance set at p < 0.05. Data are presented as median and range. There were no differences in sedation or antinociception scores between OTM and IM dosing at any of the time points. Nociceptive thresholds increased after both treatments but without significant difference between groups. Buccal pH remained between 8 and 8.5. Salivation was noted after OTM administration (n = 2) and vomiting after both OTM (n = 4), and IM (n = 3) dosing. In healthy adult cats, OTM administration of dexmedetomidine and buprenorphine resulted in comparable levels of sedation and antinociception to IM dosing. The OTM administration may offer an alternative route to administer this sedative-analgesic combination in cats. © 2013 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  16. COMPARISON OF DEXMEDETOMIDINE, BUPRENORPHINE AND FENTANYL AS AN ADJUVANT TO BUPIVACAINE DURING SPINAL ANAESTHESIA FOR HEMIARTHROPLASTY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep R

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Opioids such as fentanyl or buprenorphine are being added as adjuvant to local anaesthetic for spinal anaesthesia. Dexmedetomidine, a new α2 agonist is being tried as an adjuvant in the recent times. MATERIALS AND METHODS The patients were randomised into three Groups (n=30 each by closed envelope technique. Patients in Group 1 received 10 µg fentanyl with 15 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine, Group 2 received 15 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine supplemented with 30 µg of buprenorphine and Group 3 received 15 mg of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine plus 5 µg dexmedetomidine intrathecally. The time to reach maximum sensory and motor level, the regression time of the same, any adverse effects were recorded. Data were analysed using chi-square test or Fisher’s exact test for categorical data and analysis of variance for continuous data. A value of P<0.05 was accepted as statistically significant. Settings and Design- The study was conducted in a prospective, randomised and double-blind manner. It included ninety American Society of Anaesthesiologists class I and II patients undergoing hemiarthroplasty under spinal anaesthesia. RESULTS In this study, the patients in dexmedetomidine group showed significantly longer duration of motor block (240±20 mins. and sensory blockade (180±22.2 mins. compared to other groups, which is statistically significant (P=0.0001 and P=0.006, respectively. The time to first request of analgesic postoperatively was also longer (260±30.2 in dexmedetomidine group when compared with other groups (P=0.0001. Haemodynamic parameters were stable and there were no complications in any group. CONCLUSIONS We concluded that intrathecal dexmedetomidine (5 µg with bupivacaine provides significantly longer duration of sensory and motor blockade and longer duration for first request of analgesia in the recovery than intrathecal buprenorphine (30 µg or fentanyl (10 µg with bupivacaine for spinal anaesthesia for

  17. Access to and Payment for Office-Based Buprenorphine Treatment in Ohio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore V Parran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Importance: Office-based opiate agonist therapy has dramatically expanded access to medication-assisted treatment over the past decade but has also led to increased buprenorphine diversion. Objective: Our study sought to characterize physicians who participate in office-based therapy (OBT to assess patient access to OBT in Ohio 10 years after its introduction. Design/Setting/Participants: Cross-sectional telephone survey of Drug Addiction Treatment Act–waivered physicians in Ohio listed by the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT. Main Outcomes: This study sought to determine what proportion of eligible physicians are actively prescribing buprenorphine, whether they accept insurance for OBT, and whether they accept insurance for non-OBT services. In addition, we evaluated what physician characteristics predicted those primary outcomes. We hypothesized that a significant minority of eligible physicians are not active prescribers of buprenorphine. In addition, we expected that a significant minority of OBT prescribers do not accept insurance, further restricting patient access. We further hypothesized that a large subset of OBT prescribers accept insurance in their regular practices but do not take insurance for OBT. Results: Of the 466 listed physicians, 327 (70.2% practice representatives were reached for interview. Thirty-three physicians were excluded, with a true response rate of 75.5%. In total, 80.7% of providers reached were active OBT prescribers. Of these, 52.7% accepted insurance for OBT, 20.8% accepted insurance for non-OBT services but not for OBT, and 26.5% did not accept insurance for any services. Practices who did not accept insurance were more likely among dedicated addiction clinics located outside of Ohio’s 6 major cities. Practices who normally accepted insurance but did not for OBT services were more likely in urban locations and were not associated with dedicated addiction practices. Neither business practice was

  18. Influence of detomidine and buprenorphine on motor-evoked potentials in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollet, H; Van Ham, L; Gasthuys, F; Dewulf, J; Vanderstraeten, G; Deprez, P

    2003-04-26

    Horses need to be sedated before they are investigated by transcranial magnetic stimulation because of the mild discomfort induced by the evoked muscle contraction and the noise of stimulation. This paper describes the influence of a combination of detomidine (10 microg/kg bodyweight) and a low dose of buprenorphine (2.4 microg/kg) on the onset latency and peak-to-peak amplitude of magnetic motor-evoked potentials in normal horses. There were no significant differences between measurements of these parameters made before the horses were sedated and measurements made 10 and 30 minutes after the drugs were administered.

  19. The antinociceptive efficacy of buprenorphine administered through the drinking water of rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, L; Bjerrum, Ole Jannik; Christensen, Sten

    2007-01-01

    was assessed by use of an analgesiometric model measuring the rats' latency time to withdrawal from a noxious heat stimulus applied to the plantar surface of the paw. Results revealed that buprenorphine in drinking water (0.056 mg/mL) induced significant increases in paw withdrawal latency times during a three...... water may be a viable treatment option for the relief of pain in laboratory rats, but at the doses used in this study in pain-free rats it was associated with a decrease in water intake and some behavioural changes....

  20. Injectable naltrexone, oral naltrexone, and buprenorphine utilization and discontinuation among individuals treated for opioid use disorder in a United States commercially insured population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Jake R; Schackman, Bruce R; Leff, Jared A; Linas, Benjamin P; Walley, Alexander Y

    2018-02-01

    We investigated prescribing patterns for four opioid use disorder (OUD) medications: 1) injectable naltrexone, 2) oral naltrexone, 3) sublingual or oralmucosal buprenorphine/naloxone, and 4) sublingual buprenorphine as well as transdermal buprenorphine (which is approved for treating pain, but not OUD) in a nationally representative claims-based database (Truven Health MarketScan®) of commercially insured individuals in the United States. We calculated the prevalence of OUD in the database for each year from 2010 to 2014 and the proportion of diagnosed patient months on OUD medication. We compared characteristics of individuals diagnosed with OUD who did and did not receive these medications with bivariate descriptive statistics. Finally, we fit a Cox proportional hazards model of time to discontinuation of therapy as a function of therapy type, controlling for relevant confounders. From 2010 to 2014, the proportion of commercially insured individuals diagnosed with OUD grew by fourfold (0.12% to 0.48%), but the proportion of diagnosed patient-months on medication decreased from 25% in 2010 (0.05% injectable naltrexone, 0.4% oral naltrexone, 23.1% sublingual or oralmucosal buprenorphine/naloxone, 1.5% sublingual buprenorphine, and 0% transdermal buprenorphine) to 16% in 2014 (0.2% injectable naltrexone, 0.4% oral naltrexone, 13.8% sublingual or oralmucosal buprenorphine/naloxone, 1.4% sublingual buprenorphine, and 0.3% transdermal buprenorphine). Individuals who received medication therapy were more likely to be male, younger, and have an additional substance use disorder compared with those diagnosed with OUD who did not receive medication therapy. Those prescribed injectable naltrexone were more often male, younger, and diagnosed with additional substance use disorders compared with those prescribed other medications for opioid use disorder (MOUDs). At 30 days after initiation, 52% for individuals treated with injectable naltrexone, 70% for individuals treated

  1. Clinical Guidelines for the Use of Buprenorphine in the Treatment of Opioid Addiction. Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) Series 40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Margaret; Brown, Nancy J.; Moon, Mary A.; Schuman, Deborah J.; Thomas, Josephine; Wright, Denise L.

    2004-01-01

    This Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) addresses the clinical use of buprenorphine in the treatment of opioid addiction. TIPs are best-practice guidelines for the treatment of substance use disorders that make the latest research in substance abuse treatment available to counselors and educators. The content was generated by a panel of experts…

  2. Switching from high doses of pure u-opioid agonists to transdermal buprenorphine in patients with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundorff, Lena; Sjøgren, Per; Hansen, Ole Bo

    2013-01-01

    ) brief pain inventory; 3) pain relief and pain intensity; 4) quality of life; and 5) adverse events and symptoms. RESULTS: Eighteen patients receiving 150-516 mg of morphine/day were included. The buprenorphine dose at the end of the study varied between 52.5 and 140 μg/h. No difference in pain before...

  3. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Soltani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5μg/kg sublingually and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously. Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes, and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours. SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P Results: Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics.Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P

  4. Comparison of Intravenous Morphine with Sublingual Buprenorphine in Management of Postoperative Pain after Closed Reduction Orthopedic Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghasem Soltani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postoperative pain is a common side effect following surgery that can significantly reduce surgical quality and patient’s satisfaction. Treatment options are morphine and buprenorphine. We aimed to compare the efficacy of a single dose of intravenous morphine with sublingual buprenorphine in postoperative pain control following closed reduction surgery. Methods: This triple blind clinical trial was conducted on 90 patients referred for closed reduction orthopedic surgery. They were older than 18 years and in classes I and II of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA with an operation time of 30-90 minutes. Patients were divided into two groups of buprenorphine (4.5μg/kg sublingually and morphine (0.2mg/kg intravenously. Baseline characteristics, vital signs, pain score, level of sedation and pharmacological side effects were recorded in the recovery room (at 0 and 30 minutes, and in the ward (at 3, 6 and 12 hours. SPSS version 19 software was used for data analysis and the significance level was set at P Results: Ninety patients were studied, 60 males and 30 females with a mean age of 37.7±16.2 years. There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of baseline characteristics.Pain score in the morphine group was significantly higher than the buprenorphine group with an average score of 2.5 (P

  5. [Modification of the analgetic effects (buprenorphine, pentazocine, pethidine) on respiration and haemodynamics by epidural, halothane- or neuroleptanaesthesia (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüst, H J; Moritz, K G; Sandmann, W; Richter, O

    1980-04-01

    In 38 patients buprenorphine, meperidine and pentazocine were given in a single dose for postoperative pain relief 20 hours after the end of anaesthesia. Measuring the parameters of the high- and low-pressure system as well as the metabolism the authors found that the effects of these analgetic medicaments, intravenously injected were significantly influenced by fentanyl, halothane or diazepam, given under the course of operation. Especially buprenorphine, injected after epidural anaesthesia in combination with diazepam sedation, proved to have a rather negative effect, because it caused a strong depression of respiration and circulation. On the other hand buprenorphine had, given after neuroleptanaesthesia, a neutralizing - and pentazocine and pethidine in combination with neuroleptanaesthesia a stimulating influence on the circulation. After halothane-anaesthesia the effect of the analegtics on the cardiovascular system was, when buprenorphine was given, depressing and when pentazocine was given indifferent. Similar reactions, but more pronounced, could be seen in the epidural group. With certain reservations, caused by the preliminary character of this study, the following conclusions can be drawn for the anaesthetic practice: 1 Choosing analgetic drugs for postoperative pain relief, the anaesthesist has to be aware of the interactions, possibly resulting from the medicaments, given during anaesthesia. 2. The number of medicaments, given during anaesthesia, should be kept small, considering the eventual interactions and the unintentional secondary effects.

  6. Psychiatric comorbidity, red flag behaviors, and associated outcomes among office-based buprenorphine patients following Hurricane Sandy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Arthur R; Tofighi, Babak; Rotrosen, John; Lee, Joshua D; Grossman, Ellie

    2014-04-01

    In October 2012, Bellevue Hospital Center (Bellevue) in New York City was temporarily closed as a result of Hurricane Sandy, the largest hurricane in US history. Bellevue's primary care office-based buprenorphine program was temporarily closed and later relocated to an affiliate public hospital. Previous research indicates that the relationships between disaster exposure, substance use patterns, psychiatric symptoms, and mental health services utilization is complex, with often conflicting findings regarding post-event outcomes (on the individual and community level) and antecedent risk factors. In general, increased use of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drugs is associated with both greater disaster exposure and the development or exacerbation of other psychiatric symptoms and need for treatment. To date, there is limited published information regarding post-disaster outcomes among patients enrolled in office-based buprenorphine treatment, as the treatment modality has only been relatively approved recently. Patients enrolled in the buprenorphine program at the time of the storm were surveyed for self-reported buprenorphine adherence and illicit substance and alcohol use, as well as disaster-related personal consequences and psychiatric sequelae post-storm. Baseline demographic characteristics and insurance status were available from the medical record. Analysis was descriptive (counts and proportions) and qualitative, coding open-ended responses for emergent themes. There were 132 patients enrolled in the program at the time of the storm; of those, 91 were contacted and 89 completed the survey. Almost half of respondents reported disruption of their buprenorphine supply. Unexpectedly, patients with psychiatric comorbidity were no more likely to report increased use/relapse as a result. Rather, major risk factors associated with increased use or relapse post-storm were: (1) shorter length of time in treatment, (2) exposure to storm losses such as buprenorphine

  7. Craving and subsequent opioid use among opioid dependent patients who initiate treatment with buprenorphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I.; Anderson, Bradley J.; Strong, David R.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have directly assessed associations between craving and subsequent opioid use among treated patients. Our objective was to prospectively evaluate the relative utility of two craving questionnaires to predict opioid use among opioid dependent patients in treatment. Method Opioid dependent patients (n=147) initiating buprenorphine treatment were assessed for three months. Craving was measured using: 1) the Desires for Drug Questionnaire (DDQ) and 2) the Penn Alcohol-Craving Scale adapted for opioid craving (PCS) for this study. Multi-level logistic regression models estimated the effects of craving on the likelihood of opioid use after adjusting for gender, age, ethnicity, education, opioid of choice, frequency of use, pain and depression. In these analyses craving assessed at time t was entered as a time-varying predictor of opioid use at time t+1. Results In adjusted regression models, a 1-point increase in PCS scores (on a 7-point scale) was associated with a significant increase in the odds of opioid use at the subsequent assessment (OR = 1.27, 95% CI 1.08; 1.49, p .05) or DDQ control (OR = 0.97, 95%CI 0.85; 1.11, p > .05) scores. Conclusion Self-reported craving for opioids was associated with subsequent lapse to opioid use among a cohort of patients treated with buprenorphine. PMID:24521036

  8. Mother-child interaction and cognitive development in children prenatally exposed to methadone or buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijnenberg, Carolien; Sarfi, Monica; Melinder, Annika

    2016-10-01

    To assess the influence of mother-child interaction on children's cognitive development in a group of children prenatally exposed to methadone or buprenorphine. The study is part of a prospective longitudinal project investigating the development of children born to women in opioid maintenance therapy (OMT). The sample includes 67 children born between 2005 and 2007, 35 of which prenatally exposed to either methadone or buprenorphine and 32 non-exposed comparison children. Both groups scored within the normal range of development. However, the OMT group scored significantly lower on measures of cognitive development and mother-child interaction compared to the comparison group. Cognitive development was found to be affected by both group status, F(1,54)=5.65, p=0.02, η(2)=0.10 and mother-child interaction F(1,54)=5.26, p=0.03, η(2)=0.09. Behavioral inhibition (statue), sensorimotor function (imitating hand positions), and short-term memory (sentences) was influenced by group status while narrative memory and vocabulary were found to be more influenced by mother-child interaction. Different risk factors may influence different cognitive functions in children of women in OMT. Specifically, language-related cognitive skills may be more related to mother-child interaction while performance in higher cognitive functions requiring precise control over sensorimotor responses may be more sensitive to other factors such as prenatal OMT exposure, genetics, and/or prenatal exposure to other substances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Predictors of long term opioid withdrawal outcome after short-term stabilization with buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, M I

    2014-01-01

    We aim to examine predictors of opiate abstinence status 3 months after the end of buprenorphine/naloxone treatment for opioid-dependent participants. Participants (n= 516, age > 15 years) received buprenorphine/ naloxone treatment for 4 weeks and then randomly assigned to undergo dose tapering over either 7 days or 28 days. Bivariate analysis was performed to identify possible predictors of successful opiate abstinence outome (p-value opioid and drug urine tests result at the end taper; employment status, family problems, and alcohol use domains of addiction severity index (ASI) score; and clinical opiate withdrawal scale (COWS) at the end of stabilization. Final predictor list identified by logistic regression include: ASI score for family and alcohol problems, COWS at the end of stabilization and opiate urine test at the end of taper. Participants presenting with a negative urine test for opiate, more severe alcohol, more severe family problems, or more symptoms of opiate withdrawal at the end of stabilization were more likely to have a successful opiate abstinence.

  10. Management of eight labor and delivery patients dependent on buprenorphine (Subutex™: A retrospective chart review [version 2; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solina Tith

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Opioid use during pregnancy is a growing concern in the United States. Buprenorphine has been recommended by “The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology” as an alternative to methadone to decrease risks associated with the use of illicit opioids during pregnancy. The partial μ-opioid agonists’ unique pharmacology, including its long half time and high affinity to the μ-opioid receptor, complicates patient management in a highly kinetic, and often urgent field like obstetric anesthesia. We reviewed our management and outcomes in this medically complex population. Methods: An Institutional Review Board (IRB approved retrospective chart review was conducted of women admitted to the University of Washington Medical Center Labor and Delivery unit from July 2012 to November 2013 using buprenorphine. All deliveries, including intrauterine fetal demise, were included. Results: Eight women were admitted during this period to our L&D floor on buprenorphine. All required peri-partum anesthetic management either for labor and/or cesarean delivery management. Analgesic management included dilaudid or fentanyl PCA and/or continued epidural infusion, and in one instance ketamine infusion, while the pre-admission buprenorphine regimen was continued. Five babies were viable, two women experienced intrauterine fetal death at 22 and 36 weeks gestational age (GSA, respectively, and one neonate died shortly after delivery due to a congenital diaphragmatic hernia. Conclusions: This case series illuminates the medical complexity of parturients using buprenorphine. Different treatment modalities in the absence of evidence-based guidelines included additional opioid administration and continued epidural analgesia. The management of post-cesarean pain in patients on partial μ-opioid agonists remains complex and variable, and evidence-based guidelines could be useful for clinicians to direct care.

  11. Preemptive Epidural Analgesia for Postoperative Pain Relief Revisited: Comparison of Combination of Buprenorphine and Neostigmine with Combination of Buprenorphine and Ketamine in Lower Abdominal Surgeries, A Double-blind Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sanjay; Singh, Raj Bahadur

    2017-01-01

    Postoperative pain relief provides subjective comfort to patient in addition to blunting of autonomic and somatic reflex responses to pain, subsequently enhancing restoration of function by allowing the patient to breathe, cough, and move easily. The aim is to evaluate and compare the effects of neostigmine + buprenorphine and ketamine + buprenorphine for preemptive epidural analgesia for postoperative pain relief in patients undergoing abdominal surgeries under general anesthesia (GA). A double-blind randomized trial. A total of 60 American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status Classes I and II patients undergoing abdominal surgeries under GA were taken up for the study. They were randomly allocated into two groups, Group A and Group B of thirty patients each. Preemptive epidural analgesia for postoperative pain relief was provided by a combination of neostigmine 1 μg/kg + buprenorphine 2 μg/kg in Group A patients and ketamine 1 mg/kg + buprenorphine 2 μg/kg in Group B patients after induction of GA but before surgical incision. Postoperatively, vital parameters, pain score, requirement of top up doses, and side effects in the two groups were observed and recorded at 2, 4, 6, 10, 18, and 22 h. Mean values within each of the Group A and Group B were compared using one-way analysis of variance (one-way ANOVA). Mean values between Group A and Group B were compared using double analysis of variance (two-way ANOVA). Group A patients had a significant analgesia (visual analog scale [VAS] pain scores reduced significantly from 54.6 ± 6.3 at 2 h to 8.1 ± 8.9 at 22 h postoperatively). Group B patients had significant analgesia too (VAS pain scores reduced significantly from 36 ± 12.5 at 2 h to 5.3 ± 10.9 at 22 h postoperatively). There was however no significant difference between the two groups with respect to the degree of postoperative analgesia on comparison of VAS scores, effect on vital parameters, and incidence of side effects. Either of the two

  12. Management of opioid addiction with buprenorphine: French history and current management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poloméni P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pierre Poloméni,1 Raymund Schwan2,3 1Department of Addictology, Paris Seine Saint Denis University Hospital, AP-HP, Site René Muret Sevran, France; 2Care Center for the Treatment and Prevention of Addictions (CSAPA, Nancy University Hospital, 3General Psychiatric Division for the Greater Nancy Urban Community, Psychotherapeutic Center of Nancy, Laxou, France Abstract: The way in which opioid addiction is managed in France is unique, as it is based on the prescription of buprenorphine by general practitioners and is dispensed by retail pharmacies. This policy has had a direct, positive impact on the number of deaths caused by heroin overdose, which was reduced by four-fifths between 1994 and 2002. In addition, certain associated comorbidities, such as infection with the human immunodeficiency virus, have also been reduced; the incidence of acquired immune deficiency syndrome in intravenous drug users fell from 25% in the mid-1990s to 6% in 2010. Since the implementation of this French model of opioid management, major scientific progress has been made, leading to a better understanding of the pathophysiologic mechanisms of addiction and of the management modalities required for its treatment. However, despite notable advances in scientific knowledge and in the implementation of devices, opioid addiction remains a major public health care issue in France, with 275,000–360,000 "problem drug users" being reported in 2011. The situation is still particularly worrying due to psychoactive substance use and misuse of opioid substitution treatments. Since 2003, there has been a persistent increase in the number of deaths and comorbidities related to opioid addiction, principally hepatitis C virus infection, which affects up to 40% of intravenous drug users. In France, the direct involvement of general practitioners in the management of opioid addiction is indisputable. Nevertheless, management could be optimized through better understanding of the

  13. Emergency Department-Initiated Buprenorphine for Opioid Dependence with Continuation in Primary Care: Outcomes During and After Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Gail; Chawarski, Marek C; O'Connor, Patrick G; Pantalon, Michael V; Busch, Susan H; Owens, Patricia H; Hawk, Kathryn; Bernstein, Steven L; Fiellin, David A

    2017-06-01

    Emergency department (ED)-initiated buprenorphine/naloxone with continuation in primary care was found to increase engagement in addiction treatment and reduce illicit opioid use at 30 days compared to referral only or a brief intervention with referral. To evaluate the long-term outcomes at 2, 6 and 12 months following ED interventions. Evaluation of treatment engagement, drug use, and HIV risk among a cohort of patients from a randomized trial who completed at least one long-term follow-up assessment. A total of 290/329 patients (88% of the randomized sample) were included. The followed cohort did not differ significantly from the randomized sample. ED-initiated buprenorphine with 10-week continuation in primary care, referral, or brief intervention were provided in the ED at study entry. Self-reported engagement in formal addiction treatment, days of illicit opioid use, and HIV risk (2, 6, 12 months); urine toxicology (2, 6 months). A greater number of patients in the buprenorphine group were engaged in addiction treatment at 2 months [68/92 (74%), 95% CI 65-83] compared with referral [42/79 (53%), 95% CI 42-64] and brief intervention [39/83 (47%), 95% CI 37-58; p < 0.001]. The differences were not significant at 6 months [51/92 (55%), 95% CI 45-65; 46/70 (66%) 95% CI 54-76; 43/76 (57%) 95% CI 45-67; p = 0.37] or 12 months [42/86 (49%) 95% CI 39-59; 37/73 (51%) 95% CI 39-62; 49/78 (63%) 95% CI 52-73; p = 0.16]. At 2 months, the buprenorphine group reported fewer days of illicit opioid use [1.1 (95% CI 0.6-1.6)] versus referral [1.8 (95% CI 1.2-2.3)] and brief intervention [2.0 (95% CI 1.5-2.6), p = 0.04]. No significant differences in illicit opioid use were observed at 6 or 12 months. There were no significant differences in HIV risk or rates of opioid-negative urine results at any time. ED-initiated buprenorphine was associated with increased engagement in addiction treatment and reduced illicit opioid use during the 2-month interval

  14. Constipation and other common symptoms reported by women and men in methadone and buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haber, Paul S; Elsayed, Mahmoud; Espinoza, David; Lintzeris, Nicholas; Veillard, Anne-Sophie; Hallinan, Richard

    2017-12-01

    Opioid substitution treatment (OST) is often continued long-term and, therefore, opioid-associated symptoms are of interest. Symptoms associated with methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) in men are well described, but there are fewer reports concerning symptoms associated with buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) and very few reports among women. Recipients of BMT (n=113) and MMT (n=184), non-opioid users (n=105) and opioid users not receiving OST (n=87) completed the Patient Assessment of Constipation (PAC-SYM) and a general symptom checklist. Multivariate analysis included other potential moderators of opioid-associated symptoms. Opioid users reported a higher frequency and severity of symptoms than non-opioid users. Constipation, dry mouth, decreased appetite, sweating and fatigue were highly prevalent in the previous 30days (51-80%). Nausea, itchy skin, trouble urinating, menstrual problems, lightheadedness, blurred vision, heart racing were also common (30-50%). Non-OST opioid users had significantly higher frequency and severity than OST recipients of nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, decreased appetite, sweating and itchy skin. Sweating was significantly more common in MMT than BMT. Constipation scores were higher in women, otherwise most sex differences were small. Higher PAC-SYM scores were associated with vomiting (OR=1.04) and sweating (OR=1.06). Cannabis use was associated with vomiting (OR=2.19). Constipation (OR=1.07), insomnia (OR=2.5) and depression (OR=2.82) were associated with fatigue. Men and women receiving OST report similarly high rates of somatic symptoms, though less than opioid users not receiving OST. There were few differences between BMT and MMT. Buprenorphine might be preferred where sweating is problematic. Several modifiable factors were identified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Withdrawal from Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Maintenance with a Natural Dopaminergic Agonist: A Cautionary Note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Femino, John; Waite, Roger L; Benya, Lisa; Giordano, John; Borsten, Joan; Downs, William B; Braverman, Eric R; Loehmann, Raquel; Dushaj, Kristina; Han, David; Simpatico, Thomas; Hauser, Mary; Barh, Debmalya; McLaughlin, Thomas

    2013-04-23

    While numerous studies support the efficacy of methadone and buprenorphine for the stabilization and maintenance of opioid dependence, clinically significant opioid withdrawal symptoms occur upon tapering and cessation of dosage. We present a case study of a 35 year old Caucasian female (Krissie) who was prescribed increasing dosages of prescription opioids after carpel tunnel surgery secondary to chronic pain from reflex sympathetic dystrophy and fibromyalgia. Over the next 5 years, daily dosage requirements increased to over 80 mg of Methadone and 300 ug/hr Fentanyl transdermal patches, along with combinations of 12-14 1600 mcg Actig lollipop and oral 100 mg Morphine and 30 mg oxycodone 1-2 tabs q4-6hr PRN for breakthrough pain. Total monthly prescription costs including supplemental benzodiazepines, hypnotics and stimulants exceeded $50,000. The patient was subsequently transferred to Suboxone® in 2008, and the dosage was gradually tapered until her admission for inpatient detoxification with KB220Z a natural dopaminergic agonist. We carefully documented her withdrawal symptoms when she precipitously stopped taking buprenorphine/naloxone and during follow-up while taking KB220Z daily. We also genotyped the patient using a reward gene panel including (9 genes 18 alleles): DRD 2,3,4; MOA-A; COMT; DAT1; 5HTTLLR; OPRM1; and GABRA3. At 432 days post Suboxone® withdrawal the patient is being maintained on KB220Z, has been urine tested and is opioid free. Genotyping data revealed a moderate genetic risk for addiction showing a hypodopaminergic trait. This preliminary case data suggest that the daily use of KB220Z could provide a cost effective alternative substitution adjunctive modality for Suboxone®. We encourage double-blind randomized -placebo controlled studies to test the proposition that KB220Z may act as a putative natural opioid substitution maintenance adjunct.

  16. Predictors of buprenorphine treatment success of opioid dependence in two Baltimore City grassroots recovery programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, April Joy; Mendelson, Tamar; Agus, Deborah

    2017-10-01

    Despite evidence for the efficacy of buprenorphine treatment in primary care, few studies have identified factors associated with treatment success, nor have such factors been evaluated in community settings. Identifying correlates of treatment success can facilitate the development of treatment models tailored for distinct populations, including low-income communities of color. The current study examined client-level socio-demographic factors associated with treatment success in community-based buprenorphine programs serving vulnerable populations. Data were abstracted from client records for participants (N=445) who met DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence and sought treatment at one of Behavioral Health Leadership Institute's two community-based recovery programs in Baltimore City from 2010 to 2015. Logistic regression estimated the odds ratios of treatment success (defined as retention in treatment for ≥90days) by sociodemographic predictors including age, race, gender, housing, legal issues and incarceration. The odds of being retained in treatment ≥90days increased with age (5% increase with each year of age; pfactors. Clients who reported unstable housing had a 41% decreased odds of remaining in treatment for 90 or more days compared to clients who lived independently at intake. Treatment success did not significantly differ by several other client-level characteristics including gender, race, employment, legal issues and incarceration. In vulnerable populations, the age factor appears sufficiently significant to justify creating models formulated for younger populations. The data also support attention to housing needs for people in treatment. Findings from this paper can inform future research and program development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Trend in buprenorphine and methadone shopping behavior in France from 2004 to 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernisant, Mélanie; Delorme, Jessica; Kabore, Jean-Luc; Brousse, Georges; Laporte, Catherine; Zenut, Marie; Chenaf, Chouki; Authier, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    The opioid maintenance treatments (OMT) are widely misused and diverted in many countries. Doctor shopping represented the main way to obtain high quantities of opioids in abuse/diversion. The aim of this study was to assess the trends in the prevalence of doctor shopping for high dosage buprenorphine (HDB) and methadone (MTD) from 2004 to 2014 by using the French Health Insurance claims. This was a cross-sectional study of patients treated by OMT (High Dosage Buprenorphine or Methadone) between 2004 and 2014 from a representative sample of the French Health Insurance claims. Doctor shopping was defined as at least 1 day of overlapping prescriptions, written by at least 2 different prescribers and filled in at least 3 different pharmacies. HDB patients were more likely men (77.9 % in 2014) with a mean age ranged from 33.4±7.6 years in 2004 to 39.5±9.3 years in 2014, Pshopping for HDB decreased from 2004 to 2014 (12.6 % versus 3.9 %, Pshopping for MTD was very low during the period study (0.2 % to 0.5 %). Overall, the prevalence of doctor shopping was higher for HDB than for MTD whatever the year (Pshopping for HDB decreased significantly during the last decade while doctor shopping for MTD remained nearly inexistent even if it could be underestimated because of dispensations in specialized centers and in hospitals not comprised in the insurance claims. The low rates of doctor shopping reported in these last years could result from the guidelines for good practices in OMT use made in 2004 and the adjustments of ANSM (French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety) for HDB best use made in 2011. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Determination of an optimal dose of medetomidine-ketamine-buprenorphine for anaesthesia in the Cape ground squirrel (Xerus inauris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Joubert

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The optimal dose of medetomidine-ketamine-buprenorphine was determined in 25 Cape ground squirrels (Xerus inauris undergoing surgical implantation of a temperature logger into the abdominal cavity. At the end of anaesthesia, the squirrels were given atipamezole intramuscularly to reverse the effects of medetomidine. The mean dose of medetomidine was 67.6±9.2 μg/kg, ketamine 13.6±1.9 mg/kg and buprenorphine 0.5±0.06 μg/kg. Induction time was 3.1 ± 1.4 min. This produced surgical anaesthesia for 21± 4.2 min. Atipamezole 232±92 μg/kg produced a rapid recovery. Squirrels were sternally recumbent in 3.5 ± 2.2 min.

  19. Inhibition of CYP2D6-mediated tramadol O-demethylation in methadone but not buprenorphine maintenance patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coller, Janet K; Michalakas, Jennifer R; James, Heather M; Farquharson, Aaron L; Colvill, Joel; White, Jason M; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2012-11-01

    Management of pain in opioid dependent individuals is problematic due to numerous issues including cross-tolerance to opioids. Hence there is a need to find alternative analgesics to classical opioids and tramadol is potentially one such alternative. Methadone inhibits CYP2D6 in vivo and in vitro. We aimed to investigate the effect of methadone on the pathways of tramadol metabolism: O-demethylation (CYP2D6) to the opioid-active metabolite M1 and N-demethylation (CYP3A4) to M2 in subjects maintained on methadone or buprenorphine as a control. Compared with subjects on buprenorphine, methadone reduced the clearance of tramadol to active O-desmethyl-tramadol (M1) but had no effect on N-desmethyltramadol (M2) formation. Similar to other analgesics whose active metabolites are formed by CYP2D6 such as codeine, reduced formation of O-desmethyltramadol (M1) is likely to result in reduced analgesia for subjects maintained on methadone. Hence alternative analgesics whose metabolism is independent of CYP2D6 should be utilized in this patient population. To compare the O- (CYP2D6 mediated) and N- (CYP3A4 mediated) demethylation metabolism of tramadol between methadone and buprenorphine maintained CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer subjects. METHODS Nine methadone and seven buprenorphine maintained subjects received a single 100 mg dose of tramadol hydrochloride. Blood was collected at 4 h and assayed for tramadol, methadone, buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine (where appropriate) and all urine over 4 h was assayed for tramadol and its M1 and M2 metabolites. The urinary metabolic ratio [median (range)] for O-demethylation (M1) was significantly lower (P= 0.0002, probability score 1.0) in the subjects taking methadone [0.071 (0.012-0.103)] compared with those taking buprenorphine [0.192 (0.108-0.392)], but there was no significant difference (P= 0.21, probability score 0.69) in N-demethylation (M2). The percentage of dose [median (range)] recovered as M1 was significantly lower

  20. Management of moderate to severe chronic low back pain with buprenorphine buccal film using novel bioerodible mucoadhesive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pergolizzi Jr JV

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Joseph V Pergolizzi Jr,1 Robert B Raffa,2,3 Charles Fleischer,1 Gianpietro Zampogna,1 Robert Taylor Jr1 1NEMA Research, Naples, FL, 2University of Arizona College of Pharmacy, Tucson, AZ, 3Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: With a global prevalence of ~9%–12%, low back pain (LBP is a serious public health issue, associated with high costs for treatment and lost productivity. Chronic LBP (cLBP involves central sensitization, a neuropathic pain component, and may induce maladaptive coping strategies and depression. Treating cLBP is challenging, and current treatment options are not fully satisfactory. A new BioErodible MucoAdhesive (BEMA® delivery system for buprenorphine has been developed to treat cLBP. The buccal buprenorphine (BBUP film developed for this product (Belbuca™ allows for rapid delivery and titration over a greater range of doses than was previously available with transdermal buprenorphine systems. In clinical studies, BBUP was shown to effectively reduce pain associated with cLBP at 12 weeks with good tolerability. The most frequently reported side effects with the use of BBUP were nausea, constipation, and vomiting. There was no significant effect on the QT interval vs placebo. Chronic pain patients using other opioids can be successfully rotated to BBUP without risk of withdrawal symptoms or inadequate analgesia. The role of BBUP in managing cLBP remains to be determined, but it appears to be a promising new product in the analgesic arsenal in general. Keywords: buccal, transmucosal, buprenorphine, chronic low back pain, BEMA, drug delivery Belbuca

  1. Opioid Addiction and Abuse in Primary Care Practice: A Comparison of Methadone and Buprenorphine as Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonhomme, Jean; Shim, Ruth S.; Gooden, Richard; Tyus, Dawn; Rust, George

    2014-01-01

    Opioid abuse and addiction have increased in frequency in the United States over the past 20 years. In 2009, an estimated 5.3 million persons used opioid medications nonmedically within the past month, 200 000 used heroin, and approximately 9.6% of African Americans used an illicit drug. Racial and ethnic minorities experience disparities in availability and access to mental health care, including substance use disorders. Primary care practitioners are often called upon to differentiate between appropriate, medically indicated opioid use in pain management vs inappropriate abuse or addiction. Racial and ethnic minority populations tend to favor primary care treatment settings over specialty mental health settings. Recent therapeutic advances allow patients requiring specialized treatment for opioid abuse and addiction to be managed in primary care settings. The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 enables qualified physicians with readily available short-term training to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting, potentially making primary care physicians active partners in the diagnosis and treatment of opioid use disorders. Methadone and buprenorphine are effective opioid replacement agents for maintenance and/or detoxification of opioid-addicted individuals. However, restrictive federal regulations and stigmatization of opioid addiction and treatment have limited the availability of methadone. The opioid partial agonist-antagonist buprenorphine/naloxone combination has proven an effective alternative. This article reviews the literature on differences between buprenorphine and methadone regarding availability, efficacy, safety, side-effects, and dosing, identifying resources for enhancing the effectiveness of medication-assisted recovery through coordination with behavioral/psychological counseling, embedded in the context of recovery-oriented systems of care. PMID:23092049

  2. Preference for brand-name buprenorphine is related to severity of addiction among outpatients in opioid maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Philippe; Messaadi, Nassir; Perault-Pochat, Marie-Christine; Gagey, Stéphanie; Brabant, Yann; Ingrand, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    As a form of opioid maintenance treatment, high-dose buprenorphine is increasingly being used in the United States. On the French market since 1996, it is the most commonly prescribed and frequently employed opioid maintenance treatment. For unknown reasons, the brand-name form is used far more often than the generic form (76-24%). The objective was to show that the patients' levels of addiction were differentiated according to the form of buprenorphine currently being used and to their previous experience of a different form. An observational study in 9 sites throughout France used self-assessment questionnaires filled out in retail pharmacies by all patients to whom their prescribed buprenorphine treatment was being delivered. The 151 canvassed pharmacies solicited 879 patients, of whom 724 completed the questionnaires. Participants were statistically similar to non-participants. The patients using the brand-name form subsequent to experience with the generic form exhibited a more elevated addiction severity index and a higher dosage than brand-name form users with no experience of a different form. Compared to generic users, their doses were higher, their was addiction more severe, and their alcohol consumption was more excessive; they were also more likely to make daily use of psychotropic substances. However, the level of misuse or illicit consumption was similar between these groups. Preferring the brand-name buprenorphine form to the generic form is associated with a higher level of severe addiction, a more frequent need for daily psychotropics, and excessive drinking; but the study was unable to show a causal link.

  3. Buprenorphine/Naloxone Maintenance Therapy: an Observational Retrospective Report on the Effect of Dose on 18 months Retention in an Office-Based Treatment Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore V Parran

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Context and objective: Buprenorphine has been available with few reports of the dose range necessary to adequately maintain patients. We report on the effect of 8 mg/d versus 16 mg/d of buprenorphine on long-term patient retention in office-based opioid maintenance (OBOMT. Design, setting, and participants: Case series, at an urban hospital-based primary care clinic providing OBOMT to 157 opiate-dependent, low socioeconomic status, uninsured, nonhomeless patients. Intervention: The OBOMT program operated by a comprehensive sobriety treatment program experienced State funding cuts. Thus, after 2 years, the program was required by the State funder to decrease the buprenorphine maintenance dose from 16 to 8 mg/d for all new admissions. We report on patient retention before and after dose reduction. Main outcome measures: The primary outcomes of this study were to measure and compare patient retention in the 2 cohorts at each point of treatment transition over the 18 months following OBOMT initiation. Results: No significant differences in patient retention were observed between the 16 and 8 mg/d patient cohorts. Lower dose buprenorphine maintenance (8 mg/d in uninsured patients enrolled in publicly funded long-term OBOMT combined with comprehensive sobriety counseling was as effective as higher dose therapy (16 mg/d in promoting patient retention throughout the study period. This lower dose resulted in a substantial saving to the public funding agency. Conclusions: In an observational retrospective report, retention in treatment of opiate-addicted patients was the same at 8 and 16 mg/d buprenorphine doses after 18 months. These data have implications for public and managed care funding of OBOMT, for the general prescribing of buprenorphine in outpatient care, and may be instructive in the ongoing debate about the relationship between buprenorphine dose.

  4. Assessment of carprofen and buprenorphine on recovery of mice after surgical removal of the mammary fat pad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Trinka W; Kendall, Lon V; Goss, Sherri; Grayson, Kevin; Touma, Chadi; Palme, Rupert; Chen, Jane Q; Borowsky, Alexander D

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of pain elicited by mammary fat pad removal surgery and the effects of postoperative analgesics on recovery. Female FVB mice were anesthetized, and mammary fat pad removal was performed. After surgery, mice received carprofen, buprenorphine, a combination of carprofen and buprenorphine, or saline treatment. Additional mice received anesthesia but no surgery or treatment. Food and water intake, body weight, wheel running activity, and a visual assessment score were recorded daily for 4 d after surgery and compared with presurgical findings. Corticosterone metabolites in fecal samples were analyzed at 12 and 24 h postsurgically and compared with baseline values. All surgical groups had significantly decreased food intake at 24 h, with a return to baseline by 48 h. The combination treatment resulted in a significantly decreased water intake and body weight at 24 h. All surgical groups had significantly decreased wheel running activity at 24 h only. The visual assessment scores indicated mild pain for all surgical groups, with the buprenorphine treated mice showing the highest pain index scores, as compared with nonsurgical controls. Fecal corticosterone metabolite levels did not differ significantly between any of the groups or across time. The parameters used in this study did not indicate that administration of these analgesic regimens improved recovery as compared with that of saline-treated mice. Care should be taken when using visual assessment scores to evaluate pain in mice, given that analgesics may have side effects that inadvertently elevate the score.

  5. Assessment of the sedative effects of buprenorphine administered with 10 μg/kg detomidine in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, E J; Taylor, P M; Murrell, J; Whay, H R; Waterman-Pearson, A E

    2011-04-09

    The aim of this randomised, observer-blinded, crossover study was to compare the effects of six treatments, administered intravenously to six horses: saline and saline (S/S); detomidine and saline (D/S); detomidine and 5 µg/kg buprenorphine (D/B5); detomidine and 7.5 µg/kg buprenorphine (D/B7.5); detomidine and 10 µg/kg buprenorphine (D/B10); and detomidine and 25 µg/kg butorphanol (D/BUT). The detomidine dose was 10 µg/kg for all treatments in which it was included. Sedation was subjectively assessed and recorded on a visual analogue scale. Peak sedation, duration of sedation and the area under the curve (AUC) for sedation scores were investigated using a univariate general linear model with post-hoc Tukey tests (P<0.05). Peak sedation and duration of sedation were statistically significantly different between treatments (P<0.001). No sedation was apparent after administration of S/S. The AUC was significantly different between treatments (P=0.010), with S/S being significantly different from D/S, D/BUT, D/B5 and D/B7.5, but not D/B10 (P=0.051).

  6. Buprenorphine Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... injection is in a class of medications called opiate partial agonists. It works to prevent withdrawal symptoms ... help. If the victim has collapsed, had a seizure, has trouble breathing, or can't be awakened, ...

  7. In patients undergoing fast track total knee arthroplasty, addition of buprenorphine to a femoral nerve block has no clinical advantage A prospective, double-blinded, randomized, placebo controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beek, Rienk; Zonneveldt, Harry J.; van der Ploeg, Tjeerd; Steens, Jeroen; Lirk, Phillip; Hollmann, Marcus W.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Several adjuvants have been proposed to prolong the effect of peripheral nerve blocks, one of which is buprenorphine. In this randomized double blinded placebo controlled trial we studied whether the addition of buprenorphine to a femoral nerve block prolongs analgesia in patients

  8. Comparison of prescriber evaluations and patient-directed self-reports in office-based practice for buprenorphine treatment of opiate-dependent individuals in France, 2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estelle Lavie

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Estelle Lavie1, Mélina Fatséas1, Jean-Pierre Daulouède1,2, Cécile Denis1, Jacques Dubernet1, Laurent Cattan3, Marc Auriacombe11Laboratoire de psychiatrie/EA4139, INSERM IFR-99 and Faculté de médecine Victor Pachon, University Victor Segalen Bordeaux 2, Bordeaux, France; 2Bizia, Centre de soins d’addictologie, Centre Hospitalier de la Côte Basque, Bayonne, France; 3Centre médical, Noisy-le-sec, FranceAbstract: The objective of this cross-sectional evaluation study was to compare data generated through prescriber assessments, and data generated from independent direct contact with opiate-dependent patients in office-based practice to evaluate buprenorphine treatment for modality of buprenorphine absorption, benzodiazepine use, and depressive symptoms. A group of buprenorphine office-based practice prescribers was selected to participate in this study. They were asked to screen for inclusion all their patients coming for a visit from February to August 2002. Once included by their prescribing physician, patients were given a series of self-administered questionnaires to be returned directly to the research staff, independently of their prescriber. Each prescriber was given a questionnaire to complete based on their knowledge and interview of the patient. Items assessed were history of current treatment, current substance use, buprenorphine treatment related behavior (daily frequency of intake, route of administration, benzodiazepine use and existence of a major depressive episode. Prescribers and patients’ questionnaires were compared. Concordance of both assessments was assessed by kappa statistics. The sensitivity and specificity as well as the positive and negative predictive values of prescriber collected information were compared to that of their patients’. There was an overall good correlation between both data sources on the procedures for buprenorphine use especially for intravenous use of buprenorphine. There were important

  9. A statistical experimental design approach to evaluate the influence of various penetration enhancers on transdermal drug delivery of buprenorphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Mojtaba Taghizadeh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems (patch with different chemical penetration enhancers were designed to deliver drug through the skin as a site of application. The objective of our effort was to study the influence of various chemical penetration enhancers on skin permeation rate and adhesion properties of a transdermal drug delivery system using Box–Behnken experimental design. The response surface methodology based on a three-level, three-variable Box–Behnken design was used to evaluate the interactive effects on dependent variables including, the rate of skin permeation and adhesion properties, namely peel strength and tack value. Levulinic acid, lauryl alcohol, and Tween 80 were used as penetration enhancers (patch formulations, containing 0–8% of each chemical penetration enhancer. Buprenorphine was used as a model penetrant drug. The results showed that incorporation of 20% chemical penetration enhancer into the mixture led to maximum skin permeation flux of buprenorphine from abdominal rat skin while the adhesion properties decreased. Also that skin flux in presence of levulinic acid (1.594 μg/cm2 h was higher than Tween 80 (1.473 μg/cm2 h and lauryl alcohol (0.843 μg/cm2 h, and in mixing these enhancers together, an additional effect was observed. Moreover, it was found that each enhancer increased the tack value, while levulinic acid and lauryl alcohol improved the peel strength but Tween 80 reduced it. These findings indicated that the best chemical skin penetration enhancer for buprenorphine patch was levulinic acid. Among the designed formulations, the one which contained 12% (wt/wt enhancers exhibited the highest efficiency.

  10. Acceptability of the use of cellular telephone and computer pictures/video for "pill counts" in buprenorphine maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive plan to attempt to minimize the diversion of prescribed controlled substances, many professional organization and licensing boards are recommending the use of "pill counts." This study sought to evaluate acceptability of the use of cellular phone and computer pictures/video for "pill counts" by patients in buprenorphine maintenance treatment. Patients prescribed buprenorphine/naloxone were asked a series of questions related to the type(s) of electronic communication to which they had access as well as their willingness to use these for the purpose of performing a "pill/film count." Of the 80 patients, 4 (5 percent) did not have a phone at all. Only 28 (35 percent) had a "smart phone" with some sort of data plan and Internet access. Forty (50 percent) of the patients had a phone with no camera and 10 (12.5 percent) had a phone with a camera but no video capability. All patients said that they would be willing to periodically use the video or camera on their phone or computer to have buprenorphine/naloxone pills or film counted as long as the communication was protected from electronic tampering. With the advent of applications for smart phones that allow for Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996-compliant picture/video communication, a number of things can now be done that can enhance patient care as well as reduce the chances of misuse/diversion of prescribed medications. This could be used in settings where a larger proportion of controlled substances are prescribed including medication assisted therapy for opioid use disorders and pain management programs.

  11. Clinical effects of buprenorphine on open field behaviour and gait symmetry in healthy and lame weaned piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Ellen; van Nes, Arie; Back, Willem; van der Staay, Franz Josef

    2015-12-01

    Lameness in pigs decreases animal welfare and economic profit for the farmer. An important reason for impaired welfare in lame animals is pain due to lameness. No direct measurement of pain is possible in animals, and methods to indirectly detect and quantify the amount of pain an animal is experiencing are urgently needed. In this study, two methods to assess pain associated with lameness in pigs were evaluated to determine if they were sensitive enough to detect a lameness reduction as an effect of an experimental analgesic medication. Asymmetry associated with lameness was objectively quantified using pressure mat kinetic parameters: peak vertical force (PVF), load rate (LR), vertical impulse (VI) and peak vertical pressure (PVP). Locomotor activity was assessed in an open field test. A dose of 0.04 mg/kg buprenorphine, a strong analgesic, was used to treat 10 lame pigs, while eight other lame pigs, treated with physiological saline solution, served as controls. Buprenorphine decreased lameness-associated asymmetry for pressure mat LR (P = 0.002), VI (P = 0.003) and PVP (P = 0.001) and increased activity of the lame pigs in the open field (P = 0.023), while saline-treated animals did not show any changes in asymmetry and became less active in the open field (P open field test are both sensitive enough to detect the analgesic effects of buprenorphine when used to treat moderate to severe clinical pain in a relatively small group of affected pigs. The methods used in this study may also provide promising additional tools for future research into early pain recognition and lameness treatment in pigs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A statistical experimental design approach to evaluate the influence of various penetration enhancers on transdermal drug delivery of buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghizadeh, S Mojtaba; Moghimi-Ardakani, Ali; Mohamadnia, Fatemeh

    2015-03-01

    A series of drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems (patch) with different chemical penetration enhancers were designed to deliver drug through the skin as a site of application. The objective of our effort was to study the influence of various chemical penetration enhancers on skin permeation rate and adhesion properties of a transdermal drug delivery system using Box-Behnken experimental design. The response surface methodology based on a three-level, three-variable Box-Behnken design was used to evaluate the interactive effects on dependent variables including, the rate of skin permeation and adhesion properties, namely peel strength and tack value. Levulinic acid, lauryl alcohol, and Tween 80 were used as penetration enhancers (patch formulations, containing 0-8% of each chemical penetration enhancer). Buprenorphine was used as a model penetrant drug. The results showed that incorporation of 20% chemical penetration enhancer into the mixture led to maximum skin permeation flux of buprenorphine from abdominal rat skin while the adhesion properties decreased. Also that skin flux in presence of levulinic acid (1.594 μg/cm(2) h) was higher than Tween 80 (1.473 μg/cm(2) h) and lauryl alcohol (0.843 μg/cm(2) h), and in mixing these enhancers together, an additional effect was observed. Moreover, it was found that each enhancer increased the tack value, while levulinic acid and lauryl alcohol improved the peel strength but Tween 80 reduced it. These findings indicated that the best chemical skin penetration enhancer for buprenorphine patch was levulinic acid. Among the designed formulations, the one which contained 12% (wt/wt) enhancers exhibited the highest efficiency.

  13. Opioid withdrawal, craving, and use during and after outpatient buprenorphine stabilization and taper: a discrete survival and growth mixture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northrup, Thomas F; Stotts, Angela L; Green, Charles; Potter, Jennifer S; Marino, Elise N; Walker, Robrina; Weiss, Roger D; Trivedi, Madhukar

    2015-02-01

    Most patients relapse to opioids within one month of opioid agonist detoxification, making the antecedents and parallel processes of first use critical for investigation. Craving and withdrawal are often studied in relationship to opioid outcomes, and a novel analytic strategy applied to these two phenomena may indicate targeted intervention strategies. Specifically, this secondary data analysis of the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study used a discrete-time mixture analysis with time-to-first opioid use (survival) simultaneously predicted by craving and withdrawal growth trajectories. This analysis characterized heterogeneity among prescription opioid-dependent individuals (N=653) into latent classes (i.e., latent class analysis [LCA]) during and after buprenorphine/naloxone stabilization and taper. A 4-latent class solution was selected for overall model fit and clinical parsimony. In order of shortest to longest time-to-first use, the 4 classes were characterized as 1) high craving and withdrawal, 2) intermediate craving and withdrawal, 3) high initial craving with low craving and withdrawal trajectories and 4) a low initial craving with low craving and withdrawal trajectories. Odds ratio calculations showed statistically significant differences in time-to-first use across classes. Generally, participants with lower baseline levels and greater decreases in craving and withdrawal during stabilization combined with slower craving and withdrawal rebound during buprenorphine taper remained opioid-free longer. This exploratory work expanded on the importance of monitoring craving and withdrawal during buprenorphine induction, stabilization, and taper. Future research may allow individually tailored and timely interventions to be developed to extend time-to-first opioid use. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Very early disengagement and subsequent re-engagement in primary care Office Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) with buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hui, David; Weinstein, Zoe M; Cheng, Debbie M; Quinn, Emily; Kim, Hyunjoong; Labelle, Colleen; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2017-08-01

    Patients with opioid use disorder often require multiple treatment attempts before achieving stable recovery. Rates of disengagement from buprenorphine are highest in the first month of treatment and termination of buprenorphine therapy results in return to use rates as high as 90%. To better characterize these at-risk patients, this study aims to describe: 1) the frequency and characteristics of patients with very early disengagement (≤1month) from Office Based Opioid Treatment (OBOT) with buprenorphine and 2) the frequency and characteristics of patients who re-engage in care at this same OBOT clinic within 2years, among the subset of very early disengagers. This is a retrospective cohort study of adult patients enrolled in a large urban OBOT program. Descriptive statistics were used to characterize the sample and the proportion of patients with very early (≤1month) disengagement and their re-engagement. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to identify patient characteristics associated with the outcomes of very early disengagement and re-engagement. Potential predictors included: sex, age, race/ethnicity, education, employment, opioid use history, prior substance use treatments, urine drug testing, and psychiatric diagnoses. Overall, very early disengagement was unusual, with only 8.4% (104/1234) of patients disengaging within the first month. Among the subset of very early disengagers with 2years of follow-up, the proportion who re-engaged with this OBOT program in the subsequent 2years was 11.9% (10/84). Urine drug test positive for opiates within the first month (AOR: 2.01, 95% CI: 1.02-3.93) was associated with increased odds of very early disengagement. Transferring from another buprenorphine prescriber (AOR: 0.09, 95% CI: 0.01-0.70) was associated with decreased odds of very early disengagement. No characteristics were significantly associated with re-engagement. Early disengagement is uncommon; however, continued opioid use appeared to

  15. Trends in Receipt of Buprenorphine and Naltrexone for Opioid Use Disorder Among Adolescents and Young Adults, 2001-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadland, Scott E; Wharam, J Frank; Schuster, Mark A; Zhang, Fang; Samet, Jeffrey H; Larochelle, Marc R

    2017-08-01

    Opioid use disorder (OUD) frequently begins in adolescence and young adulthood. Intervening early with pharmacotherapy is recommended by major professional organizations. No prior national studies have examined the extent to which adolescents and young adults (collectively termed youth) with OUD receive pharmacotherapy. To identify time trends and disparities in receipt of buprenorphine and naltrexone among youth with OUD in the United States. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using deidentified data from a national commercial insurance database. Enrollment and complete health insurance claims of 9.7 million youth, aged 13 to 25 years were analyzed, identifying individuals who received a diagnosis of OUD between January 1, 2001, and June 30, 2014, with final follow-up date December 31, 2014. Analysis was conducted from April 25 to December 31, 2016. Time trends were identified and multivariable logistic regression was used to determine sociodemographic factors associated with medication receipt. Sex, age, race/ethnicity, neighborhood education and poverty levels, geographic region, census region, and year of diagnosis. Dispensing of a medication (buprenorphine or naltrexone) within 6 months of first receiving an OUD diagnosis. Among 20 822 youth diagnosed with OUD (0.2% of the 9.7 million sample), 13 698 (65.8%) were male and 17 119 (82.2%) were non-Hispanic white. Mean (SD) age was 21.0 (2.5) years at the first observed diagnosis. The diagnosis rate of OUD increased nearly 6-fold from 2001 to 2014 (from 0.26 per 100 000 person-years to 1.51 per 100 000 person-years). Overall, 5580 (26.8%) youth were dispensed a medication within 6 months of diagnosis, with 4976 (89.2%) of medication-treated youth receiving buprenorphine and 604 (10.8%) receiving naltrexone. Medication receipt increased more than 10-fold, from 3.0% in 2002 (when buprenorphine was introduced) to 31.8% in 2009, but declined in subsequent years (27.5% in 2014). In multivariable

  16. Recidivism with opiate addicted patients on buprenorphine substitution treatment: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crnić Katarina B.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Opiate dependence is a serious, chronic and recurrent psychiatric disorder, whose prevalence reach epidemic proportions. This also contributes to a significant increase in mortality, associated with overdose with opiates, as well as the rise in other health and social problems of the society. The methods and availability of treatment do not correspond to increased treatment needs, and treatment success is limited by the characteristics of the disorder, or numerous risk factors, which contribute to a high percentage of recidivism. Good clinical practice guidelines have defined treatment recommendations that include high and low-demanding programs. The personalized and integrative approaches are emphasized. Case report: The patient aged 41 years, intravenous-use opiate addict from his adolescences, with numerous psychological, health and social complications of addiction, is a participant in institutional treatment, following a court order as a measure of obligatory treatment, due to criminal offenses related to addiction. The history of the disease refers to numerous unsuccessful attempts to heal and short-term abstinence in the past, mainly in penal institutions. The patient meets all the criteria defined by the guidelines for inclusion in the buprenorphine maintenance program started in the year 2013. During the four-year treatment, the doses of the drug were adapted as needed; two heroin relapses and many in-risk situations for relapse were registered. The treatment continued with close monitoring of the patient's condition and, with appropriate psychosocial interventions, contribute to keeping the patient in treatment and preventing the development of new complications of addiction, as well an improving the quality of his life. Discussion: Pharmacological treatment of opioid dependence relies on agents belonging to groups of antagonists, agonists and partial agonists of opiate receptors. The earlier programs with abstinence as a

  17. Predictors of attrition with buprenorphine/naloxone treatment in opioid dependent youth☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Diane; Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Carmody, Thomas; Woody, George E.; Minhajuddin, Abu; Poole, Sabrina A.; Potter, Jennifer; Fishman, Marc; Bogenschutz, Michael; Patkar, Ashwin; Trivedi, Madhukar H.

    2012-01-01

    Background In opioid dependent youth there is substantial attrition from medication-assisted treatment. If youth at risk for attrition can be identified at treatment entry or early in treatment, they can be targeted for interventions to help retain them in treatment. Methods Opioid dependent adolescents and young adults (n=152), aged 15–21, were randomized to 12 weeks (BUP, n=74) or 2 weeks of detoxification (DETOX, n=78) with buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nal), both in combination with 12 weeks of psychosocial treatment. Baseline and early treatment related predictors of treatment attrition were identified in each group using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. Results In the DETOX group 36% left between weeks 2 and 4, at the end of the dose taper, while in the BUP group only 8% left by week 4. In the BUP group, early adherence to Bup/Nal, early opioid negative urines, use of any medications in the month prior to treatment entry, and lifetime non-heroin opioid use were associated with retention while prior 30-day hallucinogen use was associated with attrition. In the DETOX group, only use of sleep medications was associated with retention although not an independent predictor. A broad range of other pre-treatment characteristics was unrelated to attrition. Conclusions Prompt attention to those with early non-adherence to medication or an early opioid positive urine, markers available in the first 2 weeks of treatment, may improve treatment retention. Extended Bup/ Nal treatment appeared effective in improving treatment retention for youth with opioid dependence across a wide range of demographics, and pre-treatment clinical characteristics. PMID:22626890

  18. Predictors of attrition with buprenorphine/naloxone treatment in opioid dependent youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warden, Diane; Subramaniam, Geetha A; Carmody, Thomas; Woody, George E; Minhajuddin, Abu; Poole, Sabrina A; Potter, Jennifer; Fishman, Marc; Bogenschutz, Michael; Patkar, Ashwin; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2012-09-01

    In opioid dependent youth there is substantial attrition from medication-assisted treatment. If youth at risk for attrition can be identified at treatment entry or early in treatment, they can be targeted for interventions to help retain them in treatment. Opioid dependent adolescents and young adults (n=152), aged 15-21, were randomized to 12 weeks (BUP, n=74) or 2 weeks of detoxification (DETOX, n=78) with buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nal), both in combination with 12 weeks of psychosocial treatment. Baseline and early treatment related predictors of treatment attrition were identified in each group using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression. In the DETOX group 36% left between weeks 2 and 4, at the end of the dose taper, while in the BUP group only 8% left by week 4. In the BUP group, early adherence to Bup/Nal, early opioid negative urines, use of any medications in the month prior to treatment entry, and lifetime non-heroin opioid use were associated with retention while prior 30-day hallucinogen use was associated with attrition. In the DETOX group, only use of sleep medications was associated with retention although not an independent predictor. A broad range of other pre-treatment characteristics was unrelated to attrition. Prompt attention to those with early non-adherence to medication or an early opioid positive urine, markers available in the first 2 weeks of treatment, may improve treatment retention. Extended Bup/Nal treatment appeared effective in improving treatment retention for youth with opioid dependence across a wide range of demographics, and pre-treatment clinical characteristics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Buprenorphine/naloxone treatment practices in Malaysia: Results of national surveys of physicians and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicknasingam, B; Dazali, M N M; Singh, D; Schottenfeld, R S; Chawarski, M C

    2015-07-01

    Medication assisted treatment with buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nx), including prescribing and dispensing practices of general practitioners (GPs) in Malaysia and their patients' experiences with this treatment have not been systematically examined. The current study surveyed GPs providing Bup/Nx treatment and patients receiving office-based Bup/Nx treatment in Malaysia. Two cross-sectional surveys of GPs (N=115) providing outpatient Bup/Nx maintenance treatment and of patients (N=253) currently receiving Bup/Nx treatment throughout peninsular Malaysia. Physicians prescribed Bup/Nx dosages in the range of 2-4mg daily for 70% of patients and conducted urine testing in the past month on approximately 16% of their patients. In the patient survey, 79% reported taking daily Bup/Nx doses of 2mg or less; 82% reported that no urine toxicology testing had been conducted on them in the past month, 36% had an opiate positive urine test at the time of the survey, 43% reported illicit opiate use, 15% reported injection of heroin and 22% reported injection of Bup/Nx in the past month. Low daily Bup/Nx doses, lack of behavioral monitoring or counseling, and high rates of continued drug use, including injection of drugs and medications during Bup/Nx treatment in Malaysia, indicate continuing problems with implementation and less than optimal treatment effectiveness. High cost of Bup/Nx in Malaysia may deter patients from seeking treatment and contribute to taking low Bup/Nx dosages. Improved training of physicians and establishing standards for Bup/Nx dosing, routine toxicology testing, and counseling may be needed to improve care and treatment response. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Suboxone (buprenorphine/naloxone) as an agonist opioid treatment in Spain: a budgetary impact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Raga, José; González Saiz, Francisco; Pascual, César; Casado, Miguel A; Sabater Torres, Francisco J

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the economic impact of buprenorphine/naloxone (B/N) as an agonist opioid treatment for opiate dependence. A budgetary impact analysis model was designed to calculate the annual costs (drugs and associated costs) to the Spanish National Healthcare System of methadone versus B/N. Data for the model were obtained from official databases and expert panel opinion. It was estimated that 86,017 patients would be in an agonist opioid treatment program each of the 3 years of the study. No increase in the number of patients is expected with the introduction of B/N combination. The budgetary impact (drugs and associated costs) for agonist opiate treatment in the first year of the study would be 89.53 million EUR. In the first year of B/N use, the budgetary impact would rise by 4.39 million EUR (4.6% of the total impact), with an incremental cost of 0.79 million EUR (0.9% of the total impact). The budgetary increase would be 0.6% (0.48 million EUR increase) and 0.6% (0.49 million EUR increase) in the second and third years of use, respectively. The mean cost per patient in the first year with and without B/N would be EUR 1,050 and 1,041, respectively. The most influential variables in the sensitivity analysis were logistics and production costs of methadone and the percentage use of B/N. With an additional cost of only EUR 9 per patient, B/N is an efficient addition to the therapeutic arsenal in the drug treatment of opiate dependence, particularly when considering clinical aspects of novel pharmacotherapy. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Enzymatic assays for detecting lactose and sucrose in urine to reveal intravenous drug abuse with emphasis on buprenorphine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keltanen, T; Mariottini, C; Walta, A M; Rahikainen, A L; Ojanperä, I

    2017-06-01

    Buprenorphine and methadone are commonly used medications for opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), using sublingual and oral administration, respectively. Although beneficial for OMT, these drugs can also be abused by intravenous administration. In intravenous abuse cases, the adjuvants lactose and sucrose are excreted in urine without hydrolysis to monosaccharides, since there are no disaccharidases in the blood. We validated enzymatic methods for the analysis of lactose and sucrose in urine. The analytical performance of both assays was considered appropriate for detecting intravenous drug abuse. The principle was proven by analyzing 93 postmortem (PM) urine samples for lactose, following comprehensive toxicological drug screening. In addition, 32 clinical urine samples from potential drug abusers were analyzed to assess the effect of PM changes on the assay. The mean level of lactose was low in clinical samples and relatively low in PM samples in which no drugs were found. Markedly elevated levels were seen in many of the buprenorphine positive samples, suggesting intravenous administration. Enzymatic methods could provide a simple and cost effective way to assess the intravenous administration of OMT drugs or drugs of abuse. Very high levels of glucose in urine may interfere with the assays. Furthermore, other causes for elevated urine disaccharides, such as hypolactasia and increased intestinal permeability, need to be considered in the interpretation of the results. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. A comparison of epidural buprenorphine plus detomidine with morphine plus detomidine in horses undergoing bilateral stifle arthroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Berit L; Ludders, John W; Asakawa, Makoto; Fortier, Lisa A; Fubini, Susan L; Nixon, Alan J; Radcliffe, Rolfe M; Erb, Hollis N

    2009-01-01

    To compare the analgesic efficacy of buprenorphine plus detomidine with that of morphine plus detomidine when administered epidurally in horses undergoing bilateral stifle arthroscopy. Prospective, randomized, blinded clinical trial. Twelve healthy adult horses participating in an orthopedic research study. Group M (n = 6) received morphine (0.2 mg kg(-1)) and detomidine (0.15 mg kg(-1)) epidurally; group B (n = 6) received buprenorphine (0.005 mg kg(-1)) and detomidine (0.15 mg kg(-1)) epidurally. Horses received one of two epidural treatments following induction of general anesthesia for bilateral stifle arthroscopy. Heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), end-tidal CO(2) (Pe'CO(2)), and end-tidal isoflurane concentrations (E'Iso%) were recorded every 15 minutes following epidural administration. Post-operative assessment was performed at 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 24 hours after standing; variables recorded included HR, respiratory rate (f(R)), abdominal borborygmi, defecation, and the presence of undesirable side effects. At the same times post-operatively, each horse was videotaped at a walk and subsequently assigned a lameness score (0-4) by three ACVS diplomates blinded to treatment and who followed previously published guidelines. Nonparametric data were analyzed using Wilcoxon's rank-sum test. Inter- and intra-rater agreement were determined using weighted kappa coefficients. Statistical significance was set at p detomidine injected epidurally produced analgesia similar in intensity and duration to that of morphine plus detomidine injected epidurally.

  3. Hormonal, metabolic and physiological effects of laparoscopic surgery using a detomidine-buprenorphine combination in standing horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, P; Lankveld, D P K; Rijkenhuizen, A B M; Jonker, F H

    2003-04-01

    To assess the hormonal, metabolic and physiological effects of laparascopic surgery performed under a sedative analgesic combination of detomidine and buprenorphine in standing horses. Prospective study. Eight healthy adult Dutch Warmblood horses and five healthy adult ponies undergoing laparoscopy were studied. Five healthy adult horses not undergoing laparoscopy were used as a control group. The sedative effect of an initial detomidine and buprenorphine injection was maintained using a continuous infusion of detomidine alone. The heart and respiratory rate, arterial blood pH and arterial oxygen and carbon dioxide tensions were monitored, while blood samples were taken for the measurement of glucose, lactate, cortisol, insulin and nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA). The same variables were monitored in a control group of horses which were sedated, but which did not undergo surgery. At the end of the sedation period the effects of detomidine were antagonized using atipamezole. The protocol provided suitable conditions for standing laparoscopy in horses. Laparoscopy induced obvious metabolic and endocrine responses which, with the exception of NEFA values, were not significantly different from changes found in the control group. While atipamezole did not produce detectable adverse effects, it is possible that anatagonism may not be essential. The technique described reliably produces adequate sedation and analgesia for laparoscopic procedures. The level of sedation/analgesia was controlled by decreasing or increasing the infusion rate. Antagonism of the effects of detomidine may not be necessary in all cases.

  4. Barriers and facilitators to primary care or human immunodeficiency virus clinics providing methadone or buprenorphine for the management of opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Barbara J; Laine, Christine; Lin, Yi-Ting; Lynch, Kevin

    Federal initiatives aim to increase office-based treatment of opioid dependence, but, to our knowledge, factors associated with willingness to deliver this care have not been defined. The objective of this study was to describe clinics' willingness to provide methadone hydrochloride or buprenorphine hydrochloride for opioid dependence. The design of the study was a survey conducted in New York State. Two hundred sixty-one directors of primary care and/or human immunodeficiency virus specialty clinics (response rate, 61.1%) that serve Medicaid enrollees were questioned. Outcomes were willingness to provide methadone and buprenorphine. Predictors included clinic characteristics, attitudes about drug users and their treatment, and reported barriers and facilitators to treatment. Clinics were more willing to provide buprenorphine than methadone treatment (59.8% vs 32.6%; P methadone. Willingness was positively associated with continuing medical education credits for training, but negatively associated with greater concern about medication abuse. Immediate telephone access to an addiction expert was associated with willingness to provide buprenorphine (AOR, 2.08; 95% CI, 1.15-3.76). Greater willingness to provide methadone was associated with a belief that methadone-treated patients should be seen along with other patients (AOR, 6.20; 95% CI, 1.78-21.64), methadone program affiliation (AOR, 4.76; 95% CI, 1.64-13.82), and having more patients with chronic pain in the clinic (AOR, 2.80; 95% CI, 1.44-5.44). These clinics serving Medicaid enrollees were more receptive to buprenorphine than methadone treatment. Willingness to provide this care was greater in clinics offering human immunodeficiency virus services, treating more chronic pain, or affiliated with methadone programs. Accessible addiction experts and continuing medical education for training may facilitate adoption of this care.

  5. Efficacy of buprenorphine added to 2% lignocaine plus adrenaline 1:80,000 in providing postoperative analgesia after lower third molar surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, N; Sharma, P; Chhabra, S; Gupta, N

    2016-12-01

    A number of trials have examined the peripheral analgesic effect of opioids, known to have an anti-nociceptive effect at the central and/or spinal cord level. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of buprenorphine added to 2% lignocaine with adrenaline 1:80,000 in providing postoperative analgesia after lower third molar surgery. Sixty patients were randomized to three groups: group A received lignocaine 2% with adrenaline 1:80,000 for inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB), along with intramuscular (IM) injection of 1ml saline; group B received buprenorphine mixed with lignocaine 2% with adrenaline 1:80,000 for IANB (0.01mg buprenorphine/ml lignocaine with adrenaline), along with 1ml saline IM; group C received lignocaine 2% with adrenaline 1:80,000 for IANB, along with 0.03mg buprenorphine IM. Mean postoperative pain scores (visual analogue scale; when the patient first felt pain) were 6.0 for group A, 1.0 for group B, and 4.4 for group C. The mean duration of postoperative analgesia was 3.5h in groups A and C and 12h in group B. The mean number of postoperative analgesics consumed was 5.8 in groups A and C and 3.9 in group B. The addition of buprenorphine (0.03mg) to 2% lignocaine with adrenaline 1:80,000 significantly reduced the severity of postoperative pain and prolonged the duration of analgesia, thereby decreasing the need for postoperative analgesics. Copyright © 2016 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of Buprenorphine Weekly Depot (CAM2038) and Hydromorphone Blockade in Individuals With Opioid Use Disorder: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Sharon L; Comer, Sandra D; Lofwall, Michelle R; Vince, Bradley; Levy-Cooperman, Naama; Kelsh, Debra; Coe, Marion A; Jones, Jermaine D; Nuzzo, Paul A; Tiberg, Fredrik; Sheldon, Behshad; Kim, Sonnie

    2017-09-01

    Buprenorphine is an efficacious, widely used treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD). Daily oral transmucosal formulations can be associated with misuse, diversion, and nonadherence; these limitations may be obviated by a sustained release formulation. To evaluate the ability of a novel, weekly, subcutaneous buprenorphine depot formulation, CAM2038, to block euphorigenic opioid effects and suppress opioid withdrawal in non-treatment-seeking individuals with OUD. This multisite, double-blind, randomized within-patient study was conducted at 3 controlled inpatient research facilities. It involved 47 adults with DSM-V moderate-to-severe OUD. The study was conducted from October 12, 2015 (first patient enrolled), to April 21, 2016 (last patient visit). A total of five 3-day test sessions evaluated the response to hydromorphone (0, 6, and 18 mg intramuscular in random order; 1 dose/session/day). After the first 3-day session (ie, qualification phase), participants were randomized to either CAM2038 weekly at 24 mg (n = 22) or 32 mg (n = 25); the assigned CAM2038 dose was given twice, 1 week apart (day 0 and 7). Four sets of sessions were conducted after randomization (days 1-3, 4-6, 8-10, and 11-13). The primary end point was maximum rating on the visual analog scale for drug liking. Secondary end points included other visual analog scale (eg, high and desire to use), opioid withdrawal scales, and physiological and pharmacokinetic outcomes. A total of 46 of 47 randomized participants (mean [SD] age, 35.5 [9] years; 76% male [n = 35]) completed the study. Both weekly CAM2038 doses produced immediate and sustained blockade of hydromorphone effects (liking maximum effect, CAM2038, 24 mg: effect size, 0.813; P withdrawal (Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale, CAM2038, 24 mg: effect size, 0.617; P opioid blockade and withdrawal suppression. The results support the use of this depot formulation for treatment initiation and stabilization of patients with OUD, with

  7. Opioid receptor imaging and displacement studies with [6-O-[11C]methyl]buprenorphine in baboon brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galynker, Igor; Schlyer, David J.; Dewey, Stephen L.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Gatley, S. John; MacGregor, Robert R.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Holland, M. J.; Brodie, Jonathan; Simon, Eric; Wolf, Alfred P.

    1996-01-01

    Buprenorphine (BPN) is a mixed opiate agonist-antagonist used as an analgesic and in the treatment of opiate addiction. We have used [6-O-[ 11 C]methyl]buprenorphine ([ 11 C]BPN) to measure the regional distribution in baboon brain, the test-retest stability of repeated studies in the same animal, the displacement of the labeled drug by naloxone in vivo, and the tissue distribution in mice. The regional distribution of radioactivity in baboon brain determined with PET was striatum > thalamus > cingulate gyrus > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > occipital cortex > cerebellum. This distribution corresponded to opiate receptor density and to previously published data (37). The tracer uptake in adult female baboons showed no significant variation in serial scans in the same baboon with no intervention in the same scanning session. HPLC analysis of baboon plasma showed the presence of labeled metabolites with 92% ± 2.2% and 43% ± 14.4% of the intact tracer remaining at 5 and 30 min, respectively. Naloxone, an opiate receptor antagonist, administered 30-40 min after tracer injection at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg i.v., reduced [ 11 C]BPN binding in thalamus, striatum, cingulate gyrus, and frontal cortex to values 0.25 to 0.60 of that with no intervention. There were minimal ( 11 C]BPN can be displaced by naloxone in vivo, and they affirm the feasibility of using this tracer and displacement methodology for short-term kinetics studies with PET. Mouse tissue distribution data were used to estimate the radiation dosimetry to humans. The critical organ was the small intestine, with a radiation dose estimate to humans of 117 nrad/mCi

  8. Opioid receptor imaging and displacement studies with [6-O-[{sup 11}C]methyl]buprenorphine in baboon brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galynker, Igor; Schlyer, David J.; Dewey, Stephen L.; Fowler, Joanna S.; Logan, Jean; Gatley, S. John; MacGregor, Robert R.; Ferrieri, Richard A.; Holland, M. J.; Brodie, Jonathan; Simon, Eric; Wolf, Alfred P

    1996-04-01

    Buprenorphine (BPN) is a mixed opiate agonist-antagonist used as an analgesic and in the treatment of opiate addiction. We have used [6-O-[{sup 11}C]methyl]buprenorphine ([{sup 11}C]BPN) to measure the regional distribution in baboon brain, the test-retest stability of repeated studies in the same animal, the displacement of the labeled drug by naloxone in vivo, and the tissue distribution in mice. The regional distribution of radioactivity in baboon brain determined with PET was striatum > thalamus > cingulate gyrus > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > occipital cortex > cerebellum. This distribution corresponded to opiate receptor density and to previously published data (37). The tracer uptake in adult female baboons showed no significant variation in serial scans in the same baboon with no intervention in the same scanning session. HPLC analysis of baboon plasma showed the presence of labeled metabolites with 92% {+-} 2.2% and 43% {+-} 14.4% of the intact tracer remaining at 5 and 30 min, respectively. Naloxone, an opiate receptor antagonist, administered 30-40 min after tracer injection at a dose of 1.0 mg/kg i.v., reduced [{sup 11}C]BPN binding in thalamus, striatum, cingulate gyrus, and frontal cortex to values 0.25 to 0.60 of that with no intervention. There were minimal (< 15%) effects on cerebellum. Naloxone treatment significantly reduced the slope of the Patlak plot in receptor-containing regions. These results demonstrate that [{sup 11}C]BPN can be displaced by naloxone in vivo, and they affirm the feasibility of using this tracer and displacement methodology for short-term kinetics studies with PET. Mouse tissue distribution data were used to estimate the radiation dosimetry to humans. The critical organ was the small intestine, with a radiation dose estimate to humans of 117 nrad/mCi.

  9. Sciatic and femoral nerve blockade using bupivacaine alone, or in combination with dexmedetomidine or buprenorphine in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, M C; Doodnaught, G M; Fantoni, D T; Steagall, P V M

    2017-06-17

    The aim of this study was to determine the onset and offset of antinociception after sciatic (ScN) and femoral (FN) nerve blocks. Six healthy adult cats (4.8±1.3years; 4.3±0.4 kg) were included in a randomised, crossover, blinded and controlled study. Following sedation with dexmedetomidine (25 µg/kg, intramuscular), each ScN and FN injection was performed using 0.1 ml/kg of saline (CONTROL), bupivacaine (0.46 per cent, 0.46 mg/kg; BUPI), bupivacaine and dexmedetomidine (1 µg/kg; BUPI-DEX) or bupivacaine and buprenorphine (2.5 µg/kg; BUPI-BUPRE). Atipamezole (250 µg/kg) was administered after injections. Paw withdrawal thresholds (PWT) and motor blockade were evaluated before sedation and up to 24 hours. The PWT were significantly increased at half an hour in CONTROL, from two to four hours in BUPI and BUPI-DEX when compared with baseline. Motor blockade was observed between one and three hours in treatments using bupivacaine. Ability to walk was significantly impaired in BUPI at half an hour to two hours, BUPI-DEX at one to two hours and BUPI-BUPRE at two hours. Antinociception was observed in BUPI between one and eight hours, and in BUPI-DEX and BUPI-BUPRE between one and four hours. This study could not demonstrate a benefit of administering bupivacaine with dexmedetomidine or buprenorphine in cats. Results in BUPI-DEX may have been biased by the administration of atipamezole. British Veterinary Association.

  10. Incidence of high dosage buprenorphine and methadone shopping behavior in a retrospective cohort of opioid-maintained patients in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, Jessica; Chenaf, Chouki; Kabore, Jean-Luc; Pereira, Bruno; Mulliez, Aurélien; Tremey, Aurore; Brousse, Georges; Zenut, Marie; Laporte, Catherine; Authier, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    Opioid Substitution Treatment (OST) misuse and diversion have significantly increased worldwide. Obtaining OST prescriptions from multiple prescribers, known as doctor shopping, is a way in which opioids may be diverted. The aim of this study was to assess the incidence of OST (high dosage buprenorphine (HDB) and methadone (MTD)) shopping behavior and identify associated risk factors, and its impact on mortality. A retrospective cohort of patients treated by OST between April 1, 2004 and December 31, 2012 from a sample of the French Health Insurance database was established. Doctor shopping was defined as ≥1 day of overlapping prescriptions written by ≥2 different prescribers and filled in ≥3 different pharmacies. A total of 2043 patients were enrolled, 1450HDB and 593 MTD. The one-year incidence of shopping behavior was 8.4% (95% CI: 7.0-10.1) in HDB group and 0% in MTD group, compared to 0.2% (95% CI: 0.1-0.2) for diuretics. On multivariate analysis, factors associated with HDB shopping behavior were: male gender HR: 1.74 (95% CI: 1.20-2.54); low-income status HR: 2.95 (95% CI: 2.07-4.44); mental health disorders HR: 1.43 (95% CI: 1.06-1.94); concurrent hypnotics use HR: 1.90 (95% CI: 1.39-2.61); concurrent use of weak opioids HR: 1.48 (95% CI: 1.09-1.99) and morphine HR: 1.69 (95% CI: 1.02-2.80). HDB shoppers had a higher, yet non-significant risk of death (HR: 1.56 (95% CI: 0.64-3.81)) than non HDB shoppers. Shopping behavior was only found in high dosage buprenorphine patients and concerned almost one out ten patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Morphine- and buprenorphine-induced analgesia and antihyperalgesia in a human inflammatory pain model: a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, five-arm crossover study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravn P

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pernille Ravn,1 Erik L Secher,2 Ulrik Skram,3 Trine Therkildsen,1 Lona L Christrup,1 Mads U Werner41Department of Drug Design and Pharmacology, University of Copenhagen, 2Department of Anesthesiology, Juliane Marie Center, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospitals, 3Department of Intensive Care, Gentofte Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospitals, 4Multidisciplinary Pain Center, Neuroscience Center, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospitals, Copenhagen, DenmarkPurpose: Opioid therapy is associated with the development of tolerance and paradoxically increased sensitivity to pain. It has been suggested that buprenorphine is associated with a higher antihyperalgesia/analgesia ratio than µ-opioid receptor agonists. The primary outcome of this study was therefore to investigate relative differences in antihyperalgesia and analgesia effects between morphine and buprenorphine in an inflammatory pain model in volunteers. The secondary outcome was to examine the relationship between pain sensitivity and opioid-induced effects on analgesia, antihyperalgesia, and descending pain modulation.Subjects and methods: Twenty-eight healthy subjects were included. The study was a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, five-arm crossover study with a multimodal (electrical, mechanical, and thermal stimuli testing technique. After baseline assessments, intravenous infusions of morphine (10/20 mg, buprenorphine (0.3/0.6 mg, or placebo (normal saline were administered over a 210-minute period, during which a cold pressor test, heat injury (47°C, 7 minutes, 12.5 cm2, and the first postburn assessment were done. After completion of the drug infusions, two additional postburn assessments were done. The subjects were monitored during each 8-hour session by an anesthesiologist.Results: For nearly all tested variables, significant dose-dependent analgesic effects were demonstrated. The median antihyperalgesia/analgesia ratio (secondary hyperalgesia

  12. Carprofen neither reduces postoperative facial expression scores in rabbits treated with buprenorphine nor alters long term bone formation after maxillary sinus grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenqvist, Patricia; Trbakovic, Amela; Thor, Andreas; Ley, Cecilia; Ekman, Stina; Jensen-Waern, Marianne

    2016-08-01

    In connection with bilateral maxillary sinus augmentation, the acute effects of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug carprofen on facial expressions and long-term effects on bone formation were evaluated in 18 male New Zealand White rabbits. A 10×10mm bone window was drilled in the maxilla, the sinus membrane elevated and a titanium mini-implant inserted. One of two test materials was randomly inserted unilaterally and bovine bone chips (control) on the contralateral side in the created space. Rabbits were randomly allocated to receive buprenorphine plus carprofen (n=9) or buprenorphine plus saline (n=9) postoperatively. Buprenorphine was administered subcutaneously every 6h for 3days in a tapered dose (0.05-0.01mg/kg) and carprofen (5mg/kg) or saline administered subcutaneously 1h before, and daily for 4days postoperatively. To assess pain, clinical examination, body weight recording and scoring of facial expressions from photos taken before, and 6-13h after surgery were performed. Twelve weeks after surgery the rabbits were euthanized and sections of maxillary bones and sinuses were analysed with histomorphometry and by qualitative histology. Carprofen had no effect on mean facial expression scores, which increased from 0.0 to 3.6 (carprofen) and 4.3 (saline), of a maximum of 8.0. Neither did carprofen have an effect on bone formation or implant incorporation, whereas the test materials had. In conclusion, treatment with 5mg/kg carprofen once daily for 5days did not reduce facial expression scores after maxillary sinus augmentation in buprenorphine treated rabbits and did not affect long term bone formation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Postoperative Analgesia Due to Sustained-Release Buprenorphine, Sustained-Release Meloxicam, and Carprofen Gel in a Model of Incisional Pain in Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Travis L; Adams, Sean C; Felt, Stephen A; Jampachaisri, Katechan; Yeomans, David C; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative analgesia in laboratory rats is complicated by the frequent handling associated with common analgesic dosing requirements. Here, we evaluated sustained-release buprenorphine (Bup-SR), sustained-release meloxicam (Melox-SR), and carprofen gel (CG) as refinements for postoperative analgesia. The aim of this study was to investigate whether postoperative administration of Bup-SR, Melox-SR, or CG effectively controls behavioral mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in a rat model of incisional pain. Rats were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 treatment groups: saline, 1 mL/kg SC BID; buprenorphine HCl (Bup HCl), 0.05 mg/kg SC BID; Bup-SR, 1.2 mg/kg SC once; Melox-SR, 4 mg/kg SC once; and CG, 2 oz PO daily. Mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity were tested daily from day-1 through 4. Bup HCl and Bup-SR attenuated mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity on days 1 through 4. Melox-SR and CG attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity-but not thermal hypersensitivity-on days 1 through 4. Plasma concentrations, measured by using UPLC with mass spectrometry, were consistent between both buprenorphine formulations. Gross pathologic examination revealed no signs of toxicity in any group. These findings suggest that postoperative administration of Bup HCl and Bup-SR-but not Melox-SR or CG-effectively attenuates mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in a rat model of incisional pain.

  14. Buprenorphine from detox and beyond: preliminary evaluation of a pilot program to increase heroin dependent individuals' engagement in a full continuum of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donovan, Dennis M; Knox, Patricia C; Skytta, Jenny A F; Blayney, Jessica A; DiCenzo, Jessica

    2013-04-01

    Absence of successful transition to post-detoxification treatment leads to high rates of relapse among detoxified heroin users. The present study evaluated a pilot buprenorphine treatment program (BTP). Heroin dependent individuals were inducted onto buprenorphine/naloxone in detox, maintained while transitioning through an intensive inpatient program (IIP), and gradually tapered off medication over 5 months of outpatient (OP) treatment. Compared to programmatic indicators of treatment engagement in the year prior to BTP implementation, referrals from detox to IIP, entry into and completion of IIP and subsequent OP, and days in OP treatment increased substantially. BTP completers, compared to non-completers, viewed abstinence as more difficult and as requiring more assistance to achieve, were less likely to be current cocaine and alcohol users or to have relapsed during the course of treatment. Although preliminary and in need of replication, initial adjunctive use of buprenorphine in an abstinence-based continuum of care may improve post-detoxification treatment entry, engagement, and completion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Co-relationship between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in patients receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy for opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramdurg, Santosh; Ambekar, Atul; Lal, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    People suffering from substance dependence suffer from various sexual dysfunctions and are at risk for indulging in various high-risk sexual behaviors and thus are vulnerable to acquire various infections such as HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections. The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in opioid-dependent men receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy. Semi-structured questionnaire, brief male sexual functioning inventory and HIV-risk taking behavior scale was administered to a sample of 60 sexually active men, receiving buprenorphine (n = 30) and naltrexone (n = 30) maintenance therapy for opioid dependence. The main outcomes are correlation between severity of sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior. The study results showed 83% of the men on buprenorphine and 90% on naltrexone reported at least one of the sexual dysfunction symptoms. There was a negative correlation between sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior that suggest severe the dysfunction, higher the risk taking behavior. Significant correlation was present with overall sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior (P = 0.028 and in naltrexone receiving group premature ejaculation versus HIV-risk taking behavior however, (P = 0.022, P sexual dysfunctions and HIV-risk taking behavior, which has clinical implication. Future research should explore this further using biochemical analyses.

  16. Methadone inhibits CYP2D6 and UGT2B7/2B4 in vivo: a study using codeine in methadone- and buprenorphine-maintained subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelston, Eloise A; Coller, Janet K; Lopatko, Olga V; James, Heather M; Schmidt, Helmut; White, Jason M; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2012-01-01

    AIMS To compare the O-demethylation (CYP2D6-mediated), N-demethylation (CYP3A4-mediated) and 6-glucuronidation (UGT2B4/7-mediated) metabolism of codeine between methadone- and buprenorphine-maintained CYP2D6 extensive metabolizer subjects. METHODS Ten methadone- and eight buprenorphine-maintained subjects received a single 60 mg dose of codeine phosphate. Blood was collected at 3 h and urine over 6 h and assayed for codeine, norcodeine, morphine, morphine-3- and -6-glucuronides and codeine-6-glucuronide. RESULTS The urinary metabolic ratio for O-demethylation was significantly higher (P = 0.0044) in the subjects taking methadone (mean ± SD, 2.8 ± 3.1) compared with those taking buprenorphine (0.60 ± 0.43), likewise for 6-glucuronide formation (0.31 ± 0.24 vs. 0.053 ± 0.027; P D6 and UGTs 2B4 and 2B7 reactions in vivo, even though it is not a substrate for these enzymes. Plasma morphine was not altered, owing to the opposing effects of inhibition of both formation and elimination; however, morphine-6-glucuronide (analgesically active) concentrations were substantially reduced. Drug interactions with methadone are likely to include drugs metabolized by various UGTs and CYP2D6. PMID:22092298

  17. Memory function in opioid-dependent patients treated with methadone or buprenorphine along with benzodiazepine: longitudinal change in comparison to healthy individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rapeli Pekka

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Opioid-substitution treatment (OST for opioid dependence (OD has proven effective in retaining patients in treatment and reducing illegal opiate abuse and crime. Consequently, the World Health Organization (WHO has listed the opioid agonists methadone and buprenorphine as essential drugs for OD that should be available worldwide. In many areas of the world, OD is often associated with concomitant benzodiazepine (BZD dependence and abuse, which complicates treatment. However, possible changes in the cognitive functioning of these patients are not well-known. The present study is the first to examine longitudinal stability of memory function in OST patients with BZD use, thus providing a new tool for health policy authorities in evaluating the usefulness of OST. Methods Within the first two months (T1 and between 6–9 months (T2 after OST admission, we followed the working memory, immediate verbal memory, and memory consolidation of 13 methadone- and 15 buprenorphine- or buprenorphine/naloxone-treated patients with BZD dependence or abuse disorder. The results were compared to those of fifteen normal comparison participants. All participants also completed a self-reported memory complaint questionnaire on both occasions. Results Both patient groups performed statistically significantly worse than normal comparison participants in working memory at time points T1 and T2. In immediate verbal memory, as measured by list learning at T1, patients scored lower than normal comparison participants. Both patient groups reported significantly more subjective memory problems than normal comparison participants. Patients with more memory complaints recalled fewer items at T2 from the verbal list they had learned at T1 than those patients with fewer memory complaints. The significance of the main analyses remained nearly the same when the statistical tests were performed without buprenorphine-only patients leaving 12 patients to

  18. Tolerability of buprenorphine transdermal system in nursing home patients with advanced dementia: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial (DEP.PAIN.DEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erdal A

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Ane Erdal,1 Elisabeth Flo,2 Dag Aarsland,3,4 Geir Selbaek,5–7 Clive Ballard,8 Dagrun D Slettebo,1 Bettina S Husebo1,9 1Department of Global Public Health and Primary Care, Centre for Elderly and Nursing Home Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 2Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; 3Department of Old Age Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, UK; 4Centre for Age-Related Medicine, Stavanger University Hospital, Stavanger, Norway; 5Centre for Old Age Psychiatric Research, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Ottestad, Norway; 6National Advisory Unit on Aging and Health, Tønsberg, Norway; 7Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 8Exeter Medical School, University of Exeter, Exeter, UK; 9Municipality of Bergen, Bergen, Norway Purpose: Buprenorphine transdermal system is increasingly prescribed in people with advanced dementia, but no clinical trial has investigated the safety and factors associated with discontinuation due to adverse events in this population. Patients and methods: One hundred sixty-two people with advanced dementia and significant depression from 47 nursing homes were included and randomized to active analgesic treatment (acetaminophen/buprenorphine or identical placebo for 13 weeks. In this secondary analysis, the main outcomes were time to and reasons for discontinuation of buprenorphine due to adverse events. Change in daytime activity as measured by actigraphy was a secondary outcome. Results: Of the 44 patients who received active buprenorphine 5 μg/hour, 52.3% (n=23 discontinued treatment due to adverse events compared to 13.3% (6 of 45 in the placebo group (p<0.001. Psychiatric and neurological adverse events were the most frequently reported causes of discontinuation (69.6%, n=16. Concomitant use of antidepressants significantly increased the risk of discontinuation (HR 23.2, 95

  19. Erectile dysfunction and quality of life in men receiving methadone or buprenorphine maintenance treatment. A cross-sectional multicentre study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Lugoboni

    Full Text Available Erectile dysfunction (ED is common among men on opioid replacement therapy (ORT, but most previous studies exploring its prevalence and determinants yielded contrasting findings. Moreover, the impact of ED on patients' quality of life (QoL has been seldom explored.To explore the prevalence and determinants of ED in men on ORT, and the impact on QoL.In a multicentre cross-sectional study, we recruited 797 consecutive male patients on methadone and buprenorphine treatment, collected data on demographic, clinical, and psychopathological factors, and explored their role as predictors of ED and QoL through univariate and multivariate analysis. ED severity was assessed with a self-assessment questionnaire.Nearly half of patients in our sample were sexually inactive or reported some degree of ED. Some demographic, clinical and psychopathological variables significantly differed according to the presence or absence of ED. Multivariate regression analysis indicated that age, employment, smoke, psychoactive drugs, opioid maintenance dosage, and severity of psychopathological factors significantly influenced the risk and severity of ED. QoL was worse in patients with ED and significantly correlated with ED severity. Age, education, employment, opioid maintenance dosage, ED score, and severity of psychopathology significantly influenced QoL in the multivariate analysis.ED complaints can be explored in male opioid users on ORT through a simple and quick self-assessment tool. ED may have important effects on emotional and social well-being, and may affect outcome.

  20. Efficacy and Safety of Transdermal Buprenorphine versus Oral Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Patients with Persistent Postoperative Pain after Spinal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Hyup; Kim, Jin-Hyok; Kim, Jin-Hwan; Kim, Hak-Sun; Min, Woo-Kie; Park, Ye-Soo; Lee, Kyu-Yeol; Lee, Jung-Hee

    2017-01-01

    Control of persistent pain following spinal surgery is an unmet clinical need. This study compared the efficacy and safety of buprenorphine transdermal system (BTDS) to oral tramadol/acetaminophen (TA) in Korean patients with persistent, moderate pain following spinal surgery. Open-label, interventional, randomized multicenter study. Adults with persistent postoperative pain (Numeric Rating Scale [NRS] ≥ 4 at 14-90 days postsurgery) were enrolled. Patients received once-weekly BTDS ( n = 47; 5  μ g/h titrated to 20  μ g/h) or twice-daily TA ( n = 40; tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg, one tablet titrated to 4 tablets) for 6 weeks. The study compared pain reduction with BTDS versus TA at week 6. Quality of life (QoL), treatment satisfaction, medication compliance, and adverse events (AEs) were assessed. At week 6, both groups reported significant pain reduction (mean NRS change: BTDS -2.02; TA -2.76, both P pain following spinal surgery, BTDS is an alternative to TA for reducing pain and supports medication compliance. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01983111.

  1. Co-relationship between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in patients receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy for opioid dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Ramdurg

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People suffering from substance dependence suffer from various sexual dysfunctions and are at risk for indulging in various high-risk sexual behaviors and thus are vulnerable to acquire various infections such as HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections. AIM: The aim of the study was to evaluate the correlation between sexual dysfunction and high-risk sexual behavior in opioid-dependent men receiving buprenorphine and naltrexone maintenance therapy. Materials and Methods: Semi-structured questionnaire, brief male sexual functioning inventory and HIV-risk taking behavior scale was administered to a sample of 60 sexually active men, receiving buprenorphine (n = 30 and naltrexone (n = 30 maintenance therapy for opioid dependence. Results: The main outcomes are correlation between severity of sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior. The study results showed 83% of the men on buprenorphine and 90% on naltrexone reported at least one of the sexual dysfunction symptoms. There was a negative correlation between sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior that suggest severe the dysfunction, higher the risk taking behavior. Significant correlation was present with overall sexual dysfunction and HIV-risk taking behavior (P = 0.028 and in naltrexone receiving group premature ejaculation versus HIV-risk taking behavior however, (P = 0.022, P < 0.05 there were no significant differences among both the groups except above findings. Conclusion: Conclusion was treatment is associated with sexual dysfunctions and HIV-risk taking behavior, which has clinical implication. Future research should explore this further using biochemical analyses.

  2. The extramedical use and diversion of opioid substitution medications and other medications in prison settings in Australia following the introduction of buprenorphine-naloxone film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Nancy; Ali, Robert; Larance, Briony; Zador, Deborah; Mattick, Richard P; Degenhardt, Louisa

    2016-01-01

    Around 65% of people incarcerated in prisons in Australia, America and Europe have a history of drug dependence, sometimes treated with opioid substitution treatment (OST) medications. Studies report that those in treatment in prison do engage in some level of diversion to others, whether on a voluntary or coerced basis. We aimed to examine the use of prescribed and non-prescribed OST medications by those in prisons, especially buprenorphine-naloxone film (BNX-F); the extent of non-adherence and diversion and reasons for such practices; and the impact of the introduction of BNX-F into the prison system. Mixed methods study drawing on: (i) structured interviews with current OST clients (n = 60) who reported being incarcerated in the 12 months prior to being interviewed and (ii) qualitative interviews with key experts working in corrections and prison (or justice) health settings. The majority were prescribed OST medications in prison, with 25% removing all or part of their supervised dose on at least one occasion, and 44% reporting use of non-prescribed medications. Some reported intravenous use (14% injected). One-third of OST recipients reported selling/sharing OST medications with others in prison. The introduction of BNX-F into the prison system saw different diversion methods used and removal from dosing within prison. Despite prison being a highly regulated and controlled environment, some level of diversion and sharing of psychoactive medication occurs among prisoners. The buprenorphine formulations used in OST present particular challenges with respect to supervised dosing in this setting. [White N, Ali R, Larance B, Zador D, Mattick RP, Degenhardt L. The extramedical use and diversion of opioid substitution medications and other medications in prison settings in Australia following the introduction of buprenorphine-naloxone film. Drug Alcohol Rev 2015;●●:●●-●●]. © 2015 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  3. Effect of buprenorphine transdermal patch combined with patientcontrolled intravenous analgesia on the serum pain-related biochemical indexes in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Xu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the effect of buprenorphine transdermal patch combined with patientcontrolled intravenous analgesia on the serum pain-related biochemical indexes in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture. Methods: A total of 92 elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture who received surgical treatment in the hospital between August 2014 and January 2017 were collected and divided into control group (n=46 and observation group (n=46 according to the random number table method. The control group received patient-controlled intravenous analgesia, and the observation group received buprenorphine transdermal patch combined with patient-controlled intravenous analgesia. Differences in serum levels of inflammatory factors, oxidative stress indexes and pain mediators of two groups of patients were measured before and 24h after surgery. Results: Differences in serum levels of inflammatory factors, oxidative stress indexes and pain mediators were not statistically significant between the two groups before surgery; 24 h after surgery, serum IL- 1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MDA, SP, PGE2, 5-HT, HA and NPY levels of both groups of patients increased significantly while SOD, TAC and CAT levels decreased significantly, and serum IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, MDA, SP, PGE2, 5-HT, HA and NPY levels of observation group were lower than those of control group while SOD, TAC and CAT levels were higher than those of control group. Conclusion: Buprenorphine transdermal patch combined with patient-controlled intravenous analgesia can effectively inhibit the expression of pain-related indexes and relieve early postoperative pain intensity in elderly patients with intertrochanteric fracture.

  4. Comparing methadone and buprenorphine maintenance with methadone-assisted withdrawal for the treatment of opioid dependence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lund IO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ingunn O Lund1, Heather Fitzsimons2, Michelle Tuten2, Margaret S Chisolm2, Kevin E O’Grady3, Hendrée E Jones2,41SERAF-Norwegian Centre for Addiction Research, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; 2Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD; 3Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD; 4Substance Abuse Treatment Evaluations and Interventions Research Program, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC, USAAbstract: Pregnancy can motivate opioid-dependent women to seek substance abuse treatment. Research has demonstrated that although prenatal exposure to buprenorphine results in less severe neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS relative to prenatal methadone exposure, the maternal and other neonatal outcomes are similar for the two medications. Maternal and neonatal outcomes for opioid-dependent pregnant women receiving these medications have not been systematically compared with methadone-assisted withdrawal. The present study provides an initial assessment of the relative efficacy of both methadone and buprenorphine maintenance versus methadone-assisted withdrawal in terms of neonatal and maternal delivery outcomes. Data were derived from (1 the MOTHER (Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research study at the Johns Hopkins University Bayview Medical Center (JHBMC, or (2 retrospective records review of women who underwent methadone-assisted withdrawal at the JHBMC during the time period in which participants were enrolled in the MOTHER study. Compared with the methadone maintenance group, the methadone-assisted withdrawal group had a significantly lower mean NAS peak score (Means = 13.7 vs 7.0; P = 0.002, required a significantly lower mean amount of morphine to treat NAS (Means = 82.8 vs 0.2; P < 0.001, had significantly fewer days medicated for NAS (Means = 31.5 vs 3.9; P < 0.001, and remained in the hospital for a significantly fewer number of

  5. Cost-effectiveness of extended buprenorphine-naloxone treatment for opioid-dependent youth: data from a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsky, Daniel; Glick, Henry A; Yang, Jianing; Subramaniam, Geetha A; Poole, Sabrina A; Woody, George E

    2010-09-01

    The objective is to estimate cost, net social cost and cost-effectiveness in a clinical trial of extended buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP) treatment versus brief detoxification treatment in opioid-dependent youth. Economic evaluation of a clinical trial conducted at six community out-patient treatment programs from July 2003 to December 2006, who were randomized to 12 weeks of BUP or a 14-day taper (DETOX). BUP patients were prescribed up to 24 mg per day for 9 weeks and then tapered to zero at the end of week 12. DETOX patients were prescribed up to 14 mg per day and then tapered to zero on day 14. All were offered twice-weekly drug counseling. 152 patients aged 15-21 years. Data were collected prospectively during the 12-week treatment and at follow-up interviews at months 6, 9 and 12. The 12-week out-patient study treatment cost was $1514 (P DETOX. One-year total direct medical cost was only $83 higher for BUP (P = 0.97). The cost-effectiveness ratio of BUP relative to DETOX was $1376 in terms of 1-year direct medical cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) and $25,049 in terms of out-patient treatment program cost per QALY. The acceptability curve suggests that the cost-effectiveness ratio of BUP relative to DETOX has an 86% chance of being accepted as cost-effective for a threshold of $100,000 per QALY. Extended BUP treatment relative to brief detoxification is cost effective in the US health-care system for the outpatient treatment of opioid-dependent youth.

  6. Use of conventional, complementary, and alternative treatments for pain among individuals seeking primary care treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Declan T.; Savant, Jonathan D.; Beitel, Mark; Cutter, Christopher J.; Moore, Brent A.; Schottenfeld, Richard S.; Fiellin, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have not examined patterns of pain treatment use among patients seeking office-based buprenorphine-naloxone treatment (BNT) for opioid dependence. Objectives To examine, among individuals with pain seeking BNT for opioid dependence, the use of pain treatment modalities, perceived efficacy of prior pain treatment, and interest in pursuing pain treatment while in BNT. Methods 244 patients seeking office-based BNT for opioid dependence completed measures of demographics, pain status (i.e. “chronic pain (CP)” [pain lasting at least 3 months] vs. “some pain (SP)” [pain in the past week not meeting the duration criteria for chronic pain]), pain treatment use, perceived efficacy of prior pain treatment, and interest in receiving pain treatment while in BNT. Results In comparison to the SP group (N = 87), the CP group (N = 88) was more likely to report past-week medical use of opioid medication (AOR 3.2, 95% CI 1.2–8.4), lifetime medical use of non-opioid prescribed medication (AOR 2.2, 95% CI 1.1–4.7), and lifetime use of prayer (AOR 2.8, 95% CI 1.2–6.5), and was less likely to report lifetime use of yoga (AOR 0.2, 95% CI 0.1–0.7) to treat pain. While the two pain groups did not differ on levels of perceived efficacy of prior lifetime pain treatments, in comparison to the SP group, the CP group was more likely to report interest in receiving pain treatment while in BNT (P pain seeking BNT for opioid dependence report a wide range of conventional, complementary, and alternative pain-related treatments and are interested (especially those with CP) in receiving pain management services along with BNT. PMID:23041680

  7. Retention on buprenorphine is associated with high levels of maximal viral suppression among HIV-infected opioid dependent released prisoners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra A Springer

    Full Text Available HIV-infected prisoners lose viral suppression within the 12 weeks after release to the community. This prospective study evaluates the use of buprenorphine/naloxone (BPN/NLX as a method to reduce relapse to opioid use and sustain viral suppression among released HIV-infected prisoners meeting criteria for opioid dependence (OD.From 2005-2010, 94 subjects meeting DSM-IV criteria for OD were recruited from a 24-week prospective trial of directly administered antiretroviral therapy (DAART for released HIV-infected prisoners; 50 (53% selected BPN/NLX and were eligible to receive it for 6 months; the remaining 44 (47% selected no BPN/NLX therapy. Maximum viral suppression (MVS, defined as HIV-1 RNA<50 copies/mL, was compared for the BPN/NLX and non-BPN/NLX (N = 44 groups.The two groups were similar, except the BPN/NLX group was significantly more likely to be Hispanic (56.0% v 20.4%, from Hartford (74.4% v 47.7% and have higher mean global health quality of life indicator scores (54.18 v 51.40. MVS after 24 weeks of being released was statistically correlated with 24-week retention on BPN/NLX [AOR = 5.37 (1.15, 25.1], having MVS at the time of prison-release [AOR = 10.5 (3.21, 34.1] and negatively with being Black [AOR = 0.13 (0.03, 0.68]. Receiving DAART or methadone did not correlate with MVS.In recognition that OD is a chronic relapsing disease, strategies that initiate and retain HIV-infected prisoners with OD on BPN/NLX is an important strategy for improving HIV treatment outcomes as a community transition strategy.

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Transdermal Buprenorphine versus Oral Tramadol/Acetaminophen in Patients with Persistent Postoperative Pain after Spinal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hyup Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Control of persistent pain following spinal surgery is an unmet clinical need. This study compared the efficacy and safety of buprenorphine transdermal system (BTDS to oral tramadol/acetaminophen (TA in Korean patients with persistent, moderate pain following spinal surgery. Methods. Open-label, interventional, randomized multicenter study. Adults with persistent postoperative pain (Numeric Rating Scale [NRS] ≥ 4 at 14–90 days postsurgery were enrolled. Patients received once-weekly BTDS (n=47; 5 μg/h titrated to 20 μg/h or twice-daily TA (n=40; tramadol 37.5 mg/acetaminophen 325 mg, one tablet titrated to 4 tablets for 6 weeks. The study compared pain reduction with BTDS versus TA at week 6. Quality of life (QoL, treatment satisfaction, medication compliance, and adverse events (AEs were assessed. Findings. At week 6, both groups reported significant pain reduction (mean NRS change: BTDS −2.02; TA −2.76, both P<0.0001 and improved QoL (mean EQ-5D index change: BTDS 0.10; TA 0.19, both P<0.05. The BTDS group achieved better medication compliance (97.8% versus 91.0%. Incidence of AEs (26.1% versus 20.0% and adverse drug reactions (20.3% versus 16.9% were comparable between groups. Implications. For patients with persistent pain following spinal surgery, BTDS is an alternative to TA for reducing pain and supports medication compliance. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01983111.

  9. Pharmacokinetics and Adverse Effects of 3 Sustained-release Buprenorphine Dosages in Healthy Guinea Pigs (Cavia porcellus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanetti, Andrea S; Putta, Sumanth K; Casebolt, Donald B; Louie, Stan G

    2017-11-01

    In guinea pigs, studies addressing the efficacy, safety, and pharmacokinetic profiles of different sustained-release buprenorphine (SRB) formulations are still in their infancy. Here we assessed the pharmacokinetic profiles of 3 SRB dosages (SR-LAB, ZooPharm; SRBLow, 0.15 mg/kg; SRBMedium, 0.3 mg/kg; and SRBHigh, 0.6 mg/kg) for 72 h after a single subcutaneous administration to 8 (4 male and 4 female) healthy guinea pigs. Body weight, fecal output, and cortisol levels were also monitored and the results compared with those of the sham group. Within the first h after administration, the maximal plasma concentration (Cmax) of the drug was 64.3 ± 9.2 ng/mL (males) and 71.3 ± 3.7 ng/mL (females) in the SRBHigh group; 11.5 ± 3.2 ng/mL (males) and 6.9 ± 0.9 ng/mL (females) in the SRBMedium group; and 2.3 ± 0.8 ng/mL (males) and 2.0 ± 0.5 ng/mL (females) in the SRBLow group. After 72 h, therapeutic levels of the drug (>1 ng/mL) were observed only in guinea pigs treated with SRBHigh (both sexes) and males treated with SRBMediu cm. Fecal output (quantity and distribution) and body weight were significantly lower in the SRB groups as compared with the sham group, and with the SRBHigh group showing larger reductions. Baseline levels of serum cortisol in healthy females (1440 ± 106 ng/mL) were significantly greater than in males (550 ± 66 ng/mL). But, independent of the sex, SRB administration significantly reduced those levels. In conclusion, the data indicate that all 3 SRB dosages can be safely used in guinea pigs. However, therapeutic levels of the drug were observed for at least 48 h only guinea pigs treated with SRBHigh and SRBMedium. Further investigation is needed to determine if these dosages can alleviate pain in guinea pigs.

  10. Development and application of carbon nanotubes assisted electromembrane extraction (CNTs/EME) for the determination of buprenorphine as a model of basic drugs from urine samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasheminasab, Kobra Sadat; Fakhari, Ali Reza

    2013-03-12

    In this work carbon nanotubes assisted electromembrane extraction (CNTs/EME) coupled with capillary electrophoresis (CE) and ultraviolet (UV) detection was developed for the determination of buprenorphine as a model of basic drugs from urine samples. Carbon nanotubes reinforced hollow fiber was used in this research. Here the CNTs serve as a sorbent and provide an additional pathway for solute transport. The presence of CNTs in the hollow fiber wall increased the effective surface area and the overall partition coefficient on the membrane; and lead to an enhancement in the analyte transport. For investigating the influence of the presence of CNTs in the SLM on the extraction efficiency, a comparative study was carried out between EME and CNTs/EME methods. Optimization of the variables affecting these methods was carried out in order to achieve the best extraction efficiency. Optimal extractions were accomplished with NPOE as the SLM, with 200V as the driving force, and with pH 2.0 in the donor and pH 1.0 in the acceptor solutions with the whole assembly agitated at 750rpm after 25min and 15min for EME and CNTs/EME, respectively. Under the optimized conditions, in comparison with the conventional EME method, CNTs/EME provided higher extraction efficiencies in shorter time. This method provided lower limit of detection (1ngmL(-1)), higher preconcentration factor (185) and higher recovery (92). Finally, the applicability of this method was evaluated by the extraction and determination of buprenorphine in patients' urine samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparative study of the efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patches and prolonged-release tramadol tablets for postoperative pain control after spinal fusion surgery: a prospective, randomized controlled non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ho-Joong; Ahn, Hyo Sae; Nam, Yunjin; Chang, Bong-Soon; Lee, Choon-Ki; Yeom, Jin S

    2017-11-01

    To compare the efficacy of a transdermal buprenorphine patch (5, 10, 15, and 20 μg/h) with that of oral tramadol (150, 200, 250, and 300 mg) for postoperative pain control after single level spinal fusion surgery. The present study (ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT02416804) was a prospective, randomized controlled non-inferiority trial designed to determine the efficacy of buprenorphine TDS for alleviating postoperative pain following patient controlled analgesia (PCA) in persons underwent a single level posterior lumbar interbody fusion surgery through 1:1 allocation. The primary outcome was the Visual Analog Pain Scale (VAS) score for postoperative back pain at 7 days after surgery. The non-inferior margin of the VAS was set at δ = 1.5 points. The VAS score (primary outcome) for postoperative back pain at 7 days after surgery in the Buprenorphine group was not inferior compared to the Tramadol group. The overall changes in VAS scores for postoperative pain during follow-up assessments over a 2-week period did not differ between both groups. However, the VAS scores for postoperative pain significantly improved with time after surgery in both groups. The patterns of changes in the VAS scores for postoperative pain during the follow-up period were not significantly different between the both groups. The efficacy of buprenorphine TDS was not inferior to that of oral tramadol medication for alleviating postoperative pain in the subacute period from 72 h after surgery, following PCA administration. In addition, adverse events were similar between both groups.

  12. Safety and efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine versus oral tramadol for the treatment of post-operative pain following surgery for fracture neck of femur: A prospective, randomised clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Sameer N; Badiger, Santhoshi V; Tokur, Shreesha B; Naik, Prashanth A

    2017-03-01

    Transdermal buprenorphine, which is used in chronic pain management, has rarely been studied for use in acute pain management. The aim of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of transdermal buprenorphine patch to oral tramadol for post-operative analgesia, following proximal femur surgeries. Fifty adult patients undergoing surgery for hip fracture under spinal anaesthesia were included in this study. One group (Group TDB) received transdermal buprenorphine 10 mcg/h patch applied a day before the surgery and other group received oral tramadol 50 mg three times a day for analgesia (Group OT). They were allowed to take diclofenac and paracetamol tablets for rescue analgesia. Pain scores at rest, on movement, rescue analgesic requirement and side effects were compared between the groups over 7 days. Chi-square and independent sample t -test were used for categorical and continuous variables, respectively. Resting pain scores and pain on movement were significantly lower in TDB Group on all 7 days starting from 24 h post-operatively. Rescue analgesic requirement was significantly lower in TDB Group compared to OT Group. All the patients needed rescue analgesic in OT Group whereas 68% of the patients needed the same in TDB Group. Incidence of vomiting was less and satisfaction scores were much higher in TDB Group as compared to OT Group (79% vs. 66%, P pain after 24 hours, with fewer side effects when compared to oral tramadol.

  13. Efeitos cardiorrespiratórios da buprenorfina em cães anestesiados pelo desfluorano Cardiorespiratory effects of buprenorphine in dogs anesthetized with desflurane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almir Pereira de Souza

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objetivou-se, com este estudo, avaliar os efeitos da buprenorfina sobre variáveis cardiovasculares e respiratórias em cães durante anestesia com desfluorano. Para tanto, foram utilizados 20 cães adultos, distribuídos em dois grupos (GB e GC. A anestesia foi induzida com propofol (8mg kg-1 IV e em seguida os animais foram intubados com sonda de Magill, a qual foi conectada ao aparelho de anestesia para administração de desfluorano (1,5 CAM. Após 30 minutos, foi aplicado no GB buprenorfina (0,02mg kg-1 e no GC solução de NaCl à 0,9% (0,05ml kg-1. Avaliaram-se: freqüências cardíaca e respiratória (FC e ¦; pressões arteriais sistólica, diastólica e média (PAS, PAD e PAM; débito cardíaco (DC; pressão venosa central (PVC; e as variáveis hemogasométricas pH, PaCO2, PaO2, HCO3, SatO2 e DB. As colheitas dos dados foram feitas aos 30 minutos após o início da administração do desfluorano (MO, 15 minutos após a administração do opióide ou placebo (M15, e a cada 15 minutos após Ml5 (M30, M45, M60 e M75. A avaliação estatística dos dados foi efetuada por meio de Análise de Perfil (P¦ e o pH tiveram reduções no GB, enquanto a PaCO2 esteve aumentada. Concluiu-se que a inclusão da buprenorfina durante anestesia inalatória pelo desfluorano determina discretas alterações cardiovasculares, bem-como potencializa a hipoventilação promovida pelo desfluorano, com a manifestação de hipercapnia, o que não contra-indica o seu uso em pacientes estáveis.The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of buprenorphine on cardiovascular and respiratory variables in dogs anesthetized with desflurane. Twenty adult healthy male and female mongrel dogs were randomly distributed in two groups of ten animals each (GB and GC. The anesthetic induction was done using propofol (8mg kg-1, IV, and immediately, the dogs were intubated and submited to desflurane anesthesia administrated at 1.5 MAC. After 30 minutes of induction, animals

  14. Analgesia after feline ovariohysterectomy under midazolam-medetomidine-ketamine anaesthesia with buprenorphine or butorphanol, and carprofen or meloxicam: a prospective, randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polson, Sally; Taylor, Polly M; Yates, David

    2012-08-01

    One hundred female cats undergoing routine ovariohysterectomy under midazolam-medetomidine-ketamine anaesthesia were included in a blinded, randomised, prospective clinical study to compare postoperative analgesia produced by four analgesic drug combinations given preoperatively (n = 25 per group). A secondary aim was to assess the effects in kittens and pregnant animals. Buprenorphine 180 µg/m(2) or butorphanol 6 mg/m(2) were given with either carprofen 4 mg/kg (groups BUPC and BUTC, respectively) or meloxicam 0.3 mg/kg (groups BUPM or BUTM, respectively). Medetomidine was not antagonised. A simple, descriptive scale (SDS; 0-4), a dynamic and interactive visual analogue scale (DIVAS; 0-100 mm) and mechanical nociceptive thresholds (MT; 2.5-mm diameter probe) were used to evaluate postoperative pain. All pain scores were low (DIVAS 10 N) and there were no significant differences between the groups. It was concluded that all protocols provided adequate analgesia and when used with midazolam-medetomidine-ketamine are effective for routine feline ovariohysterectomy.

  15. A Comparative Study of Analgesic Efficacy of Intrathecal Buprenorphine with Ultrasound-Guided Transversus Abdominis Plane Block for Postcesarean Delivery Analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marappa, Prakash; Chikkapillappa, Manjunath Abloodu; Chennappa, Nagaraj Mungasuvalli; Pujari, Vinayak Seenappa

    2017-01-01

    Women undergoing cesarean (CS) delivery present a unique set of challenges to the anesthetist in terms of postoperative pain management. This study was conducted to compare the analgesic efficacy of intrathecal buprenorphine (ITB) with ultrasound-guided transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block in post-CS delivery pain. A prospective randomized comparative study of sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I and II pregnant patients divided into two groups of thirty each as ITB group and TAP block group after satisfying the inclusion criteria. In the present study, demographic data were comparable between both groups. The time to first analgesic request was significantly longer in ITB group (389.67 ± 90.78 min) compared to TAP group (669.17 ± 140.65 min) and was statistically significant, P consumption in the first 24 h was higher in the TAP group (3.5 g) compared to the ITB group (1.13 g) and was statistically significant, P consumption during the first 24 h. The benefits of neuraxial opiates are significant and far outweigh the side effects.

  16. [National and regional market penetration rates of generic's high dosage buprenorphine: its evolution from 2006 to 2008, using reimbursed drug database].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczek, Christelle; Frauger, Elisabeth; Micallef, Joëlle; Allaria-Lapierre, Véronique; Reggio, Patrick; Sciortino, Vincent

    2012-01-01

    To assess the national market penetration rate (PR) of generic high-dosage buprenorphine (HDB) in 2008 and its evolution since their marketing (2006), and making a point for each dosage and at regional level. Retrospective study over data using national and regional health reimbursement database over three years (2006-2008). In 2008, the generic HDB's national MPR was 31%. The PR for each dosage were 45% for 0.4 mg, 36% for 2 mg and 19% for 8 mg. The (PR) based on Defined Daily Dose (DDD) was 23% in 2008, 15% in 2007 and 4% in 2006. In 2008, at the regional level, disparities were observed in the adjusted penetration rate from 15% in Île de France to 39% in Champagne Ardennes Lorraine. The national PR of generic HDB has increased. There are differences in MPR in terms of dosage and area. However, this PR is still low (in 2008, 82% of the delivered drugs are generics). © 2012 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  17. Poly-substance use and antisocial personality traits at admission predict cumulative retention in a buprenorphine programme with mandatory work and high compliance profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öhlin, Leif; Hesse, Morten; Fridell, Mats; Tätting, Per

    2011-05-12

    Continuous abstinence and retention in treatment for alcohol and drug use disorders are central challenges for the treatment providers. The literature has failed to show consistent, strong predictors of retention. Predictors and treatment structure may differ across treatment modalities. In this study the structure was reinforced by the addition of supervised urine samples three times a week and mandatory daily work/structured education activities as a prerequisite of inclusion in the program. Of 128 patients consecutively admitted to buprenorphine maintenance treatment five patients dropped out within the first week. Of the remaining 123 demographic data and psychiatric assessment were used to predict involuntary discharge from treatment and corresponding cumulative abstinence probability. All subjects were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR, and the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90), the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), the Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP) and the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC), all self-report measures. Some measures were repeated every third month in addition to interviews. Of 123 patients admitted, 86 (70%) remained in treatment after six months and 61 (50%) remained in treatment after 12 months. Of those discharged involuntarily, 34/62 individuals were readmitted after a suspension period of three months. Younger age at intake, poly-substance abuse at intake (number of drugs in urine), and number of conduct disorder criteria on the SCID Screen were independently associated with an increased risk of involuntary discharge. There were no significant differences between dropouts and completers on SCL-90, SSP, SOC or AUDIT. Of the patients admitted to the programme 50% stayed for the first 12 months with continuous abstinence and daily work. Poly-substance use before intake into treatment, high levels of conduct disorder on SCID screen and younger age at intake had a negative impact on

  18. Triggers of Substance Abuse Slip and Relapse During Outpatient Treatment in Methadone/Buprenorphine Maintenance Therapy Clinics: A Predictive Model with Emphasis on Treatment-Related Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Komasi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Most addicts relapse in the first year of treatment especially in the first 3 - 6 months, which is the most vulnerable period. Objectives The present study aimed to assess the predictors of substance abuse slip and relapse among addicts in the first 6 months of treatment with an emphasis on treatment related factors. Methods The data of this cross-sectional study collected through assessment of 148 patients who were referred to the Methadone/Buprenorphine maintenance therapy clinics of Kermanshah city during April to September of 2015. Demographic, history, treatment checklist, comorbidity index, and medical records were used for collecting data. Data was analyzed through chi-square, t-test, and Binary logistic regression analysis. Results The mean age of total participants was 42.4 ± 11.3 years and 98% of them were male. 27% and 35.1% of the patients, respectively, had a slip and relapse during the first 6 months of treatment. After adjustment for all demographic data, it was indicated that self-employment (P = 0.037, more treatment costs (P = 0.049, previous treatment history (P = 0.027, not satisfied dose of medication (P = 0.012, and lack of medical therapy history under physicians supervision (P = 0.046 can increase the possibility of a slip significantly. Conclusions Despite the fact that prevention of re-abuse and relapse of disease includes multi-factorial approach, it seems that the treatment-related factors are as the most major factors in relapse and slip during the first 6 months of treatment. Health practitioners’ special attention to treatment related factors in addiction, especially previous treatment history as the most important predictor of relapse, are probably effective in the control and decrease of a slip and relapse.

  19. Understanding abuse of buprenorphine/naloxone film versus tablet products using data from ASI-MV® substance use disorder treatment centers and RADARS® System Poison Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Stephen F; Black, Ryan A; Severtson, Stevan Geoffrey; Dart, Richard C; Green, Jody L

    2018-01-01

    The objectives were to examine the abuse prevalence and route-of-administration (ROA) profiles of sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone combination (BNX) film in comparison with the BNX tablet and to identify clinically-relevant subgroups of patients or geographic patterns. Between Q1 2015 through Q3 2015, data were collected from two major surveillance systems: (1) assessment of individuals in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment collected from the National Addictions Vigilance Intervention and Prevention Program (NAVIPPRO®) ASI-MV® system and (2) intentional abuse/misuse exposures in the RADARS® System Poison Center Program. Poisson regression models were tailored to each system's data characteristics by population (all SUD treatment patients, US census) and adjusted for prescription volume. Effects of gender, race, age and US region as well as ROA profile were examined. For the ASI-MV study, 45,695 assessments of unique adults evaluated for substance use problems were collected. The abuse rate unadjusted for prescription volume of BNX tablet formulation was 2.64 cases/100 ASI-MV respondents versus 7.01 cases for the film formulation (RR=0.390, pfilm) (RR=1.25, pfilm abuse (0.0364) were greater than for tablet (0.0161), while prescription-adjusted rates were greater for tablet (0.2114) than for film (0.1703) per 100,000 prescriptions. ASI-MV ROA analyses indicated less abuse of the film by any alternate route, insufflation or injection than the tablet. Poison center data found more injection of tablets than film, although insufflation was not significantly different. On a prescription-adjusted basis, overall abuse of the BNX tablet is greater than that of the sublingual film formulation. For those who continue to abuse BNX, use by alternate ROAs was, in general, lower for the film. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Poly-substance use and antisocial personality traits at admission predict cumulative retention in a buprenorphine programme with mandatory work and high compliance profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fridell Mats

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continuous abstinence and retention in treatment for alcohol and drug use disorders are central challenges for the treatment providers. The literature has failed to show consistent, strong predictors of retention. Predictors and treatment structure may differ across treatment modalities. In this study the structure was reinforced by the addition of supervised urine samples three times a week and mandatory daily work/structured education activities as a prerequisite of inclusion in the program. Methods Of 128 patients consecutively admitted to buprenorphine maintenance treatment five patients dropped out within the first week. Of the remaining 123 demographic data and psychiatric assessment were used to predict involuntary discharge from treatment and corresponding cumulative abstinence probability. All subjects were administered the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR, and the Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL-90, the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT, the Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP and the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC, all self-report measures. Some measures were repeated every third month in addition to interviews. Results Of 123 patients admitted, 86 (70% remained in treatment after six months and 61 (50% remained in treatment after 12 months. Of those discharged involuntarily, 34/62 individuals were readmitted after a suspension period of three months. Younger age at intake, poly-substance abuse at intake (number of drugs in urine, and number of conduct disorder criteria on the SCID Screen were independently associated with an increased risk of involuntary discharge. There were no significant differences between dropouts and completers on SCL-90, SSP, SOC or AUDIT. Conclusion Of the patients admitted to the programme 50% stayed for the first 12 months with continuous abstinence and daily work. Poly-substance use before intake into treatment, high levels of conduct disorder on SCID

  1. Buprenorphine/naloxone as a promising therapeutic option for opioid abusing patients with chronic pain: reduction of pain, opioid withdrawal symptoms, and abuse liability of oral oxycodone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Perrine; Sullivan, Maria A; Cohen, Julien; Fugon, Lionel; Jones, Jermaine D; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Cooper, Ziva D; Manubay, Jeanne M; Mogali, Shanthi; Comer, Sandra D

    2013-08-01

    Few studies have examined abuse of prescription opioids among individuals with chronic pain under buprenorphine/naloxone (Bup/Nx) maintenance. The current 7-week inpatient study assessed oral oxycodone self-administration by patients with chronic pain who had a history of opioid abuse. Participants (n=25) were transitioned from their preadmission prescribed opioid to Bup/Nx. All of the participants were tested under each of the sublingual Bup/Nx maintenance doses (2/0.5, 8/2 or 16/4 mg) in random order. During each maintenance period, participants could self-administer oxycodone orally (0, 10, 20, 40 or 60 mg prescription opioids) or receive money during laboratory sessions. Drug choice (percentage) was the primary dependent variable. Subjective ratings of clinical pain and withdrawal symptoms also were measured. Mann-Whitney tests compared percentage of drug choice for each active oxycodone dose to placebo. Logistic regression analyses identified correlates of oxycodone preference, defined as 60% or greater choice of oxycodone compared to money. Pain was significantly reduced while participants were maintained on Bup/Nx compared to preadmission ratings. No differences in percentage drug choice were observed between the active oxycodone doses and placebo under each Bup/Nx maintenance dose. However, factors associated with oxycodone preference were lower Bup/Nx maintenance dose, more withdrawal symptoms and more pain. These data suggest that Bup/Nx was effective in reducing pain and supplemental oxycodone use. Importantly, adequate management of pain and withdrawal symptoms by Bup/Nx may reduce oxycodone preference in this population. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Efficacy and tolerability of buccal buprenorphine in opioid-experienced patients with moderate to severe chronic low back pain: results of a phase 3, enriched enrollment, randomized withdrawal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbel, Joseph; Spierings, Egilius L H; Katz, Nathaniel; Xiang, Qinfang; Tzanis, Evan; Finn, Andrew

    2016-11-01

    A buccal film of buprenorphine (BBUP) was evaluated for safety and efficacy in a multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled, enriched-enrollment, randomized-withdrawal study in opioid-experienced patients (30 to ≤160 mg/d morphine sulfate equivalent) with moderate to severe chronic low back pain taking around-the-clock opioid analgesics. Patients' opioid doses were tapered to ≤30 mg morphine sulfate equivalent before open-label titration with BBUP (range, 150-900 μg every 12 hours). Patients who responded (received adequate analgesia that was generally well tolerated for 14 days) were randomized to receive buprenorphine (n = 254) or placebo (n = 257) buccal film. The primary efficacy variable was the change from baseline to week 12 of double-blind treatment in mean average daily pain-intensity scores using a rating scale of 0 (no pain) to 10 (worst pain imaginable). In the intent-to-treat population, mean pain scores were 6.7 after opioid taper and declined to 2.8 after the BBUP titration period. After randomization, mean pain scores were lower in the BBUP group than in the placebo group; the difference between groups in the mean change from baseline to week 12 was -0.98 (95% CI, -1.32 to -0.64; P opioid-experienced patients taking around-the-clock opioid treatment for chronic low back pain.

  3. Medically assisted recovery from opiate dependence within the context of the UK drug strategy: methadone and Suboxone (buprenorphine-naloxone) patients compared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeganey, Neil; Russell, Christopher; Cockayne, Lucinda

    2013-01-01

    The focus of drug policy in the UK has shifted markedly in the past 5 years to move beyond merely emphasising drug abstinence towards maximising individuals' opportunities for recovery. The UK government continues to recognise the prescribing of narcotic medications indicated for opiate dependence as a key element of these individuals' recovery journey. This article describes a small, naturalistic comparison of the efficacy of the two most commonly prescribed opiate substitute medications in the UK--methadone hydrochloride (methadone oral solution) and Suboxone (buprenorphine-naloxone sublingual tablets)--for reducing current heroin users' (n = 34) days of heroin use, and preventing short-term abstainers (n = 37) from relapsing to regular heroin use. All patients had been prescribed either methadone or Suboxone for maintenance for 6 months prior to intake. Results showed that when controlling for a number of patient-level covariates, both methadone and Suboxone significantly reduced current users' days of heroin use between the 90 days prior to intake and at the 8-month follow-up, with Suboxone yielding a significantly larger magnitude reduction in heroin use days than methadone. Methadone and Suboxone were highly and equally effective for preventing relapse to regular heroin use, with all but 3 of 37 (91.9%) patients who were abstinent at intake reporting past 90-day point prevalence heroin abstinence at the 8-month follow-up. Overall, prescribing methadone or Suboxone for eight continuous months was highly effective for initiating abstinence from heroin use, and for converting short-term abstinence to long-term abstinence. However, the study design, which was based on a relatively small sample size and was not able randomise patients to medication and so could not control for the effects of potential prognostic factors inherent within each patient group, means that these conclusions can only be made tentatively. These positive but preliminary indications of the

  4. Opioids and the management of chronic severe pain in the elderly: consensus statement of an International Expert Panel with focus on the six clinically most often used World Health Organization Step III opioids (buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pergolizzi, Joseph; Böger, Rainer H; Budd, Keith; Dahan, Albert; Erdine, Serdar; Hans, Guy; Kress, Hans-Georg; Langford, Richard; Likar, Rudolf; Raffa, Robert B; Sacerdote, Paola

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY OF CONSENSUS: 1. The use of opioids in cancer pain: The criteria for selecting analgesics for pain treatment in the elderly include, but are not limited to, overall efficacy, overall side-effect profile, onset of action, drug interactions, abuse potential, and practical issues, such as cost and availability of the drug, as well as the severity and type of pain (nociceptive, acute/chronic, etc.). At any given time, the order of choice in the decision-making process can change. This consensus is based on evidence-based literature (extended data are not included and chronic, extended-release opioids are not covered). There are various driving factors relating to prescribing medication, including availability of the compound and cost, which may, at times, be the main driving factor. The transdermal formulation of buprenorphine is available in most European countries, particularly those with high opioid usage, with the exception of France; however, the availability of the sublingual formulation of buprenorphine in Europe is limited, as it is marketed in only a few countries, including Germany and Belgium. The opioid patch is experimental at present in U.S.A. and the sublingual formulation has dispensing restrictions, therefore, its use is limited. It is evident that the population pyramid is upturned. Globally, there is going to be an older population that needs to be cared for in the future. This older population has expectations in life, in that a retiree is no longer an individual who decreases their lifestyle activities. The "baby-boomers" in their 60s and 70s are "baby zoomers"; they want to have a functional active lifestyle. They are willing to make trade-offs regarding treatment choices and understand that they may experience pain, providing that can have increased quality of life and functionality. Therefore, comorbidities--including cancer and noncancer pain, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and postherpetic neuralgia--and patient functional

  5. A Systematic, Intensive Statistical Investigation of Data from the Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD) for Compliance and Illicit Opioid Abstinence in Substance Addiction Treatment with Buprenorphine/naloxone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Han, David; Modestino, Edward J; Saunders, Scott; Roy, A Kennison; Jacobs, W; Inaba, Darryl S; Baron, David; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Hauser, Mary; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Smith, David E; Femino, John; Gold, Mark S

    2018-01-28

    Buprenorphine and naloxone (bup/nal), a combination partial mu receptor agonist and low-dose delta mu antagonist, is presently recommended and used to treat opioid-use disorder. However, a literature review revealed a paucity of research involving data from urine drug tests that looked at compliance and abstinence in one sample. Statistical analysis of data from the Comprehensive Analysis of Reported Drugs (CARD) was used to assess compliance and abstinence during treatment in a large cohort of bup/nal patients attending chemical-dependency programs from eastern USA in 2010 and 2011. Part 1: Bup/nal was present in 93.4% of first (n = 1,282; p drugs were present in 47.7% (n = 655, p =.0261) of samples. Patients who were compliant to the bup/nal prescription were more likely than noncompliant patients to be abstinent during treatment (p =.0012; odds ratio = 1.69 with 95% confidence interval (1.210, 2.354). Part 2: An analysis of all samples collected in 2011 revealed a significant improvement in both compliance (p < 2.2 × 10 -16 ) and abstinence (p < 2.2 × 10 -16 ) during treatment. Conclusion/Importance: While significant use of illicit opioids during treatment with bup/nal is present, improvements in abstinence and high compliance during maintenance-assisted therapy programs may ameliorate fears of diversion in comprehensive programs. Expanded clinical datasets, the treatment modality, location, and year of sampling are important covariates, for further studies. The potential for long-term antireward effects from bup/nal use requires consideration in future investigations.

  6. Effectiveness and Safety of Transdermal Buprenorphine Versus Sustained-release Tramadol in Patients With Moderate to Severe Musculoskeletal Pain: An 8-Week, Randomized, Double-Blind, Double-Dummy, Multicenter, Active-controlled, Noninferiority Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xiaomei; Li, Zhanguo; Lv, Houshan; Zheng, Yi; Liu, Yi; Dai, Kerong; Yao, Chen; Yan, Xiaoyan; Zeng, Xiaofeng

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this noninferiority study was to investigate clinical effectiveness and safety of buprenorphine transdermal system (BTDS) in patients with moderate to severe musculoskeletal pain inadequately controlled with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, compared with sustained-release tramadol tablets. Eligible patients were randomized (1:1) to receive low-dose 7-day BTDS (5, 10, and 20 μg/h, maximum dosage of 20 μg/h) or sustained-release tramadol tablets (100 mg, maximum dosage of 400 mg/d) over an 8-week double-blind treatment period (3-week titration, 5-week maintenance). The primary endpoint was the difference in the visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores from baseline to treatment completion. Noninferiority was assumed if the treatment difference on the VAS scale was within ±1.5 cm, this threshold indicating a clinically meaningful result. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01476774. Two hundred eighty patients were randomized to BTDS (n=141) or to tramadol (n=139). Both treatments were associated with a significant reduction in pain by the end of the treatment. The least squares mean difference of the change from baseline in VAS scores between the BTDS and tramadol groups were 0.45 (95% confidence interval, -0.02 to 0.91), which was within the ±1.5 cm predefined threshold, indicating that the effectiveness of BTDS was not inferior to the effectiveness of sustained-release tramadol tablets. The incidence of adverse events was comparable between the 2 treatment groups. Our results suggest that BTDS is a good therapeutic option for patients experiencing chronic musculoskeletal pain of moderate to severe intensity that is insufficiently controlled by nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs.

  7. Buprenorphine Sublingual and Buccal (opioid dependence)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treximet), and zolmitriptan (Zomig); mirtazapine (Remeron); muscle relaxants; opiate (narcotic) medications for pain control and cough; rifampin (Rifadin, Rimactane, in Rifater, in Rifamate); medications for seizures such as carbamazepine (Epitol, Tegretol, Teril, others), phenobarbital, ...

  8. Buprenorphine During Pregnancy Reduces Neonate Distress

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Alcohol Club Drugs Cocaine Fentanyl Hallucinogens Inhalants Heroin Marijuana MDMA (Ecstasy/Molly) Methamphetamine Opioids Over-the-Counter Medicines Prescription Medicines Steroids (Anabolic) Synthetic Cannabinoids (K2/Spice) Synthetic Cathinones (Bath Salts) Tobacco/ ...

  9. Evaluation of tribromoethanol, tribromoethanol-buprenorphine and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    olayemitoyin

    and alleviate the stress associated with surgery in laboratory animals. ... Aside from the adverse effects associated with the .... better understand the pathology of osteoarthritis in .... anaesthetic agent can depress the thalamus resulting.

  10. The switch from buprenorphine to tapentadol: is it worth?

    OpenAIRE

    Miclescu, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Opioid analgesia continues to be the primary pharmacologic intervention for managing acute pain and malignant pain in both hospitalized and ambulatory patients. The increasing use of opioids in chronic nonmalignant pain is more problematic. Opioid treatment is complicated with the risks raised by adverse effects, especially cognitive disturbance, respiratory depression but also the risk of tolerance, opioid abuse and drug–disease interactions. Despite the growing number of available opioids w...

  11. Continuous infusion in adult females dogs submitted to ovariohysterectomy with midazolam-xylazine and/or medetomidine pre-treated with methotrimeprazine and buprenorphine Infusão continua em cães fêmeas submetidas à ovariohisterectomia com midazolam/cetamina/xilazina e/ou medetomidina pré-tratadas com levomepromazina e buprenorfina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando do Carmo Silva

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To compare, by continuous infusion of ketamine or medetomidine combined to methotrimeprazine and buprenorphine, ketamine and midazolam, the degree of hypnosis, myorelaxation, anesthetic quality and surgical feasibility through evaluation of possible parametric alterations and recovery quality. METHODS: 20 healthy adult females dogs, aged 3 to 5 years, body weight between 7 and 15 kg, were assigned randomly and homogenously to 2 groups of 10 animals each (n=10, group 1 (G1 and group 2 (G2, respectively. Animals of G1 were subjected to a pre-treatment with intravenous 1.0 mg/kg methotrimeprazine and or 3ì/kg. After 15 minutes, a 5.0 mg/kg ketamine and 0.2 mg/kg midazolam were intravenously injected. Immediately after induction, an anesthetic combination of 0.4 mg/kg/h midazolam, 20 mg/kg/h ketamine and 1.0 mg/kg/h xylazine, was continuously and intravenously administered for 30 minutes. The same techniques were used in G2 except for the substitution of xylazine for 30ìg/kg/h medetomidine. RESULTS: In G1 there was a 1st and 2nd degree atrioventricular heart block, a longer recovery period and lower quality. In G2 a 1st degree atrioventricular heart block occurred but isolated and ephemeral. CONCLUSIONS: The continuous infusion method, besides reducing drugs utilization, prevented collateral effects allowing a more tranquil recovery with no excitations, both protocols permitted the surgical procedure (ovary-hysterectomy bringing about a reduction in hypnosis and an accentuated myorelaxation. Xylazine and medetomidine showed a similar pharmacodynamic behavior but with different clinical aspects. The electrocardiographic alterations observed in G2 and in a lower degree in G1 must be well studied. Describers: dogs, ketamine, methotrimeprazine, medetomidine, midazolam and xylazine.OBJETIVO: Comparar através de infusão contínua de xilazina ou medetomidina associada à metotrimeprazina e buprenorfina, cetamina e midazolam, o grau de hipnose

  12. Avaliação algimétrica por estímulo nociceptivo térmico e pressórico em cães pré-tratados com levomepromazina, midazolam e quetamina associados ou não ao butorfanol ou buprenorfina The algimetry evaluation for thermic and pressoric nociceptive stimulus in pre treated dogs with methotrimeprazine, midazolam and ketamine associated or not with butorphanol or buprenorphine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Leguthe Rosa

    2005-02-01

    methotrimeprazine and midazolam put on the same syringe with ketamine. The animals of GII received the same treatment of GI but associated with butorphanol and finally the animals of GIII received the same treatment of GI but associated with buprenorphine. The routine parametric evaluations has been proceeded, although using the thermo algimetry measured in °C with the average of 52°C and the pressoric algimetry in Kg. RESULTS: In the thermo algimetry, there has been significant difference in GI at the moments M0, M1, M4 and M5; in GII it was found at M0, M1, M5 and M6 and in GIII it was observed the significant at M0 and M1. It has also been shown in pressoric algimetry significant difference in GI at the moments M0, M2 and M3. Among GII it has observed significant difference at all moments and it has found at M0, M9 in GIII. Thus, it has observed significant differences between all groups; for such the M2 of GII smaller than the others; and M4, M5 of GIII bigger than GI and GII. In the assessment of all periods it was observed significant latent period bigger in GI, however, with reasonable period and short recovery in GII and GIII. In the order hand, the postural tonus recovery it was longer in GIII, followed by GII and finally GI. CONCLUSION: The used method for the measurement of algic stimulus was efficient, noticing a reasonable analgesic period of 3 hours for butorphanol and 6 hours for buprenorphine.

  13. Improved memory for reward cues following acute buprenorphine administration in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Syal, Supriya; Ipser, Jonathan; Terburg, David|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/32304087X; Solms, Mark; Panksepp, Jaak; Malcolm-Smith, Susan; Bos, Peter A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337018995; Montoya, Estrella R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34141347X; Stein, Dan J.; van Honk, Jack|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/188602801

    2015-01-01

    In rodents, there is abundant evidence for the involvement of the opioid system in the processing of reward cues, but this system has remained understudied in humans. In humans, the happy facial expression is a pivotal reward cue. Happy facial expressions activate the brain's reward system and are

  14. The applicability of a gel delivery system for self-administration of buprenorphine to laboratory mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovard, A. M. B.; Teilmann, A. C.; Hau, J.

    2015-01-01

    have previously demonstrated sticky nut and chocolate paste to be well-liked by mice and readily ingested in most cases. However, a disadvantage with nut and chocolate paste is its high content of fat and sugar, which may have undesirable effects in some experimental models. Alternatively, a delivery...

  15. Voluntary ingestion of nut paste for administration of buprenorphine in rats and mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abelson, Klas S P; Jacobsen, Kirsten R; Sundbom, Renée

    2012-01-01

    for voluntary ingestion. This method has many advantages over parenteral administration. To use the method in a successful way, however, it is important to prepare and administer the mix correctly. The present paper describes in detail how to implement the method, by means of habituation, presentation, adequate...

  16. 78 FR 34108 - Determination That SUBOXONE (Buprenorphine Hydrochloride and Naloxone Hydrochloride) Sublingual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-06

    ... naloxone HCl) sublingual tablets, 2 mg/0.5 mg and 8 mg/2 mg, are the subject of NDA 20-733, held by Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Reckitt), and initially approved on October 8, 2002. SUBOXONE is indicated...,'' http://www.rb.com/site/rkbr/templates/mediainvestorsgeneral2.aspx?pageid=1332&cc=GB , Reckitt Benckiser...

  17. Screening for drugs of abuse (II): Cannabinoids, lysergic acid diethylamide, buprenorphine, methadone, barbiturates, benzodiazepines and other drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D; Braithwaite, R A; Jarvie, D R; Stewart, M J; Walker, S; Watson, I W; Widdop, B

    1997-09-01

    Requirements for the provision of an efficient and reliable service for drugs of abuse screening in urine have been summarized in Part I of this review. The requirements included rapid turn-around times, good communications between requesting clinicians and the laboratory, and participation in quality assessment schemes. In addition, the need for checking/confirmation of positive results obtained for preliminary screening methods was stressed. This aspect of the service has assumed even greater importance with widespread use of dip-stick technology and the increasing number of reasons for which drug screening is performed. Many of these additional uses of drug screening have possible serious legal implications, for example, screening school pupils, professional footballers, parents involved in child custody cases, persons applying for renewal of a driving licence after disqualification for a drug-related offence, doctors seeking re-registration after removal for drug abuse, and checking for compliance with terms of probation orders; as well as pre-employment screening and work-place testing. In many cases these requests will be received from a general practitioner or drug clinic with no indication of the reason for which testing has been requested. This also raises the serious problems of a chain of custody, provision of two samples, stability of samples, and secure and lengthy storage of samples in the laboratory-samples may be requested by legal authorities several months after the initial testing. The need for confirmation of positive results is now widely accepted but it may be equally important to confirm unexpected negative results. Failure to detect the presence of maintenance drugs may lead to the patient being discharged from a drug treatment clinic and, if attendance at the clinic is one of the terms of continued employment, to dismissal. It seems likely that increasing abuse of drugs and the efforts of regulatory authorities to control this, will lead to the manufacture of more designer drugs. Production of substituted phenethylamines was facilitated by the drug makers' cook book, 'PIHKAL' (Phenethylamines I Have Known And Loved) by Dr Alexander Shulgin and Ann Shulgin, and production of substituted tryptamines is promised in their next book, TIHKAL. Looking to the future, laboratories will need to ensure that they can detect and quantitate an ever-increasing number of drugs and related substances. The question of confidence in results of drugs of abuse testing raised in 1993 by Watson has assumed even greater importance as a result of attention focused on the OJ Simpson trial in Los Angeles. Toxicological investigations are likely to be challenged more frequently in the future. Even if analyses have been performed by GC-MS, there is a need to establish the level of match between the spectrum of the unknown substance and a library spectrum which is considered acceptable for legal purposes. It will also be essential to ensure that computer libraries contain spectra for all substances likely to be encountered in drugs of abuse screening.

  18. Behavioural Outcomes of Four-Year-Old Children Prenatally Exposed to Methadone or Buprenorphine: A Test of Three Risk Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijnenberg, Carolien; Lund, Ingunn Olea; Melinder, Annika

    2015-01-01

    It is still under debate whether the reported effects of opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) on child behaviour are a direct effect of prenatal exposure, or whether other factors are involved. This prospective cohort study investigated three models: the teratogenic risk model, the maternal risk model, and a combined risk model in a group of 35…

  19. Poly-substance use and antisocial personality traits at admission predict cumulative retention in a buprenorphine programme with mandatory work and high compliance profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhlin, Leif; Hesse, Morten; Fridell, Mats

    2011-01-01

    -IV-TR, and the Symptoms Checklist 90 (SCL-90), the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test (AUDIT), the Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP) and the Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC), all self-report measures. Some measures were repeated every third month in addition to interviews. Results Of 123 patients...

  20. Consumer attitudes about opioid addiction treatment: a focus group study in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohler, Nancy L; Weiss, Linda; Egan, James E; López, Carolina M; Favaro, Jamie; Cordero, Robert; Cunningham, Chinazo O

    2013-01-01

    To develop effective programs for people who are opioid dependent and to impact the opioid epidemic in New York City, it is crucial to monitor attitudes about opioid addiction treatments among opioid users who have experienced barriers to engagement and retention in addiction treatment. The authors conducted a qualitative study using focus groups. Six focus groups in three needle exchanges in New York City were audio recorded, transcribed, and systematically coded. The authors report on the main themes related to the study objectives. Participants of each needle exchange who were opioid dependent and had some knowledge of both methadone and buprenorphine were eligible. There were four main findings. Participants felt the following: 1) buprenorphine is an appropriate option for those heroin users who are motivated to stop using, 2) they have less control over their addiction treatment with methadone than they would have with buprenorphine, 3) buprenorphine treatment is not accessible to many New York City residents who would benefit from this treatment, and 4) lack of access to buprenorphine treatment is a cause of treatment-related diversion. Both methadone maintenance and buprenorphine treatment opportunities are necessary to address the diverse treatment needs of opioid-dependent people in New York City. However, the current medical model of buprenorphine treatment may be too restrictive for some opioid-dependent people and may be contributing to the use of illicit buprenorphine. New models to deliver buprenorphine treatment may address these problems.

  1. home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find physicians and treatment programs providing buprenorphine for opioid addiction (heroin or pain relievers). Find programs providing methadone for the treatment of opioid addiction (heroin or pain relievers). /locator/widget/220 SAMHSA ...

  2. Prescription Pain Medicines - An Addictive Path?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the brain affected by heroin, morphine, and prescription painkillers. The tablets relieve drug cravings without prompting the same intense high or dangerous side effects. When combined with naloxone, buprenorphine's abuse potential is ...

  3. Naloxone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated: 03/03/2016 Medications to Treat OPIOID ADDICTION Methadone Naltrexone Buprenorphine Related SAMHSA Resources Behavioral Health ... Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing ...

  4. Naltrexone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated: 09/12/2016 Medications to Treat OPIOID ADDICTION Methadone Naltrexone Buprenorphine Related SAMHSA Resources Behavioral Health ... Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing ...

  5. Opioid Overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated: 03/10/2016 Medications to Treat OPIOID ADDICTION Methadone Naltrexone Buprenorphine Related SAMHSA Resources Behavioral Health ... Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing ...

  6. Methadone

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Updated: 09/28/2015 Medications to Treat OPIOID ADDICTION Methadone Naltrexone Buprenorphine Related SAMHSA Resources Behavioral Health ... Systems Integration Health Disparities Health Financing Health Information Technology HIV, AIDS, and Viral Hepatitis Homelessness and Housing ...

  7. Suboxone : det nye fengselsdopet : en etnografisk studie av legemiddelassistert rehabilitering i Trondheim fengsel.

    OpenAIRE

    Aleric, Mirna

    2017-01-01

    Background: Opiate maintenance treatment (OMT) is being offered for rehabilitation purposes in the Norwegian society, including Norwegian prisons. The OMT program has been a controversial issue because of fear of the diversion of OMT medications and development of black markets for prescription drugs such as buprenorphine and methadone. The OTM program is seeking normalization through rehabilitation, and is therefore forced to observe their patients during the intake of buprenorphine and meth...

  8. Pharmacogenomics-guided policy in opioid use disorder (OUD) management: An ethnically-diverse case-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettienne, Earl B; Chapman, Edwin; Maneno, Mary; Ofoegbu, Adaku; Wilson, Bradford; Settles-Reaves, Beverlyn; Clarke, Melissa; Dunston, Georgia; Rosenblatt, Kevin

    2017-12-01

    Opioid use disorder (OUD) is characterized by a problematic pattern of opioid use leading to clinically-significant impairment or distress. Opioid agonist treatment is an integral component of OUD management, and buprenorphine is often utilized in OUD management due to strong clinical evidence for efficacy. However, interindividual genetic differences in buprenorphine metabolism may result in variable treatment response, leaving some patients undertreated and at increased risk for relapse. Clinical pharmacogenomics studies the effect that inherited genetic variations have on drug response. Our objective is to demonstrate the impact of pharmacogenetic testing on OUD management outcomes. We analyzed a patient who reported discomfort at daily buprenorphine dose of 24 mg, which was a mandated daily maximum by the pharmacy benefits manager. Regular urine screenings were conducted to detect the presence of unauthorized substances, and pharmacogenetic testing was used to determine the appropriate dose of buprenorphine for OUD management. At the 24 mg buprenorphine daily dose, the patient had multiple relapses with unauthorized substances. Pharmacogenetic testing revealed that the patient exhibited a cytochrome P450 3A4 ultrarapid metabolizer phenotype, which necessitated a higher than recommended daily dose of buprenorphine (32 mg) for adequate OUD management. The patient exhibited a reduction in the number of relapses on the pharmacogenetic-based dose recommendation compared to standard dosing. Pharmacogenomic testing as clinical decision support helped to individualize OUD management. Collaboration by key stakeholders is essential to establishing pharmacogenetic testing as standard of care in OUD management.

  9. Pharmacogenomics-guided policy in opioid use disorder (OUD management: An ethnically-diverse case-based approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earl B. Ettienne

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Opioid use disorder (OUD is characterized by a problematic pattern of opioid use leading to clinically-significant impairment or distress. Opioid agonist treatment is an integral component of OUD management, and buprenorphine is often utilized in OUD management due to strong clinical evidence for efficacy. However, interindividual genetic differences in buprenorphine metabolism may result in variable treatment response, leaving some patients undertreated and at increased risk for relapse. Clinical pharmacogenomics studies the effect that inherited genetic variations have on drug response. Our objective is to demonstrate the impact of pharmacogenetic testing on OUD management outcomes. Methods: We analyzed a patient who reported discomfort at daily buprenorphine dose of 24mg, which was a mandated daily maximum by the pharmacy benefits manager. Regular urine screenings were conducted to detect the presence of unauthorized substances, and pharmacogenetic testing was used to determine the appropriate dose of buprenorphine for OUD management. Results: At the 24mg buprenorphine daily dose, the patient had multiple relapses with unauthorized substances. Pharmacogenetic testing revealed that the patient exhibited a cytochrome P450 3A4 ultrarapid metabolizer phenotype, which necessitated a higher than recommended daily dose of buprenorphine (32mg for adequate OUD management. The patient exhibited a reduction in the number of relapses on the pharmacogenetic-based dose recommendation compared to standard dosing. Conclusion: Pharmacogenomic testing as clinical decision support helped to individualize OUD management. Collaboration by key stakeholders is essential to establishing pharmacogenetic testing as standard of care in OUD management. Keywords: Opioid use disorder, Opioid agonist treatment, Buprenorphine, Pharmacogenomics, Policy

  10. Suspected Lonely Mouse Syndrome as a Cage Effect in a Drug Safety Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaobu; Itzoe, MariaLisa; Sarabia-Estrada, Rachel; DeTolla, Louis; Tyler, Betty M; Guarnieri, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that buprenorphine, a front line drug for veterinary analgesia, may alleviate symptoms of chronic pain. A cage side observation protocol was used to record behavioral signs in a mouse clinical trial of extended release buprenorphine. A retrospective review of the observations for signs of pain and stress revealed that mice given a fivefold overdose of buprenorphine (16.25 mg/kg) showed lethargy and facial signs associated with stress. However, similar signs were observed in the drug-free control mice as early as Day 3 of single-cage housing. This appears to be the first report of cage effects in a clinical trial for a veterinary drug.

  11. Suspected Lonely Mouse Syndrome as a Cage Effect in a Drug Safety Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobu Ye

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies have demonstrated that buprenorphine, a front line drug for veterinary analgesia, may alleviate symptoms of chronic pain. A cage side observation protocol was used to record behavioral signs in a mouse clinical trial of extended release buprenorphine. A retrospective review of the observations for signs of pain and stress revealed that mice given a fivefold overdose of buprenorphine (16.25 mg/kg showed lethargy and facial signs associated with stress. However, similar signs were observed in the drug-free control mice as early as Day 3 of single-cage housing. This appears to be the first report of cage effects in a clinical trial for a veterinary drug.

  12. A sensitive, simple and rapid HPLC–MS/MS method for simultaneous quantification of buprenorpine and its N-dealkylated metabolite norbuprenorphine in human plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ya Wang

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive, simple and rapid high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC–MS/MS method was developed and fully validated for the simultaneous quantification of buprenorphine (BUP and its N-dealkylated metabolite norbuprenorphine (NBUP in 200μL human plasma. Human plasma samples were prepared using liquid–liquid extraction, and then separated on a Shiseido MG C18 (5μm, 2.0mm×50mm via 4.1min gradient elution. Following electrospray ionization, the analytes were quantified on a triple–quadrupole mass spectrometer in multiple-reaction-monitoring (MRM positive ion mode. Linearity was achieved from 25.0 to 10000pg/mL for buprenorphine, from 20.0 to 8000pg/mL for norbuprenorphine with r2>0.99. The method was demonstrated with acceptable accuracy, precision and specificity for the detection of buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine. Recovery was 81.8–88.8% for buprenorphine and 77.0–84.6% for norbuprenorphine, and the matrix effect was 95.6–97.4% for buprenorphine and 94.0–96.9% for norbuprenorphine; all were not concentration dependent. With validated matrix and autosampler stability data, this method was successfully applied in a bioequivalence study to support abbreviated new drug application. Keywords: Buprenorphine, Norbuprenorphine, Human plasma, HPLC–MS/MS

  13. Medication-assisted therapy for opioid addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Tai, Betty; Saxon, Andrew J.; Ling, Walter

    2013-01-01

    The “Medication-Assisted Therapy for Opioid Addiction” session was chaired by Dr. Betty Tai and had three presenters. The presenters (and their topics) were: Dr. Andrew J. Saxon (Methadone and Buprenorphine for Treatment of Opioid Addiction and HIV Risk Reduction), Dr. Walter Ling (Opioid Antagonist Treatment for Opioid Addiction), and Dr. Betty Tai (Chronic Care Model for Substance Use Disorder).

  14. Syncope and QT prolongation among patients treated with methadone for heroin dependence in the city of Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanoe, Søren; Hvidt, C; Ege, P

    2007-01-01

    were collected in a population of adult heroin addicts treated with methadone or buprenorphine on a daily basis. Of the patients at the Drug Addiction Service in the municipal of Copenhagen, 450 ( 52%) were included. The QT interval was estimated from 12 lead ECGs. All participants were interviewed...

  15. Colon anastomotic leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Achiam, Michael Patrick; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    /experiments. In the final successful experiment (B), eight and four absorbable sutures were used in the control and intervention anastomoses, respectively, and buprenorphine in chocolate spread was used for pain treatment. RESULTS: In the final model (experiment B), significantly more animals in the intervention group had...

  16. The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS project: An open-label pragmatic randomised control trial comparing the efficacy of differing therapeutic agents for primary care detoxification from either street heroin or methadone [ISRCTN07752728

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheard Laura

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Heroin is a synthetic opioid with an extensive illicit market leading to large numbers of people becoming addicted. Heroin users often present to community treatment services requesting detoxification and in the UK various agents are used to control symptoms of withdrawal. Dissatisfaction with methadone detoxification 8 has lead to the use of clonidine, lofexidine, buprenorphine and dihydrocodeine; however, there remains limited evaluative research. In Leeds, a city of 700,000 people in the North of England, dihydrocodeine is the detoxification agent of choice. Sublingual buprenorphine, however, is being introduced. The comparative value of these two drugs for helping people successfully and comfortably withdraw from heroin has never been compared in a randomised trial. Additionally, there is a paucity of research evaluating interventions among drug users in the primary care setting. This study seeks to address this by randomising drug users presenting in primary care to receive either dihydrocodeine or buprenorphine. Methods/design The Leeds Evaluation of Efficacy of Detoxification Study (LEEDS project is a pragmatic randomised trial which will compare the open use of buprenorphine with dihydrocodeine for illicit opiate detoxification, in the UK primary care setting. The LEEDS project will involve consenting adults and will be run in specialist general practice surgeries throughout Leeds. The primary outcome will be the results of a urine opiate screening at the end of the detoxification regimen. Adverse effects and limited data to three and six months will be acquired.

  17. 77 FR 72752 - Opioid Drugs in Maintenance and Detoxification Treatment of Opiate Addiction; Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-06

    ... buprenorphine products (Subutex[supreg] and Suboxone[supreg]) on October 8, 2002, and the DEA's rescheduling of....'' The same commenter suggested allowing Nurse Practitioners to become qualified to treat these patients... guidance for nurses in OTPs or other practice settings such as ``Technical Assistance Publication 30...

  18. Apyrase: A Portable Treatment to Prevent Burn Progression and Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    sedated with telazol/xylazine and anesthesia is maintained on isoflurane via face mask . A buprenorphine patch is applied and one injection of...and presentations § Journal publications. Nothing to report § Books or other non-periodical, one-time publications. Nothing to report § Other

  19. Dgroup: DG01717 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DG01717 DGroup Drugs for opioid dependence ... DG00820 ... Buprenorphine ... D07132 ... Bupre... Naloxone ... D08249 ... Naloxone (INN) ... D01340 ... Naloxone hydrochloride (JP17/USP) ... Other ... DG01718 ... Drugs for addictive disorder ATC code: N07BC Drugs of addictive disorder ...

  20. Dgroup: DG01718 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DG01718 DGroup Drugs for addictive disorder ... DG01715 ... Drugs for nicotine dependence ... DG00994 ... Nicotine ... D03365 ... Nicotine (USP) ... D05156 ... Nicotine bitartrate (USAN) ... D05157 ... Nicotine polacrilex (USAN) ... DG00995 ... Varenicline ... D08669 ... Varenicline (INN) ... D06282 ... Varenicline tartrate (JAN/USAN) ... DG01716 ... Drugs for alcohol dependence ... DG00996 ... Acamprosate ... D07058 ... Acamprosate (INN) ... D02780 ... Acamprosate calcium (JAN/USAN) ... DG00997 ... Naltrexone ... D05113 ... Naltrexone (USAN/INN) ... D02095 ... Naltrexone hydrochloride (USP) ... DG00998 ... Nalmefene ... D05111 ... Nalmefene (USAN/INN) ... D02104 ... Nalmefene hydrochloride ... D10812 ... Nalmefene hydrochloride hydrate (JAN) ... DG01756 ... Ondelopran ... D10143 ... Ondelopran (USAN/INN) ... D10144 ... Ondelopran hydrochloride (USAN) ... D00123 ... Cyanamide (JP17) ... D00131 ... Disulfiram (JP17/USP/INN) ... D03288 ... Calcium carbimide (INN) DG01717 ... Drugs for opioid dependence ... DG00820 ... Buprenorphine ... D07132 ... Buprenorphine (JAN/INN) ... D00836 ... Buprenorphine hydrochloride (JP17/USP) ... DG00999 ... Methadone ... D08195 ... Methadone (BAN) ... D02102 ... Methadone hydrochloride (JAN/USP) ... DG01000 ... Levacetylmethadol ... D04716 ... Levomethadyl acetate (USAN); Levacetylmethadol (INN) ... D00840 ... Levomethadyl acetate hydrochloride (USAN) ... DG01001 ... Lofexidine ... D08141 ... Lofexidine (INN) ... D04765 ... Lofexidine hydrochloride (USAN) ... DG01002 ... Levomethadone ... D08121 ... Levomethadone (INN) ... D08122 ... Levomethadone hydrochloride ... DG01003 ... Diamorphine ... D07286 ... Diamorphine (BAN) ... D07810 ... Diacetylmorphine hydrochloride ... D10250 ... Buprenorphine - naloxone mixt ... DG01151 ... Nalorphine ... D08247 ... Nalorphine (INN) ... D08248 ... Nalorphine hydrochloride (USP) ... DG01155 ... Naloxone ... D08249 ... Naloxone (INN) ... D01340 ... Naloxone hydrochloride (JP17/USP

  1. [Post-operative analgesia in case of ano-rectal diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossitto, Maurizio; Pantè, Sebastiano; Manfrè, Antonino; Ciccolo, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was that to evaluate the post-operative pain in case of ano-rectal diseases wether treated by ketorolac, or buprenorphine or tramadol. The intensity of post-operative pain was evaluated in 60 patients with hemorrhoidal diseases, fistulae, abscesses and anal neoplasms, divided into three homogenous groups and treated with intramuscular ketorolac (Group I), transdermal buprenorphine (Group II) and tramadol in elastomeric pump (Group III). The average index of the visual analogue scale, as mean to evaluate the intensity of the post-operative pain, was 1,85 in the first group, 1,20 in the second one and 1,40 in the third group. In patients treated with transdermal buprenorphine or with tramadol in elastomeric pump there has been a more quick psycho-physical recovery than in those treated with ketorolac; the management of elastomeric pump represents however for patients cause of concern while the transdermal system is a kind of rational and comfortable way of treatment of the pain, with the advantage of being non-invasive. Better compliance and lower operating costs have given the preference to the use of transdermal buprenorphine for the treatment of diseases of the post-operative pain in the diseases of the anal canal.

  2. Defeating the dragon.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    medical disorder, best treated via a medical intervention model.1 .... as a safe and effective treatment for opioid dependence. ... children. The maximum effect that buprenorphine can produce is lower than that of a full agonist, and ... only limited treatment spaces. ... Learning from the French experience, they delayed the roll-.

  3. Stigma associated with medication treatment for young adults with opioid use disorder: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadland, Scott E; Park, Tae Woo; Bagley, Sarah M

    2018-05-07

    Opioid-related overdose deaths have risen sharply among young adults. Despite this increase, access to evidence-based medication for opioid agonist treatment (OAT) for youth remains low. Among older adults, barriers to OAT include the paucity of buprenorphine-waivered prescribers and low rates of prescribing among waivered physicians. We have increasingly found in our clinical practice significant stigma related to using OAT to treat addiction for young adults. In this series, we describe three cases of young adults who faced significant stigma related to their treatment. The first case is a young male with a history of significant trauma and a severe opioid use disorder. He started buprenorphine and has found a job, stayed abstinent, and began a healthy relationship. At each step in his recovery, he has faced resistance to taking medication from other treatment providers, directors of sober houses, and his parents. The second case is a young woman who presented to a substance use treatment program after a relapse. She was unable to restart buprenorphine despite our calling to ask that it be restarted. Ultimately, she left against medical advice and was stabilized as an outpatient on buprenorphine. The final case is a young woman who stopped buprenorphine after being told she was "not sober" while attending 12-step group but restarted after conversations with her clinical team. In each case, the patient has continued their medication treatment and are stable. Opioid-related deaths continue to rise among all age groups, including young adults. Stigma related to medication treatment can be a substantial barrier for many young adult patients but there are concrete steps that providers and communities can take to address this stigma.

  4. Sex Differences in Regional Brain Glucose Metabolism Following Opioid Withdrawal and Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Giovanni C; Carrion, Joseph; Patel, Krishna; Vilchez, Crystal; Veith, Jennifer; Brodie, Jonathan D; Dewey, Stephen L

    2017-08-01

    Methadone and buprenorphine are currently the most common pharmacological treatments for opioid dependence. Interestingly, the clinical response to these drugs appears to be sex specific. That is, females exhibit superior therapeutic efficacy, defined as extended periods of abstinence and longer time to relapse, compared with males. However, the underlying metabolic effects of opioid withdrawal and replacement have not been examined. Therefore, using 18 FDG and microPET, we measured differences in regional brain glucose metabolism in males and females following morphine withdrawal and subsequent methadone or buprenorphine replacement. In both males and females, spontaneous opioid withdrawal altered glucose metabolism in regions associated with reward and drug dependence. Specifically, metabolic increases in the thalamus, as well as metabolic decreases in insular cortex and the periaqueductal gray, were noted. However, compared with males, females exhibited increased metabolism in the preoptic area, primary motor cortex, and the amygdala, and decreased metabolism in the caudate/putamen and medial geniculate nucleus. Methadone and buprenorphine initially abolished these changes uniformly, but subsequently produced their own regional metabolic alterations that varied by treatment and sex. Compared with sex-matched control animals undergoing spontaneous opioid withdrawal, male animals treated with methadone exhibited increased caudate/putamen metabolism, whereas buprenorphine produced increased ventral striatum and motor cortex metabolism in females, and increased ventral striatum and somatosensory cortex metabolism in males. Notably, when treatment effects were compared between sexes, methadone-treated females showed increased cingulate cortex metabolism, whereas buprenorphine-treated females showed decreased metabolism in cingulate cortex and increased metabolism in the globus pallidus. Perhaps the initial similarities in males and females underlie early therapeutic

  5. Cost-effectiveness of emergency department-initiated treatment for opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Susan H; Fiellin, David A; Chawarski, Marek C; Owens, Patricia H; Pantalon, Michael V; Hawk, Kathryn; Bernstein, Steven L; O'Connor, Patrick G; D'Onofrio, Gail

    2017-11-01

    In a recent randomized trial, patients with opioid dependence receiving brief intervention, emergency department (ED)-initiated buprenorphine and ongoing follow-up in primary care with buprenorphine (buprenorphine) were twice as likely to be engaged in addiction treatment compared with referral to community-based treatment (referral) or brief intervention and referral (brief intervention). Our aim was to evaluate the relative cost-effectiveness of these three methods of intervening on opioid dependence in the ED. Measured health-care use was converted to dollar values. We considered a health-care system perspective and constructed cost-effectiveness acceptability curves that indicate the probability each treatment is cost-effective under different thresholds of willingness-to-pay for outcomes studied. An urban ED in the United States. Opioid-dependent patients aged 18 years or older. Self-reported 30-day assessment data were used to construct cost-effectiveness acceptability curves for patient engagement in formal addiction treatment at 30 days and the number of days illicit opioid-free in the past week. Considering only health-care system costs, cost-effectiveness acceptability curves indicate that at all positive willingness-to-pay values, ED-initiated buprenorphine treatment was more cost-effective than brief intervention or referral. For example, at a willingness-to-pay threshold of $1000 for 30-day treatment engagement, we are 79% certain ED-initiated buprenorphine is most cost-effective compared with other studied treatments. Similar results were found for days illicit opioid-free in the past week. Results were robust to secondary analyses that included patients with missing cost data, included crime and patient time costs in the numerator, and to changes in unit price estimates. In the United States, emergency department-initiated buprenorphine intervention for patients with opioid dependence provides high value compared with referral to community

  6. Easy-access Services in Low-threshold Opiate Agonist Maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesse, Morten; Pedersen, Mads Uffe

    2007-01-01

    Background: There is currently evidence that methadone and buprenorphine maintenance is effective in reducing substance abuse. However, it is not known whether psychosocial support improves the outcome of methadone maintenance in the absence of control measures, such as regular urine testing....... Materials and Methods: In a prospective observational study, the effectiveness of standard psychosocial support [SPS] was compared with enhanced psychosocial support [EPS]. EPS included intensive case management and drop-in centres. Subjects were administered the Addiction Severity Index before and after...... in the control group. Change in psychiatric and social problems were associated with the absence of no-shows. Discussion: Enhanced psychosocial support appeared to be effective at reducing problems associated with drug use in a low-threshold buprenorphine or methadone maintenance setting without substantial...

  7. Pharmacokinetic drug interactions of morphine, codeine, and their derivatives: theory and clinical reality, Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Scott C; Cozza, Kelly L

    2003-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic drug-drug interactions with codeine, dihydrocodeine, hydrocodone, oxycodone, and buprenorphine are reviewed in this column. These compounds have a very similar chemical structure to morphine. Unlike morphine, which is metabolized chiefly through conjugation reactions with uridine diphosphate glucuronosyl transferase (UGT) enzymes, these five drugs are metabolized both through oxidative reactions by the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme and conjugation by UGT enzymes. There is controversy as to whether codeine, dihydrocodeine, and hydrocodone are actually prodrugs requiring activation by the CYP450 2D6 enzyme or UGT enzymes. Oxycodone and buprenorphine, however, are clearly not prodrugs and are metabolized by the CYP450 2D6 and 3A4 enzymes, respectively. Knowledge of this metabolism assists in the understanding for the potential of drug-drug interactions with these drugs. This understanding is important so that clinicians can choose the proper dosages for analgesia and anticipate potential drug-drug interactions.

  8. Allometric scaling of chemical restraint associated with inhalant anesthesia in giant anteaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carregaro, Adriano Bonfim; Gerardi, Patrícia Molina; Honsho, Daniel Kan

    2009-04-01

    This study describes the use of allometric scaling in five giant anteaters (Myrmecophaga tridactyla) submitted for osteosynthesis, gastrostomy, or treatment of burns. Chemical restraint was performed by allometric scaling using the dog as a reference; acepromazine (0.06 mg/kg), diazepam (0.3 mg/kg), ketamine (8.8 mg/kg), and buprenorphine (5.9 microg/kg) were combined, and the animals were maintained under isoflurane anesthesia. Heart rate, respiratory rate, hemoglobin oxygen saturation, temperature, and anesthetic depth were measured. Postoperative treatment consisted of ketoprofen, buprenorphine, and ceftiofur. Anesthetic induction was obtained in 10-15 min, achieving muscle relaxation and absence of excitement. Physiologic parameters were stable during the procedures, and postoperative treatment was effective. Allometric scaling was effective for chemical restraint and postoperative treatment.

  9. Role of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the piracetam induced blockade of opioid effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehni, Ashish K; Singh, Nirmal; Jindal, Seema

    2007-12-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of piracetam on morphine/ buprenorphine-induced antinociception in rats and effect of piracetam on morphine or minoxidil induced relaxation in KCl-precontracted isolated rat aortic ring preparation. Nociceptive threshold was measured by the tail flick test in rats. The cumulative dose responses of morphine or minoxidil were recorded in KCl-precontracted isolated rat aortic ring preparation. Piracetam attenuated buprenorphine-induced antinociception in rats. Piracetam significantly reduced the morphine and minoxidil induced relaxation in KCl precontracted isolated rat aortic ring preparation suggesting that piracetam interferes with opioid receptor and ATP-sensitive potassium channel (KATP) opener mediated responses in vitro. Thus, it may be suggested that piracetam attenuates opioid effects by an opioid receptor-KATP channel linked mechanism.

  10. Treatment with analgesics after mouse sciatic nerve injury does not alter expression of wound healing-associated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt C Danzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of sciatic nerve injury are commonly used to study neuropathic pain as well as axon regeneration. Administration of post-surgical analgesics is an important consideration for animal welfare, but the actions of the analgesic must not interfere with the scientific goals of the experiment. In this study, we show that treatment with either buprenorphine or acetaminophen following a bilateral sciatic nerve crush surgery does not alter the expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG sensory neurons of a panel of genes associated with wound healing. These findings indicate that the post-operative use of buprenorphine or acetaminophen at doses commonly suggested by Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees does not change the intrinsic gene expression response of DRG neurons to a sciatic nerve crush injury, for many wound healing-associated genes. Therefore, administration of post-operative analgesics may not confound the results of transcriptomic studies employing this injury model.

  11. Evaluation of Pain Assessment Techniques and Analgesia Efficacy in a Female Guinea Pig (Cavia porcellus) Model of Surgical Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Vanessa L; Athavale, Stephanie; Simon, Katherine E; Kendall, Lon V; Nemzek, Jean A; Lofgren, Jennifer L

    2017-01-01

    Guinea pigs (Cavia porcellus) are a frequently used species in research, often involving potentially painful procedures. Therefore, evidence-based recommendations regarding analgesia are critically needed to optimize their wellbeing. Our laboratory examined the efficacy of carprofen and extended-release (ER) buprenorphine, alone and as a multimodal combination, for relieving postsurgical pain in guinea pigs. Animals were assessed by using evoked (mechanical hypersensitivity), nonevoked (video ethogram, cageside ethogram, time-to-consumption test), and clinical (weight loss) measurements for 96 h during baseline, anesthesia–analgesia, and hysterectomy conditions. In addition, ER buprenorphine was evaluated pharmacologically. Guinea pigs treated with a single analgesic showed increased mechanical sensitivity for at least 96 h and indices of pain according to the video ethogram for as long as 8 h, compared with levels recorded during anesthesia–analgesia. In contrast, animals given both analgesics demonstrated increased mechanical sensitivity and behavioral evidence of pain for only 2 h after surgery compared with anesthesia–analgesia. The cageside ethogram and time-to-consumption tests failed to identify differences between conditions or treatment groups, highlighting the difficulty of identifying pain in guinea pigs without remote observation. Guinea pigs treated with multimodal analgesia or ER buprenorphine lost at least 10% of their baseline weights, whereas weight loss in carprofen animals was significantly lower (3%). Plasma levels for ER buprenorphine exceeded 0.9 ng/mL from 8 to 96 h after injection. Of the 3 analgesia regimens evaluated, multimodal analgesia provided the most effective pain control in guinea pigs. However the weight loss in the ER buprenorphine–treated animals may need to be considered during analgesia selection. PMID:28724492

  12. [Surveillance system on drug abuse: Interest of the French national OPPIDUM program of French addictovigilance network].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauger, Elisabeth; Pochard, Liselotte; Boucherie, Quentin; Giocanti, Adeline; Chevallier, Cécile; Daveluy, Amélie; Gibaja, Valérie; Caous, Anne-Sylvie; Eiden, Céline; Authier, Nicolas; Le Boisselier, Reynald; Guerlais, Marylène; Jouanjus, Émilie; Lepelley, Marion; Pizzoglio, Véronique; Pain, Stéphanie; Richard, Nathalie; Micallef, Joëlle

    2017-09-01

    It is important to assess drug abuse liability in 'real life' using different surveillance systems. OPPIDUM ('Observation of illegal drugs and misuse of psychotropic medications') surveillance system anonymously collects information on drug abuse and dependence observed in patients recruited in specialized care centers dedicated to drug dependence. The aim of this article is to demonstrate the utility of OPPIDUM system using 2015 data. OPPIDUM is a cross-sectional survey repeated each year since 1995. In 2015, 5003 patients described the modality of use of 10,159 psychoactive drugs. Among them, 77% received an opiate maintenance treatment: 68% methadone (half of them consumed capsule form) and 27% buprenorphine (39% consumed generic form). Brand-name buprenorphine is more often injected than generic buprenorphine (10% vs. 2%) and among methadone consumers 7% of methadone capsule consumers have illegally obtained methadone (vs. 9% for syrup form). The proportion of medications among psychoactive drugs injected is important (42%), with morphine representing 21% of the total psychoactive drugs injected and buprenorphine, 16%. OPPIDUM highlighted emergent behaviors of abuse with some analgesic opioids (like tramadol, oxycodone or fentanyl), pregabalin, or quetiapine. OPPIDUM highlighted variations of drugs use regarding geographic approaches or by drug dependence care centers (like in harm reduction centers). OPPIDUM clearly demonstrated that collection of valid and useful data on drug abuse is possible, these data have an interest at regional, national and international levels. Copyright © 2017 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Stroke from Vasospasm due to Marijuana Use: Can Cannabis Synergistically with Other Medications Trigger Cerebral Vasospasm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Marium; Zafar, Atif; Adeel Faizi, Syed; Zawar, Ifrah

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of imaging proven cerebral vasospasm causing ischemic stroke in a young patient chronically on buprenorphine-naloxone for heroin remission who started smoking cannabis on a daily basis. With cannabis legalization spreading across the states in the USA, it is important for physicians not only to be aware of cannabis reported association with cerebral vasospasm in some patients but also to be on the lookout for possible interacting medications that can synergistically affect cerebral vessels causing debilitating strokes.

  14. Pharmacogenetic analysis of opioid dependence treatment dose and dropout rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Richard C; Li, James; Doyle, Glenn A; Gilbert, Alex; Dechairo, Bryan M; Berrettini, Wade H

    2018-01-01

    Currently, no pharmacogenetic tests for selecting an opioid-dependence pharmacotherapy have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Determine the effects of variants in 11 genes on dropout rate and dose in patients receiving methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00315341). Variants in six pharmacokinetic genes (CYP1A2, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2C9, CYP2D6, CYP3A4) and five pharmacodynamic genes (HTR2A, OPRM1, ADRA2A, COMT, SLC6A4) were genotyped in samples from a 24-week, randomized, open-label trial of methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone for the treatment of opioid dependence (n = 764; 68.7% male). Genotypes were then used to determine the metabolism phenotype for each pharmacokinetic gene. Phenotypes or genotypes for each gene were analyzed for association with dropout rate and mean dose. Genotype for 5-HTTLPR in the SLC6A4 gene was nominally associated with dropout rate when the methadone and buprenorphine/naloxone groups were combined. When the most significant variants associated with dropout rate were analyzed using pairwise analyses, SLC6A4 (5-HTTLPR) and COMT (Val158Met; rs4860) had nominally significant associations with dropout rate in methadone patients. None of the genes analyzed in the study was associated with mean dose of methadone or buprenorphine/naloxone. This study suggests that functional polymorphisms related to synaptic dopamine or serotonin levels may predict dropout rates during methadone treatment. Patients with the S/S genotype at 5-HTTLPR in SLC6A4 or the Val/Val genotype at Val158Met in COMT may require additional treatment to improve their chances of completing addiction treatment. Replication in other methadone patient populations will be necessary to ensure the validity of these findings.

  15. An Autologous Muscle Tissue Expansion Approach for the Treatment of Volumetric Muscle Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Gamba PG, Conconi MT, Lo Piccolo R, et al. Experimental abdominal wall defect repaired with acellular matrix. Pediatr Surg Int. 2002;18:327–331. 41...tissue was removed (*75mg). Sus- tained release buprenorphine (72 h) was delivered (1.2mg/kg SC) before surgery for pain . Construct preparation...regeneration with a dermis/small intestinal submucosa scaffold in a rat full-thickness abdominal wall defect model. J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater

  16. Trends in opioid agonist therapy in the Veterans Health Administration: is supply keeping up with demand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Elizabeth M; Trafton, Jodie A; Harris, Alex H S; Gordon, Adam J

    2013-03-01

    Opioid agonist therapy (OAT) through addiction specialty clinic settings (clinic-based OAT) using methadone or buprenorphine or office-based settings using buprenorphine (office-based OAT) is an evidence-based treatment for opioid dependence. The low number of clinic-based OATs available to veterans (N = 53) presents a barrier to OAT access; thus, the expansion in office-based OAT has been encouraged. To examine trends in office-based OAT utilization over time and whether availability of office-based OAT improved the proportion of veterans with opioid use disorders treated with OAT. We examined Veterans Health Administration (VHA) administrative data for evidence of buprenorphine prescribing and clinic-based OAT clinic stops from October 2003 through September 2010 [fiscal years (FY) 2004-2010]. The number of patients receiving buprenorphine increased from 300 at 27 facilities in FY2004 to 6147 at 118 facilities in FY2010. During this time, the number of patients diagnosed with an opioid use disorder increased by 45%; however, the proportion of opioid use disorder patients receiving OAT remained relatively stable, ranging from 25% to 27%. Office-based OAT utilization and the number of opioid use disorder veterans treated with OAT are increasing at the same rate over time, suggesting that office-based OAT is being used to meet the growing need for OAT care. Although office-based OAT is increasingly being used within the VHA and may be one way the VHA is keeping up with the demand for OAT, more research is needed to understand how to engage a greater proportion of opioid use disorder patients in treatment.

  17. Adding an Internet-delivered treatment to an efficacious treatment package for opioid dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Darren R; Landes, Reid D; Jackson, Lisa; Marsch, Lisa A; Mancino, Michael J; Chopra, Mohit P; Bickel, Warren K

    2014-12-01

    To examine the benefit of adding an Internet-delivered behavior therapy to a buprenorphine medication program and voucher-based motivational incentives. A block-randomized, unblinded, parallel, 12-week treatment trial was conducted with 170 opioid-dependent adult patients (mean age = 34.3 years; 54.1% male; 95.3% White). Participants received an Internet-based community reinforcement approach intervention plus contingency management (CRA+) and buprenorphine or contingency management alone (CM-alone) plus buprenorphine. The primary outcomes, measured over the course of treatment, were longest continuous abstinence, total abstinence, and days retained in treatment. Compared to those receiving CM-alone, CRA+ recipients exhibited, on average, 9.7 total days more of abstinence (95% confidence interval [CI = 2.3, 17.2]) and had a reduced hazard of dropping out of treatment (hazard ratio = 0.47; 95% CI [0.26, 0.85]). Prior treatment for opioid dependence significantly moderated the additional improvement of CRA+ for longest continuous days of abstinence. These results provide further evidence that an Internet-based CRA+ treatment is efficacious and adds clinical benefits to a contingency management/medication based program for opioid dependence.

  18. Using a Learning Collaborative Strategy With Office-based Practices to Increase Access and Improve Quality of Care for Patients With Opioid Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordstrom, Benjamin R; Saunders, Elizabeth C; McLeman, Bethany; Meier, Andrea; Xie, Haiyi; Lambert-Harris, Chantal; Tanzman, Beth; Brooklyn, John; King, Gregory; Kloster, Nels; Lord, Clifton Frederick; Roberts, William; McGovern, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Rapidly escalating rates of heroin and prescription opioid use have been widely observed in rural areas across the United States. Although US Food and Drug Administration-approved medications for opioid use disorders exist, they are not routinely accessible to patients. One medication, buprenorphine, can be prescribed by waivered physicians in office-based practice settings, but practice patterns vary widely. This study explored the use of a learning collaborative method to improve the provision of buprenorphine in the state of Vermont. We initiated a learning collaborative with 4 cohorts of physician practices (28 total practices). The learning collaborative consisted of a series of 4 face-to-face and 5 teleconference sessions over 9 months. Practices collected and reported on 8 quality-improvement data measures, which included the number of patients prescribed buprenorphine, and the percent of unstable patients seen weekly. Changes from baseline to 8 months were examined using a p-chart and logistic regression methodology. Physician engagement in the learning collaborative was favorable across all 4 cohorts (85.7%). On 6 of the 7 quality-improvement measures, there were improvements from baseline to 8 months. On 4 measures, these improvements were statistically significant (P learning collaborative approach to engage physicians, modestly improve patient access, and significantly reduce practice variation. The strategy is potentially generalizable to other systems and regions struggling with this important public health problem.

  19. Management of neonatal abstinence syndrome in neonates born to opioid maintained women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, Nina; Rohrmeister, Klaudia; Winklbaur, Bernadette; Baewert, Andjela; Jagsch, Reinhold; Peternell, Alexandra; Thau, Kenneth; Fischer, Gabriele

    2007-03-16

    Neonates born to opioid-maintained mothers are at risk of developing neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), which often requires pharmacological treatment. This study examined the effect of opioid maintenance treatment on the incidence and timing of NAS, and compared two different NAS treatments (phenobarbital versus morphine hydrochloride). Fifty-three neonates born to opioid-maintained mothers were included in this study. The mothers received methadone (n=22), slow-release oral morphine (n=17) or buprenorphine (n=14) throughout pregnancy. Irrespective of maintenance treatment, all neonates showed APGAR scores comparable to infants of non-opioid dependent mothers. No difference was found between the three maintenance groups regarding neonatal weight, length or head circumference. Sixty percent (n=32) of neonates required treatment for NAS [68% in the methadone-maintained group (n=15), 82% in the morphine-maintained group (n=14), and 21% in the buprenorphine-maintained group (n=3)]. The mean duration from birth to requirement of NAS treatment was 33 h for the morphine-maintained group, 34 h for the buprenorphine-maintained group and 58 h for the methadone-maintained group. In neonates requiring NAS treatment, those receiving morphine required a significantly shorter mean duration of treatment (9.9 days) versus those treated with phenobarbital (17.7 days). Results suggest that morphine hydrochloride is preferable for neonates suffering NAS due to opioid withdrawal.

  20. Treating opioid dependence. Growing implications for primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krantz, Mori J; Mehler, Philip S

    2004-02-09

    Almost 3 million Americans have abused heroin. The most effective treatment for this concerning epidemic is opioid replacement therapy. Although, from a historical perspective, acceptance of this therapy has been slow, growing evidence supports its efficacy. There are 3 approved medications for opioid maintenance therapy: methadone hydrochloride, levomethadyl acetate, and buprenorphine hydrochloride. Each has unique characteristics that determine its suitability for an individual patient. Cardiac arrhythmias have been reported with methadone and levomethadyl, but not with buprenorphine. Due to concerns about cardiac risk, levomethadyl use has declined and the product may ultimately be discontinued. These recent safety concerns, specifics about opioid detoxification and maintenance, and new federal initiatives were studied. Opioid detoxification has a role in both preventing acute withdrawal and maintaining long-term abstinence. Although only a minority of eligible patients are engaged in treatment, opioid maintenance therapy appears to offer the greatest public health benefits. There is growing interest in expanding treatment into primary care, allowing opioid addiction to be managed like other chronic illnesses. This model has gained wide acceptance in Europe and is now being implemented in the United States. The recent Drug Addiction Treatment Act enables qualified physicians to treat opioid-dependent patients with buprenorphine in an office-based setting. Mainstreaming opioid addiction treatment has many advantages; its success will depend on resolution of ethical and delivery system issues as well as improved and expanded training of physicians in addiction medicine.

  1. Challenges and opportunities in using wastewater analysis to measure drug use in a small prison facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyken, Emma; Lai, Foon Yin; Thai, Phong K; Ort, Christoph; Bruno, Raimondo; Hall, Wayne; Kirkbride, K Paul; Mueller, Jochen F; Prichard, Jeremy

    2016-03-01

    Wastewater analysis (WWA) is intended to be a direct and objective method of measuring substance use in large urban populations. It has also been used to measure prison substance use in two previous studies. The application of WWA in this context has raised questions as to how best it might be used to measure illicit drug use in prisons, and whether it can also be used to measure prescription misuse. We applied WWA to a small regional prison to measure the use of 12 licit and illicit substances. We attempted to measure the non-medical use of methadone and buprenorphine and to compare our findings with the results of the prison's mandatory drug testing (MDT). Representative daily composite samples were collected for two periods of 12 consecutive days in May to July 2013 and analysed for 18 drug metabolites. Prescription data and MDT results were obtained from the prison and compared with the substance use estimates calculated from WWA data. Daily use of methamphetamine, methadone, buprenorphine and codeine was detected, while sporadic detection of ketamine and methylone was also observed. Overall buprenorphine misuse appeared to be greater than methadone misuse. Compared with MDT, WWA provides a more comprehensive picture of prison substance use. WWA also has the potential to measure the misuse of medically prescribed substances. However, a great deal of care must be exercised in quantifying the usage of any substance in small populations, such as in prisons. © 2014 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  2. A case of topical opioid-induced delirium mistaken as behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia in demented state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Go; Kanemoto, Kousuke

    2013-06-01

    In Japan, indications for opioid analgesics, once exclusively used as pain killers for patients suffering from malignant cancer, have been expanded for a wide range of pain. Herein we report a patient with opioid-induced delirium associated with the administration of buprenorphine patches that was well below the indicated therapeutic range limit. An 82-year-old woman was referred to us from an orthopaedic practitioner for uncontrollable behavioural problems apparently caused by the beginning of dementia; the patient had gradually developed disorientation, visual hallucinations, and delusions. Laboratory and imaging findings excluded common causes of delirium including Alzheimer's disease and diffuse Lewy body disease. Detailed questioning revealed that the patient's confused state appeared following a buprenorphine patch dose increase and subsequently disappeared after administration was stopped. Delirium has not been reported as a side-effect in clinical trials of buprenorphine patches. However, our findings in this case show that even topical opioids can precipitate the development of a delirious state in elderly patients. © 2013 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2013 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  3. Random Forest Segregation of Drug Responses May define Regions of Biological Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qasim eBukhari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The ability to assess brain responses in unsupervised manner based on fMRI measure has remained a challenge. Here we have applied the Random Forest (RF method to detect differences in the pharmacological MRI (phMRI response in rats to treatment with an analgesic drug (buprenorphine as compared to control (saline. Three groups of animals were studied: two groups treated with different doses of the opioid buprenorphine, low (LD and high dose (HD, and one receiving saline. PhMRI responses were evaluated in 45 brain regions and RF analysis was applied to allocate rats to the individual treatment groups. RF analysis was able to identify drug effects based on differential phMRI responses in the hippocampus, amygdala, nucleus accumbens, superior colliculus and the lateral and posterior thalamus for drug vs. saline. These structures have high levels of mu opioid receptors. In addition these regions are involved in aversive signaling, which is inhibited by mu opioids. The results demonstrate that buprenorphine mediated phMRI responses comprise characteristic features that allow an unsupervised differentiation from placebo treated rats as well as the proper allocation to the respective drug dose group using the RF method, a method that has been successfully applied in clinical studies.

  4. The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act: Opioid Use Disorder and Midwifery Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Jeanne; Goodman, Daisy; Johnson, M Christina; Terplan, Mishka

    2018-03-01

    The federal response to the opioid use disorder crisis has included a mobilization of resources to encourage office-based pharmacotherapy with buprenorphine, an effort culminating in the 2016 Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, signed into law as Public Law 114-198. The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act was designed to increase access to treatment with special emphasis on services for pregnant women and follow-up for infants affected by prenatal substance exposure. In this effort, the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act laudably expands eligibility for obtaining a waiver to prescribe buprenorphine to nurse practitioners and physician assistants. However, certified nurse-midwives and certified midwives, who care for a significant proportion of pregnant and postpartum women and attend a significant proportion of births in the United States, were not included in the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act legislation. In this commentary, we argue that an "all-hands" approach to providing office-based medication-assisted treatment for opioid use disorder is essential to improving access to treatment. Introduced in the House of Representatives in September 2017, the Addiction Treatment Access Improvement Act (H.R. 3692) would allow midwives to apply for the federal waiver to prescribe buprenorphine and is supported by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American College of Nurse-Midwives. We support this change and encourage the U.S. Congress to act quickly to allow midwives to prescribe medication-assisted treatment for pregnant women with opioid use disorder.

  5. Comparison of a drug versus money and drug versus drug self-administration choice procedure with oxycodone and morphine in opioid addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Sandra D; Metz, Verena E; Cooper, Ziva D; Kowalczyk, William J; Jones, Jermaine D; Sullivan, Maria A; Manubay, Jeanne M; Vosburg, Suzanne K; Smith, Mary E; Peyser, Deena; Saccone, Phillip A

    2013-09-01

    This double-blind, placebo-controlled study investigated the effects of oral morphine (0, 45, 135 mg/70 kg) and oral oxycodone (0, 15, 45 mg/70 kg) on buprenorphine-maintained opioid addicts. As a 3: 1 morphine : oxycodone oral dose ratio yielded equivalent subjective and physiological effects in nondependent individuals, this ratio was used in the present study. Two self-administration laboratory procedures - that is, a drug versus money and a drug versus drug procedure - were assessed. Study participants (N=12) lived in the hospital and were maintained on 4 mg/day sublingual buprenorphine. When participants chose between drug and money, money was preferred over all drug doses; only high-dose oxycodone was self-administered more than placebo. When participants chose between drug and drug, both drugs were chosen more than placebo, high doses of each drug were chosen over low doses, and high-dose oxycodone was preferred over high-dose morphine. The subjective, performance-impairing, and miotic effects of high-dose oxycodone were generally greater than those of high-dose morphine. The study demonstrated that a 3: 1 oral dose ratio of morphine : oxycodone was not equipotent in buprenorphine-dependent individuals. Both self-administration procedures were effective for assessing the relative reinforcing effects of drugs; preference for one procedure should be driven by the specific research question of interest.

  6. [A randomized, double-blind, controlled study: Ji-Tai tablet for the treatment of acute withdrawl syndrome of mild heroin dependence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuhong; Tang, Cuiqing; Cheng, Shuang; Cui, Guimei; Zhang, Ruiling; Zhang, Zhiyong; Xie, Lingyin; Lin, Yongxiong; Hao, Wei

    2015-02-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of Ji-Tai tablet and Ji-Tai tablet combined with buprenorphine in the treatment of patients with acute withdrawal syndrome of mild heroin dependence. A total of 150 patients with mild heroin dependence were recruited, and were randomly assigned to a Ji-Tai tablet group (n=50), a Ji-Tai tablet combined with buprenorphine group (n=50) and a control group (n=50) during a 10-day clinical trial. Opiate withdrawal scale (OWS) was used to measure the severity of withdrawal symptoms. Anxiety symptoms assessments were made at 0 day (baseline), the day 5 (middle), and the day 10 (end) by the Hamilton anxiety scale (HAMA). Symptoms were assessed before and 1 h or 2 h after medication each day. The total withdrawal symptoms scores and the daily reduction rate were used to measure the effect of Ji-Tai tablet vs Ji- Tai tablet plus buprenorphine. Safety evaluation was carried out by the following measures: baseline of treatment, drug side effects after the treatment, vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, and respiration rate), laboratory examination (routine blood and urine tests and the liver and kidney function tests), and electrocardiograms. A total of 142 mild heroin dependence patients performed the experiments (including 48 in the Ji-Tai tablet group, 48 in the Ji-Tai tablet with buprenorphine group and 46 in the control group). The scores of baseline withdrawal symptoms were 43.520±19.786, 42.640±17.648 and 47.100±24.450, respectively, with no significant differences among the 3 groups (all P>0.05 ). During the 10-day treatment, the reduction rate of acute withdrawal symptoms scores increased daily, the acute withdrawal syndrome scores and the anxiety symptoms scores declined from day 0 to day 10, there was also no significant difference among the 3 groups (all P>0.05). Ji-Tai tablet did not affect vital signs such as blood pressure, heart rate, and respiration rate. Ji-Tai tablet or Ji-Tai tablet combined with buprenorphine

  7. Test of a workforce development intervention to expand opioid use disorder treatment pharmacotherapy prescribers: protocol for a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Molfenter

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overdoses due to non-medical use of prescription opioids and other opiates have become the leading cause of accidental deaths in the USA. Buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone are key evidence-based pharmacotherapies available to addiction treatment providers to address opioid use disorder (OUD and prevent overdose deaths. Treatment organizations’ efforts to provide these pharmacotherapies have, however, been stymied by limited success in recruiting providers (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants to prescribe these medications. Historically, the addiction treatment field has not attracted physicians, and many barriers to implementing OUD pharmacotherapy exist, ranging from lack of confidence in treating OUD patients to concerns regarding reimbursement. Throughout the USA, the prevalence of OUD far exceeds the capacity of the OUD pharmacotherapy treatment system. Poor access to OUD pharmacotherapy prescribers has become a workforce development need for the addiction treatment field and a significant health issue. Methods This cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT is designed to increase buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone treatment capacity for OUD. The implementation intervention to be tested is a bundle of OUD pharmacotherapy capacity building practices called the Prescriber Recruitment Bundle (PRB, which was developed and piloted in a previous statewide buprenorphine implementation study. For this cluster RCT, organizational sites will be recruited and then randomized into one of two arms: (1 control, with treatment as usual and access to a website with PRB resources, or (2 intervention, with organizations implementing the PRB using the Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment organizational change model over a 24-month intervention period and a 10-month sustainability period. The primary treatment outcomes for each organizational site are self-reported monthly counts of

  8. Is there a reasonable excuse for not providing post-operative analgesia when using animal models of peripheral neuropathic pain for research purposes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Hestehave

    Full Text Available The induction of neuropathic pain-like behaviors in rodents often requires surgical intervention. This engages acute nociceptive signaling events that contribute to pain and stress post-operatively that from a welfare perspective demands peri-operative analgesic treatment. However, a large number of researchers avoid providing such care based largely on anecdotal opinions that it might interfere with model pathophysiology in the longer term.To investigate effects of various peri-operative analgesic regimens encapsulating different mechanisms and duration of action, on the development of post-operative stress/welfare and pain-like behaviors in the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI-model of neuropathic pain.Starting on the day of surgery, male Sprague-Dawley rats were administered either vehicle (s.c., carprofen (5.0mg/kg, s.c., buprenorphine (0.1mg/kg s.c. or 1.0mg/kg p.o. in Nutella®, lidocaine/bupivacaine mixture (local irrigation or a combination of all analgesics, with coverage from a single administration, and up to 72 hours. Post-operative stress and recovery were assessed using welfare parameters, bodyweight, food-consumption, and fecal corticosterone, and hindpaw mechanical allodynia was tested for assessing development of neuropathic pain for 28 days.None of the analgesic regimes compromised the development of mechanical allodynia. Unexpectedly, the combined treatment with 0.1mg/kg s.c. buprenorphine and carprofen for 72 hours and local irrigation with lidocaine/bupivacaine, caused severe adverse effects with peritonitis. This was not observed when the combination included a lower dose of buprenorphine (0.05mg/kg, s.c., or when buprenorphine was administered alone (0.1mg/kg s.c. or 1.0mg/kg p.o. for 72 hours. An elevated rate of wound dehiscence was observed especially in the combined treatment groups, underlining the need for balanced analgesia. Repeated buprenorphine injections had positive effects on body weight the first day after surgery

  9. Test of a workforce development intervention to expand opioid use disorder treatment pharmacotherapy prescribers: protocol for a cluster randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfenter, Todd; Knudsen, Hannah K; Brown, Randy; Jacobson, Nora; Horst, Julie; Van Etten, Mark; Kim, Jee-Seon; Haram, Eric; Collier, Elizabeth; Starr, Sanford; Toy, Alexander; Madden, Lynn

    2017-11-15

    Overdoses due to non-medical use of prescription opioids and other opiates have become the leading cause of accidental deaths in the USA. Buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone are key evidence-based pharmacotherapies available to addiction treatment providers to address opioid use disorder (OUD) and prevent overdose deaths. Treatment organizations' efforts to provide these pharmacotherapies have, however, been stymied by limited success in recruiting providers (physicians, nurse practitioners, and physician assistants) to prescribe these medications. Historically, the addiction treatment field has not attracted physicians, and many barriers to implementing OUD pharmacotherapy exist, ranging from lack of confidence in treating OUD patients to concerns regarding reimbursement. Throughout the USA, the prevalence of OUD far exceeds the capacity of the OUD pharmacotherapy treatment system. Poor access to OUD pharmacotherapy prescribers has become a workforce development need for the addiction treatment field and a significant health issue. This cluster randomized controlled trial (RCT) is designed to increase buprenorphine and extended-release naltrexone treatment capacity for OUD. The implementation intervention to be tested is a bundle of OUD pharmacotherapy capacity building practices called the Prescriber Recruitment Bundle (PRB), which was developed and piloted in a previous statewide buprenorphine implementation study. For this cluster RCT, organizational sites will be recruited and then randomized into one of two arms: (1) control, with treatment as usual and access to a website with PRB resources, or (2) intervention, with organizations implementing the PRB using the Network for the Improvement of Addiction Treatment organizational change model over a 24-month intervention period and a 10-month sustainability period. The primary treatment outcomes for each organizational site are self-reported monthly counts of buprenorphine slots, extended

  10. Efficacy and Safety of Analgesic Treatment for Depression in People with Advanced Dementia: Randomised, Multicentre, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial (DEP.PAIN.DEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdal, Ane; Flo, Elisabeth; Aarsland, Dag; Ballard, Clive; Slettebo, Dagrun D; Husebo, Bettina S

    2018-05-03

    Chronic pain and depression often co-occur, and pain may exacerbate depression in people with dementia. The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of analgesic treatment for depression in nursing home patients with advanced dementia and clinically significant depressive symptoms. We conducted a multicentre, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in 47 nursing homes, including 162 nursing home patients aged ≥ 60 years with dementia (Mini-Mental State Examination ≤ 20) and depression (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia ≥ 8). Patients were randomised to receive active analgesic treatment (paracetamol or buprenorphine transdermal system) or identical placebo for 13 weeks. The main outcome measure was the change in depression (Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia) from baseline to 13 weeks, assessed using linear mixed models with fixed effects for time, intervention and their interaction in the models. Secondary outcomes were to assess whether any change in depression was secondary to change in pain (Mobilisation-Observation-Behaviour-Intensity-Dementia-2 Pain Scale) and adverse events. The mean depression change was - 0.66 (95% confidence interval - 2.27 to 0.94) in the active group (n = 80) and - 3.30 (- 4.68 to -1.92) in the placebo group (n = 82). The estimated treatment effect was 2.64 (0.55-4.72, p = 0.013), indicating that analgesic treatment had no effect on depressive symptoms from baseline to 13 weeks while placebo appeared to ameliorate depressive symptoms. There was no significant reduction in pain in the active treatment group (paracetamol and buprenorphine combined) vs. placebo; however, a subgroup analysis demonstrated a significant reduction in pain for paracetamol vs. placebo [by - 1.11 (- 2.16 to - 0.06, p = 0.037)] from week 6 to 13 without a change in depression. Buprenorphine did not have significant effects on depression [3.04 (- 0.11 to 6.19), p = 0

  11. The Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study: What have we learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D; Rao, Vinod

    2017-04-01

    The multi-site Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS), conducted by the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network, was the largest clinical trial yet conducted with patients dependent upon prescription opioids (N=653). In addition to main trial results, the study yielded numerous secondary analyses, and included a 3.5-year follow-up study, the first of its kind with this population. This paper reviews key findings from POATS and its follow-up study. The paper summarizes the POATS design, main outcomes, predictors of outcome, subgroup analyses, the predictive power of early treatment response, and the long-term follow-up study. POATS examined combinations of buprenorphine-naloxone of varying duration and counseling of varying intensity. The primary outcome analysis showed no overall benefit to adding drug counseling to buprenorphine-naloxone and weekly medical management. Only 7% of patients achieved a successful outcome (abstinence or near-abstinence from opioids) during a 4-week taper and 8-week follow-up; by comparison, 49% of patients achieved success while subsequently stabilized on buprenorphine-naloxone. Long-term follow-up results were more encouraging, with higher abstinence rates than in the main trial. Patients receiving opioid agonist treatment at the time of follow-up were more likely to have better outcomes, though a sizeable number of patients succeeded without agonist treatment. Some patients initiated risky use patterns, including heroin use and drug injection. A limitation of the long-term follow-up study was the low follow-up rate. POATS was the first large-scale study of the treatment of prescription opioid dependence; its findings can influence both treatment guidelines and future studies. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Analgesic Use on Inflammation and Hematology in a Murine Model of Venous Thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hish, Gerald A; Diaz, Jose A; Hawley, Angela E; Myers, Daniel D; Lester, Patrick A

    2014-01-01

    Venous thrombosis (VT) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Surgical animal models are crucial in studies investigating the pathogenesis of this disease and evaluating VT therapies. Because inflammation is critical to both the development and resolution of VT, analgesic medications have the potential to adversely affect multiple parameters of interest in VT research. The objective of this study was to determine how several common analgesics affect key variables in a murine ligation model of deep vein thrombosis. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to receive either local (bupivacaine) or systemic parenteral analgesia (buprenorphine, tramadol, or carprofen) or 0.9% NaCl (control). All mice underwent laparotomy and ligation of the inferior vena cava, and treatment was continued until euthanasia at 6 or 48 h after surgery. Analysis of harvested tissues and blood included: hematology, thrombus weight, serum and vein-wall cytokines (IL1β, IL6, IL10, TNFα), soluble P-selectin, and vein-wall leukocyte infiltration. Compared with 0.9% NaCl, all of the analgesics affected multiple parameters important to VT research. Carprofen and tramadol affected the most parameters and should not be used in murine models of VT. Although they affected fewer parameters, a single dose of bupivacaine increased thrombus weight at 6 h, and buprenorphine was associated with reduced vein wall macrophages at 48 h. Although we cannot recommend the use of any of the evaluated analgesic dosages in this mouse model of VT, buprenorphine merits additional investigation to ensure the highest level of laboratory animal care and welfare. PMID:25255071

  13. Nociceptive thermal threshold testing in horses – effect of neuroleptic sedation and neuroleptanalgesia at different stimulation sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Aim of the study was to compare the effect of neuroleptic sedation with acepromazine and neuroleptanalgesia with acepromazine and buprenorphine on thermal thresholds (TT) obtained at the nostrils and at the withers. The study was carried out as a randomized, blinded, controlled trial with cross-over design. Thermal thresholds were determined by incremental contact heat applied to the skin above the nostril (N) or the withers (W). Eleven horses were treated with saline (S), acepromazine (0.05 mg/kg) (ACE) or acepromazine and buprenorphine (0.0075 mg/kg) (AB) intravenously (IV). Single stimulations were performed 15 minutes prior and 15, 45, 75, 105, 165, 225, 285, 405 and 525 minutes after treatment. Sedation score, gastrointestinal auscultation score and occurrence of skin lesions were recorded. Data were analysed with analysis of variance for repeated measurements. Results There were no significant differences in TT between N and W with all treatments. The TT remained constant after S and there was no difference in TT between S and ACE. After AB there was a significant increase above baseline in TT until 405 minutes after treatment. Restlessness occurred 30–90 minutes after AB in 7 horses. All horses had reduced to absent borborygmi after AB administration for 165 to 495 minutes. Conclusion Thermal stimulation at both described body areas gives comparable results in the assessment of cutaneous anti-nociception in horses. There is no differential influence of neuroleptic sedation or neuroleptanalgesia on TTs obtained at N or W. Buprenorphine combined with acepromazine has a long lasting anti-nociceptive effect associated with the typical opioid induced side effects in horses. PMID:23837730

  14. Non-natural manners of death among users of illicit drugs: Substance findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaveris, Gerd Jorunn M; Teige, Brita; Rogde, Sidsel

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the study was to explore differences and similarities between the various non-natural manners of death (accident, suicide, homicide) regarding toxicological findings in illicit drug users. Medicolegal autopsy reports from the Institute of Forensic Medicine University of Oslo concerning deaths from 2000 to 2009 were investigated. Those aged 20-59 whose manner of death was non-natural and who tested positive for any narcotic drug (morphine/heroin, amphetamines, ecstasy, cannabis, LSD, PCP, and high levels of GHB in addition to methadone and buprenorphine) were selected. All substance findings were registered and categorized (narcotics, ethanol, and medicinal products). Of the 1603 autopsies that met the selection criteria, 1204 were accidental intoxications, 122 accidents other than intoxication, 114 suicides by intoxication, 119 non-intoxication suicides, and 44 victims of homicide. Poly drug use was found in all manners of death. The drug profile as well as the mean number of substances (illicit drugs and medicinal products) varied from 2.9 to 4.6 substances per case, depending on the manner of death. Intoxication suicides had the highest number of substances and a total drug profile similar to accidental intoxications. Non-intoxication suicides had a total drug profile similar to homicide and accidents other than intoxication. The number of substances found per case increased during the decade, mainly due to increased findings of methadone, cannabis, amphetamines, and benzodiazepines. Methadone findings increased much more than buprenorphine. Methadone was found 20 times more often than buprenorphine in accidental intoxication cases. In summary, poly drug findings are common in adults who suffer a non-natural death while using illicit drugs. The different manners of death have some specific characteristics and significant differences regarding drug profile. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Illicit use of opioid substitution drugs: prevalence, user characteristics, and the association with non-fatal overdoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretteville-Jensen, Anne Line; Lillehagen, Mats; Gjersing, Linn; Andreas, Jasmina Burdzovic

    2015-02-01

    Diversion of opioid substitution drugs (OSD) is of public concern. This study examined the prevalence, frequency, and predictors of illicit OSD use in a group of injecting drug users (IDUs) and assessed if such use was associated with non-fatal overdoses. Semi-annual cross-sectional interviews conducted in Oslo, Norway (2006-2013), from 1355 street-recruited IDUs. Hurdle, logistic, and multinomial regression models were employed. Overall, 27% reported illicit OSD use in the past four weeks; 16.8% methadone, 12.5% buprenorphine, and 2.9% both drugs. Almost 1/10 reported at least one non-fatal overdose in the past four weeks, and roughly 1/3 reported such experience in the past year. Use of additional drugs tended to be equally, or more prevalent among illicit OSD users than other IDUs. In terms of illicit OSD use being a risk factor for non-lethal overdoses, our results showed significant associations only for infrequent buprenorphine use (using once or less than once per week). Other factors associated with non-fatal overdoses included age, education, homelessness, as well as the benzodiazepines, stimulants, and heroin use. Users of diverted OSD may represent a high-risk population, as they used more additional drugs and used them more frequently than other IDUs. However, illicit OSD use may be less harmful than previously assumed. After accounting for an extensive set of covariates, only infrequent illicit buprenorphine use, but not methadone use, was associated with non-fatal overdoses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. State-Targeted Funding and Technical Assistance to Increase Access to Medication Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Amanda J; Andrews, Christina M; Grogan, Colleen M; Pollack, Harold A; D'Aunno, Thomas; Humphreys, Keith; Friedmann, Peter D

    2018-04-01

    As the United States grapples with an opioid epidemic, expanding access to effective treatment for opioid use disorder is a major public health priority. Identifying effective policy tools that can be used to expand access to care is critically important. This article examines the relationship between state-targeted funding and technical assistance and adoption of three medications for treating opioid use disorder: oral naltrexone, injectable naltrexone, and buprenorphine. This study draws from the 2013-2014 wave of the National Drug Abuse Treatment System Survey, a nationally representative, longitudinal study of substance use disorder treatment programs. The sample includes data from 695 treatment programs (85.5% response rate) and representatives from single-state agencies in 49 states and Washington, D.C. (98% response rate). Logistic regression was used to examine the relationships of single-state agency targeted funding and technical assistance to availability of opioid use disorder medications among treatment programs. State-targeted funding was associated with increased program-level adoption of oral naltrexone (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]=3.14, 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.49-6.60, p=.004) and buprenorphine (AOR=2.47, 95% CI=1.31-4.67, p=.006). Buprenorphine adoption was also correlated with state technical assistance to support medication provision (AOR=1.18, 95% CI=1.00-1.39, p=.049). State-targeted funding for medications may be a viable policy lever for increasing access to opioid use disorder medications. Given the historically low rates of opioid use disorder medication adoption in treatment programs, single-state agency targeted funding is a potentially important tool to reduce mortality and morbidity associated with opioid disorders and misuse.

  17. Opioid dependence - management in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Matthew

    2010-08-01

    Addiction to opioids, or opioid dependence, encompasses the biopsychosocial dysfunction seen in illicit heroin injectors, as well as aberrant behaviours in patients prescribed opioids for chronic nonmalignant pain. To outline the management of opioid dependence using opioid pharmacotherapy as part of a comprehensive chronic illness management strategy. The same principles and skills general practitioners employ in chronic illness management underpin the care of patients with opioid dependence. Opioid pharmacotherapy, with the substitution medications methadone and buprenorphine, is an effective management of opioid dependence. Training and regulatory requirements for prescribing opioid pharmacotherapies vary between jurisdictions, but this treatment should be within the scope of most Australian GPs.

  18. Pharmacotherapy for opioid dependence in jails and prisons: research review update and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma A

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Anjalee Sharma,1 Kevin E O'Grady,1,2 Sharon M Kelly,1 Jan Gryczynski,1 Shannon Gwin Mitchell,1 Robert P Schwartz1 1Friends Research Institute, Baltimore, 2Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA Purpose: The World Health Organization recommends the initiation of opioid agonists prior to release from incarceration to prevent relapse or overdose. Many countries in the world employ these strategies. This paper considers the evidence to support these recommendations and the factors that have slowed their adoption in the US. Methods: We reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs and longitudinal/observational studies that examine participant outcomes associated with the initiation or continuation of opioid agonists (methadone, buprenorphine or antagonists (naltrexone during incarceration. Papers were identified through a literature search of PubMed with an examination of their references and were included if they reported outcomes for methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone continued during incarceration or initiated prior to release in a correctional institution. Results: Fourteen studies were identified, including eight RCTs and six observational studies. One RCT found that patients treated with methadone who were continued on versus tapered off methadone during brief incarceration were more likely to return to treatment upon release. A second RCT found that the group starting methadone treatment in prison versus a waiting list was less likely to report using heroin and sharing syringes during incarceration. A third RCT found no differences in postrelease heroin use or reincarceration between individuals initiating treatment with methadone versus those initiating treatment with buprenorphine during relatively brief incarcerations. Findings from four additional RCTs indicate that starting opioid agonist treatment during incarceration versus after release was associated with higher rates of entry into community

  19. Challenges and Opportunities for the Use of Medications to Treat Opioid Addiction in the United States and Other Nations of the World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrino, Mark W; Maremmani, Angelo Giovanni Icro; Samuels, Paul N; Maremmani, Icro

    2015-01-01

    There has been a well documented increase in the use and abuse of prescription opioids and heroin in the United States and other parts of the world. There has also been an increasing focus to increase access to the use of medications (methadone, buprenorphine, Naltrexone/Vivitrol) for opioid addicted individuals under legal supervision. As policymakers engage in strategic initiatives to better prevent and effectively treat chronic opioid addiction, both in the United States and other countries, there are a number of unintended consequences, complicating how best to increase access to effective treatment.

  20. Stroke from Vasospasm due to Marijuana Use: Can Cannabis Synergistically with Other Medications Trigger Cerebral Vasospasm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marium Jamil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of imaging proven cerebral vasospasm causing ischemic stroke in a young patient chronically on buprenorphine-naloxone for heroin remission who started smoking cannabis on a daily basis. With cannabis legalization spreading across the states in the USA, it is important for physicians not only to be aware of cannabis reported association with cerebral vasospasm in some patients but also to be on the lookout for possible interacting medications that can synergistically affect cerebral vessels causing debilitating strokes.

  1. Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, Mary Beth; Leeman, Lawrence; Hsi, Andrew

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal opioid withdrawal syndrome is common due to the current opioid addiction epidemic. Infants born to women covertly abusing prescription opioids may not be identified as at risk until withdrawal signs present. Buprenorphine is a newer treatment for maternal opioid addiction and appears to result in a milder withdrawal syndrome than methadone. Initial treatment is with nonpharmacological measures including decreasing stimuli, however pharmacological treatment is commonly required. Opioid monotherapy is preferred, with phenobarbital or clonidine uncommonly needed as adjunctive therapy. Rooming-in and breastfeeding may decease the severity of withdrawal. Limited evidence is available regarding long-term effects of perinatal opioid exposure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessing Need for Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opiate-Dependent Prison Inmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albizu-García, Carmen E.; Caraballo, José Noel; Caraballo-Correa, Glorimar; Hernández-Viver, Adriana; Román-Badenas, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with a history of heroin dependence are overrepresented in American correctional facilities and 75% of inmates with a drug use disorder do not receive treatment during incarceration or after release. Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) with opiate agonists, such as methadone or buprenorphine, constitute standard of care; to guide planning for an expansion of drug treatment services in correctional facilities, a needs assessment was conducted at the Department of Correction and Rehabilitation (DCR) of Puerto Rico (PR). We report on the research process, the findings that informed our recommendations for the PCR to expand MAT for eligible inmates, and lessons learned. PMID:22263714

  3. Long term Suboxone™ emotional reactivity as measured by automatic detection in speech.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Hill

    Full Text Available Addictions to illicit drugs are among the nation's most critical public health and societal problems. The current opioid prescription epidemic and the need for buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone®; SUBX as an opioid maintenance substance, and its growing street diversion provided impetus to determine affective states ("true ground emotionality" in long-term SUBX patients. Toward the goal of effective monitoring, we utilized emotion-detection in speech as a measure of "true" emotionality in 36 SUBX patients compared to 44 individuals from the general population (GP and 33 members of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA. Other less objective studies have investigated emotional reactivity of heroin, methadone and opioid abstinent patients. These studies indicate that current opioid users have abnormal emotional experience, characterized by heightened response to unpleasant stimuli and blunted response to pleasant stimuli. However, this is the first study to our knowledge to evaluate "true ground" emotionality in long-term buprenorphine/naloxone combination (Suboxone™. We found in long-term SUBX patients a significantly flat affect (p<0.01, and they had less self-awareness of being happy, sad, and anxious compared to both the GP and AA groups. We caution definitive interpretation of these seemingly important results until we compare the emotional reactivity of an opioid abstinent control using automatic detection in speech. These findings encourage continued research strategies in SUBX patients to target the specific brain regions responsible for relapse prevention of opioid addiction.

  4. Carprofen for perioperative analgesia causes early anastomotic leakage in the rat ileum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vijver, Rozemarijn J; van Laarhoven, Cees J H M; Lomme, Roger M L M; Hendriks, Thijs

    2012-12-27

    There is increasing evidence that perioperative use of NSAIDs may compromise the integrity of intestinal anastomoses. This study aims to characterize the negative effects of carprofen on early anastomotic healing in the rat ileum. In 159 male Wistar rats an anastomosis was constructed in the ileum. In experiment 1 eighty-four rats were divided over control and experimental groups, which received daily buprenorphine or carprofen, respectively, as an analgesic and were killed on day 1, 2 or 3 after surgery. In experiment 2 three groups of 15 rats received carprofen either immediately after surgery or with a delay of 1 or 2 days. Animals were killed after 3 days of carprofen administration. In experiment 3 three groups of 10 rats received different doses (full, half or quarter) of carprofen from surgery. In significant contrast to buprenorphine, which never did so, carprofen induced frequent signs of anastomotic leakage, which were already present at day 1. If first administration was delayed for 48 hours, the leakage rate was significantly reduced (from 80 to 20%; p = 0.0028). Throughout the study, the anastomotic bursting pressure was lowest in animals who displayed signs of anastomotic leakage. Loss of anastomotic integrity did not coincide with reduced levels of hydroxyproline or increased activity of matrix metalloproteinases. Carprofen interferes with wound healing in the rat ileum at a very early stage. Although the mechanisms responsible remain to be fully elucidated, one should be aware of the potential of NSAIDs to interfere with the early phase of wound repair.

  5. Using the Mouse Grimace Scale to Reevaluate the Efficacy of Postoperative Analgesics in Laboratory Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumiya, Lynn C; Sorge, Robert E; Sotocinal, Susana G; Tabaka, John M; Wieskopf, Jeffrey S; Zaloum, Austin; King, Oliver D; Mogil, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative pain management in animals is complicated greatly by the inability to recognize pain. As a result, the choice of analgesics and their doses has been based on extrapolation from greatly differing pain models or the use of measures with unclear relevance to pain. We recently developed the Mouse Grimace Scale (MGS), a facial-expression–based pain coding system adapted directly from scales used in nonverbal human populations. The MGS has shown to be a reliable, highly accurate measure of spontaneous pain of moderate duration, and therefore is particularly useful in the quantification of postoperative pain. In the present study, we quantified the relative intensity and duration of postoperative pain after a sham ventral ovariectomy (laparotomy) in outbred mice. In addition, we compiled dose–response data for 4 commonly used analgesics: buprenorphine, carprofen, ketoprofen, and acetaminophen. We found that postoperative pain in mice, as defined by facial grimacing, lasts for 36 to 48 h, and appears to show relative exacerbation during the early dark (active) photophase. We find that buprenorphine was highly effective in inhibiting postoperative pain-induced facial grimacing in mice at doses equal to or lower than current recommendations, that carprofen and ketoprofen are effective only at doses markedly higher than those currently recommended, and that acetaminophen was ineffective at any dose used. We suggest the revision of practices for postoperative pain management in mice in light of these findings. PMID:22330867

  6. Effects of Multimodal Analgesia on the Success of Mouse Embryo Transfer Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, John M.; Austin, Jamie; Wilkerson, James; Carbone, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Multimodal analgesia is promoted as the best practice pain management for invasive animal research procedures. Universal acceptance and incorporation of multimodal analgesia requires assessing potential effects on study outcome. The focus of this study was to assess effects on embryo survival after multimodal analgesia comprising an opioid and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug (NSAID) compared with opioid-only analgesia during embryo transfer procedures in transgenic mouse production. Mice were assigned to receive either carprofen (5 mg/kg) with buprenorphine (0.1 mg/kg; CB) or vehicle with buprenorphine (0.1 mg/kg; VB) in a prospective, double-blinded placebo controlled clinical trial. Data were analyzed in surgical sets of 1 to 3 female mice receiving embryos chimeric for a shared targeted embryonic stem-cell clone and host blastocyst cells. A total of 99 surgical sets were analyzed, comprising 199 Crl:CD1 female mice and their 996 offspring. Neither yield (pups weaned per embryo implanted in the surgical set) nor birth rate (average number of pups weaned per dam in the set) differed significantly between the CB and VB conditions. Multimodal opioid–NSAID analgesia appears to have no significant positive or negative effect on the success of producing novel lines of transgenic mice by blastocyst transfer. PMID:21838973

  7. Preemptive carprofen for peri-operative analgesia in dogs undergoing Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO): a prospective, randomized, blinded, placebo controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufalari, A; Maggio, C; Cerasoli, I; Morath, U; Adami, C

    2012-03-01

    Eighteen client-owned dogs undergoing Tibial Plateau Leveling Osteotomy (TPLO) were included in this blinded clinical study and randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups. Group C (carprofen) received intravenous (IV) carprofen, 4 mg/kg, prior to anesthesia, whereas group P (placebo) received IV saline. General anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and a constant rate infusion (CRI) of sufentanyl IV. Intra-operatively, assessment of nociception was based on changes in physiological parameters and on the analgesics requirement, whereas in the post-operative period evaluation of pain was performed by using a Hellyer and Gaynor pain score and by comparing the doses of rescue buprenorphine required by the two treatment groups. Although no statistically significant differences in intra-operative sufentanyl doses were found between treatment groups, group C had superior cardiovascular stability, and lower post-operative pain scores and rescue buprenorphine doses than group P. Our results indicate that administration of carprofen prior to surgery was effective in improving peri-operative analgesia in dogs undergoing TPLO.

  8. Hypothetical intertemporal choice and real economic behavior: delay discounting predicts voucher redemptions during contingency-management procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Warren K; Jones, Bryan A; Landes, Reid D; Christensen, Darren R; Jackson, Lisa; Mancino, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Delay discounting rates are predictive of drug use status, the likelihood of becoming abstinent, and a variety of health behaviors. Rates of delay discounting may also be related to other relevant behaviors associated with addiction, such as the frequency at which individuals redeem contingency management voucher earnings. This study examined the discounting rates of 152 participants in a buprenorphine treatment program for opioid abuse. Participants received up to 12 weeks of buprenorphine treatment combined with contingency management. Participant's drug use was measured via urine specimens submitted three times a week. Successive negative urine specimens were reinforced with increasing amounts of money. After each negative urine specimen, a participant could either redeem his or her earnings or accumulate it in an account. Analysis of the frequency of redemptions showed that participants with higher rates of delay discounting at study intake redeemed their earnings significantly more often than participants with lower rates of discounting. Age and income also predicted redemption rates. We suggest that delay discounting rates can be used to predict redemption behaviors in a contingency management treatment program and that these findings are consistent with the recent theory of the competing neurobehavioral decision systems. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. October 2016 critical care case of the month

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fountain S

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. A 27-year-old Caucasian man with past medical history of opioid abuse (reportedly sober for 10 years on buprenorphine, post traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety presented to the emergency department complaining of dysarthria after taking diphenhydramine and meclizine in addition to his prescribed trazodone and buprenorphine to try to sleep. He was discharged to home after his symptoms appeared to improve with intravenous fluid. He returned to the emergency department the following afternoon with worsening dysarthria, dysphagia, and subjective weakness. The patient was non toxic appearing, afebrile, vital signs were stable and his strength was reported as 5/5. Computed tomography of his head did not show any evidence of acute intracranial abnormality. Given his ongoing complaints, he was admitted for observation to the general medicine wards. That night a rapid response was initiated when the nurse found the patient to be unresponsive, but spontaneously breathing. The patient’s clinical status did ...

  10. [Management of opioid maintenance treatments when analgesic treatments are required].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laprevote, Vincent; Geoffroy, Pierre A; Rolland, Benjamin; Leheup, Benoît F; Di Patrizio, Paolo; Cottencin, Olivier; Schwan, Raymund

    2013-01-01

    Opioid maintenance treatments (OMT) reduce illicit opiate use and its associated risks. They are often prescribed on a long-term basis. Physiological changes induced by long-term OMT may cause hyperalgesia and cross-tolerance to opioid agonists, which suggests that the dosage of analgesic treatment should be modified in cases of acute pain, especially when an opioid-based analgesia is required. When treatment with analgesics is necessary, OMT must be maintained, except in exceptional cases. If a split-dosing schedule is temporarily employed during OMT, the daily dosage should not be increased for analgesic purposes. Analgesic treatment must be managed differently in case of treatment with buprenorphine or methadone. With buprenorphine, non-opioid analgesics should be introduced first, if possible. If this strategy is inefficient or contraindicated, a temporary or definitive switch to methadone should be considered. In the case of methadone-based OMT, opioid analgesics should be added directly and the dosage should be adapted according to the level of pain reported by the patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. [Opiate addiction in gravidity - consequences for the newborn. Results of an interdisciplinary treatment concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrmeister, K; Bernert, G; Langer, M; Fischer, G; Weninger, M; Pollak, A

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the outcome of infants of drug dependent mothers (IDM) after establishing an interdisciplinary attention concept at the University Hospital in Vienna. To compare the influence of different maintenance agents on neonatal morbidity. All newborns of opiate dependent mothers were prospectively included from III 1995 to IX 1999. The following data were collected: maintenance agent (methadone, slow release morphine, buprenorphine), infectious status, demographic data, congenital malformations, perinatal complications, as well as incidence and duration of the neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Medical treatment with phenobarbital (1995 - 96) or morphine hydrochloride (MoHCl) (1997 - 99), respectively, was indicated when Finnegan score exceeded 10. 88 neonates (38 females/50 males) with a median gestational age of 39 weeks were included, 18 (20.5 %) were born prematurely. The median birthweight was 2905 g, 24 (27.3 %) infants were small for date (methadone group 76 %, in the morphine group 93 %, but in the buprenorphine group 19 % only (p methadone and morphine exposure (8.3 d versus 15 d and 16.5 d respectively). In neonates treated with phenobarbital duration of NAS was 17.6 d, whereas NAS in infants with MoHCl therapy lasted 12.8 d (p methadone and morphine exposure. Withdrawal time under morphin-hydrochloride therapy was reduced by one third compared to treatment with phenobarbital.

  12. No-carrier-added (NCA) N-(3-( sup 18 F)fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine and N-(3-( sup 18 F)fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine -synthesis, anatomical distribution in mice and rats, and tomographic studies in a baboon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Lanqin; Teng, Renrui; Shiue, Chyngyann; Wolf, A P; Dewey, S L [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA); Holland, M J; Simon, E J [New York Univ., NY (USA). Medical Center

    1990-01-01

    N-(3-Fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine (3a) and N-(3-fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine (4a) were synthesized by N-alkylation of norbuprenorphine (1) and nordiprenorphine (2) with 1-bromo-3-fluoropropane. The corresponding no-carrier-added (NCA) N-(3-({sup 18}F)fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine (3b) and N-(3-({sup 18}F)fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine (4b) were synthesized by N-alkylation of 1 and 2 with NCA 1-({sup 18}F)fluoro-3-iodopropane. In vitro studies indicate that in the absence of sodium chloride, compounds 3a, 4a, N-propyl-N-norbuprenorphine (5), buprenorphine and diprenorphine are reasonably comparable in binding affinity for opioid receptors. In the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride, however, compounds 3a, 4a and 5, are clearly less potent than buprenorphine and diprenorphine. The anatomical distribution study of compound 3b in mice shows radioactivity accumulating in bone. Rat studies of both compounds 3b and 4b indicate the specific distribution of these two radioligands within certain cortical and subcortical regions of rat brain. However, the absolute uptake of compound 4b in rat brain was only half that of compound 3b. PET studies of 3b in a baboon revealed specific binding of compound 3b in striatum and cerebellum. At 1 h after injection, ratios of specific/non-specific binding of 3b in striatum and cerebellum of a baboon were 1.9 and 1.7 respectively. (author).

  13. No-carrier-added (NCA) N-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine and N-(3-[18F]fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine -synthesis, anatomical distribution in mice and rats, and tomographic studies in a baboon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lanqin Bai; Renrui Teng; Chyngyann Shiue; Wolf, A.P.; Dewey, S.L.; Holland, M.J.; Simon, E.J.

    1990-01-01

    N-(3-Fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine (3a) and N-(3-fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine (4a) were synthesized by N-alkylation of norbuprenorphine (1) and nordiprenorphine (2) with 1-bromo-3-fluoropropane. The corresponding no-carrier-added (NCA) N-(3-[ 18 F]fluoropropyl)-N-norbuprenorphine (3b) and N-(3-[ 18 F]fluoropropyl)-N-nordiprenorphine (4b) were synthesized by N-alkylation of 1 and 2 with NCA 1-[ 18 F]fluoro-3-iodopropane. In vitro studies indicate that in the absence of sodium chloride, compounds 3a, 4a, N-propyl-N-norbuprenorphine (5), buprenorphine and diprenorphine are reasonably comparable in binding affinity for opioid receptors. In the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride, however, compounds 3a, 4a and 5, are clearly less potent than buprenorphine and diprenorphine. The anatomical distribution study of compound 3b in mice shows radioactivity accumulating in bone. Rat studies of both compounds 3b and 4b indicate the specific distribution of these two radioligands within certain cortical and subcortical regions of rat brain. However, the absolute uptake of compound 4b in rat brain was only half that of compound 3b. PET studies of 3b in a baboon revealed specific binding of compound 3b in striatum and cerebellum. At 1 h after injection, ratios of specific/non-specific binding of 3b in striatum and cerebellum of a baboon were 1.9 and 1.7 respectively. (author)

  14. Opioids Switching with Transdermal Systems in Chronic Cancer Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbarisi M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to tolerance development and adverse side effects, chronic pain patients frequently need to be switched to alternative opioid therapy Objective To assess the efficacy and tolerability of an alternative transdermally applied (TDS opioid in patients with chronic cancer pain receiving insufficient analgesia using their present treatment. Methods A total of 32 patients received alternative opioid therapy, 16 were switched from buprenorphine to fentanyl and 16 were switched from fentanyl to buprenorphine. The dosage used was 50% of that indicated in equipotency conversion tables. Pain relief was assessed at weekly intervals for the next 3 weeks Results Pain relief as assessed by VAS, PPI, and PRI significantly improved (p Conclusion Opioid switching at 50% of the calculated equianalgesic dose produced a significant reduction in pain levels and rescue medication. The incidence of side effects decreased and no new side effects were noted. Further studies are required to provide individualized treatment for patients according to their different types of cancer.

  15. Risks and realities: dyadic interaction between 6-month-old infants and their mothers in opioid maintenance treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfi, Monica; Smith, Lars; Waal, Helge; Sundet, Jon Martin

    2011-12-01

    A number of studies point to methadone exposure in utero as a possible risk factor in the developing mother-infant relationship in the first year of life. This study is part of a larger, national follow-up of 38 infants prenatally exposed to methadone or buprenorphine and 36 comparison, low-risk infants. The aim of the present paper is to assess the quality of mother-infant relationship when the infants are 6 months old. Videotaped mother-infant interactions were rated in a global scale (NICHD). Maternal and infant contributions collapsed into the variables "infant style" and "maternal style" showed that the only factor making significant contribution to the outcome measure "dyadic mutuality" was maternal style. The importance of group membership (exposed versus non-exposed), was reduced when controlling for maternal drug use prior to opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), maternal depression and parenting stress as well as infants' developmental status and sensory-integrative functions. This suggests that prediction of dyadic mutuality should be based on individual characteristics rather than group characteristics. These results support previous research findings that methadone and buprenorphine use per se does not have direct influence on the quality of early mother-infant relationship, but tailored follow-up procedures targeting drug-free pregnancies and parenting support are beneficial for women in OMT and their children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Misleading Drugs with Street Name Temgesic and Norgesic in Hand of Iranian Drug Abusers; What Are Their True Natures?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Solhi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The illicit vials with street name Temgesic and Norgesic has been distributed in black market of Iran in recent years. With reference to their name, one may presume that they contain the opioid Buprenorphine; but there are some reports in opposition to this. True nature of these vials has been shown in the current study. Methods: All of drugs that had been apprehended by law enforcement police in Arak city in center of Iran during March 2010 to September 2010 were included in the study. Totally 31 samples were analyzed. The samples were examined using thin layer chromatography (TLC method. Gas chromatography with mass Spectrophotometry (GC-MS or high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC methods were used to confirm the results. Results: All of the samples contained opioids include Heroin, Morphine, Codeine, Mono acetyl morphine and Acetyl codeine with varying proportions. In addition, pheniramine, amitriptyline and caffeine were found in some samples. There was no Buprenorphine in the samples. Presence of the steroid Dexamethasone in the samples was shown too. Conclusion: When the physicians treat the patients with acute or long-term complications of Temgesic and Norgesic abuse, they should mull over true nature of the vials; not their disingenuous street name.

  17. Efficacy of Tramadol Extended-Release for Opioid Withdrawal: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Kelly E; Tompkins, D Andrew; Bigelow, George E; Strain, Eric C

    2017-09-01

    Opioid use disorder (OUD) is a significant public health problem. Supervised withdrawal (ie, detoxification) from opioids using clonidine or buprenorphine hydrochloride is a widely used treatment. To evaluate whether tramadol hydrochloride extended-release (ER), an approved analgesic with opioid and nonopioid mechanisms of action and low abuse potential, is effective for use in supervised withdrawal settings. A randomized clinical trial was conducted in a residential research setting with 103 participants with OUD. Participants' treatment was stabilized with morphine, 30 mg, administered subcutaneously 4 times daily. A 7-day taper using clonidine (n = 36), tramadol ER (n = 36), or buprenorphine (n = 31) was then instituted, and patients were crossed-over to double-blind placebo during a post-taper period. The study was conducted from October 25, 2010, to June 23, 2015. Retention, withdrawal symptom management, concomitant medication utilization, and naltrexone induction. Results were analyzed over time and using area under the curve for the intention-to-treat and completer groups. Of the 103 participants, 88 (85.4%) were men and 43 (41.7%) were white; mean (SD) age was 28.9 (10.4) years. Buprenorphine participants (28 [90.3%]) were significantly more likely to be retained at the end of the taper compared with clonidine participants (22 [61.1%]); tramadol ER retention was intermediate and did not differ significantly from that of the other groups (26 [72.2%]; χ2 = 8.5, P = .01). Time-course analyses of withdrawal revealed significant effects of phase (taper, post taper) for the Clinical Opiate Withdrawal Scale (COWS) score (taper mean, 5.19 [SE, .26]; post-taper mean, 3.97 [SE, .23]; F2,170 = 3.6, P = .03) and Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale (SOWS) score (taper mean,8.81 [SE, .40]; post-taper mean, 4.14 [SE, .30]; F2,170 = 15.7, P withdrawal severity between the taper and post-taper periods for clonidine (taper mean, 13.1; post

  18. Trends in Opioid Use Disorder Diagnoses and Medication Treatment Among Veterans With Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiner, Brian; Leonard Westgate, Christine; Bernardy, Nancy C; Schnurr, Paula P; Watts, Bradley V

    2017-01-01

    Despite long-standing interest in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and opioid use disorder comorbidity, there is a paucity of data on the prevalence of opioid use disorder in patients with PTSD. Therefore, there is limited understanding of the use of medications for opioid use disorder in this population. We determined the prevalence of diagnosed opioid use disorder and use of medications for opioid use disorder in a large cohort of patients with PTSD. We obtained administrative and pharmacy data for veterans who initiated PTSD treatment in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) between 2004 and 2013 (N = 731,520). We identified those with a comorbid opioid use disorder diagnosis (2.7%; n = 19,998) and determined whether they received a medication for opioid use disorder in the year following their initial clinical PTSD diagnosis (29.6%; n = 5,913). Using logistic regression, we determined the predictors of receipt of opioid use disorder medications. Comorbid opioid use disorder diagnoses increased from 2.5% in 2004 to 3.4% in 2013. Patients with comorbid opioid use disorder used more health services and had more comorbidities than other patients with PTSD. Among patients with PTSD and comorbid opioid use disorder, use of medications for opioid use disorder increased from 22.6% to 35.1% during the same time period. Growth in the use of buprenorphine (2.0% to 22.7%) was accompanied by relative decline in use of methadone (19.3% to 12.7%). Patients who received buprenorphine were younger and more likely to be rural, White, and married. Patients who received methadone were older, urban, unmarried, from racial and ethnic minorities, and more likely to see substance abuse specialists. While use of naltrexone increased (2.8% to 8.6%), most (87%) patients who received naltrexone also had an alcohol use disorder. Controlling for patient factors, there was a substantial increase in the use of buprenorphine, a substantial decrease in the use of methadone, and no change

  19. Prepubertal gonadectomy in cats: different injectable anaesthetic combinations and comparison with gonadectomy at traditional age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porters, Nathalie; de Rooster, Hilde; Moons, Christel P H; Duchateau, Luc; Goethals, Klara; Bosmans, Tim; Polis, Ingeborgh

    2015-06-01

    Anaesthetic and analgesic effects of three different injectable anaesthetic combinations for prepubertal gonadectomy (PPG) in cats were studied. One anaesthetic protocol was compared with a similar one for gonadectomy at traditional age (TAG). Kittens were randomly assigned to PPG or TAG. For PPG, three different protocols were compared: (1) intramuscular (IM) administration of 60 μg/kg dexmedetomidine plus 20 μg/kg buprenorphine followed by an IM injection of the anaesthetic agent (20 mg/kg ketamine) (DB-IM protocol); (2) oral transmucosal (OTM) administration of 80 μg/kg dexmedetomidine plus 20 μg/kg buprenorphine followed by an IM injection of 20 mg/kg ketamine combined with 20 µg/kg dexmedetomidine (DB-OTM protocol); (3) IM injection of a 40 μg/kg medetomidine-20 μg/kg buprenorphine-20 mg/kg ketamine combination (MBK-IM protocol). For TAG, a DB-IM protocol was used, but with different doses for dexmedetomidine (40 μg/kg) and ketamine (5 mg/kg). All cats (PPG and TAG) received a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory before surgery. Anaesthetic and analgesic effects were assessed pre- and postoperatively (until 6 h). Cumulative logit, linear and logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. Compared with the DB-OTM protocol, the DB-IM and MBK-IM protocols provided better anaesthesia with fewer adverse effects in PPG cats. Postoperative pain was not significantly different between anaesthetic protocols. PPG and TAG cats anaesthetised with the two DB-IM protocols differed significantly only for sedation and pain scores, but sedation and pain scores were generally low. Although there were no anaesthesia-related mortalities in the present study and all anaesthetic protocols for PPG in cats provided a surgical plane of anaesthesia and analgesia up to 6 h postoperatively, our findings were in favour of the intramuscular (DB-IM and MBK-IM) protocols. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  20. Long-Term Pain Treatment Did Not Improve Sleep in Nursing Home Patients with Comorbid Dementia and Depression: A 13-Week Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjersti M. Blytt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Previous research indicates that pain treatment may improve sleep among nursing home patients. We aimed to investigate the long-term effect of pain treatment on 24-h sleep patterns in patients with comorbid depression and dementia.Design: A 13-week, multicenter, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial conducted between August 2014 and September 2016.Setting: Long-term patients from 47 nursing homes in Norway.Participants: We included 106 patients with comorbid dementia and depression according to the Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE and the Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia (CSDD.Intervention: Patients who were not using analgesics were randomized to receive either paracetamol (3 g/day or placebo tablets. Those who already received pain treatment were randomized to buprenorphine transdermal system (maximum 10 μg/h/7 days or placebo transdermal patches.Measurements: Sleep was assessed continuously for 7 days by actigraphy, at baseline and in week 13. Total sleep time (TST, sleep efficiency (SE, sleep onset latency (SOL, wake after sleep onset (WASO, early morning awakening (EMA, and number of wake bouts (NoW were evaluated. In addition, daytime total sleep time (DTS was estimated. Pain was assessed with Mobilization-Observation-Behavior-Intensity-Dementia-2 Pain Scale (MOBID-2.Results: The linear mixed model analyses for TST, SE, SOL, WASO, EMA, NoW and DTS showed no statistically significant differences between patients who received active pain treatment and those who received placebo. Post hoc subgroup analyses showed that there were no statistically significant differences between active treatment and placebo from baseline to week 13 in patients who were in pain (MOBID-2 ≥ 3 at baseline, or in patients who had poor sleep (defined as SE < 85% at baseline. Patients who received active buprenorphine showed an increase in TST and SE compared to those who received active paracetamol

  1. Impact of anesthesia, analgesia, and euthanasia technique on the inflammatory cytokine profile in a rodent model of severe burn injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mousawi, Ahmed M; Kulp, Gabriela A; Branski, Ludwik K; Kraft, Robert; Mecott, Gabriel A; Williams, Felicia N; Herndon, David N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2010-09-01

    Anesthetics used in burn and trauma animal models may be influencing results by modulating inflammatory and acute-phase responses. Accordingly, we determined the effects of various anesthetics, analgesia, and euthanasia techniques in a rodent burn model. Isoflurane (ISO), ketamine-xylazine (KX), or pentobarbital (PEN) with or without buprenorphine were administered before scald-burn in 72 rats that were euthanized without anesthesia by decapitation after 24 h and compared with unburned shams. In a second experiment, 120 rats underwent the same scald-burn injury using KX, and 24 h later were euthanized under anesthesia or carbon dioxide (CO2). In addition, we compared euthanasia by exsanguination with that of decapitation. Serum cytokine levels were determined by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In the first experiment, ISO was associated with elevation of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 2 (CINC-2) and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and KX and PEN was associated with elevation of CINC-1,CINC-2, IL-6, and MCP-1. Pentobarbital also decreased IL-1". IL-6 increased significantly when ISO or PEN were combined with buprenorphine. In the second experiment, euthanasia performed by exsanguination under ISO was associated with reduced levels of IL-1", CINC-1, CINC-2, and MCP-1, whereas KX reduced CINC-2 and increased IL-6 levels. Meanwhile, PEN reduced levels of IL-1" and MCP-1, and CO2 reduced CINC-2 and MCP-1. In addition,decapitation after KX, PEN, or CO2 decreased IL-1" and MCP-1, although we found no significant difference between ISO and controls. Euthanasia by exsanguination compared with decapitation using the same agent also led to modulation of several cytokines. Differential expression of inflammatory markers with the use of anesthetics and analgesics should be considered when designing animal studies and interpreting results because these seem to have a significant modulating impact. Our findings indicate that brief anesthesia with ISO

  2. Fatal poisoning in drug addicts in the Nordic countries in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonsen, K Wiese; Edvardsen, H M E; Thelander, G; Ojanperä, I; Thordardottir, S; Andersen, L V; Kriikku, P; Vindenes, V; Christoffersen, D; Delaveris, G J M; Frost, J

    2015-03-01

    This report is a follow-up to a study on fatal poisoning in drug addicts conducted in 2012 by a Nordic working group. Here we analyse data from the five Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. Data on sex, number of deaths, places of death, age, main intoxicants and other drugs detected in the blood were recorded. National data are presented and compared between the Nordic countries and with data from similar studies conducted in 1991, 1997, 2002 and 2007. The death rates (number of deaths per 100,000 inhabitants) increased in drug addicts in Finland, Iceland and Sweden but decreased in Norway compared to the rates in earlier studies. The death rate was stable in Denmark from 1991 to 2012. The death rate remained highest in Norway (5.79) followed by Denmark (5.19) and Iceland (5.16). The differences between the countries diminished compared to earlier studies, with death rates in Finland (4.61) and Sweden (4.17) approaching the levels in the other countries. Women accounted for 15-27% of the fatal poisonings. The median age of the deceased drug addicts was still highest in Denmark, and deaths of addicts >45 years old increased in all countries. Opioids remained the main cause of death, but medicinal opioids like methadone, buprenorphine, fentanyl and tramadol mainly replaced heroin. Methadone was the main intoxicant in Denmark and Sweden, whereas heroin/morphine caused the most deaths in Norway. Finland differed from the other Nordic countries in that buprenorphine was the main intoxicant with only a few heroin/morphine and methadone deaths. Deaths from methadone, buprenorphine and fentanyl increased immensely in Sweden compared to 2007. Poly-drug use was widespread in all countries. The median number of drugs per case varied from 4 to 5. Heroin/morphine, medicinal opioids, cocaine, amphetamines, benzodiazepines and alcohol were the main abused drugs. However, less widely used drugs, like gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB), methylphenidate

  3. A longitudinal study of organizational formation, innovation adoption, and dissemination activities within the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Paul M; Abraham, Amanda J; Rothrauff, Tanja C; Knudsen, Hannah K

    2010-06-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse established the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network (CTN) to conduct trials of promising substance abuse treatment interventions in diverse clinical settings and to disseminate results of these trials. This article focuses on three dimensions of CTN's organizational functioning. First, a longitudinal dataset is used to examine CTN's formation as a network of interorganizational interaction among treatment practitioners and researchers. Data indicate strong relationships of interaction and trust, but a decline in problem-centered interorganizational interaction over time. Second, adoption of buprenorphine and motivational incentives among CTN's affiliated community treatment programs (CTPs) is examined over three waves of data. Although adoption is found to increase with CTPs' CTN participation, there is only modest evidence of widespread penetration and implementation. Third, CTPs' pursuit of the CTN's dissemination goals are examined, indicating that such organizational outreach activities are underway and likely to increase innovation diffusion in the future.

  4. Opium Syrup Distribution, Limitation and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Dahmardehei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Addiction is one of dilemmas in the current society. Formal statistics report of 2 million addict people in the country. Among important activities for addiction prevention and therapy is implementation of protecting treatment. Protecting treatments are done through Methadone, Buprenorphine and tincture-opium. Tincture-opium is a solution of 10 g morphine in one litter liquid containing 20% alcohol. The first report about using this medicine has been in 1994, in French in connection with successful therapy of 18 patients. A study in Australia, in 2004, proposed detoxification with tincture-opium in 15 migrated Vietnamese, in high dosage for therapy. In Iran, since 1384 many researches were done, which 34% responded the therapy appropriately; and in 1387, 130 people reached final treatment.

  5. A fatal poisoning involving 2-fluorofentanyl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mette Findal; Hardlei, Tore Forsingdal; Rosendal, Ingrid

    Background/introduction: A fatal intoxication involving 2-fluorofentanyl, a potent synthetic opioid analgesic, is reported. This is the first serious case associated with 2-fluorofentanyl that to our knowledge have been reported. 2-fluorofentanyl is the common name for N-(2-fluorophenyl)-N-[1...... and gastric content samples were submitted for toxicological examination; all samples were screened by ultra-performance liquid chromatography high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-HR-TOFMS) and quantified by specific UPLC-MS/MS methods. Powder recovered from the scene of death was identified......-mortem femoral blood concentrations found were: 2-fluorofentanyl 0.012 mg/kg (UPLC-MS/MS); alcohol production as the body was moderate decomposed; buprenorphine 0.0004 mg/kg (UPLC-MS/MS) prescribed; quetiapine 0.088 mg/kg (UPLC-MS/MS) prescribed; venlafaxine 0.089 mg...

  6. Refractometry for quality control of anesthetic drug mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabenow, Jennifer M; Maske, Mindy L; Vogler, George A

    2006-07-01

    Injectable anesthetic drugs used in rodents are often mixed and further diluted to increase the convenience and accuracy of dosing. We evaluated clinical refractometry as a simple and rapid method of quality control and mixing error detection of rodent anesthetic or analgesic mixtures. Dilutions of ketamine, xylazine, acepromazine, and buprenorphine were prepared with reagent-grade water to produce at least 4 concentration levels. The refraction of each concentration then was measured with a clinical refractometer and plotted against the percentage of stock concentration. The resulting graphs were linear and could be used to determine the concentration of single-drug dilutions or to predict the refraction of drug mixtures. We conclude that refractometry can be used to assess the concentration of dilutions of single drugs and can verify the mixing accuracy of drug combinations when the components of the mixture are known and fall within the detection range of the instrument.

  7. Newer approaches to opioid detoxification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharth Sarkar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Opioid use disorders present with distressing withdrawal symptoms at the time of detoxification. The pharmacological agents and methods currently in use for detoxification mainly include buprenorphine, methadone, and clonidine. Many other pharmacological agents have been tried for opioid detoxification. This review takes a look at the newer pharmacological options, both opioid agonists and non-agonist medications that have been utilized for detoxification. Peer reviewed articles were identified using PubMed and PsychInfo databases. The keywords included for the search were a combination of ′opioid′ and ′detoxification′ and their synonyms. All the articles published in the last 10 years were screened for. Relevant data was extracted from identified studies. Many newer pharmacological agents have been tried in detoxification of opioids. However, the quest for a safe, efficacious, cost-effective pharmacological option which requires minimal monitoring still continues. The role of non-pharmacological measures and alternative medicine needs further evaluation.

  8. Fate of psychoactive compounds in wastewater treatment plant and the possibility of their degradation using aquatic plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackuľak, Tomáš; Mosný, Michal; Škubák, Jaroslav; Grabic, Roman; Birošová, Lucia

    2015-03-01

    In this study we analyzed and characterized 29 psychoactive remedies, illicit drugs and their metabolites in single stages of wastewater treatment plants in the capital city of Slovakia. Psychoactive compounds were present within all stages, and tramadol was detected at a very high concentration (706 ng/L). Significant decreases of codeine, THC-COOH, cocaine and buprenorphine concentration were observed in the biological stage. Consequently, we were interested in the possibility of alternative tertiary post-treatment of effluent water with the following aquatic plants: Cabomba caroliniana, Limnophila sessiliflora, Egeria najas and Iris pseudacorus. The most effective plant for tertiary cleansing was I. pseudacorus which demonstrated the best pharmaceutical removal capacity. After 48 h codeine and citalopram was removed with 87% efficiency. After 96 h were all analyzed compounds were eliminated with efficiencies above 58%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. DYNAMICS OF OPIOID SUBSTITUTION TREATMENTIN DIFFERENT INITIAL SUBSTANCE USER OPIOID DEPENDENT PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todadze, Kh; Mosia, S

    2016-05-01

    Injecting drug user size estimation studies carried out in 2009, 2012 and 2015 revealed growing trends of drug abuse in Georgia:estimated number of people who inject drugs (PWID) have been increased from 40000 and 45000 to 50000. Since Soviet period the most popular injective narcotics have been opioids: home-made opium, heroine, buprenorphine and home-made desomorphine ("Krokodile") replacing each other on the black market. Self-made desomorphine typically contains big amounts of different toxic substances and causes significant somatic disorders, especially skin, bone, blood infections, liver and kidney failure; is highly addictive, associates with frequent injections that enhance injecting-related harm, including the risk of HIV transmission, in comparison with typical opioids. The aim of the study was to determine the effectiveness of opioid substitution treatment (OST) on depression and anxiety in opioid dependent clients with history of different opioid substance use. 104 opioid drug users undergoing OST with intensive psychological counseling have been divided in 5 groups according to the principal opioid drug that was abused during past 6 months before starting treatment: heroine, desomorphine, illicit methadone injectors, illicit buprenorphine injectors, and multiple drug abusers consuming opioids as primary drugs. Level of depression (Beck Depression Inventory), anxiety (Spielberger Anxiety Inventory) as well as clinical symptoms, risky behavior, quality of life (WHO), and other data were measured before starting and after 3, 9, 15, 21 months of treatment. The illegal use of psychotropic-narcotics was checked through random urine-testing 1-2 times per patient per month. In all five groups remarkable decrease of depression and anxiety was observed in comparison with the starting data. Before inclusion desomorphine and poly-drug users had the highest scores of depression and anxiety while buprenorphine users manifested the lowest rate. Improvement of

  10. Prospective multicenter observational study of 260 infants born to 259 opiate-dependent mothers on methadone or high-dose buprenophine substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejeune, Claude; Simmat-Durand, Laurence; Gourarier, Laurent; Aubisson, Sandrine

    2006-05-20

    Specialized prenatal care and substitution programs improve the perinatal prognoses of pregnant drug-abusers and their infants. Although methadone is well documented, little is known about high-dose buprenorphine (HDB). This prospective, multicenter (n = 35) observational study included 259 women on maintenance during pregnancy: 39% on methadone and 61% on HDB. Major findings were: 46% of them received good prenatal care; 62% had peridural analgesia; 12.3% delivered prematurely (hydrochloride. No baby died. Newborns were discharged with their mothers (96%) or placed in foster care (4%). Comparing methadone with HDB, respectively, mean age at the maximum Lipsitz score was 81 h versus 66 h (P = 0.066). The perinatal medical and social prognoses for these 259 drug addicts and their infants appeared to be improved by specialized prenatal care and was similar for methadone or BHD substitution during pregnancy.

  11. Perception and knowledge about narcotics among nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desai Geetha

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the extent to which nurses are able to correctly identify drugs as narcotics and to ascertain their perception of the addiction potential of opiates when used for pain management. Methods: A questionnaire was administered to 86 nurses who attended palliative care workshops in India. Findings: Only morphine (95%, heroin (71% and codeine (75% were correctly identified as narcotics by the majority of participants. Imipramine (34%, diazepam (20% and phenobarbitone (39% were wrongly classified as narcotics by many nurses. Dextropropoxyphene (11%, pentazocine (21%, buprenorphine (15% were correctly classified as narcotics by fewer than half the participants. Only 14% knew that that the frequency of psychological dependence due to use of morphine for cancer pain was less than 1%.

  12. Opiate Withdrawal Complicated by Tetany and Cardiac Arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfanali R. Kugasia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with symptoms of opiate withdrawal, after the administration of opiate antagonist by paramedics, are a common presentation in the emergency department of hospitals. Though most of opiate withdrawal symptoms are benign, rarely they can become life threatening. This case highlights how a benign opiate withdrawal symptom of hyperventilation led to severe respiratory alkalosis that degenerated into tetany and cardiac arrest. Though this patient was successfully resuscitated, it is imperative that severe withdrawal symptoms are timely identified and immediate steps are taken to prevent catastrophes. An easier way to reverse the severe opiate withdrawal symptom would be with either low dose methadone or partial opiate agonists like buprenorphine. However, if severe acid-base disorder is identified, it would be safer to electively intubate these patients for better control of their respiratory and acid-base status.

  13. The challenge of perioperative pain management in opioid-tolerant patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluzzi, Flaminia; Bifulco, Francesca; Cuomo, Arturo; Dauri, Mario; Leonardi, Claudio; Melotti, Rita Maria; Natoli, Silvia; Romualdi, Patrizia; Savoia, Gennaro; Corcione, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    The increasing number of opioid users among chronic pain patients, and opioid abusers among the general population, makes perioperative pain management challenging for health care professionals. Anesthesiologists, surgeons, and nurses should be familiar with some pharmacological phenomena which are typical of opioid users and abusers, such as tolerance, physical dependence, hyperalgesia, and addiction. Inadequate pain management is very common in these patients, due to common prejudices and fears. The target of preoperative evaluation is to identify comorbidities and risk factors and recognize signs and symptoms of opioid abuse and opioid withdrawal. Clinicians are encouraged to plan perioperative pain medications and to refer these patients to psychiatrists and addiction specialists for their evaluation. The aim of this review was to give practical suggestions for perioperative management of surgical opioid-tolerant patients, together with schemes of opioid conversion for chronic pain patients assuming oral or transdermal opioids, and patients under maintenance programs with methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone. PMID:28919771

  14. Validation of an automated solid-phase extraction method for the analysis of 23 opioids, cocaine, and metabolites in urine with ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Fernández, María del Mar; Van Durme, Filip; Wille, Sarah M R; di Fazio, Vincent; Kummer, Natalie; Samyn, Nele

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this work was to automate a sample preparation procedure extracting morphine, hydromorphone, oxymorphone, norcodeine, codeine, dihydrocodeine, oxycodone, 6-monoacetyl-morphine, hydrocodone, ethylmorphine, benzoylecgonine, cocaine, cocaethylene, tramadol, meperidine, pentazocine, fentanyl, norfentanyl, buprenorphine, norbuprenorphine, propoxyphene, methadone and 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine from urine samples. Samples were extracted by solid-phase extraction (SPE) with cation exchange cartridges using a TECAN Freedom Evo 100 base robotic system, including a hydrolysis step previous extraction when required. Block modules were carefully selected in order to use the same consumable material as in manual procedures to reduce cost and/or manual sample transfers. Moreover, the present configuration included pressure monitoring pipetting increasing pipetting accuracy and detecting sampling errors. The compounds were then separated in a chromatographic run of 9 min using a BEH Phenyl analytical column on a ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry system. Optimization of the SPE was performed with different wash conditions and elution solvents. Intra- and inter-day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were within ±15% and bias was within ±15% for most of the compounds. Recovery was >69% (RSD automated SPE system was observed. The extracted samples were stable for 72 h in the autosampler (4°C). This method was applied to authentic samples (from forensic and toxicology cases) and to proficiency testing schemes containing cocaine, heroin, buprenorphine and methadone, offering fast and reliable results. Automation resulted in improved precision and accuracy, and a minimum operator intervention, leading to safer sample handling and less time-consuming procedures.

  15. Skin Permeation Enhancers and their Effects on Narcotic Transdermal Drug Delivery Systems through Response Surface Experimental Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Moghimi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Drug delivery through skin is often obstructed by low permeability of skin towards most drugs; however, such problem would be solved by application of skin penetration enhancers in the formulations. In the present study, a drug in adhesive patch with buprenorphine as active ingredient was prepared. Drug-in-adhesive transdermal drug delivery systems with different chemical penetration enhancers were designed. For this purpose a response-surface experimental design was used. Response surface methodology based on a three-level, three-variable Box–Behnken design was used to evaluate the interactive effects of dependent variables such as: the rate of skin permeation and adhesion properties including peel strength and tack value. The parameters such as drug release and adhesion were used as independent variables. Levulinic acid, lauryl alcohol and Tween 80 were used as penetration enhancers. In order to prepare samples, buprenorphine with constant concentration was incorporated into acrylic pressure sensitive adhesive with carboxylic functionality and this mixture was added to chemical penetration enhancer with different concentrations. The results show that the cumulative amount of drug release in presence of Tween 80 is 462.9 ± 0.006 μg so it is higher than cumulative amount of drug release in presence of levulinic acid (357.9 ± 0.005 μg and lauryl alcohol (269.5 ± 0.001 μg. Results of adhesion properties such as peel strength and tack reveal that using levulinic acid and lauryl alcohol will increase peel strength while Tween 80 will decrease it. Besides, the results show that all these permeation enhancers have increased tack values.

  16. Opioid Addiction in Pregnancy: Does Depression Negatively Impact Adherence With Prenatal Care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Lauren; Sulo, Suela; Kozmic, Sarah; Parilla, Barbara V

    We aimed to evaluate whether depression in pregnancy in women with opioid dependency negatively impacts adherence with prenatal care. This was a retrospective chart analysis of opioid-dependent pregnant women over a 6-year period at 2 large referral and tertiary care centers. The primary outcome was adherence with prenatal care based on the concurrent diagnosis of depression. Adherence was assessed by looking at the number of observed versus expected prenatal visits. Secondary outcomes included neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) stay, and incidence and severity of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). A total of 74 patient charts were reviewed. 45/74 (60.8%) of the opioid-dependent pregnant patients were either diagnosed with depression (n = 41), anxiety (n = 2), or scored >10 on the Edinburgh Prenatal Depression Scale (n = 1). Patients with a diagnosis of depression were significantly less adherent with prenatal care; 80% adherent (73% vs 93%; P = 0.03), 90% adherent (62% vs 93%; P = 0.003). A higher number of patients in the depression group had an infant treated for withdrawal (62% vs 38%; P = 0.041), and had longer NICU stays (27% vs 21%; P = 0.018). Analysis of the whole cohort of opioid dependent gravidas revealed Buprenorphine maintenance therapy had the lowest mean NAS score 6.5 ± 4.4, compared with methadone maintenance 10.6 ± 3.6, and no maintenance therapy 9.4 ± 4.0 (P = 0.008). Depression negatively impacts adherence with prenatal care and was significantly associated with a higher incidence of neonatal withdrawal and longer NICU stays. Buprenorphine therapy had the lowest incidence and severity of NAS when compared with methadone and no maintenance therapy.

  17. Assessment of the use of oral fluid as a matrix for drug monitoring in patients undergoing treatment for opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, Frank; Fey, Elizabeth; Borg, Damon; Stripp, Richard; Getto, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Drug testing is an important clinical tool that is available to physicians who are assessing the effectiveness of drug treatment as well as patient compliance to the administered program. While urine has traditionally been the matrix of choice for drug monitoring, oral fluid, a filtrate of the blood, has shown great promise as an alternative matrix for such applications. Oral fluid collection can be accomplished without the need for highly trained medical staff through the use of a simple, noninvasive oral fluid collection device, which obtains an adequate sample in only a few minutes. There has been a significant amount of research performed on the use of oral fluid for forensic toxicology application; however, more studies assessing the use of oral fluid drug testing are required to validate its ability to achieve clinical drug monitoring goals. Testing for various drugs in oral fluid may yield a different result when compared to the same drugs in urine, requiring an assessment of the utility of oral fluid for such practices. The purpose of this study was to examine the application of oral fluid drug testing in patients undergoing buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence. A retrospective analysis of drug testing results obtained from 6,928 patients (4,560 unobserved urine collections and 2,368 observed oral fluid collections) monitored for heroin metabolite, amphetamine, benzodiazepines, buprenorphine, tetrahydrocannabinol, cocaine, codeine, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, oxycodone, and oxymorphone was completed. Results of this statistical exercise indicated that patients undergoing observed oral fluid collection tested positive more frequently than those unobserved urine collections for several illicit drugs and prescription medications targeted. Oral fluid was shown to detect illicit drug use as well as noncompliance in this patient population under the studied conditions more often than the urine specimens.

  18. Carprofen for perioperative analgesia causes early anastomotic leakage in the rat ileum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Vijver Rozemarijn J

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that perioperative use of NSAIDs may compromise the integrity of intestinal anastomoses. This study aims to characterize the negative effects of carprofen on early anastomotic healing in the rat ileum. Results In 159 male Wistar rats an anastomosis was constructed in the ileum. In experiment 1 eighty-four rats were divided over control and experimental groups, which received daily buprenorphine or carprofen, respectively, as an analgesic and were killed on day 1, 2 or 3 after surgery. In experiment 2 three groups of 15 rats received carprofen either immediately after surgery or with a delay of 1 or 2 days. Animals were killed after 3 days of carprofen administration. In experiment 3 three groups of 10 rats received different doses (full, half or quarter of carprofen from surgery. In significant contrast to buprenorphine, which never did so, carprofen induced frequent signs of anastomotic leakage, which were already present at day 1. If first administration was delayed for 48 hours, the leakage rate was significantly reduced (from 80 to 20%; p = 0.0028. Throughout the study, the anastomotic bursting pressure was lowest in animals who displayed signs of anastomotic leakage. Loss of anastomotic integrity did not coincide with reduced levels of hydroxyproline or increased activity of matrix metalloproteinases. Conclusions Carprofen interferes with wound healing in the rat ileum at a very early stage. Although the mechanisms responsible remain to be fully elucidated, one should be aware of the potential of NSAIDs to interfere with the early phase of wound repair.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of Sustained-Release Analgesics in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Lon V; Hansen, Ryan J; Dorsey, Kathryn; Kang, Sooah; Lunghofer, Paul J; Gustafson, Daniel L

    2014-01-01

    Buprenorphine and carprofen, 2 of the most commonly used analgesics in mice, must be administered every 8 to 12 h to provide sustained analgesia. Sustained-release (SR) formulations of analgesics maintain plasma levels that should be sufficient to provide sustained analgesia yet require less frequent dosing and thus less handling of and stress to the animals. The pharmacokinetics of SR formulations of buprenorphine (Bup-SR), butorphanol (Butp-SR), fentanyl (Fent-SR), carprofen (Carp-SR), and meloxicam (Melox-SR) were evaluated in mice over 72 h and compared with those of traditional, nonSR formulations. Bup-SR provided plasma drug levels greater than the therapeutic level for the first 24 to 48 h after administration, but plasma levels of Bup-HCl fell below the therapeutic level by 4 h. Fent-SR maintained plasma levels greater than reported therapeutic levels for 12 h. Therapeutic levels of the remaining drugs are unknown, but Carp-SR provided plasma drug levels similar to those of Carp for the first 24 h after administration, whereas Melox-SR had greater plasma levels than did Melox for the first 8 h. Butp-SR provided detectable plasma drug levels for the first 24 h, with a dramatic decrease over the first 4 h. These results indicate that Bup-SR provides a stable plasma drug level adequate for analgesia for 24 to 48 h after administration, whereas Carp-SR, Melox-SR, Fent-SR, and Butp-SR would require additional doses to provide analgesic plasma levels beyond 24 h in mice. PMID:25255070

  20. Differential Effectiveness of Clinically-Relevant Analgesics in a Rat Model of Chemotherapy-Induced Mucositis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra L Whittaker

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy-induced intestinal mucositis is characterized by pain and a pro-inflammatory tissue response. Rat models are frequently used in mucositis disease investigations yet little is known about the presence of pain in these animals, the ability of analgesics to ameliorate the condition, or the effect that analgesic administration may have on study outcomes. This study investigated different classes of analgesics with the aim of determining their analgesic effects and impact on research outcomes of interest in a rat model of mucositis. Female DA rats were allocated to 8 groups to include saline and chemotherapy controls (n = 8. Analgesics included opioid derivatives (buprenorphine; 0.05mg/kg and tramadol 12.5mg/kg and NSAID (carprofen; 15mg/kg in combination with either saline or 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU; 150mg/kg. Research outcome measures included daily clinical parameters, pain score and gut histology. Myeloperoxidase assay was performed to determine gut inflammation. At the dosages employed, all agents had an analgesic effect based on behavioural pain scores. Jejunal myeloperoxidase activity was significantly reduced by buprenorphine and tramadol in comparison to 5-FU control animals (53%, p = 0.0004 and 58%, p = 0.0001. Carprofen had no ameliorating effect on myeloperoxidase levels. None of the agents reduced the histological damage caused by 5-FU administration although tramadol tended to increase villus length even when administered to healthy animals. These data provide evidence that carprofen offers potential as an analgesic in this animal model due to its pain-relieving efficacy and minimal effect on measured parameters. This study also supports further investigation into the mechanism and utility of opioid agents in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced mucositis.

  1. Primary care for opioid use disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannelli P

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Mannelli,1 Li-Tzy Wu1–41Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, 2Department of Medicine, 3Duke Clinical Research Institute, Duke University Medical Center, 4Center for Child and Family Policy, Sanford School of Public Policy, Duke University, Durham, NC, USARecent reports on prescription opioid misuse and abuse have described unprecedented peaks of a national crisis and the only answer is to expand prevention and treatment, including different levels of care.1 Nonetheless, concerns remain about the ability of busy primary care settings to manage problem opioid users along with other patients. In particular, proposed extensions of buprenorphine treatment, a critically effective intervention for opioid use disorder (OUD, are cautiously considered due to the potential risk of misuse or abuse.2 General practitioners are already facing this burden daily in the treatment of chronic pain, and expert supervision and treatment model adjustment are needed to help improve outcomes. Approximately 20% of patients in primary care have noncancer pain symptoms, with most of them receiving opioid prescriptions by their physicians, and their number is increasing.3 Pain diagnoses are comparable in severity to those of tertiary centers and are complicated by significant psychiatric comorbidity, with a measurable lifetime risk of developing OUD.4,5 Some primary care physicians report frustration about opioid abuse and diversion by their patients; support from pain specialists would improve their competence, the quality f their performance, and the ability to identify patients at risk of opioid misuse.6 Thus, buprenorphine treatment should not be adding to a complex clinical scenario. To this end, the promising models of care emphasize the integration of medical with psychological and pharmacological expertise for the management of OUD. 

  2. Analysis of inflammation-induced depression of home cage wheel running in rats reveals the difference between opioid antinociception and restoration of function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Ram; Calsbeek, Jonas J.; Morgan, Michael M.

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are effective at inhibiting responses to noxious stimuli in rodents, but have limited efficacy and many side effects in chronic pain patients. One reason for this disconnect is that nociception is typically assessed using withdrawal from noxious stimuli in animals, whereas chronic pain patients suffer from abnormal pain that disrupts normal activity. We hypothesized that assessment of home cage wheel running in rats would provide a much more clinically relevant method to assess opioid efficacy to restore normal behavior. Intraplantar injection of Complete Freund’s Adjuvant (CFA) into the right hindpaw depressed wheel running and caused mechanical allodynia measured with the von Frey test in both male and female rats. Administration of an ED50 dose of morphine (3.2 mg/kg) reversed mechanical allodynia, but did not reverse CFA-induced depression of wheel running. In contrast, administration of a low dose of morphine (1.0 mg/kg) restored running for one hour in both sexes, but had no effect on mechanical allodynia. Administration of the atypical opioid buprenorphine had no effect on inflammation-induced depression of wheel running in male or female rats, but attenuated mechanical allodynia in male rats. Administration of buprenorphine and higher doses of morphine depressed wheel running in non-inflamed rats, suggesting that the side effects of opioids interfere with restoration of function. These data indicate that restoration of pain-depressed function requires antinociception in the absence of disruptive side effects. The disruptive side effects of opioids are consistent with the major limitation of opioid use in human pain patients. PMID:27746208

  3. Ethanol Reversal of Tolerance to the Respiratory Depressant Effects of Morphine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Rob; Lyndon, Abi; Withey, Sarah; Roberts, Joanne; Kershaw, Yvonne; MacLachlan, John; Lingford-Hughes, Anne; Kelly, Eamonn; Bailey, Chris; Hickman, Matthew; Henderson, Graeme

    2016-01-01

    Opioids are the most common drugs associated with unintentional drug overdose. Death results from respiratory depression. Prolonged use of opioids results in the development of tolerance but the degree of tolerance is thought to vary between different effects of the drugs. Many opioid addicts regularly consume alcohol (ethanol), and post-mortem analyses of opioid overdose deaths have revealed an inverse correlation between blood morphine and ethanol levels. In the present study, we determined whether ethanol reduced tolerance to the respiratory depressant effects of opioids. Mice were treated with opioids (morphine, methadone, or buprenorphine) for up to 6 days. Respiration was measured in freely moving animals breathing 5% CO2 in air in plethysmograph chambers. Antinociception (analgesia) was measured as the latency to remove the tail from a thermal stimulus. Opioid tolerance was assessed by measuring the response to a challenge dose of morphine (10 mg/kg i.p.). Tolerance developed to the respiratory depressant effect of morphine but at a slower rate than tolerance to its antinociceptive effect. A low dose of ethanol (0.3 mg/kg) alone did not depress respiration but in prolonged morphine-treated animals respiratory depression was observed when ethanol was co-administered with the morphine challenge. Ethanol did not alter the brain levels of morphine. In contrast, in methadone- or buprenorphine-treated animals no respiratory depression was observed when ethanol was co-administered along with the morphine challenge. As heroin is converted to morphine in man, selective reversal of morphine tolerance by ethanol may be a contributory factor in heroin overdose deaths. PMID:26171718

  4. Bioavailability of morphine, methadone, hydromorphone, and oxymorphone following buccal administration in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pypendop, B H; Ilkiw, J E; Shilo-Benjamini, Y

    2014-06-01

    Buccal administration of buprenorphine is commonly used to treat pain in cats. It has been argued that absorption of buprenorphine through the buccal mucosa is high, in part due to its pKa of 8.24. Morphine, methadone, hydromorphone, and oxymorphone have a pKa between 8 and 9. This study characterized the bioavailability of these drugs following buccal administration to cats. Six healthy adult female spayed cats were used. Buccal pH was measured prior to drug administration. Morphine sulfate, 0.2 mg/kg IV or 0.5 mg/kg buccal; methadone hydrochloride, 0.3 mg/kg IV or 0.75 mg/kg buccal; hydromorphone hydrochloride, 0.1 mg/kg IV or 0.25 mg/kg buccal; or oxymorphone hydrochloride, 0.1 mg/kg IV or 0.25 mg/kg buccal were administered. All cats received all treatments. Arterial blood was sampled immediately prior to drug administration and at various times up to 8 h thereafter. Bioavailability was calculated as the ratio of the area under the time-concentration curve following buccal administration to that following IV administration, each indexed to the administered dose. Mean ± SE (range) bioavailability was 36.6 ± 5.2 (12.7-49.5), 44.2 ± 7.9 (18.7-70.5), 22.4 ± 6.9 (6.4-43.4), and 18.8 ± 2.0 (12.9-23.5)% for buccal administration of morphine, methadone, hydromorphone, and oxymorphone, respectively. Bioavailability of methadone was significantly higher than that of oxymorphone. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Patterns of drug abuse among drug users with regular and irregular attendance for treatment as detected by comprehensive UHPLC-HR-TOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström, Mira; Pelander, Anna; Simojoki, Kaarlo; Ojanperä, Ilkka

    2016-01-01

    The most severe consequences of drug abuse include infectious diseases, overdoses, and drug-related deaths. As the range of toxicologically relevant compounds is continually changing due to the emergence of new psychoactive substances (NPS), laboratories are encountering analytical challenges. Current immunoassays are insufficient for determining the whole range of the drugs abused, and a broad-spectrum screening method is therefore needed. Here, the patterns of drug abuse in two groups of drug users were studied from urine samples using a comprehensive screening method based on high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The two groups comprised drug abusers undergoing opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) or drug withdrawal therapy and routinely visiting a rehabilitation clinic, and drug abusers with irregular attendance at a harm reduction unit (HRU) and suspected of potential NPS abuse. Polydrug abuse was observed in both groups, but was more pronounced among the HRU subjects with a mean number of concurrent drugs per sample of 3.9, whereas among the regularly treated subjects the corresponding number was 2.1. NPS and pregabalin were more frequent among HRU subjects, and their abuse was always related to drug co-use. The most common drug combination for an HRU subject included amphetamine, cannabis, buprenorphine, benzodiazepine, and alpha-pyrrolidinovalerophenone. A typical set of drugs for treated subjects was buprenorphine, benzodiazepine, and occasionally amphetamine. Abuse of several concurrent drugs poses a higher risk of drug intoxication and a threat of premature termination of OMT. Since the subjects attending treatment used fewer concurrent drugs, this treatment could be valuable in reducing polydrug abuse. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. The challenge of perioperative pain management in opioid-tolerant patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coluzzi F

    2017-09-01

    patients under maintenance programs with methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone. Keywords: opioids, postoperative pain, addiction, abusers, buprenorphine, methadone 

  7. Prenatal drug exposure: infant and toddler outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandstra, Emmalee S; Morrow, Connie E; Mansoor, Elana; Accornero, Veronica H

    2010-04-01

    This manuscript provides an overview of the current scientific literature on the impact of maternal drug use, specifically opioids and cocaine, during pregnancy on the acute and long-term outcomes of infants and toddlers from birth through age 3 years. Emphasis with regard to opioids is placed on heroin and opioid substitutes used to treat opioid addiction, including methadone, which has long been regarded as the standard of care in pregnancy, and buprenorphine, which is increasingly being investigated and prescribed as an alternative to methadone. Controlled studies comparing methadone at high and low doses, as well as those comparing methadone with buprenorphine, are highlighted and the diagnosis and management of neonatal abstinence syndrome is discussed. Over the past two decades, attention of the scientific and lay communities has also been focused on the potential adverse effects of cocaine and crack cocaine, especially during the height of the cocaine epidemic in the United States. Herein, the findings are summarized from prospective studies comparing cocaine-exposed with non-cocaine-exposed infants and toddlers with respect to anthropometric growth, infant neurobehavior, visual and auditory function, and cognitive, motor, and language development. The potentially stigmatizing label of the so-called "crack baby" preceded the evidence now accumulating from well-designed prospective investigations that have revealed less severe sequelae in the majority of prenatally exposed infants than originally anticipated. In contrast to opioids, which may produce neonatal abstinence syndrome and infant neurobehavioral deficits, prenatal cocaine exposure appears to be associated with what has been described as statistically significant but subtle decrements in neurobehavioral, cognitive, and language function, especially when viewed in the context of other exposures and the caregiving environment which may mediate or moderate the effects. Whether these early findings may

  8. [Changes and the impact on immune function of opioid-dependent subjects by Jitai tabelets during the withdrawal stage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X X; Fan, H Y; Sun, L; Liang, J C; Deng, Y P

    2017-04-10

    Objective: To detect the changes in the immune function of opioid-dependent subjects during the withdrawal stage through the administration of Jitai tablet. Methods: Subjects were treated as Jitai tablet alone, Jitai tablet plus buprenorphine and placebo, in a randomized,double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Before and after the 14(th) day of withdrawal, levels of immunoglobulin (IgM, IgA, IgG), T cell subsets (CD(3)(+), CD(4)(+), CD(8)(+), CD(4)(+)/CD(8)(+)) and cytokines (IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4, IFN-γ/IL-4) were detected. Results: Compared with healthy people, immunity function before withdrawal among the opioid abusers showed higher levels of IgM, IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-4 and lower level of CD(3)(+)T, as (1.67±0.87) g/L, (14.44±13.50) % , (20.23±15.10) % , (1.97±1.59) % , (47.01±13.62) % , respectively, with difference statistically significant ( P 0.05). At the 14(th) day of withdrawal in placebo group, levels of IL-4 returned to normal while IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio increased by 3.43 times ( P 0.05). Compared with placebo group, fluctuation of IgG and IgM decreased in Jitai group during withdrawal period, together with a normal level of IgM at the 14(th) day. Level of IL-4 abnormally rose up by 0.54 times in Jitai tablet plus buprenorphine group, while IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio been switched back at the 14(th) day of withdrawal. Other immune indicators were not affected by medical interventions. Conclusion: We noticed that certain impairment of the immune function might be restored by Jitai tablet during the withdrawal period.

  9. [Reimbursement of opiate substitution drugs to militaries in 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Argouges, F; Desjeux, G; Marsan, P; Thevenin-Garron, V

    2012-09-01

    The use of psychoactive drugs by militaries is not compatible with the analytical skills and self-control required by their jobs. Military physicians take this problem into consideration by organising systematic drugs screening in the French forces. However, for technical reasons, opiates are not concerned by this screening with the agreement of the people concerned. The estimated number of militaries who use an opiate substitute may be an approach of heroin consumption in the French forces. This study describes buprenorphine and methadone reimbursements made during 2007 by the national military healthcare centre to French militaries. Each French soldier is affiliated to a special health insurance. The national military healthcare centre has in its information system, all the data concerning drug reimbursement made to French military personnel. This is a retrospective study of buprenorphine and methadone reimbursements made during 2007 by the military healthcare centre, to militaries from the three sectors of the French forces, and from the gendarmerie and joint forces. Only one reimbursement of one of these two drugs during this period allowed the patient to be included in our study. Daily drug dose and treatment steadiness profile have been calculated according to the criteria of the French monitoring centre for drugs and drug addiction. The criteria of the National guidelines against frauds have been used to identify misuse of these drugs. Doctors' shopping behaviour has also been studied. Finally, the nature of the prescriber and the consumption of other drugs in combination with opiate substitute have been analysed. One hundred and eighty-one military consumers of opiate substitute drugs (167 men and 14 women) participated. This sample included people from the three sectors of the French forces as well as from the gendarmerie and from the joint forces. The average age of the consumers was 26.6 years (20-42 years). The average length of service was 6.1 years

  10. Volatility and change in chronic pain severity predict outcomes of treatment for prescription opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Heinzerling, Keith G; Shoptaw, Steven; Ling, Walter

    2017-07-01

    Buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP-NLX) can be used to manage prescription opioid addiction among persons with chronic pain, but post-treatment relapse is common and difficult to predict. This study estimated whether changes in pain over time and pain volatility during BUP-NLX maintenance would predict opioid use during the taper BUP-NLX taper. Secondary analysis of a multi-site clinical trial for prescription opioid addiction, using data obtained during a 12-week BUP-NLX stabilization and 4-week BUP-NLX taper. Community clinics affiliated with a national clinical trials network in 10 US cities. Subjects with chronic pain who entered the BUP-NLX taper phase (n = 125) with enrollment occurring from June 2006 to July 2009 (52% male, 88% Caucasian, 31% married). Outcomes were weekly biologically verified and self-reported opioid use from the 4-week taper phase. Predictors were estimates of baseline severity, rate of change and volatility in pain from weekly self-reports during the 12-week maintenance phase. Controlling for baseline pain and treatment condition, increased pain [odds ratio (OR) = 2.38, P = 0.02] and greater pain volatility (OR = 2.43, P = 0.04) predicted greater odds of positive opioid urine screen during BUP-NLX taper. Increased pain (IRR = 1.40, P = 0.04) and greater pain volatility [incidence-rate ratio (IRR) = 1.66, P = 0.009] also predicted greater frequency of self-reported opioid use. Adults with chronic pain receiving out-patient treatment with buprenorphine-naloxone (BUP-NLX) for prescription opioid addiction have an elevated risk for opioid use when tapering off maintenance treatment. Those with relative persistence in pain over time and greater volatility in pain during treatment are less likely to sustain abstinence during BUP-NLX taper. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  11. Exposure to fentanyl-contaminated heroin and overdose risk among illicit opioid users in Rhode Island: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Jennifer J; Marshall, Brandon D L; Rich, Josiah D; Green, Traci C

    2017-08-01

    Illicit fentanyl use has become wide spread in the US, causing high rates of overdose deaths among people who use drugs. This study describes patterns and perceptions of fentanyl exposure among opioid users in Rhode Island. A mixed methods study was conducted via questionnaire with a convenience sample of 149 individuals using illicit opioids or misusing prescription opioids in Rhode Island between January and November 2016. Of these, 121 knew of fentanyl and reported known or suspected exposure to fentanyl in the past year. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the first 47 participants. Study participants were predominantly male (64%) and white (61%). Demographic variables were similar across sample strata. Heroin was the most frequently reported drug of choice (72%). Self-reported exposure to illicit fentanyl in the past year was common (50.4%, n=61). In multivariate models, regular (at least weekly) heroin use was independently associated with known or suspected fentanyl exposure in the past year (adjusted prevalence ratio (APR)=4.07, 95% CI: 1.24-13.3, p=0.020). In interviews, users described fentanyl as unpleasant, potentially deadly, and to be avoided. Participants reporting fentanyl exposure routinely experienced or encountered non-fatal overdose. Heroin users reported limited ability to identify fentanyl in their drugs. Harm reduction strategies used to protect themselves from fentanyl exposure and overdose, included test hits, seeking prescription opioids in lieu of heroin, and seeking treatment with combination buprenorphine/naloxone. Participants were often unsuccessful in accessing structured treatment programs. Among illicit opioid users in Rhode Island, known or suspected fentanyl exposure is common, yet demand for fentanyl is low. Fentanyl-contaminated drugs are generating user interest in effective risk mitigation strategies, including treatment. Responses to the fentanyl epidemic should be informed by the perceptions and experiences of

  12. Association of opioid agonist therapy with lower incidence of hepatitis C virus infection in young adult injection drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I; Evans, Jennifer L; Lum, Paula J; Hahn, Judith A; Page, Kimberly

    2014-12-01

    Injection drug use is the primary mode of transmission for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Prior studies suggest opioid agonist therapy may reduce the incidence of HCV infection among injection drug users; however, little is known about the effects of this therapy in younger users. To evaluate whether opioid agonist therapy was associated with a lower incidence of HCV infection in a cohort of young adult injection drug users. Observational cohort study conducted from January 3, 2000, through August 21, 2013, with quarterly interviews and blood sampling. We recruited young adult (younger than 30 years) injection drug users who were negative for anti-HCV antibody and/or HCV RNA. Substance use treatment within the past 3 months, including non-opioid agonist forms of treatment, opioid agonist (methadone hydrochloride or buprenorphine hydrochloride) detoxification or maintenance therapy, or no treatment. Incident HCV infection documented with a new positive result for HCV RNA and/or HCV antibodies. Cumulative incidence rates (95% CI) of HCV infection were calculated assuming a Poisson distribution. Cox proportional hazards regression models were fit adjusting for age, sex, race, years of injection drug use, homelessness, and incarceration. Baseline characteristics of the sample (n = 552) included median age of 23 (interquartile range, 20-26) years; 31.9% female; 73.1% white; 39.7% who did not graduate from high school; and 69.2% who were homeless. During the observation period of 680 person-years, 171 incident cases of HCV infection occurred (incidence rate, 25.1 [95% CI, 21.6-29.2] per 100 person-years). The rate ratio was significantly lower for participants who reported recent maintenance opioid agonist therapy (0.31 [95% CI, 0.14-0.65]; P = .001) but not for those who reported recent non-opioid agonist forms of treatment (0.63 [95% CI, 0.37-1.08]; P = .09) or opioid agonist detoxification (1.45 [95% CI, 0.80-2.69]; P = .23). After adjustment for

  13. Using behavioral economics to predict opioid use during prescription opioid dependence treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Shoptaw, Steven J; Bickel, Warren K; Ling, Walter

    2015-03-01

    Research grounded in behavioral economics has previously linked addictive behavior to disrupted decision-making and reward-processing, but these principles have not been examined in prescription opioid addiction, which is currently a major public health problem. This study examined whether pre-treatment drug reinforcement value predicted opioid use during outpatient treatment of prescription opioid addiction. Secondary analyses examined participants with prescription opioid dependence who received 12 weeks of buprenorphine-naloxone and counseling in a multi-site clinical trial (N=353). Baseline measures assessed opioid source and indices of drug reinforcement value, including the total amount and proportion of income spent on drugs. Weekly urine drug screens measured opioid use. Obtaining opioids from doctors was associated with lower pre-treatment drug spending, while obtaining opioids from dealers/patients was associated with greater spending. Controlling for demographics, opioid use history, and opioid source frequency, patients who spent a greater total amount (OR=1.30, peconomic resources to drugs, reflects propensity for continued opioid use during treatment among individuals with prescription opioid addiction. Future studies should examine disrupted decision-making and reward-processing in prescription opioid users more directly and test whether reinforcer pathology can be remediated in this population. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Tobacco withdrawal among opioid-dependent smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streck, Joanna M; Heil, Sarah H; Higgins, Stephen T; Bunn, Janice Y; Sigmon, Stacey C

    2018-04-01

    Prevalence of cigarette smoking among opioid-dependent individuals is 6-fold that of the general U.S. adult population and their quit rates are notoriously poor. One possible reason for the modest cessation outcomes in opioid-dependent smokers may be that they experience more severe tobacco withdrawal upon quitting. In this secondary analysis, we evaluated tobacco withdrawal in opioid-dependent (OD) smokers versus smokers without co-occurring substance use disorders (SUDs). Participants were 47 methadone- or buprenorphine-maintained smokers and 25 non-SUD smokers who completed 1 of several 2-week studies involving daily visits for biochemical monitoring, delivery of financial incentives contingent on smoking abstinence, and assessment of withdrawal via the Minnesota Nicotine Withdrawal Scale (MNWS). Prior to quitting smoking, OD smokers presented with higher baseline withdrawal scores than non-SUD smokers (1.7 ± 0.2 vs. 0.7 ± 0.2, respectively; F [1, 63] = 7.31, p non-SUD smokers, suggesting that elevated withdrawal severity following quitting may not be a major factor contributing to the poor cessation outcomes consistently observed among OD smokers. Further scientific efforts are needed to improve our understanding of the high smoking rates and modest cessation outcomes in this challenging population. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. Financial factors and the implementation of medications for treating opioid use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Hannah K; Roman, Paul M

    2012-12-01

    Despite the established effectiveness of pharmacotherapies for treating opioid use disorders, implementation of medications for addiction treatment (MAT) by specialty treatment programs is limited. This research examined relationships between organizational factors and the program-level implementation of MAT, with attention paid to specific sources of funding, organizational structure, and workforce resources. Face-to-face structured interviews were conducted in 2008 to 2009 with administrators of 154 community-based treatment programs affiliated with the National Institute on Drug Abuse's Clinical Trials Network; none of these programs exclusively dispensed methadone without offering other levels of care. Implementation of MAT was measured by summing the percentages of opioid patients receiving buprenorphine maintenance, methadone maintenance, and tablet naltrexone. Financial factors included the percentages of revenues received from Medicaid, private insurance, criminal justice, the Federal block grant, state government, and county government. Organizational structure and workforce characteristics were also measured. Implementation of MAT for opioid use disorders was low. Greater reliance on Medicaid was positively associated with implementation after controlling for organizational structure and workforce measures, whereas the association for reliance on criminal justice revenues was negative. The implementation of MAT for opioid use disorders by specialty addiction treatment programs may be facilitated by Medicaid but may be impeded by reliance on funding from the criminal justice system. These findings point to the need for additional research that considers the impact of organizational dependence on different types of funding on patterns of addiction treatment practice.

  16. Pain volatility and prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in patients with chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worley, Matthew J; Heinzerling, Keith G; Shoptaw, Steven; Ling, Walter

    2015-12-01

    The combination of prescription opioid dependence and chronic pain is increasingly prevalent and hazardous to public health. Variability in pain may explain poor prescription opioid addiction treatment outcomes in persons with chronic pain. This study examined pain trajectories and pain volatility in patients with chronic pain receiving treatment for prescription opioid addiction. We conducted secondary analyses of adults with chronic pain (n = 149) who received buprenorphine/naloxone (BUP/NLX) and counseling for 12 weeks in an outpatient, multisite clinical trial. Good treatment outcome was defined as urine-verified abstinence from opioids at treatment endpoint (Week 12) and during at least 2 of the previous 3 weeks. Pain severity significantly declined over time during treatment (b = -0.36, p opioid dependence. Patients with greater volatility in subjective pain during treatment have increased risk of returning to opioid use by the conclusion of an intensive treatment with BUP/NLX and counseling. Future research should examine underlying mechanisms of pain volatility and identify related therapeutic targets to optimize interventions for prescription opioid addiction and co-occurring chronic pain. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Risk factors for opioid overdose and awareness of overdose risk among veterans prescribed chronic opioids for addiction or pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Christine M; Miller, Shannon C; Tiffany, Elizabeth; Winhusen, Theresa; Winstanley, Erin L; Stein, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Rising overdose fatalities among U.S. veterans suggest veterans taking prescription opioids may be at risk for overdose. However, it is unclear whether veterans prescribed chronic opioids are aware of this risk. The objective of this study was to identify risk factors and determine awareness of risk for opioid overdose in veterans treated with opioids for chronic pain, using veterans treated with methadone or buprenorphine for opioid use disorder as a high-risk comparator group. In the current study, 90 veterans on chronic opioid medication, for either opioid use disorder or pain management, completed a questionnaire assessing risk factors, knowledge, and self-estimate of risk for overdose. Nearly all veterans in both groups had multiple overdose risk factors, although individuals in the pain management group had on average a significantly lower total number of risk factors than did individuals in the opioid use disorder group (5.9 versus 8.5, p opioid overdose risk factors (12.1 versus 13.5, p opioid overdose risk factors. Our results suggest that veterans in both groups underestimated their risk for opioid overdose. Expansion of overdose education to include individuals on chronic opioids for pain management and a shift in educational approaches to overdose prevention may be indicated.

  18. Co-morbid pain and opioid addiction: long term effect of opioid maintenance on acute pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachholtz, Amy; Gonzalez, Gerardo

    2014-12-01

    Medication assisted treatment for opioid dependence alters the pain experience. This study will evaluate changes pain sensitivity and tolerance with opioid treatments; and duration of this effect after treatment cessation. 120 Individuals with chronic pain were recruited in 4 groups (N = 30): 1-methadone for opioid addiction; 2-buprenorphine for opioid addiction; 3-history of opioid maintenance treatment for opioid addiction but with prolonged abstinence (M = 121 weeks; SD = 23.3); and 4-opioid naïve controls. Participants completed a psychological assessment and a cold water task including, time to first pain (sensitivity) and time to stopping the pain task (tolerance). Data analysis used survival analyses. A Kaplan-Meier-Cox survival analysis showed group differences for both pain sensitivity (log rank = 15.50; p opioid maintenance resulted in differing pain sensitivity compared to opioid naïve (p's opioid maintenance compared to active methadone patients (p opioid naïve control group participants (p's opioid abstinence increased (R = .37; p opioid maintenance, there appears to be long-term differences in pain sensitivity that do not resolve with discontinuation of opioid maintenance. Although pain sensitivity does not change, pain tolerance does improve after opioid maintenance cessation. Implications for treating co-morbid opioid addiction and pain (acute and chronic) are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reducing the health consequences of opioid addiction in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Sarah; Eiserman, Julie; Beletsky, Leo; Stancliff, Sharon; Bruce, R Douglas

    2013-07-01

    Addiction to prescription opioids is prevalent in primary care settings. Increasing prescription opioid use is largely responsible for a parallel increase in overdose nationally. Many patients most at risk for addiction and overdose come into regular contact with primary care providers. Lack of routine addiction screening results in missed treatment opportunities in this setting. We reviewed the literature on screening and brief interventions for addictive disorders in primary care settings, focusing on opioid addiction. Screening and brief interventions can improve health outcomes for chronic illnesses including diabetes, hypertension, and asthma. Similarly, through the use of screening and brief interventions, patients with addiction can achieve improved health outcome. A spectrum of low-threshold care options can reduce the negative health consequences among individuals with opioid addiction. Screening in primary care coupled with short interventions, including motivational interviewing, syringe distribution, naloxone prescription for overdose prevention, and buprenorphine treatment are effective ways to manage addiction and its associated risks and improve health outcomes for individuals with opioid addiction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A Systematic Review on the Use of Psychosocial Interventions in Conjunction With Medications for the Treatment of Opioid Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugosh, Karen; Abraham, Amanda; Seymour, Brittany; McLoyd, Keli; Chalk, Mady; Festinger, David

    2016-01-01

    Opioid use and overdose rates have risen to epidemic levels in the United States during the past decade. Fortunately, there are effective medications (ie, methadone, buprenorphine, and oral and injectable naltrexone) available for the treatment of opioid addiction. Each of these medications is approved for use in conjunction with psychosocial treatment; however, there is a dearth of empirical research on the optimal psychosocial interventions to use with these medications. In this systematic review, we outline and discuss the findings of 3 prominent prior reviews and 27 recent publications of empirical studies on this topic. The most widely studied psychosocial interventions examined in conjunction with medications for opioid addiction were contingency management and cognitive behavioral therapy, with the majority focusing on methadone treatment. The results generally support the efficacy of providing psychosocial interventions in combination with medications to treat opioid addictions, although the incremental utility varied across studies, outcomes, medications, and interventions. The review highlights significant gaps in the literature and provides areas for future research. Given the enormity of the current opioid problem in the United States, it is critical to gain a better understanding of the most effective ways to deliver psychosocial treatments in conjunction with these medications to improve the health and well-being of individuals suffering from opioid addiction.

  1. Nonnatural deaths among users of illicit drugs: pathological findings and illicit drug abuse stigmata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaveris, Gerd Jorunn Møller; Hoff-Olsen, Per; Rogde, Sidsel

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the study was to provide information on illicit drug abuse stigmata and general pathological findings among an adult narcotic drug-using population aged 20 to 59 years whose death was nonnatural. A total of 1603 medicolegal autopsy reports from 2000 to 2009 concerning cases positive for morphine, heroin, amphetamines, ecstasy, cannabis, LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide), PCP (phencyclidine), and high levels of GHB (γ-hydroxybutyric acid) in addition to methadone and buprenorphine were investigated. Reported findings of hepatitis, portal lymphadenopathy, recent injection marks, drug user's equipment, and numbers of significant pathological conditions were registered and analyzed according to cases positive for opiates, opioids (OPs), and central nervous system (CNS)-stimulating illicit drugs, respectively. Of the selected cases, 1305 were positive for one or more opiate or OP. Cases positive for OPs had significantly more findings of noninfectious pathological conditions. Hepatitis, portal lymphadenopathy, recent injections marks findings of drug user's equipment were all findings found more frequently among the opiate OP-positive individuals. Portal lymphadenopathy was significantly more often found in cases with hepatitis than in cases with other or no infection. In the population positive for CNS stimulants, hepatitis recent injection marks were more frequent findings than in the CNS stimulant-negative group, irrespective of whether they were opiate OP positive or negative.

  2. Advertising representation, treatment menu and economic circulation of substance misuse treatment centers in Iran: a rapid survey based on newspaper advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaee, Sobhan; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2014-05-01

    Daily newspapers are the main platform by which substance misuse treatment (SMT) centers in Iran advertise their services. However, these advertisements provide little information on treatment options or costs. The current research aimed to use advertisements to compile a schema of treatment services and to map the extent and nature of drug treatments offered. During a four-week period (April to May) in 2009, the four most popular Persian newspapers printed in Tehran were reviewed. Across these publications 1704 advertisements were posted by 66 SMT centers. Each center was then contacted by telephone to complete a structured interview about services offered and related costs. The advertisements were also decoded through a quantitative contextual analysis method. On average, each SMT center published 26 advertisements during the review period, costing 421 US$. In addition, advertisements included word signifiers in six main categories including centers' introduction (100%), treatment types (91%), treatment duration (68%), medicines (70%), treatment features (60%) and psychological facilities (52%). The three detoxification programs advertised were the rapid method (57% of clinics, 443.23 US$), buprenorphine (68%, 265 US$) and methadone (71%, 137 US$). More than 90% of the centers in Tehran were offering methadone maintenance (99 US$, per month). SMT services in the Iranian market ranged from abstinence to maintenance programs, with opiates as the main focus. This review of centers' advertisements provides an indirect but rapidly obtained picture of the drug misuse treatment network. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Visual selective attention is impaired in children prenatally exposed to opioid agonist medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konijnenberg, Carolien; Melinder, Annika

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether prenatal exposure to opioid agonist medication is associated with visual selective attention and general attention problems in early childhood. Twenty-two children (mean age = 52.17 months, SD = 1.81) prenatally exposed to methadone, 9 children (mean age = 52.41 months, SD = 1.42) prenatally exposed to buprenorphine and 25 nonexposed comparison children (mean age = 51.44 months, SD = 1.31) were tested. Visual selective attention was measured with a Tobii 1750 Eye Tracker using a spatial negative priming paradigm. Attention problems were measured using the Child Behavior Checklist. The comparison group demonstrated a larger spatial negative priming effect (mean = 23.50, SD = 45.50) than the exposed group [mean = -6.84, SD = 86.39, F(1,50) = 5.91, p = 0.019, η(2) = 0.11]. No difference in reported attention problems was found [F(1,51) = 1.63, p = 0.21, η(2) = 0.03]. Neonatal abstinence syndrome and prenatal exposure to marijuana were found to predict slower saccade latencies in the exposed group (b = 54.55, SE = 23.56, p = 0.03 and b = 88.86, SE = 32.07, p = 0.01, respectively). Although exposed children did not appear to have attention deficits in daily life, lower performance on the SNP task indicates subtle alteration in the attention system. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. From political controversy to a technical problem? Fifteen years of opioid substitution treatment in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selin, Jani; Hakkarainen, Pekka; Partanen, Airi; Tammi, Tuukka; Tigerstedt, Christoffer

    2013-11-01

    The aim of the article is to analyze changes in opioid substitution treatments (OST) in Finland. OST spread in Finland in the late 1990s and early 2000s (Phase 1). Since then, OST has become an integrated part of Finnish drug policy and is provided in various substance abuse treatment units as well as in municipal health centers (Phase 2). The paper analyses the policy around the implementation of opioid substitution treatment in Finland, focusing on identifying the key factors and the relations between them that have contributed to the implementation of OST in Finland. OST has become accepted in Finland during the past ten years as a crucial element of a harm reduction strategy. Present incentives behind this development are not as clearly related to drug-specific policies as in the late 1990s; rather, they stem from both the restructuring of health care services (e.g. cost-effectiveness) and the strengthening of the medical or technico-administrative approach to the development of OST. Since the early 2000s, the development of substitution treatment in Finland has not taken place under explicit drug-political guidance, but largely as a result of many differing intended and unintended effects. One of the unintended effects is the fact that buprenorphine has replaced heroin as the most commonly misused opioid in Finland. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Abuse of prescription medicines in southwestern France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumevieille, M; Haramburu, F; Bégaud, B

    1997-01-01

    Few quantitative data are available concerning abuse of medicine in the general population, although dependence on prescription medicines involves a significant proportion of the population. Falsified prescription forms can be used as an indicator of abuse. Community pharmacists in a representative network were asked to report any falsified prescription form presented over a 1-year period. Sales data were used to express results as abuse rate and abuse rate ratio. Two-thirds of the 130 pharmacies in the network reported at least 1 falsified prescription. The reported incidence of falsified prescriptions was 2.3 per 10 000 inhabitants. A total of 392 falsified prescription forms was collected. The abuse rate ratios were 171 (95% CI 140 to 210) for dextroamphetamine-phenobarbital in combination, 168 (95% CI 131 to 216) for fenozolone, 67 (95% CI 53 to 84) for buprenorphine, and 40.5 (95% CI 33 to 50) for clobenzorex. These results show the efficiency of a method for detecting falsified prescriptions forms using community pharmacists. The abuse of medicines already known for their addictive potential can be estimated and alerts can also be detected.

  6. The Opioid Epidemic: What Does it Mean for Nurses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, Laura G

    2017-01-01

    The United States is facing a major crisis with the current opioid epidemic. Tens of thousands of individuals are dying each year due to abuse and misuse of heroin and prescription opiate drugs. Nurses play an integral role in these aspects of health care and offer solutions by providing education; preventive measures; treatments, including medication-assisted treatments (MATs); and ongoing recovery options for individuals with opioid use disorders. Nurses provide education, issue prescriptions and dispense medications, and provide overall physical and mental health care to patients struggling with this "disease of the brain," and with the signing of the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act, advanced practice RNs will soon be able to include MATs related to buprenorphine as part of their treatment plan. The current article explores the anatomy, physiology, and genetics of addiction and how they relate to the pharmacological MATs used to treat opioid use disorders. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(1), 18-23.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Experiences from a community based substance use treatment centre in an urban resettlement colony in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Ranjan, Rajeev; Dhawan, Anju; Yadav, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Background. There are limited community based treatment services for drug dependence in India. Rural areas and urban resettlement colonies are in particular deficient in such services. Aims. The current study aimed at preliminary assessment of substance use disorder management services at a community based substance use treatment clinic in an urban resettlement colony. Methods. The study was carried out at community based substance use treatment centre in a resettlement colony in India. The records of the centre were chart reviewed. Results. A total of 754 patients were registered at the clinic during the study period. Heroin was the primary drug of abuse for 63% of the patients. The mean duration of follow-up for the patients with opioid and alcohol dependence was 13.47 (SD ± 10.37; range 0-39) months. A total of 220 patients of opioid dependence were prescribed substation or abstinence directed therapy. Buprenorphine (87), slow release oral morphine (SROM) (16), and dextropropoxyphene (98) were used for opioid substitution. Conclusion. It is possible to deliver substance use disorder treatment services in community setting. There is a need to develop area specific community based treatment services for substance abuse in socially disadvantaged populations such as urban resettlement colonies.

  8. E-cigarette knowledge, attitudes, and use in opioid dependent smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Michael D; Caviness, Celeste M; Grimone, Kristin; Audet, Daniel; Borges, Allison; Anderson, Bradley J

    2015-05-01

    Individuals in treatment for opioid dependence have smoking rates 3-5 times greater than the U.S. prevalence rate. Traditional smoking cessation strategies have been ineffective in this population. Novel approaches are needed as well as harm reduction avenues. E-cigarettes (e-cigs) may provide such a novel harm reduction and cessation opportunity, but little is known about the knowledge of, attitudes about, and usage of e-cigs in opioid dependent smokers. The current study enrolled 315 opioid dependent smokers (164 methadone, 151 buprenorphine), treated in the same health system in Fall River, Massachusetts. The sample was 49.7% male and 85.1% non-Latino White. Overall 98.7% had heard of e-cigs, 73.0% had ever tried e-cigs, and 33.8% had used e-cigs in the past 30 days. The most common reasons for use were curiosity (41.4%) and to quit all nicotine (26.0%). The proportion of opioid dependent smokers that had ever tried e-cigs and used them in the past month was substantially greater than that found in recent general population surveys. While e-cigs have been used to quit smoking, how to optimize their utility as a cessation tool remains undefined. E-cigs should be a part of smoking cessation discussions with this vulnerable, difficult-to-treat population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Outcome of heroin-dependent adolescents presenting for opiate substitution treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Smyth, Bobby P

    2012-01-01

    Because the outcome of methadone and buprenorphine substitution treatment in adolescents is unclear, we completed a retrospective cohort study of 100 consecutive heroin-dependent adolescents who sought these treatments over an 8-year recruitment period. The participants\\' average age was 16.6 years, and 54 were female. Half of the patient group remained in treatment for over 1 year. Among those still in treatment at 12 months, 39% demonstrated abstinence from heroin. The final route of departure from the treatment program was via planned detox for 22%, dropout for 32%, and imprisonment for 8%. The remaining 39% were transferred elsewhere for ongoing opiate substitution treatment after a median period of 23 months of treatment. Males were more likely to exit via imprisonment (p < .05), but other outcomes were not predicted by gender. There were no deaths during treatment among these 100 patients who had a cumulative period of 129 person years at risk. Our findings suggest that this treatment delivers reductions in heroin use and that one fifth of patients will exit treatment following detox completion within a 1- to 2-year time frame.

  10. Injecting Drug Users and Their Health Seeking Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Mohammed Shariful Islam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and Aim. Injecting drug users (IDUs are amongst the most vulnerable people to acquisition of HIV/AIDS. This study aims to collect information on IDUs and their health seeking behavior in Bangladesh. Design and Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted among 120 IDUs attending a drug rehabilitation center in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Data were collected on sociodemographics, drug use, health seeking behavior, knowledge of injecting drugs, and sexual behavior. Results. The mean ± SD and median (IQR age of the participants were 32.5±21.3 and 33 (27–38 years, respectively, with only 9.2% females. Injection buprenorphine was the drug of choice for 40% of participants, and 58% of the participants first started drug use with smoking cannabis. 73.3% of participants shared needles sometimes and 57.5% were willing to use the needle exchange programs. 60% of the participants had no knowledge about the diseases spread by injection. Condom use during the last intercourse with regular partners was 11.7% and with any partners 15.8%. Conclusion. IDUs in Bangladesh are a high-risk group for HIV/AIDS due to lack of knowledge and risky behaviors. Education and interventions specifically aimed at IDUs are needed, because traditional education may not reach IDUs or influence their behavior.

  11. Suicidal ideation and HIV risk behaviors among a cohort of injecting drug users in New Delhi, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarin Enisha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data on mental health among injecting drug users in South Asia is scarce yet poor mental health among users has significant implications for the success of HIV prevention and treatment programmes. A cohort of 449 injecting drug users in Delhi was examined on the following issues (1 examine trends in suicidal ideation, suicide plan and suicidal attempts over a 12-month period, (2 examine association between injecting practices (receive and give used syringes and suicidal ideation over a 12 month study period. Methods An observational study was conducted providing phased interventions with follow up interviews every 3 months to 449 injecting drug users (IDUs, from August 2004 to November 2005. The study was conducted in Yamuna Bazaar, a known hub of drug peddling in Delhi. Interventions included nutrition, basic medical services, needle exchange, health education, HIV voluntary counseling and testing, STI diagnosis and treatment, oral buprenorphine substitution, and detoxification, each introduced sequentially. Results Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts, did not significantly change over 12 months of observation, while suicide plans actually increased over the time period. Keeping other factors constant, IDUs with suicidal ideation reported more giving and receiving of used syringes in the recent past. Conclusions: Mental health services are warranted within harm reduction programmes. Special attention must be paid to suicidal IDUs given their higher risk behaviours for acquiring HIV and other blood borne infections. IDU intervention programmes should assess and address suicide risk through brief screening and enhanced counseling.

  12. Multiple access to sterile syringes for injection drug users: vending machines, needle exchange programs and legal pharmacy sales in Marseille, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moatti, J P; Vlahov, D; Feroni, I; Perrin, V; Obadia, Y

    2001-03-01

    In Marseille, southeastern France, HIV prevention programs for injection drug users (IDUs) simultaneously include access to sterile syringes through needle exchange programs (NEPs), legal pharmacy sales and, since 1996, vending machines that mechanically exchange new syringes for used ones. The purpose of this study was to compare the characteristics of IDUs according to the site where they last obtained new syringes. During 3 days in September 1997, all IDUs who obtained syringes from 32 pharmacies, four NEPs and three vending machines were offered the opportunity to complete a self-administered questionnaire on demographics, drug use characteristics and program utilization. Of 485 individuals approached, the number who completed the questionnaire was 141 in pharmacies, 114 in NEPs and 88 at vending machines (response rate = 70.7%). Compared to NEP users, vending machine users were younger and less likely to be enrolled in a methadone program or to report being HIV infected, but more likely to misuse buprenorphine. They also had lower financial resources and were less likely to be heroin injectors than both pharmacy and NEP users. Our results suggest that vending machines attract a very different group of IDUs than NEPs, and that both programs are useful adjuncts to legal pharmacy sales for covering the needs of IDUs for sterile syringes in a single city. Assessment of the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of combining such programs for the prevention of HIV and other infectious diseases among IDUs requires further comparative research. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  13. Methadone for the treatment of Prescription Opioids Dependence. A retrospective chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, Pablo; Ezzeldin, Mohamed; Bruguera, Pol; Pérez, Ana; Mansilla, Sara; Fàbrega, Marina; Lligoña, Anna; Mondón, Sílvia; Balcells, Mercè

    2016-06-14

    Prescription opioids (PO) addiction is increasing to an epidemic level. Few studies exist regarding its treatment. Although buprenorphine has been the mainstay so far, other treatment options might be considered, such as methadone. We conducted a retrospective assessment of all patients admitted to a psychiatry ward for PO detoxification using methadone between 2010 and 2013. The assessment and description was carried out during a 3-month follow-up period after their discharge. Although this is a retrospective chart review, our exploration included sociodemographic and treatment variables in addition to the abstinence rates for the whole sample. Eleven patients were included, mostly women (81.8%), with a median age of 50 years. The median duration of dependence was 8 years. Dependence on other substances and psychiatric comorbidities were high. Eight patients were monitored during three months. Of these, 7 (87.5%) were abstinent after that period. The results suggest that methadone deserves further exploration as a potentially efficacious treatment option for PO dependence.

  14. Implementing opioid substitution in Lebanon: Inception and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khoury, Joseph; Abbas, Zeinab; Nakhle, Pascale E; Matar, Marie-Therese

    2016-05-01

    Opioid Substitution Treatment (OST) is a firmly established method of treating and managing dependence to opioids in Europe, the US and rest of the developed world. It has a solid evidence base and a positive safety track record. Dissemination of its practice, in parallel to the acceptance of harm reduction as an effective approach, is still timid in low and middle Income countries. After years of advocacy on the parts of clinicians and the voluntary sector, the government of Lebanon launched a national opioid substitution program in 2011 using buprenorphine as the substance of substitution. Lebanon is one of the first countries in the MENA region to establish such a program despite a difficult socio-political context. This paper provides the background of harm reduction efforts in the region and presents the outline of the program from inception to present date. Challenges and recommendations for the future are also discussed. The Lebanese experience with opioid substitution is encouraging so far and can be used as a template for others in the region who might be contemplating broadening the range of services available to tackle addiction to heroin and related substances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Promise and deceit: pharmakos, drug replacement therapy, and the perils of experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Todd

    2014-06-01

    The problem of lying as a feature of medication compliance has been well documented in anthropological and clinical literatures. Yet the role of the lie-its destabilizing effects on the continuity of drug treatment and therapy, as a technology of drug misuse, or as a way to understand the neuro-chemical processes of treatment (pharmacotherapy "tricking" or lying to the brain)-has been less considered, particularly in the context of opioid replacement therapy. The following paper is set against the backdrop of a three-year study of adolescents receiving a relatively new drug (buprenorphine) for the treatment of opiate dependency inside and outside of highly monitored treatment environments in the United States. Lies give order not only to the experience of addiction but also to the experience of therapy as well. In order to better understand this ordering of experience, the paper puts the widely discussed conceptual duality of the pharmakon (healing and poison) in conversation with a perilously overlooked subject in the critical study of pharmacotherapy, namely the pharmakos or the personification of sacrifice. The paper demonstrates how the patient-subject comes to represent therapeutic promise by allowing for the possibility of (and often performing) deceit.

  16. Concurrent and simultaneous polydrug use: latent class analysis of an Australian nationally representative sample of young adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lake-Hui eQuek

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Alcohol use and illicit drug use peak during young adulthood (around 18-29 years of age, but comparatively little is known about polydrug use in nationally representative samples of young adults. Drawing on a nationally representative cross-sectional survey (Australian National Drug Strategy Household Survey, this study examines polydrug use patterns and associated psychosocial risk factors among young adults (n = 3,333; age 19-29. Method: The use of a broad range of licit and illicit drugs were examined, including alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, cocaine, hallucinogens, ecstasy, ketamine, GHB, inhalants, steroids, barbiturates, meth/amphetamines, heroin, methadone/buprenorphine, other opiates, painkillers and tranquillizers/sleeping pills. Latent class analysis was employed to identify patterns of polydrug use. Results: Polydrug use in this sample was best described using a 5-class solution. The majority of young adults predominantly used alcohol only (52.3%, alcohol and tobacco (34.18%. The other classes were cannabis, ecstasy, and licit drug use (9.4%, cannabis, amphetamine derivative, and licit drug use (2.8%, and sedative and alcohol use (1.3%. Young adult males with low education and/or high income were most at risk of polydrug use. Conclusion: Almost half of young adults reported polydrug use, highlighting the importance of post-high school screening for key risk factors and polydrug use profiles, and the delivery of early intervention strategies targeting illicit drugs.

  17. Right upper-quadrant pain in a patient with drug abuse, secondary syphilis and occult hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Cory M; Angulo, Paul

    2014-01-01

    To describe the etiology of hepatitis and identify occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. A 40-year-old man presented with severe abdominal pain and jaundice, a history of acute HBV infection that had cleared as well as the use of acetaminophen, methamphetamine, buprenorphine and marijuana. He admitted to having had unprotected sex with multiple partners of both genders. A thorough skin examination revealed papulosquamous lesions on his penis, scrotum, upper and lower extremities and feet. Transaminases and bilirubin were elevated. His rapid plasma reagin was reactive, and hepatitis serologies showed occult HBV. Liver biopsy showed severe hepatitis, but the stains for hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antigen were negative. The pathological findings were highly indicative of drug-induced hepatitis without evidence of chronic hepatitis, reactivation of HBV or syphilitic hepatitis. With supportive management and abstinence from drugs, his condition improved. This case describes a patient with multiple potential causes for hepatitis and highlights the importance of obtaining a detailed social history. Further, one should consider the presence of occult HBV and recognize the serologic pattern. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Physician Introduction to Opioids for Pain Among Patients with Opioid Dependence and Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I.; Herman, Debra S.; Kettavong, Malyna; Alford, Daniel; Anderson, Bradley J.; Stein, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    This study determined the frequency of reporting being introduced to opioids by a physician among opioid dependent patients. Cross-sectional analyses were performed using baseline data from a cohort of opioid addicts seeking treatment with buprenorphine. The primary outcome was response to the question: “Who introduced you to opiates?” Covariates included sociodemographics, depression, pain, current and prior substance use. Of 140 participants, 29% reported that they had been introduced to opioids by a physician. Of those who were introduced to opioids by a physician, all indicated that they had initially used opioids for pain, versus only 11% of those who did not report being introduced to opioids by a physician (p<0.01). There was no difference in current pain (78% vs. 85%, p=0.29), however participants who were introduced to opioids by a physician were more likely to have chronic pain (63% vs. 43%, p=0.04). A substantial proportion of individuals with opioid dependence seeking treatment may have been introduced to opioids by a physician. PMID:20727704

  19. How to overcome hurdles in opiate substitution treatment? A qualitative study with general practitioners in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraeyman, Jessica; Symons, Linda; Van Royen, Paul; Van Hal, Guido; Peremans, Lieve

    2016-06-01

    Opiate substitution treatment (OST) is the administration of opioids (methadone or buprenorphine) under medical supervision for opiate addiction. Several studies indicate a large unmet need for OST in general practice in Antwerp, Belgium. Some hurdles remain before GPs engage in OST prescribing. Formulate recommendations to increase engagement of GPs in OST, applicable to Belgium and beyond. In 2009, an exploratory qualitative research was performed using focus group discussions and interviews with GPs. During data collection and analysis, purposive sampling, open and axial coding was applied. The script was composed around the advantages, disadvantages and conditions of engaging in OST in general practice. We conducted six focus groups and two interviews, with GPs experienced in prescribing OST (n = 13), inexperienced GPs (n = 13), and physicians from addiction centres (n = 5). Overall, GPs did not seem very willing to prescribe OST for opiate users. A lack of knowledge about OST and misbehaving patients creates anxiety and makes the GPs reluctant to learn more about OST. The GPs refer to a lack of collaboration with the addiction centres and a need of support (from either addiction centres or experienced GP-colleagues for advice). Important conditions for OST are acceptance of only stable opiate users and more support in emergencies. Increasing GPs' knowledge about OST and improving collaboration with addiction centres are essential to increase the uptake of OST in general practice. Special attention could be paid to the role of more experienced colleagues who can act as advising physicians for inexperienced GPs.

  20. Improving recruitment to pharmacological trials for illicit opioid use: findings from a qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neale, Joanne; Tompkins, Charlotte N E; McDonald, Rebecca; Strang, John

    2018-06-01

    To explore potential study participants' views on willingness to join clinical trials of pharmacological interventions for illicit opioid use to inform and improve future recruitment strategies. Qualitative focus group study [six groups: oral methadone (two groups); buprenorphine tablets (two groups); injectable opioid agonist treatment (one group); and former opioid agonist treatment (one group)]. Drug and alcohol services and a peer support recovery service (London, UK). Forty people with experience of opioid agonist treatment for heroin dependence (26 males, 14 females; aged 33-66 years). Data collection was facilitated by a topic guide that explored willingness to enrol in clinical pharmacological trials. Groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Transcribed data were analysed inductively via Iterative Categorization. Participants' willingness to join pharmacological trials of medications for opioid dependence was affected by factors relating to study burden, study drug, study design, study population and study relationships. Participants worried that the trial drug might be worse than, or interfere with, their current treatment. They also misunderstood aspects of trial design despite the researchers' explanations. Recruitment of participants for clinical trials of pharmacological interventions for illicit opioid use could be improved if researchers became better at explaining clinical trials to potential participants, dispelling misconceptions about trials and increasing trust in the research process and research establishment. A checklist of issues to consider when designing pharmacological trials for illicit opioid use is proposed. © 2018 The Authors. Addiction published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  1. Effect of prewarming on the body temperature of small dogs undergoing inhalation anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigotti, Clara F; Jolliffe, Colette T; Leece, Elizabeth A

    2015-10-01

    To investigate whether prewarming affects body temperature of small dogs (weighing dogs weighing temperature was recorded. Before IM administration of buprenorphine hydrochloride and acepromazine maleate, dogs were randomly assigned to be placed in a pediatric incubator at 33°C (91.4°F) for approximately 30 to 60 minutes (prewarming group) or to receive no prewarming (control group); subsequently, dogs underwent inhalation anesthesia with isoflurane in oxygen. Rectal, esophageal, and ambient temperatures were measured every 5 minutes from induction of anesthesia (IOA) for > 1 hour by an observer who was unaware of treatment. If a dog became hypothermic (esophageal temperature dogs, anesthesia, temperatures, hypothermia, and study withdrawal were compared between groups. 1 dog was excluded from the prewarming group after becoming excessively excited in the incubator. Between groups, age, weight, body condition score, degree of preanesthesia sedation, interval from sedation to IOA, duration of anesthesia, baseline rectal temperature, rectal temperatures immediately prior to IOA, esophageal temperature following IOA, ambient temperature during the first 70 minutes of anesthesia, esophageal or rectal temperature during the first 90 minutes of anesthesia, and incidence of hypothermia and study withdrawal (5 dogs/group) did not differ significantly. Prewarming in an incubator prior to IOA failed to improve or maintain body temperature of dogs weighing < 10 kg during inhalation anesthesia.

  2. Attitudes toward opioid substitution therapy and pre-incarceration HIV transmission behaviors among HIV-infected prisoners in Malaysia: implications for secondary prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachireddy, Chethan; Bazazi, Alexander R; Kavasery, Ravi; Govindasamy, Sumathi; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L

    2011-07-01

    Pre-incarceration HIV transmission behaviors and current attitudes toward opioid substitution therapy (OST) among HIV-infected male prisoners in Malaysia have important implications for secondary HIV prevention efforts. In June 2007, 102 HIV-infected male prisoners within 6 months of community-release were anonymously surveyed in Kota Bharu, Malaysia. Nearly all subjects (95%) met criteria for opioid dependence. Overall, 66% of participants reported sharing needles, and 37% reported unprotected sex in the 30 days prior to incarceration. During this period, 77% reported injection drug use, with 71% injecting daily and 65% injecting more than one substance. Injection of buprenorphine (28%), benzodiazepines (28%) and methamphetamines (49%) was reported. Nearly all (97%) of those reporting unprotected sex did so with someone not known to be HIV-infected. While 51% believed that opioid substitution therapy (OST) would be helpful, only 33% believed they needed it to prevent relapse after prison release. Most participants (70%) expressed interest in learning more about OST. Those reporting the highest injection risks were more likely to believe OST would be helpful (pMalaysia is crucial to reduce community HIV transmission after release. Effectively reducing HIV risk associated with opioid injection will require OST expansion, including social marketing to improve its acceptability and careful monitoring. Access to sterile injection equipment, particularly for non-opioid injectors, and behavioral interventions that reduce sexual risk will also be required. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Which psychoactive prescription drugs are illegally obtained and through which ways of acquisition? About OPPIDUM survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauger, Elisabeth; Nordmann, Sandra; Orleans, Veronica; Pradel, Vincent; Pauly, Vanessa; Thirion, Xavier; Micallef, Joëlle

    2012-08-01

    The objective of the study was to determine which psychoactive prescription drugs are illegally obtained and through which ways of acquisition. OPPIDUM is an annual national study. It is based on specialized care centers that included subjects presenting a drug dependency or under opiate maintenance treatment. All their psychoactive substances consumed are reported. This work focuses on the different ways of acquisition specially the illegal ways of acquisition (bought on the street, forged prescription, stolen, given, internet). For each medication illegally obtained, a ratio has been calculated (number of illegal acquisitions divided by the number of described acquisitions). In 2008, 5542 subjects have been included and have described the consumption of 11 027 substances including 63.8% of prescription drugs. Among them, 11% were illegally obtained. The different illegal acquisition ways were 'street market' (77.6%), 'gift' (16.6%), 'theft' (2.3%), 'forged prescription' (2.3%), and 'internet' (0.7%). The third first drugs illegally obtained were high dosage buprenorphine, methadone, and clonazepam. Some prescription drugs, less consumed, have an important ratio of illegal acquisition like ketamine, flunitrazepam, morphine, trihexyphenidyl, or methylphenidate. This study confirms that theft, forged prescription and internet are few used and permits to highlight diversion of prescription drugs. It is important to inform healthcare professionals on the different prescription drugs that are illegally obtained. © 2011 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2011 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  4. Long-acting intramuscular naltrexone for opioid use disorder: Utilization and association with multi-morbidity nationally in the Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Megan M; Reilly, Erin; Quiñones, Timothy; Desai, Nitigna; Rosenheck, Robert

    2018-02-01

    Long acting intramuscular (IM) naltrexone is an effective treatment for opioid use disorder (OUD), but rates and correlates of its use have not been studied. National administrative from the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) from Fiscal Year 2012 identified only 16 VHA facilities that prescribed IM naltrexone to 5 or more veterans diagnosed with OUD. Data from these facilities were used to identify sociodemographic, diagnostic, and service use characteristics, including use of psychotropic medication, that were characteristic of veterans who filled prescriptions for IM naltrexone. This was in comparison to users of opiate agonist treatments (methadone or buprenorphine) or veterans with no pharmacologic treatment for OUD. Comparisons were made using both bi-variate analyses and multivariable logistic regression. Only 179 of 16,402 veterans with OUD (1%) at these 16 facilities filled a prescription for IM naltrexone and only 256 of 99,394 (0.26%) nationally. These veterans were characterized by past homelessness, co-morbid alcohol use disorder, multiple psychiatric disorders, and a greater likelihood of psychiatric hospitalization, as well as mental health outpatient and antidepressant medication use. IM naltrexone is rarely used for OUD and is primarily used for patients with multiple co-morbidities, especially alcohol use disorder and serious mental illness. The use of this treatment illustrates many of the principles identified by the emerging focus on multi-morbidity as a critical feature of clinical practice. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Co-occurring Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder symptoms in adults affected by heroin dependence: Patients characteristics and treatment needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugoboni, Fabio; Levin, Frances Rudnick; Pieri, Maria Chiara; Manfredini, Matteo; Zamboni, Lorenzo; Somaini, Lorenzo; Gerra, Gilberto; Gruppo InterSert Collaborazione Scientifica Gics

    2017-04-01

    Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a risk for substance use disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between adult ADHD symptoms, opioid use disorder, life dysfunction and co-occurring psychiatric symptoms. 1057 heroin dependent patients on opioid substitution treatment participated in the survey. All patients were screened for adult ADHD symptoms using the Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale (ASRS-v1.1). 19.4% of the patients screened positive for concurrent adult ADHD symptoms status and heroin dependence. Education level was lower among patients with ADHD symptoms, but not significant with respect to non-ADHD patients. Patients with greater ADHD symptoms severity were less likely to be employed. A positive association was observed between ADHD symptoms status and psychiatric symptoms. Patients with ADHD symptoms status were more likely to be smokers. Patients on methadone had a higher rate of ADHD symptoms status compared to buprenorphine. Those individuals prescribed psychoactive drugs were more likely to have ADHD symptoms. In conclusion, high rate of ADHD symptoms was found among heroin dependent patients, particularly those affected by the most severe form of addiction. These individuals had higher rates of unemployment, other co-morbid mental health conditions, heavy tobacco smoking. Additional psychopharmacological interventions targeting ADHD symptoms, other than opioid substitution, is a public health need. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Criminal justice continuum for opioid users at risk of overdose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren; Zaller, Nickolas; Martino, Sarah; Cloud, David H; McCauley, Erin; Heise, Andrew; Seal, David

    2018-02-24

    The United States (US) is in the midst of an epidemic of opioid use; however, overdose mortality disproportionately affects certain subgroups. For example, more than half of state prisoners and approximately two-thirds of county jail detainees report issues with substance use. Overdose is one of the leading causes of mortality among individuals released from correctional settings. Even though the criminal justice (CJ) system interacts with a disproportionately high number of individuals at risk of opioid use and overdose, few CJ agencies screen for opioid use disorder (OUD). Even less provide access to medication assisted treatment (e.g. methadone, buprenorphine, and depot naltrexone), which is one of the most effective tools to combat addiction and lower overdose risk. However, there is an opportunity to implement programs across the CJ continuum in collaboration with law enforcement, courts, correctional facilities, community service providers, and probation and parole. In the current paper, we introduce the concept of a "CJ Continuum of Care for Opioid Users at Risk of Overdose", grounded by the Sequential Intercept Model. We present each step on the CJ Continuum and include a general overview and highlight opportunities for: 1) screening for OUD and overdose risk, 2) treatment and/or diversion, and 3) overdose prevention and naloxone provision. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A case of rhabdomyolysis associated with severe opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangahar, Deepali

    2015-08-01

    While the risk of opioid overdose is widely accepted, the dangers of opioid withdrawal are far less clearly defined. The purpose of this publication is to provide evidence against the erroneous clinical dictum that opioid withdrawal is never life-threatening. This case report (N = 1) illustrates an unfortunate, common scenario of a man abusing prescription opioids and heroin. His attempt at self-detoxification with buprenorphine-naloxone resulted in life-threatening opioid withdrawal. A detailed account of each day of his withdrawal period was documented by patient and family report and review of all medical records. The patient was contacted three months after hospitalization to verify information and determine progress in treatment and abstinence from drugs and alcohol. A review of the literature was completed on severe cases of precipitated and spontaneous opioid withdrawal followed by a discussion of the significance as it relates to this case. Given the widespread use of prescription opioids and opioid maintenance treatment, physicians should be aware of the complications of acute opioid withdrawal and should be equipped to treat these complications. © American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  8. Contribution of positron emission tomography for the study of response variability to opioid drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auvity, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    investigate the neuro-pharmacokinetic component of opioid pharmacology. "1"1C-diphenhydramine was developed in rats as a specific probe to estimate the H"+/antiporter function at the blood-brain barrier. This newly identified carrier transport System was shown to control the brain exposure of many CNS drugs, including oxycodone. Then, we used "1"1C-buprenorphine PET imaging and validated a co-injection strategy to quantify the parameters that describe the brain kinetics of buprenorphine in nonhuman primates. Throughout this project, several methods have been evaluated or developed in order to address original hypothesis regarding the pharmacology of opioid drugs. The choice for noninvasive and quantitative methods such as PET imaging allows for clinical translation. These tools may thus be useful to investigate the neuro-immune and neuro-pharmacokinetic component of the variability of response to opioid drugs in humans. (author) [fr

  9. Confecção de um modelo experimental in vitro do espaço subaracnóide eqüino para teste de opióides hiperbáricos Making of an in vitro experimental model of equine subarachnoid space to test hyperbaric opioids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre da Silva Polydoro

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de avaliar as características de distribuição de agentes hiperbáricos no líquido cérebro-espinhal (LCE eqüino, é apresentado um modelo in vitro do espaço subaracnóide confeccionado em policloreto de vinila (PVC transparente, no qual se adaptou um cateter para a infusão contínua de glicose a 10%, morfina hiperbárica, buprenorfina hiperbárica e metadona hiperbárica marcadas com azul de metileno para permitir a visualização da distribuição destas substâncias no LCE. Avaliaram-se a distância alcançada pelos diferentes agentes minuto a minuto e a forma de distribuição dos mesmos. Todas as substâncias testadas mostraram comportamento de distribuição vertical a partir da extremidade do cateter, quando se deu o início da migração cranial no LCE, sendo que o avanço máximo registrado foi aos 15 minutos após o término da infusão, com migração de 15cm para glicose a 10%, 13cm para a morfina hiperbárica, 18cm para a buprenorfina hiperbárica e 17cm para a metadona hiperbárica. O modelo proposto mostrou-se eficiente para a avaliação do comportamento físico dos agentes hiperbáricos no interior do espaço subaracnóide, oferecendo a possibilidade de teste de substâncias a serem utilizadas pela via subaracnóide de cavalos.The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution characteristics of hyperbaric solutions in equine cerebrospinal fluid (CSF, in an in vitro model of the subarachnoid space. The model was made with transparent PVC in which a catheter was adapted to infuse 10% glucose, 10% hyperbaric morphine, hyperbaric buprenorphine, and hyperbaric methadone, dyed with methilene blue in order to visualize the solutions distribution in the CSF. The distance in cm reached by the different agents every minute as well as the pattern of distribution were evaluated. All tested solutions distributed itself in a forward and vertically pattern from the tip of the catheter. Maximum distance reached after

  10. The toxicological significance of post-mortem drug concentrations in bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferner, Robin E; Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2018-01-01

    Some authors have proposed that post-mortem drug concentrations in bile are useful in estimating concentrations in blood. Both The International Association of Forensic Toxicologists (TIAFT) and the US Federal Aviation Administration recommend that samples of bile should be obtained in some circumstances. Furthermore, standard toxicological texts compare blood and bile concentrations, implying that concentrations in bile are of forensic value. To review the evidence on simultaneous measurements of blood and bile drug concentrations reported in the medical literature. We made a systematic search of EMBASE 1980-2016 using the search terms ("bile/" OR "exp drug bile level/concentration/") AND "drug blood level/concentration/", PubMed 1975-2017 for ("bile[tw]" OR "biliary[tw]") AND ("concentration[tw]" OR "concentrations[tw]" OR "level[tw]" OR "levels[tw]") AND "post-mortem[tw]" and also MEDLINE 1990-2016 for information on drugs whose biliary concentrations were mentioned in standard textbooks. The search was limited to human studies without language restrictions. We also examined recent reviews, indexes of relevant journals and citations in Web of Science and Google Scholar. We calculated the bile:blood concentration ratio. The searches together yielded 1031 titles with abstracts. We scanned titles and abstracts for relevance and retrieved 230, of which 161 were considered further. We excluded 49 papers because: the paper reported only one case (30 references); the data referred only to a metabolite (1); the work was published before 1980 (3); the information concerned only samples taken during life (10); or the paper referred to a toxin or unusual recreational drug (5). The remaining 112 papers provided data for analysis, with at least two observations for each of 58 drugs. Bile:blood concentration ratios: Median bile:blood concentration ratios varied from 0.18 (range 0.058-0.32) for dextromoramide to 520 (range 0.62-43,000) for buprenorphine. Median bile

  11. [Guidelines for substitution treatments in prison populations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, L; Maguet, O

    2005-01-01

    Care access for the drug addict patients in prison (in particular for the treatments of substitution) in France is very unequal from one establishment to another. This reflects the great variability of the practices of substitution and especially the absence of consensus on the methods of adaptation of these practices to the prison environment. Because of difficulties expressed by prisoners and medical staff on this subject and of stakes (let us recall that approximately 30% of the prisoners are dependent or abusers of one or more psychoactive substances), the formulation of recommendations or of a good practices guide of substitution in prison appeared necessary. Work that we detail here answers a ordering of the Advisory Commission of the Treatments of Substitution (September 2001) whose authors are members. It was presented at the session April 2003. It results from the confrontation of a review of the literature (including legal texts and official reports concerning substitution, the organization of the care in prison environment and the lawful framework), with a vast investigation. The latter was carried out near medical staff (22 prisons), penitentiary staff (3 prisons, 27 people met including directors of these establishments) and prisoners (7 establishments, 28 prisoners met) in the form of individual talks (semi-directing interviews with evaluation of the type of existing device and its knowledge by the penitentiary staff and the prisoners; statement of the suggestions, needs and requests of the medical, penitentiary staffs and of the prisoners). In the whole visited prisons, 7.8% (870) of the prisoners received substitution treatments (6.35% by buprenorphine, 1.44% by methadone), representing a proportion of substituted drug addicts (870 substituted for an evaluation of 3,350 prisoners drug addicts among the 11,168 prisoners of the 22 visited prisons) notably lower than that in free environment (56%, ie 96,000 substituted for an evaluated population of

  12. [Investigation of the medical and social situation of patients managed by opiate replacement regimens for over 10 years by their GP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messaadi, Nassir; Favre, Jonathan; Rolland, Benjamin; Cottencin, Olivier; Calafiore, Matthieu; Stalnikiewicz, Bertrand; Berkhout, Christophe

    2016-10-01

    Management with opiate replacement regimens (ORRs) of patients presenting to primary care settings with opiate addiction has become a long-term follow-up. The aim of this survey study was to describe patients who had been prescribed ORRs for at least 10 years by their general practitioner (GP). In 2011, two questionnaires were sent to a sample of 38 GPs prescribing ORRs in Northern France. Doctors' questionnaires collected their typology and opinions on their patients receiving opiate substitution treatments for over 10 years. Patients' questionnaires were completed in the presence of the patient. Twenty-three doctors' and 83 patients' questionnaires were suitable for analysis. The average number of listed ORR patients was 14.2 and 3.6 had been managed for 10 years or more. Misuse persisted: 30.5% of GPs considered that it was carried out by at least by 15% of patients. Average dosages were 60.3 mg for methadone and 7.0 mg for buprenorphine. Employment (46.3% of patients had a salary), dwelling and family live (46.3% of patients were in charge of children) were favored. Nevertheless, precariousness persisted: 32% of patients were indebted and help of social workers was not systematically searched. One third of the patients were alcohol and cannabis misusers, 70% were smoking and 34.5% multiple drug misusers. An important number of patients were taking anxiolytics (37.8%) and hypnotics (30.5%). After 10 years of follow-up for an ORR by a GP, the social situation of patients seems to have stabilized, but psychoactive drugs consumption remains important. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigating expectation and reward in human opioid addiction with [(11) C]raclopride PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Ben J; Taylor, Lindsay G; Reid, Alastair G; Wilson, Sue J; Stokes, Paul R; Brooks, David J; Myers, James F; Turkheimer, Federico E; Nutt, David J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R

    2014-11-01

    The rewarding properties of some abused drugs are thought to reside in their ability to increase striatal dopamine levels. Similar increases have been shown in response to expectation of a positive drug effect. The actions of opioid drugs on striatal dopamine release are less well characterized. We examined whether heroin and the expectation of heroin reward increases striatal dopamine levels in human opioid addiction. Ten opioid-dependent participants maintained on either methadone or buprenorphine underwent [(11) C]raclopride positron emission tomography imaging. Opioid-dependent participants were scanned three times, receiving reward from 50-mg intravenous heroin (diamorphine; pharmaceutical heroin) during the first scan to generate expectation of the same reward at the second scan, during which they only received 0.1-mg intravenous heroin. There was no heroin injection during the third scan. Intravenous 50-mg heroin during the first scan induced pronounced effects leading to high levels of expectation at the second scan. There was no detectable increase in striatal dopamine levels to either heroin reward or expectation of reward. We believe this is the first human study to examine whether expectation of heroin reward increases striatal dopamine levels in opioid addiction. The absence of detectable increased dopamine levels to both the expectation and delivery of a heroin-related reward may have been due to the impact of substitute medication. It does however contrast with the changes seen in abstinent stimulant users, suggesting that striatal dopamine release alone may not play such a pivotal role in opioid-maintained individuals. © 2013 The Authors. Addiction Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society for the Study of Addiction.

  14. Long-term course of opioid addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Evans, Elizabeth; Grella, Christine; Ling, Walter; Anglin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    Opioid addiction is associated with excess mortality, morbidities, and other adverse conditions. Guided by a life-course framework, we review the literature on the long-term course of opioid addiction in terms of use trajectories, transitions, and turning points, as well as other factors that facilitate recovery from addiction. Most long-term follow-up studies are based on heroin addicts recruited from treatment settings (mostly methadone maintenance treatment), many of whom are referred by the criminal justice system. Cumulative evidence indicates that opioid addiction is a chronic disorder with frequent relapses. Longer treatment retention is associated with a greater likelihood of abstinence, whereas incarceration is negatively related to subsequent abstinence. Over the long term, the mortality rate of opioid addicts (overdose being the most common cause) is about 6 to 20 times greater than that of the general population; among those who remain alive, the prevalence of stable abstinence from opioid use is low (less than 30% after 10-30 years of observation), and many continue to use alcohol and other drugs after ceasing to use opioids. Histories of sexual or physical abuse and comorbid mental disorders are associated with the persistence of opioid use, whereas family and social support, as well as employment, facilitates recovery. Maintaining opioid abstinence for at least five years substantially increases the likelihood of future stable abstinence. Recent advances in pharmacological treatment options (buprenorphine and naltrexone) include depot formulations offering longer duration of medication; their impact on the long-term course of opioid addiction remains to be assessed.

  15. Long-term outcomes from the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Griffin, Margaret L; Provost, Scott E; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; McDermott, Katherine A; Srisarajivakul, Emily N; Dodd, Dorian R; Dreifuss, Jessica A; McHugh, R Kathryn; Carroll, Kathleen M

    2015-05-01

    Despite the growing prevalence of prescription opioid dependence, longitudinal studies have not examined long-term treatment response. The current study examined outcomes over 42 months in the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS). POATS was a multi-site clinical trial lasting up to 9 months, examining different durations of buprenorphine-naloxone plus standard medical management for prescription opioid dependence, with participants randomized to receive or not receive additional opioid drug counseling. A subset of participants (N=375 of 653) enrolled in a follow-up study. Telephone interviews were administered approximately 18, 30, and 42 months after main-trial enrollment. Comparison of baseline characteristics by follow-up participation suggested few differences. At Month 42, much improvement was seen: 31.7% were abstinent from opioids and not on agonist therapy; 29.4% were receiving opioid agonist therapy, but met no symptom criteria for current opioid dependence; 7.5% were using illicit opioids while on agonist therapy; and the remaining 31.4% were using opioids without agonist therapy. Participants reporting a lifetime history of heroin use at baseline were more likely to meet DSM-IV criteria for opioid dependence at Month 42 (OR=4.56, 95% CI=1.29-16.04, popioid abstinence. Eight percent (n=27/338) used heroin for the first time during follow-up; 10.1% reported first-time injection heroin use. Long-term outcomes for those dependent on prescription opioids demonstrated clear improvement from baseline. However, a subset exhibited a worsening course, by initiating heroin use and/or injection opioid use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Prescription opioid abuse, pain and addiction: clinical issues and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Walter; Mooney, Larissa; Hillhouse, Maureen

    2011-05-01

    Prescription opioid misuse in the USA has increased over threefold since 1990 to epidemic proportions, with substantial increases in prescription opioid use also reported in other countries, such as Australia and New Zealand. The broad availability of prescription pain medications, coupled with public misconceptions about their safety and addictive potential, have contributed to the recent surge in non-medical use of prescription opioids and corresponding increases in treatment admissions for problems related to opioid misuse. Given competing pressures faced by physicians to both diagnose and treat pain syndromes and identify individuals at risk for addictive disorders, the use of opioids in the treatment of pain poses a significant clinical challenge. This paper reviews the interaction between pain and opioid addiction with a focus on clinical management issues, including risk factors for opioid dependence in patients with chronic pain and the use of assessment tools to identify and monitor at-risk individuals. Treatment options for opioid dependence and pain are reviewed, including the use of the partial µ agonist buprenorphine in the management of concurrent pain and opioid addiction. Physicians should strive to find a reasonable balance between minimising potential adverse effects of opioid medications without diminishing legitimate access to opioids for analgesia. The article discusses the need to identify methods for minimising risks and negative consequences associated with opioid analgesics and poses research directions, including the development of abuse-deterrent opioid formulations, genetic risk factors for opioid dependence and opioid-induced hyperalgesia as a potential target for medication therapy. © 2011 Australasian Professional Society on Alcohol and other Drugs.

  17. The current status of opioid maintenance treatment in France: a survey of physicians, patients, and out-of-treatment opioid users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benyamina A

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Amine Benyamina National Institute for Medical Research (INSERM U-669, Hôpital Universitaire Paul Brousse, 94804 Villejuif, France Aim: Project Access France was a national survey designed to provide real-world observations on the status of opioid dependence treatment in France. Methods: The views of physicians (n=100, patients (n=130, and out-of-treatment opioid users (n=33 were collected via interviews and questionnaires. Results: Physicians reported being moderately satisfied with treatment programs in their area (rating 6.9 out of 10. Most physicians (82% reported being concerned about misuse and diversion of medication-assisted treatment (MAT medications and 50% identified psychosocial/behavioral counseling as the key change that would most improve patient care. Among patients, the mean number of previous MAT episodes was low (1.5; 78% reported that it was easy to access a doctor to undergo MAT; 14% reported regularly or sometimes using heroin; misuse and diversion were reported in 15% and 39% of patients, respectively; and 57% of patients were not receiving psychosocial help. Out-of-treatment opioid users reported using drugs on a regular basis (42% regularly used heroin and cited 'not wanting to give up drugs completely' as the most frequent reason for staying out of MAT. Conclusion: This survey highlights a number of positive features of the open-access, GP-based treatment model for opioid dependence in France. Challenges remain with regard to continued misuse/diversion of MAT medications and limited patient access to psychosocial support. Keywords: opioid maintenance treatment, medication-assisted treatment, buprenorphine, methadone, buprenorphine–naloxone, France

  18. Anaesthesia and analgesia for dogs and cats in South Africa undergoing sterilisation and with osteoarthritis - an update from 2000 : report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.E. Joubert

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available A survey was conducted in 2000 into the use of analgesic drugs by veterinarians in South Africa. This survey was repeated in 2005 to establish whether the use of analgesic drugs has increased and which analgesic drugs are being used for acute pain and osteoarthritis. The number of sterilisations performed and the number of new cases of osteoarthritis in dogs and cats was estimated. It is estimated that approximately 260 000 cats are operated on each year in South Africa and that 150 000 cats are sterilised. Five hundred thousand dogs undergo surgery, of which 242 000 are sterilised. It appears that the number of surgical procedures performed in South Africa has decreased. The estimated death rate following anaesthesia has remained unchanged at 1:1004. Overall, the use of analgesics by South African veterinarians has increased significantly. Fifty-six per cent of cats and 74% of dogs were given peri-operative analgesics but this increased to 94 % and 84 % after including pre-anaesthetic medications with analgesic properties. The use of opioids (morphine and buprenorphine and propofol has increased significantly. Approximately 253 000 dogs and 33 000 cats with osteoarthritis are seen by veterinarians in South Africa annually. The recognition by veterinarians of osteoarthritis in cats appears to be poor and is in need of attention. Carprofen and glucosamine / chondroitin are the most commonly used agents for the treatment of osteoarthritis. Details of the drugs used by veterinarians are given. Knowledge of analgesic drugs has increased significantly over the last 5 years. Continuing education is thought to have played an important role in the changes reported in this study.

  19. Detection of drugs of abuse in exhaled breath using a device for rapid collection: comparison with plasma, urine and self-reporting in 47 drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Olof; Stephanson, Niclas; Sandqvist, Sören; Franck, Johan

    2013-06-01

    Exhaled breath has recently been identified as a matrix for the detection of drugs of abuse. This work aims to further document this application using a new and simple collection device in patients following recovery from acute intoxication. Breath, plasma and urine samples were collected from 47 patients (38 males, age range 25-74) together with interview data. Analysis of breath and plasma samples was done by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. Urine was screened using immunochemical reagents and positive findings confirmed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. The 12 analytes investigated were: methadone, amphetamine, methamphetamine, 6-acetylmorphine, morphine, benzoylecgonine, cocaine, diazepam, oxazepam, alprazolam, buprenorphine and tetrahydrocannabinol. In all 47 cases, recent intake of an abused substance prior to admission was reported, but in one case the substance (ketobemidone) was not investigated. In 40 of the remaining cases (87%) breath analysis gave a positive finding of any of the substances that were part of the analytical investigation. Identifications were based on correct chromatographic retention time and product ion ratios obtained in selected reaction monitoring mode. In general, data from breath, plasma, urine and self-reporting were in good agreement, but in 23% of the cases substances were detected that had not been self-reported. All substances covered were detected in a number of breath samples. Considering that breath sampling was often done about 24 h after intake, the detection rate was considered to be high for most substances. Analytes with low detection rates were benzodiazepines, and a further increase in analytical sensitivity is needed to overcome this. This study further supports use of exhaled breath as a new matrix in clinical toxicology.

  20. Underestimation of substance abuse in psychiatric patients by conventional hospital screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidy, Lisa J; Junquera, Patricia; Van Dijck, Karolien; Steele, Bernard W; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2014-12-01

    Psychiatric diagnosis mainly relies on behavioral signs and symptoms. Substance abuse can mimic the clinical presentation of primary psychiatric disorders and can also complicate the management of psychiatric patients. The reliability and accuracy of urine toxicology is a vital tool in the optimal treatment of these patients. Current demographics of substance abuse suggest that in addition to the most conventional drugs of abuse (e.g. cocaine, cannabis) that are of concern to treating physicians, prescription medications and new designer drugs also should be when evaluating patients who present with symptoms of psychosis/drug addiction or altered mental status. Urine samples from 220 psychiatric inpatients admitted to either an acute drug and alcohol unit or acute psychiatric unit were analyzed for drugs by the standard hospital assay (KIMS) and by a more sensitive ELISA and GC-MS basic drug screening protocol. The standard hospital toxicology (KIMS) was inferior to the ELISA and GC-MS methods in terms of both assay sensitivity and in detecting a broader number of drugs. The KIMS tests failed to identify opiates and amphetamine/methamphetamine in 50% of the patients. The KIMS screen did not identify zolpidem, buprenorphine and a number of synthetic drugs of abuse including cathinone and tryptamines. In order to reliably identify substance abuse in patients with altered mental status in inpatient settings, analytical methodologies with adequate assay sensitivity and range to detect the vast majority of commonly abused illicit drugs and prescription medications are required for optimal clinical assessment and treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Primary care models for treating opioid use disorders: What actually works? A systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooja Lagisetty

    Full Text Available Primary care-based models for Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT have been shown to reduce mortality for Opioid Use Disorder (OUD and have equivalent efficacy to MAT in specialty substance treatment facilities.The objective of this study is to systematically analyze current evidence-based, primary care OUD MAT interventions and identify program structures and processes associated with improved patient outcomes in order to guide future policy and implementation in primary care settings.PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsychInfo.We included randomized controlled or quasi experimental trials and observational studies evaluating OUD treatment in primary care settings treating adult patient populations and assessed structural domains using an established systems engineering framework.We included 35 interventions (10 RCTs and 25 quasi-experimental interventions that all tested MAT, buprenorphine or methadone, in primary care settings across 8 countries. Most included interventions used joint multi-disciplinary (specialty addiction services combined with primary care and coordinated care by physician and non-physician provider delivery models to provide MAT. Despite large variability in reported patient outcomes, processes, and tasks/tools used, similar key design factors arose among successful programs including integrated clinical teams with support staff who were often advanced practice clinicians (nurses and pharmacists as clinical care managers, incorporating patient "agreements," and using home inductions to make treatment more convenient for patients and providers.The findings suggest that multidisciplinary and coordinated care delivery models are an effective strategy to implement OUD treatment and increase MAT access in primary care, but research directly comparing specific structures and processes of care models is still needed.

  2. Retention in medication-assisted treatment programs in Ukraine-Identifying factors contributing to a continuing HIV epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumchev, Kostyantyn; Dvoryak, Sergii; Chernova, Olena; Morozova, Olga; Altice, Frederick L

    2017-10-01

    Opioid agonist treatments (OAT) are widely-used, evidence-based strategies for treating opioid dependence and reducing HIV transmission. The positive benefits of OAT are strongly correlated with time spent in treatment, making retention a key indicator for program quality. This study assessed patient retention and associated factors in Ukraine, where OAT was first introduced in 2004. Data from clinical records of 2916 patients enrolled in OAT at thirteen sites from 2005 to 2012 were entered into an electronic monitoring system. Survival analysis methods were used to determine the probability of retention and its correlates. Twelve-month retention was 65.8%, improving from 27.7% in 2005, to 70.9% in 2011. In multivariable analyses, the correlates of retention were receiving medium and high doses of medication (compared to low doses, dropout aHR=0.57 for both medium and high doses), having not been tested for HIV and tuberculosis (compared to not being tested, dropout aHR=4.44 and 3.34, respectively), and among those who were tested-a negative TB test result (compared to receiving a positive test result, dropout aHR=0.67). Retention in Ukrainian OAT programs, especially in recent years, is comparable to other countries. The results confirm the importance of adequate OAT dosing (≥60mg of methadone, ≥8mg of buprenorphine). Higher dosing, however, will require interventions that address negative attitudes toward OAT by patients and providers. Interruption of OAT, in the case developing tuberculosis, should incorporate continuity of OAT for TB patients through integrated care delivery systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Differential activation of G-proteins by μ-opioid receptor agonists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidak, Zuzana; Blake-Palmer, Katherine; Hay, Debbie L; Northup, John K; Glass, Michelle

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the ability of the activated μ-opioid receptor (MOR) to differentiate between myristoylated Gαi1 and GαoA type Gα proteins, and the maximal activity of a range of synthetic and endogenous agonists to activate each Gα protein. Membranes from HEK293 cells stably expressing transfected MOR were chaotrope extracted to denature endogenous G-proteins and reconstituted with specific purified G-proteins. The Gα subunits were generated in bacteria and were demonstrated to be recognised equivalently to bovine brain purified Gα protein by CB1 cannabinoid receptors. The ability of agonists to catalyse the MOR-dependent GDP/[35S]GTPγS exchange was then compared for Gαi1 and GαoA. Activation of MOR by DAMGO produced a high-affinity saturable interaction for GαoA (Km=20±1 nM) but a low-affinity interaction with Gαi1 (Km=116±12 nM). DAMGO, met-enkephalin and leucine-enkephalin displayed maximal Gα activation among the agonists evaluated. Endomorphins 1 and 2, methadone and β-endorphin activated both Gα to more than 75% of the maximal response, whereas fentanyl partially activated both G-proteins. Buprenorphine and morphine demonstrated a statistically significant difference between the maximal activities between Gαi1 and GαoA. Interestingly, DAMGO, morphine, endomorphins 1 and 2, displayed significant differences in the potencies for the activation of the two Gα. Differences in maximal activity and potency, for Gαi1 versus GαoA, are both indicative of agonist selective activation of G-proteins in response to MOR activation. These findings may provide a starting point for the design of drugs that demonstrate greater selectivity between these two G-proteins and therefore produce a more limited range of effects. PMID:16415903

  4. Sprcial discussion: Future Roles for Tincture of Opium in Medical Intervention for Opioid Dependence Treads and Hopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Opium tincture or tincture of opium (TOP, also known as Laudanum, is an alcoholic herbal preparation of opium. It is made by combining ethanol with opium latex or powder. After works of Paracelsus, the 16th century Swiss-German alchemist, who discovered that the alkaloids in opium are far more soluble in alcohol compared to water and named Opium tincture as Laudanum, this drug has been found a broad range of applications as the drug of choice for practically every ailment through 17th to 19th centuries. The early 20th century brought increased regulation of all manner of narcotics, including laudanum, as the addictive properties of opium became more widely understood. By the late 20th century, TOP's use was almost exclusively confined to treating severe diarrhea. During these thirty years, The efficacy and cost-effectiveness of opioid substitution therapy for the treatment of opioid addiction has been well documented by methadone and buprenorphine. Based on the idea of substitution therapy, TOP and slow releasing oral morphine (SROM have been proposed as the new alternatives. TOP could be used in three different ways in interventions for opioid dependency, first, as a supportive drug to reduce withdrawal syndrome during detoxification programs, second, as a substitution drug in long term maintenance, third, as a legal form of opioid drugs for harm reduction purposes. A little but growing evidences are supporting effectiveness of TOP for detoxification programs, in Iran, some preliminary open label studies showed effectiveness of TOP as a detoxifying drug in three to six month program, Now another open label study is evaluating TOP in a specific detoxification program with monthly evaluation and providing long term follow up after reaching to abstinence. There are a strong debate among the policy makers and clinicians on implementation of TOP in Iranian National Substance Abuse Treatment Facilities. In this article, We reviewed the proposed

  5. Route of administration for illicit prescription opioids: a comparison of rural and urban drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Havens Jennifer R

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonmedical prescription opioid use has emerged as a major public health concern in recent years, particularly in rural Appalachia. Little is known about the routes of administration (ROA involved in nonmedical prescription opioid use among rural and urban drug users. The purpose of this study was to describe rural-urban differences in ROA for nonmedical prescription opioid use. Methods A purposive sample of 212 prescription drug users was recruited from a rural Appalachian county (n = 101 and a major metropolitan area (n = 111 in Kentucky. Consenting participants were given an interviewer-administered questionnaire examining sociodemographics, psychiatric disorders, and self-reported nonmedical use and ROA (swallowing, snorting, injecting for the following prescription drugs: buprenorphine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, OxyContin® and other oxycodone. Results Among urban participants, swallowing was the most common ROA, contrasting sharply with substance-specific variation in ROA among rural participants. Among rural participants, snorting was the most frequent ROA for hydrocodone, methadone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone, while injection was most common for hydromorphone and morphine. In age-, gender-, and race-adjusted analyses, rural participants had significantly higher odds of snorting hydrocodone, OxyContin®, and oxycodone than urban participants. Urban participants had significantly higher odds of swallowing hydrocodone and oxycodone than did rural participants. Notably, among rural participants, 67% of hydromorphone users and 63% of morphine users had injected the drugs. Conclusions Alternative ROA are common among rural drug users. This finding has implications for rural substance abuse treatment and harm reduction, in which interventions should incorporate methods to prevent and reduce route-specific health complications of drug use.

  6. Use of Liposomal Bupivacaine for Postoperative Analgesia in an Incisional Pain Model in Rats (Rattus norvegicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Stacey C; Jampachaisri, Katechan; Seymour, Travis L; Felt, Stephen A; Pacharinsak, Cholawat

    2017-01-01

    The local anesthetic bupivacaine is valuable for perioperative analgesia, but its use in the postoperative period is limited by its short duration of action. Here, we evaluated the application of a slow-release liposomal formulation of bupivacaine for postoperative analgesia. The aim was to assess whether liposomal bupivacaine effectively attenuates postoperative mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity in a rat model of incisional pain. Rats (n = 36) were randomly assigned to 1 of 5 treatment groups: saline, 1 mL/kg SC every 12 h for 2 d; buprenorphine HCl, 0.05 mg/kg SC every 12 h for 2 d (Bup HCl); 0.5% bupivacaine, 2 mg/kg SC local infiltration once (Bupi); liposomal bupivacaine, 1 mg/kg SC local infiltration once (Exp1); and liposomal bupivacaine, 6 mg/kg SC local infiltration once (Exp6). Mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity were evaluated daily on days -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4. The saline group exhibited both hypersensitivities through all 4 evaluated postoperative days. Bup HCl attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity for 2 d and thermal hypersensitivity for 1 d. Bupi attenuated only thermal hypersensitivity for 4 d. Rats in the Exp1 group showed attenuation of both mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity for 4 d, and those in the Exp6 group had attenuation of mechanical hypersensitivity on day 0 and thermal hypersensitivity for 4 d. These data suggest that a single local infiltration of liposomal bupivacaine at a dose of 1 mg/kg SC effectively attenuates postoperative mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity for 4 d in a rat model of incisional pain.

  7. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS): Transitioning Methadone Treated Infants From An Inpatient to an Outpatient Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backes, Carl H.; Backes, Carl R.; Gardner, Debra; Nankervis, Craig A.; Giannone, Peter J.; Cordero, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Background Each year in the US approximately 50,000 neonates receive inpatient pharmacotherapy for the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Objective To compare the safety and efficacy of a traditional inpatient only approach with a combined inpatient and outpatient methadone treatment program. Design/Methods Retrospective review (2007-9). Infants were born to mothers maintained on methadone or buprenorphine in an antenatal substance abuse program. All infants received methadone for NAS treatment as inpatient. Methadone weaning for the traditional group (75 pts) was inpatient while the combined group (46 pts) was outpatient. Results Infants in the traditional and combined groups were similar in demographics, obstetrical risk factors, birth weight, GA and the incidence of prematurity (34 & 31%). Hospital stay was shorter in the combined than in the traditional group (13 vs 25d; p < 0.01). Although the duration of treatment was longer for infants in the combined group (37 vs 21d, p<0.01), the cumulative methadone dose was similar (3.6 vs 3.1mg/kg, p 0.42). Follow-up: Information was available for 80% of infants in the traditional and 100% of infants in the combined group. All infants in the combined group were seen ≤ 72 hours from hospital discharge. Breast feeding was more common among infants in the combined group (24 vs. 8% p<0.05). Following discharge there were no differences between the two groups in hospital readmissions for NAS. Prematurity (<37w GA) was the only predictor for hospital readmission for NAS in both groups (p 0.02, OR 5). Average hospital cost for each infant in the combined group was $13,817 less than in the traditional group. Conclusions A combined inpatient and outpatient methadone treatment in the management of NAS decreases hospital stay and substantially reduces cost. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the potential long term benefits of the combined approach on infants and their families. PMID:21852772

  8. A randomized pilot clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of Community Reinforcement and Family Training for Treatment Retention (CRAFT-T) for improving outcomes for patients completing opioid detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham, Gregory S; Slesnick, Natasha; Winhusen, Theresa M; Lewis, Daniel F; Guo, Xiamei; Somoza, Eugene

    2014-05-01

    Detoxification with psychosocial counseling remains a standard opioid-use disorder treatment practice but is associated with poor outcomes. This study tested the efficacy of a newly developed psychosocial intervention, Community Reinforcement Approach and Family Training for Treatment Retention (CRAFT-T), relative to psychosocial treatment as usual (TAU), for improving treatment outcomes. A randomized, 14-week trial with follow-up visits at 6 and 9 months post-randomization conducted at two substance use disorder (SUD) treatment programs. Opioid-dependent adults (i.e., identified patient - IP) enrolled in a residential buprenorphine-detoxification program and their identified concerned significant other (CSO) was randomized to CRAFT-T (n=28 dyads) or TAU (n=24 dyads). CRAFT-T consisted of two sessions with the IP and CSO together and 10 with the CSO alone, over 14 weeks. TAU for the CSOs was primarily educational and referral to self-help. All IPs received treatment as usually provided by the SUD program in which they were enrolled. The primary outcome was time to first IP drop from treatment lasting 30 days or more. Opioid and other drug use were key secondary outcomes. CRAFT-T resulted in a moderate but non-significant effect on treatment retention (p=0.058, hazard ratio=0.57). When the CSO was parental family, CRAFT-T had a large and significant effect on treatment retention (pCRAFT-T had a significant positive effect on IP opioid and other drug use (pCRAFT-T is a promising treatment for opioid use disorder but replication is needed to confirm these results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Neurobiology of opioid dependence in creating addiction vulnerability [version 1; referees: 3 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Evans

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Opioid drugs are potent modulators of many physiological and psychological processes. When given acutely, they can elicit the signature responses of euphoria and analgesia that societies have coveted for centuries. Repeated, or chronic, use of opioids induces adaptive or allostatic changes that modify neuronal circuitry and create an altered normality — the “drug-dependent” state. This state, at least that exhibited by those maintained continuously on long-acting opioid drugs such as methadone or buprenorphine, is generally indistinguishable from the drug-naïve state for most overt behaviors. The consequences of the allostatic changes (cellular, circuit, and system adaptations that accompany the drug-dependent state are revealed during drug withdrawal. Drug cessation triggers a temporally orchestrated allostatic re-establishment of neuronal systems, which is manifested as opposing physiological and psychological effects to those exhibited by acute drug intoxication. Some withdrawal symptoms, such as physical symptoms (sweating, shaking, and diarrhea resolve within days, whilst others, such as dysphoria, insomnia, and anxiety, can linger for months, and some adaptations, such as learned associations, may be established for life. We will briefly discuss the cellular mechanisms and neural circuitry that contribute to the opioid drug-dependent state, inferring an emerging role for neuroinflammation. We will argue that opioid addictive behaviors result from a learned relationship between opioids and relief from an existing or withdrawal-induced anxiogenic and/or dysphoric state. Furthermore, a future stressful life event can recall the memory that opioid drugs alleviate negative affect (despair, sadness, and anxiety and thereby precipitate craving, resulting in relapse. A learned association of relief of aversive states would fuel drug craving in vulnerable people living in an increasingly stressful society. We suggest that this route to

  10. Changes in quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) and addiction severity index (ASI) among participants in opioid substitution treatment (OST) in low and middle income countries: an international systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feelemyer, Jonathan P; Jarlais, Don C Des; Arasteh, Kamyar; Phillips, Benjamin W; Hagan, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Opioid substitution treatment (OST) can increase quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF) and reduce addiction severity index (ASI) scores among participants over time. OST program participants have noted that improvement in quality of life is one of the most important variables to their reduction in drug use. However, there is little systematic understanding of WHOQOL-BREF and ASI domain changes among OST participants in low and middle-income countries (LMIC). Utilizing PRISMA guidelines we conducted a systematic literature search to identify OST program studies documenting changes in WHOQOL-BREF or ASI domains for participants in buprenorphine or methadone programs in LMIC. Standardized mean differences for baseline and follow-up domain scores were compared along with relationships between domain scores, OST dosage, and length of follow-up. There were 13 OST program studies with 1801 participants from five countries eligible for inclusion in the review. Overall, statistically significant changes were noted in all four WHOQOL-BREF domain and four of the seven ASI domain scores (drug, psychological, legal, and family) documented in studies. Dosage of pharmacologic medication and length of follow-up did not affect changes in domain scores. WHOQOL-BREF and ASI domain scoring is a useful tool in measuring overall quality of life and levels of addiction among OST participants. Coupled with measurements of blood-borne infection, drug use, relapse, and overdose, WHOQOL-BREF and ASI represent equally important tools for evaluating the effects of OST over time and should be further developed as integrated tools in the evaluation of participants in LMIC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Evaluation of the vaginal flora in pregnant women receiving opioid maintenance therapy: a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, Alex; Kiss, Herbert; Hagmann, Michael; Holzer, Iris; Kueronya, Verena; Husslein, Peter W; Petricevic, Ljubomir

    2016-08-05

    Vaginal infections are a risk factor for preterm delivery. In this study, we sought to evaluate the vaginal flora of pregnant women receiving opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) in comparison to non-dependent, non-maintained controls. A total of 3763 women with singleton pregnancies who underwent routine screening for asymptomatic vaginal infections between 10 + 0 and 16 + 0 gestational weeks were examined. Vaginal smears were Gram-stained, and microscopically evaluated for bacterial vaginosis, candidiasis, and trichomoniasis. In a retrospective manner, data of 132 women receiving OMT (cases) were matched for age, ethnicity, parity, education, previous preterm delivery, and smoking status to the data of 3631 controls. The vaginal flora at antenatal screening served as the primary outcome measure. Secondary outcome measures were gestational age and birth weight. In the OMT group, 62/132 (47 %) pregnant women received methadone, 39/132 (29.5 %) buprenorphine, and 31/132 (23.5 %) slow-release oral morphine. Normal or intermediate flora was found in 72/132 OMT women (54.5 %) and 2865/3631 controls [78.9 %; OR 0.49 (95 % CI, 0.33-0.71); p Candidiasis occurred more frequently in OMT women than in controls [OR 2.11 (95 % CI, 1.26-3.27); p candidiasis) and trichomoniasis. Compared to infants of the control group, those of women with OMT had a lower mean birth weight [MD -165.3 g (95 % CI, -283.6 to -46.9); p = 0.006]. Pregnant women with OMT are at risk for asymptomatic vaginal infections. As recurrent candidiasis is associated with preterm delivery, the vulnerability of this patient population should lead to consequent antenatal infection screening at early gestation.

  12. Tamper-resistant prescription forms for narcotics in France:should we generalise them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveluy, Amélie; Sauvaget, Lucie; Bastien, Angela; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse; Collin, Cédric; Richard, Nathalie; Haramburu, Françoise

    2018-03-27

    In France, prescription of narcotics must be written on a tamper-resistant prescription form with specific technical particularities. Dosage and daily dose of medicines shall be written out entirely in letters. These prescription forms are also mandatory for buprenorphine, clorazepate, clonazepam, tianeptine, buccal midazolam and zolpidem owing to traffic, abuse or diversion. In 2012, to assess the use of standard and tamper-resistant prescription forms and the acceptability of the generalization of the latter to all medicines, a national opinion survey was performed, with a postal questionnaire, within 3 randomized samples of 1,500 prescribers (physicians, dentists and midwives). Of the 403 participating prescribers (participation rate of 26.8%), 373 were physicians, 14 dentists and 16 midwives. Tamper-resistant prescription forms were used by 76.2% of prescribers, but only by 5.1% in a computerised version, whereas, for standard prescription forms, 61% used computer assisted prescription software. The main reason was the inability of the prescription software to print these forms or to respect the mandatory prescription rules for narcotics. Theft and falsification of prescriptions had ever occurred (working life). Most prescribers (62.5%) were against the generalization of tamper-resistant prescription forms. Those in favour were for a generalization to all medicines (65%) and not only to psychotropic agents. Generalization of tamper-resistant prescription forms is not a consensual solution to prevent medicines' diversion. Some prescribers alluded to the possibility of dematerialisation and electronic transmission of prescription forms, which could avoid theft, forgery or falsification. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Needs assessment and treatment compliance at state opioid substitution treatment programes in Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piralishvili, G; Gamkrelidze, I; Nikolaishvili, N; Chavchanidze, M

    2013-01-01

    conduct needs assessments and treatment compliance evaluations in MMT and Suboxone Substitution State Programs in Georgia (Republic of). 506 patients (2 females) were surveyed (92% on Methadone, 8% on Suboxone) from 6 Tbilisi and 4 regional State Programs in 2011 November. Mean age - 40±8,56 (22-65) year; 254 (51.4%) were in treatment for 1-3 year. Evaluation was carried out on the base of structured self-questionnaire that covers demographics, drug use history, general drug use trends, psychotherapeutic sessions' acceptance and open label question regarding treatment challenges and satisfaction. 305 (60.3%) attended individual and 57 (11.3%) group psychotherapy sessions with 50.79% attending once/month or rare. The main reason given for therapy non-attendance - no needs for it (29.48%); the main drugs before admission - heroin (80.04%), buprenorphine (53.49%); Main drugs used in Georgia nowadays - desomorphine ("crocodile"), alcohol and marihuana. Commonly used drugs by program patients (136 positive answers) - alcohol-13.62%, marihuana-10.39%, pregabalin - 8.17%, opioids- 6.62% (mostly-"crocodile"), home-made stimulants-6.23%, sedatives -5.45%. 55.4% are extremely satisfied with treatment, 82.4% - with program staff. Patients' main wishes- free of charge programs (46.4%) and provide take-home doses (22.07%). Methadone and Suboxone ST are being well accepted in Georgia and appear to be reducing illegal opioid use. However, the psychotherapeutic sessions' attendance is very low.

  14. Development of a new multi-analyte assay for the simultaneous detection of opioids in serum and other body fluids using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, K; Röhrich, J; Breitmeier, D; Ferner, M; Laufenberg-Feldmann, R; Urban, R

    2015-09-15

    A liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method using electrospray ionization in positive ionization mode was developed for the simultaneous detection of multiple opioid-type drugs in plasma. The presented assay allows the quantitative determination of alfentanil, buprenorphine, codeine, desomorphine, dextromethorphan, dextrorphan, dihydrocodeine, dihydromorphine, ethylmorphine, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, methadone, morphine, naloxone, naltrexone, oxycodone, oxymorphone, pentazocine, pethidine, pholcodine, piritramide, remifentanil, sufentanil, and tramadol as well as the metabolites 6-monoacetylmorphine, bisnortilidine, morphine-3-glucuronide, morphine-6-glucuronide, naltrexol, norbuprenorphine, norfentanyl, norpethidine, nortilidine, and O-desmethyltramadol. Serum and blood samples were purified by solid-phase extraction. The analytes were separated on a phenyl-hexyl (100mm) column by formic acid/acetonitrile gradient elution using an UPLC 1290 Infinity coupled with a 6490 Triple Quadrupole mass spectrometer. The limits of detection ranged from 0.02 to 0.6ng/mL and the lower limits of quantification ranged from 0.1 to 2.0ng/mL. The calibration curves were linear between Calibration Levels 1-6 for all 35 substances. Recovery rates ranged between 51 and 88% for all compounds except alfentanil, bisnortilidine, pethidine, and morphine-3-glucuronide. The matrix effect ranged from 86% for ethylmorphine to 105% for desomorphine. Using the validation procedure proposed by the German Society of Toxicological and Forensic Chemistry, acceptable precision and accuracy data for almost all analytes were obtained. The method was successfully applied to 206 authentic serum samples provided by the palliative and intensive care units of the University Medical Center and the police authorities. Furthermore, a suspected fatal intoxication is demonstrated by an analysis of the sufentanil in post mortem body fluids and tissues. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All

  15. Increase in Drug Overdose Deaths Involving Fentanyl-Rhode Island, January 2012-March 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Melissa C; Sumner, Steven A; Spelke, M Bridget; Bohm, Michele K; Sugerman, David E; Stanley, Christina

    2018-03-01

    This study identified sociodemographic, substance use, and multiple opioid prescriber and dispenser risk factors among drug overdose decedents in Rhode Island, in response to an increase in overdose deaths (ODs) involving fentanyl. This cross-sectional investigation comprised all ODs reviewed by Rhode Island's Office of the State Medical Examiners (OSME) during January 2012 to March 2014. Data for 536 decedents were abstracted from OSME's charts, death certificates, toxicology reports, and Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP) databases. Decedents whose cause of death involved illicit fentanyl (N = 69) were compared with decedents whose causes of death did not involve fentanyl (other drug decedents; N = 467). Illicit-fentanyl decedents were younger than other drug decedents (P = 0.005). While more other-drug decedents than illicit fentanyl decedents had postmortem toxicological evidence of consuming heroin (31.9% vs 19.8%, P < 0.001) and various pharmaceutical substances (P = 0.002-0.027), third party reports indicated more recent heroin use among illicit fentanyl decedents (62.3% vs 45.6%, P = 0.002). Approximately 35% of decedents filled an opioid prescription within 90 days of death; of these, one-third had a mean daily dosage greater than 100 morphine milligram equivalents (MME/day). Most decedents' opioid prescriptions were filled at one to two dispensers (83.9%) and written by one to two prescribers (75.8%). Notably, 29.2% of illicit fentanyl and 10.5% of other drug decedents filled prescriptions for buprenorphine, which is used to treat opioid use disorders. Illicit-fentanyl deaths frequently involved other illicit drugs (e.g., cocaine, heroin). The proportion of all decedents acquiring greater than 100 MME/day prescription dosages written and/or filled by few prescribers and dispensers is concerning. To protect patients, prescribers and dispensers should review PMP records and substance abuse history prior to providing opioids.

  16. Screening for illicit and medicinal drugs in whole blood using fully automated SPE and ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography with TOF-MS with data-independent acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Anders Just; Dalsgaard, Petur Weihe; Rode, Andrej Jaroslav; Rasmussen, Brian Schou; Müller, Irene Breum; Johansen, Sys Stybe; Linnet, Kristian

    2013-07-01

    A broad forensic screening method for 256 analytes in whole blood based on a fully automated SPE robotic extraction and ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) with TOF-MS with data-independent acquisition has been developed. The limit of identification was evaluated for all 256 compounds and 95 of these compounds were validated with regard to matrix effects, extraction recovery, and process efficiency. The limit of identification ranged from 0.001 to 0.1 mg/kg, and the process efficiency exceeded 50% for 73 of the 95 analytes. As an example of application, 1335 forensic traffic cases were analyzed with the presented screening method. Of these, 992 cases (74%) were positive for one or more traffic-relevant drugs above the Danish legal limits. Commonly abused drugs such as amphetamine, cocaine, and frequent types of benzodiazepines were the major findings. Nineteen less frequently encountered drugs were detected e.g. buprenorphine, butylone, cathine, fentanyl, lysergic acid diethylamide, m-chlorophenylpiperazine, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone, mephedrone, 4-methylamphetamine, p-fluoroamphetamine, and p-methoxy-N-methylamphetamine. In conclusion, using UHPLC-TOF-MS screening with data-independent acquisition resulted in the detection of common drugs of abuse as well as new designer drugs and more rarely occurring drugs. Thus, TOF-MS screening of blood samples constitutes a practical way for screening traffic cases, with the exception of δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol, which should be handled in a separate method. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Escitalopram is Associated with Reductions in Pain Severity and Pain Interference in Opioid Dependent Patients with Depressive Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Judith I.; Herman, Debra S.; Kettavong, Malyna; Anderson, Bradley J.; Stein, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Pain is common among opioid dependent patients, yet pharmacologic strategies are limited. The aim of this study was to explore whether escitalopram, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, was associated with reductions in pain. The study used longitudinal data from a randomized, controlled trial that evaluated the effects of escitalopram on treatment retention in patients with depressive symptoms who were initiating buprenorphine/naloxone for treatment of opioid dependence. Participants were randomized to take escitalopram 10mg or placebo daily. Changes in pain severity, pain interference and depression were assessed at 1, 2 and 3 months visits using the Visual Analog Scale, Brief Pain Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory II, respectively. Fixed-effects estimator for panel regression models were used to assess the effects of intervention on changes in outcomes over time. Additional models were estimated to explore whether the intervention effect was mediated by within-person changes in depression. In this sample of 147 adults, we found that participants randomized to escitalopram had significantly larger reductions on both pain severity (b = −14.34, t = −2.66, p < .01) and pain interference (b = −1.20, t = −2.23, p < .05) between baseline and follow-up. After adjusting for within-subject changes in depression, the estimated effects of escitalopram on pain severity and pain interference were virtually identical to the unadjusted effects. In summary, this study of opioid-dependent patients with depressive symptoms found that treatment with escitalopram was associated with clinically meaningful reductions in pain severity and pain interference during the first three months of therapy. PMID:21924552

  18. Spillover effects of HIV testing policies: changes in HIV testing guidelines and HCV testing practices in drug treatment programs in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemima A. Frimpong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the extent to which state adoption of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC 2006 revisions to adult and adolescent HIV testing guidelines is associated with availability of other important prevention and medical services. We hypothesized that in states where the pretest counseling requirement for HIV testing was dropped from state legislation, substance use disorder treatment programs would have higher availability of HCV testing services than in states that had maintained this requirement. Methods We analyzed a nationally representative sample of 383 opioid treatment programs from the 2005 and 2011 National Drug Abuse Treatment System Survey (NDATSS. Data were collected from program directors and clinical supervisors through telephone surveys. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to measure associations between state adoption of CDC recommended guidelines for HIV pretest counseling and availability of HCV testing services. Results The effects of HIV testing legislative changes on HCV testing practices varied by type of opioid treatment program. In states that had removed the requirement for HIV pretest counseling, buprenorphine-only programs were more likely to offer HCV testing to their patients. The positive spillover effect of HIV pretest counseling policies, however, did not extend to methadone programs and did not translate into increased availability of on-site HCV testing in either program type. Conclusions Our findings highlight potential positive spillover effects of HIV testing policies on HCV testing practices. They also suggest that maximizing the benefits of HIV policies may require other initiatives, including resources and programmatic efforts that support systematic integration with other services and effective implementation.

  19. OPPIDUM surveillance program: 20 years of information on drug abuse in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauger, Elisabeth; Moracchini, Christophe; Le Boisselier, Reynald; Braunstein, David; Thirion, Xavier; Micallef, Joëlle

    2013-12-01

    It is important to assess drug abuse liability in 'real life' using different surveillance systems. Some are based on specific population surveys, such as individuals with drug abuse or dependence, or under opiate maintenance treatment, because this population is very familiar with drugs and is more likely to divert or abuse them. In France, an original surveillance system based on this specific population and called 'Observation of illegal drugs and misuse of psychotropic medications (OPPIDUM) survey' was set up in 1990 as the first of its kind. The aim of this article is to describe this precursor of French drug abuse surveillance using different examples, to demonstrate its ability to effectively give health authorities and physicians interesting data on drug abuse. OPPIDUM is an annual, cross-sectional survey that anonymously collects information on abuse and dependence observed in patients recruited in specialized care centers dedicated to drug dependence. From 1990 to 2010, a total of 50,734 patients were included with descriptions of 102,631 psychoactive substance consumptions. These data have outlined emergent behaviors such as the misuse of buprenorphine by intravenous or nasal administration. It has contributed to assess abuse liability of emergent drugs such as clonazepam or methylphenidate. This surveillance system was also able to detect the decrease of flunitrazepam abuse following implementation of regulatory measures. OPPIDUM's twenty years of experience clearly demonstrate that collection of valid and useful data on drug abuse is possible and can provide helpful information for physicians and health authorities. © 2013 The Authors Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology © 2013 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  20. Characterization of adolescent prescription drug abuse and misuse using the Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-related Surveillance (RADARS(®)) System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zosel, Amy; Bartelson, Becki Bucher; Bailey, Elise; Lowenstein, Steven; Dart, Rick

    2013-02-01

    To describe the characteristics and health effects of adolescent (age 13-19 years) prescription drug abuse and misuse using the Researched Abuse Diversion and Addiction-Related Surveillance (RADARS(®)) System. Secondary analysis of data collected from RADARS System participating poison centers was performed. Data for all intentional exposures from 2007 through 2009 were used to describe adolescent prescription opioid (oxycodone, fentanyl, hydrocodone, hydromorphone, morphine, methadone, buprenorphine, and tramadol) and stimulant (methylphenidate and amphetamines) exposures. A total of 16,209 intentional adolescent exposures to prescription drugs were identified, 68% to opioids and 32% to stimulants. The mean age was 16.6 years (SD ± 1.7 years). Slightly more than half (52.4%) of drug mentions involved females. The five most frequently misused or abused drugs were hydrocodone (32%), amphetamines (18%), oxycodone (15%), methylphenidate (14%), and tramadol (11%). Of all exposures, 38% were classified as suspected suicidal. Of adolescents who intentionally exposed themselves to prescription drugs, 30% were treated in a health care facility, 2,792 of whom were admitted to the hospital, including 1,293 to the intensive care unit. A total of 17.2% of intentional exposures were associated with no effect, 38.9% minor effects, 23.3% moderate effects, 3.6% major effects, and 0.1% were associated with death. Oxycodone and methadone were associated with the most deaths. No deaths were associated with exposures to stimulants. Prescription drug misuse and abuse poses an important health problem and results in thousands of hospitalizations of adolescents per year. Further work is needed to develop focused interventions and educational programs to prevent prescription drug abuse and misuse by adolescents. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Evaluation of interobserver agreement for postoperative pain and sedation assessment in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Javier; Monteiro, Beatriz P; Beauchamp, Guy; Lascelles, B Duncan X; Steagall, Paulo V

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate agreement between observers with different training and experience for assessment of postoperative pain and sedation in cats by use of a dynamic and interactive visual analog scale (DIVAS) and for assessment of postoperative pain in the same cats with a multidimensional composite pain scale (MCPS). DESIGN Randomized, controlled, blinded study. ANIMALS 45 adult cats undergoing ovariohysterectomy. PROCEDURES Cats received 1 of 3 preoperative treatments: bupivacaine, IP; meloxicam, SC with saline (0.9% NaCl) solution, IP, (positive control); or saline solution only, IP (negative control). All cats received premedication with buprenorphine prior to general anesthesia. An experienced observer (observer 1; male; native language, Spanish) used scales in English, and an inexperienced observer (observer 2; female; native language, French) used scales in French to assess signs of sedation and pain. Rescue analgesia was administered according to MCPS scoring by observer 1. Mean pain and sedation scores per treatment and time point, proportions of cats in each group with MCPS scores necessitating rescue analgesia, and mean MCPS scores assigned at the time of rescue analgesia were compared between observers. Agreement was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient determination. Percentage disagreement between observers on the need for rescue analgesia was calculated. RESULTS Interobserver agreements for pain scores were good, and that for sedation scores was fair. On the basis of observer 1's MCPS scores, a greater proportion of cats in the negative control group received rescue analgesia than in the bupivacaine or positive control groups. Scores from observer 2 indicated a greater proportion of cats in the negative control group than in the positive control group required rescue analgesia but identified no significant difference between the negative control and bupivacaine groups for this variable. Overall, disagreement regarding need for rescue

  2. Reimbursement of analgesics for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Line; Hansen, Anneli Borge; Svendsen, Kristian; Skurtveit, Svetlana; Borchgrevink, Petter C; Fredheim, Olav Magnus S

    2012-11-27

    The prevalence of chronic non-malignant pain in Norway is between 24% and 30%. The proportion of the population using opioids for non-malignant pain on a long-term basis is around 1%. The purpose of our study was to investigate how many were prescribed analgesics on reimbursable prescription under reimbursement code -71 (chronic non-malignant pain) in 2009 and 2010, which analgesics were prescribed and whether prescribing practices were in accordance with national guidelines. We retrieved pseudonymised data from the National Prescription Database on all those who received drugs with reimbursement code -71 in 2009 and 2010. The data contain information on drug, dosage, formulation, reimbursement code and date of issue. 90,731 patients received reimbursement for drugs indicated for chronic non-malignant pain in 2010. Of these, 6,875 were given opioids, 33,242 received paracetamol, 25,865 non-steroid inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), 20,654 amitryptiline and 16,507 gabapentin. Oxycodone was the most frequently prescribed opioid, followed by buprenorphine, tramadol and codeine/paracetamol. Of those who were prescribed opioids, 4,047 (59%) received mainly slow-release opioids, 2,631 (38%) also received benzodiazepines and 2,418 (35%) received benzodiazepine-like sleep medications. The number of patients who received analgesics and opioids on reimbursable prescriptions was low compared to the proportion of the population with chronic pain and the proportion using opioids long-term. 38% of those reimbursed for opioids also used benzodiazepines, which is contrary to official Norwegian guidelines.

  3. Pain in the Frail or Elderly Patient: Does Tapentadol Have a Role?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veal, Felicity C; Peterson, Gregory M

    2015-06-01

    Persistent pain affects the elderly disproportionally, occurring in 50% of elderly community-dwelling patients and 80% of aged care residents. The management of pain in the elderly and frail patient is complicated because of the risks posed by changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, polypharmacy, and drug-disease interactions. Trials evaluating the efficacy of analgesics have often excluded elderly patients and universally excluded frail patients; therefore, the true efficacy and side-effect profiles in these population groups are largely unknown, especially for long-term use. A stepwise approach is recommended to managing pain, commencing with paracetamol and adding on opioids when needed to manage pain. However, because of the short duration of clinical trials, exclusion of frail patients, and minimal inclusion of elderly patients, the decision as to which opioid should be added on to paracetamol is a difficult one. This article reviews the evidence surrounding a newer opioid, tapentadol. Tapentadol acts on both the mu receptors and on neuronal reuptake of noradrenaline, and has no significant analgesically active metabolites, which theoretically presents some advantages, particularly in comparison with tramadol. However, the evidence to support tapentadol is weak and the trials were often methodologically poor and sponsored almost universally by the drug company. Currently, there is insufficient evidence to support the use of tapentadol over other opioids, which have been on the market longer, are less expensive, and have better established safety profiles. As a first-line agent after the failure of paracetamol alone, morphine, oxycodone, fentanyl, or buprenorphine are still the preferred evidence-based choices for add-on opioid therapy for elderly or frail patients.

  4. Analgesic effect of bupivacaine eluting porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) in ferrets undergoing acute abdominal hernia defect surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brenda M; Ko, Jeff C; Hall, Paul J; Saunders, Alan T; Lantz, Gary C

    2011-05-15

    Porcine small intestinal submucosa (SIS) is used as a biological implant for abdominal wall hernia repair to facilitate wound healing and augment local tissue strength. This prospective, randomized, blinded study evaluated local pain control provided by bupivacaine adsorbed to SIS for repair of acutely created abdominal wall full thickness muscle/fascial defects in ferrets. Eighteen healthy ferrets were randomly and equally assigned to three groups: (1) SIS with bupivacaine subjected to surgery, (2) SIS with no bupivacaine subjected to surgery, and (3) anesthesia only control group. Ferrets in groups 1 and 2 were anesthetized with butorphanol and sevoflurane for the surgery. Control ferrets were anesthetized in the same fashion for the same duration without surgery. Behavior and pain were evaluated in all ferrets by behavioral observation, algometer, and palpometer measurements, and heart and respiratory rates each obtained before surgery and at various intervals for 96 h after surgery. When pain reached a predetermined threshold, buprenorphine was used as a rescue analgesic. The serum and combined tissue concentrations of bupivacaine were analyzed. Overall, the palpometer testing was better tolerated in the bupivacaine treated SIS group than by the untreated SIS group (P = 0.04). There was an observed physiologically significant difference in algometer and other palpometer readings as well as heart and respiratory rates. All ferrets in the untreated SIS group were rescued while 33% of the SIS-bupivacaine groups were rescued (P pain relief over 2-4 days with no clinical adverse effects observed in the ferrets. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Tincture of opium for treating opioid dependence: a systematic review of safety and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikoo, Mohammadali; Nikoo, Nooshin; Anbardan, Sanam Javid; Amiri, Afshar; Vogel, Marc; Choi, Fiona; Sepehry, Amir Ali; Bagheri Valoojerdi, Amir Hooshang; Jang, Kerry; Schütz, Christian; Akhondzadeh, Shahin; Krausz, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Recently, there has been a growing interest in using opium tincture (OT) for treating opioid dependence in certain regions. We aimed to assess the evidence on its safety and efficacy for this indication. We searched several databases (CENTRAL, Medline, EMBASE, Web of Science, PsychINFO, ProQuest Dissertation and Theses Database, Iran Medex, clinicaltrials.gov and who.int/trialsearch) with no language or publication date limitations. Two reviewers selected randomized controlled trials (RCT), cohort/case-control/cross-sectional studies and case-series on safety or efficacy of OT for treating opioid dependence and then extracted reported measures of mentioned outcomes from selected studies. We used the Effective Public Health Practice Project (EPHPP) Quality Assessment tool for appraisal. From nine selected studies; in three RCTs and one cohort analytical analysis on detoxification, 110 patients were treated with 15-140 morphine equivalents/day (mEq/d) of OT; in four prospective and one retrospective uncontrolled case-series on long-term/maintenance treatment, 570 patients were treated with 100-400 mEq/d of OT. Only two studies on detoxification included a comparison: one concluded equal efficacy of OT and methadone in suppressing withdrawal symptoms (P = 0.32) and the other concluded OT to be less efficacious than buprenorphine/naloxone in suppressing withdrawal [OT = 12.20, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 11.00, 13.40]; control: 5.20 (95% CI = 4.69, 5.71) and craving (OT = 303.0, 95% CI = -144.664, 750.664; control: 0.0) but not significantly different (P = 0.26) in retaining participants in treatment. No major adverse events were reported. Conclusive recommendations about the safety and efficacy of opium tincture for treating opioid dependence are not possible at this time. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  6. Imaging drugs with and without clinical analgesic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Jaymin; Anderson, Julie; Schwarz, Adam J; Coimbra, Alexandre; Baumgartner, Richard; Pendse, G; George, Edward; Nutile, Lauren; Wallin, Diana; Bishop, James; Neni, Saujanya; Maier, Gary; Iyengar, Smriti; Evelhoch, Jeffery L; Bleakman, David; Hargreaves, Richard; Becerra, Lino; Borsook, David

    2011-12-01

    The behavioral response to pain is driven by sensory and affective components, each of which is mediated by the CNS. Subjective pain ratings are used as readouts when appraising potential analgesics; however, pain ratings alone cannot enable a characterization of CNS pain circuitry during pain processing or how this circuitry is modulated pharmacologically. Having a more objective readout of potential analgesic effects may allow improved understanding and detection of pharmacological efficacy for pain. The pharmacological/functional magnetic resonance imaging (phMRI/fMRI) methodology can be used to objectively evaluate drug action on the CNS. In this context, we aimed to evaluate two drugs that had been developed as analgesics: one that is efficacious for pain (buprenorphine (BUP)) and one that failed as an analgesic in clinical trials aprepitant (APREP). Using phMRI, we observed that activation induced solely by BUP was present in regions with μ-opioid receptors, whereas APREP-induced activation was seen in regions expressing NK(1) receptors. However, significant pharmacological modulation of functional connectivity in pain-processing pathways was only observed following BUP administration. By implementing an evoked pain fMRI paradigm, these drugs could also be differentiated by comparing the respective fMRI signals in CNS circuits mediating sensory and affective components of pain. We report a correlation of functional connectivity and evoked pain fMRI measures with pain ratings as well as peak drug concentration. This investigation demonstrates how CNS-acting drugs can be compared, and how the phMRI/fMRI methodology may be used with conventional measures to better evaluate candidate analgesics in small subject cohorts.

  7. A Multi-site, Two-Phase, Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS): Rationale, Design, and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D.; Potter, Jennifer Sharpe; Provost, Scott E.; Huang, Zhen; Jacobs, Petra; Hasson, Albert; Lindblad, Robert; Connery, Hilary Smith; Prather, Kristi; Ling, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse Clinical Trials Network launched the Prescription Opioid Addiction Treatment Study (POATS) in response to rising rates of prescription opioid dependence and gaps in understanding the optimal course of treatment for this population. POATS employed a multi-site, two-phase adaptive, sequential treatment design to approximate clinical practice. The study took place at 10 community treatment programs around the United States. Participants included men and women age ≥18 who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th Edition criteria for dependence upon prescription opioids, with physiologic features; those with a prominent history of heroin use (according to pre-specified criteria) were excluded. All participants received buprenorphine/naloxone (bup/nx). Phase 1 consisted of 4 weeks of bup/nx treatment, including a 14-day dose taper, with 8 weeks of follow-up. Phase 1 participants were monitored for treatment response during these 12 weeks. Those who relapsed to opioid use, as defined by pre-specified criteria, were invited to enter Phase 2; Phase 2 consisted of 12 weeks of bup/nx stabilization treatment, followed by a 4-week taper and 8 weeks of post-treatment follow-up. Participants were randomized at the beginning of Phase 1 to receive bup/nx, paired with either Standard Medical Management (SMM) or Enhanced Medical Management (EMM; defined as SMM plus individual drug counseling). Eligible participants entering Phase 2 were re-randomized to either EMM or SMM. POATS was developed to determine what benefit, if any, EMM offers over SMM in short-term and longer-term treatment paradigm. This paper describes the rationale and design of the study. PMID:20116457

  8. Regional anesthesia procedures for shoulder and upper arm surgery upper extremity update--2005 to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripada, Ramprasad; Bowens, Clifford

    2012-01-01

    This review of the literature since 2005 assesses developments of RA techniques commonly used for shoulder surgery, and their effectiveness for postoperative analgesia. Advantages of regional techniques include site-specific anesthesia and decreased postoperative opioid use. For shoulder surgeries, the ISB provides effective analgesia with minimal complications, whereas the impacts of IA single-injections remain unclear. When combined with GA, ISB can be used in lower volumes and reducing the complications for shoulder and proximal upper extremity. USG ISB and SCB are both effective and safe for shoulder surgery with a low incidence of complications, especially PONS.53 When compared with intravenous patient-controlled opioid analgesia, a perineural LA infusion using a disposable pump with patient-controlled LA bolus function has led to better pain relief and functional recovery while decreasing the need for rescue analgesics and the number of adverse events after ambulatory orthopedic surgery. The most remarkable advance in RA in the past 5 years is the increased usage of USG. Although there are no large-scale prospective studies to show the safety, efficacy, and success and complication rates for USG blocks, USG RA theoretically could have less risk for neurologic symptoms, except for those induced by LA (less likely perineurally, much more likely intraneurally). The next "quantum leap" lies in reducing LA concentrations and augmenting anesthetic-analgesic effects with perineural additives (including clonidine, buprenorphine, and likely low-dose dexamethasone). Since 2005, perineural catheters have been an analgesic option that offers improved pain relief among other benefits, and are now being used at home. It is clear that patients benefit greatly from a single injection and continuous nerve block for postoperative pain management,but the financial and logistical aspects need to be resolved, not to mention the phrenic hemiparesis coin toss. Whether combined

  9. Stress-related behavioral alterations accompanying cocaine toxicity: the effects of mixed opioid drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayase, T; Yamamoto, Y; Yamamoto, K

    2000-12-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of mixed opioid drugs on the severity of cocaine (COCA) toxicity by examining stress-related behavioral alterations in mice. In order to ascertain the strength of the stress, the continuous observation of the behavioral symptoms in the cage and the forced swimming test (Porsolt test) were performed in the COCA (75 mg/kg, i.p.)-treated groups, with or without the mixed mu-kappa receptor-related opioid drugs, buprenorphine (BUP) and pentazocine (PEN). Using the high-sensitivity activity measuring instrument Supermex, both the spontaneous behaviors in the cage and the forced swimming behaviors in the water were assessed as activity counts. The behavioral alterations in the COCA-treated groups were compared with a group of mice given a 10 min immobilization stress (IM group). In the COCA-only group, a prolonged increase in the spontaneous behaviors accompanied by convulsive seizures was observed even in the surviving mice, unlike in the IM group. However, an acceleration of behavioral despair in the Porsolt test similar to that observed in the IM group was observed in the COCA group after the disappearance of the acute toxic symptoms (5 hours after the COCA treatment). Among the opioid-treated groups, the mortality rate was attenuated only in the COCA-BUP (0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) group. In the COCA-BUP group, a prolonged suppression of the morbid hyperactivity in the cage except for the convulsive seizures, and a normalization of the swimming behavior in the Porsolt test were observed in the survivors. On the other hand, in the COCA-PEN (5 mg/kg, i.p.) group, the swimming behavior in the Porsolt test was abnormally increased in addition to the prolonged morbid hyperactivity in the cage. Therefore, the COCA-induced stress-related behaviors were normalized in the group of mice treated with BUP, a group with a good prognosis.

  10. Utility of coloured hair for the detection of drugs and alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Ronald

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the utility of coloured hair for the detection of drugs and alcohol in a large statistically significant population. The positivity rate, the 1st, 5th, 50th, 95th, and 99th percentiles of five amphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, four opiates, methadone, buprenorphine, seven benzodiazepines, and ethyl glucuronide (EtG) in 9488 non-treated and 1026 cosmetically treated (dyed or bleached) authentic hair samples was compared. Analytical methods used were accredited for forensic purposes at the cut-offs defined by the German driving licence re-granting medical and psychological assessment (MPA) guidelines. Considering only the drug classes for which at least 10 positive samples were detected, the positivity rate in non-treated hair was highest for alcohol (4.50%; measured using EtG at concentrations ≥ 7 pg/mg hair), followed by THC (2.00%), cocaine (1.75%), and amphetamine (0.59%). While the 1st to 99th percentile range was significantly lower for drugs in treated, compared to non-treated hair, no significant change was observed for EtG. Additionally, no significant difference in the positivity rate was observed between treated hair and non-treated hair for both drugs and EtG. This study is the first attempt to evaluate the influence of cosmetic treatment, mainly dying, on the positivity rate for both drugs and EtG in hair samples submitted routinely for abstinence testing and the first to indicate that dyed and eventually bleached hair is not necessarily useless in detecting drugs and/or alcohol consumption, thus making coloured hair analysis still useful, often being the only possibility to prove such misuse. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Criminal Activity or Treatable Health Condition? News Media Framing of Opioid Analgesic Abuse in the United States, 1998-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinty, Emma E; Kennedy-Hendricks, Alene; Baller, Julia; Niederdeppe, Jeff; Gollust, Sarah; Barry, Colleen L

    2016-04-01

    Opioid analgesic abuse is a complex and relatively new public health problem, and to date little is known about how the news media frame the issue. To better understand how this issue has been framed in public discourse, an analysis was conducted of the volume and content of news media coverage of opioid analgesic abuse over a 15-year period from 1998 to 2012 (N=673 news stories). A 70-item structured coding instrument was used to measure items in four domains that prior research suggests can influence public attitudes about health and social issues: causes, solutions, and consequences of the problem and individual depictions of persons who abuse opioid analgesics. Although experts have deemed opioid analgesic abuse a public health crisis, results of our study suggest that the news media more often frame the problem as a criminal justice issue. The most frequently mentioned cause of the problem was illegal drug dealing, and the most frequently mentioned solutions were law enforcement solutions designed to arrest and prosecute the individuals responsible for diverting opioid analgesics onto the illegal market. Prevention-oriented approaches, such as prescription drug-monitoring programs, were mentioned more frequently in the latter years of the study period, but less than 5% of news stories overall mentioned expanding substance abuse treatment, and even fewer mentioned expanding access to evidence-based medication-assisted treatments, such as buprenorphine. Findings underscore the need for a concerted effort to reframe opioid analgesic abuse as a treatable condition addressable via well-established public and behavioral health approaches.

  12. Pro-dopamine regulator, KB220Z, attenuates hoarding and shopping behavior in a female, diagnosed with SUD and ADHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Thomas; Blum, Kenneth; Steinberg, Bruce; Modestino, Edward J; Fried, Lyle; Baron, David; Siwicki, David; Braverman, Eric R; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D

    2018-03-01

    Background Addictive-like behaviors (e.g., hoarding and shopping) may be the result of the cumulative effects of dopaminergic and other neurotransmitter genetic variants as well as elevated stress levels. We, therefore, propose that dopamine homeostasis may be the preferred goal in combating such challenging and unwanted behaviors, when simple dopaminergic activation through potent agonists may not provide any resolution. Case presentation C.J. is a 38-year-old, single, female, living with her mother. She has a history of substance use disorder as well as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, inattentive type. She had been stable on buprenorphine/naloxone combination and amphetamine, dextroamphetamine mixed salts for many years when unexpectedly she lost her job for oversleeping and not calling into work. KB200z (a pro-dopamine compound) was added to her regimen for complaints of low drive and motivation. After taking this nutraceutical for 4 weeks, she noticed a marked improvement in her mental status and many behaviors. She noted that her shopping and hoarding addictions had appreciably decreased. Furthermore, her lifelong history of terrifying lucid dreams was eliminated. Finally, she felt more in control; her locus of control shifted from external to more internal. Discussion The hypothesis is that C.J.'s reported, behavioral, and psychological benefits resulted from the pro-dopamine-regulating effect of KB220Z across the brain reward system. Conclusions This effect, we surmise, could be the result of a new dopamine balance, across C.J.'s brain reward system. Dopamine homeostasis is an effect of KB220Z seen in both animal and human placebo-controlled fMRI experiments.

  13. Development of a murine model of blunt hepatic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemzek-Hamlin, Jean A; Hwang, Haejin; Hampel, Joseph A; Yu, Bi; Raghavendran, Krishnan

    2013-10-01

    Despite the prevalence of blunt hepatic trauma in humans, there are few rodent models of blunt trauma that can be used to study the associated inflammatory responses. We present a mouse model of blunt hepatic trauma that was created by using a cortical contusion device. Male mice were anesthetized with ketamine-xylazine-buprenorphine and placed in left lateral recumbency. A position of 2 mm ventral to the posterior axillary line and 5 mm caudal to the costal margin on the right side was targeted for impact. An impact velocity of 6 m/s and a piston depth of 12 mm produced a consistent pattern of hepatic injury with low mortality. All mice that recovered from anesthesia survived without complication for the length of the study. Mice were euthanized at various time points (n = 5 per group) until 7 d after injury for gross examination and collection of blood and peritoneal lavage fluids. Some mice were reanesthetized for serial monitoring of hepatic lesions via MRI. At 2 h after trauma, mice consistently displayed laceration, hematoma, and discoloration of the right lateral and caudate liver lobes, with intraabdominal hemorrhage but no other gross injuries. Blood and peritoneal lavage fluid were collected from all mice for cytokine analysis. At 2 h after trauma, there were significant increases in plasma IL10 as well as peritoneal lavage fluid IL6 and CXCL1/KC; however, these levels decreased within 24 h. At 7 d after trauma, the mice had regained body weight, and the hepatic lesions, which initially had increased in size during the first 48 h, had returned to their original size. In summary, this technique produced a reliable, low mortality, murine model that recreates features of blunt abdominal liver injury in human subjects with similar acute inflammatory response.

  14. Intentional intrathecal opioid detoxification in 3 patients: characterization of the intrathecal opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Tracy P; Lonergan, Daniel F; Todd, R David; Martin, Peter R

    2013-04-01

    Intrathecal (IT) drug delivery systems for patients with chronic non-malignant pain are intended to improve pain and quality of life and reduce side effects of systemic use. A subset of patients may have escalating pain, functional decline, and/or intolerable side effects even as IT opioid doses are increased. Discontinuation of IT medications may represent a viable treatment option but strategies to accomplish this are needed. Three patients with intrathecal drug delivery systems (IDDS), inadequate pain control, and declining functionality underwent abrupt IT opioid cessation. This was accomplished through a standardized protocol with symptom-triggered administration of clonidine and buprenorphine, monitored using the clinical opiate withdrawal scale. Symptoms of IT withdrawal were similar in all patients and included diuresis, agitation, hyperalgesia, mild diarrhea, yawning, and taste and smell aversion. Hypertension and tachycardia were effectively controlled by clonidine administration. Classic symptoms of withdrawal, such as piloerection, chills, severe diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, diaphoresis, myoclonus, and mydriasis, were not noted. At 2 to 3 months follow-up, patients reported decreased, but ongoing pain, with improvements in functional capacity and quality of life. This preliminary work demonstrates the safety of abrupt IT opioid cessation utilizing standardized inpatient withdrawal protocols. To our knowledge, these are among the first reported cases of intentional, controlled IT opioid cessation without initiation of an opioid bridge: self-reported pain scores, functional capacity, and quality of life improved. The IT opioid withdrawal syndrome is characterized based upon our observations and a review of the literature. © 2012 The Authors. Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  15. Patient Outcomes in Dose Reduction or Discontinuation of Long-Term Opioid Therapy: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Joseph W; Lovejoy, Travis I; Becker, William C; Morasco, Benjamin J; Koenig, Christopher J; Hoffecker, Lilian; Dischinger, Hannah R; Dobscha, Steven K; Krebs, Erin E

    2017-08-01

    Expert guidelines recommend reducing or discontinuing long-term opioid therapy (LTOT) when risks outweigh benefits, but evidence on the effect of dose reduction on patient outcomes has not been systematically reviewed. To synthesize studies of the effectiveness of strategies to reduce or discontinue LTOT and patient outcomes after dose reduction among adults prescribed LTOT for chronic pain. MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library from inception through April 2017; reference lists; and expert contacts. Original research published in English that addressed dose reduction or discontinuation of LTOT for chronic pain. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed study quality using the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force quality rating criteria. All authors assessed evidence quality using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. Prespecified patient outcomes were pain severity, function, quality of life, opioid withdrawal symptoms, substance use, and adverse events. Sixty-seven studies (11 randomized trials and 56 observational studies) examining 8 intervention categories, including interdisciplinary pain programs, buprenorphine-assisted dose reduction, and behavioral interventions, were found. Study quality was good for 3 studies, fair for 13 studies, and poor for 51 studies. Many studies reported dose reduction, but rates of opioid discontinuation ranged widely across interventions and the overall quality of evidence was very low. Among 40 studies examining patient outcomes after dose reduction (very low overall quality of evidence), improvement was reported in pain severity (8 of 8 fair-quality studies), function (5 of 5 fair-quality studies), and quality of life (3 of 3 fair-quality studies). Heterogeneous interventions and outcome measures; poor-quality studies with uncontrolled designs. Very low quality evidence suggests that several types of interventions may be effective to reduce or

  16. Primary healthcare-based integrated care with opioid agonist treatment: First experience from Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, Olga; Dvoriak, Sergey; Pykalo, Iryna; Altice, Frederick L

    2017-04-01

    Ukraine's HIV epidemic is concentrated among people who inject drugs (PWID), however, coverage with opioid agonist therapies (OATs) available mostly at specialty addiction clinics is extremely low. OAT integrated into primary healthcare clinics (PHCs) provides an opportunity for integrating comprehensive healthcare services and scaling up OAT. A pilot study of PHC-based integrated care for drug users conducted in two Ukrainian cities between 2014 and 2016 included three sub-studies: 1) cross-sectional treatment site preference assessment among current OAT patients (N=755); 2) observational cohort of 107 PWID who continued the standard of care versus transition of stabilized and newly enrolled PWID into PHC-based integrated care; and 3) pre/post analysis of attitudes toward PWID and HIV patients by PHC staff (N=26). Among 755 OAT patients, 53.5% preferred receiving OAT at PHCs, which was independently correlated with convenience, trust in physician, and treatment with methadone (vs. buprenorphine). In 107 PWID observed over 6 months, retention in treatment was high: 89% in PWID continuing OAT in specialty addiction treatment settings (standard of care) vs 94% in PWID transitioning to PHCs; and 80% among PWID newly initiating OAT in PHCs. Overall, satisfaction with treatment, subjective self-perception of well-being, and trust in physician significantly increased in patients prescribed OAT in PHCs. Among PHC staff, attitudes towards PWID and HIV patients significantly improved over time. OAT can be successfully integrated into primary care in low and middle-income countries and improves outcomes in both patients and clinicians while potentially scaling-up OAT for PWID. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Opioid antagonists with minimal sedation for opioid withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowing, Linda; Ali, Robert; White, Jason M

    2017-05-29

    Managed withdrawal is a necessary step prior to drug-free treatment or as the endpoint of long-term substitution treatment. To assess the effects of opioid antagonists plus minimal sedation for opioid withdrawal. Comparators were placebo as well as more established approaches to detoxification, such as tapered doses of methadone, adrenergic agonists, buprenorphine and symptomatic medications. We updated our searches of the following databases to December 2016: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and Web of Science. We also searched two trials registers and checked the reference lists of included studies for further references to relevant studies. We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled clinical trials along with prospective controlled cohort studies comparing opioid antagonists plus minimal sedation versus other approaches or different opioid antagonist regimens for withdrawal in opioid-dependent participants. We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. Ten studies (6 randomised controlled trials and 4 prospective cohort studies, involving 955 participants) met the inclusion criteria for the review. We considered 7 of the 10 studies to be at high risk of bias in at least one of the domains we assessed.Nine studies compared an opioid antagonist-adrenergic agonist combination versus a treatment regimen based primarily on an alpha 2 -adrenergic agonist (clonidine or lofexidine). Other comparisons (placebo, tapered doses of methadone, buprenorphine) made by included studies were too diverse for any meaningful analysis. This review therefore focuses on the nine studies comparing an opioid antagonist (naltrexone or naloxone) plus clonidine or lofexidine versus treatment primarily based on clonidine or lofexidine.Five studies took place in an inpatient setting, two studies were in outpatients with day care, two used day care only for the first day of opioid antagonist administration, and one study described the setting as outpatient

  18. Determination of safety margins for whole blood concentrations of alcohol and nineteen drugs in driving under the influence cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristoffersen, Lena; Strand, Dag Helge; Liane, Veronica Horpestad; Vindenes, Vigdis; Tvete, Ingunn Fride; Aldrin, Magne

    2016-02-01

    Legislative limits for driving under the influence of 20 non-alcohol drugs were introduced in Norway in February 2012. Per se limits corresponding to blood alcohol concentrations (BAC) of 0.2g/kg were established for 20 psychoactive drugs, and limits for graded sanctions corresponding to BACs of 0.5 and 1.2g/kg were determined for 13 of these drugs. This new legislation made it possible for the courts to make sentences based on the analytical results, similar to the situation for alcohol. To ensure that the reported concentration is as least as high as the true concentration, with a 99% safety level, safety margins had to be calculated for each of the substances. Diazepam, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and alcohol were used as model substances to establish a new model for estimating the safety margins. The model was compared with a previous used model established several years ago, by a similar yet much simpler model, and they were found to be in agreement. The measurement uncertainties depend on the standard batch used, the work list and the measurements' replicate. A Bayesian modelling approach was used to determine the parameters in the model, using a dataset of 4700 diazepam positive specimens and 5400 THC positive specimens. Different safety margins were considered for low and high concentration levels of diazepam (≤2μM (0.6mg/L) and >2μM) and THC (≤0.01μM (0.003mg/L) and >0.01μM). The safety margins were for diazepam 19.5% (≤2μM) and 34% (>2μM), for THC 19.5% (≤0.01μM) and 24.9% (>0.01μM). Concentration dependent safety margins for BAC were based on a dataset of 29500 alcohol positive specimens, and were in the range 10.4% (0.1g/kg) to 4.0% (4.0g/kg) at a 99% safety level. A simplified approach was used to establish safety margins for the compounds amphetamine, MDMA, methamphetamine, alprazolam, phenazepam, flunitrazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, oxazepam, buprenorphine, GHB, methadone, ketamine, cocaine, morphine, zolpidem and zopiclone. The

  19. Harm reduction in the USA: the research perspective and an archive to David Purchase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Jarlais, Don C

    2017-07-26

    The history of harm reduction in the USA has led to the development of some of the most important methods for treating persons for drug use disorders, such as methadone and buprenorphine for opiate use disorder. However, there has been fierce political resistance to implementation and scale-up of harm reduction in the USA. This resistance is rooted in historical demonization of particular psychoactive drugs that were associated with stigmatized racial/ethnic groups.With the discovery of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in 1981, harm reduction became important not only for treating substance use disorders, but for reducing transmission of blood-borne infection. However, within the context of the crack cocaine epidemic in the 1980s, it was very difficult to implement any programs that appeared to "condone" drug use.It was not until the late 1980s that syringe exchange programs began at the state and local level in the USA. With funding primarily from state and local governments and the support of the North American Syringe Exchange Network (NASEN), there are now approximately 200 programs for syringe exchange in the USA. Research has shown that these programs have been extremely effective in reducing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission among persons who inject drugs (PWID). The programs in the USA also offer many additional services for drug users, including condom distribution, referrals to substance abuse treatment, HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) counseling and testing, overdose education and naloxone distribution to reverse for overdose.Currently, the USA is experiencing an opioid/heroin epidemic, with significant increases in overdose deaths among drug users. Much of this epidemic is occurring in suburban and rural of the country without harm reduction services. The current challenges for harm reduction and harm reduction research involve expansion of services to suburban and rural areas and implementation science on

  20. The effect of bundling medication-assisted treatment for opioid addiction with mHealth: study protocol for a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, David H; Landucci, Gina; McTavish, Fiona; Kornfield, Rachel; Johnson, Roberta A; Mares, Marie-Louise; Westergaard, Ryan P; Quanbeck, Andrew; Alagoz, Esra; Pe-Romashko, Klaren; Thomas, Chantelle; Shah, Dhavan

    2016-12-12

    Opioid dependence has devastating and increasingly widespread consequences and costs, and the most common outcome of treatment is early relapse. People who inject opioids are also at disproportionate risk for contracting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). This study tests an approach that has been shown to improve recovery rates: medication along with other supportive services (medication-assisted treatment, or MAT) against MAT combined with a smartphone innovation called A-CHESS (MAT + A-CHESS). This unblinded study will randomly assign 440 patients to receive MAT + A-CHESS or MAT alone. Eligible patients will meet criteria for having an opioid use disorder of at least moderate severity and will be taking methadone, injectable naltrexone, or buprenorphine. Patients with A-CHESS will have smartphones for 16 months; all patients will be followed for 24 months. The primary outcome is the difference between patients in the two arms in percentage of days using illicit opioids during the 24-month intervention. Secondary outcomes are differences between patients receiving MAT + A-CHESS versus MAT in other substance use, quality of life, retention in treatment, health service use, and, related to HIV and HCV, screening and testing rates, medication adherence, risk behaviors, and links to care. We will also examine mediators and moderators of the effects of MAT + A-CHESS. We will measure variables at baseline and months 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24. At each point, patients will respond to a 20- to 30-min phone survey; urine screens will be collected at baseline and up to twice a month thereafter. We will use mixed-effects to evaluate the primary and secondary outcomes, with baseline scores functioning as covariates, treatment condition as a between-subject factor, and the outcomes reflecting scores for a given assessment at the six time points. Separate analyses will be conducted for each outcome. A-CHESS has been shown to

  1. The impact of chronic pain on opioid addiction treatment: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brittany B; Bawor, Monica; Paul, James; Varenbut, Michael; Daiter, Jeff; Plater, Carolyn; Pare, Guillaume; Marsh, David C; Worster, Andrew; Desai, Dipika; Thabane, Lehana; Samaan, Zainab

    2015-04-16

    The consequences of opioid relapse among patients being treated with opioid substitution treatment (OST) are serious and can result in abnormal cardiovascular function, overdose, and mortality. Chronic pain is a major risk factor for opioid relapse within the addiction treatment setting. There exist a number of opioid maintenance therapies including methadone, buprenorphine, naltrexone, and levomethadyl acetate (LAAM), of which the mediating effects of pain on treatment attrition, substance use behavior, and social functioning may differ across therapies. We aim to 1) evaluate the impact of pain on the treatment outcomes of addiction patients being managed with OST and 2) identify the most recently published opioid maintenance treatment guidelines from the United States, Canada, and the UK to determine how the evidence is being translated into clinical practice. The authors will search Medline, EMBASE, PubMed, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ProQuest Dissertations and theses Database, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform Search Portal, and the National Institutes for Health Clinical Trials Registry. We will search www. gov and the National Institute for Care and Excellence (NICE) databases to identify the most recently published OST guidelines. All screening and data extraction will be completed in duplicate. Provided the data are suitable, we will perform a multiple treatment comparison using Bayesian meta-analytic methods to produce summary statistics estimating the effect of chronic pain on all OSTs. Our primary outcome is substance use behavior, which includes opioid and non-opioid substance use. We will also evaluate secondary endpoints such as treatment retention, general physical health, intervention adherence, personal and social functioning, as well as psychiatric symptoms. This review will capture the experience of treatment

  2. Opioid maintenance therapy in Switzerland: an overview of the Swiss IMPROVE study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, J; Beck, T; Wiesbeck, G; Hämmig, R; Kuntz, A; Abid, S; Stohler, R

    2014-01-01

    Switzerland's drug policy model has always been unique and progressive, but there is a need to reassess this system in a rapidly changing world. The IMPROVE study was conducted to gain understanding of the attitudes and beliefs towards opioid maintenance therapy (OMT) in Switzerland with regards to quality and access to treatment. To obtain a "real-world" view on OMT, the study approached its goals from two different angles: from the perspectives of the OMT patients and of the physicians who treat patients with maintenance therapy. The IMPROVE study collected a large body of data on OMT in Switzerland. This paper presents a small subset of the dataset, focusing on the research design and methodology, the profile of the participants and the responses to several key questions addressed by the questionnaires. IMPROVE was an observational, questionnaire-based cross-sectional study on OMT conducted in Switzerland. Respondents consisted of OMT patients and treating physicians from various regions of the country. Data were collected using questionnaires in German and French. Physicians were interviewed by phone with a computer-based questionnaire. Patients self-completed a paper-based questionnaire at the physicians' offices or OMT treatment centres. A total of 200 physicians and 207 patients participated in the study. Liquid methadone and methadone tablets or capsules were the medications most commonly prescribed by physicians (60% and 20% of patient load, respectively) whereas buprenorphine use was less frequent. Patients (88%) and physicians (83%) were generally satisfied with the OMT currently offered. The current political framework and lack of training or information were cited as determining factors that deter physicians from engaging in OMT. About 31% of OMT physicians interviewed were ≥60 years old, indicating an ageing population. Diversion and misuse were considered a significant problem in Switzerland by 45% of the physicians. The subset of IMPROVE data

  3. Gender and racial/ethnic differences in addiction severity, HIV risk, and quality of life among adults in opioid detoxification: results from the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Burchett

    2010-12-01

    more likely than whites to use heroin and cocaine and to have more severe alcohol and employment problems.Conclusions: Women and whites show more psychopathology than men and African Americans. These results highlight the need to monitor an increased trend of opioid addiction among women and whites and to develop effective combined psychosocial and pharmacologic treatments to meet the diverse needs of the expanding opioid-abusing population. Elevated levels of HIV risk behaviors among Hispanics and whites also warrant more research to delineate mechanisms and to reduce their risky behaviors.Keywords: buprenorphine, clinical trials network, gender differences, heath disparity, HIV risk behavior, methadone, opioid dependence, rehabilitation

  4. Hemodynamics and bispectral index (BIS of dogs anesthetized with midazolam and ketamine associated with medetomidine or dexmedetomidine and submitted to ovariohysterectomy Avaliação hemodinâmica e do índice bispectral (BIS de cadelas anestesiadas com midazolam e cetamina associados à medetomidina ou dexmedetomidina e submetidas a ovário-salpingo-histerectomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando do Carmo Silva

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate hemodynamics and bispectral index (BIS in bitches anesthetized with ketamine and midazolam in combination with dexmedetomidine or medetomidine and submitted to ovariohysterectomy. METHODS: Twenty bitches pretreated with levomedetomidine and buprenorphine were anesthetized with 5 mg.kg-1 ketamine and 0.2 mg.kg-1 midazolam i.v. Continuous infusion of 0.4 mg.kg-1.h-1 midazolam and 20 mg.kg-1.h-1 ketamine was initiated in combination with DEX (n=10: 20 µg.kg-1.h-1 dexmedetomidine or MED (n=10: 30 µg.kg-1.h-1 medetomidine over 30 minutes. A pharmacokinetic study provided dexmedetomidine plasma concentration, set to be 3.0 ng.mL-1. RESULTS: BIS decreased in both groups (P0.05, but heart rate decreased in both groups, as compared to control values (POBJETIVO: Verificar o comportamento hemodinâmico e o índice bispectral de cadelas anestesiadas com cetamina e midazolam associados à dexmedetomidina ou medetomidina. MÉTODOS: Vinte cadelas receberam pré-tratamento com levomepromazina e buprenorfina e foram anestesiadas com cetamina, 5 mg.kg-1 i.v., e midazolam, 0,2 mg.kg-1 i.v., seguidos da administração contínua de midazolam, 0,4 mg.kg-1.h-1, e cetamina, 20 mg.kg-1.h-1, associados, conforme o grupo, à: DEX (n=10: dexmedetomidina 20 µg.kg-1.h-1 ou MED (n=10: medetomidina 30 µg.kg-1.h-1, mantidos por 30 minutos. A dose de dexmedetomidina foi obtida por meio de estudo farmacocinético planejando-se concentração plasmática de 3,0 ng.mL-1. RESULTADOS: Os valores do BIS diminuíram em ambos os grupos (P0,05, sem a presença de efeitos adversos. CONCLUSÃO: A administração contínua de dexmedetomidina em concentração plasmática calculada de 3 ng.mL-1, em combinação com midazolam e cetamina, resulta em plano anestésico adequado para castração de cadelas, estabilidade hemodinâmica e despertar tranquilo, sem efeitos adversos.

  5. Community pharmacy services for people with drug problems over two decades in Scotland: Implications for future development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Catriona; Thiruvothiyur, Manimekalai; Robertson, Helen; Bond, Christine

    2016-01-01

    In Scotland community pharmacies are heavily involved in service delivery for people with drug problems (PWDP) as documented through surveys of all community pharmacies in 1995, 2000 and 2006. A further survey in 2014 enabled trends in service demand/provision to be analysed and provides insight into future development. The lead pharmacist in every Scottish pharmacy (n=1246) was invited to complete a postal questionnaire covering attitudes towards PWDP and service provision and level of involvement in services (needle exchange, dispensing for PWDP and methadone supervision). Additional questions covered new services of take-home naloxone (THN) and pharmacist prescribing for opioid dependence. Telephone follow-up of non-responders covered key variables. A comparative analysis of four cross-sectional population surveys of the community pharmacy workforce (1995, 2000, 2006 and 2014) was undertaken. Completed questionnaires were returned by 709 (57%) pharmacists in 2014. Key variables (questionnaire or telephone follow-up) were available from 873 (70%). The proportion of pharmacies providing needle exchange significantly increased from 1995 to 2014 (8.6%, 9.5%, 12.2%, 17.8%, p<0.001) as did the proportion of pharmacies dispensing for the treatment of drug misuse (58.9%, 73.4%, 82.6% and 88%, p<0.001). Methadone was dispensed to 16,406 individuals and buprenorphine to 1777 individuals (increased from 12,400 and 192 respectively in 2006). Attitudes improved significantly from 1995 to 2014 (p<0.001). Being male and past training in drug misuse significantly predicted higher attitude scores (p<0.05) in all four years. Attitude score was a consistently significant predictor in all four years for dispensing for the treatment of drug misuse [OR=1.1 (1995 and 2006, CI 1.1-1.3, and 2014 CI 1.1-1.4) and 1.2 (2000), CI 1.3-1.5] and providing needle exchange [OR=1.1 (1995 and 2006), CI 1.1-1.2, 1.1-1.3 and 1.2 (2000 and 2014), CI 1.1-1.3 and 1.1-1.5]. In 2014, 53% of pharmacists

  6. Opioid analgesics-related pharmacokinetic drug interactions: from the perspectives of evidence based on randomized controlled trials and clinical risk management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng XQ

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Xiu-qin Feng,1 Ling-ling Zhu,2 Quan Zhou3 1Nursing Administration Office, Division of Nursing, 2VIP Care Ward, Division of Nursing, 3Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Background: Multimorbidity results in complex polypharmacy which may bear a risk of drug interactions. A better understanding of opioid analgesics combination therapy used for pain management could help warrant medication safety, efficacy, and economic relevance. Until now there has been no review summarizing the opioid analgesics-related pharmacokinetic drug interactions from the perspective of evidence based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs. Method: A literature search was performed using PubMed, MEDLINE, and the Cochrane Library, using a PRISMA flowchart. Results: Fifty-two RCTs were included for data interpretation. Forty-two RCTs (80.8% were conducted in healthy volunteers, whereas 10 RCTs (19.2% enrolled true patients. None of the opioid–drug/herb pairs was listed as contraindications of opioids involved in this review. Circumstances in which opioid is comedicated as a precipitant drug include morphine–P2Y12 inhibitors, morphine–gabapentin, and methadone–zidovudine. Circumstances in which opioid is comedicated as an object drug include rifampin–opioids (morphine, tramadol, oxycodone, methadone, quinidine–opioids (morphine, fentanyl, oxycodone, codeine, dihydrocodeine, methadone, antimycotics–opioids (buprenorphine, fentanyl, morphine, oxycodone, methadone, tilidine, tramadol, protease inhibitors–opioids (ritonavir, ritonavir/lopinavir–oxycodone, ritonavir–fentanyl, ritonavir–tilidine, grapefruit juice–opioids (oxycodone, fentanyl, methadone, antidepressants–opioids (paroxetine–tramadol, paroxetine–hydrocodone, paroxetine–oxycodone, escitalopram–tramadol, metoclopramide–morphine, amantadine–morphine, sumatriptan

  7. Kratom alkaloids and O-desmethyltramadol in urine of a "Krypton" herbal mixture consumer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Torsten; Claussen, Ulrich; Güssregen, Brunhilde; Schröfel, Stefanie; Stürzer, Birgit; Werle, Annika; Wolf, Gerald

    2011-05-20

    A drug and alcohol withdrawal rehabilitation centre requested an analysis for "Krypton" in urine of a former opiate-addictive woman. She showed an altered clinical picture and behaviour with miosis, itchiness, agitation, and moderate euphoria after 3 months of until than successful treatment. Literature search revealed that "Krypton" is said to contain "Kratom" (leaves of Mitragyna speciosa), but could also contain O-desmethyltramadol (European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction thematic paper "Spice"). Immunological drug screenings were done with test strips (nal von minden, Regensburg, Germany) and with cloned enzyme donor immunoassay (Microgenics, Passau, Germany). "Kratom" alkaloids and tramadol (metabolites) were analyzed by LC-MS/MS (ThermoFisher Scientific Quantum Ultra Triple Quadrupole mass spectrometer). Immunoassays were negative for amphetamines, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, benzoylecgonine, buprenorphine, ethylglucuronide, methadone (metabolite), opiates, oxycodone, and THC-COOH, and test strips were negative for tramadol and its metabolites (cut-off 10 mg/L for O-desmethyltramadol). LC-MS/MS detected the "Kratom" alkaloids mitragynine, speciociliatine, speciogynine, mitraciliatine, and paynantheine and approximately 9mg/L O-desmethyltramadol, but no tramadol and N-desmethyltramadol. The detection of M. speciosa alkaloids is a proof of "Kratom" abuse. Confronted with the analysis data, the patient admitted to have consumed 3-4 infusions of "Krypton". The origin of the O-desmethyltramadol is unclear. Tramadol abuse is unlikely since tramadol and N-desmethyltramadol (physiologically occurring in urine after tramadol intake) were not detectable. Consumption of a "Krypton" product spiked with O-desmethyltramadol could explain our findings and the patient's clinical picture. This would be in agreement with a most recent report about spiking apparently natural herbal mixtures with the synthetic opioid O-desmethyltramadol. Analysis of "Kratom

  8. CR4056, a new analgesic I2 ligand, is highly effective against bortezomib-induced painful neuropathy in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meregalli C

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Meregalli,1 Cecilia Ceresa,1 Annalisa Canta,1 Valentina Alda Carozzi,1 Alessia Chiorazzi,1 Barbara Sala,1 Norberto Oggioni,1 Marco Lanza,2 Ornella Letar,i2 Flora Ferrari,2 Federica Avezza,1 Paola Marmiroli,1 GianFranco Caselli,2 Guido Cavaletti11Department of Neuroscience and Biomedical Technologies, University of Milan-Bicocca, 2Pharmacology and Toxicology Department, Rottapharm | Madaus Research Center, Monza, ItalyAbstract: Although bortezomib (BTZ is the frontline treatment for multiple myeloma, its clinical use is limited by the occurrence of painful peripheral neuropathy, whose treatment is still an unmet clinical need. Previous studies have shown chronic BTZ administration (0.20 mg/kg intravenously three times a week for 8 weeks to female Wistar rats induced a peripheral neuropathy similar to that observed in humans. In this animal model of BTZ-induced neurotoxicity, the present authors evaluated the efficacy of CR4056, a novel I2 ligand endowed with a remarkable efficacy in several animal pain models. CR4056 was administered in a wide range of doses (0.6–60 mg/kg by gavage every day for 2–3 weeks in comparison with buprenorphine (Bupre (28.8 µg/kg subcutaneously every day for 2 weeks and gabapentin (Gaba (100 mg/kg by gavage every day for 3 weeks. Chronic administration of BTZ reduced nerve conduction velocity and induced allodynia. CR4056, Bupre, or Gaba did not affect the impaired nerve conduction velocity. Conversely, CR4056 dose-dependently reversed BTZ-induced allodynia (minimum effective dose 0.6 mg/kg. The optimal dose found, 6 mg/kg, provided a constant pain relief throughout the treatment period and without rebound after suspension, being effective when coadministered with BTZ, starting before or after allodynia was established, or when administered alone after BTZ cessation. A certain degree of tolerance was seen after 7 days of administration, but only at the highest doses (20 and 60 mg/kg. Bupre was effective

  9. Use of opioid substitution therapies in the treatment of opioid use disorder: results of a UK cost-effectiveness modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, James; Yi, Yunni; Wright, Antony; Brown, Jim; Maria Madrigal, Ana; Dunlop, William C N

    2017-07-01

    This study investigated the cost-effectiveness of buprenorphine maintenance treatment (BMT) and methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) vs no opioid substitution therapy (OST) for the treatment of opioid use disorder, from the UK National Health Service (NHS)/personal social services (PSS) and societal perspectives over 1 year. Cost-effectiveness of OST vs no OST was evaluated by first replicating and then expanding an existing UK health technology assessment model. The expanded model included the impact of OST on infection rates of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Versus no OST, incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) for BMT and MMT were £13,923 and £14,206 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY), respectively, from a NHS/PSS perspective. When total costs (NHS/PSS and societal) are considered, there are substantial savings associated with adopting OST; these savings are in excess of £14,032 for BMT vs no OST and £17,174 for MMT vs no OST over 1 year. This is primarily driven by a reduction in victim costs. OST treatment also impacted other aspects of criminality and healthcare resource use. The model's 1-year timeframe means long-term costs and benefits, and the influence of changes over time are not captured. OST can be considered cost-effective vs no OST from the UK NHS/PSS perspective, with a cost per QALY well below the UK's willingness-to-pay threshold. There were only small differences between BMT and MMT. The availability of two or more cost-effective options is beneficial to retaining patients in OST programs. From a societal perspective, OST is estimated to save over £14,032 and £17,174 per year for BMT and MMT vs no OST, respectively, due to savings in victim costs. Further work is required to fully quantify the clinical and health economic impacts of different OST formulations and their societal impact over the long-term.

  10. [Mental health service utilization among borderline personality disorder patients inpatient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cailhol, L; Thalamas, C; Garrido, C; Birmes, P; Lapeyre-Mestre, M

    2015-04-01

    other PD control). They were randomly chosen in the health database insurance previously used. One hundred and thirty-seven (95.8%) screened patients agreed to answer the psychological assessment. In this sample, 44 (32.1%) had BPD, 39 (28.5%) other PD and another 39 (28.5%) did not have PD. The BPD group was compared to a sample of 165 matched subjects and the other group PD to a sample of 123 matched controls. There was no difference between BPD and other PD groups regarding the mental health utilization. However, there was an increased use of hospitalizations and deliverances of nervous system drugs in both clinical groups compared to their controls. The analysis of drugs supplied in pharmacies for BPD patients showed that the first two drugs were opiate substitutes (12.3% methadone, buprenorphine 6.7%). No anticonvulsants or atypical antipsychotics appear in the top 20 of treatments delivered. A composite variable (hospitalization for more than 6 months during previous five years and 500 supplied drugs) allowed the discrimination of two groups among patients with BPD: heavy users of care and low care users. No variables (demographics, Axis I, Axis II, self-aggressiveness, DSQ-40, Haq-II, YSQ-I) could discriminate the two groups except the number of previous psychotherapies (heavy users: n=0.4 (SD 0.5) vs low users: n=1.8 (SD 2.1) P=0.0054). This study confirms the important use of the service of BPD patients in France, as well as the possible moderating role of psychotherapy. We found a mismatch between these uses and recommendations. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Substitution treatment for opioid addicts in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerlach Ralf

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background After a long and controversial debate methadone maintenance treatment (MMT was first introduced in Germany in 1987. The number of patients in MMT – first low because of strict admission criteria – increased considerably since the 1990s up to some 65,000 at the end of 2006. In Germany each general practitioner (GP, who has completed an additional training in addiction medicine, is allowed to prescribe substitution drugs to opioid dependent patients. Currently 2,700 GPs prescribe substitution drugs. Psychosocial care should be made available to all MMT patients. Results The results of research studies and practical experiences clearly indicate that patients benefit substantially from MMT with improvements in physical and psychological health. MMT proves successful in attaining high retention rates (65 % to 85 % in the first years, up to 50 % after more than seven years and plays a major role in accessing and maintaining ongoing medical treatment for HIV and hepatitis. MMT is also seen as a vital factor in the process of social re-integration and it contributes to the reduction of drug related harms such as mortality and morbidity and to the prevention of infectious diseases. Some 10 % of MMT patients become drug-free in the long run. Methadone is the most commonly prescribed substitution medication in Germany, although buprenorphine is attaining rising importance. Access to MMT in rural areas is very patchy and still constitutes a problem. There are only few employment opportunities for patients participating in MMT, although regular employment is considered unanimously as a positive factor of treatment success. Substitution treatment in German prisons is heterogeneous in access and treatment modalities. Access is very patchy and the number of inmates in treatment is limited. Nevertheless, substitution treatment plays a substantial part in the health care system provided to drug users in Germany. Conclusion In Germany, a

  12. Intracranial implantation with subsequent 3D in vivo bioluminescent imaging of murine gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelwahab, Mohammed G; Sankar, Tejas; Preul, Mark C; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2011-11-06

    The mouse glioma 261 (GL261) is recognized as an in vivo model system that recapitulates many of the features of human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The cell line was originally induced by intracranial injection of 3-methyl-cholantrene into a C57BL/6 syngeneic mouse strain (1); therefore, immunologically competent C57BL/6 mice can be used. While we use GL261, the following protocol can be used for the implantation and monitoring of any intracranial mouse tumor model. GL261 cells were engineered to stably express firefly luciferase (GL261-luc). We also created the brighter GL261-luc2 cell line by stable transfection of the luc2 gene expressed from the CMV promoter. C57BL/6-cBrd/cBrd/Cr mice (albino variant of C57BL/6) from the National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD were used to eliminate the light attenuation caused by black skin and fur. With the use of albino C57BL/6 mice; in vivo imaging using the IVIS Spectrum in vivo imaging system is possible from the day of implantation (Caliper Life Sciences, Hopkinton, MA). The GL261-luc and GL261-luc2 cell lines showed the same in vivo behavior as the parental GL261 cells. Some of the shared histological features present in human GBMs and this mouse model include: tumor necrosis, pseudopalisades, neovascularization, invasion, hypercellularity, and inflammation (1). Prior to implantation animals were anesthetized by an intraperitoneal injection of ketamine (50 mg/kg), xylazine (5 mg/kg) and buprenorphine (0.05 mg/kg), placed in a stereotactic apparatus and an incision was made with a scalpel over the cranial midline. A burrhole was made 0.1 mm posterior to the bregma and 2.3mm to the right of the midline. A needle was inserted to a depth of 3mm and withdrawn 0.4 mm to a depth of 2.6 mm. Two μl of GL261-luc or GL261-luc2 cells (10(7) cells/ml) were infused over the course of 3 minutes. The burrhole was closed with bonewax and the incision was sutured. Following stereotactic implantation the bioluminescent cells are

  13. Substance use in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Suzanne; Ordean, Alice; Kahan, Meldon

    2011-04-01

    health care and assistance with appropriate addiction care leads to reduced health care costs and decreased maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. 1. All pregnant women and women of childbearing age should be screened periodically for alcohol, tobacco, and prescription and illicit drug use. (III-A) 2. When testing for substance use is clinically indicated, urine drug screening is the preferred method. (II-2A) Informed consent should be obtained from the woman before maternal drug toxicology testing is ordered. (III-B) 3. Policies and legal requirements with respect to drug testing of newborns may vary by jurisdiction, and caregivers should be familiar with the regulations in their region. (III-A) 4. Health care providers should employ a flexible approach to the care of women who have substance use problems, and they should encourage the use of all available community resources. (II-2B) 5. Women should be counselled about the risks of periconception, antepartum, and postpartum drug use. (III-B) 6. Smoking cessation counselling should be considered as a first-line intervention for pregnant smokers. (I-A) Nicotine replacement therapy and/or pharmacotherapy can be considered if counselling is not successful. (I-A) 7. Methadone maintenance treatment should be standard of care for opioid-dependent women during pregnancy. (II-IA) Other slow-release opioid preparations may be considered if methadone is not available. (II-2B) 8. Opioid detoxification should be reserved for selected women because of the high risk of relapse to opioids. (II-2B) 9. Opiate-dependent women should be informed that neonates exposed to heroin, prescription opioids, methadone, or buprenorphine during pregnancy are monitored closely for symptoms and signs of neonatal withdrawal (neonatal abstinence syndrome). (II-2B) Hospitals providing obstetric care should develop a protocol for assessment and management of neonates exposed to opiates during pregnancy. (III-B) 10. Antenatal planning for

  14. Substitution treatment for opioid addicts in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Ingo Ilja; Stöver, Heino; Gerlach, Ralf

    2007-02-02

    After a long and controversial debate methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) was first introduced in Germany in 1987. The number of patients in MMT--first low because of strict admission criteria--increased considerably since the 1990s up to some 65,000 at the end of 2006. In Germany each general practitioner (GP), who has completed an additional training in addiction medicine, is allowed to prescribe substitution drugs to opioid dependent patients. Currently 2,700 GPs prescribe substitution drugs. Psychosocial care should be made available to all MMT patients. The results of research studies and practical experiences clearly indicate that patients benefit substantially from MMT with improvements in physical and psychological health. MMT proves successful in attaining high retention rates (65% to 85% in the first years, up to 50% after more than seven years) and plays a major role in accessing and maintaining ongoing medical treatment for HIV and hepatitis. MMT is also seen as a vital factor in the process of social re-integration and it contributes to the reduction of drug related harms such as mortality and morbidity and to the prevention of infectious diseases. Some 10% of MMT patients become drug-free in the long run. Methadone is the most commonly prescribed substitution medication in Germany, although buprenorphine is attaining rising importance. Access to MMT in rural areas is very patchy and still constitutes a problem. There are only few employment opportunities for patients participating in MMT, although regular employment is considered unanimously as a positive factor of treatment success. Substitution treatment in German prisons is heterogeneous in access and treatment modalities. Access is very patchy and the number of inmates in treatment is limited. Nevertheless, substitution treatment plays a substantial part in the health care system provided to drug users in Germany. In Germany, a history of substitution treatment spanning 20 years has meanwhile

  15. Obsessive-compulsive disorder, impulse control disorders and drug addiction: common features and potential treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenelle, Leonardo F; Oostermeijer, Sanne; Harrison, Ben J; Pantelis, Christos; Yücel, Murat

    2011-05-07

    The basic concepts underlying compulsive, impulsive and addictive behaviours overlap, which may help explain why laymen use these expressions interchangeably. Although there has been a large research effort to better characterize and disentangle these behaviours, clinicians and scientists are still unable to clearly differentiate them. Accordingly, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), impulse control disorders (ICD) and substance-related disorders (SUD) overlap on different levels, including phenomenology, co-morbidity, neurocircuitry, neurocognition, neurochemistry and family history. In this review we summarize these issues with particular emphasis on the role of the opioid system in the pathophysiology and treatment of OCD, ICD and SUD. We postulate that with progression and chronicity of OCD, the proportion of the OCD-related behaviours (e.g. checking, washing, ordering and hoarding, among others) that are driven by impulsive 'rash' processes increase as involvement of more ventral striatal circuits becomes prominent. In contrast, as SUD and ICD progress, the proportion of the SUD- and ICD-related behaviours that are driven by compulsive 'habitual' processes increase as involvement of more dorsal striatal circuits become prominent. We are not arguing that, with time, ICD becomes OCD or vice versa. Instead, we are proposing that these disorders may acquire qualities of the other with time. In other words, while patients with ICD/SUD may develop 'compulsive impulsions', patients with OCD may exhibit 'impulsive compulsions'. There are many potential implications of our model. Theoretically, OCD patients exhibiting impulsive or addictive features could be managed with drugs that address the quality of the underlying drives and the involvement of neural systems. For example, agents for the reduction or prevention of relapse of addiction (e.g. heavy drinking), which modulate the cortico-mesolimbic dopamine system through the opioid (e.g. buprenorphine and naltrexone

  16. Who rules the roost?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Barry; Sanoff, Margot Kaplan; Augustyn, Marilyn

    2010-01-01

    Adam's mother was concerned about her 3-year-old son's hyperactivity, violence, and activity level. Adam and his mom had recently moved into a shelter for pregnant women. The rest of the residents are primarily in their early 20s, whereas Adam's mom is 42. She had found about 3 months ago that she was pregnant. This was her fourth pregnancy, second with this father, and he had recently left her when she refused an abortion. Her other children are 22 and 24 and live out of state. She has a history of opioid addiction. She had been on methadone during Adam's gestation and had recently started on buprenorphine to treat her addiction during this pregnancy as well. Adam is here today for his 3-year-old checkup and you had not seen him for a year. Mom states that he has been healthy but has become progressively active over the last year. He is very angry about his dad leaving, and according to Adam's mother "blames her" for sending him away. They are living in 1 room at the shelter, and mom is finding it increasingly difficult to keep him busy all day. When she goes out looking for a job, he is very challenging at the shelter, and she constantly receives complaints that he is "too loud" in the common rooms. She feels like she is at the end of her rope with him, he is constantly climbing, bolting from her, and taking risks.When you examine Adam, you find a robust, healthy young boy. His eye contact is good, and he is socially related but does actively explore your office. When he begins taking the instruments off your wall, his mother sits passively watching him. When he begins playing with the faucet, she half heartedly tells him to "stop" but he looks at her and continues splashing. He then begins flicking the light switch on and off in the room with no response from mom. When you ask about discipline, mom states "nothing works." When you ask about supports, she states "I have nobody except Adam and the new baby now."Adam was born after an uneventful full-term pregnancy

  17. 13th National Congress of the South African Society of Psychiatrists, 20-23 September 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Allers

    2004-10-01

    , Liezl Koen 45. Buprenorphine/Naloxone maintenance in office practice: 18 months and 170 patients after the American release Ted Parran Jr, Chris Adelman 46. Integration of Pharmacotherapy for Opioid dependence into general psychiatric practice: Naltrexone, Methadone and Buprenorphine/ Naloxone Ted Parran 47. Our African understanding of individulalism and communitarianism Willie Pienaar 48. Healthy ageing and the prevention of Dementia Felix Potocnik, Susan van Rensburg, Christianne Bouwens 49. Indigenous plants and methods used by traditional African healers for treatinf psychiatric patients in the Soutpansberg Area (Research was done in 1998 Ramovha Muvhango Rachel 50. Symptom pattern & associated psychiatric disorders in subjects with possible & confirmed 22Q11 deletional syndrome J.L. Roos, H.W. Pretorius, M. Karayiorgou 51. Duration of antidepressant treatment: How long is long enough? How long is too long Steven P Roose 52. A comparison study of early non-psychotic deviant behaviour in the first ten years of life, in Afrikaner patients with Schizophrenia, Schizo-affective disorder and Bipolar disorder Martin Scholtz, Melissa Janse van Rensburg, J. Louw Roos 53. Treatment, treatment issues, and prevention of PTSD in women: An update Soraya Seedat 54. Fron neural networks to clinical practice M Spitzer 55. Opening keynote presentation: The art and science of Psychiatry M Spitzer 56. The future of Pharmacotherapy for anxiety disorders Dan J. Stein 57. Neuropsychological deficits pre and post Electro Convulsive Therapy (ECT thrice a week: A report of four cases Ugash Subramaney, Yusuf Moosa 58. Prevalence of and risk factors for Tradive Dyskinesia in a Xhosa population in the Eastern Cape Dave Singler, Betty D. Patterson, Sandi Willows 59. Eating disorders: Addictive disorders? Christopher Paul Szabo 60. Ethical challenges and dilemmas of research in third world countries Godfrey B. Tangwa 61. The interface between Neurology and Psychiatry with specific focus on

  18. Tramadol with or without paracetamol (acetaminophen) for cancer pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiffen, Philip J; Derry, Sheena; Moore, R Andrew

    2017-05-16

    chronic malignant tumour-related pain who were experiencing pain intensities described as moderate to severe, with most experiencing at least 4/10 with current treatment. The mean ages were 59 to 70 years, with participants aged between 24 and 87 years. Study length ranged from one day to six months. Five studies used a cross-over design. Tramadol doses ranged from 50 mg as single dose to 600 mg per day; doses of 300 mg per day to 400 mg per day were most common.Nine studies were at high risk of bias for one to four criteria (only one high risk of bias for size). We judged all the results to be very low quality evidence because of widespread lack of blinding of outcome assessment, inadequately described sequence generation, allocation concealment, and small numbers of participants and events. Important outcomes were poorly reported. There were eight different active comparators and one comparison with placebo. There was little information available for any comparison and no firm conclusions could be drawn for any outcome.Single comparisons of oral tramadol with codeine plus paracetamol, of dihydrocodeine, and of rectal versus oral tramadol provided no data for key outcomes. One study used tramadol combined with paracetamol; four participants received this intervention. One study compared tramadol with flupirtine - a drug that is no longer available. One study compared tramadol with placebo and a combination of cobrotoxin, tramadol, and ibuprofen, but the dosing schedule poorly explained.Two studies (191 participants) compared tramadol with buprenorphine. One study (131 participants) reported a similar proportion of no or mild pain at 14 days.Three studies (300 participants) compared tramadol with morphine. Only one study, combining tramadol, tramadol plus paracetamol, and paracetamol plus codeine as a single weak-opioid group reported results. Weak opioid produced reduction in pain of at least 30% from baseline in 55/117 (47%) participants, compared with 91/110 (82

  19. Illicit Drug Use, Illicit Drug Use Disorders, and Drug Overdose Deaths in Metropolitan and Nonmetropolitan Areas - United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Karin A; Jones, Christopher M; Ballesteros, Michael F

    2017-10-20

    2016;66[No. RR-1]) and facilitating better access to medication-assisted treatment with methadone, buprenorphine, or naltrexone could benefit communities with high opioid use disorder rates.

  20. 长沙市甲基苯丙胺使用情况"应答者驱动抽样"流行病学调查%EPIDEMIOLOGICAL RESEARCH OF METHAMPHETAMINE USE AND ITS DETERMINANTS AND CONSEQUENCES IN CHANGSHA CITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张官柏; 刘铁桥; 郝伟; Brian C Kelly; 王济川; 胡红星; 曾敏; 柳红

    2011-01-01

    participated in the investigation. Most of them were male, Han nationality, employed, having a partner (including spouse, girlfriend/boyfriend or cohabitant), received junior or high middle school education and higher level of income. The average age was 29.0 a ±s 7.8 a (ranging from 18 a to 48 a) ,none of the 102 participants who accepted HIV antibody test was HIV positive. Most of them (94/129,72.9% ) had ever used other illicit addictive drugs including katemine, Ecstasy, heroin, marijuana,buprenorphine, tramadol,methadone,and diazepam. No one reported ever having used cocaine or crack.Meth was commonly found in two swbstances. One is ice, which is pure meth, and the other is called Magu made of meth, caffeine, and perfume, etc. All the users smoked meth with a special instrument ' ice pot' in private locations including home,rented apartment and hotel. The mean days of meth use within last 3 months were 21.4 d ± s 31.3 d (median 10 d), and the mean doses used for ice and Magu were 0.3 gram and 3.8 tablets, respectively for each time. Meth was highly available, and more than 2/3 of the participants(87/129, 67. 4% )reported "they can easily or very easily" get this drug. The main determinants of meth use were: peer influence, sensory - seeking, promotion of sexual pleasure, and escaping from bad mood. Only a few people used meth for weight reduction. The adverse consequences of meth use included bad appetite, weigh loss, bad health, loss of money, bad emotion, and harm to the family. Conclusion:Meth has brought great harm to the users. High level of meth availability and peer influence may result in more and more meth users. Measures should be taken specifically to reduce drug availability and propaganda carried out to reduce meth use.

  1. [Psychopathology of the misuse of Subutex®: The Popeye syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Békaert, J; Podevin, G

    2015-06-01

    High dose buprenorphine (HDB), commonly known as Subutex(®), is nowadays largely prescribed as a replacement therapy for major opiate dependence. Its sublingual administration allows a decrease in the withdrawal syndrome accompanying opiate abuse cessation. Over the past few decades, epidemiological data on people on replacement therapy have emphasized an increase in the misuse of Subutex(®) and more specifically intravenous injections of HDB. These growing practices pave the way to major physical consequences or even death. Several studies have highlighted the infectious, vascular, venous and arterial (pseudo-aneurysm) complications stemming from this habit. Among the possible vascular complications, we can notice the presence of abscess, venous thrombosis, phlegmons, skin necrosis, cellulite, and profound and superficial thrombophlebitis at injection sites. These can evolve into chronic edemas of the tips and subcutaneous nodules. The Popeye syndrome is one of the possible complications of this misuse. This syndrome is characterized by the swelling of both sides of the forearms and hands. These edemas tend to become persistent and to be paired with tissue changes such as skin thickening. Besides, the increase in the hands volume can occur bilaterally or sometimes in an asymmetrical way, accentuated on the hand of the non-dominant limb. This syndrome does not decrease, or just a little, after the stoppage of injections. It can have a psychological, social, psychopathological and esthetic impact. In this article, we will focus on the clinical case of a 43-year-old man, who is hospitalized in an addictology unit for massive injections of HDB. This patient suffers from a Popeye syndrome as well as from an alcoholic dependence. Following the description of psychopathological disorders, our analysis will originate from a clarification relative to the specificities of the practice of intravenous HDB injection to better sharpen the understanding of these misuses in