WorldWideScience

Sample records for buoyant density solution

  1. Buoyant densities of phototrophic sulfur bacteria and cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, R.

    1985-01-01

    The buoyant densities of bacterial cells are greatly influenced by the accumulation of intracellular reserve material. The buoyant density of phototrophic bacteria that are planktonic is of particular interest, since these organisms must remain in the photic zone of the water column for optimal growth. Separation of cells by their buoyant density may also be of use in separating and identifying organisms from a natural population. The bacteria used were obtained from pure cultures, enrichments, or samples taken directly from the environment.

  2. Preparation of Avocado Mitochondria Using Self-Generated Percoll Density Gradients and Changes in Buoyant Density during Ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, F; Romani, R

    1982-11-01

    Mitochondria from avocado (Persea americana Mill, var. Fuerte and Hass) can be rapidly prepared at every stage of ripening using differential centrifugation and self-generated Percoll gradients. The procedure results in improved oxidative and phosphorylative properties, especially for mitochondria isolated from preclimacteric fruits.A gradual change in the buoyant density of avocado mitochondria takes place during ripening. Climacteric and postclimacteric avocado mitochondria have the same buoyant density as other plant mitochondria (potato, cauliflower), whereas mitochondria from preclimacteric fruit have a lower density. The transition in buoyant density occurs during the climacteric rise, and two populations of intact mitochondria (p = 1.060 and p = 1.075) can be separated at this stage. Evidence indicates that the difference in mitochondrial buoyant density between preclimacteric and postclimacteric mitochondria is likely due to interactions with soluble cytosolic components.

  3. Countering Solutal Buoyant Convection with High Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, N.; Leslie, F. W.

    2002-01-01

    An important component in biotechnology, particularly in the area of protein engineering and rational drug design is the knowledge of the precise three-dimensional molecular structure of proteins. The quality of structural information obtained from X-ray diffraction methods is directly dependent on the degree of perfection of the protein crystals. As a consequence, the growth of high quality macromolecular crystals for diffraction analyses has been the central focus for biochemist, biologists, and bioengineers. Macromolecular crystals are obtained from solutions that contain the crystallizing species in equilibrium with higher aggregates, ions, precipitant, other possible phases of the protein, foreign particles, the walls of the container, and a likely host of other impurities. By changing transport modes in general, i.e., reduction of convection and sedimentation, as is achieved in microgravity, we have been able to dramatically effect the movement and distribution of macromolecules in the fluid, and thus their transport, formation of crystal nuclei, and adsorption to the crystal surface. While a limited number of high quality crystals from space flights have been obtained, as the recent National Research Council (NRC) review of the NASA microgravity crystallization program pointed out, the scientific approach and research in crystallization of proteins has been mainly empirical yielding inconclusive results. We postulate that we can reduce convection in ground-based experiments and we can understand the different aspects of convection control through the use of strong magnetic fields and field gradients. We postulate that limited convection in a magnetic field will provide the environment for the growth of high quality crystals. The approach exploits the variation of fluid magnetic susceptibility with concentration for this purpose and the convective damping is realized by appropriately positioning the crystal growth cell so that the magnetic susceptibility

  4. Experimental and numerical study on density stratification erosion phenomena with a vertical buoyant jet in a small vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Satoshi, E-mail: abe.satoshi@jaea.go.jp; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2016-07-15

    Highlights: • This paper shows results of a small scale experiment and CFD analyses on a density stratification erosion with a vertical buoyant jet. • The particle image velocimetry (PIV) and quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) with a multiport rotating valve were applied. • Two typical well-used RANS models were applied. • The simulated stratification erosion was in agreement with the experimental result, which suggested that the turbulence mixing occurred only in the jet impinging region. - Abstract: The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project to investigate thermal hydraulic phenomena in a reactor containment vessel during a severe accident. The hydrogen distribution in the vessel is one of significant safety issues in discussing a potential of hydrogen combustion in the containment. Density stratification and its break-up are important phenomena affecting the hydrogen distribution. This paper focuses on a density stratification erosion and break-up mechanism with a vertical buoyant jet promoting the turbulent helium transport. Small scale experiment and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses were carried out for investigating this phenomena. In the experiment, a rectangular vessel made with acrylic plates with a width of 1.5 m, a length of 1.5 m and a height of 1.8 m was used for visualizing flow field with particle image velocimetry (PIV) system. The quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) system with a multiport rotating valve was applied for measuring gaseous concentration at 20 elevation points. In CFD analysis with OpenFOAM, two typical well-used turbulence models were used: low-Reynolds number type k–ε model and SST k–ω model, with a turbulence model modification to consider the buoyant effect in the stratification. As a result, the stratification erosion in the CFD analyses with the modified turbulence model agreed well with the experimental data, indicating importance of the turbulence damping by the buoyant effect.

  5. Theoretical analysis and semianalytical solutions for a turbulent buoyant hydrogen-air jet

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Semianalytical solutions are developed for turbulent hydrogen-air plume. We derived analytical expressions for plume centerline variables (radius, velocity, and density deficit) in terms of a single universal function, called plume function. By combining the obtained analytical expressions of centerline variables with empirical Gaussian expressions of the mean variables, we obtain semianalytical expressions for mean quantities of hydrogen-air plume (velocity, density deficit, and mass fraction).

  6. Unsteady turbulent buoyant plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Woodhouse, Mark J; Hogg, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    We model the unsteady evolution of turbulent buoyant plumes following temporal changes to the source conditions. The integral model is derived from radial integration of the governing equations expressing the conservation of mass, axial momentum and buoyancy. The non-uniform radial profiles of the axial velocity and density deficit in the plume are explicitly described by shape factors in the integral equations; the commonly-assumed top-hat profiles lead to shape factors equal to unity. The resultant model is hyperbolic when the momentum shape factor, determined from the radial profile of the mean axial velocity, differs from unity. The solutions of the model when source conditions are maintained at constant values retain the form of the well-established steady plume solutions. We demonstrate that the inclusion of a momentum shape factor that differs from unity leads to a well-posed integral model. Therefore, our model does not exhibit the mathematical pathologies that appear in previously proposed unsteady i...

  7. CHANGES OF BUOYANT DENSITY DURING THE S-PHASE OF THE CELL-CYCLE - DIRECT EVIDENCE DEMONSTRATED IN ACUTE MYELOID-LEUKEMIA BY FLOW-CYTOMETRIC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DAENEN, S; HUIGES, W; MODDERMAN, E; HALIE, MR

    1993-01-01

    Studies with synchronized or exponentially growing bacteria and mammalian cell lines are not able to demonstrate small changes in buoyant density during the cell cycle. Flowcytometric analysis of density separated acute myeloid leukemia cells, a system not dependent on time-related variables, shows

  8. Effect of large density ratios on turbulence budgets in buoyant jets with coflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charonko, John; Prestridge, Kathy

    2016-11-01

    Turbulence statistics and energy transport budgets have been measured in two fully turbulent jets with coflow at density ratios of s = 1 . 2 & 4.2 to improve our understanding of variable-density mixing in turbulent flows. The exit Reynolds number was matched for both flows at 20,000 and simultaneous planar PIV and acetone PLIF measurements were acquired so the coupled evolution of the velocity and density statistics could be examined in terms of density-weighted average quantities. Measurements were taken over 10,000 snapshots of the flow at three locations to assure statistical convergence, and the spatial resolution (288 μm) is well below the Taylor microscale. Variable-density effects caused changes in both the magnitude and distribution of the evolving turbulence, with differences most pronounced within the jet half-width. As the jet tends toward pseudo self-similarity, a new scaling based on effective diameter and density successfully scales the energy budgets of the two jets, but significant differences were still seen in the core. For the high density ratio jet, the turbulent kinetic energy production is negative on the centerline, as opposed to slightly positive, leading to large changes in advection and diffusion. A mechanism for these differences is proposed.

  9. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezzano, D.; Hwang, K.; Catalano, P.; Aster, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 . 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets . 7.57 mu3, LD platelets . 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  10. Evidence that platelet buoyant density, but not size, correlates with platelet age in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezzano, D; Hwang, K; Catalano, P; Aster, R H

    1981-01-01

    Following infusion of 51Cr-labeled autologous platelets into normal subjects, high-density (HD) and low-density (LD) platelet cohorts were isolated by prolonged centrifugation in isosmotic arabino-galactan (Stractan). Specific radio-activity of LD platelets declined rapidly post-infusion (T1/2 = 1.5 days), but specific radioactivity of HD platelets remained constant or increased over a 3--4-day period and gradually declined for 6--7 days thereafter. These differences were exaggerated when platelet cohorts enriched in LD or HD cells by slow centrifugation in high-density albumin were labeled and transfused. Mean survival of a platelet cohort enriched with HD cells was significantly (P less than 0.02) shorter (7.73 days) than that of a cohort enriched with LD cells (9.33) days). In normal subjects treated with aspirin, capacity for thromboxane synthesis was regained more rapidly (P less than 0.05) in LD than in HD platelets. HD and LD platelets differed only slightly in mean volume (HD platelets = 7.57 mu3, LD platelets = 6.87 mu3, 0.05 less than P less than 0.01). We believe the most logical interpretation of these findings is that under normal conditions in man, newly formed platelets are less dense on the average than total platelets and become more dense as they age in the circulation. Thus, specific radioactivity of LD platelets declines rapidly as these platelets move into a more dense compartment and are replaced by newly formed, unlabelled cells; specific radioactivity of HD platelets remains constant or increases as labelled platelets enter this compartment in numbers equal to or greater than the number leaving it at the end of their life span. The similarity in mean volumes of LD and HD platelets suggests that platelet size is unrelated to platelet age under normal conditions.

  11. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  12. Non-Boussinesq turbulent buoyant jet of a low-density gas leaks into high-density ambient

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2010-12-01

    In this article, we study the problem of low-density gas jet injected into high-density ambient numerically which is important in applications such as fuel injection and leaks. It is assumed that the local rate of entrainment is consisted of two components; one is the component of entrainment due to jet momentum while the other is the component of entrainment due to buoyancy. The integral models of the mass, momentum and concentration fluxes are obtained and transformed to a set of ordinary differential equations using some similarity transformations. The resulting system is solved to determine the centerline quantities which are used to get the mean axial velocity, mean concentration and mean density of the jet. Therefore, the centerline and mean quantities are used together with the governing equation to determine some important turbulent quantities such as, cross-stream velocity, Reynolds stress, velocity- concentration correlation, turbulent eddy viscosity and turbulent eddy diffusivity. Throughout this paper the developed model is verified by comparing the present results with experimental results and jet/plume theory from the literature. © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Determination of buoyant density and sensitivity to chloroform and freon for the etiological agent of infectious salmonid anaemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, K.E.; Hjeltnes, B.; Uglenes , I.; Winton, J.R.

    1993-01-01

    Plasma was collected from Atlantic salmon Salrno salar with acute infectious salmon anaemia (ISA) and used to challenge Atlantic salmon parr by intraperitoneal injection. Treatment of plasma with the lipid solvent, chloroform, showed that the etiological agent of ISA contained essential lipids, probably as a viral envelope. Some infectivity remained following treatment with freon. Injection challenges using fractions from equilibrium density gradient centrifugation of plasma from fish with acute ISA revealed a band of infectivity in the range 1.184 to 1.262 g cm-3. The band was believed to conta~n both complete ISA-virus particles and infectious particles lacking a complete envelope, nucleocapsid or genome. Density gradient centrifugation of infectious plasma for enrichment of the putative ISA virus appeared to offer a suitable method for obtaining virus-specific nucleic acid for use in the construction of cDNA libraries. 

  14. Turbulent buoyant jets and plumes

    CERN Document Server

    Rodi, Wolfgang

    The Science & Applications of Heat and Mass Transfer: Reports, Reviews, & Computer Programs, Volume 6: Turbulent Buoyant Jets and Plumes focuses on the formation, properties, characteristics, and reactions of turbulent jets and plumes. The selection first offers information on the mechanics of turbulent buoyant jets and plumes and turbulent buoyant jets in shallow fluid layers. Discussions focus on submerged buoyant jets into shallow fluid, horizontal surface or interface jets into shallow layers, fundamental considerations, and turbulent buoyant jets (forced plumes). The manuscript then exami

  15. NUMERICAL PREDICTION OF LINE BUOYANT JETS IN CROSS FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The k-ε turbulence model was used to establish the mathematicalmodel of two-dimensional line buoyant jets in crossflow. The hybrid finite analytic method and staggered grid were applied to the calculation of line buoyant jets. Only receiving water with uniform density is considered. The distribution of velocity, temperature and turbulent kinetic energy were analyzed, and the variation of the maximum velocity was given. The effect of velocity ratio and densimetric Froude number on line buoyant jets was considered.

  16. RANS analyses on erosion behavior of density stratification consisted of helium–air mixture gas by a low momentum vertical buoyant jet in the PANDA test facility, the third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, Satoshi, E-mail: abe.satoshi@jaea.go.jp; Ishigaki, Masahiro; Sibamoto, Yasuteru; Yonomoto, Taisuke

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: . • The third international benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in the reactor containment vessel. • Two types turbulence model modification were applied in order to accurately simulate the turbulence helium transportation in the density stratification. • The analysis result in case with turbulence model modification is good agreement with the experimental data. • There is a major difference of turbulence helium–mass transportation between in case with and without the turbulence model modification. - Abstract: Density stratification in the reactor containment vessel is an important phenomenon on an issue of hydrogen safety. The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has started the ROSA-SA project on containment thermal hydraulics. As a part of the activity, we participated in the third international CFD benchmark exercise (IBE-3) focused on density stratification erosion by a vertical buoyant jet in containment vessel. This paper shows our approach for the IBE-3, focusing on the turbulence transport phenomena in eroding the density stratification and introducing modified turbulence models for improvement of the CFD analyses. For this analysis, we modified the CFD code OpenFOAM by using two turbulence models; the Kato and Launder modification to estimate turbulent kinetic energy production around a stagnation point, and the Katsuki model to consider turbulence damping in density stratification. As a result, the modified code predicted well the experimental data. The importance of turbulence transport modeling is also discussed using the calculation results.

  17. Turbulent Buoyant Jets in Flowing Ambients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Hai-Bo; Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    1991-01-01

    The mean behaviour of horizontal turbulent buoyant jets in co-flowing currents is investigated experimentally and numerically, in terms of jet trajectory, dilution and centerline density deficit and velocity decay. It is demonstrated in the paper that the laboratory data on the jet trajectory and...

  18. Density of aqueous solutions of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Julio E.

    2001-10-10

    In this report, we present a numerical representation for the partial molar volume of CO2 in water and the calculation of the corresponding aqueous solution density. The motivation behind this work is related to the importance of having accurate representations for aqueous phase properties in the numerical simulation of carbon dioxide disposal into aquifers as well as in geothermal applications. According to reported experimental data the density of aqueous solutions of CO2 can be as much as 2-3% higher than pure water density. This density variation might produce an influence on the groundwater flow regime. For instance, in geologic sequestration of CO2, convective transport mixing might occur when, several years after injection of carbon dioxide has stopped, the CO2-rich gas phase is concentrated at the top of the formation, just below an overlaying caprock. In this particular case the heavier CO2 saturated water will flow downward and will be replaced by water with a lesser CO2 content.

  19. Analytical Solution for Stellar Density in Globular Clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M. A. Sharaf; A. M. Sendi

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, four parameters analytical solution will be established for the stellar density function in globular clusters. The solution could be used for any arbitrary order of outward decrease of the cluster’s density.

  20. A new framework for simulating forced homogeneous buoyant turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Phares L.; Blanquart, Guillaume

    2015-06-01

    This work proposes a new simulation methodology to study variable density turbulent buoyant flows. The mathematical framework, referred to as homogeneous buoyant turbulence, relies on a triply periodic domain and incorporates numerical forcing methods commonly used in simulation studies of homogeneous, isotropic flows. In order to separate the effects due to buoyancy from those due to large-scale gradients, the linear scalar forcing technique is used to maintain the scalar variance at a constant value. Two sources of kinetic energy production are considered in the momentum equation, namely shear via an isotropic forcing term and buoyancy via the gravity term. The simulation framework is designed such that the four dimensionless parameters of importance in buoyant mixing, namely the Reynolds, Richardson, Atwood, and Schmidt numbers, can be independently varied and controlled. The framework is used to interrogate fully non-buoyant, fully buoyant, and partially buoyant turbulent flows. The results show that the statistics of the scalar fields (mixture fraction and density) are not influenced by the energy production mechanism (shear vs. buoyancy). On the other hand, the velocity field exhibits anisotropy, namely a larger variance in the direction of gravity which is associated with a statistical dependence of the velocity component on the local fluid density.

  1. Method for solvent extraction with near-equal density solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdwell, Joseph F.; Randolph, John D.; Singh, S. Paul

    2001-01-01

    Disclosed is a modified centrifugal contactor for separating solutions of near equal density. The modified contactor has a pressure differential establishing means that allows the application of a pressure differential across fluid in the rotor of the contactor. The pressure differential is such that it causes the boundary between solutions of near-equal density to shift, thereby facilitating separation of the phases. Also disclosed is a method of separating solutions of near-equal density.

  2. Viscosity and density tables of sodium chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fair, J.A.; Ozbek, H. (comps.)

    1977-04-01

    A file is presented containing tabulated data extracted from the scientific literature on the density and viscosity of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. Also included is a bibliography of the properties of aqueous sodium chloride solutions. (MHR)

  3. Non-Boussinesq Integral Model for Horizontal Turbulent Buoyant Round Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Xiao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal buoyant jet is a fundamental flow regime for hydrogen safety analysis in power industry. The purpose of this study is to develop a fast non-Boussinesq engineering model the horizontal buoyant round jets. Verification of this integral model is established with available experimental data and comparisons over a large range of density variations with the CFD codes GASFLOW. The model has proved to be an efficient engineering tool for predicting horizontal strongly buoyant round jets.

  4. Anharmonic densities of states: A general dynamics-based solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, Julius; Aleinikava, Darya

    2016-06-01

    Density of states is a fundamental physical characteristic that lies at the foundation of statistical mechanics and theoretical constructs that derive from them (e.g., kinetic rate theories, phase diagrams, and others). Even though most real physical systems are anharmonic, the vibrational density of states is customarily treated within the harmonic approximation, or with some partial, often limited, account for anharmonicity. The reason for this is that the problem of anharmonic densities of states stubbornly resisted a general and exact, yet convenient and straightforward in applications, solution. Here we formulate such a solution within both classical and quantum mechanics. It is based on actual dynamical behavior of systems as a function of energy and as observed, or monitored, on a chosen time scale, short or long. As a consequence, the resulting anharmonic densities of states are fully dynamically informed and, in general, time-dependent. As such, they lay the ground for formulation of new statistical mechanical frameworks that incorporate time and are ergodic, by construction, with respect to actual dynamical behavior of systems.

  5. Solvent density mode instability in non-polar solutions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Susmita Kar; Ranjit Biswas; J Chakrabarti

    2008-08-01

    We analyse the origin of the multiple long time scales associated with the long time decay observed in non-polar solvation dynamics by linear stability analysis of solvent density modes where the effects of compressibility and solvent structure are systematically incorporated. The coupling of the solute–solvent interactions at both ground and excited states of the solute with the compressibility and solvent structure is found to have important effects on the time scales. The present theory suggests that the relatively longer time constant is controlled by the solvent compressibility, while the solvent structure at the nearest-neighbour length scale dominates the shorter time constant.

  6. Fast Density Inversion Solution for Full Tensor Gravity Gradiometry Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhenlong; Wei, Xiaohui; Huang, Danian

    2016-02-01

    We modify the classical preconditioned conjugate gradient method for full tensor gravity gradiometry data. The resulting parallelized algorithm is implemented on a cluster to achieve rapid density inversions for various scenarios, overcoming the problems of computation time and memory requirements caused by too many iterations. The proposed approach is mainly based on parallel programming using the Message Passing Interface, supplemented by Open Multi-Processing. Our implementation is efficient and scalable, enabling its use with large-scale data. We consider two synthetic models and real survey data from Vinton Dome, US, and demonstrate that our solutions are reliable and feasible.

  7. Dilution of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Petersen, Ole

    The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls.......The purpose of present work is to establish a quantitative description of a surface plume which is valid for the range of density differences occurring in relation to sewage outfalls....

  8. Use of a Force Sensor in Archimedes' Principle Experiment, Determination of Buoyant Force and Acceleration Due To Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh Aurora, Tarlok

    2013-04-01

    In introductory physics, students verify Archimedes' principle by immersing an object in water in a container, with a side-spout to collect the displaced water, resulting in a large uncertainty, due to surface tension. A modified procedure was introduced, in which a plastic bucket is suspended from a force sensor, and an object hangs underneath the bucket. The object is immersed in water in a glass beaker (without any side spout), and the weight loss is measured with a computer-controlled force sensor. Instead of collecting the water displaced by the object, tap water was added to the bucket to compensate for the weight loss, and the Archimedes' principle was verified within less than a percent. With this apparatus, buoyant force was easily studied as a function of volume of displaced water; as well as a function of density of saline solution. By graphing buoyant force as a function of volume (or density of liquid), value of g was obtained from slope. Apparatus and sources of error will be discussed.

  9. Infrared Sensing of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1988-01-01

    This paper is concerned with laboratory experiments on buoyant surface plumes where heat is the source of buoyancy. Temperature distributions were measured at the water surface using infra-red sensing, and inside the waterbody a computer based measurement system was applied. The plume is described...

  10. Water exit dynamics of buoyant spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truscott, Tadd T.; Epps, Brenden P.; Munns, Randy H.

    2016-11-01

    Buoyant spheres released below the free surface can rise well above the surface in a phenomenon known as pop-up. Contrary to intuition, increasing the release depth sometimes results in a lower pop-up height. We present the pop-up height of rising buoyant spheres over a range of release depths (1-12.5 diameters) and Reynolds numbers (4 ×104 to 6 ×105 ). While the dynamics of rising buoyant spheres and bubbles has been thoroughly investigated for Reynolds numbers below 104, pop-up in these larger-Reynolds-number regimes has not been studied. Yet the underwater motions of the sphere for the Reynolds numbers we study are the key to understanding the pop-up height. Two major regimes are apparent: vertical and oscillatory. The vertical regime exhibits a nearly vertical underwater trajectory and results in the largest pop-up heights. The oscillatory regime exhibits an underwater trajectory with periodic lateral motions and results in lower pop-up heights; this periodic lateral motion is modulated by unsteady vortex shedding in the wake of the sphere. Despite these complex fluid structure interactions, the experiments presented herein yield extremely repeatable results.

  11. ROUNDED FLOWING STATES OF OBSTRUCTED BUOYANT JET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUAI Wen-xin; FANG Shen-guang

    2006-01-01

    The mutual relationships of three effective factors, the diameter D/d (d is the diameter of exit) of obstructed plate, exit densimetric Froude number and the distance H/d of the plate from jet orifice for obstructed buoyant jet in static ambient, are analyzed to explain normal and abnormal rounded flowing (reverberated and bifurcated flowing).The critical Froude numbers for obstructed buoyant jets with H/d=2, 4, 6, 8 which distinguished normal and abnormal flowing pattern are obtained. Normal rounded flowing is found only for a plate under a special value of H/d. A fitted formula of critical Froude numbers with H/d and D/d is presented to distinguish rounded flowing types. The occurring of reverberated or bifurcated flowing in abnormal rounded flow is analyzed. Based on the results of obstructed buoyant jets with D/d=1, normal rounded flowing occurred only for all conditions and axial dilution behind the plate under different H/D is obtained.

  12. Ions in solution: density corrected density functional theory (DC-DFT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Sim, Eunji; Burke, Kieron

    2014-05-14

    Standard density functional approximations often give questionable results for odd-electron radical complexes, with the error typically attributed to self-interaction. In density corrected density functional theory (DC-DFT), certain classes of density functional theory calculations are significantly improved by using densities more accurate than the self-consistent densities. We discuss how to identify such cases, and how DC-DFT applies more generally. To illustrate, we calculate potential energy surfaces of HO·Cl(-) and HO·H2O complexes using various common approximate functionals, with and without this density correction. Commonly used approximations yield wrongly shaped surfaces and/or incorrect minima when calculated self consistently, while yielding almost identical shapes and minima when density corrected. This improvement is retained even in the presence of implicit solvent.

  13. Ions in solution: Density Corrected Density Functional Theory (DC-DFT)

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Burke, Kieron

    2014-01-01

    Standard density functional approximations often give questionable results for odd-electron radical complexes, with the error typically attributed to self-interaction. In density corrected density functional theory (DC-DFT), certain classes of density functional theory calculations are significantly improved by using densities more accurate than the self-consistent densities. We discuss how to identify such cases, and how DC-DFT applies more generally. To illustrate, we calculate potential energy surfaces of HO$\\cdot$Cl$^-$ and HO$\\cdot$H$_2$O complexes using various common approximate functionals, with and without this density correction. Commonly used approximations yield wrongly shaped surfaces and/or incorrect minima when calculated self consistently, while yielding almost identical shapes and minima when density corrected. This improvement is retained even in the presence of implicit solvent.

  14. Turbulence statistics in a negatively buoyant particle plume - laboratory measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoloi, Ankur; Clark, Laura; Veliz, Gerardo; Heath, Michael; Variano, Evan

    2016-11-01

    Negatively buoyant plumes of nylon particles are investigated in quiescent salt-water solution using flow visualization and stereoscopic PIV. Particles of the size 2 mm are continuously released through a nozzle from the top inside a water tank using a screw-conveyor based release mechanism. The plume propagates downward due to gravity, and by virtue of interacting particle wakes, becomes turbulent. The two phases are refractive index matched, so that the velocity field in the interstitial fluid can be quantified using PIV. We examine the velocity fields in the fluid phase to characterize turbulence statistics, such as turbulent kinetic energy, Reynolds stresses in the fully developed region of the plume. Further, we develop an image processing method to obtain particle distribution and particle slip inside the plume. In the presentation, we will discuss these results in the light of existing literature for rising plumes of bubbles under similar experimental conditions.

  15. A new solution to wireless sensor network density control problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jian; JIA Yu-fu; DONG Tian-lin; LI Jiang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper,we proposed a scheme based on Monte Carlo algorithm to test whether or not the nodes are redundant for realizing the node density control in the sensor network.The computational complexity is only O(n).We also established the coverage collision detection and back-off mechanism applied in the wireless sensor network.The simulation results show that the system can cover all the interested area with the smallest number of nodes and a coverage void will not appear during the course of state-transition.The coverage collision detection and back-off mechanism proposed in this article can be applied when the nodes have either synchronous or asynchronous mechanism.It also provides a stable stage with the length of the time that can be adjusted.

  16. Exact solutions of Brans-Dicke cosmology with decaying vacuum density

    CERN Document Server

    Montenegro, A E

    2007-01-01

    We investigate cosmological solutions of Brans-Dicke theory with both the vacuum energy density and the gravitational constant decaying linearly with the Hubble parameter. A particular class of them, with constant deceleration factor, sheds light on the cosmological constant problems, leading to a presently small vacuum term, and to a constant ratio between the vacuum and matter energy densities. By fixing the only free parameter of these solutions, we obtain cosmological parameters in accordance with observations of both the relative matter density and the universe age. In addition, we have three other solutions, with Brans-Dicke parameter w = -1 and negative cosmological term, two of them with a future singularity of big-rip type. Although interesting from the theoretical point of view, two of them are not in agreement with the observed universe. The third one leads, in the limit of large times, to a constant relative matter density, being also a possible solution to the cosmic coincidence problem.

  17. Dynamics of a buoyant plume in a linearly stratified environment using simultaneous PIV-PLIF measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mirajkar, Harish N

    2016-01-01

    The presence of stratified layer in atmosphere and ocean leads to buoyant vertical motions, commonly referred to as plumes. It is important to study the mixing dynamics of a plume at a local scale in order to model their evolution and growth. Such a characterization requires measuring the velocity and density of the mixing fluids simultaneously. Here, we present the results of a buoyant plume propagating in a linearly stratified medium with a density difference of 0.5%, thus yielding a buoyancy frequency of N=0.15 s^{-1}. To understand the plume behaviour, statistics such as centerline and axial velocities along varying downstream locations, turbulent kinetic energy, Reynolds stress, and buoyancy flux were measured. The centerline velocity was found to decrease with increase in height. The Reynolds stress and buoyancy flux profiles showed the presence of a unstable layer and the mixing associated within that layer.

  18. The dynamics of a suspension of solidifying, buoyant ice crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees Jones, David; Wells, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    In a wide range of geophysical and industrial situations, the solidification of a liquid melt occurs through the growth of solid crystals suspended in the melt. For example, so-called frazil ice crystals form by freezing of the polar oceans, and crystals also form in the interior of solidifying magma chambers. The growth of these crystals is dynamically coupled to the fluid flow: advection enhances the transport and removal of latent heat that controls crystal growth, whilst the particles provide hydrodynamic feedbacks on the flow. The crystal density is typically different to the liquid density, which induces relative motion, and crystals may also induce density gradients within the liquid itself through the temperature field. We develop scaling arguments for the relative importance of crystal growth, agglomeration, nucleation and transport as a function of particle size and properties of the fluid flow. We introduce a new framework for the direct numerical simulation of the coupling of solidifying, buoyant particles to the fluid flow using a Lattice Boltzmann Method and present results for idealized test cases motivated by our scaling analysis.

  19. Thermodynamic analysis of energy density in pressure retarded osmosis: The impact of solution volumes and costs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reimund, Kevin K. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; McCutcheon, Jeffrey R. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Wilson, Aaron D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    A general method was developed for estimating the volumetric energy efficiency of pressure retarded osmosis via pressure-volume analysis of a membrane process. The resulting model requires only the osmotic pressure, π, and mass fraction, w, of water in the concentrated and dilute feed solutions to estimate the maximum achievable specific energy density, uu, as a function of operating pressure. The model is independent of any membrane or module properties. This method utilizes equilibrium analysis to specify the volumetric mixing fraction of concentrated and dilute solution as a function of operating pressure, and provides results for the total volumetric energy density of similar order to more complex models for the mixing of seawater and riverwater. Within the framework of this analysis, the total volumetric energy density is maximized, for an idealized case, when the operating pressure is π/(1+√w⁻¹), which is lower than the maximum power density operating pressure, Δπ/2, derived elsewhere, and is a function of the solute osmotic pressure at a given mass fraction. It was also found that a minimum 1.45 kmol of ideal solute is required to produce 1 kWh of energy while a system operating at “maximum power density operating pressure” requires at least 2.9 kmol. Utilizing this methodology, it is possible to examine the effects of volumetric solution cost, operation of a module at various pressure, and operation of a constant pressure module with various feed.

  20. Probing Ionic Liquid Aqueous Solutions Using Temperature of Maximum Density Isotope Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Tariq

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This work is a new development of an extensive research program that is investigating for the first time shifts in the temperature of maximum density (TMD of aqueous solutions caused by ionic liquid solutes. In the present case we have compared the shifts caused by three ionic liquid solutes with a common cation—1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium coupled with acetate, ethylsulfate and tetracyanoborate anions—in normal and deuterated water solutions. The observed differences are discussed in terms of the nature of the corresponding anion-water interactions.

  1. Large mixing angle solution to the solar neutrino problem and random matter density perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Guzzo, M M; Reggiani, N

    2003-01-01

    There are reasons to believe that mechanisms exist in the solar interior which lead to random density perturbations in the resonant region of the Large Mixing Angle solution to the solar neutrino problem. We find that, in the presence of these density perturbations, the best fit point in the (sin^2(2\\theta), Delta_m^2) parameter space moves to smaller values, compared with the values obtained for the standard LMA solution. Combining solar data with KamLAND results, we find a new compatibility region, which we call VERY-LOW LMA, where sin^2(2\\theta) ~ 0.6 and Delta_m^2~2e-5 eV^2, for random density fluctuations of order 5% < \\xi< 8%. We argue that such values of density fluctuations are still allowed by helioseismological observations at small scales of order 10 - 1000 km deep inside the solar core.

  2. An empirical model to estimate density of sodium hydroxide solution: An activator of geopolymer concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamane, N. P.; Nataraja, M. C.; Jeyalakshmi, R.; Nithiyanantham, S.

    2016-02-01

    Geopolymer concrete is zero-Portland cement concrete containing alumino-silicate based inorganic polymer as binder. The polymer is obtained by chemical activation of alumina and silica bearing materials, blast furnace slag by highly alkaline solutions such as hydroxide and silicates of alkali metals. Sodium hydroxide solutions of different concentrations are commonly used in making GPC mixes. Often, it is seen that sodium hydroxide solution of very high concentration is diluted with water to obtain SHS of desired concentration. While doing so it was observed that the solute particles of NaOH in SHS tend to occupy lower volumes as the degree of dilution increases. This aspect is discussed in this paper. The observed phenomenon needs to be understood while formulating the GPC mixes since this influences considerably the relationship between concentration and density of SHS. This paper suggests an empirical formula to relate density of SHS directly to concentration expressed by w/w.

  3. Weak solutions for a non-Newtonian diffuse interface model with different densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, Helmut; Breit, Dominic

    2016-11-01

    We consider weak solutions for a diffuse interface model of two non-Newtonian viscous, incompressible fluids of power-law type in the case of different densities in a bounded, sufficiently smooth domain. This leads to a coupled system of a nonhomogenouos generalized Navier-Stokes system and a Cahn-Hilliard equation. For the Cahn-Hilliard part a smooth free energy density and a constant, positive mobility is assumed. Using the {{L}∞} -truncation method we prove existence of weak solutions for a power-law exponent p>\\frac{2d+2}{d+2} , d  =  2, 3.

  4. An Experimental Investigation on Inclined Negatively Buoyant Jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raed Bashitialshaaer

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study was performed to investigate the behavior of inclined negatively buoyant jets. Such jets arise when brine is discharged from desalination plants. A turbulent jet with a specific salinity was discharged through a circular nozzle at an angle to the horizontal into a tank with fresh water and the spatial evolution of the jet was recorded. Four different initial jet parameters were changed, namely the nozzle diameter, the initial jet inclination, the jet density and the flow rate. Five geometric quantities describing the jet trajectory that are useful in the design of brine discharge systems were determined. Dimensional analysis demonstrated that the geometric jet quantities studied, if normalized with the jet exit diameter, could be related to the densimetric Froude number. Analysis of the collected data showed that this was the case for a Froude number less than 100, whereas for larger values of the Froude number the scatter in the data increased significantly. As has been observed in some previous investigations, the slope of the best-fit straight line through the data points was a function of the initial jet angle (θ, where the slope increased with θ for the maximum levels (Ym studied, but had a more complex behavior for horizontal distances.

  5. Structural properties of aqueous metoprolol succinate solutions. Density, viscosity, and refractive index at 311 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deosarkar, S. D.; Kalyankar, T. M.

    2013-06-01

    Density, viscosity and refractive index of aqueous solutions of metoprolol succinate of different concentrations (0.005-0.05 mol dm-3) were measured at 38°C. Apparent molar volume of resultant solutions were calculated and fitted to the Masson's equation and apparent molar volume at infinite dilution was determined graphically. Viscosity data of solutions has been fitted to the Jone-Dole equation and viscosity A- and B-coefficients were determined graphically. Physicochemical data obtained were discussed in terms of molecular interactions.

  6. Solubility of N2O in and density, viscosity, and surface tension of aqueous piperazine solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derks, P. W.; Hogendoorn, K. J.; Versteeg, G. F.

    2005-01-01

    The physical solubility of N2O in and the density and viscosity of aqueous piperazine solutions have been measured over a temperature range of (293.15 to 323.15) K for piperazine concentrations ranging from about (0.6 to 1.8) kmol·mr-3. Furthermore, the present study contains experimental surface t

  7. Solution of Equations of Internal Ballistics for the Composite Charge Using Lagrange Density Approximation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Narvilkar

    1979-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the equations of internal ballistics of composite charge consisting of N component charge with quadratic form are solved. Largange density approximation and hydrodynamic flow behaviour, have been assumed and the solutions are obtained for the composite charge for these assumptions.

  8. STEREOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF HYDRATION OF CARBOHYDRATES IN AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS .3. DENSITY AND ULTRASOUND MEASUREMENTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GALEMA, SA; HOILAND, H

    1991-01-01

    Density and ultrasound measurements have been performed in aqueous solutions of pentoses, hexoses, methylpyranosides, and disaccharides as a function of molality of carbohydrate (0-0.3 mol kg-1). Partial molar volumes, partial molar isentropic compressibilities, and hydration numbers have been calcu

  9. The effect of random matter density perturbations on the MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem

    CERN Document Server

    Nunokawa, H; Semikoz, V B; Valle, José W F

    1996-01-01

    We consider the implications of solar matter density random noise upon resonant neutrino conversion. The evolution equation describing MSW-like conversion is derived in the framework of the Schr\\"odinger approach. We study quantitatively their effect upon both large and small mixing angle MSW solutions to the solar neutrino problem. This is carried out both for the active-active \

  10. Effect of current density on distribution coefficient of solute at solid-liquid interface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常国威; 王自东; 吴春京; 胡汉起

    2003-01-01

    When current passes through the solid-liquid interface, the growth rate of crystal, solid-liquid interfaceenergy and radius of curvature at dendritic tip will change. Based on this fact, the theoretical relation between thedistribution of solute at solid-liquid interface and current density was established, and the effect of current on thedistribution coefficient of solute through effecting the rate of crystal growth, the solid-liquid interface energy and theradius of curvature at the dendritic tip was discussed. The results show that as the current density increases, thedistribution coefficient of solute tends to rise in a whole, and when the former is larger than about 400 A/cm2 , thelatter varies significantly.

  11. Buoyant subduction on Venus: Implications for subduction around coronae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, J. D.; Head, J. W.

    1993-03-01

    Potentially low lithospheric densities, caused by high Venus surface and perhaps mantle temperatures, could inhibit the development of negative buoyancy-driven subduction and a global system of plate tectonics/crustal recycling on that planet. No evidence for a global plate tectonic system was found so far, however, specific features strongly resembling terrestrial subduction zones in planform and topographic cross-section were described, including trenches around large coronae and chasmata in eastern Aphrodite Terra. The cause for the absence, or an altered expression, of plate tectonics on Venus remains to be found. Slab buoyancy may play a role in this difference, with higher lithospheric temperatures and a tendency toward positive buoyancy acting to oppose the descent of slabs and favoring under thrusting instead. The effect of slab buoyancy on subduction was explored and the conditions which would lead to under thrusting versus those allowing the formation of trenches and self-perpetuating subduction were defined. Applying a finite element code to assess the effects of buoyant forces on slabs subducting into a viscous mantle, it was found that mantle flow induced by horizontal motion of the convergent lithosphere greatly influences subduction angle, while buoyancy forces produce a lesser effect. Induced mantle flow tends to decrease subduction angle to near an under thrusting position when the subducting lithosphere converges on a stationary overriding lithosphere. When the overriding lithosphere is in motion, as in the case of an expanding corona, subduction angles are expected to increase. An initial stage involved estimating the changes in slab buoyancy due to slab healing and pressurization over the course of subduction. Modeling a slab, descending at a fixed angle and heated by conduction, radioactivity, and the heat released in phase changes, slab material density changes due to changing temperature, phase, and pressure were derived.

  12. Modeling of density of aqueous solutions of amino acids with the statistical associating fluid theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji Peijun [College of Chemical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Feng Wei [College of Life Science and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)]. E-mail: fengwei@mail.buct.edu.cn; Tan Tianwei [College of Life Science and Technology, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China)

    2007-07-15

    The density of aqueous solutions of amino acids has been modeled with the statistical associating fluid theory (SAFT) equation of state. The modeling is accomplished by extending the previously developed new method to determine the SAFT parameters for amino acids. The modeled systems include {alpha}-alanine/H{sub 2}O, {beta}-alanine/H{sub 2}O, proline/H{sub 2}O, L-asparagine/H{sub 2}O, L-glutamine/H{sub 2}O, L-histidine/H{sub 2}O, serine/H{sub 2}O, glycine/H{sub 2}O, alanine/H{sub 2}O/sucrose, DL-valine/H{sub 2}O/sucrose, arginine/H{sub 2}O/sucrose, serine/H{sub 2}O/ethylene glycol, and glycine/H{sub 2}O/ethylene glycol. The density of binary solutions of amino acids has been correlated or predicted with a high precision. And then the density of multicomponent aqueous solutions of amino acids has been modeled based on the modeling results of binary systems, and a high accuracy of density calculations has been obtained. Finally, the water activities of DL-valine/H{sub 2}O, glycine/H{sub 2}O, and proline/H{sub 2}O have been predicted without using binary interaction parameters, and good results have been obtained.

  13. Iterative solutions to the steady-state density matrix for optomechanical systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, P. D.; Johansson, J. R.; Blencowe, M. P.; Rimberg, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a sparse matrix permutation from graph theory that gives stable incomplete lower-upper preconditioners necessary for iterative solutions to the steady-state density matrix for quantum optomechanical systems. This reordering is efficient, adding little overhead to the computation, and results in a marked reduction in both memory and runtime requirements compared to other solution methods, with performance gains increasing with system size. Either of these benchmarks can be tuned via the preconditioner accuracy and solution tolerance. This reordering optimizes the condition number of the approximate inverse and is the only method found to be stable at large Hilbert space dimensions. This allows for steady-state solutions to otherwise intractable quantum optomechanical systems.

  14. Iterative solutions to the steady state density matrix for optomechanical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Nation, P D; Blencowe, M P; Rimberg, A J

    2014-01-01

    We present a sparse matrix permutation from graph theory that gives stable incomplete Lower-Upper (LU) preconditioners necessary for iterative solutions to the steady state density matrix for quantum optomechanical systems. This reordering is efficient, adding little overhead to the computation, and results in a marked reduction in both memory and runtime requirements compared to other solution methods, with performance gains increasing with system size. Either of these benchmarks can be tuned via the preconditioner accuracy and solution tolerance. This reordering optimizes the condition number of the approximate inverse, and is the only method found to be stable at large Hilbert space dimensions. This allows for steady state solutions to otherwise intractable quantum optomechanical systems.

  15. Moment-independent importance measure of basic random variable and its probability density evolution solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To analyze the effect of basic variable on failure probability in reliability analysis,a moment-independent importance measure of the basic random variable is proposed,and its properties are analyzed and verified.Based on this work,the importance measure of the basic variable on the failure probability is compared with that on the distribution density of the response.By use of the probability density evolution method,a solution is established to solve two importance measures,which can efficiently avoid the difficulty in solving the importance measures.Some numerical examples and engineering examples are used to demonstrate the proposed importance measure on the failure probability and that on the distribution density of the response.The results show that the proposed importance measure can effectively describe the effect of the basic variable on the failure probability from the distribution density of the basic variable.Additionally,the results show that the established solution on the probability density evolution is efficient for the importance measures.

  16. Analytic, piecewise solution to the Lane-Emden equation for stars with complex density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeff; Bogdanovic, Tamara

    2017-01-01

    The polytropic models of stars are used for a variety of applications in computational astrophysics. These are typically obtained by numerically solving the Lane-Emden equation for a star in hydrostatic equilibrium under assumption that the pressure and density within the star obey the polytropic equation of state. We present an efficient analytic, piecewise differentiable solution to the Lane-Emden equation which allows “stitching” of different polytropes to represent complex pressure and density profiles. This approach can be used to model stars with distinct properties in their cores and envelopes, such as the evolved red giant and horizontal branch stars.

  17. Quantum Electrodynamical Density-matrix Functional Theory and Group-theoretical Consideration of its Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Ohsaku, T; Yamaki, D; Yamaguchi, K

    2002-01-01

    For studying the group theoretical classification of the solutions of the density functional theory in relativistic framework, we propose quantum electrodynamical density-matrix functional theory (QED-DMFT). QED-DMFT gives the energy as a functional of a local one-body $4\\times4$ matrix $Q(x)\\equiv -$, where $\\psi$ and $\\bar{\\psi}$ are 4-component Dirac field and its Dirac conjugate, respectively. We examine some characters of QED-DMFT. After these preparations, by using Q(x), we classify the solutions of QED-DMFT under O(3) rotation, time reversal and spatial inversion. The behavior of Q(x) under nonrelativistic and ultrarelativistic limits are also presented. Finally, we give plans for several extensions and applications of QED-DMFT.

  18. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A; Isborn, Christine M

    2015-12-28

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  19. Size-dependent error of the density functional theory ionization potential in vacuum and solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sosa Vazquez, Xochitl A.; Isborn, Christine M., E-mail: cisborn@ucmerced.edu [Chemistry and Chemical Biology, School of Natural Sciences, University of California, Merced, 5200 North Lake Road, Merced, California 95343 (United States)

    2015-12-28

    Density functional theory is often the method of choice for modeling the energetics of large molecules and including explicit solvation effects. It is preferable to use a method that treats systems of different sizes and with different amounts of explicit solvent on equal footing. However, recent work suggests that approximate density functional theory has a size-dependent error in the computation of the ionization potential. We here investigate the lack of size-intensivity of the ionization potential computed with approximate density functionals in vacuum and solution. We show that local and semi-local approximations to exchange do not yield a constant ionization potential for an increasing number of identical isolated molecules in vacuum. Instead, as the number of molecules increases, the total energy required to ionize the system decreases. Rather surprisingly, we find that this is still the case in solution, whether using a polarizable continuum model or with explicit solvent that breaks the degeneracy of each solute, and we find that explicit solvent in the calculation can exacerbate the size-dependent delocalization error. We demonstrate that increasing the amount of exact exchange changes the character of the polarization of the solvent molecules; for small amounts of exact exchange the solvent molecules contribute a fraction of their electron density to the ionized electron, but for larger amounts of exact exchange they properly polarize in response to the cationic solute. In vacuum and explicit solvent, the ionization potential can be made size-intensive by optimally tuning a long-range corrected hybrid functional.

  20. Analytical solution of the Gross-Neveu model at finite density

    CERN Document Server

    Thies, M

    2003-01-01

    Recent numerical calculations have shown that the ground state of the Gross-Neveu model at finite density is a crystal. Guided by these results, we can now present the analytical solution to this problem in terms of elliptic functions. The scalar potential is the superpotential of the non-relativistic Lame Hamiltonian. This model can also serve as analytically solvable toy model for a relativistic superconductor in the Larkin-Ovchinnikov-Fulde-Ferrell phase.

  1. Polar-solvation classical density-functional theory for electrolyte aqueous solutions near a wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warshavsky, Vadim; Marucho, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    A precise description of the structural and dielectric properties of liquid water is critical to understanding the physicochemical properties of solutes in electrolyte solutions. In this article, a mixture of ionic and dipolar hard spheres is considered to account for water crowding and polarization effects on ionic electrical double layers near a uniformly charged hard wall. As a unique feature, solvent hard spheres carrying a dipole at their centers were used to model water molecules at experimentally known concentration, molecule size, and dipolar moment. The equilibrium ionic and dipole density profiles of this electrolyte aqueous model were calculated using a polar-solvation classical density-functional theory (PSCDFT). These profiles were used to calculate the charge density distribution, water polarization, dielectric permittivity function, and mean electric potential profiles as well as differential capacitance, excess adsorptions, and wall-fluid surface tension. These results were compared with those corresponding to the pure dipolar model and unpolar primitive solvent model of electrolyte aqueous solutions to understand the role that water crowding and polarization effects play on the structural and thermodynamic properties of these systems. Overall, PSCDFT predictions are in agreement with available experimental data.

  2. Formation of density singularities in hydrodynamics of freely cooling inelastic gases: a family of exact solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Assaf, Michael; Livne, Eli

    2007-01-01

    We employ granular hydrodynamics to investigate a paradigmatic problem of clustering of particles in a freely cooling dilute granular gas. We consider large-scale hydrodynamic motions where the viscosity and heat conduction can be neglected, and one arrives at the equations of ideal gas dynamics with an additional term describing bulk energy losses due to inelastic collisions. We employ Lagrangian coordinates and derive a broad family of exact non-stationary analytical solutions that depend only on one spatial coordinate. These solutions exhibit a new type of singularity, where the gas density blows up in a finite time when starting from smooth initial conditions. The density blowups signal formation of close-packed clusters of particles. As the density blow-up time $t_c$ is approached, the maximum density exhibits a power law $\\sim (t_c-t)^{-2}$. The velocity gradient blows up as $\\sim - (t_c-t)^{-1}$ while the velocity itself remains continuous and develops a cusp (rather than a shock discontinuity) at the ...

  3. Impact of the aspects of forward model solution schemes in the inverse solution of density dependent flow problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, M.; Ginn, T.

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the computational error on the solution of the inverse problem connecting with density-dependent flow problem. This effect will be addressed by evaluating the uniqueness of the inverse via monitoring objective function surface behavior in two dimensions parameter space, hydraulic conductivity and longitudinal dispersivity. In addition, the Pareto surface will be generated to evaluate the trade-offs between two calibration objectives based on head and concentration measurement errors. This is conducted by changing the aspects of forward model solution scheme, Eulerian and Lagrangian methods with associated variables. The data used for this study is based on the lab study of Nassar et al (2008). The seepage tank is essentially 2D (in an x-z vertical plane) with relatively homogenous coarse sand media with assigned flux in the upstream and constant head or assigned flux boundary condition at the downstream. The forward model solution is conducted with SEAWAT and it is utilized jointly with the inverse code UCODE-2005. This study demonstrates that the choice of the different numerical scheme with associated aspects of the forward problem is a vital step in the solution of the inverse problem in indirect manner. The method of characteristics gives good results by increasing the initial particles numbers and/ or reducing the time step. The advantage of using more particles concept over decreasing the time step is in smoothing the objective function surface that enable the gradient based search technique works in efficient way. Also, the selected points on the Pareto surface is collapsed to two points on the objective function space. Most likely they are not collapsed to a single point in objective function space with one best parameter set because the problem is advection dominating problem.

  4. Buoyant Magnetic Loops Generated by Global Convective Dynamo Action

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Nicholas J; Brun, A Sacha; Miesch, Mark S; Toomre, Juri

    2012-01-01

    Our global 3D simulations of convection and dynamo action in a Sun-like star reveal that persistent wreaths of strong magnetism can be built within the bulk of the convention zone. Here we examine the characteristics of buoyant magnetic structures that are self-consistently created by dynamo action and turbulent convective motions in a simulation with solar stratification but rotating at three times the current solar rate. These buoyant loops originate within sections of the magnetic wreaths in which turbulent flows amplify the fields to much larger values than is possible through laminar processes. These amplified portions can rise through the convective layer by a combination of magnetic buoyancy and advection by convective giant cells, forming buoyant loops. We measure statistical trends in the polarity, twist, and tilt of these loops. Loops are shown to preferentially arise in longitudinal patches somewhat reminiscent of active longitudes in the Sun, although broader in extent. We show that the strength o...

  5. Shifts in the temperature of maximum density (TMD) of ionic liquid aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tariq, M; Esperança, J M S S; Soromenho, M R C; Rebelo, L P N; Lopes, J N Canongia

    2013-07-14

    This work investigates for the first time shifts in the temperature of maximum density (TMD) of water caused by ionic liquid solutes. A vast amount of high-precision volumetric data--more than 6000 equilibrated (static) high-precision density determination corresponding to ∼90 distinct ionic liquid aqueous solutions of 28 different types of ionic liquid--allowed us to analyze the TMD shifts for different homologous series or similar sets of ionic solutes and explain the overall effects in terms of hydrophobic, electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding contributions. The differences between the observed TMD shifts in the -2 temperatures are discussed taking into account the different types of possible solute-water interactions that can modify the structure of the aqueous phase. The results also reveal different insights concerning the nature of the ions that constitute typical ionic liquids and are consistent with previous results that established hydrophobic and hydrophilic scales for ionic liquid ions based on their specific interactions with water and other probe molecules.

  6. Emergent singular solutions of nonlocal density-magnetization equations in one dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Darryl D; O Náraigh, Lennon; Tronci, Cesare

    2008-03-01

    We investigate the emergence of singular solutions in a nonlocal model for a magnetic system. We study a modified Gilbert-type equation for the magnetization vector and find that the evolution depends strongly on the length scales of the nonlocal effects. We pass to a coupled density-magnetization model and perform a linear stability analysis, noting the effect of the length scales of nonlocality on the system's stability properties. We carry out numerical simulations of the coupled system and find that singular solutions emerge from smooth initial data. The singular solutions represent a collection of interacting particles (clumpons). By restricting ourselves to the two-clumpon case, we are reduced to a two-dimensional dynamical system that is readily analyzed, and thus we classify the different clumpon interactions possible.

  7. Joint density-functional theory and its application to systems in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrosyan, Sahak A.

    The physics of solvation, the interaction of water with solutes, plays a central role in chemistry and biochemistry, and it is essential for the very existence of life. Despite the central importance of water and the advent of the quantum theory early in the twentieth century, the link between the fundamental laws of physics and the observable properties of water remain poorly understood to this day. The central goal of this thesis is to develop a new formalism and framework to make the study of systems (solutes or surfaces) in contact with liquid water as practical and accurate as standard electronic structure calculations without the need for explicit averaging over large ensembles of configurations of water molecules. The thesis introduces a new form of density functional theory for the ab initio description of electronic systems in contact with a molecular liquid environment. This theory rigorously joins an electron density-functional for the electrons of a solute with a classical density-functional theory for the liquid into a single variational principle for the free energy of the combined system. Using the new form of density-functional theory for the ab initio description of electronic systems in contact with a molecular liquid environment, the thesis then presents the first detailed study of the impact of a solvent on the surface chemistry of Cr2O3, the passivating layer of stainless steel alloys. In comparison to a vacuum, we predict that the presence of water has little impact on the adsorption of chloride ions to the oxygen-terminated surface but has a dramatic effect on the binding of hydrogen to that surface. A key ingredient of a successful joint density functional theory is a good approximate functional for describing the solvent. We explore how the simplest examples of the best known class of approximate forms for the classical density functional fail when applied directly to water. The thesis then presents a computationally efficient density

  8. Modeling lower critical solution temperature behavior of associating polymer brushes with classical density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Kai; Marshall, Bennett D; Chapman, Walter G

    2013-09-07

    We study the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) behavior of associating polymer brushes (i.e., poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)) using classical density functional theory. Without using any empirical or temperature-dependent parameters, we find the phase transition of polymer brushes from extended to collapsed structure with increasing temperature, indicating the LCST behavior of polymer brushes. The LCST behavior of associating polymer brushes is attributed to the interplay of hydrogen bonding interactions and Lennard-Jones attractions in the system. The effect of grafting density and molecular weight on the phase behavior of associating polymer brushes has been also investigated. We find no LCST behavior at low grafting density or molecular weight. Moreover, increasing grafting density decreases the LCST and swelling ratio of polymer brushes. Similarly, increasing molecular weight decreases the LCST but increases the swelling ratio. At very high grafting density, a partial collapsed structure appears near the LCST. Qualitatively consistent with experiments, our results provide insight into the molecular mechanism of LCST behavior of associating polymer brushes.

  9. Horizontal H 2-air turbulent buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-02-01

    The current article is devoted to introducing mathematical and physical analyses with numerical investigation of a buoyant jet resulting from hydrogen leakage in air from a horizontal round source. H 2-air jet is an example of the non-Boussinesq buoyant jet in which a low-density gas jet is injected/leak into a high-density ambient. The density of the mixture is a function of the concentration only, the binary gas mixture is assumed to be of a linear mixing type and the rate of entrainment is assumed to be a function of the plume centerline velocity and the ratio of the mean plume and ambient densities. On the other hand, the local rate of entrainment consists of two components; one is the component of entrainment due to jet momentum while the other is the component of entrainment due to buoyancy. The top-hat profile assumption is used to obtain the mean centerline velocity, width, density and concentration of the H 2-air horizontal jet in addition to kinematic relations which govern the jet trajectories. A set of ordinary differential equations is obtained and solved numerically using Runge-Kutta method. In the second step, the mean axial velocity, mean concentration and mean density of the jet are obtained based on Gaussian model. Finally, several quantities of interest, including the cross-stream velocity, Reynolds stress, velocity-concentration correlation (radial flux), turbulent eddy viscosity and turbulent eddy diffusivity, are obtained by solving the governing partial differential equations. Additionally, the turbulent Schmidt number is estimated and the normalized jet-feed material density and the normalized momentum flux density are correlated. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The constraint on the integral kernels of density functional theories which results from insisting that there be a unique solution for the density function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, Ronald

    1988-06-01

    All predictive theories for the spatial variation of the density in an inhomogeneous system can be constructed by approximating exact, nonlinear integral equations which relate the density and pair correlation functions of the system. It is shown that the set of correct kernels in the exact integral equations for the density is on the boundary between the set of kernels for which the integral equations have no solution for the density and the set for which the integral equations have a multiplicity of solutions. Thus arbitrarily small deviations from the correct kernel can make these integral equations insoluble. A heuristic model equation is used to illustrate how the density functional problem can be so sensitive to the approximation made to the correlation function kernel and it is then shown explicitly that this behavior is realized in the relation between the density and the direct correlation function and in the lowest order BGYB equation. Functional equations are identified for the kernels in these equations which are satisified by the correct kernels, which guarantee a unique solution to the integral equations, and which provide a natural constraint on approximations which can be used in density functional theory. It is also shown that this sensitive behavior is a general property of density functional problems and that the methodology for constructing the constraints is equally general. A variety of applications of density functional theory are reviewed to illustrate practical consequences of this sensitivity.

  11. Accelerating Solutions of Perfect Fluid Hydrodynamics for Initial Energy Density and Life-Time Measurements in Heavy Ion Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Csörgö, T; Csanad, M

    2007-01-01

    A new class of accelerating, exact, explicit and simple solutions of relativistic hydrodynamics is presented. Since these new solutions yield a finite rapidity distribution, they lead to an advanced estimate of the initial energy density and life-time of high energy heavy ion reactions. Accelerating solutions are also given for spherical expansions in arbitrary number of spatial dimensions.

  12. Characterization of Horizontally-Issuing Reacting Buoyant Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    aquatic discharges. Research into aquatic discharges has been conducted for decades. In 1982, Satyanarayana and Jaluria arranged a set of experiments... Satyanarayana , S., Jaluria, A. A Study of Laminar Buoyant Jets Discharged at an Inclination to the Vertical Buoyancy Force. International Journal of

  13. Surface Intermediate Zone of Submerged Turbulent Buoyant Jet in Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H. B.; Larsen, Torben

    1995-01-01

    This paper deals with the intermediate zone between the jet and plume stages of a submerged buoyant discharge from sea outfall in current. The stability criteria, plume width and height after the intermediate zone and the dilution within the intermediate region have been studied theoretically...

  14. Laboratory Study of Dispersion of Buoyant Surface Plumes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ole; Larsen, Torben

    1990-01-01

    -differences. Other methods as infra-red sensing are used for visualizing purpose. The results are used to calibrate an integral model of the dispersion. Conclusions are that the dispersion of a buoyant surface plume can be treated the superposition of a buoyancy induced stretching and turbulent diffusion, reduced...

  15. Propagating buoyant mantle upwelling on the Reykjanes Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Fernando; Hey, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Crustal features of the Reykjanes Ridge have been attributed to mantle plume flow radiating outward from the Iceland hotspot. This model requires very rapid mantle upwelling and a "rheological boundary" at the solidus to deflect plume material laterally and prevent extreme melting above the plume stem. Here we propose an alternative explanation in which shallow buoyant mantle upwelling instabilities propagate along axis to form the crustal features of the ridge and flanks. As only the locus of buoyant upwelling propagates this mechanism removes the need for rapid mantle plume flow. Based on new geophysical mapping we show that a persistent sub-axial low viscosity channel supporting buoyant mantle upwelling can explain the current oblique geometry of the ridge as a reestablishment of its original configuration following an abrupt change in opening direction. This mechanism further explains the replacement of ridge-orthogonal crustal segmentation with V-shaped crustal ridges and troughs. Our findings indicate that crustal features of the Reykjanes Ridge and flanks are formed by shallow buoyant mantle instabilities, fundamentally like at other slow spreading ridges, and need not reflect deep mantle plume flow.

  16. PREDICTION OF CHARACTERISTICS FOR VERTICAL ROUND NEGATIVE BUOYANT JETS IN HOMOGENEOUS AMBIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The k-ε turbulence model is used to establish a mathematicalmodel of a vertical round jet with negative buoyancy in a static homogeneous ambient. The hybrid finite analytic method, with a non-uniform staggered grid, is used to calculate the whole flow field. The variations of centerline velocity, density and turbulent kinetic energy along the axial line for a given exit densimetric Froude number are found to converge to single curves under the unified scaling law derived by Chen and Rodi. The profiles of mean velocities, mean density difference and the half-width of negative buoyant jets for velocity and density are given. The calculation confirmed that the maximum height of rise is proportional to M03/4B0-1/2 ,where M0 and B0 are the momentum flux and the buoyancy flux at the source, respectively.

  17. Aqueous ammonium thiocyanate solutions as refractive index-matching fluids with low density and viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Benjamin C.; Borrero-Echeverry, Daniel

    2015-11-01

    Index-matching fluids play an important role in many fluid dynamics experiments, particularly those involving particle tracking, as they can be used to minimize errors due to distortion from the refraction of light across interfaces of the apparatus. Common index-matching fluids, such as sodium iodide solutions or mineral oils, often have densities or viscosities very different from those of water. This can make them undesirable for use as a working fluid when using commercially available tracer particles or at high Reynolds numbers. A solution of ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN) can be used for index-matching common materials such as borosilicate glass and acrylic, and has material properties similar to those of water (ν ~ 1 . 6 cSt and ρ ~ 1 . 1 g/cc). We present an empirical model for predicting the refractive index of aqueous NH4SCN solutions as a function of temperature and NH4SCN concentration that allows experimenters to develop refractive index matching solutions for various common materials. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation (CBET-0853691) and by the James Borders Physics Student Fellowship at Reed College.

  18. Near field characteristics of buoyant helium plumes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kuchimanchi K Bharadwaj; Debopam Das; Pavan K Sharma

    2015-05-01

    Puffing and entrainment characteristics of helium plumes emanating out into ambient air from a circular orifice are investigated in the present study. Velocity and density fields are measured across a diametric plane using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) respectively in phase resolved manner. Experiments are performed in Froude numbers range 0.2–0.4 and for Reynolds numbers 58–248. Puffing frequency measurements reveal that the plume puffing frequencies are insensitive to the plume exit conditions, since the instability is buoyancy driven. The frequencies obtained in the present case are in agreement with frequencies obtained by Cetegen & Kasper (1996) for plumes originating from circular nozzles of various L/D ratios. Velocity and density measurements reveal that toroidal vortex formed during a puffing cycle entrains ambient air as it traverses downstream and this periodic engulfment governs the entrainment mechanism in pulsating plumes. The obtained velocity and density fields are used to calculate mass entrainment rates. It is revealed that though the flow is unsteady, the contribution of unsteady term in mass conservation to entrainment is negligible, and it becomes zero over a puff cycle. Finally, an empirical relation for variation of mass entrainment with height has been proposed, in which the non-dimensional mass entrainment is found to follow a power law with the non-dimensional height.

  19. 46 CFR 160.010-5 - Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. 160.010-5... Vessels § 160.010-5 Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy. (a) Buoyant apparatus with plastic foam buoyancy must have a plastic foam body with an external protective covering. The body may be reinforced...

  20. A relativistic density functional study of uranyl hydrolysis and complexation by carboxylic acids in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Rupashree Shyama

    2009-02-10

    In this work, the complexation of uranium in its most stable oxidation state VI in aqueous solution was studied computationally, within the framework of density functional (DF) theory. The thesis is divided into the following parts: Chapter 2 briefly summarizes the relevant general aspects of actinide chemistry and then focuses on actinide environmental chemistry. Experimental results on hydrolysis, actinide complexation by carboxylic acids, and humic substances are presented to establish a background for the subsequent discussion. Chapter 3 describes the computational method used in this work and the relevant features of the parallel quantum chemistry code PARAGAUSS employed. First, the most relevant basics of the applied density functional approach are presented focusing on relativistic effects. Then, the treatment of solvent effects, essential for an adequate modeling of actinide species in aqueous solution, will be introduced. At the end of this chapter, computational parameters and procedures will be summarized. Chapter 4 presents the computational results including a comparison to available experimental data. In the beginning, the mononuclear hydrolysis product of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, [UO{sub 2}OH]{sup +}, will be discussed. The second part deals with actinide complexation by carboxylate ligands. First of all the coordination number for uranylacetate will be discussed with respect to implications for the complexation of actinides by humic substances followed by the uranyl complexation of aromatic carboxylic acids in comparison to earlier results for aliphatic ones. In the end, the ternary uranyl-hydroxo-acetate are discussed, as models of uranyl humate complexation at ambient condition.

  1. Calculation of the density of solutions (sunflower oil + n-hexane) over a wide range of temperatures and pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarov, M. M.; Abdukhamidova, Z.

    1995-09-01

    We present the results from an experimental investigation of the density of the sunflower oil system as a function of the mass concentration of n-hexane in the ranges of temperatures T=290 520 K and pressures P=0.101 98.1 MPa. A method of hydrostatic weighing was used to measure the density of the solutions under study.

  2. Supergranulation as the Largest Buoyantly Driven Convective Scale of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Rast, Mark P.

    2016-09-01

    The origin of solar supergranulation remains a mystery. Unlike granulation, the size of which is comparable to both the thickness of the radiative boundary layer and local scale-height in the photosphere, supergranulation does not reflect any obvious length scale of the solar convection zone. Moreover, recent observations of flows in the photosphere using Doppler imaging or correlation or feature tracking show a monotonic decrease in horizontal flow power at scales larger than supergranulation. Both local area and global spherical shell simulations of solar convection by contrast show the opposite, an increase in horizontal flow amplitudes to a low wavenumber. We examine these disparities and investigate how the solar supergranulation may arise as a consequence of nonlocal heat transport by cool diving plumes. Using three-dimensional anelastic simulations with surface driving, we show that the kinetic energy of the largest convective scales in the upper layers of a stratified domain reflects the depth of transition from strong buoyant driving to adiabatic stratification below caused by the dilution of the granular downflows. This depth is quite shallow because of the rapid increase of the mean density below the photosphere. We interpret the observed monotonic decrease in solar convective power at scales larger than supergranulation to be a consequence of this rapid transition, with the supergranular scale the largest buoyantly driven mode of convection in the Sun.

  3. Filtered Rayleigh Scattering Measurements in a Buoyant Flowfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    graph in Figure 35 have a Reynolds number of 238 and a Grashof number of 1242. The referenced literature of Law et al, 2003, and Satyanarayana and...and is consistent with the literature (Law et al., 2003 and Satyanarayana and Jaluria, 1982). A key advantage for using the time averaged image to...Journal, Vol. 44, No. 7, pp. 1505-1515. Satyanarayana , S. and Jaluria, Yogesh. (1982), “A Study of Laminar Buoyant Jets Discharged at an

  4. Analysis of a turbulent buoyant confined jet modeled using realizable k-ε model

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2010-06-13

    Through this paper, analyses of components of the unheated/heated turbulent confined jet are introduced and some models to describe them are developed. Turbulence realizable k-ε model is used to model the turbulence of this problem. Numerical simulations of 2D axisymmetric vertical hot water confined jet into a cylindrical tank have been done. Solutions are obtained for unsteady flow while velocity, pressure, temperature and turbulence distributions inside the water tank are analyzed. For seeking verification, an experiment was conducted for measuring of the temperature of the same system, and comparison between the measured and simulated temperature shows a good agreement. Using the simulated results, some models are developed to describe axial velocity, centerline velocity, radial velocity, dynamic pressure, mass flux, momentum flux and buoyancy flux for both unheated (non-buoyant) and heated (buoyant) jet. Finally, the dynamics of the heated jet in terms of the plume function which is a universal quantity and the source parameter are studied and therefore the maximum velocity can be predicted theoretically. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.

  5. Cs diffusion in local Taiwan laterite with different solution concentration, pH and packing density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, T.-H. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Li, M.-H. [Institute of Hydrological Sciences, National Central University, Jungli 320, Taiwan (China); Teng, S.-P. [Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: spteng@ess.nthu.edu.tw

    2008-09-15

    In this work we used an 'in-diffusion' method to study the effects of pH, solution concentration and packing density on Cs diffusion by packing local Taiwan laterite (LTL) into modified capillary columns with 5 mm diameter. These packed columns were first pre-equilibrated with synthetic groundwater (GW) for 3 weeks. The diffusion experiments were then carried out at ambient condition for 2 weeks. Our experimental results showed that the Cs diffusion profile fits Fick's second law very well in given experimental conditions, indicating the validity of modified capillary column method. Generally speaking, Cs diffusion in LTL decreases as the pH increases and as Cs concentration decreases. The apparent diffusion coefficient (D{sub a}) increases from 5.52x10{sup -12} (10{sup -7} M) to 2.18x10{sup -11} (10{sup -3} M) m{sup 2}/s, while the effective diffusion coefficient (D{sub e}) shows slight variation as the Cs concentration changes. Both the derived D{sub a} and D{sub e} values decrease as the pH increases, implying that the diffusion mechanisms of Cs nuclide in alkaline and acid environment are different. In addition, our results show that Cs diffusion is unaffected by the given packing density, indicating the interlaminary space is not the major determinant of Cs adsorption and diffusion in LTL.

  6. Low-density, polymer foams as structural models for phase-separation in polymer solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaucage, G. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lagasse, R.R.; Aubert, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Low density polymer foams are produced through nano-scale phase separation of 5 to 15% solutions yielding gels. The gels are solvent exchanged and dried by supercritical extraction. We have found that the morphology of the phase separated gel, the intermediate solvent exchanged gels and the final foams are essentially identical over a wide range of size. Through the combination of several scattering techniques covering many decades of size we can distinguish structural levels in these low-density foams. The combined scattering data spans sizes ranging from 10{mu}m to 1{Angstrom}. A recently developed global fitting approach can describe the multiple levels of structure observed in these complex materials. Several morphological classes of foams are observed. A perplexing feature in the scattering patterns from all of the foams is a 3-dimensional structure with a radius of gyration from 40 to 100{Angstrom}. By variation of the polymer molecular-weight, scattering data supports a model describing this nano-scale structure as partially isolated, collapsed polymer coils. This model indicates that collapsed base structural unit in these morphologies.

  7. Video Image Analysis of Turbulent Buoyant Jets Using a Novel Laboratory Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, T. J.; Colgan, R. E.; Ferencevych, P. G.

    2012-12-01

    Turbulent buoyant jets play an important role in the transport of heat and mass in a variety of environmental settings on Earth. Naturally occurring examples include the discharges from high-temperature seafloor hydrothermal vents and from some types of subaerial volcanic eruptions. Anthropogenic examples include flows from industrial smokestacks and the flow from the damaged well after the Deepwater Horizon oil leak of 2010. Motivated by a desire to find non-invasive methods for measuring the volumetric flow rates of turbulent buoyant jets, we have constructed a laboratory apparatus that can generate these types of flows with easily adjustable nozzle velocities and fluid densities. The jet fluid comprises a variable mixture of nitrogen and carbon dioxide gas, which can be injected at any angle with respect to the vertical into the quiescent surrounding air. To make the flow visible we seed the jet fluid with a water fog generated by an array of piezoelectric diaphragms oscillating at ultrasonic frequencies. The system can generate jets that have initial densities ranging from approximately 2-48% greater than the ambient air. We obtain independent estimates of the volumetric flow rates using well-calibrated rotameters, and collect video image sequences for analysis at frame rates up to 120 frames per second using a machine vision camera. We are using this apparatus to investigate several outstanding problems related to the physics of these flows and their analysis using video imagery. First, we are working to better constrain several theoretical parameters that describe the trajectory of these flows when their initial velocities are not parallel to the buoyancy force. The ultimate goal of this effort is to develop well-calibrated methods for establishing volumetric flow rates using trajectory analysis. Second, we are working to refine optical plume velocimetry (OPV), a non-invasive technique for estimating flow rates using temporal cross-correlation of image

  8. Effect of Side Wind on the Directional Stability and Aerodynamics of a Hybrid Buoyant Aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Anwar U

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Directional stability characteristics explain the capabilities of a hybrid buoyant aircraft’s performance against the side wind, which induces flow separation that is chaotic in nature and may lead to oscillations of the aerodynamic surfaces. A numerical study is carried out to estimate the effect of side wind. The boundary conditions for the computational domain are set to velocity inlet and pressure outlet. Due to the incompressible flow at the cruise velocity, the density is taken to be constant. For these steady state simulations, the time is discretized in first order implicit and the SIMPLE scheme is employed for pressure velocity coupling alongwith k-ω SST model. Based on the results obtained so far, it is concluded that voluminous hybrid lifting fuselage is the major cause of directional.

  9. Experiments on the fragmentation of a buoyant liquid volume in another liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Landeau, Maylis; Olson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We present experiments on the instability and fragmentation of volumes of heavier liquid released into lighter immiscible liquids. We focus on the regime defined by small Ohnesorge numbers, density ratios of order one, and variable Weber numbers. The observed stages in the fragmentation process include deformation of the released fluid by either Rayleigh-Taylor instability or vortex ring roll-up and destabilization, formation of filamentary structures, capillary instability, and drop formation. At low and intermediate Weber numbers, a wide variety of fragmentation regimes is identified. Those regimes depend on early deformations, which mainly result from a competition between the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and the roll-up of a vortex ring. At high Weber numbers, turbulent vortex ring formation is observed. We have adapted the standard theory of turbulent entrainment to buoyant vortex rings with initial momentum. We find consistency between this theory and our experiments, indicating that the conc...

  10. Measurements of Accelerations of Large Neutrally-buoyant Particles in Intense Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Rachel D; Voth, Greg A

    2009-01-01

    We measure acceleration statistics of neutrally buoyant spherical particles with diameter 0.4 , clearly resolve the transition from the tracer like behavior of small particles to the much smaller accelerations of large particles. For d>5 eta, decreases with diameter as d^{-2/3} in agreement with inertial range scaling arguments. A model relating to the pressure structure functions matches the transition from small to large particle behavior if the particles respond to pressure differences over (1.7 +- 0.3) d. A model relating to the fluid acceleration averaged over the particle diameter predicts the transition with no free parameters, but does not show clean inertial range scaling in the size range studied. Consistent with earlier work, we find that the scaled acceleration probability density function shows very little dependence on particle size.

  11. Second-order solutions for random interfacial waves in N-layer density stratified fluid with steady uniform currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xiao-Gang; Guo Zhi-Ping; Song Jin-Bao

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper,the random interfacial waves in N-layer density-stratified fluids moving at different steady uniform speeds are researched by using an expansion technique,and the second-order asymptotic solutions of the random displacements of the density interfaces and the associated velocity potentials in N-layer fluid are presented based on the small amplitude wave theory.The obtained results indicate that the wave-wave second-order nonlinear interactions of the wave components and the second-order nonlinear interactions between the waves and currents are described.As expected,the solutions include those derived by Chen(2006)as a special case where the steady uniform currents of the N-layer fluids are taken as zero,and the solutions also reduce to those obtained by Song(2005)for second-order solutions for random interracial waves with steady uniform currents if N=2.

  12. Buoyant triacylglycerol-filled green algae and methods therefor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, Ursula; Goodson, Carrie

    2015-04-14

    Cultures of Chlamydomonas are disclosed comprising greater than 340 mg/l triacylglycerols (TAG). The cultures can include buoyant Chlamydomonas. Methods of forming the cultures are also disclosed. In some embodiments, these methods comprise providing Chlamydomonas growing in log phase in a first culture medium comprising a nitrogen source and acetate, replacing the first culture medium with a second medium comprising acetate but no nitrogen source, and subsequently supplementing the second medium with additional acetate. In some embodiments, a culture can comprise at least 1,300 mg/l triacyglycerols. In some embodiments, cultures can be used to produce a biofuel such as biodiesel.

  13. Dynamics of finite size neutrally buoyant particles in isotropic turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elhimer, M; Jean, A; Praud, O; Bazile, R; Marchal, M; Couteau, G, E-mail: elhimer@imft.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, IMFT - Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, Allee Camille Soula, F-31400 Toulouse (France); CNRS, IMFT, F-31400 Toulouse (France)

    2011-12-22

    The dynamics of neutrally buoyant particles suspended in a turbulent flow is investigated experimentally, with particles having diameters larger than the Kolmogorov length scale. To that purpose, a turbulence generator have been constructed and the resulting flow characterized. The fluid was then seeded with polystyrene particles of diameter about 1 mm and their velocity measured separately and simultaneously with the surrounding fluid. Comparison of the velocities statistics between the two phases shows no appreciable discrepancy. However, simultaneous velocity measurement shows that particles may move in different direction from the underlying flow.

  14. Traveling wave solutions of density-dependent nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation via the extended generalized Riccati equation mapping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kengne, Emmanuel; Saydé, Michel; Ben Hamouda, Fathi; Lakhssassi, Ahmed

    2013-11-01

    Analytical entire traveling wave solutions to the 1+1 density-dependent nonlinear reaction-diffusion equation via the extended generalized Riccati equation mapping method are presented in this paper. This equation can be regarded as an extension case of the Fisher-Kolmogoroff equation, which is used for studying insect and animal dispersal with growth dynamics. The analytical solutions are then used to investigate the effect of equation parameters on the population distribution.

  15. Formation of density singularities in ideal hydrodynamics of freely cooling inelastic gases: A family of exact solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouxon, Itzhak; Meerson, Baruch; Assaf, Michael; Livne, Eli

    2007-09-01

    We employ granular hydrodynamics to investigate a paradigmatic problem of clustering of particles in a freely cooling dilute granular gas. We consider large-scale hydrodynamic motions where the viscosity and heat conduction can be neglected, and one arrives at the equations of ideal gas dynamics with an additional term describing bulk energy losses due to inelastic collisions. We employ Lagrangian coordinates and derive a broad family of exact nonstationary analytical solutions that depend only on one spatial coordinate. These solutions exhibit a new type of singularity, where the gas density blows up in a finite time when starting from smooth initial conditions. The density blowups signal formation of close-packed clusters of particles. As the density blow-up time tc is approached, the maximum density exhibits a power law ˜(tc-t)-2. The velocity gradient blows up as ˜-(tc-t)-1 while the velocity itself remains continuous and develops a cusp (rather than a shock discontinuity) at the singularity. The gas temperature vanishes at the singularity, and the singularity follows the isobaric scenario: the gas pressure remains finite and approximately uniform in space and constant in time close to the singularity. An additional exact solution shows that the density blowup, of the same type, may coexist with an "ordinary" shock, at which the hydrodynamic fields are discontinuous but finite. We confirm stability of the exact solutions with respect to small one-dimensional perturbations by solving the ideal hydrodynamic equations numerically. Furthermore, numerical solutions show that the local features of the density blowup hold universally, independently of details of the initial and boundary conditions.

  16. On the cooling of a buoyant boundary current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Hsien-Wang

    2005-06-01

    Through a steady-state reduced-gravity model, we examine the downstream evolution of a buoyant boundary current as it is subjected to surface cooling. It is found that the adverse pressure gradient associated with the diminishing buoyancy is countered by falling pressure head, so the overall strength of the current—as measured by the (transport-weighted) mean square velocity—remains unchanged. This constancy also applies to the cross-stream difference of the square velocity because of the vorticity constraint, which leads to the general deduction that the net current shear is enhanced regardless of its upstream sign. As a consequence, if the upstream flow contains near-shore and offshore branches that are comparable in strength, this parity would persist downstream; but if the near-shore branch is weaker to begin with, it may be stagnated by cooling, with the ensuing generation of anti-cyclonic eddies. On account of the geostrophic balance, the buoyant layer narrows as the square root of the buoyancy—the same rate as the falling pressure head, but more rapid than that of the local deformation radius. Some of the model predictions are compared with observations from the Tsushima Current in the Japan/East Sea.

  17. Evolution of the buoyant bubbles in M87

    CERN Document Server

    Churazov, E; Kaiser, C R; Böhringer, H; Forman, W R

    2000-01-01

    The morphology of the X-ray and radio emitting features in the central 50 kpc region around the galaxy M87 strongly suggests that buoyant bubbles of cosmic rays (inflated by an earlier nuclear active phase of the galaxy) are slowly rising through the cooling gas. In the absence of strong surface tension, an intrinsic property of initially spherical bubbles is their transformation into tori as they rise through an external medium. Such structures can be identified in the radio images of the halo of M87. During their rise the bubbles uplift relatively cool X-ray emitting ambient gas from the central regions of the cooling flow to larger distances. This gas is colder than the ambient gas and has a higher volume emissivity. As a result, rising "radio" bubbles may be trailed by elongated X-ray features as indeed is observed in M87. We performed simple hydrodynamical simulations in order to qualitatively illustrate the evolution of the buoyant bubbles in the M87 environment.

  18. Nonlinear Asymptotic Stability of the Lane-Emden Solutions for the Viscous Gaseous Star Problem with Degenerate Density Dependent Viscosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tao; Xin, Zhouping; Zeng, Huihui

    2016-11-01

    The nonlinear asymptotic stability of Lane-Emden solutions is proved in this paper for spherically symmetric motions of viscous gaseous stars with the density dependent shear and bulk viscosities which vanish at the vacuum, when the adiabatic exponent {γ} lies in the stability regime {(4/3, 2)}, by establishing the global-in-time regularity uniformly up to the vacuum boundary for the vacuum free boundary problem of the compressible Navier-Stokes-Poisson systems with spherical symmetry, which ensures the global existence of strong solutions capturing the precise physical behavior that the sound speed is {C^{{1}/{2}}}-Hölder continuous across the vacuum boundary, the large time asymptotic uniform convergence of the evolving vacuum boundary, density and velocity to those of Lane-Emden solutions with detailed convergence rates, and the detailed large time behavior of solutions near the vacuum boundary. Those uniform convergence are of fundamental importance in the study of vacuum free boundary problems which are missing in the previous results for global weak solutions. Moreover, the results obtained in this paper apply to much broader cases of viscosities than those in Fang and Zhang (Arch Ration Mech Anal 191:195-243, 2009) for the theory of weak solutions when the adiabatic exponent {γ} lies in the most physically relevant range. Finally, this paper extends the previous local-in-time theory for strong solutions to a global-in-time one.

  19. Nonlinear adjustment of a localized layer of buoyant, uniform potential vorticity fluid against a vertical wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Karl R.

    2006-08-01

    The nonlinear evolution of a localized layer of buoyant, uniform potential vorticity fluid with depth H, width w and length L released adjacent to a wall in a rotating system is studied using reduced-gravity shallow-water theory and numerical modeling. In the interior, far from the two ends of the layer, the initial adjustment gives, after ignoring inertia-gravity waves, a geostrophic flow of width w and layer velocities parallel to the wall directed in the downstream direction (defined by Kelvin wave propagation). This steady geostrophic flow serves as the initial condition for a semigeostrophic solution using the method of characteristics. At the downstream end, the theory shows that the fluid intrudes along the wall as rarefaction terminating at a nose of vanishing width and depth. However, in a real fluid the presence of the lower layer leads to a blunt gravity current head. The theory is amended by introducing a gravity current head condition that has a blunt bore joined to the rarefaction by a uniform gravity current. The upstream termination of the initial layer produces a Kelvin rarefaction that propagates downstream, decreasing the layer depth along the wall, and initiating upstream flow adjacent to the wall. The theoretical solution compares favorably to numerical solutions of the reduced-gravity shallow-water equations. The agreement between theory and numerical solutions occurs regardless of whether the numerical runs are initiated with an adjusted geostrophic solution or with the release of a stagnant layer. The latter case excites inertia-gravity waves that, despite their large amplitude and breaking, do not significantly affect the evolution of the geostrophic flow. At times beyond the validity of the semigeostrophic theory, the numerical solutions evolve into a stationary array of vortices. The vortex formation can be interpreted as the finite-amplitude manifestation of a linear instability of the new flow established by the passage of the Kelvin

  20. The stability of the MSW solution to the solar neutrino problem with respect to random matter density perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, A

    1996-01-01

    We present a generalization of the resonant neutrino conversion in matter, including a random component in the matter density profile. The study is focused on the effect of such matter perturbations upon both large and small mixing angle MSW solutions to the solar neutrino problem. This is carried out both for the active-active \

  1. Effect of aggregation behavior of gelatin in aqueous solution on the grafting density of gelatin modified with glycidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Li, Tian-Duo; Tang, Xiao-Long; Qiao, Cong-De; Jiang, Qing-Wei

    2012-06-15

    The effect of aggregation behavior of gelatin in aqueous solution on the grafting density of glycidol grafted gelatin polymers (GGG polymers) was investigated. The grafting density was measured using the Van Slyke method by calculating the conversion rate of free - NH(2) groups of gelatin. The conversion rate reached peak values at 6% and 14% of the gelatin aqueous solution. SEM micrographs displayed a series of structural transitions (i.e., spherical, spindle, butterfly, irregular and dendritic aggregates) at varying concentrations from 2% to 16% (w/w) at an interval of 2% (w/w). The spindle aggregates reappeared at the concentrations of 6% and 14%. Viscosity measurements indicated that the physicochemical properties of the gelatin solution had changed with increasing concentration. UV and CD analysis indicated that hydrophobic interactions competed with hydrogen bonding, and the random coils partly transformed to β-sheet structure by changing the concentration. Zeta potential and pH data confirmed the increasing electrostatic repulsion associated with increasing the hydrophobic region. XPS analysis revealed that the elemental composition of the gelatin particle surface changed with variation in the aggregate structure, determining the monotonic variation of the grafting density with increasing concentration. Results demonstrate that aggregation behavior of gelatin in aqueous solution plays a crucial role in deciding the grafting density of gelatin modified products.

  2. Development of surfaces repelling negatively buoyant solid particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmler, Carina; Alexeev, Alexander

    2011-03-01

    Using a hybrid computational method that integrates the lattice Boltzmann model for fluid dynamics and the lattice spring model for solids, we examine the motion of negatively buoyant solid microparticles in shear flow near a solid wall decorated with regularly distributed rigid posts. The posts are arranged in a square pattern and tilted relative to the flow direction. We show that when rigid posts are tilted against flow, secondary flows emerge that prevent the deposition of suspended particles on the solid surface. We probe the effect of post geometry on the development of secondary flows and identify the optimal post architecture in terms of the mass of levitated solid particles. Our results are useful for designing anti-fouling surfaces that repel colloidal particles carried by fluid.

  3. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Buoyant Convection in Geophysical Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Fedorovich, E; Viegas, D; Wyngaard, J

    1998-01-01

    Studies of convection in geophysical flows constitute an advanced and rapidly developing area of research that is relevant to problems of the natural environment. During the last decade, significant progress has been achieved in the field as a result of both experimental studies and numerical modelling. This led to the principal revision of the widely held view on buoyancy-driven turbulent flows comprising an organised mean component with superimposed chaotic turbulence. An intermediate type of motion, represented by coherent structures, has been found to play a key role in geophysical boundary layers and in larger scale atmospheric and hydrospheric circulations driven by buoyant forcing. New aspects of the interaction between convective motions and rotation have recently been discovered and investigated. Extensive experimental data have also been collected on the role of convection in cloud dynamics and microphysics. New theoretical concepts and approaches have been outlined regarding scaling and parameteriz...

  4. Turbulent buoyant confined jet with variable source temperature

    CERN Document Server

    El-Amin, M F; Sun, S

    2013-01-01

    In this work, experimental and numerical investigations are considered for confined buoyant turbulent jet with varying inlet temperatures. Results of the experimental work and numerical simulations for the problem under consideration are presented. Four cases of different variable inlet temperatures and different flow rates are considered. The realizable k-epsilon turbulence model is used to model the turbulent flow. Comparisons show good agreements between simulated and measured results. The results indicate that temperatures along the vertical axis vary, generally, in nonlinear fashion as opposed to the approximately linear variation that was observed for the constant inlet temperature that was done in a previous work. Furthermore, thermal stratification exits particularly closer to the entrance region. Further away from the entrance region the variation in temperatures becomes relatively smaller. The stratification is observed since the start of the experiment and continues during whole time. Numerical exp...

  5. Numerical simulations of buoyant reactive jets with sidewall effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Heping; JIANG Xi; WANG Wei; YANG Yun; XU Liang; FAN Weicheng

    2004-01-01

    The near field dynamics of buoyant reactive jets with adjacent sidewalls is investigated by time-dependent three-dimensional direct simulations. The physical problem is a fuel jet issuing vertically into an oxidant ambient environment in a corner configuration with sidewall boundaries. Simulation results are presented for two cases with different jet nozzle geometries: a corner-round reactive jet and a corner-square reactive jet with the same cross-sectional area on the nozzle plane. Buoyancy-induced large vortical structures evolve spatially in the flow field and transition to turbulence occurs downstream. Calculation of the mean flow properties shows that entrainment of the corner-round jet is stronger than that of the corner-square jet due to the stronger vortex deformation in the corner-round case.

  6. Density, Viscosity, Solubility, and Diffusivity of N2O in Aqueous Amino Acid Salt Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kumar, P. Senthil; Hogendoorn, J.A.; Feron, P.H.M.; Versteeg, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    Solubility and diffusivity of N2O in aqueous solutions of potassium taurate are reported over a wide range of concentration and temperature. Also, the solubility of N2O in aqueous potassium glycinate solution is reported at 295 K. The ion specific constants are reported for taurate and glycinate ani

  7. The effects of possibly buoyant flat slab segments on Nazca and South American plate motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lithgow-Bertelloni, C. R.; Shea, R.; Crameri, F.

    2014-12-01

    Flat slabs are ubiquitous today and in Earth's past, present in at least 10% of present-day subduction zones. The Nazca slab is a classic example with large dip variations along strike, including two prominent flat segments in Peru and Argentina that coincide with the subduction of aseismic ridges. The origin of flat segments remain enigmatic though much work has examined the consequences for upper plate deformation and continued subduction. In the case of the Argentinian flat segment, detailed seismic imaging has shown significantly increased crustal thickness in the flat part of the slab. Our present understanding of oceanic crust formation suggests that incrased crustal thickness forms in response to larger degrees of partial melt, which in turn decrease the water content of the formed crust. The residuum from this process is depleted. The resulting combined lithospheric column is buoyant with respect to the underlying mantle, and likely cold from its contact with the overlying plate and unlikely to undergo the basalt-eclogite transition due to kinetic hindrances. This has consequences for mantle flow and the shear stresses it exerts at the base of the lithosphere and hence to plate motions. Interestingly, the motion of the Nazca-South America pair is difficult to reproduce even in the most sophisticated models (Stadler et al. 2010) without invoking special coupling, rheology or forces. We examine the effects of the subduction of neutral and buoyant flat segments on mantle flow and plate motions, globally and locally for Nazca and South America. We construct high-resolution models of the morphology and density structure of the Nazca slab and embed them in an existing global slab model. We compute the global viscous flow induced and predict plate motions consistent with the density heterogeneity and plate geometry. As an end member we also examine a Nazca slab that dips uniformly with a 30 degree dip. We find, perhaps unsurprisingly, that the most important

  8. Global strong solution to compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density dependent viscosity and temperature dependent heat conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Ran; Guo, Ai; Zhu, Changjiang

    2017-04-01

    We obtain existence and uniqueness of global strong solution to one-dimensional compressible Navier-Stokes equations for ideal polytropic gas flow, with density dependent viscosity and temperature dependent heat conductivity under stress-free and thermally insulated boundary conditions. Here we assume viscosity coefficient μ (ρ) = 1 +ρα and heat conductivity coefficient κ (θ) =θβ for all α ∈ [ 0 , ∞) and β ∈ (0 , + ∞).

  9. Solubilities ,Densities and Refractive Indices of Rubidium Chloride or Cesium Chloride in Ethanol Aqueous Solutions at Different Temperatures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO,Wen-Xia; HU,Man-Cheng; JIANG,Yu-Cheng; LI,Shu-Ni

    2007-01-01

    The data of solubilities.densities and refractive indices of rubidium chloride or cesium chloride in the system C2H5OH-H2O were measured by using a simple accurate analytical method at different temperatures,with mass fractions of ethanol in the range of O to 1.0.In all cases,the presence of ethanol significantly reduced the solubility of rubidium chloride and cesium chloride in aqueous solution.The solubilities of the saturated solutions were fitted via polynomial equations as a function of the mass fraction of ethanol.The CsCl-C2H5OH-H2O temary system appeared in two liquid phases:alcoholic phase and water phase.when the mass fractions of ethanol were in the range of 10.37% to 49.59%at 35℃.Density and refractive index were also determined for the same ternary systems with varied unsaturated salt concentrations.Values for both experiment and theory were correlated with the salt concentrations and proportions of alcohol in the solutions.The equations proposed could also account for the saturated solutions.

  10. Impact of numerical artifact of the forward model in the inverse solution of density-dependent flow problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassar, Mohamed K.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the effect of computational error on the inversion of a density-dependent flow and transport model, using SEAWAT and UCODE-2005 in an inverse identification of hydraulic conductivity and dispersivity using head and concentration data from a 2-D laboratory experiment. We investigated inversions using three different solution schemes including variation of number of particles and time step length, in terms of the three aspects: the shape and smoothness of the objective function surface, the consequent impacts to the optimization, and the resulting Pareto analyses. This study demonstrates that the inversion is very sensitive to the choice of the forward model solution scheme. In particular, standard finite difference methods provide the smoothest objective function surface; however, this is obtained at the cost of numerical artifacts that can lead to erroneous warping of the objective function surface. Total variation diminishing (TVD) schemes limit these impacts at the cost of more computation time, while the hybrid method of characteristics (HMOC) approach with increased particle numbers and/or reduced time step gives both smoothed and accurate objective function surface. Use of the most accurate methods (TVD and HMOC) did lead to successful inversion of the two parameters; however, with distinct results for Pareto analyses. These results illuminate the sensitivity of the inversion to a number of aspects of the forward solution of the density-driven flow problem and reveal that parameter values may result that are erroneous but that counteract numerical errors in the solution.

  11. Complex Probability Distributions A Solution for the Long-Standing Problem of QCD at Finite Density

    CERN Document Server

    Azcoiti, V

    1996-01-01

    We show how the prescription of taking the absolute value of the fermion determinant in the integration measure of QCD at finite density, forgetting its phase, reproduces the correct thermodynamical limit. This prescription, which applies also to other gauge theories with non-positive-definite integration measure, also has the advantage of killing finite size effects due to extremely small mean values of the cosine of the phase of the fermion determinant. We also give an explanation for the pathological behaviour of quenched QCD at finite density.

  12. Boiteux's solution to the shifting-peak problem and the equilibrium price density in continuous time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsley, A.; Wrobel, A.J.

    2002-01-01

    Bewley's condition on production sets, imposed to ensure the existence of an equilibrium price density when L∞ is the commodity space, is weakened to allow applications to continuous-time problems, and especially to peak-load pricing when the users' utility and production functions are Mackey contin

  13. Cobalt incorporation in calcite: thermochemistry of (Ca,Co)CO3 solid solutions from density functional theory simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-López, Jorge; Ruiz-Hernández, Sergio E.; Fernández-González, Ángeles; Jiménez, Amalia; de Leeuw, Nora H.; Grau-Crespo, Ricardo

    2015-04-01

    The incorporation of cobalt in mixed metal carbonates is a possible route to the immobilization of this toxic element in the environment. However, the thermodynamics of (Ca,Co)CO3 solid solutions are still unclear due to conflicting data from experiment and from the observation of natural ocurrences. Atomistic computer simulations, which allow the evaluation of thermodynamic properties without the interference of unknown kinetic factors, have been increasingly used in recent years for the investigation of the thermodynamics of mixing and impurity incorporation in carbonate. We report here the results of a computer simulation study of the mixing of calcite (CaCO3) and spherocobaltite (CoCO3), using density functional theory calculations. Our simulations suggest that previously proposed thermodynamic models, based only on observed compositions, significantly overestimate the solubility between the two solids and therefore underestimate the extension of the miscibility gap under ambient conditions. The enthalpy of mixing of the disordered solid solution is strongly positive and moderately asymmetric: calcium incorporation in spherocobaltite is more endothermic than cobalt incorporation in calcite. Ordering of the impurities in (0001) layers is energetically favourable with respect to the disordered solid solution at low temperatures and intermediate compositions, but the ordered phase is still unstable to demixing. The solvus and spinodal lines in the phase diagram using a sub-regular solution model has been also calculated, and conclude that many Ca1-xCoxCO3 mineral solid solutions (with observed compositions of up to x=0.027, and above x=0.93) are metastable with respect to phase separation. The strong non-ideality of this solid solution has an important effect on the solid solution / aqueous solution thermodynamic partitioning: the equilibrium level of substitutional impurities in the endmember solids is always low, regardless of the composition of the aqueous

  14. Shapes of Buoyant and Nonbuoyant Methane Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Peter B.; Yuan, Zeng-Guang; Urban, David L.

    1997-01-01

    Laminar gas jet diffusion flames represent a fundamental combustion configuration. Their study has contributed to numerous advances in combustion, including the development of analytical and computational combustion tools. Laminar jet flames are pertinent also to turbulent flames by use of the laminar flamelet concept. Investigations into the shapes of noncoflowing microgravity laminar jet diffusion flames have primarily been pursued in the NASA Lewis 2.2-second drop tower, by Cochran and coworkers and by Bahadori and coworkers. These studies were generally conducted at atmospheric pressure; they involved soot-containing flames and reported luminosity lengths and widths instead of the flame-sheet dimensions which are of Greater value to theory evaluation and development. The seminal model of laminar diffusion flames is that of Burke and Schumann, who solved the conservation of momentum equation for a jet flame in a coflowing ambient by assuming the velocity of fuel, oxidizer and products to be constant throughout. Roper and coworkers improved upon this model by allowing for axial variations of velocity and found flame shape to be independent of coflow velocity. Roper's suggestion that flame height should be independent of gravity level is not supported by past or present observations. Other models have been presented by Klajn and Oppenheim, Markstein and De Ris, Villermaux and Durox, and Li et al. The common result of all these models (except in the buoyant regime) is that flame height is proportional to fuel mass flowrate, with flame width proving much more difficult to predict. Most existing flame models have been compared with shapes of flames containing soot, which is known to obscure the weak blue emission of flame sheets. The present work involves measurements of laminar gas jet diffusion flame shapes. Flame images have been obtained for buoyant and nonbuoyant methane flames burning in quiescent air at various fuel flow-rates, burner diameters and ambient

  15. MEAN BEHAVIOR OF THREE DIMENSIONAL LINE BUOYANT JETS IN CROSS FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han Hui-ling; Zhang Hong-min; Liang Su-tao; Li Wei

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a numerical calculation on the mean behavior of finite length line buoyant jets from slot with width B, discharged perpendicularly into relatively deep cross-flows in the mixing region. The length of diffuser was varied from 4 to 20 times the width of diffuser. The calculations were performed with the standard K-ε model and Hybrid Finite Analytic Method (HFAM) with staggered grid. The phenomenon and development of vortex pairs are simulated successfully and the influence of diffuser length and buoyant on turbulent buoyant jets are analyzed.

  16. Sourceless formation evaluation. An LWD solution providing density and neutron measurements without the use of radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, R.; Reichel, N. [Schlumberger, Sungai Buloh (Malaysia)

    2013-08-01

    For many years the industry has been searching for a way to eliminate the logistical difficulties and risk associated with deployment of radioisotopes for formation evaluation. The traditional gamma-gamma density (GGD) measurement uses the scattering of 662-keV gamma rays from a 137Cs radioisotopic source, with a 30.17-year half-life, to determine formation density. The traditional neutron measurement uses an Am-Be source emitting neutrons with an energy around 4 MeV, with a half-life of 432 years. Both these radioisotopic sources pose health, security, and environmental risks. Pulsed-neutron generators have been used in the industry for several decades in wireline tools and more recently in logging-while-drilling tools. These generators produce 14-MeV neutrons, many of which interact with the nuclei in the formation. Elastic collisions allow a neutron porosity measurement to be derived, which has been available to the industry since 2005. Inelastic interactions are typically followed by the emission of a variety of high-energy gamma rays. Similar to the case of the GGD measurement, the transport and attenuation of these gamma rays is a strong function of the formation density. However, the gamma-ray source is now distributed over a volume within the formation, where gamma rays have been induced by neutron interactions and the source can no longer be considered to be a point as in the case of a radioisotopic source. In addition, the extent of the induced source region depends on the transport of the fast neutrons from the source to the point of gamma-ray production. Even though the physics is more complex, it is possible to measure the formation density if the fast neutron transport is taken into account when deriving the density answer. This paper briefly reviews the physics underlying the sourceless neutron porosity and recently introduced neutron-gamma density (SNGD) measurement, demonstrates how they can be used in traditional workflows and illustrates their

  17. Observations and numerical modelling of a non-buoyant front in the Tay Estuary, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, S. P.; Copeland, G. J. M.; Ferrier, G.; Folkard, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and density data have been collected for a section of front which consistently occurs on the flood tide along a break in bathymetry in the Tay Estuary. Lateral velocity shear in a vertical profile through the front was measured to be 0.52 s -1. An estuarine cross-sectional numerical model was developed with buoyancy-driven flow. Results from the numerical model showed that shears of such magnitude cannot be produced by buoyancy alone. Instead, a hypothesis was devised for the generation of the bathymetry-aligned front, and tested using the numerical model. The flooding current flows over sandbanks at the southern bank of the estuary and is then directed over (rather than along) the bathymetry break due to a sudden topographic restriction at the Tayport Narrows. Due to tidal phase effects, this overbank flow has a lower density than the ambient main channel water, hence behaving as a buoyant plume. The plume entrains higher density bottom water and a recirculation cell is set up in the lee of the bathymetry break. A surface convergent front occurs because a corresponding towards-bank flow (confirmed by field data) occurs in the centre of the channel. The numerical model was applied to this configuration using suitable initial and boundary conditions based on field observations. Lateral velocity profiles and the strength of shear show good agreement with the field data. It is suggested that the presence of a density gradient is required to generate the front but is not the main driving force.

  18. The vertical distribution of buoyant plastics at sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Reisser

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Millimeter-sized plastics are numerically abundant and widespread across the world's ocean surface. These buoyant macroscopic particles can be mixed within the upper water column due to turbulent transport. Models indicate that the largest decrease in their concentration occurs within the first few meters of water, where subsurface observations are very scarce. By using a new type of multi-level trawl at 12 sites within the North Atlantic accumulation zone, we measured concentrations and physical properties of plastics from the air–seawater interface to a depth of 5 m, at 0.5 m intervals. Our results show that plastic concentrations drop exponentially with water depth, but decay rates decrease with increasing Beaufort scale. Furthermore, smaller pieces presented lower rise velocities and were more susceptible to vertical transport. This resulted in higher depth decays of plastic mass concentration (mg m−3 than numerical concentration (pieces m−3. Further multi-level sampling of plastics will improve our ability to predict at-sea plastic load, size distribution, drifting pattern, and impact on marine species and habitats.

  19. Taylor-Couette flow instabilities in neutrally-buoyant suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majji, Madhu; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Morris, Jeffrey F.

    2016-11-01

    Experimentally-determined instabilities and flow states of a neutrally-buoyant suspension are described. The flow is studied in a concentric-cylinder device with inner-to-outer cylinder ratio of 0.877 with inner cylinder rotating and outer stationary. The cylinder length to annular gap ratio is 20, while the gap to particle size ratio is approximately 30, for spherical particles of 250 μm diameter. Using a slowly increasing or decreasing Re ramp, the flow agrees with all expectations for the pure fluid, while a slowly decreasing (quasi-static) ramp is used for the suspension flow, which is found to be unstable at lower Reynolds number Re (based on the effective viscosity) than pure fluid, and exhibits spiraling and ribbon states not found for a pure fluid with only inner cylinder rotating. Strikingly, the suspension at solid fraction ϕ >= 0 . 05 goes unstable first to a nonaxisymetric state rather than axisymmetric Taylor vortices. At 0 . 1 states during quais-static ramping of Re , while for ϕ = 0 . 3 , the base state Couette flow gives way to wavy spirals (WS) at Re 80 and exhibits only the WS state up to Re = 150 . Transient behavior on sudden change of Re and particle tracking will also be presented.

  20. Buoyant radio-lobes in a viscous intracluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, C S; Fabian, A C; Stone, J M; Vernaleo, J C

    2004-01-01

    (Abridged) Ideal hydrodynamic models of the intracluster medium (ICM) in the core regions of galaxy clusters fail to explain both the observed temperature structure of this gas, and the observed morphology of radio-galaxy/ICM interactions. It has recently been suggested that, even in the presence of reasonable magnetic fields, thermal conduction in the ICM may be crucial for reproducing the temperature floor seen in many systems. If this is indeed correct, it raises the possibility that other transport processes may be important. With this motivation, we present a numerical investigation of the buoyant evolution of AGN-blown cavities in ICM that has a non-negligible shear viscosity. We use the ZEUS-MP code to follow the 3-d evolution of an initially static, hot bubble in a beta-model ICM atmosphere with varying degrees of shear viscosity. With no explicit viscosity, it is found that the combined action of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities shred the ICM cavity and one does not reproduce the in...

  1. Densities and solubilities of Glycylglycine and Glycyl-L-Alanine in Aqueous Electrolyte Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breil, Martin Peter; Mollerup, Jørgen; Rudolph, E. Susanne J.

    2004-01-01

    is 1.74 and 4.78 mol/kg of water, respectively. The solubility of glycylglycine in salt solutions of NaCl, Na2SO4, and (NH4)(2)SO4 show a moderate salting-in effect. The solubility of glycyl-L-alanine show a minor or no salting-in effect at low salt concentrations and a moderate salting-out effect...

  2. Probability density function of non-reactive solute concentration in heterogeneous porous formations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellin, Alberto; Tonina, Daniele

    2007-10-30

    Available models of solute transport in heterogeneous formations lack in providing complete characterization of the predicted concentration. This is a serious drawback especially in risk analysis where confidence intervals and probability of exceeding threshold values are required. Our contribution to fill this gap of knowledge is a probability distribution model for the local concentration of conservative tracers migrating in heterogeneous aquifers. Our model accounts for dilution, mechanical mixing within the sampling volume and spreading due to formation heterogeneity. It is developed by modeling local concentration dynamics with an Ito Stochastic Differential Equation (SDE) that under the hypothesis of statistical stationarity leads to the Beta probability distribution function (pdf) for the solute concentration. This model shows large flexibility in capturing the smoothing effect of the sampling volume and the associated reduction of the probability of exceeding large concentrations. Furthermore, it is fully characterized by the first two moments of the solute concentration, and these are the same pieces of information required for standard geostatistical techniques employing Normal or Log-Normal distributions. Additionally, we show that in the absence of pore-scale dispersion and for point concentrations the pdf model converges to the binary distribution of [Dagan, G., 1982. Stochastic modeling of groundwater flow by unconditional and conditional probabilities, 2, The solute transport. Water Resour. Res. 18 (4), 835-848.], while it approaches the Normal distribution for sampling volumes much larger than the characteristic scale of the aquifer heterogeneity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the same model with the spatial moments replacing the statistical moments can be applied to estimate the proportion of the plume volume where solute concentrations are above or below critical thresholds. Application of this model to point and vertically averaged bromide

  3. NUMERICAL STUDY ON THE STABILITY AND MIXING OF VERTICAL ROUNE BUOYANT JET IN SHALLOW WATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾玉红; 槐文信

    2005-01-01

    The k-epsilon model was applied to establish the mathematical model of vertical round buoyant jet discharging into confined depth, and it was solved using the Hybrid Finite Analytic Method ( HFAM ). The numerical predictions demonstrate two generic flow patterns for different jet discharge and environmental parameters: ( i ) a stable buoyant flow discharge with the mixed fluid leaving the near-field warm in a surface warm water layer;( ii ) an unstable buoyant flow discharge with recirculation and re-entrainment of warm water in the near field. Furthermore, the mixing characters of vertical round buoyant jet were numerically predicted. Both the stability criterion and numerical predictions of bulk dilutions are in excellent agreement with Lee and Jirka ' s experiments and theory.

  4. Nonsimilar Solution for Shock Waves in a Rotational Axisymmetric Perfect Gas with a Magnetic Field and Exponentially Varying Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, G.; Sinha, A. K.

    2017-01-01

    The propagation of a cylindrical shock wave in an ideal gas in the presence of a constant azimuthal magnetic field with consideration for the axisymmetric rotational effects is investigated. The ambient medium is assumed to have the radial, axial, and azimuthal velocity components. The fluid velocities and density of the ambient medium are assumed to vary according to an exponential law. Nonsimilar solutions are obtained by taking into account the vorticity vector and its components. The dependences of the characteristics of the problem on the Alfven-Mach number and time are obtained. It is shown that the presence of a magnetic field has a decaying effect on the shock wave. The pressure and density are shown to vanish at the inner surface (piston), and hence a vacuum forms at the line of symmetry.

  5. Low-Density Water Structure Observed in a Nanosegregated Cryoprotectant Solution at Low Temperatures from 285 to 238 K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towey, J J; Soper, A K; Dougan, L

    2016-05-19

    The structure of liquid water is defined by its molecular association through hydrogen bonding. Two different structures have been proposed for liquid water at low temperatures: low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL) water. Here, we demonstrate a platform that can be exploited to experimentally probe the structure of liquid water in equilibrium at temperatures down to 238 K. We make use of a cryoprotectant molecule, glycerol, that, when mixed with water, lowers the freezing temperature of the solution nonmonotonically with glycerol concentration. We use a combination of neutron diffraction measurements and computational modeling to examine the structure of water in glycerol-water liquid mixtures at low temperatures from 285 to 238 K. We confirm that the mixtures are nanosegregated into regions of glycerol-rich and water-rich clusters. We examine the water structure and reveal that, at the temperatures studied here, water forms a low-density water structure that is more tetrahedral than the structure at room temperature. We postulate that nanosegregation allows water to form a low-density structure that is protected by an extensive and encapsulating glycerol interface.

  6. Heat capacity and density of potassium iodide solutions in mixed N-methylpyrrolidone-water solvent at 298.15 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, A. N.

    2014-10-01

    The heat capacity and density of potassium iodide solutions in a mixed N-methylpyrrolidone (MP)-water solvent with a low content of the organic component are measured via calorimetry and densimetry at 298.15 K. Standard partial molal heat capacities and volumes of potassium iodide in MP-water mixtures are calculated. Standard heat capacities and volumes of potassium and iodide ions are determined. The character of the changes in heat capacity and volume are discussed on the basis of calculating additivity coefficients δ c and δ v upon the mixing of isomolal binary solutions KI-MP and KI-water, depending on the composition of the MP-H2O mixture and the concentration of the electrolyte.

  7. SEAWAT: A Computer Program for Simulation of Variable-Density Groundwater Flow and Multi-Species Solute and Heat Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langevin, Christian D.

    2009-01-01

    SEAWAT is a MODFLOW-based computer program designed to simulate variable-density groundwater flow coupled with multi-species solute and heat transport. The program has been used for a wide variety of groundwater studies including saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers, aquifer storage and recovery in brackish limestone aquifers, and brine migration within continental aquifers. SEAWAT is relatively easy to apply because it uses the familiar MODFLOW structure. Thus, most commonly used pre- and post-processors can be used to create datasets and visualize results. SEAWAT is a public domain computer program distributed free of charge by the U.S. Geological Survey.

  8. Energy density of marine pelagic fish eggs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis-Vestergaard, J.

    2002-01-01

    Analysis of the literature on pelagic fish eggs enabled generalizations to be made of their energy densities, because the property of being buoyant in sea water appears to constrain the proximate composition of the eggs and thus to minimize interspecific variation. An energy density of 1.34 J mul...

  9. The effect of particle properties on the depth profile of buoyant plastics in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Merel; Reisser, Julia; Slat, Boyan; Ferrari, Francesco F.; Schmid, Moritz S.; Cunsolo, Serena; Brambini, Roberto; Noble, Kimberly; Sirks, Lys-Anne; Linders, Theo E. W.; Schoeneich-Argent, Rosanna I.; Koelmans, Albert A.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies on buoyant microplastics in the marine environment rely on sea surface sampling. Consequently, microplastic amounts can be underestimated, as turbulence leads to vertical mixing. Models that correct for vertical mixing are based on limited data. In this study we report measurements of the depth profile of buoyant microplastics in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre, from 0 to 5 m depth. Microplastics were separated into size classes (0.5–1.5 and 1.5–5.0 mm) and types (‘fragments’ and ‘lines’), and associated with a sea state. Microplastic concentrations decreased exponentially with depth, with both sea state and particle properties affecting the steepness of the decrease. Concentrations approached zero within 5 m depth, indicating that most buoyant microplastics are present on or near the surface. Plastic rise velocities were also measured, and were found to differ significantly for different sizes and shapes. Our results suggest that (1) surface samplers such as manta trawls underestimate total buoyant microplastic amounts by a factor of 1.04–30.0 and (2) estimations of depth-integrated buoyant plastic concentrations should be done across different particle sizes and types. Our findings can assist with improving buoyant ocean plastic vertical mixing models, mass balance exercises, impact assessments and mitigation strategies. PMID:27721460

  10. The effect of particle properties on the depth profile of buoyant plastics in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Merel; Reisser, Julia; Slat, Boyan; Ferrari, Francesco F.; Schmid, Moritz S.; Cunsolo, Serena; Brambini, Roberto; Noble, Kimberly; Sirks, Lys-Anne; Linders, Theo E. W.; Schoeneich-Argent, Rosanna I.; Koelmans, Albert A.

    2016-10-01

    Most studies on buoyant microplastics in the marine environment rely on sea surface sampling. Consequently, microplastic amounts can be underestimated, as turbulence leads to vertical mixing. Models that correct for vertical mixing are based on limited data. In this study we report measurements of the depth profile of buoyant microplastics in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre, from 0 to 5 m depth. Microplastics were separated into size classes (0.5–1.5 and 1.5–5.0 mm) and types (‘fragments’ and ‘lines’), and associated with a sea state. Microplastic concentrations decreased exponentially with depth, with both sea state and particle properties affecting the steepness of the decrease. Concentrations approached zero within 5 m depth, indicating that most buoyant microplastics are present on or near the surface. Plastic rise velocities were also measured, and were found to differ significantly for different sizes and shapes. Our results suggest that (1) surface samplers such as manta trawls underestimate total buoyant microplastic amounts by a factor of 1.04–30.0 and (2) estimations of depth-integrated buoyant plastic concentrations should be done across different particle sizes and types. Our findings can assist with improving buoyant ocean plastic vertical mixing models, mass balance exercises, impact assessments and mitigation strategies.

  11. Wave induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drivdal

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of wave-current and wave-turbulence interactions have received much attention in recent years. In this study the focus is on how these wave effects modify the transport of particles in the ocean. Here the particles are buoyant tracers that can represent oil droplets, plastic particles or plankton, for example fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis–Stokes force affect the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes as well as the Stokes drift depend on the directional wave spectrum that can be obtained from a wave model or from observations. As a first test the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (e.g. classical Ekman theory. Secondly the model is applied to a case where we investigate the oil drift after an offshore oil spill outside the western coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by empirical models. With wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive, it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift in this case, and has the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  12. Wave-induced mixing and transport of buoyant particles: application to the Statfjord A oil spill

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Drivdal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on how wave–current and wave–turbulence interactions modify the transport of buoyant particles in the ocean. Here the particles can represent oil droplets, plastic particles, or plankton such as fish eggs and larvae. Using the General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM, modified to take surface wave effects into account, we investigate how the increased mixing by wave breaking and Stokes shear production, as well as the stronger veering by the Coriolis–Stokes force, affects the drift of the particles. The energy and momentum fluxes, as well as the Stokes drift, depend on the directional wave spectrum obtained from a wave model. As a first test, the depth and velocity scales from the model are compared with analytical solutions based on a constant eddy viscosity (i.e., classical Ekman theory. Secondly, the model is applied to a case in which we investigate the oil drift after an oil spill off the west coast of Norway in 2007. During this accident the average net drift of oil was observed to be both slower and more deflected away from the wind direction than predicted by oil-drift models. In this case, using wind and wave forcing from the ERA Interim archive it is shown that the wave effects are important for the resultant drift and have the potential to improve drift forecasting.

  13. Supergranulation as the Sun's largest buoyantly driven mode of convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossette, Jean-Francois; Rast, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Solar supergranulation has been characterized as horizontally divergent flow motions having a typical scale of 32 Mm using Doppler imaging, granule tracking and helioseismology. Unlike granules, the size of which is comparable to both the thickness of the radiative boundary layer and local scale height at the photosphere, supergranules do not appear to correspond to any particular length scale of the flow. Possible explanations ranging from convection theories involving Helium ionization to spatial correlation or self-organization of granular flows have been proposed as physical mechanisms to explain solar supergranulation. However, its existence remains largely a mystery. Remarkably, horizontal velocity power spectra obtained from Doppler imaging and correlation tracking of flow features at the solar surface reveal the presence of peaks corresponding to granular and supergranular scales, followed by a monotonic decrease in power at scales larger than supergranulation, which suggests that large-scale modes in the deep layers of the convection zone may be suppressed. Using 3D anelastic simulations of solar convection we investigate whether supergranulation may reflect the largest buoyantly driven mode of convection inside the Sun. Results show that the amount of kinetic energy contained in the largest flow scales relative to that associated with supergranular motions is a function of the depth of the transition from a convectively unstable to convectively stable mean stratification inside the simulation. This suggests that the observed monotonic decrease in power at scales larger than supergranulation may be explained by rapid cooling in the subphotospheric layers and an essentially isentropic solar interior, wherein convective driving is effectively suppressed.

  14. Influence of Force Fields and Quantum Chemistry Approach on Spectral Densities of BChl a in Solution and in FMO Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Suryanarayanan; Aghtar, Mortaza; Valleau, Stéphanie; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2015-08-06

    Studies on light-harvesting (LH) systems have attracted much attention after the finding of long-lived quantum coherences in the exciton dynamics of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex. In this complex, excitation energy transfer occurs between the bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) pigments. Two quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) studies, each with a different force-field and quantum chemistry approach, reported different excitation energy distributions for the FMO complex. To understand the reasons for these differences in the predicted excitation energies, we have carried out a comparative study between the simulations using the CHARMM and AMBER force field and the Zerner intermediate neglect of differential orbital (ZINDO)/S and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) quantum chemistry methods. The calculations using the CHARMM force field together with ZINDO/S or TDDFT always show a wider spread in the energy distribution compared to those using the AMBER force field. High- or low-energy tails in these energy distributions result in larger values for the spectral density at low frequencies. A detailed study on individual BChl a molecules in solution shows that without the environment, the density of states is the same for both force field sets. Including the environmental point charges, however, the excitation energy distribution gets broader and, depending on the applied methods, also asymmetric. The excitation energy distribution predicted using TDDFT together with the AMBER force field shows a symmetric, Gaussian-like distribution.

  15. Moving least squares-based multi-functional sensing technique or estimating viscosity and density of ternary solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Dan; WEI Guo; SUN Jin-wei; LIU Xin

    2009-01-01

    In the osmotic dehydration process of food, on-line estimation of concentrations of two components in ternary solution with NaCI and sucrose was performed based on multi-functional sensing technique.Moving Least Squares were adopted in approximation procedure to estimate the viscosity of such interested ternary solu-tion with the given data set.As a result, in one mode of using total experimental data as calibration data andvalidation data, the relative deviations of estimated viscosities are less than ~ 1.24%.In the other mode, by taking total experimental data except the ones for estimation as calibration data, the relative deviations are less than±3.47%.In the same way, the density of ternary solution can be also estimated with deviations less than ± 0.11% and ± 0.30% respectively in these two models.The satisfactory and accurate results show the ex-traordinary efficiency of Moving Least Squares behaved in signal approximation for multi-functional sensors.

  16. Hypersonic low-density solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations with chemical nonequilibrium and multicomponent surface slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R. N.; Simmonds, A. L.

    1986-01-01

    Solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations with chemical nonequilibrium and multicomponent surface slip are presented along the stagnation streamline under low-density hypersonic flight conditions. The conditions analyzed are those encountered by the nose region of the Space Shuttle Orbiter during reentry. A detailed comparison of the Navier-Stokes (NS) results is made with the viscous shock-layer (VSL) and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) predictions. With the inclusion of surface-slip boundary conditions in NS calculations, the surface heat transfer and other flow field quantities adjacent to the surface are predicted favorably with the DSMC calculations from 75 km to 115 km in altitude. Therefore, the practical range for the applicability of Navier-Stokes solutions is much wider than previously thought. This is appealing because the continuum (NS and VSL) methods are commonly used to solve the fluid flow problems and are less demanding in terms of computer resource requirements than the noncontinuum (DSMC) methods. The NS solutions agree well with the VSL results for altitudes less than 92 km. An assessment is made of the frozen flow approximation employed in the VSL calculations.

  17. Existence, uniqueness and regularity of a time-periodic probability density distribution arising in a sedimentation-diffusion problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsche, Ludwig C.; Nitsche, Johannes M.; Brenner, Howard

    1988-01-01

    The sedimentation and diffusion of a nonneutrally buoyant Brownian particle in vertical fluid-filled cylinder of finite length which is instantaneously inverted at regular intervals are investigated analytically. A one-dimensional convective-diffusive equation is derived to describe the temporal and spatial evolution of the probability density; a periodicity condition is formulated; the applicability of Fredholm theory is established; and the parameter-space regions are determined within which the existence and uniqueness of solutions are guaranteed. Numerical results for sample problems are presented graphically and briefly characterized.

  18. Rossby adjustment of a finite-length buoyant patch along a vertical wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfrich, Karl

    2004-11-01

    The release of a patch of buoyant fluid of initial uniform depth H and width L0 perpendicular to a wall in a rotating system is reconsidered for a patch with finite length along the wall. The lower layer is slightly denser and much deeper. The finite length results in distinct end effects. At the downstream end (in the Kelvin wave direction) a semigeostrophic theory shows that the fluid intrudes along the wall as rarefaction terminated at a nose of zero width and depth. The nose speed increases to c_nose = 3.80 (g^' H)^1/2 for L0 arrow ∞. In a real fluid the presence of the lower layer leads to a blunt gravity current head rather than the thinning nose. For that case the theory is amended by joining the rarefaction to a bore condition of the form cb = c_b(g^', h_0, f), where cb is the bore speed, h0 is the depth of the layer along the wall at the bore head and f is the Coriolis frequency. The bore is attached to the rarefaction by a gravity current with uniform wall depth and width. The analytical solutions are compared to numerical solutions of the reduced-gravity shallow water equations. The modeling reveals that immediately after the release a Kelvin wave propagates away from the upstream termination of the patch and alters the geostrophically adjusted flow to a new, unstable state. The flow rapidly evolves into an array of vortices that prematurely shuts off the flux into the gravity current.

  19. Powering of cool filaments in cluster cores by buoyant bubbles. I. Qualitative model

    CERN Document Server

    Churazov, E; Schekochihin, A

    2013-01-01

    Cool-core clusters (e.g., Perseus or M87) often possess a network of bright gaseous filaments, observed in radio, IR, optical and X-ray bands. We propose that these filaments are powered by the reconnection of the magnetic field in the wakes of buoyant bubbles. AGN-inflated bubbles of relativistic plasma rise buoyantly in the cluster atmosphere, stretching and amplifying the field in the wake to values of $\\beta =8\\pi P_{gas}/B^2\\sim 1$. The field lines in the wake have opposite directions and are forced together as the bubble motion stretches the filament. This setup bears strong similarity to the coronal loops on the Sun or the Earth magneto-tail. The reconnection process naturally explains both the required level of local dissipation rate in filaments and the overall luminosity of filaments. The original source of power for the filaments is the potential energy of buoyant bubbles, inflated by the central AGN.

  20. Creation of Novel Solid-Solution Alloy Nanoparticles on the Basis of Density-of-States Engineering by Interelement Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kusada, Kohei; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2015-06-16

    Currently 118 known elements are represented in the periodic table. Of these 118 elements, only about 80 elements are stable, nonradioactive, and widely available for our society. From the viewpoint of the "elements strategy", we need to make full use of the 80 elements to bring out their latent ability and create innovative materials. Furthermore, there is a strong demand that the use of rare or toxic elements be reduced or replaced while their important properties are retained. Advanced science and technology could create higher-performance materials even while replacing or reducing minor or harmful elements through the combination of more abundant elements. The properties of elements are correlated directly with their electronic states. In a solid, the magnitude of the density of states (DOS) at the Fermi level affects the physical and chemical properties. In the present age, more attention has been paid to improving the properties of materials by means of alloying elements. In particular, the solid-solution-type alloy is advantageous because the properties can be continuously controlled by tuning the compositions and/or combinations of the constituent elements. However, the majority of bulk alloys are of the phase-separated type under ambient conditions, where constituent elements are immiscible with each other. To overcome the challenge of the bulk-phase metallurgical aspects, we have focused on the nanosize effect and developed methods involving "nonequilibrium synthesis" or "a process of hydrogen absorption/desorption". We propose a new concept of "density-of-states engineering" for the design of materials having the most desirable and suitable properties by means of "interelement fusion". In this Account, we describe novel solid-solution alloys of Pd-Pt, Ag-Rh, and Pd-Ru systems in which the constituent elements are immiscible in the bulk state. The homogeneous solid-solution alloys of Pd and Pt were created from Pd core/Pt shell nanoparticles using a

  1. A Lagrangian Particle Random Walk Model for Simulating A Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Plume with both Buoyant and Non-Buoyant Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Yu; LI Wei; ZHANG Ai-qun

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a computational model of simulating a deep-sea hydrothermal plume based on a Lagrangian particle random walk algorithm.This model achieves the efficient process to calculate a numerical plume developed in a fluid-advected environment with the characteristics such as significant filament intermittency and significant plume meander due to flow variation with both time and location.Especially,this model addresses both non-buoyant and buoyant features of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume in three dimensions,which significantly challenge a strategy for tracing the deep-sea hydrothermal plume and localizing its source.This paper also systematically discusses stochastic initial and boundary conditions that are critical to generate a proper numerical plume.The developed model is a powerful tool to evaluate and optimize strategies for the tracking of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume via an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV).

  2. STABILITY AND MIXING CHARACTER FOR BUOYANT JETS IN QUIESCENT SHALLOW WATER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG Yu-hong

    2005-01-01

    The near field stability and mixing characteristics of buoyant jets produced by thermal diffuse in quiescent shallow water are investigated numerically to predict under what combinations of discharge and ambient characteristics the near field will be stable or unstable.Analyses for different discharging types show that the discharge stability is purely dependent on the near-field behavior of the jets, or the dynamic interaction of the buoyant jet region, the surface impingement region and the internal hydraulic jump region, and is independent of the far-field geometry of the receiving water.The stability criterion is a function of the relative submerged depth, and source densimetric Froude number.

  3. Note: Buoyant-force assisted liquid membrane electrochemical etching for nano-tip preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yongbin; Wang, Yufeng; Wu, Xiujuan; Xu, Kun; Qu, Ningsong

    2014-12-01

    A liquid membrane electrochemical etching process for preparing nano-tips is proposed by the introduction of buoyant force to the lower tip, in which the lower portion of the anodic wire is immersed into a floating layer. A mathematical model of this method is derived. Both calculation and experimental results demonstrate that the introduction of buoyant force can significantly decrease the tip radius. The lubricating oil and deionized water floating layers were tested for the processing of nano-tips. Further, high-aspect-ratio nano-electrodes were prepared by applying a relative vertical movement to the anodic wire.

  4. EFFECT OF RADIATION ON HIGH-CHARGE-DENSITY POLYDIALLY-DIMETHYL AMMONIUM CHLORIDE IN DILUTE AQUEOUS SOLUTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-long Zhang; Min Yi; Jing Ren; Hong-fei Ha

    2003-01-01

    The effect of radiation on high-charge-density cationic polymer, polydiallyl-dimethyl ammonium chloride (polyDADMAC), in dilute aqueous solution was investigated. The irradiated samples were characterized in terms of reduced viscosity and electric conductivity. The crosslinking reaction of polyDADMAC chains occurs preferentially in the irradiated samples at a concentration of polyDADMAC higher than 1.3 g/100 mL that was induced indirectly by the OH radicals, one of the radiolysis products of water. In more dilute samples (less than 0.8 g/100 mL) the chain scission of macro radicals appears to be the main reaction. N2O atmosphere enhances the erosslinking due to the extra OH radicals produced by reaction between N2O and eaq, another radiolysis products of water. Methanol and some mineral salts such as KC1, KBr inhibit the crosslinking to a certain extent. The mechanism of sensitization and inhibition is discussed in detail.

  5. Amino acids recognition by water-soluble uncharged porphyrin tweezers: Spectroscopic evidences in high optical density solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villari, Valentina, E-mail: villari@me.cnr.it [CNR-IPCF Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, V.le F. Stagno d' Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Mineo, Placido, E-mail: gmineo@unict.it [CNR-IPCF Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, V.le F. Stagno d' Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Catania, Viale Andrea Doria 6, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Scamporrino, Emilio [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, Universita di Catania, Viale Andrea Doria 6, I-95125 Catania (Italy); Micali, Norberto [CNR-IPCF Istituto per i Processi Chimico-Fisici, V.le F. Stagno d' Alcontres 37, I-98158 Messina (Italy)

    2012-06-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular recognition properties of metal bis-porphyrins at high concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of the complex causes the disruption of the aggregates. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High sensitivity for the optical detection of low amount of amino acids. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potential applications as a selective molecular sensor of amino acids. - Abstract: Small angle X-ray measurements on concentrated solutions of Cobalt-bis-porphyrins showed, at all the investigated concentration values, the presence of small aggregates which possess a sphere-like shape with a homogeneous electron density distribution. Such an aggregation, however, is proven not to affect the binding properties of the molecules with amino acids. Indeed, the Cobalt ion of the bis-porphyrins are available for coordinating the nitrogen atom of the amino acid to form a stable complex, as indicated by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectroscopy. The ability of these uncharged water-soluble bis-porphyrins to act as molecular sensors of amino acids in a wide concentration range takes great relevance in biosensing applications for which high concentration might be required.

  6. Chromium inhibition and size-selected Au nanocluster catalysis for the solution growth of low-density ZnO nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Vito Errico; Giuseppe Arrabito; Plant, Simon R.; Pier Gianni Medaglia; Palmer, Richard E.; Christian Falconi

    2015-01-01

    The wet chemical synthesis of nanostructures has many crucial advantages over high-temperature methods, including simplicity, low-cost, and deposition on almost arbitrary substrates. Nevertheless, the density-controlled solution growth of nanowires still remains a challenge, especially at the low densities (e.g. 1 to 10 nanowires/100 μm2) required, as an example, for intracellular analyses. Here, we demonstrate the solution-growth of ZnO nanowires using a thin chromium film as a nucleation in...

  7. The effect of particle properties on the depth profile of buoyant plastics in the ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooi, Merel; Reisser, J.; Slat, B.; Ferrari, F.; Schmid, M.; Cunsolo, S.; Brambini, R.; Noble, K.; Sirks, L.A.; Linders, T.E.W.; Schoeneich-Argent, R.I.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies on buoyant microplastics in the marine environment rely on sea surface sampling. Consequently, microplastic amounts can be underestimated, as turbulence leads to vertical mixing. Models that correct for vertical mixing are based on limited data. In this study we report measurements of t

  8. Deformation statistics of sub-Kolmogorov-scale ellipsoidal neutrally buoyant drops in isotropic turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biferale, L.; Meneveau, C.; Verzicco, R.

    2014-01-01

    Small droplets in turbulent flows can undergo highly variable deformations and orientational dynamics. For neutrally buoyant droplets smaller than the Kolmogorov scale, the dominant effects from the surrounding turbulent flow arise through Lagrangian time histories of the velocity gradient tensor. H

  9. Effect of Technology Enhanced Conceptual Change Texts on Students' Understanding of Buoyant Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Gulbin; Selcuk, Gamze Sezgin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of technology enhanced conceptual change texts on elementary school students' understanding of buoyant force was investigated. The conceptual change texts (written forms) used in this study are proven for effectiveness and are enriched by using technology support in this study. These texts were tried out on two groups. A…

  10. Reference interaction site model with hydrophobicity induced density inhomogeneity: An analytical theory to compute solvation properties of large hydrophobic solutes in the mixture of polyatomic solvent molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Siqin [The HKUST Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Sheong, Fu Kit [Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Huang, Xuhui, E-mail: xuhuihuang@ust.hk [The HKUST Shenzhen Research Institute, Shenzhen (China); Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong); Division of Biomedical Engineering, Center of Systems Biology and Human Health, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2015-08-07

    Reference interaction site model (RISM) has recently become a popular approach in the study of thermodynamical and structural properties of the solvent around macromolecules. On the other hand, it was widely suggested that there exists water density depletion around large hydrophobic solutes (>1 nm), and this may pose a great challenge to the RISM theory. In this paper, we develop a new analytical theory, the Reference Interaction Site Model with Hydrophobicity induced density Inhomogeneity (RISM-HI), to compute solvent radial distribution function (RDF) around large hydrophobic solute in water as well as its mixture with other polyatomic organic solvents. To achieve this, we have explicitly considered the density inhomogeneity at the solute-solvent interface using the framework of the Yvon-Born-Green hierarchy, and the RISM theory is used to obtain the solute-solvent pair correlation. In order to efficiently solve the relevant equations while maintaining reasonable accuracy, we have also developed a new closure called the D2 closure. With this new theory, the solvent RDFs around a large hydrophobic particle in water and different water-acetonitrile mixtures could be computed, which agree well with the results of the molecular dynamics simulations. Furthermore, we show that our RISM-HI theory can also efficiently compute the solvation free energy of solute with a wide range of hydrophobicity in various water-acetonitrile solvent mixtures with a reasonable accuracy. We anticipate that our theory could be widely applied to compute the thermodynamic and structural properties for the solvation of hydrophobic solute.

  11. Influence of cooling on dynamics of buoyant jet

    CERN Document Server

    Goncharov, V P

    2016-01-01

    The Rayleigh--Taylor instability which is responsible for the occurrence of narrow upward jets are studied in the scope of the nonhydrostatic model with horizontally--nonuniform density and the Newtonian cooling. As analysis shows, the total hierarchy of instabilities in this model consists of three regimes -- collapse, algebraic instability, and inertial motion. Realization of these stages, mutual transitions and interference depend on a ratio between two characteristic time scales -- collapse time and cooling time.

  12. Acceleration of the effect of solute on the entropy-volume cross fluctuation density in aqueous 2-butoxyethanol, 1-propanol, and glycerol: The fourth derivative of Gibbs energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Koh; Baluja, Shipra; Inaba, Akira; Koga, Yoshikata

    2011-06-01

    Using a differential pressure perturbation calorimetry developed by us recently [K. Yoshida, S. Baluja, A. Inaba, K. Tozaki, and Y. Koga, "Experimental determination of third derivative of G (III): Differential pressure perturbation calorimetry (II)," J. Solution Chem. (in press)], we experimentally determined the partial molar S-V cross fluctuation density of solute B, SVδB, in binary aqueous solutions for B = 1-propanol (1P) and glycerol (Gly). This third derivative of G provides information about the effect of solute B on the S-V cross fluctuation density, SVδ, in aqueous solution as the concentration of B varies. Having determined SVδB by better than 1% uncertainty, we evaluated for the first time the fourth derivative quantity SVδB-B = N(∂SVδB /∂nB) for B = 1P and Gly graphically without resorting to any fitting functions within several percent. This model-free quantity gives information about the acceleration of the effect of solute B on SVδ. By comparing fourth derivative quantities, SVδB-B, among B = 1P, Gly, and 2-butoxyethanol obtained previously, the distinction of the effect of solute on H2O becomes clearer than before when only the third derivative quantities were available.

  13. On the existence of weak solutions to the steady compressible Navier-Stokes equations when the density is not square integrable

    OpenAIRE

    Novo, Sébastien; Novotný, Antonin

    2002-01-01

    We consider the steady compressible Navier-Stokes equations in the isentropic regime in a bounded domain of $\\mathbb{R}^{3}$. We show that the renormalized continuity equation holds even if the density is not square integrable. We use this result to prove existence of weak solutions under the sole hypothesis $\\gamma > 3/2$ for the adiabatic constant.

  14. Influence of flavour absorption by food-packaging materials (low-density polyethylene, polycarbonate and polyethylene terephthalate) on taste perception of a model solution and orange juice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willige, van R.W.G.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Legger, A.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of flavour absorption by low-density polyethylene (LDPE), polycarbonate (PC) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) on taste perception of a model solution containing seven flavour compounds and orange juice in glass bottles was studied with and without pieces of the respective plastic f

  15. Dendritic immune cell densities in the central cornea associated with soft contact lens types and lens care solution types: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindt CW

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Christine W Sindt1, Trudy K Grout1, D Brice Critser1, Jami R Kern2, David L Meadows21University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA; 2Alcon Research Ltd, Fort Worth, TX, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to assess whether differences in central corneal dendritic immune cell densities associated with combinations of soft contact lenses and lens care solutions could be detected by in vivo confocal microscopy.Methods: Participants were adults naïve to contact lens wear (n = 10 or who wore soft contact lenses habitually on a daily-wear schedule (n = 38 or on a study-assigned schedule for 30 days with daily disposable silicone hydrogel lenses (n = 15. Central corneas were scanned using an in vivo confocal microscope. Cell densities were compared among groups by demographic parameters, lens materials, and lens care solutions (polyhexamethylene biguanide [PHMB], polyquaternium-1 and myristamidopropyl dimethylamine [PQ/MAPD], peroxide, or blister pack solution [for daily disposable lenses].Results: Among lens wearers, no associations were observed between immune cell densities and age, gender, or years of lens-wearing experience. Mean cell density was significantly lower (P < 0.01 in nonwearers (29 ± 23 cells/mm2, n = 10 than in lens wearers (64 ± 71 cells/mm2, n = 53. Mean cell density was lower (P = 0.21 with traditional polymer lenses (47 ± 44 cells/mm2, n = 12 than with silicone hydrogel lenses (69 ± 77 cells/mm2, n = 41. Lowest to highest mean density of immune cells among lens wearers was as follows: PQ/MAPD solution (49 ± 28 cells/mm2, blister pack solution (63 ± 81 cells/mm2, PHMB solution (66 ± 44 cells/mm2, and peroxide solution (85 ± 112 cells/mm2.Conclusion: In this pilot study, in vivo confocal microscopy was useful for detecting an elevated immune response associated with soft contact lenses, and for identifying lens-related and solution-related immune responses that merit further research.Keywords: Clear Care

  16. SOLUTIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Hoyos Guajardo, Ph.D. Candidate, M.Sc., B.Eng.

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The theory that is presented below aims to conceptualise how a group of undergraduate students tackle non-routine mathematical problems during a problem-solving course. The aim of the course is to allow students to experience mathematics as a creative process and to reflect on their own experience. During the course, students are required to produce a written ‘rubric’ of their work, i.e., to document their thoughts as they occur as well as their emotionsduring the process. These ‘rubrics’ were used as the main source of data.Students’ problem-solving processes can be explained as a three-stage process that has been called ‘solutioning’. This process is presented in the six sections below. The first three refer to a common area of concern that can be called‘generating knowledge’. In this way, generating knowledge also includes issues related to ‘key ideas’ and ‘gaining understanding’. The third and the fourth sections refer to ‘generating’ and ‘validating a solution’, respectively. Finally, once solutions are generated and validated, students usually try to improve them further before presenting them as final results. Thus, the last section deals with‘improving a solution’. Although not all students go through all of the stages, it may be said that ‘solutioning’ considers students’ main concerns as they tackle non-routine mathematical problems.

  17. The Heads and Tails of Buoyant Autocatalytic Balls

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, Michael C

    2012-01-01

    Buoyancy produced by autocatalytic reaction fronts can produce fluid flows that advect the front position, giving rise to interesting feedback between chemical and hydrodynamic effects. In a large diameter, extended cylinder that is relatively free of boundary constraints, localized initiation of an iodate-arsenous acid (IAA) reaction front on the bottom boundary generates a rising autocatalytic plume. Such plumes have several differences from their non-reactive counterparts. Using numerical simulation, we have found that if reaction is initiated using a spherical ball of product solution well above the bottom boundary, the subsequent flow can evolve much like an autocatalytic plume: the ball develops a reacting head and tail that is akin to the head and conduit of an autocatalytic plume, except that the tail is disconnected from the boundary. In the limit of large initial autocatalytic balls, however, growth of a reacting tail is suppressed and the resemblance to plumes disappears. Conversely, very small bal...

  18. Parameter Estimation for a Turbulent Buoyant Jet Using Approximate Bayesian Computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Jason D.; Wimer, Nicholas T.; Hayden, Torrey R. S.; Lapointe, Caelan; Grooms, Ian; Rieker, Gregory B.; Hamlington, Peter E.

    2016-11-01

    Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC) is a powerful tool that allows sparse experimental or other "truth" data to be used for the prediction of unknown model parameters in numerical simulations of real-world engineering systems. In this presentation, we introduce the ABC approach and then use ABC to predict unknown inflow conditions in simulations of a two-dimensional (2D) turbulent, high-temperature buoyant jet. For this test case, truth data are obtained from a simulation with known boundary conditions and problem parameters. Using spatially-sparse temperature statistics from the 2D buoyant jet truth simulation, we show that the ABC method provides accurate predictions of the true jet inflow temperature. The success of the ABC approach in the present test suggests that ABC is a useful and versatile tool for engineering fluid dynamics research.

  19. Generating buoyant magnetic flux ropes in solar-like convective dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, Nicholas J

    2014-01-01

    Our Sun exhibits strong convective dynamo action which results in magnetic flux bundles emerging through the stellar surface as magnetic spots. Global-scale dynamo action is believed to generate large-scale magnetic structures in the deep solar interior through the interplay of convection, rotation, and shear. Portions of these large-scale magnetic structures are then believed to rise through the convective layer, forming magnetic loops which then pierce the photosphere as sunspot pairs. Previous global simulations of 3D MHD convection in rotating spherical shells have demonstrated mechanisms whereby large-scale magnetic wreaths can be generated in the bulk of the convection zone. Our recent simulations have achieved sufficiently high levels of turbulence to permit portions of these wreaths to become magnetically buoyant and rise through the simulated convective layer through a combination of magnetic buoyancy and advection by convective giant cells. These buoyant magnetic loops are created in the bulk of the...

  20. Influence of viscosity contrast on buoyantly unstable miscible fluids in porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Pramanik, Satyajit; Mishra, Manoranjan

    2015-01-01

    The influence of viscosity contrast on buoyantly unstable miscible fluids in a porous medium is investigated through a linear stability analysis (LSA) as well as direct numerical simulations (DNS). The linear stability method implemented in this paper is based on an initial value approach, which helps to capture the onset of instability more accurately than the quasi-steady state analysis. In the absence of displacement, we show that viscosity contrast delays the onset of instability in buoyantly unstable miscible fluids. Further, it is observed that suitably choosing the viscosity contrast and injection velocity a gravitationally unstable miscible interface can be stabilized completely. Through LSA we draw a phase diagram, which shows three distinct stability regions in a parameter space spanned by the displacement velocity and the viscosity contrast. DNS are performed corresponding to parameters from each regime and the results obtained are in accordance with the linear stability results. Moreover, the conv...

  1. A reference-modified density functional theory: An application to solvation free-energy calculations for a Lennard-Jones solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumi, Tomonari; Maruyama, Yutaka; Mitsutake, Ayori; Koga, Kenichiro

    2016-06-14

    In the conventional classical density functional theory (DFT) for simple fluids, an ideal gas is usually chosen as the reference system because there is a one-to-one correspondence between the external field and the density distribution function, and the exact intrinsic free-energy functional is available for the ideal gas. In this case, the second-order density functional Taylor series expansion of the excess intrinsic free-energy functional provides the hypernetted-chain (HNC) approximation. Recently, it has been shown that the HNC approximation significantly overestimates the solvation free energy (SFE) for an infinitely dilute Lennard-Jones (LJ) solution, especially when the solute particles are several times larger than the solvent particles [T. Miyata and J. Thapa, Chem. Phys. Lett. 604, 122 (2014)]. In the present study, we propose a reference-modified density functional theory as a systematic approach to improve the SFE functional as well as the pair distribution functions. The second-order density functional Taylor series expansion for the excess part of the intrinsic free-energy functional in which a hard-sphere fluid is introduced as the reference system instead of an ideal gas is applied to the LJ pure and infinitely dilute solution systems and is proved to remarkably improve the drawbacks of the HNC approximation. Furthermore, the third-order density functional expansion approximation in which a factorization approximation is applied to the triplet direct correlation function is examined for the LJ systems. We also show that the third-order contribution can yield further refinements for both the pair distribution function and the excess chemical potential for the pure LJ liquids.

  2. Onshore propagation of a buoyant ocean front observed using a shore-based marine radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmorino, G. O.; Cooper, A. L.; Mied, R. P.; Lindemann, G. J.; Trizna, D. B.; Porter, D. L.

    2004-06-01

    An analysis is presented of a 2-h-long time series of X-band marine radar images, collected at Duck, North Carolina (USA), that captured the evolution of a buoyant ocean front as it propagated onshore, following a period of upwelling-favorable winds. In plan view, the front exhibits a scallop-shaped structure similar to that previously observed along strongly convergent fronts. This alongshore structure consists of broad frontal crests (a few hundred meters in length) alternating with sharply angled troughs, or frontal cusps. The evolution of these frontal shapes is explored using a reduced-gravity model (Cooper et al., J. Geophys. Res.-Oceans 106 (2001) 16887) that allows for nonlinear self-interaction of a propagating front. A model simulation shows cusps that develop quickly from initially broad troughs and that point toward the buoyant water, features resembling the observations. However, the simulation also shows a continuous oscillation of frontal shapes, while the observed front reaches a quasi-steady plan form. We attribute this difference in behavior to the gradual shoaling of the observed front as it steadily advances, ultimately reaching water depths of less than 2 m, which is comparable to the thickness of the buoyant layer. As a consequence of the shoaling, we suggest the cusps become sites of enhanced mixing, where water inshore of the front is also accelerated seaward.

  3. Numerical Study of A Round Buoyant Jet Under the Effect of JONSWAP Random Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong-ping; LI Chi-wai; ZHANG Chang-kuan; XU Zhen-shan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical study on the hydrodynamic behaviours of a round buoyant jet under the effect of JONSWAP random waves.A three-dimensional large eddy simulation (LES) model is developed to simulate the buoyant jet in a stagnant ambient and JONSWAP random waves.By comparison of velocity and concentration fields,it is found that the buoyant jet exhibits faster decay of centedine velocity,wider lateral spreading and larger initial dilution under the wave effect,indicating that wave dynamics improves the jet entrainment and mixing in the near field,and subsequently mitigate the jet impacts in the far field.The effect of buoyancy force on the jet behaviours in the random waves is also numerically investigated.The results show that the wave effect on the jet entrainment and mixing is considerably weakened under the existence of buoyancy force,resulting in a slower decay rate of centerline velocity and a narrower jet width for the jet with initial buoyancy.

  4. Local Spin Density Approximation Solution for Spinel LiV2O4: Spin Fluctuation as a Possible Role for Heavy Fermion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭明秋; 陶向明

    2001-01-01

    We report on a self-consistent full-potential linear muffin tin orbital band-structure calculation for the heavy fermion (HF) compound LiV2O4. It is found that a stable local spin density approximation solution for LiV2O4 is lower in total energy than the local density approximation calculation. We speculate that the mechanism responsible for HF properties in LiV2O4 might be of spin fluctuation type and is different from the Kondo mechanism in conventional 4f and 5f HF compounds.

  5. BEHAVIOR OF OBSTRUCTED SQUARE BUOYANT VERTICAL JETS IN STATIC AMBIENT (Ⅰ)-VERIFICATION OF MATHEMATICAL MODEL AND NUMERICAL METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUAI Wen-xin; FANG Shen-guang; DAI Hui-chao

    2006-01-01

    Some experiments were made for the buoyant jet from a square orifice with a square disc placed on it in static ambient and concentration along the axis in self-similar area behind disc was measured. And at the same time a three-dimensional mathematical model was established to simulate the whole flowing under different conditions. All the results predicted by the numerical calculation were substantiated by the experiments.The results were compared with experiential formula for obstructed round buoyant vertical jets in static ambient and it was found that the two concentration distributions had good accordance. Star shape of temperature isolines on cross-sections in the near areas from the disc was found and it was a very special figure for obstructed square buoyant vertical jets with a square disc. The shape will transform to concentric circles gradually alike to the round buoyant vertical jet in self-similar area with increasing of the distance from the disc.

  6. Effect of Sintering Atmosphere and Solution Treatment on Density, Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Duplex Stainless Steels Developed from Pre-alloyed Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Arun Prasad; Mahendran, Sudhahar; Ramajayam, Mariappan; Ganesan, Dharmalingam; Chinnaraj, Raj Kumar

    2017-01-01

    In this research, Powder Metallurgy (P/M) of Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) of different compositions were prepared through pre-alloyed powders and elemental powders with and without addition of copper. The powder mix was developed by pot mill for 12 h to obtain the homogeneous mixture of pre-alloyed powder with elemental compositions. Cylindrical green compacts with the dimensions of 30 mm diameter and 12 mm height were compacted through universal testing machine at a pressure level of 560 ± 10 MPa. These green compacts were sintered at 1350 °C for 2 h in hydrogen and argon atmospheres. Some of the sintered stainless steel preforms were solution treated at 1050 °C followed by water quenching. The sintered as well as solution treated samples were analysed by metallography examination, Scanning Electron Microscopy and evaluation of mechanical properties. Ferrite content of sintered and solution treated DSS were measured by Fischer Ferritoscope. It is inferred that the hydrogen sintered DSS depicted better density (94% theoretical density) and tensile strength (695 MPa) than the argon sintered steels. Similarly the microstructure of solution treated DSS revealed existence of more volume of ferrite grains than its sintered condition. Solution treated hydrogen sintered DSS A (50 wt% 316L + 50 wt% 430L) exhibited higher tensile strength of 716 MPa and elongation of 17%, which are 10-13% increment than the sintered stainless steels.

  7. Adiabatic density surface, neutral density surface, potential density surface, and mixing path

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Rui-xin

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, adiabatic density surface, neutral density surface and potential density surface are compared. The adiabatic density surface is defined as the surface on which a water parcellcan move adiabatically, without changing its potential temperature and salinity. For a water parcelltaken at a given station and pressure level, the corresponding adiabatic density surface can be determined through simple calculations. This family of surface is neutrally buoyant in the world ocean, and different from other surfaces that are not truly neutrally buoyant. In order to explore mixing path in the ocean, a mixing ratio m is introduced, which is defined as the portion of potential temperature and salinity of a water parcellthat has exchanged with the environment during a segment of migration in the ocean. Two extreme situations of mixing path in the ocean are m=0 (no mixing), which is represented by the adiabatic density curve, and m=1, where the original information is completely lost through mixing. The latter is represented by the neutral density curve. The reality lies in between, namely, 0

  8. Low-Density Water Structure Observed in a Nanosegregated Cryoprotectant Solution at Low Temperatures from 285 to 238 K

    OpenAIRE

    Towey, JJ; Soper, AK; Dougan, L.

    2016-01-01

    The structure of liquid water is defined by its molecular association through hydrogen bonding. Two different structures have been proposed for liquid water at low temperatures: low-density liquid (LDL) and high-density liquid (HDL) water. Here, we demonstrate a platform that can be exploited to experimentally probe the structure of liquid water in equilibrium at temperatures down to 238 K. We make use of a cryoprotectant molecule, glycerol, that, when mixed with water, lowers the freezing te...

  9. Electrical conductivity of the nutrient solution and plant density in aeroponic production of seed potato under tropical conditions (winter/spring)

    OpenAIRE

    Calori,Alex Humberto; Factor,Thiago Leandro; Feltran, José Carlos [UNESP; Watanabe,Eduardo Yuji; Moraes,Carolina Cinto de; Purquerio,Luís Felipe Villani

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The recent introduction in Brazil of production of quality seed potatoes in hydroponic systems, such as aeroponics, demands studies on the nutritional and crop management. Thus, this study evaluated the influence of electrical conductivity of the nutrient solution and plant density on the seed potato minitubers production in aeroponics system. The Agata and Asterix cultivars were produced in a greenhouse under tropical conditions (winter/spring). The experimental design was a randomi...

  10. Electrical conductivity of the nutrient solution and plant density in aeroponic production of seed potato under tropical conditions (winter/spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Humberto Calori

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The recent introduction in Brazil of production of quality seed potatoes in hydroponic systems, such as aeroponics, demands studies on the nutritional and crop management. Thus, this study evaluated the influence of electrical conductivity of the nutrient solution and plant density on the seed potato minitubers production in aeroponics system. The Agata and Asterix cultivars were produced in a greenhouse under tropical conditions (winter/spring. The experimental design was a randomized block in a split-split plot design. The plot consisted of 4 electrical conductivities of the nutrient solution (1.0; 2.0; 3.0; and 4.0 dS∙m−1; the subplot, of 4 plant densities (25; 44; 66; and 100 plants∙m−2; and the subsubplot, of the 2 potato cultivars (Ágata and Asterix, totaling 4 blocks. The 2.2 and 2.1 dS∙m−1 electrical conductivities yielded the highest productivity of seed potato minitubers, for Ágata and Asterix cultivars, respectively, regardless of plant density. For both cultivars, the highest yield was observed for the 100 plants∙m−2 density.

  11. High Critical Current Density of YBa2Cu3O7-x Superconducting Films Prepared through a DUV-assisted Solution Deposition Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanqing; Bian, Weibai; Huang, Wenhuan; Tang, Xinni; Zhao, Gaoyang; Li, Lingwei; Li, Na; Huo, Wen; Jia, Jiqiang; You, Caiyin

    2016-12-01

    Although the solution deposition of YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) superconducting films is cost effective and capable of large-scale production, further improvements in their superconductivity are necessary. In this study, a deep UV (DUV) irradiation technique combined with a low-fluorine solution process was developed to prepare YBCO films. An acrylic acidic group as the chelating agent was used in the precursor solution. The acrylic acidic group was highly sensitive to DUV light at 254 nm and significantly absorbed UV light. The coated gel films exposed to DUV light decomposed at 150 °C and copper aggregation was prevented. The UV irradiation promoted the removal of the carbon residue and other by-products in the films, increased the density and enhanced the crystallinity and superconductivity of the YBCO films. Using a solution with F/Ba = 2, YBCO films with thicknesses of 260 nm and enhanced critical current densities of nearly 8 MA/cm(2) were produced on the LaAlO3 (LAO) substrates.

  12. High Critical Current Density of YBa2Cu3O7‑x Superconducting Films Prepared through a DUV-assisted Solution Deposition Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuanqing; Bian, Weibai; Huang, Wenhuan; Tang, Xinni; Zhao, Gaoyang; Li, Lingwei; Li, Na; Huo, Wen; Jia, Jiqiang; You, Caiyin

    2016-12-01

    Although the solution deposition of YBa2Cu3O7‑x (YBCO) superconducting films is cost effective and capable of large-scale production, further improvements in their superconductivity are necessary. In this study, a deep UV (DUV) irradiation technique combined with a low-fluorine solution process was developed to prepare YBCO films. An acrylic acidic group as the chelating agent was used in the precursor solution. The acrylic acidic group was highly sensitive to DUV light at 254 nm and significantly absorbed UV light. The coated gel films exposed to DUV light decomposed at 150 °C and copper aggregation was prevented. The UV irradiation promoted the removal of the carbon residue and other by-products in the films, increased the density and enhanced the crystallinity and superconductivity of the YBCO films. Using a solution with F/Ba = 2, YBCO films with thicknesses of 260 nm and enhanced critical current densities of nearly 8 MA/cm2 were produced on the LaAlO3 (LAO) substrates.

  13. Universal solvation model based on solute electron density and on a continuum model of the solvent defined by the bulk dielectric constant and atomic surface tensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marenich, Aleksandr V; Cramer, Christopher J; Truhlar, Donald G

    2009-05-07

    We present a new continuum solvation model based on the quantum mechanical charge density of a solute molecule interacting with a continuum description of the solvent. The model is called SMD, where the "D" stands for "density" to denote that the full solute electron density is used without defining partial atomic charges. "Continuum" denotes that the solvent is not represented explicitly but rather as a dielectric medium with surface tension at the solute-solvent boundary. SMD is a universal solvation model, where "universal" denotes its applicability to any charged or uncharged solute in any solvent or liquid medium for which a few key descriptors are known (in particular, dielectric constant, refractive index, bulk surface tension, and acidity and basicity parameters). The model separates the observable solvation free energy into two main components. The first component is the bulk electrostatic contribution arising from a self-consistent reaction field treatment that involves the solution of the nonhomogeneous Poisson equation for electrostatics in terms of the integral-equation-formalism polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM). The cavities for the bulk electrostatic calculation are defined by superpositions of nuclear-centered spheres. The second component is called the cavity-dispersion-solvent-structure term and is the contribution arising from short-range interactions between the solute and solvent molecules in the first solvation shell. This contribution is a sum of terms that are proportional (with geometry-dependent proportionality constants called atomic surface tensions) to the solvent-accessible surface areas of the individual atoms of the solute. The SMD model has been parametrized with a training set of 2821 solvation data including 112 aqueous ionic solvation free energies, 220 solvation free energies for 166 ions in acetonitrile, methanol, and dimethyl sulfoxide, 2346 solvation free energies for 318 neutral solutes in 91 solvents (90 nonaqueous

  14. Multiple hydrogen bonding in excited states of aminopyrazine in methanol solution: time-dependent density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Shuo; Yu, Jie; Han, Yong-Chang; Cong, Shu-Lin

    2013-11-01

    Aminopyrazine (AP) and AP-methanol complexes have been theoretically studied by using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). The excited-state hydrogen bonds are discussed in detail. In the ground state the intermolecular multiple hydrogen bonds can be formed between AP molecule and protic solvents. The AP monomer and hydrogen-bonded complex of AP with one methanol are photoexcited initially to the S2 state, and then transferred to the S1 state via internal conversion. However the complex of AP with two methanol molecules is directly excited to the S1 state. From the calculated electronic excited energies and simulated absorption spectra, we find that the intermolecular hydrogen bonds are strengthened in the electronic excited states. The strengthening is confirmed by the optimized excited-state geometries. The photochemical processes in the electronic excited states are significantly influenced by the excited-state hydrogen bond strengthening.

  15. Exact solutions to traffic density estimation problems involving the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards traffic flow model using mixed integer programming

    KAUST Repository

    Canepa, Edward S.

    2012-09-01

    This article presents a new mixed integer programming formulation of the traffic density estimation problem in highways modeled by the Lighthill Whitham Richards equation. We first present an equivalent formulation of the problem using an Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Then, using a semi-analytic formula, we show that the model constraints resulting from the Hamilton-Jacobi equation result in linear constraints, albeit with unknown integers. We then pose the problem of estimating the density at the initial time given incomplete and inaccurate traffic data as a Mixed Integer Program. We then present a numerical implementation of the method using experimental flow and probe data obtained during Mobile Century experiment. © 2012 IEEE.

  16. On a novel graded areal density solution to facilitate ramp wave generation in plate-impact studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, J. D.; Fitzmaurice, B. C.; Goff, M.; Appleby-Thomas, G. J.; Wood, D. C.; Pinto, T.

    2017-01-01

    Building on a substantial body of work on functionally graded materials in the literature, it has been previously shown that the use of graded areal density impactors, in conjunction with buffer materials, allows generation of ramp-wave loading profiles in impacted targets. Such off-principle-Hugoniot loading paths are of particular interest where control of one or more state variables (e.g. temperature) is desirable during the loading event. Previous attempts to produce suitable graded areal density impactors have focused on rapid prototyping techniques such as 3D printing. While suitable for small-scale production of impactors, such technologies are relatively immature. Instead, here a novel approach to creating graded areal density structures - TWI Ltd.'s novel surface modification process, Surfi-Sculpt®, with a nominal surface spike distribution of 1.5 per mm2, has been employed to produce the required impactors. Initial experimental results are presented highlighting the potential of this experimental approach; further, these results -combined with basic hydrocode simulations - are used to postulate idealised structures which would allow useful loading paths such as the Adiabat to be readily accessed.

  17. AEROSTATIC AND AERODYNAMIC MODULES OF A HYBRID BUOYANT AIRCRAFT: AN ANALYTICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar Ul Haque

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An analytical approach is essential for the estimation of the requirements of aerodynamic and aerostatic lift for a hybrid buoyant aircraft. Such aircrafts have two different modules to balance the weight of aircraft; aerostatic module and aerodynamic module. Both these modules are to be treated separately for estimation of the mass budget of propulsion systems and required power. In the present work, existing relationships of aircraft and airship are reviewed for its further application for these modules. Limitations of such relationships are also disussed and it is precieved that it will provide a strating point for better understanding of design anatomy of such aircraft.

  18. Mushroom-Shaped Structures as Tracers of Buoyant Flow in the Galactic Disk

    CERN Document Server

    D'Avillez, M A; Avillez, Miguel A. de; Low, Mordecai-Mark Mac

    2001-01-01

    Recent HI emission observations of the Southern Galactic hemisphere have revealed a mushroom-like structure extending from z=-70 to -450 pc, composed of a stem and a cap. Similar structures occur in three-dimensional simulations of a dynamic galactic disk driven by isolated and clustered supernovae. Using these simulations, we show that hot gas in the Galactic disk that is not evacuated through chimneys expands into the cooler gas of the thick disk, forming mushroom-shaped structures. This new class of objects traces buoyant flow of hot gas into the thick disk.

  19. Density functional theory study of 1:1 glycine–water complexes in the gas phase and in solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    We present a systematic study of 1:1 glycine-water complexes involving all possible glycine conformers. The complex geometries are fully optimized for the first time both in the gas phase and in solution using three DFT methods (B3LYP, PBE1PBE, X3LYP) and the MP2 method. We calculate the G3 energies and use them as the reference data to gauge hydrogen bond strength in the gas phase. The solvent effects are treated via the integral equation formalism-polarizable continuum model (IEF-PCM). Altogether, we locate fifty-two unique nonionized (N) structures and six zwitterionic (Z) structures in the gas phase, and fifty-five N structures and thirteen Z structures in solution. Both correlation and solvation are shown to be important in geometry determination. We found that in the gas phase, a water molecule binds more strongly to the carboxylic acid group of glycine than to its amine group, whereas in solution phase the reverse is true. The most stable Z structure is isoenergetic with the most stable N structure.

  20. Experimental Study on Liquid Free Surface in Buoyant-Thermocapillary Convection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Li; KANG Qi; HU Wen-Rui

    2008-01-01

    @@ We investigate the surface deformations of buoyant-thermocapillary convection in a rectangular cavity due to gravity and temperature gradient between the two sidewalls. The cavity is 52mm×42 mm in horizontal cross section, the thickness of liquid layer h is changed from 2.5mm to 6.5 mm. Surface deformations of h = 3.5 mm and 6.0mm are discussed and compared. Temperature difference is increased gradually, and the flow in the liquid layer will change from stable convection to unstable convection. Two kinds of optical diagnostic system with image processor are developed for study of the kinetics of buoyant-thermocapillaxy convection, they give out the information of liquid free surface. The quantitative results are calculated by Fourier transform and correlation analysis, respectively. With the increasing temperature gradient, surface deformations calculated are more declining. It is interesting phenomenon that the inclining directions of the convections in thin and thick liquid layers are different. For a thin layer, the convection is mainly controlled by thermocapillary effect. However,for a thick layer, the convection is mainly controlled by buoyancy effect. The surface deformation theoretically analysed is consistent with our experimental results. The present experiment proves that surface deformation is related to temperature gradient and thickness of the liquid layer. In other words, surface deformation lies on capillary convection and buoyancy convection.

  1. Formation of lower continental crust by relamination of buoyant arc lavas and plutons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, Peter B.; Behn, Mark D.

    2016-03-01

    The formation of the Earth's continents is enigmatic. Volcanic arc magmas generated above subduction zones have geochemical compositions that are similar to continental crust, implying that arc magmatic processes played a central role in generating continental crust. Yet the deep crust within volcanic arcs has a very different composition from crust at similar depths beneath the continents. It is therefore unclear how arc crust is transformed into continental crust. The densest parts of arc lower crust may delaminate and become recycled into the underlying mantle. Here we show, however, that even after delamination, arc lower crust still has significantly different trace element contents from continental lower crust. We suggest that it is not delamination that determines the composition of continental crust, but relamination. In our conceptual model, buoyant magmatic rocks generated at arcs are subducted. Then, upon heating at depth, they ascend and are relaminated at the base of the overlying crust. A review of the average compositions of buoyant magmatic rocks -- lavas and plutons -- sampled from the Aleutians, Izu-Bonin-Marianas, Kohistan and Talkeetna arcs reveals that they fall within the range of estimated major and trace elements in lower continental crust. Relamination may thus provide an efficient process for generating lower continental crust.

  2. Characterization of Buoyant Fluorescent Particles for Field Observations of Water Flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Tauro

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the feasibility of off-the-shelf buoyant fluorescent microspheres as particle tracers in turbid water flows is investigated. Microspheres’ fluorescence intensity is experimentally measured and detected in placid aqueous suspensions of increasing concentrations of clay to simulate typical conditions occurring in natural drainage networks. Experiments are conducted in a broad range of clay concentrations and particle immersion depths by using photoconductive cells and image-based sensing technologies. Results obtained with both methodologies exhibit comparable trends and show that the considered particles are fairly detectable in critically turbid water flows. Further information on performance and integration of the studied microspheres in low-cost measurement instrumentation for field observations is obtained through experiments conducted in a custom built miniature water channel. This experimental characterization provides a first assessment of the feasibility of commercially available buoyant fluorescent beads in the analysis of high turbidity surface water flows. The proposed technology may serve as a minimally invasive sensing system for hazardous events, such as pollutant diffusion in natural streams and flash flooding due to extreme rainfall.

  3. Influence of critical current density on magnetic force of HTSC bulk above PMR with 3D-modeling numerical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yiyun; Qin, Yujie

    2015-09-01

    Numerical simulations of thermo-electromagnetic properties of a high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk levitating over a permanent magnetic guideway (PMG) are performed by resorting to the quasistatic approximation of the H-method coupling with the classical description of the heat conduction equation. The numerical resolving codes are practiced with the help of the finite element program generation system (FEPG) platform using finite element method (FEM). The E-J power law is used to describe the electric current nonlinear characteristics of HTS bulk. The simulation results show that the heat conduction and the critical current density are tightly relative to the thermal effects of the HTS bulk over the PMG. The heat intensity which responds to the heat loss of the HTS bulk is mainly distributed at the two bottom-corners of the bulk sample.

  4. Structures and formation mechanisms of aquo/hydroxo oligomeric beryllium in aqueous solution: a density functional theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoyan; Liao, Rongbao; Wu, Hai; Huang, Zhengjie; Zhang, Hong

    2015-09-01

    The structures and formation mechanisms of a wide variety of aquo/hydroxo oligomeric beryllium clusters were investigated using density functional theory. The structural parameters of beryllium clusters were found to vary regularly with the stepwise substitution of bound water molecules in the inner coordination sphere by hydroxyl groups. According to the Gibbs free energies deduced from SMD solvation model computations, unhydrolyzed oligomeric beryllium species are the most favorable products of polymerization, independent of the degrees of hydrolysis of the reactants. Simulation of the formation processes of oligomeric beryllium showed that polymerization, in essence, involves the nucleophilic attack of a terminal hydroxyl group in one BeO4 tetrahedron on the beryllium center in another BeO4 tetrahedron, leading to the bridging of two BeO4 tetrahedrons by a hydroxyl group.

  5. Optimizing minimum free-energy crossing points in solution: linear-response free energy/spin-flip density functional theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minezawa, Noriyuki

    2014-10-28

    Examining photochemical processes in solution requires understanding the solvent effects on the potential energy profiles near conical intersections (CIs). For that purpose, the CI point in solution is determined as the crossing between nonequilibrium free energy surfaces. In this work, the nonequilibrium free energy is described using the combined method of linear-response free energy and collinear spin-flip time-dependent density functional theory. The proposed approach reveals the solvent effects on the CI geometries of stilbene in an acetonitrile solution and those of thymine in water. Polar acetonitrile decreases the energy difference between the twisted minimum and twisted-pyramidalized CI of stilbene. For thymine in water, the hydrogen bond formation stabilizes significantly the CI puckered at the carbonyl carbon atom. The result is consistent with the recent simulation showing that the reaction path via this geometry is open in water. Therefore, the present method is a promising way of identifying the free-energy crossing points that play an essential role in photochemistry of solvated molecules.

  6. Buoyant Response of the Tank 241-SY-101 Crust to Transfer and Back-Dilution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CW Stewart

    1999-11-08

    The mixer pump installed in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) in July 1993 has prevented the large buoyant displacement gas release events (BD GRE) it has historically exhibited. But the absence of periodic disruption from GREs and the action of mixing have allowed the crust to grow. The accelerated gas retention has resulted in over 30 inches of waste level growth and the flammable gas volume stored in the crust has become a hazard. To remediate gas retention in the crust and the potential for buoyant displacement gas releases from below the crust, SY-101 will be diluted in the fall of 1999 to dissolve a large fraction of the solids in the tank. The plan is to transfer waste out and back-dilute with water in several steps of about 100,000 gallons each. Back-dilution water may be added at the transfer pump inlet, the base of the mixer pump, and on top of the crust. The mixer pump will continue to be required to prevent formation of a deep nonconnective layer and resumption of BD GREs. Therefore, it is vital to ensure that the transfer and back-dilution processes do not significantly degrade the pump's effectiveness. Part of the strategy to avoid mixer pump degradation is to keep the base of the crust layer well above the pump inlet, which is 236 inches above the tank bottom. The maximum transfer for which an equal back-dilution is possible without sinking the crust is 90 kgal if water is injected at the 96-inch transfer pump inlet and 120 kgal for injection at the 9-inch mixer pump burrowing ring. To keep the crust base above the lowest observed elevation of 295 inches, transfer and back-dilution must be limited to 143 kgal and 80 kgal, respectively, for the 96-inch back-dilution and 175 kgal with a 112 kgal back-dilution using the 9-inch back-dilution elevation. These limits can be avoided by adding water to the top of the crust to dissolve the negatively buoyant layers. If 20 kgal of water is placed on top of the crust and the rest of the back-dilution is

  7. 46 CFR 160.047-3a - Materials-Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials-Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other... Materials—Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests. (a) Specifications. Dee ring and snap lock assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests may...

  8. 46 CFR 160.052-3a - Materials-Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials-Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other... Materials—Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests. (a) Specifications. Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests may...

  9. Flow instability of buoyant-Marangoni convection in the LEC GaAs melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Flow transitions and instabilities have significant effects on the quality of the crystals. The flow and heat transfer in the LEC GaAs melt are numerically studied by a time-dependent and three-dimensional turbulent flow model. The effects of the change of the buoyancy and Marangoni force on the flow state are analyzed by changing the temperature difference between the crystal and the crucible walls. The results show that the flow will transform from axisymmetric steady flow to non-axisymmetric oscillatory flow when the temperature difference exceeds the critical value, and that the mechanism of the transition is attributed to the Marangoni instability. The critical temperature differences for the flow transitions corresponding to different melt depth H are numerically predicted. Several important characteristics of the non-axisymmetric buoyant-Marangoni convection are numerically observed and compared with that of the non-axisymmetric mixed convection coupled with crystal rotation.

  10. Tomography reveals buoyant asthenosphere accumulating beneath the Juan de Fuca plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, William B.; Allen, Richard M.; Richards, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    The boundary between Earth’s strong lithospheric plates and the underlying mantle asthenosphere corresponds to an abrupt seismic velocity decrease and electrical conductivity increase with depth, perhaps indicating a thin, weak layer that may strongly influence plate motion dynamics. The behavior of such a layer at subduction zones remains unexplored. We present a tomographic model, derived from on- and offshore seismic experiments, that reveals a strong low-velocity feature beneath the subducting Juan de Fuca slab along the entire Cascadia subduction zone. Through simple geodynamic arguments, we propose that this low-velocity feature is the accumulation of material from a thin, weak, buoyant layer present beneath the entire oceanic lithosphere. The presence of this feature could have major implications for our understanding of the asthenosphere and subduction zone dynamics.

  11. Translational and rotational dynamics of a large buoyant sphere in turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Mathai, Varghese; van der Poel, Erwin P; Sun, Chao

    2016-01-01

    We report experimental measurements of the translational and rotational dynamics of a large buoyant sphere in isotropic turbulence. We introduce an efficient method to simultaneously determine the position and (absolute) orientation of a spherical body from visual observation. The method employs a minimization algorithm to obtain the orientation from the 2D projection of a specific pattern drawn onto the surface of the sphere. This has the advantages that it does not require a database of reference images, is easily scalable using parallel processing, and enables accurate absolute orientation reference. Analysis of the sphere's translational dynamics reveals clear differences between the streamwise and transverse directions. The translational auto-correlations and PDFs provide evidence for periodicity in the particle's dynamics even under turbulent conditions. The angular autocorrelations show weak periodicity. The angular accelerations exhibit wide tails, however without a directional dependence.

  12. FULLY RESOLVED NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF TURBULENT PIPE FLOWS LADEN WITH LARGE NEUTRALLY- BUOYANT PARTICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Teng-hu; SHAO Xue-ming; YU Zhao-sheng

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we employ a fully-resolved numerical simulation method (the fictitious domain method) to investigate the effects of large neutrally-buoyant particles on the turbulent flow in a pipe at low Reynolds number and non-dilute regimes. The tube Reynolds number is fixed to be 4 900, the particle-pipe diameter ratio is 0.1, and the particle volume fraction ranges from 0.33% to 10%. Our results indicate that the presence of large particles decreases the maximum root-of-mean-square (rms) of the streamwise velocity fluctuation near the wall by weakening the intensity of large-scale streamwise vortices, although in the region very close to the wall the particles increase the rms of streamwise velocity fluctuation. On the other hand, the particles induce small-scale vortices in the near-wall region, resulting in the enhancement of the rms of radial and circumferential velocity fluctuations there.

  13. Three-dimensional Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of Buoyant Bubbles in Galaxy Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neill, S M; Jones, T W

    2009-01-01

    We report results of 3D MHD simulations of the dynamics of buoyant bubbles in magnetized galaxy cluster media. The simulations are three dimensional extensions of two dimensional calculations reported by Jones & De Young (2005). Initially spherical bubbles and briefly inflated spherical bubbles all with radii a few times smaller than the intracluster medium (ICM) scale height were followed as they rose through several ICM scale heights. Such bubbles quickly evolve into a toroidal form that, in the absence of magnetic influences, is stable against fragmentation in our simulations. This ring formation results from (commonly used) initial conditions that cause ICM material below the bubbles to drive upwards through the bubble, creating a vortex ring; that is, hydrostatic bubbles develop into "smoke rings", if they are initially not very much smaller or very much larger than the ICM scale height. Even modest ICM magnetic fields with beta = P_gas/P_mag ~ 10^3 can influence the dynamics of the bubbles, provided...

  14. SUTRA: A model for 2D or 3D saturated-unsaturated, variable-density ground-water flow with solute or energy transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Clifford I.; Provost, A.M.

    2002-01-01

    SUTRA (Saturated-Unsaturated Transport) is a computer program that simulates fluid movement and the transport of either energy or dissolved substances in a subsurface environment. This upgraded version of SUTRA adds the capability for three-dimensional simulation to the former code (Voss, 1984), which allowed only two-dimensional simulation. The code employs a two- or three-dimensional finite-element and finite-difference method to approximate the governing equations that describe the two interdependent processes that are simulated: 1) fluid density-dependent saturated or unsaturated ground-water flow; and 2) either (a) transport of a solute in the ground water, in which the solute may be subject to: equilibrium adsorption on the porous matrix, and both first-order and zero-order production or decay; or (b) transport of thermal energy in the ground water and solid matrix of the aquifer. SUTRA may also be used to simulate simpler subsets of the above processes. A flow-direction-dependent dispersion process for anisotropic media is also provided by the code and is introduced in this report. As the primary calculated result, SUTRA provides fluid pressures and either solute concentrations or temperatures, as they vary with time, everywhere in the simulated subsurface system. SUTRA flow simulation may be employed for two-dimensional (2D) areal, cross sectional and three-dimensional (3D) modeling of saturated ground-water flow systems, and for cross sectional and 3D modeling of unsaturated zone flow. Solute-transport simulation using SUTRA may be employed to model natural or man-induced chemical-species transport including processes of solute sorption, production, and decay. For example, it may be applied to analyze ground-water contaminant transport problems and aquifer restoration designs. In addition, solute-transport simulation with SUTRA may be used for modeling of variable-density leachate movement, and for cross sectional modeling of saltwater intrusion in

  15. Solution-Based High-Density Arrays of Dielectric Microsphere Structures for Improved Crystal Quality of III-Nitride Layers on Si Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Jun Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent development of dielectric microsphere lithography has been able to open up new means of performing simple and easy patterning on the semiconductor surfaces. Here, we report uniform and high-density arrays of microspheres using a solution-based spin-coating method. The arrays of microspheres were used for etching mask to form the arrays of III-nitride microrods. By regrowing GaN layer on the microrod structures, high-quality GaN layer was achieved in terms of surface morphology as well as XRD characterization. To apply the advantages such as improved crystal quality and light extraction enhancement, light-emitting diodes (LEDs were grown and then fabricated. The regrown LEDs with microspheres showed much improved optical output power and forward voltage characteristics in the same current injection. Therefore, we believe that this approach is quite useful for the development of high efficiency LEDs for future lighting.

  16. Teller Medal Lecture IFSA2001: Problems and solutions in the design and analysis of early laser driven high energy density and ICF target physics experiments (IFSA 2001)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Mordecai D.

    2016-10-01

    The high energy density (HED) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) physics community relies on increasingly sophisticated high power laser driven experiments to advance the field. We review early work in the design and analysis of such experiments, and discuss the problems encountered. By finding solutions to those problems we put the field on firmer ground, allowing the community to develop it to the exciting stage it is in today. Specific examples include: drive and preheat in complex hohlraum geometries with the complicating effects of sample motion; and issues in the successful design of laboratory soft x-ray lasers and in the invention of methods to reduce the required optical laser driver energy by several orders of magnitude.

  17. Solution Structures of Highly Active Molecular Ir Water-Oxidation Catalysts from Density Functional Theory Combined with High-Energy X-ray Scattering and EXAFS Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke R; Matula, Adam J; Kwon, Gihan; Hong, Jiyun; Sheehan, Stafford W; Thomsen, Julianne M; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H; Tiede, David M; Chen, Lin X; Batista, Victor S

    2016-05-04

    The solution structures of highly active Ir water-oxidation catalysts are elucidated by combining density functional theory, high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. We find that the catalysts are Ir dimers with mono-μ-O cores and terminal anionic ligands, generated in situ through partial oxidation of a common catalyst precursor. The proposed structures are supported by (1)H and (17)O NMR, EPR, resonance Raman and UV-vis spectra, electrophoresis, etc. Our findings are particularly valuable to understand the mechanism of water oxidation by highly reactive Ir catalysts. Importantly, our DFT-EXAFS-HEXS methodology provides a new in situ technique for characterization of active species in catalytic systems.

  18. Laboratory flow experiments for visualizing carbon dioxide-induced, density-driven brine convection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneafsey, T.; Pruess, K.

    2009-09-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers confined by low-permeability cap rock will result in a layer of CO{sub 2} overlying the brine. Dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the brine increases the brine density, resulting in an unstable situation in which more-dense brine overlies less-dense brine. This gravitational instability could give rise to density-driven convection of the fluid, which is a favorable process of practical interest for CO{sub 2} storage security because it accelerates the transfer of buoyant CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase, where it is no longer subject to an upward buoyant drive. Laboratory flow visualization tests in transparent Hele-Shaw cells have been performed to elucidate the processes and rates of this CO{sub 2} solute-driven convection (CSC). Upon introduction of CO{sub 2} into the system, a layer of CO{sub 2}-laden brine forms at the CO{sub 2}-water interface. Subsequently, small convective fingers form, which coalesce, broaden, and penetrate into the test cell. Images and time-series data of finger lengths and wavelengths are presented. Observed CO{sub 2} uptake of the convection system indicates that the CO{sub 2} dissolution rate is approximately constant for each test and is far greater than expected for a diffusion-only scenario. Numerical simulations of our system show good agreement with the experiments for onset time of convection and advancement of convective fingers. There are differences as well, the most prominent being the absence of cell-scale convection in the numerical simulations. This cell-scale convection observed in the experiments is probably initiated by a small temperature gradient induced by the cell illumination.

  19. 地质封存中CO2水溶液密度研究进展%Research Progress on Density of CO2 Aqueous Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    常飞; 宋永臣; 张毅

    2011-01-01

    Sequestration of CO2 into underground saline aquifer is considered as a viable option to reduce CO2 and mitigate climate change. The density of CO2 salt solution is a key parameter for CO2 saline aquifer storage which determines the diffusion and migration of CO2 in reservoir and then affects the storage safety. Research progress of the density of CO2 aqueous solution from an experimental and a simulation perspective were summarized. It was found that although the operating range of existing density data nearly covered the scope of storage conditions,they cannot meet the needs of sequestration in terms of quantity and accuracy. Most of the existing model are empirical formula,which have a narrow applicable range and low prediction accuracy. Theoretical model is in the research stage, in which the theoretical model based on SAFT Equation of State is the research focus at present. It is necessary to investigate the relationship between density of CO2 aqueous solution and factors such as temperature,pressure,CO2 concentration and salinity under sequestration conditions systematically and build a theoretical model with wide applicable range and high prediction accuracy in order to provide necessary support for CO2 saline aquifer storage.%CO2地下盐水层封存是减排CO2、缓解气候变化的可行方案之一.CO2盐水溶液密度影响CO2在储层中的扩散和运移,从而影响封存的安全性;因此,对于CO2盐水层封存十分重要.文章从实验测量和数学模型两个角度总结了对CO2水溶液密度的研究进展,认为现有实验数据的工况范围能够覆盖封存条件范围,但在数量和准确性方面都无法满足CO2地下盐水层封存需要.现有溶液密度模型大多数是经验公式,适用范围较窄、预测精度不高.理论模型正处于研究阶段,基于SAFT状态方程的理论模型是目前的研究热点.因此,需要系统研究封存条件下的CO2水溶液密度与温度、压力、CO2质

  20. Comprehensive evaluation of medium and long range correlated density functionals in TD-DFT investigation of DNA bases and base pairs: gas phase and water solution study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Manoj K.; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2010-11-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the performance of the TD-DFT method using different density functionals including recently developed medium and long-range correlation corrected density functionals have been carried out for lower-lying electronic singlet valence transitions of nucleic acid bases and the Watson-Crick base pairs in the gas phase and in the water solution. The standard 6-311++G(d,p) basis set was used. Ground state geometries of bases and base pairs were optimized at the M05-2X/6-311++G(d,p) level. The nature of potential energy surfaces (PES) was ascertained through the harmonic vibrational frequency analysis; all geometries were found to be minima at the respective PES. Electronic singlet vertical transition energies were also computed at the CC2/def2-TZVP level in the gas phase. The effect of state-specific water solvation on TD-DFT computed transition energies was considered using the PCM model. For the isolated bases the performance of the B3LYP functional was generally found to be superior among all functionals, but it measurably fails for charge-transfer states in the base pairs. The CC2/def2-TZVP computed transition energies were also revealed to be inferior compared with B3LYP results for the isolated bases. The performance of the ωB97XD, CAM-B3LYP and BMK functionals were found to be similar and comparable with the CC2 results for the isolated bases. However, for the Watson-Crick adenine-thymine and guanine-cytosine base pairs the performance of the ωB97XD functional was found to be the best among all the studied functionals in the present work in predicting the locally excited transitions as well as charge transfer states.

  1. X-ray scattering study of pike olfactory nerve: intensity of the axonal membrane, solution of the phase problem and electron density profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzati, Vittorio; Vachette, Patrice; Benoit, Evelyne; Charpentier, Gilles

    2004-10-08

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray scattering experiments were performed on unmyelinated pike olfactory nerves. The difference between the meridional and the equatorial traces of the 2-D spectra yielded the 1-D equatorial intensity of the macromolecular components oriented with respect to the nerve: axonal membranes, microtubules and other cytoskeletal filaments. These 1-D spectra display a diffuse band typical of bilayer membranes and, at small s, a few sharper bands reminiscent of microtubules. All the spectra merge at large s. The intensity of the axonal membrane was determined via a noise analysis of the nerve-dependent spectra, involving also the notion that the thickness of the membrane is finite. The shape of the intensity function indicated that the electron density profile is not centrosymmetric. The knowledge of intensity and thickness paved the way to the electron density profile via an ab initio solution of the phase problem. An iterative procedure was adopted: (i) choose the lattice D of a 1-D pseudo crystal, interpolate the intensity at the points sh = h/D, adopt an arbitrary set of initial phases and compute the profile; (ii) determine the phases corresponding to this profile truncated by the thickness D/2; (iii) repeat the operation with the updated phases until a stable result is obtained. This iterative procedure was carried out for different D-values, starting in each case from randomly generated phases: stable results were obtained in less than 10,000 iterations. Most importantly, for D in the vicinity of 200 A, the overwhelming majority of the profiles were congruent with each other. These profiles were strongly asymmetric and otherwise typical of biological membranes.

  2. Mass transport of low density lipoprotein in reconstructed hemodynamic environments of human carotid arteries: the role of volume and solute flux through the endothelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho; Giddens, Don P

    2015-04-01

    The accumulation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the arterial intima is a critical step in the initiation and progression of atheromatous lesions. In this study we examine subject-specific LDL transport into the intima of carotid bifurcations in three human subjects using a three-pore model for LDL mass transfer. Subject-specific carotid artery computational models were derived using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to obtain the geometry and phase-contract MRI (PC-MRI) to acquire pulsatile inflow and outflow boundary conditions for each subject. The subjects were selected to represent a wide range of anatomical configurations and different stages of atherosclerotic development from mild to moderate intimal thickening. A fluid-solid interaction (FSI) model was implemented in the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach in order to consider the effects of a compliant vessel on wall shear stress (WSS). The WSS-dependent response of the endothelium to LDL mass transfer was modeled by multiple pathways to include the contributions of leaky junctions, normal junctions, and transcytosis to LDL solute and plasma volume flux from the lumen into the intima. Time averaged WSS (TAWSS) over the cardiac cycle was computed to represent the spatial WSS distribution, and wall thickness (WTH) was determined from black blood MRI (BBMRI) so as to visualize intimal thickening patterns in the bifurcations. The regions which are exposed to low TAWSS correspond to elevated WTH and higher mass and volume flux via the leaky junctions. In all subjects, the maximum LDL solute flux was observed to be immediately downstream of the stenosis, supporting observations that existing atherosclerotic lesions tend to progress in the downstream direction of the stenosis.

  3. Numerical simulation and analysis of confined turbulent buoyant jet with variable source

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2016-01-23

    In this work, experimental and numerical investigations are undertaken for confined buoyant turbulent jet with varying inlet temperatures. Results of the experimental work and numerical simulations for the problem under consideration are presented. Four cases of different variable inlet temperatures and different flow rates are considered. The realizable k-ɛ turbulence model is used to model the turbulent flow. Comparisons show good agreements between simulated and measured results. The average deviation of the simulated temperature by realizable k-ɛ turbulent model and the measured temperature is within 2%. The results indicate that temperatures along the vertical axis vary, generally, in nonlinear fashion as opposed to the approximately linear variation that was observed for the constant inlet temperature that was done in a previous work. Furthermore, thermal stratification exits, particularly closer to the entrance region. Further away from the entrance region the variation in temperatures becomes relatively smaller. The stratification is observed since the start of the experiment and continues during the whole course. Numerical experiments for constant, monotone increasing and monotone decreasing of inlet temperature are done to show its effect on the buoyancy force in terms of Richardson number.

  4. Experimental Studies for the characterization of the mixing processes in negative buoyant jets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Querzoli G.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A negatively buoyant jet (NBJ corresponds to the physical phenomenon that develops when a fluid is discharged upwards into a lighter environment or downwards into a heavier receptor fluid. In a NBJ the flow is initially driven mostly by the momentum, so it basically behaves as a simple jet released withthe same angle, while far from the outlet the buoyancy prevails, bending the jet axis down and making it similar to a plume. The coexistence in the same phenomenon of both the characteristics of simple jets and plumes makes the NBJs a phenomenon still not entirely explained but, considering also the numerous practical applications, very interesting to study. Here some of the experimental results are presented. The laboratory experiment were obtained on a model simulating a typical sea discharge of brine from desalination plants: a pipe laid down on the sea bottom, with orifices on its lateral wall, releasing brine (heavier than the sea water with a certain angle to the horizontal, in order to increase the jet path before sinking to the seafloor. A non-intrusive image analysis technique, namely Feature Tracking Velocimetry, is applied to measure velocity fields, with the aim at understanding the influence of some non-dimensional parameters driving the phenomenon (e.g. Reynolds number, release angle on the structure of the NBJ and of the turbulence.

  5. An inkjet-printed buoyant 3-D lagrangian sensor for real-time flood monitoring

    KAUST Repository

    Farooqui, Muhammad Fahad

    2014-06-01

    A 3-D (cube-shaped) Lagrangian sensor, inkjet printed on a paper substrate, is presented for the first time. The sensor comprises a transmitter chip with a microcontroller completely embedded in the cube, along with a $1.5 \\\\lambda 0 dipole that is uniquely implemented on all the faces of the cube to achieve a near isotropic radiation pattern. The sensor has been designed to operate both in the air as well as water (half immersed) for real-time flood monitoring. The sensor weighs 1.8 gm and measures 13 mm$\\\\,\\\\times\\\\,$ 13 mm$\\\\,\\\\times\\\\,$ 13 mm, and each side of the cube corresponds to only $0.1 \\\\lambda 0 (at 2.4 GHz). The printed circuit board is also inkjet-printed on paper substrate to make the sensor light weight and buoyant. Issues related to the bending of inkjet-printed tracks and integration of the transmitter chip in the cube are discussed. The Lagrangian sensor is designed to operate in a wireless sensor network and field tests have confirmed that it can communicate up to a distance of 100 m while in the air and up to 50 m while half immersed in water. © 1963-2012 IEEE.

  6. Buoyant Filter Bio-Reactor (BFBR)--a novel anaerobic wastewater treatment unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panicker, Soosan J; Philipose, M C; Haridas, Ajit

    2008-01-01

    The Buoyant Filter Bio-Reactor (BFBR) is a novel and very efficient method for the treatment of complex wastewater. Sewage is a complex wastewater containing insoluble COD contributed by fat and proteins. The fat and proteins present in the domestic sewage cause operational problems and underperformance in the Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket Reactor, used now for treating sewage anaerobically. The biogas yield from the BFBR is 0.36 m3/kg COD reduced and the methane content was about 70-80%. Production of methane by anaerobic digestion of organic waste had the benefit of lower energy costs for treatment and is thus environmentally beneficial to the society by providing a clean fuel from renewable feed stocks. The BFBR achieved a COD removal efficiency of 80-90% for an organic loading rate of 4.5 kg/m3/d at a hydraulic retention time of 3.25 hours. The effluent COD was less than 100 mg/l, thus saving on secondary treatment cost. No pretreatment like sedimentation was required for the influent to the BFBR. The BFBR can produce low turbidity effluent as in the activated sludge process (ASP). The land area required for the BFBR treatment plant is less when compared to ASP plant. Hence the problem of scarcity of land for the treatment plant is reduced. The total expenditure for erecting the unit was less than 50% as that of conventional ASP for the same COD removal efficiency including land cost.

  7. Wind relaxation and a coastal buoyant plume north of Pt. Conception, CA: Observations, simulations, and scalings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suanda, Sutara H.; Kumar, Nirnimesh; Miller, Arthur J.; Di Lorenzo, Emanuele; Haas, Kevin; Cai, Donghua; Edwards, Christopher A.; Washburn, Libe; Fewings, Melanie R.; Torres, Rachel; Feddersen, Falk

    2016-10-01

    In upwelling regions, wind relaxations lead to poleward propagating warm water plumes that are important to coastal ecosystems. The coastal ocean response to wind relaxation around Pt. Conception, CA is simulated with a Regional Ocean Model (ROMS) forced by realistic surface and lateral boundary conditions including tidal processes. The model reproduces well the statistics of observed subtidal water column temperature and velocity at both outer and inner-shelf mooring locations throughout the study. A poleward-propagating plume of Southern California Bight water that increases shelf water temperatures by ≈ 5°C is also reproduced. Modeled plume propagation speed, spatial scales, and flow structure are consistent with a theoretical scaling for coastal buoyant plumes with both surface-trapped and slope-controlled dynamics. Plume momentum balances are distinct between the offshore (>30 m depth) region where the plume is surface-trapped, and onshore of the 30 m isobath (within 5 km from shore) where the plume water mass extends to the bottom and is slope controlled. In the onshore region, bottom stress is important in the alongshore momentum equation and generates vertical vorticity that is an order of magnitude larger than the vorticity in the plume core. Numerical experiments without tidal forcing show that modeled surface temperatures are biased 0.5°C high, potentially affecting plume propagation distance and persistence.

  8. Isolation of Low Abundance Proteins and Cells Using Buoyant Glass Microbubble Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steingrimur Stefansson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventional protein affinity chromatography relies on highly porous resins that have large surface areas. These properties are ideal for fast flow separation of proteins from biological samples with maximum yields, but these properties can also lead to increased nonspecific protein binding. In certain applications where the purity of an isolated protein is more important than the yield, using a glass solid phase could be advantageous as glass is nonporous and hydrophilic and has a low surface area and low nonspecific protein binding. As a proof of principle, we used protein A-conjugated hollow glass microbubbles to isolate fluorescently labeled neurofilament heavy chain spiked into serum and compared them to protein A Sepharose and protein A magnetic beads (Dynabeads using an anti-neurofilament protein antibody. As expected, a greater volume of glass bubbles was required to match the binding capacity of the magnetic beads and Sepharose resins. On the other hand, nonspecific protein binding to glass bubbles was greatly reduced compared to the other resins. Additionally, since the glass bubbles are buoyant and transparent, they are well suited for isolating cells from biological samples and staining them in situ.

  9. Isolation of rare tumor cells from blood cells with buoyant immuno-microbubbles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guixin Shi

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs are exfoliated at various stages of cancer, and could provide invaluable information for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancers. There is an urgent need for the development of cost-efficient and scalable technologies for rare CTC enrichment from blood. Here we report a novel method for isolation of rare tumor cells from excess of blood cells using gas-filled buoyant immuno-microbubbles (MBs. MBs were prepared by emulsification of perfluorocarbon gas in phospholipids and decorated with anti-epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM antibody. EpCAM-targeted MBs efficiently (85% and rapidly (within 15 minutes bound to various epithelial tumor cells suspended in cell medium. EpCAM-targeted MBs efficiently (88% isolated frequent tumor cells that were spiked at 100,000 cells/ml into plasma-depleted blood. Anti-EpCAM MBs efficiently (>77% isolated rare mouse breast 4T1, human prostate PC-3 and pancreatic cancer BxPC-3 cells spiked into 1, 3 and 7 ml (respectively of plasma-depleted blood. Using EpCAM targeted MBs CTCs from metastatic cancer patients were isolated, suggesting that this technique could be developed into a valuable clinical tool for isolation, enumeration and analysis of rare cells.

  10. Numerical simulation and analysis of confined turbulent buoyant jet with variable source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    EL-AMIN Mohamed F; AL-GHAMDI Abdulmajeed; SALAMA Amgad; SUN Shuyu

    2015-01-01

    In this work, experimental and numerical investigations are undertaken for confined buoyant turbulent jet with varying inlet temperatures. Results of the experimental work and numerical simulations for the problem under consideration are presented. Four cases of different variable inlet temperatures and different flow rates are considered. The realizable k-ε turbulence model is used to model the turbulent flow. Comparisons show good agreements between simulated and measured results. The average devia- tion of the simulated temperature by realizablek-ε turbulent model and the measured temperature is within 2%. The results indicate that temperatures along the vertical axis vary, generally, in nonlinear fashion as opposed to the approximately linear varia- tion that was observed for the constant inlet temperature that was done in a previous work. Furthermore, thermal stratification exits, particularly closer to the entrance region. Further away from the entrance region the variation in temperatures becomes relatively smaller. The stratification is observed since the start of the experiment and continues during the whole course. Numerical experime- nts for constant, monotone increasing and monotone decreasing of inlet temperature are done to show its effect on the buoyancy force in terms of Richardson number.

  11. Turbulent channel flow of dense suspensions of neutrally-buoyant spheres

    CERN Document Server

    Picano, F; Brandt, L

    2014-01-01

    Dense particle suspensions are widely encountered in many applications and in environmental flows. While many previous studies investigate their rheological properties in laminar flows, little is known on the behaviour of these suspensions in the turbulent/inertial regime. The present study aims to fill this gap by investigating the turbulent flow of a Newtonian fluid laden with solid neutrally-buoyant spheres at relatively high volume fractions in a plane channel. An Immersed Boundary Method has been used to account for the dispersed phase performing Direct Numerical Simulation in the range of volume fractions $\\Phi=0-0.2$. The results show that the mean velocity profiles are significantly altered by the presence of a solid phase with a decrease of the von K\\'arm\\'an constant in the log-law. The overall drag is found to increase with the volume fraction, more than one would expect just considering the increase of the system viscosity due to the presence of the particles. At the highest volume fraction here i...

  12. On the theory of solitons of fluid pressure and solute density in geologic porous media, with applications to shale, clay and sandstone

    CERN Document Server

    Caserta, A; Salusti, E

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose the application of a new model of transients of pore pressure p and solute density \\r{ho} in geologic porous media. This model is rooted in the non-linear waves theory, the focus of which is advection and effect of large pressure jumps on strain (due to large p in a non-linear version of the Hooke law). It strictly relates p and \\r{ho} evolving under the effect of a strong external stress. As a result, the presence of quick and sharp transients in low permeability rocks is unveiled, i.e. the non-linear Burgers solitons. We therefore propose that the actual transport process in porous rocks for large signals is not the linear diffusion, but could be governed by solitons. A test of an eventual presence of solitons in a rock is here proposed, and then applied to Pierre Shale, Bearpaw Shale, Boom Clay and Oznam-Mugu silt and clay. A quick analysis showing the presence of solitons for nuclear waste disposal and salty water intrusions is also analyzed. Finally, in a kind of "theoretical exp...

  13. Totally solution-processed CuInS2 solar cells based on chloride inks: reduced metastable phases and improved current density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Mehdi; Behjat, Abbas; Tajabadi, Fariba; Taghavinia, Nima

    2015-03-01

    Planar superstrate CuInS2 (CIS) solar cell devices are fabricated using totally solution-processed deposition methods. These Cd-free devices are structured by FTO/TiO2/In2S3/CIS/carbon, where TiO2 and In2S3 are deposited by spray pyrolysis, and a CIS film is deposited using spin-coating followed by annealing at 250 °C. The pasted carbon layer is utilized as the anode. No further sulfurization or selenization is employed. The Cu/In ratio in the ink is found as a critical factor affecting the morphology and crystallinity of the film as well as the photovoltaic performance of the device. An optimum Cu/In = 1.05 results in large-grain films with sharp diffraction peaks and, subsequently, optimal series resistance and shunt conductance. It is also found that the chloride-based ink results in CIS films with considerably reduced metastable phases, compared to the conventional acetate-based inks. A current density of 23.6 mA cm-2 is obtained for the best devices, leading to a conversion efficiency of 4.1%.

  14. Some exact solutions of the local induction equation for motion of a vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate with Gaussian density profile

    CERN Document Server

    Ruban, V P

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of a vortex filament in a trapped Bose-Einstein condensate is considered when the equilibrium density of the condensate, in rotating with angular velocity ${\\bf\\Omega}$ coordinate system, is Gaussian with a quadratic form ${\\bf r}\\cdot\\hat D{\\bf r}$. It is shown that equation of motion of the filament in the local induction approximation admits a class of exact solutions in the form of a straight moving vortex, ${\\bf R}(\\beta,t)=\\beta {\\bf M}(t) +{\\bf N}(t)$, where $\\beta$ is a longitudinal parameter, and $t$ is the time. The vortex is in touch with an ellipsoid, as it follows from the conservation laws ${\\bf N}\\cdot \\hat D {\\bf N}=C_1$ and ${\\bf M}\\cdot \\hat D {\\bf N}=C_0=0$. Equation of motion for the tangent vector ${\\bf M}(t)$ turns out to be closed, and it has the integrals ${\\bf M}\\cdot \\hat D {\\bf M}=C_2$, $(|{\\bf M}| -{\\bf M}\\cdot\\hat G{\\bf \\Omega})=C$, where the matrix $\\hat G=2(\\hat I \\mbox{Tr\\,} \\hat D -\\hat D)^{-1}$. Intersection of the corresponding level surfaces determines trajecto...

  15. Current-source density estimation based on inversion of electrostatic forward solution: effects of finite extent of neuronal activity and conductivity discontinuities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersen, Klas H; Devor, Anna; Ulbert, Istvan; Dale, Anders M; Einevoll, Gaute T

    2006-06-30

    A new method for estimation of current-source density (CSD) from local field potentials is presented. This inverse CSD (iCSD) method is based on explicit inversion of the electrostatic forward solution and can be applied to data from multielectrode arrays with various geometries. Here, the method is applied to linear-array (laminar) electrode data. Three iCSD methods are considered: the CSD is assumed to have cylindrical symmetry and be (i) localized in infinitely thin discs, (ii) step-wise constant or (iii) continuous and smoothly varying (using cubic splines) in the vertical direction. For spatially confined CSD distributions the standard CSD method, involving a discrete double derivative, is seen in model calculations to give significant estimation errors when the lateral source dimension is comparable to the size of a cortical column (less than approximately 1 mm). Further, discontinuities in the extracellular conductivity are seen to potentially give sizable errors for even wider source distributions. The iCSD methods are seen to give excellent estimates when the correct lateral source dimension and spatial distribution of conductivity are incorporated. To illustrate the application to real data, iCSD estimates of stimulus-evoked responses measured with laminar electrodes in the rat somatosensory (barrel) cortex are compared to estimates from the standard CSD method.

  16. Trace Metal and Sulfur Dynamics in the First Meter of Buoyant Hydrothermal Vent Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, A.; Gartman, A.; Shaw, T. J.; Luther, G. W., III

    2014-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of metals and metal sulfides within the buoyant plume is critical to determining the ultimate fate of metals emitted from hydrothermal vents. The concentration, size fractionation, and partitioning of trace metals (Fe, Mn, Cu, Co, Zn, Cd, Pb) were determined within the first meter of the rising plume at three vent fields (TAG, Snakepit, and Rainbow) along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. At Rainbow, total Fe concentrations exceed total sulfide concentrations by an order of magnitude, whereas at the other two sites, total Fe and total sulfide concentrations are nearly equal. At all three sites, Mn and Fe are primarily in the filtered (< 0.2 μm) fraction and Cu, Co, Zn, Cd, and Pb are mainly in the unfiltered fraction. At TAG and Snakepit, unfiltered copper is correlated with unfiltered cobalt, and unfiltered zinc is correlated with unfiltered cadmium and lead. At Rainbow, unfiltered zinc, cadmium and lead are correlated, but unfiltered copper and cobalt are not, indicating precipitation dynamics at Rainbow are different than those at TAG and Snakepit due to bulk geochemical differences, including a higher iron to sulfide ratio. A sequential HCl/HNO3 leaching method was used to distinguish metals present in pyrite and chalcopyrite in both unfiltered and filtered samples. Significant portions of unfiltered Cu and Co were extracted in HNO3, whereas unfiltered Zn, Cd, and Pb were extracted in HCl. Up to 95 % of filtered Cu, Co, and Zn, up to 80% Cd, and up to 60 % Pb are only extractable in HNO3, indicating that a significant portion of metals < 0.2 μm are incorporated into a recalcitrant fraction such as nanoparticulate pyrite or chalcopyrite.

  17. Modelling of a non-buoyant vertical jet in waves and currents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐振山; 陈永平; 陶建峰; 潘毅; 张长宽; 李志伟

    2016-01-01

    A generic numerical model using the large eddy simulation (LES) technique is developed to simulate a non-buoyant vertical jet in wave and/or current environments. The experimental data obtained in five different cases, i.e., one case of the jet in a wave only environment, two cases of the jet in a cross-flow only environment and two cases of the jet in a wave and cross-flow coexisting environment, are used to validate the model. The grid sensitivity tests are conducted based on four different grid systems and the results illustrate that the non-uniform grid system C (205×99×126 nodes with the minimum size of 1/10 jet diameter) is sufficiently fine for the modelling. The comparative study shows that the wave-current non-linear interaction should be taken into account at the inflow boundary while modelling the jet in wave and cross-flow coexisting environments. All numerical results agree well with the experimental data, showing that: (1) the jet under the influence of the wave action has a faster centerline velocity decay and a higher turbulence level than that in the stagnant ambience, meanwhile the “twin peaks” phenomenon exists on the cross-sectional velocity profiles, (2) the jet under a cross-flow scenario is deflected along the cross-flow with the node in the downstream, (3) the jet in wave and cross-flow coexisting environments has a flow structure of “effluent clouds”, which enhances the mixing of the jet with surrounding waters.

  18. Coral calcification under environmental change: a direct comparison of the alkalinity anomaly and buoyant weight techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; Hu, Xinping; Holcomb, Michael; Cai, Wei-Jun; Li, Qian; Wang, Yongchen; Xu, Hui; Warner, Mark E.; Melman, Todd F.; Hoadley, Kenneth D.; Pettay, D. Tye; Matsui, Yohei; Baumann, Justin H.; Grottoli, Andréa G.

    2017-03-01

    Two primary methods—the buoyant weight (BW) and alkalinity anomaly (AA) techniques—are currently used to quantify net calcification rates ( G) in scleractinian corals. However, it remains unclear whether they are directly comparable since the few method comparisons conducted to date have produced inconsistent results. Further, such a comparison has not been made for tropical corals. We directly compared G BW and G AA in four tropical and one temperate coral species cultured under various pCO2, temperature, and nutrient conditions. A range of protocols for conducting alkalinity depletion incubations was assessed. For the tropical corals, open-top incubations with manual stirring produced G AA that were highly correlated with and not significantly different from G BW. Similarly, G AA of the temperate coral was not significantly different from G BW when incubations provided water motion using a pump, but were significantly lower than G BW by 16% when water motion was primarily created by aeration. This shows that the two techniques can produce comparable calcification rates in corals but only when alkalinity depletion incubations are conducted under specific conditions. General recommendations for incubation protocols are made, especially regarding adequate water motion and incubation times. Further, the re-analysis of published data highlights the importance of using appropriate regression statistics when both variables are random and measured with error. Overall, we recommend the AA technique for investigations of community and short-term day versus night calcification, and the BW technique to measure organism calcification rates integrated over longer timescales due to practical limitations of both methods. Our findings will facilitate the direct comparison of studies measuring coral calcification using either method and thus have important implications for the fields of ocean acidification research and coral biology in general.

  19. Buoyant Turbulent Kinetic Energy Production in Steep-Slope Katabatic Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, Holly J.; Pardyjak, Eric R.; Higgins, Chad W.; Parlange, Marc B.

    2016-12-01

    We develop several critical concepts that should be considered when interpreting, modelling and designing future experiments for flows over sloping terrain. Vertical buoyancy fluxes in katabatic flows can be positive and a source of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) despite the statically stable, thermal stratification that drives these flows. This phenomenon occurs when the ratio of along-slope to slope-normal kinematic heat fluxes is greater than the cotangent of the slope angle, suggesting a critical value of slope-angle steepness found in earlier studies. We provide field-data-based evidence that the along-slope heat flux may dominate the variables in this inequality, and therefore in generating buoyant TKE production or suppression over a steep slope. These data show the along-slope heat flux can be more variable and significantly larger in magnitude than the slope-normal component. The gradient Richardson number does not include the effects of the along-slope buoyancy; furthermore, none of the canonical stability parameters can properly reflect the TKE redistribution from turbulent transport divergence and the sink of TKE in cases of counter-gradient momentum fluxes, which we frequently observe near the peak of the katabatic jet. In such cases, canonical stability parameters inadequately represent the physical mechanisms associated with stability. These results have broad implications related to accurately modelling turbulence and surface exchanges over sloping terrain and illustrate the need to more thoroughly investigate the along-slope heat flux and its drivers, the meaning and definitions of stability, and the effects of non-local turbulent transport.

  20. Kinetics of hydrolysis of 1-benzoyl-1,2,4-triazole in aqueous solution as a function of temperature near the temperature of maximum density, and the isochoric controversy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blandamer, MJ; Buurma, NJ; Engberts, JBFN; Reis, JCR; Buurma, Niklaas J.; Reis, João C.R.

    2003-01-01

    At temperatures above and below the temperature of maximum density, TMD, for water at ambient pressure, pairs of temperatures exist at which the molar volumes of water are equal. First-order rate constants for the pH-independent hydrolysis of 1-benzoyl-1,2,4-triazole in aqueous solution at pairs of

  1. Crowding and Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Design and Environment, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Three-part report pinpointing problems and uncovering solutions for the dual concepts of density (ratio of people to space) and crowding (psychological response to density). Section one, A Primer on Crowding,'' reviews new psychological and social findings; section two, Density in the Suburbs,'' shows conflict between status quo and increased…

  2. A simple device for measuring the minimum current velocity to maintain semi-buoyant fish eggs in suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Julia S.; Cheek, Brandon D.; Chen, Qingman; Groeschel, Jillian R.; Brewer, Shannon K.; Grabowski, Timothy B.

    2013-01-01

    Pelagic broadcast spawning cyprinids are common to Great Plains rivers and streams. This reproductive guild produces non-adhesive semi-buoyant eggs that require sufficient current velocity to remain in suspension during development. Although studies have shown that there may be a minimum velocity needed to keep the eggs in suspension, this velocity has not been estimated directly nor has the influence of physicochemical factors on egg buoyancy been determined. We developed a simple, inexpensive flow chamber that allowed for evaluation of minimum current velocity needed to keep semi-buoyant eggs in suspension at any time frame during egg development. The device described here has the capability of testing the minimum current velocity needed to keep semi-buoyant eggs in suspension at a wide range of physicochemical conditions. We used gellan beads soaked in freshwater for 0, 24, and 48 hrs as egg surrogates and evaluated minimum current velocities necessary to keep them in suspension at different combinations of temperature (20.0 ± 1.0° C, 25.0 ± 1.0° C, and 28.0 ± 1.0° C) and total dissolved solids (TDS; 1,000 mg L-1, 3,000 mg L-1, and 6,000 mg L-1). We found that our methodology generated consistent, repeatable results within treatment groups. Current velocities ranging from 0.001–0.026 needed to keep the gellan beads in suspension were negatively correlated to soak times and TDS and positively correlated with temperature. The flow chamber is a viable approach for evaluating minimum current velocities needed to keep the eggs of pelagic broadcast spawning cyprinids in suspension during development.

  3. Vertical distribution of buoyant Microcystis blooms in a Lagrangian particle tracking model for short-term forecasts in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, M. D.; Anderson, E. J.; Wynne, T. T.; Stumpf, R. P.; Fanslow, D. L.; Kijanka, K.; Vanderploeg, H. A.; Strickler, J. R.; Davis, T. W.

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CHABs) are a problem in western Lake Erie, and in eutrophic fresh waters worldwide. Western Lake Erie is a large (3000 km2), shallow (8 m mean depth), freshwater system. CHABs occur from July to October, when stratification is intermittent in response to wind and surface heating or cooling (polymictic). Existing forecast models give the present location and extent of CHABs from satellite imagery, then predict two-dimensional (surface) CHAB movement in response to meteorology. In this study, we simulated vertical distribution of buoyant Microcystis colonies, and 3-D advection, using a Lagrangian particle model forced by currents and turbulent diffusivity from the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM). We estimated the frequency distribution of Microcystis colony buoyant velocity from measured size distributions and buoyant velocities. We evaluated several random-walk numerical schemes to efficiently minimize particle accumulation artifacts. We selected the Milstein scheme, with linear interpolation of the diffusivity profile in place of cubic splines, and varied the time step at each particle and step based on the curvature of the local diffusivity profile to ensure that the Visser time step criterion was satisfied. Inclusion of vertical mixing with buoyancy significantly improved model skill statistics compared to an advection-only model, and showed greater skill than a persistence forecast through simulation day 6, in a series of 26 hindcast simulations from 2011. The simulations and in situ observations show the importance of subtle thermal structure, typical of a polymictic lake, along with buoyancy in determining vertical and horizontal distribution of Microcystis.

  4. From free jets to clinging wall jets: The influence of a horizontal boundary on a horizontally forced buoyant jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, H. C.; Hunt, G. R.

    2017-02-01

    We investigate the incompressible turbulent jet formed when buoyant fluid is steadily ejected horizontally from a circular source into an otherwise quiescent uniform environment. As our primary focus, we introduce a horizontal boundary beneath the source. For sufficiently small separations, the jet attaches and clings to the boundary, herein the "clinging jet," before, farther downstream, the jet is pulled away from the boundary by the buoyancy force. For larger source-boundary separations, the buoyant jet is free to rise under the action of the buoyancy force, herein the "free jet." Based on measurements of saline jets in freshwater surroundings we deduce the conditions required for a jet to cling. We present a data set that spans a broad range of source conditions for the variation in volume flux (indicative of entrainment), jet perimeter, and jet centerline for both "clinging" and "free" jets. For source Froude numbers Fr0≥12 the data collapse when scaled, displaying universal behaviors for both clinging and free jets. Our results for the variation in the volume flux across horizontal planes, π Qjet , show that within a few jet lengths of the source, π Qjet for the clinging jet exceeds that of a free jet with identical source conditions. However, when examined in a coordinate following the jet centerline π Qjet for free jets is greater. Finally, we propose a new parametrization for an existing integral model which agrees well with our experimental data as well as with data from other studies. Our findings offer the potential to tailor the dilution of horizontal buoyant jets by altering the distance at which they are released from a boundary.

  5. A semi-empirical model to predict the probability of capture of buoyant particles by a cylindrical collector through capillarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzo, Paolo; Pietro Viero, Daniele; Defina, Andrea

    2016-11-01

    The seeds of many aquatic plants, as well as many propagulae and larvae, are buoyant and transported at the water surface. These particles are therefore subject to surface tension, which may enhance their capture by emergent vegetation through capillary attraction. In this work, we develop a semi-empirical model that predicts the probability that a floating particle is retained by plant stems and branches piercing the water surface, due to capillarity, against the drag force exerted by the flowing water. Specific laboratory experiments are also performed to calibrate and validate the model.

  6. Magnetic Fields in Massive Stars. II. The Buoyant Rise of Magnetic Flux Tubes Through the Radiative Interior

    CERN Document Server

    MacGregor, K B

    2003-01-01

    We present results from an investigation of the dynamical behavior of buoyant magnetic flux rings in the radiative interior of a uniformly rotating early-type star. Our physical model describes a thin, axisymmetric, toroidal flux tube that is released from the outer boundary of the convective core, and is acted upon by buoyant, centrifugal, Coriolis, magnetic tension, and aerodynamic drag forces. We find that rings emitted in the equatorial plane can attain a stationary equilibrium state that is stable with respect to small displacements in radius, but is unstable when perturbed in the meridional direction. Rings emitted at other latitudes travel toward the surface along trajectories that largely parallel the rotation axis of the star. Over much of the ascent, the instantaneous rise speed is determined by the rate of heating by the absorption of radiation that diffuses into the tube from the external medium. Since the time scale for this heating varies like the square of the tube cross-sectional radius, for t...

  7. Apparatus for towing by ships for removal of oil slicks and other forms of buoyant pollutants from a water surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrick, A.P.

    1971-06-30

    This device may be towed behind crude oil tankers and other ships for the purpose of removing oil slicks, or other flotsam, from the surface of the water in which they are buoyant. The device consists of a coil of hose, a substantial part of which can float above the water surface. By operation of controls on the towing ship, a drum of drums may be rotated within the device to payout the coils of hose to such an extent that they take up an arcuate shape at the water surfaces so that by continued forward movement of the towing vessel, oil slicks and other pollutants at the water surface are swept towards the outer ends of the arcuate lengths of hose. From here they may be sucked and pumped into tanks inboard of the towing vessel through lengths of nonbuoyant hose linking the outer ends of the buoyant hose lengths to pumps near the stren of the towing vessel or ship. (1 claim)

  8. Self Induced Buoyant Blow Off in Upward Flame Spread on Thin Solid Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Michael C.; T'ien, James S.; Muff, Derek E.; Olson, Sandra L.; Ferkul, Paul V.

    2013-01-01

    ) is as follows: The observed one-sided extinction is a blow- off induced by buoyant entrainment. It is known that the flammable diffusion flame regime is bounded by quenching and blow ]off limits when varying incoming air velocity. The narrowest samples tested (between 2 and 5 cm) begin within the flammable range, but as the flame grows, the buoyancy driven air velocity increases at the neighborhood of the flame base. The initially stable flame crosses the extinguishment boundary resulting in a flame blow-off. When one-side of the flame extinguishes, the remaining side shrinks due to the reduced heat transfer to the solid. This reduces the induced velocity and the flame becomes stable. It is proposed that this may have implications to upward flame growth beyond this experiment.

  9. Liquid-liquid transition in supercooled aqueous solution involving a low-temperature phase similar to low-density amorphous water

    CERN Document Server

    Woutersen, Sander; Zhao, Zuofeng; Angell, C Austen

    2016-01-01

    The striking anomalies in physical properties of supercooled water that were discovered in the 1960-70s, remain incompletely understood and so provide both a source of controversy amongst theoreticians, and a stimulus to experimentalists and simulators to find new ways of penetrating the "crystallization curtain" that effectively shields the problem from solution. Recently a new door on the problem was opened by showing that, in ideal solutions, made using ionic liquid solutes, water anomalies are not destroyed as earlier found for common salt and most molecular solutes, but instead are enhanced to the point of precipitating an apparently first order liquid-liquid transition. The evidence was a spike in apparent heat capacity during cooling that could be fully reversed during reheating before any sign of ice crystallization appeared. Here, we use decoupled-oscillator infrared spectroscopy to define the structural character of this phenomenon using similar down and upscan rates as in the calorimetric study. Th...

  10. High-density turbidity currents: Are they sandy debris flows?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, G. [Mobil Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Conventionally, turbidity currents are considered as fluidal flows in which sediment is supported by fluid turbulence, whereas debris flows are plastic flows in which sediment is supported by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The concept of high-density turbidity current refers to high-concentration, commonly non-turbulent, flows of fluids in which sediment is supported mainly by matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. The conventional wisdom that traction carpets with entrained turbulent clouds on top represent high-density turbidity currents is a misnomer because traction carpets are neither fluidal nor turbulent. Debris flows may also have entrained turbulent clouds on top. The traction carpet/debris flow and the overriding turbulent clouds are two separate entities in terms of flow rheology and sediment-support mechanism. In experimental and theoretical studies, which has linked massive sands and floating clasts to high-density turbidity currents, the term high-density turbidity current has actually been used for laminar flows. In alleviating this conceptual problem, sandy debris flow is suggested as a substitute for high-density turbidity current. Sandy debris flows represent a continuous spectrum of processes between cohesive and cohesionless debris flows. Commonly they are rheologically plastic. They may occur with or without entrained turbulent clouds on top. Their sediment-support mechanisms include matrix strength, dispersive pressure, and buoyant lift. They are characterized by laminar flow conditions, a moderate to high grain concentration, and a low to moderate mud content. Although flows evolve and transform during the course of transport in density-stratified flows, the preserved features in a deposit are useful to decipher only the final stages of deposition. At present, there are no established criteria to decipher transport mechanism from the depositional record.

  11. Shaped Gunpowder Grain Density Detection Device and Technology Solutions%成型药柱密度检测装置及技术方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马宏亮

    2016-01-01

    针对密度瓶法、液体静力称量法和标准量筒法等方法的不足,设计一种采用气体法对成型药柱进行密度检测的装置。采用氮气或氦气等惰性气体为中介,渗入试样中极小的空隙和表面的不规则空陷,通过快速精确地测定试样块体积,来实现对成型药柱密度的精确测定。介绍气体法测密度原理,分析装置的组成和功能,给出其工艺流程和相关技术参数。结果表明:该方法灵敏度高、操作方便,可实现自动计算和校正,大大提高工作效率。%In order to overcome the three detection methods defect of density bottle density detection method, hydrostatic weighing density detection method and standard measuring density detection method, design a sealing detection device for testing the shaped gunpowder grain density. Using inert gases such as nitrogen or helium as an intermediary, permeated into the sample in the tiny voids and surface of the irregular air trapping, fast and accurate determination of test piece volume to achieve an accurate determination of explosive forming density, analyze composition and function of the device, give the technological process and technical parameters. The results show that the method has high sensitivity and convenient operation, it can realize the automatic revision of original value, improve work efficiency greatly.

  12. Holographic Magnetisation Density Waves

    CERN Document Server

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2016-01-01

    We numerically construct asymptotically $AdS$ black brane solutions of $D=4$ Einstein theory coupled to a scalar and two $U(1)$ gauge fields. The solutions are holographically dual to $d=3$ CFTs in a constant external magnetic field along one of the $U(1)$'s. Below a critical temperature the system's magnetisation density becomes inhomogeneous, leading to spontaneous formation of current density waves. We find that the transition can be of second order and that the solutions which minimise the free energy locally in the parameter space of solutions have averaged stressed tensor of a perfect fluid.

  13. Influence of oxygen pressure on critical current density and magnetic flux pinning structures in YBa2Cu3O7-x fabricated by chemical solution deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding Fa-Zhu; Gu Hong-Wei; Zhang Teng; Dai Shao-Tao; Xiao Li-Ye

    2011-01-01

    This paper studies the effect of oxygen partial pressure on the fabrication of YBa2Cu3O7-x films on (00/) LaAlO3 substrates by metalorganic deposition using trifluoroacetates (TFA-MOD). As the oxygen partial pressure increases to 1500 Pa, a great increase in the superconducting properties is observed at high magnetic fields parallel to the YBCO c axis. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscope images show that a high density of stacking faults in the size range of 10-15 nm may act as flux pinning centres to enhance the critical current density of the YBCO films

  14. Mechanistic modeling of fingering, nonmonotonicity, fragmentation, and pulsation within gravity/buoyant destabilized two-phase/unsaturated flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Robert J.; Yarrington, Lane

    2003-03-01

    Fingering, nonmonotonicity, fragmentation, and pulsation within gravity/buoyant destabilized two-phase/unsaturated flow systems has been widely observed with examples in homogeneous to heterogeneous porous media, in single fractures to fracture networks, and for both wetting and nonwetting invasion. To model this phenomena, we consider a mechanistic approach based on forms of modified invasion percolation (MIP) that include gravity, the influence of the local interfacial curvature along the phase-phase interface, and the simultaneous invasion and reinvasion of both wetting and nonwetting fluids. We present example simulations and compare them to experimental data for three very different situations: (1) downward gravity-driven fingering of water into a dry, homogeneous, water-wettable, porous medium; (2) upward buoyancy-driven migration of gas within a water saturated, heterogeneous, water-wettable, porous medium; and (3) downward gravity-driven fingering of water into a dry, water-wettable, rough-walled fracture.

  15. Behavior of near-field dilution of thermal buoyant jet discharged horizontally in compound open-channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The RNG к-ε model considering the buoyancy effect,which is solved by the hybrid finite analytic method,is used to simulate the mixture of the horizontal round thermal buoyant jet in compound open channel flow.The mixing features near the spout and flowing characteristic of the secondary currents are studied by numerical simulation.Meanwhile,(1) the distribution of the measured isovels for stream-wise velocity,(2) secondary currents,(3) the distribution of the measured isovels for temperature of typical cross-section near the spout,were obtained by the three-dimensional Micro ADV and the Temperature measuring device.Compared with experimental data,the RNG к-εmodel based on buoyancy effect can preferably simulate the jet which performs the bifurcation phenomenon,jet reattachment (Conada effect) and beach secondary currents phenomenon with the effect of ambient flow,buoyancy,and secondary currents of compound section and so on.

  16. An oscillating motion of a red blood cell and a neutrally buoyant particle in Poiseuille flow in a narrow channel

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Lingling; Pan, Tsorng-Whay; Glowinski, Roland

    2013-01-01

    Two motions of oscillation and vacillating breathing (swing) of a red blood cell have been observed in bounded Poiseuille flows (Phys. Rev. E 85, 16307 (2012)). To understand such motions, we have studied the oscillating motion of a neutrally buoyant rigid particle of the same shape in Poiseuille flow in a narrow channel and obtained that the crucial point is to have the particle interacting with Poiseuille flow with its mass center moving up and down in the channel central region. Since the mass center of the cell migrates toward the channel central region, its oscillating motion of the inclination angle is similar to the aforementioned motion as long as the cell keeps the shape of long body. But as the up-and-down oscillation of the cell mass center damps out, the oscillating motion of the inclination angle also damps out and the cell inclination angle approaches to a fixed angle.

  17. Determination of Types of Tractor Failures, Failure Density and Solutions for economic stability of Agriculture in Şanlıurfa District

    OpenAIRE

    PİŞKİN, Bülent; SAĞLAM, Ramazan; ÇOBAN, Hasan

    2017-01-01

    In this study a questionnaire form and a tractor failure service registration form used for determine the failure density. Survey is applied in the South Eastern Anatolia Project (GAP) provinces with 68 farmers, 22 service stations and 18 spare parts dealers. Target audiences within the scope o f the survey were asked 20 questions. They have chosen the failures that were occurred on their tractors. Obtained results are compared with the tractor failures registered in services. Based on the re...

  18. The Buoyant Filter Bioreactor: a high-rate anaerobic reactor for complex wastewater--process dynamics with dairy effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, Ajit; Suresh, S; Chitra, K R; Manilal, V B

    2005-03-01

    A novel high-rate anaerobic reactor, called "Buoyant Filter Bioreactor" (BFBR), has been developed for treating lipid-rich complex wastewater. The BFBR is able to decouple the biomass and insoluble COD retention time from the hydraulic retention time by means of a granular filter bed made of buoyant polystyrene beads. Filter clogging is prevented by an automatic backwash driven by biogas release, which fluidizes the granular filter bed in a downward direction. During filter backwash, the solids captured in the filter are reintroduced into the reaction zone of the reactor. The reaction zone is provided with a mixing system, which is independent of the hydraulic retention time. The performance of a laboratory-scale BFBR was studied for the treatment of dairy effluent, chosen as a model complex wastewater. The dairy effluent was not pre-treated for fat removal. The BFBR was operated over 400 d and showed greater than 85% COD removal at 10 kg COD/(m3/d). The COD conversion to methane in the BFBR was essentially complete. The BFBR performance improved with age, and with feed containing 3200 mg COD/l, the treated effluent had 120 mg COD/l and no turbidity. The hold-up of degradable biosolids, including scum, inside the BFBR was estimated using starvation tests. When load is increased, scum accumulates inside the BFBR and then decays after undergoing change from hydrophobic to hydrophilic. This is explained as the accumulation of fat solids, its conversion to insoluble long chain fatty acids and its further solubilization and degradation.

  19. 46 CFR 160.060-3a - Materials-Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Materials-Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other....060-3a Materials—Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for buoyant vests. (a) Specifications. Dee ring and snap hook assemblies and other instruments of closure for...

  20. Structures, vibrational absorption and vibrational circular dichroism spectra of L-alanine in aqueous solution: a density functional theory and RHF study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimand, Kenneth; Bohr, Henrik; Jalkanen, Karl J.;

    2000-01-01

    at the density functional theory level using the B3LYP functional with the 6-31G* basis set. The Hessians and atomic polar tensors and atomic axial tensors were all calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory. An important result is the method of treating solvent effects by both adding explicit water....... The calculated VA and VCD spectra of this conformer are in better agreement with experimentally measured VA and VCD spectra previously reported. (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  1. Measurement and modeling of density and viscosity of n-octanol-kerosene-phosphoric acid solutions in a temperature range 293.15-333.15 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Changwen; Pei, Xiangjun; Liu, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Densities and viscosities have been measured for the n-octanol + aviation kerosene (AK) + phosphoric acid (H3PO4) system with the mass fraction of H3PO4 in the range from w = 0 to 0.26 and in the temperature of 293.15-333.15 K. According to the experimental data, the measured viscosities were found well correlated with the temperature and mass fraction of H3PO4, which were fitted to regression equations. The result shows that the dilution effect of AK is obvious under the same temperature and mass fraction of H3PO4.

  2. 密度功能梯度压电悬臂梁的解析解%Analytical solutions to density functionally graded piezoelectric cantilever beams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    江爱民; 丁皓江

    2008-01-01

    得到了用三个调和位移函数表达的材料特征值互不相同情况下平面压电介质通解,同时推导出压电平面有体力问题的特别解.然后,利用试凑法和叠加法研究了一系列压电梁问题解析解,包括:压电悬臂梁体力分别随z或x呈指数函数或多项式形式变化,并通过数值计算结果分析了压电材料的不均匀性的影响.%The general solution of the two-dimensional piezoelectric media expressed with three harmonic displacement functions was first given in the case of distinct eigenvalues. Then, the expressions of specific solutions of piezoelectric plane problems with body force were derived. Finally, a series of beam problems was solved by the trial-and-error method, including cantilever beam with body forces varying exponentially only in the z direction or depending only on x coordinate and expressed by x polynomial. Numerical examples were given and discussed to show the significant influence of material inhomogeneity, and adopting certain value of in-homogeneity parameters λ, Cn can optimize the mechanical-electric responses.

  3. Lithium ion solvation by ethylene carbonates in lithium-ion battery electrolytes, revisited by density functional theory with the hybrid solvation model and free energy correction in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Wei; Lansac, Yves; Lee, Hochun; Hong, Seung-Tae; Jang, Yun Hee

    2016-09-14

    Complex formation between lithium (Li(+)) ions and electrolyte molecules would affect the ionic conductivity through the electrolyte in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). We hence revisit the solvation number of Li(+) in the most commonly used ethylene carbonate (EC) electrolyte. The solvation number n of Li(+)(EC)n in the first solvation shell of Li(+) is estimated on the basis of the free energy calculated by the density functional theory combined with a hybrid solvation model where the explicit solvation shell of Li(+) is immersed in a free volume of an implicit bulk solvent. This new hybrid solvation (implicit and explicit) model predicts the most probable solvation number (n = 4) and solvation free energy (-91.3 kcal mol(-1)) of Li(+) in a good agreement with those predicted by calculations employing simpler solvation models (either implicit or explicit). The desolvation (n = 2) of Li(0)(EC)n upon reduction near anodes is also well described with this new hybrid model.

  4. Comparison of throughfall and soil solution chemistry between a high-density Corsican pine stand and a naturally regenerated silver birch stand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schrijver, A; Nachtergale, L; Staelens, J; Luyssaert, S; De Keersmaeker, L

    2004-09-01

    In Flanders, critical loads for acidification and eutrophication are exceeded in the majority of the forest stands, and many previously nitrogen limited forest ecosystems have become nitrogen saturated. The present study investigates whether a naturally regenerated stand of silver birch (Betula pendula Roth) contributes less to the acidification and eutrophication of the forest soil than a high-density plantation of Corsican pine (Pinus nigra ssp. laricio Maire). Throughfall deposition of inorganic nitrogen was about 3.5 times higher in the Corsican pine stand than in the birch stand. Potassium throughfall deposition was significantly higher under birch due to higher canopy leaching. Magnesium throughfall deposition was significantly higher under the pine canopy due to higher dry deposition. The lower nitrogen throughfall deposition in the birch stand was reflected in a 60% lower nitrate percolation at 1m depth compared with pine. Nitrate soil percolation is linked to losses of aluminium and base cations.

  5. Measurement of the nonlinear optical response of low-density lipoprotein solutions from patients with periodontitis before and after periodontal treatment: evaluation of cardiovascular risk markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Andréa M.; Jardini, Maria A. N.; Giampaoli, Viviana; Alves, Sarah; Figueiredo Neto, Antônio M.; Gidlund, Magnus

    2012-11-01

    The Z-Scan (ZS) technique in the thermal regime has been used to measure the nonlinear optical response of low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The ZS technique is carried out in LDL from 40 patients with chronic periodontitis before and after three, six, and 12 months of periodontal treatment. Clinical parameters such as probing depths, bleeding on probing, total and differential white blood cells counts, lipid profiles, cytokine levels, and antibodies against oxidized LDL are also determined and compared over time. Before the treatment, the ZS experimental results reveal that the LDL particles of these patients are heavily modified. Only after 12 months of the periodontal treatment, the ZS results obtained reveal behavioral characteristics of healthy particles. This conclusion is also supported by complementary laboratorial analysis showing that the periodontal treatment induces systemic changes in several inflammatory markers.

  6. 异重流潜入运动的剖面二维数值模拟%2-D Vertical Numerical Solution to the Density Current Plunge Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The transient 2 D Navier stokes and energy equations have been solved numerically by means of the hybrid finite analytic method for density flow in a sudden enlargement condition below in the Boussinessq limit. The results show that the characteristics of the flow is mainly governed by an inlet densimetric Froude number Fre.%本文采用变密度流基本方程和混合有限分析法,求解了突扩边界下的异重流潜入运动。通过对数值计算结果分析,讨论了进口密度弗汝德数Fre对潜入运动的影响,加深了对异重流潜入规律的了解。

  7. Synthesis of linear low-density polyethylene-g-poly (acrylic acid)-co-starch/organo-montmorillonite hydrogel composite as an adsorbent for removal of Pb(ΙΙ) from aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irani, Maryam; Ismail, Hanafi; Ahmad, Zulkifli; Fan, Maohong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to remove Pb(II) from the aqueous solution using a type of hydrogel composite. A hydrogel composite consisting of waste linear low density polyethylene, acrylic acid, starch, and organo-montmorillonite was prepared through emulsion polymerization method. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Solid carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (CNMR)), silicon(-29) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (Si NMR)), and X-ray diffraction spectroscope ((XRD) were applied to characterize the hydrogel composite. The hydrogel composite was then employed as an adsorbent for the removal of Pb(II) from the aqueous solution. The Pb(II)-loaded hydrogel composite was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)), scanning electron microscopy (SEM)), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ((XPS)). From XPS results, it was found that the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of the hydrogel composite participated in the removal of Pb(II). Kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption of Pb(II) followed the pseudo-second-order equation. It was also found that the Langmuir model described the adsorption isotherm better than the Freundlich isotherm. The maximum removal capacity of the hydrogel composite for Pb(II) ions was 430mg/g. Thus, the waste linear low-density polyethylene-g-poly (acrylic acid)-co-starch/organo-montmorillonite hydrogel composite could be a promising Pb(II) adsorbent.

  8. Synthesis of linear low-density polyethylene-g-poly (acrylic acid)-co-starch/organo-montmorillonite hydrogel composite as an adsorbent for removal of Pb(Ⅱ) from aqueous solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Maryam Irani; Hanafi Ismail; Zulkifli Ahmad; Maohong Fan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to remove Pb(Ⅱ) from the aqueous solution using a type of hydrogel composite.A hydrogel composite consisting of waste linear low density polyethylene,acrylic acid,starch,and organo-montmorillonite was prepared through emulsion polymerization method.Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR),Solid carbon nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (CNMR)),silicon-29 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (Si NMR)),and X-ray diffraction spectroscope ((XRD) were applied to characterize the hydrogel composite.The hydrogel composite was then employed as an adsorbent for the removal of Pb(Ⅱ) from the aqueous solution.The Pb(Ⅱ)-loaded hydrogel composite was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)),scanning electron microscopy (SEM)),and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy ((XPS)).From XPS results,it was found that the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups of the hydrogel composite participated in the removal of Pb(Ⅱ).Kinetic studies indicated that the adsorption of Pb(Ⅱ)followed the pseudo-second-order equation.It was also found that the Langmuir model described the adsorption isotherm better than the Freundlich isotherm.The maximum removal capacity of the hydrogel composite for Pb(Ⅱ) ions was 430 mg/g.Thus,the waste linear low-density polyethylene-g-poly (acrylic acid)-co-starch/organo-montmorillonite hydrogel composite could be a promising Pb(Ⅱ) adsorbent.

  9. A Possible Solution for the M/L-[Fe/H] Relation of Globular Clusters in M31: A metallicity and density dependent top-heavy IMF

    CERN Document Server

    Zonoozi, Akram Hasani; Kroupa, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    The observed mass-to-light ($M/L$) ratios of a large sample of GCs in M31 show an inverse trend with metallicity compared to what is expected from Simple Stellar Population (SSP) models with an invariant canonical stellar IMF, in the sense that the observed $M/L$ ratios decrease with increasing metallicity. We show that incorporating the effect of dynamical evolution the SSP models with a canonical IMF can not explain the decreasing $M/L$ ratios with increasing metallicity for the M31 GCs. The recently derived top-heavy IMF as a function of metallicity and embedded cluster density is proposed to explain the lower than expected $M/L$ ratios of metal-rich GCs. We find that the SSP models with a top-heavy IMF, retaining a metallicity- and cluster mass- dependent fraction of the remnants within the clusters, and taking standard dynamical evolution into account can successfully explain the observed $M/L-[Fe/H]$ relation of M31 GCs. Thus we propose that the kinematical data of GCs can be used to constrain the top-h...

  10. Increased methane emissions from deep osmotic and buoyant convection beneath submarine seeps as climate warms

    CERN Document Server

    Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2016-01-01

    High speeds have been measured at seep and mud-volcano sites expelling methane-rich fluids from the seabed. Thermal or solute-driven convection alone cannot explain such high velocities in low-permeability sediments. Here, we demonstrate that in addition to buoyancy, osmotic effects generated by the adsorption of methane onto the sediments can create large overpressures, capable of recirculating seawater from the seafloor to depth in the sediment layer, then expelling it upwards at rates of up to a few hundreds of metres per year. In the presence of global warming, such deep recirculation of seawater can accelerate the melting of methane hydrates at depth from timescales of millennia to just decades, and can drastically increase the rate of release of methane into the hydrosphere and perhaps the atmosphere.

  11. A novel technique to neutralize the Yawing moment due to asymmetric thrust in a hybrid buoyant aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Anwar U.; Asrar, Waqar; Omar, Ashraf A.; Sulaeman, Erwin; J. S Ali, Mohamed

    2016-03-01

    Dorsal fin is used in swimming animals like shark for the generation of thrust as well as to meet the requirement of the lateral stability. In the case of aircraft, rudders are normally used for the said requirement. In the present work, this nature inspired idea is explored for its application to neutralize the unavoidable asymmetric thrust produced by the twin engines of a hybrid buoyant aircraft. First, the estimation of asymmetric thrust is obtained with the help of analytical techniques for maximum thrust condition at 4 degree angle of attack. The moment generated by it is utilized for the sizing of a dorsal fin which looks similar to a tapered wing and is placed aft of the center of gravity. Wind tunnel testing at subsonic speed is carried out to explore the design features of this rotatable dorsal fin. It is found that a small rotation of 5 degree can generate the required moment. However, such rotation requires a complete pneumatic/electro-mechanical system and an alternative of it is to use a cambered airfoil for the dorsal fin installed at fixed location. Such a flow controlling device can also be used as an antenna mast, which is commonly installed out the fuselage of the aircraft for communication purposes. Moreover, by incorporating this technique, a pilot doesn't have to put an extra effort to make the aircraft stable in the presence of side wind.

  12. A novel technique to neutralize the Yawing moment due to asymmetric thrust in a hybrid buoyant aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haque Anwar U

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dorsal fin is used in swimming animals like shark for the generation of thrust as well as to meet the requirement of the lateral stability. In the case of aircraft, rudders are normally used for the said requirement. In the present work, this nature inspired idea is explored for its application to neutralize the unavoidable asymmetric thrust produced by the twin engines of a hybrid buoyant aircraft. First, the estimation of asymmetric thrust is obtained with the help of analytical techniques for maximum thrust condition at 4 degree angle of attack. The moment generated by it is utilized for the sizing of a dorsal fin which looks similar to a tapered wing and is placed aft of the center of gravity. Wind tunnel testing at subsonic speed is carried out to explore the design features of this rotatable dorsal fin. It is found that a small rotation of 5 degree can generate the required moment. However, such rotation requires a complete pneumatic/electro-mechanical system and an alternative of it is to use a cambered airfoil for the dorsal fin installed at fixed location. Such a flow controlling device can also be used as an antenna mast, which is commonly installed out the fuselage of the aircraft for communication purposes. Moreover, by incorporating this technique, a pilot doesn’t have to put an extra effort to make the aircraft stable in the presence of side wind.

  13. MULTI-PARAMETRIC STUDY OF RISING 3D BUOYANT FLUX TUBES IN AN ADIABATIC STRATIFICATION USING AMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Sykora, Juan; Cheung, Mark C. M. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Moreno-Insertis, Fernando [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain)

    2015-11-20

    We study the buoyant rise of magnetic flux tubes embedded in an adiabatic stratification using two-and three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We analyze the dependence of the tube evolution on the field line twist and on the curvature of the tube axis in different diffusion regimes. To be able to achieve a comparatively high spatial resolution we use the FLASH code, which has a built-in Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) capability. Our 3D experiments reach Reynolds numbers that permit a reasonable comparison of the results with those of previous 2D simulations. When the experiments are run without AMR, hence with a comparatively large diffusivity, the amount of longitudinal magnetic flux retained inside the tube increases with the curvature of the tube axis. However, when a low-diffusion regime is reached by using the AMR algorithms, the magnetic twist is able to prevent the splitting of the magnetic loop into vortex tubes and the loop curvature does not play any significant role. We detect the generation of vorticity in the main body of the tube of opposite sign on the opposite sides of the apex. This is a consequence of the inhomogeneity of the azimuthal component of the field on the flux surfaces. The lift force associated with this global vorticity makes the flanks of the tube move away from their initial vertical plane in an antisymmetric fashion. The trajectories have an oscillatory motion superimposed, due to the shedding of vortex rolls to the wake, which creates a Von Karman street.

  14. Multi-Parametric Study of Rising 3D Buoyant Flux Tubes in an Adiabatic Stratification Using AMR

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Cheung, Mark C M

    2015-01-01

    We study the buoyant rise of magnetic flux tubes embedded in an adiabatic stratification using two-and three-dimensional, MHD simulations. We analyze the dependence of the tube evolution on the field line twist and on the curvature of the tube axis in different diffusion regimes. To be able to achieve a comparatively high spatial resolution we use the FLASH code, which has a built-in Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) capability. Our 3D experiments reach Reynolds numbers that permit a reasonable comparison of the results with those of previous 2D simulations. When the experiments are run without AMR, hence with a comparatively large diffusivity, the amount of longitudinal magnetic flux retained inside the tube increases with the curvature of the tube axis. However, when a low-diffusion regime is reached by using the AMR algorithms, the magnetic twist is able to prevent the splitting of the magnetic loop into vortex tubes and the loop curvature does not play any significant role. We detect the generation of vortic...

  15. Numerical analysis of the angular motion of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in shear flow at small Reynolds numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosén, T.; Einarsson, J.; Nordmark, A.; Aidun, C. K.; Lundell, F.; Mehlig, B.

    2015-12-01

    We numerically analyze the rotation of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in a shear flow at small shear Reynolds number. Using direct numerical stability analysis of the coupled nonlinear particle-flow problem, we compute the linear stability of the log-rolling orbit at small shear Reynolds number Rea. As Rea→0 and as the box size of the system tends to infinity, we find good agreement between the numerical results and earlier analytical predictions valid to linear order in Rea for the case of an unbounded shear. The numerical stability analysis indicates that there are substantial finite-size corrections to the analytical results obtained for the unbounded system. We also compare the analytical results to results of lattice Boltzmann simulations to analyze the stability of the tumbling orbit at shear Reynolds numbers of order unity. Theory for an unbounded system at infinitesimal shear Reynolds number predicts a bifurcation of the tumbling orbit at aspect ratio λc≈0.137 below which tumbling is stable (as well as log rolling). The simulation results show a bifurcation line in the λ -Rea plane that reaches λ ≈0.1275 at the smallest shear Reynolds number (Rea=1 ) at which we could simulate with the lattice Boltzmann code, in qualitative agreement with the analytical results.

  16. Eruption versus intrusion? Arrest of propagation of constant volume, buoyant, liquid-filled cracks in an elastic, brittle host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taisne, B.; Tait, S.

    2009-06-01

    When a volume of magma is released from a source at depth, one key question is whether or not this will culminate in an eruption or in the emplacement of a shallow intrusion. We address some of the physics behind this question by describing and interpreting laboratory experiments on the propagation of cracks filled with fixed volumes of buoyant liquid in a brittle, elastic host. Experiments were isothermal, and the liquid was incompressible. The cracks propagated vertically because of liquid buoyancy but were then found to come to a halt at a configuration of static mechanical equilibrium, a result that is inconsistent with the prediction of the theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics in two dimensions. We interpret this result as due to a three-dimensional effect. At the curved crack front, horizontal cracking is necessary in order for vertical propagation to take place. As the crack elongates and thins, the former becomes progressively harder and, in the end, impossible to fracture. We present a scaling law for the final length and breadth of cracks as a function of a governing dimensionless parameter, constructed from the liquid volume, the buoyancy, and host fracture toughness. An important implication of this result is that a minimum volume of magma is required for a volcanic eruption to occur for a given depth of magma reservoir.

  17. Axial allometry in a neutrally buoyant environment: effects of the terrestrial-aquatic transition on vertebral scaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K E; Pierce, S E

    2016-03-01

    Ecological diversification into new environments presents new mechanical challenges for locomotion. An extreme example of this is the transition from a terrestrial to an aquatic lifestyle. Here, we examine the implications of life in a neutrally buoyant environment on adaptations of the axial skeleton to evolutionary increases in body size. On land, mammals must use their thoracolumbar vertebral column for body support against gravity and thus exhibit increasing stabilization of the trunk as body size increases. Conversely, in water, the role of the axial skeleton in body support is reduced, and, in aquatic mammals, the vertebral column functions primarily in locomotion. Therefore, we hypothesize that the allometric stabilization associated with increasing body size in terrestrial mammals will be minimized in secondarily aquatic mammals. We test this by comparing the scaling exponent (slope) of vertebral measures from 57 terrestrial species (23 felids, 34 bovids) to 23 semi-aquatic species (pinnipeds), using phylogenetically corrected regressions. Terrestrial taxa meet predictions of allometric stabilization, with posterior vertebral column (lumbar region) shortening, increased vertebral height compared to width, and shorter, more disc-shaped centra. In contrast, pinniped vertebral proportions (e.g. length, width, height) scale with isometry, and in some cases, centra even become more spool-shaped with increasing size, suggesting increased flexibility. Our results demonstrate that evolution of a secondarily aquatic lifestyle has modified the mechanical constraints associated with evolutionary increases in body size, relative to terrestrial taxa.

  18. Numerical analysis of the angular motion of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in shear flow at small Reynolds numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Rosen, T; Nordmark, A; Aidun, C K; Lundell, F; Mehlig, B

    2015-01-01

    We numerically analyse the rotation of a neutrally buoyant spheroid in a shear flow at small shear Reynolds number. Using direct numerical stability analysis of the coupled nonlinear particle-flow problem we compute the linear stability of the log-rolling orbit at small shear Reynolds number, ${\\rm Re}_a$. As ${\\rm Re}_a \\to 0$ and as the box size of the system tends to infinity we find good agreement between the numerical results and earlier analytical predictions valid to linear order in ${\\rm Re}_a$ for the case of an unbounded shear. The numerical stability analysis indicates that there are corrections to the analytical result of order ${\\rm Re}_a^{3/2}$. We also compare the analytical results to results of lattice-Boltzmann simulations to analyse the stability of the tumbling orbit at shear Reynolds numbers of order unity. Theory for an unbounded system at infinitesimal shear Reynolds number predicts a bifurcation of the tumbling orbit at aspect ratio $\\lambda_{\\rm c} \\approx 0.137$ below which tumbling ...

  19. Numerical Simulation of Buoyant Pulsating Exchange Flow through Circular Opening in Horizontal Partition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gera

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An interesting transport phenomenon is observed through openings between two compartments separated by a thin, vented, horizontal partition such as those between containment internals in nuclear power systems, in industrial installations in event of fire, passive cooling of heated structures and in natural building ventilation. A heavier fluid located on the top of a lighter fluid and separated by a horizontal vent constitutes a gravitationally unstable system. Horizontal vents produce flow, which are unstable with irregular oscillatory behavior. The objective of the present work was to simulate such type of flow across a circular opening in horizontal partition in presence of buoyancy force. Unsteady, axisymmetric Navier-Stokes equations have been solved with Finite Volume Method. The equations were solved using the in-house CFD code based upon the well-established pressure-based finite volume methodology. In terms of temporal differencing second order accurate Crank-Nicolson scheme was used. Interpolation to cell faces for the convective terms was performed using a third order QUICK scheme, second order central differencing was used for the viscous terms. Pressure-velocity coupling was based on the SIMPLE procedure. The upper chamber was filled with salt water and the lower chamber with fresh water, creating a density differential between the two chambers. Opposing forces at the interface created a gravitationally unstable system, and an oscillating exchange of fluid developed. Three different cases for vent length to diameter ratio (L/D 0.008, 0.0376 and 0.106 from a reported experiment were examined. The pulsation frequencies and their decay with time have been determined. The flow coefficients were computed and compared with experimental results.

  20. Density gradient centrifugation in urografin of Moraxella and Kingella cells and appendages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frøholm, L O; Bøvre, K

    1978-04-01

    Purification of fimbriae (pili) by density gradient banding in Urografin medium was attempted. Moraxella nonliquefaciens and Kingella kingae fimbriae were of higher density than their cells of origin, but fimbrial fractions obtained by homogenization and differential centrifugation still banded together with presumed outer membrane fragments and some whole cells in Urografin gradients. The cellular density of genetic variants with different fimbriation/competence levels was also studied. For one strain of M. nonliquefaciens and two strains of K. kingae, cells harvested from agar plates tended to show several bands on isopycnic density gradient centrifugation, with slightly higher general density of fimbriated variants than non-fimbriated. A single density band could be observed with cells from log phase broth cultures of selected strains which showed no distinct difference between fimbriation or competence variants of each strain. Cells of M. nonliquefaciens and M. bovis showed comparable buoyant densities, whereas those of K. kingae had a higher density.

  1. Road density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  2. Electronic structure and optical properties of CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures from X-ray absorption near edge structure, X-ray excited optical luminescence, and density functional theory investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, M. W. [DESY (Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron), FS-PEX, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Yiu, Y. M., E-mail: yyiu@uwo.ca; Sham, T. K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A5B7 (Canada); Ward, M. J. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Liu, L. [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM) and Soochow University-Western University Center for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu, 215123 (China); Hu, Y. [Canadian Light Source, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N2V3 (Canada); Zapien, J. A. [Center Of Super-Diamond and Advanced Films (COSDAF) and Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR (China); Liu, Yingkai [Institute of Physics and Electronic Information, Yunnan Normal University, Kunming, Yunnan, 650500 (China)

    2014-11-21

    The electronic structure and optical properties of a series of iso-electronic and iso-structural CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures have been investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray excited optical luminescence at various absorption edges of Cd, S, and Se. It is found that the system exhibits compositions, with variable local structure in-between that of CdS and CdSe accompanied by tunable optical band gap between that of CdS and CdSe. Theoretical calculation using density functional theory has been carried out to elucidate the observations. It is also found that luminescence induced by X-ray excitation shows new optical channels not observed previously with laser excitation. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of Thymus vulgaris plant extract as an eco-friendly corrosion inhibitor for stainless steel 304 in acidic solution by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, electrochemical noise analysis and density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, A; Mahjani, M G; Hosseini, M; Safari, R; Moshrefi, R; Mohammad Shiri, H

    2017-03-15

    Inhibition performance of Thymus vulgaris plant leaves extract (thyme) as environmentally friendly (green) inhibitor for the corrosion protection of stainless steel (SS) type 304 in 1.0molL(-1) HCl solution was studied by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance (EIS) and electrochemical noise measurements (EN) techniques. The EN data were analyzed with FFT technique to make the spectral power density plots. The calculations were performed by MATLAB 2014a software. Geometry optimization and calculation of the structural and electronic properties of the molecular system of inhibitor have been carried out using UB3LYP/6-311++G(∗∗) level. Moreover, the results obtained from electrochemical noise analysis were compared with potentiodynamic polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. All of the used techniques showed positive effect of green inhibitor with increasing inhibitor concentration.

  4. Apparent and partial molar volumes of long-chain alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides and bromides in aqueous solutions at T=15 deg. C and T=25 deg. C[Alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chlorides; Alkyldimethylbenzylammonium bromides; Micellization; Density; Apparent molar volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Perez, A.; Ruso, J.M.; Nimo, J.; Rodriguez, J.R. E-mail: fmjulio@usc.es

    2003-12-01

    Density measurements of dodecyl- (C{sub 12}DBACl), tetradecyl- (C{sub 14}DBACl), hexadecyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (C{sub 16}DBACl) and of decyl- (C{sub 10}DBABr) and dodecyldimethylbenzylammonium bromide (C{sub 12}DBABr) in aqueous solutions at T=15 deg. C and T=25 deg. C have been carried out. From these results, apparent and partial molar volumes were calculated. Positive deviations from the Debye-Hueckel limiting law provide evidence for limited association at concentrations below the critical micelle concentration. The change of the apparent molar volume upon micellization was calculated. The relevant parameters have been presented in function of the alkyl chain length. Apparent molar volumes of the present compounds in the micellar phase, V{sub phi}{sup m}, and the change upon micellization, {delta}V{sub phi}{sup m}, have been discussed in terms of temperature and type of counterion.

  5. Experimental characterization of the spreading and break-up of liquid flat-fan sheets discharging in a low-density atmosphere and application to BrLi solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacios, E. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (Spain). Departamento de Mecanica Industrial; Nogueira, J.; Rodriguez, P.A.; Lecuona, A. [Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (Spain). Departamento de Ingenieria Termica y de Fluidos

    2009-02-15

    This work presents and characterizes the existence of two different regimes in the spreading and break-up of liquid flat-fan sheets when discharging in low-density atmospheres. The motivation of the study is the improvement on the absorption phenomena of lithium bromide aqueous solution when discharging in a 600-1,500 Pa water vapor environment. This corresponds to the absorber conditions in current absorption closed-cycle cooling machines. Despite this, the dimensionless characterization obtained has universal validity. The conditions that define the change in the break-up regime, the dimensionless sheet break-up length and the break-up time are given as a function of the parameters involved. Digital particle tracking velocimetry (PTV) has been applied to measure the velocity field and additional visualization techniques have been used to further characterize the break-up process. The experiments verify the existence of critical gas-to-liquid density and viscosity ratios below which gas to liquid interaction becomes negligible. The article also offers expressions that define their values as a function of the other dimensionless parameters. (orig.)

  6. Stability and instability of the isoelectronic UO2(2+) and PaO2+ actinyl oxo-cations in aqueous solution from density functional theory based molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezia, Riccardo; Siboulet, Bertrand; Abadie, Sacha; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Vitorge, Pierre

    2011-04-07

    In this work, Pa(V) monocations have been studied in liquid water by means of density functional theory (DFT) based molecular dynamic simulations (CPMD) and compared with their U(VI) isoelectronic counterparts to understand the peculiar chemical behavior of Pa(V) in aqueous solution. Four different Pa(V) monocationic isomers appear to be stable in liquid water from our simulations: [PaO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](+)(aq), [Pa(OH)(4)(H(2)O)(2)](+)(aq), [PaO(OH)(2)(H(2)O)(4)](+)(aq), and [Pa(OH)(4)(H(2)O)(3)](+)(aq). On the other hand, in the case of U(VI) only the uranyl, [UO(2)(H(2)O)(5)](2)(+)(aq), is stable. The other species containing hydroxyl groups replacing one or two oxo bonds are readily converted to uranyl. The Pa-OH bond is stable, while it is suddenly broken in U-OH. This makes possible the formation of a broad variety of Pa(V) species in water and participates to its unique chemical behavior in aqueous solution. Further, the two actinyl oxocations in water are different in the ability of the oxygen atoms to form stable and extended H-bond networks for Pa(V) contrary to U(VI). In particular, protactinyl is found to have between 2 and 3 hydrogen bonds per oxygen atom while uranyl has between zero and one.

  7. ac impedance, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory studies of 3,5-bis(n-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazoles as efficient corrosion inhibitors for carbon steel surface in hydrochloric acid solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Outirite, Moha; Lagrenee, Michel; Lebrini, Mounim [Unite de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UMR-CNRS 8181, ENSCL, B.P. 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Traisnel, Michel; Jama, Charafeddine [Laboratoire des Procedes d' Elaboration des Revetements Fonctionnels, PERF UMR-CNRS 8008, ENSCL, B.P. 90108, F-59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Vezin, Herve [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique et Macromoleculaire, UMR-CNRS 8009, USTL Bat C4, F-59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Bentiss, Fouad, E-mail: fbentiss@enscl.f [Laboratoire de Chimie de Coordination et d' Analytique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Chouaib Doukkali, B.P. 20, M-24000 El Jadida (Morocco)

    2010-02-01

    The corrosion inhibition properties of a new class of oxadiazole derivatives, namely 3,5-bis(n-pyridyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazoles (n-DPOX) for C38 carbon steel corrosion in 1 M HCl medium were analysed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). An adequate structural model of the interface was used and the values of the corresponding parameters were calculated and discussed. The experimental results showed that these compounds are excellent inhibitors for the C38 steel corrosion in acid solution and that the protection efficiency increased with increasing the inhibitors concentration. Electrochemical impedance data demonstrate that the addition of the n-DPOX derivatives in the corrosive solution decreases the charge capacitance and simultaneously increases the function of the charge/discharge of the interface, facilitating the formation of an adsorbed layer over the steel surface. Adsorption of these inhibitors on the steel surface obeys to the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the thermodynamic data of adsorption showed that inhibition of steel corrosion in normal hydrochloric solution by n-DPOX is due to the formation of a chemisorbed film on the steel surface. Quantum chemical calculations using the Density Functional Theory (DFT) and the Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) approach were performed on n-DPOX derivatives to determine the relationship between molecular structure and their inhibition efficiencies. The results of the quantum chemical calculations and experimental inhibition efficiency were subjected to correlation analysis and indicate that their inhibition effect is closely related to E{sub HOMO}, E{sub LUMO}, and dipole moment (mu).

  8. Hazardous or not - Are adult and juvenile individuals of Potamopyrgus antipodarum affected by non-buoyant microplastic particles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Hannes K; Laforsch, Christian

    2016-11-01

    Microplastic has been ubiquitously detected in freshwater ecosystems. A variety of freshwater organisms were shown to ingest microplastic particles, while a high potential for adverse effects are expected. However, studies addressing the effect of microplastic in freshwater species are still scarce compared to studies on marine organisms. In order to gain further insights into possible adverse effects of microplastic particles on freshwater invertebrates and to set the base for further experiments we exposed the mud snail (Potampoyrgus antipodarum) to a large range of common and environmentally relevant non-buoyant polymers (polyamide, polyethylene terephthalate, polycarbonate, polystyrene, polyvinylchloride). The impact of these polymers was tested by performing two exposure experiments with irregular shaped microplastic particles with a broad size distribution in a low (30%) and a high microplastic dose (70%) in the food. First, possible effects on adult P. antipodarum were assessed by morphological and life-history parameters. Second, the effect of the same mixture on the development of juvenile P. antipodarum until maturity was analyzed. Adult P. antipodarum showed no morphological changes after the exposure to the microplastic particles, even if supplied in a high dose. Moreover, although P. antipodarum is an established model organism and reacts especially sensitive to endocrine active substances no effects on embryogenesis were detected. Similarly, the juvenile development until maturity was not affected. Considering, that most studies showing effects on marine and freshwater invertebrates mostly exposed their experimental organisms to very small (≤20 μm) polystyrene microbeads, we anticipate that these effects may be highly dependent on the chemical composition of the polymer itself and the size and shape of the particles. Therefore, more studies are necessary to enable the identification of harmful synthetic polymers as some of them may be

  9. Polarizable Density Embedding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Steinmann, Casper; Ruud, Kenneth;

    2015-01-01

    We present a new QM/QM/MM-based model for calculating molecular properties and excited states of solute-solvent systems. We denote this new approach the polarizable density embedding (PDE) model and it represents an extension of our previously developed polarizable embedding (PE) strategy. The PD...

  10. Multi-angle inversion of formation densities based on the accurate solutions of Zoeppritz's partial derivative equations%基于Zoeppritz偏导方程精确解的地层密度多角度反演

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘福平; 孟宪军; 王玉梅; 慎国强; 肖加奇

    2012-01-01

    基于Zoeppritz方程对介质密度偏导数所建立的偏导方程的精确解,构造了多角度反演地层介质密度的反演方程,在偏导数求解过程中考虑了介质密度对波速度的影响因素,并由此实现了利用反射系数梯度精确解计算地层密度的多角度联合反演.通过数值算例考察了计算方法,结果显示:反演方法对层状地层模型不论反射波是否存在相干现象均获得了较好的反演结果,反演迭代10次后计算结果的最大相对误差能够收敛到1%之内;随着反演角度的增加地层介质密度反演的精度逐步提高,反演具有自动校正能力,有快的计算速度.本方法克服了传统AVO(Amplitude Versus Offset)基于Zoeppritz方程近似所遇到的困难,不受反演角度大小及反射界面对波反射强弱的限制,为地层介质密度的多角度包括大角度反演提供了一种新的快速有效的计算方法.%Based on the accurate solutions of Zoeppritz's partial derivative equations, which is the derivative equations of Zoeppritz equations with respect to densities of formation, we have constructed the multi-angle inverse equations for inversion of formation densities, and realized the multi-angle inversion of formation densities with the accurate solution of reflected coefficient's grads of seismic wave. We have also given numerical examples for different stratum models. The results show that whether there is interference between two reflected waves from different reflection interfaces or not, the precisions of inverse results are very good, if only the iterative times of inversion are over 10, the largest relative error of inverse results is less than 1%; with the increasing of inverse angles the precision of multi-angle inverse results is gradually improved; the inversion has emending function itself, and has high running speeds. This method has overcome the difficulty that conventional AVO( Amplitude Versus Offset) approximate methods are

  11. Lung density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garnett, E S; Webber, C E; Coates, G

    1977-01-01

    breathing in the sitting position ranged from 0.25 to 0.37 g.cm-3. Subnormal values were found in patients with emphsema. In patients with pulmonary congestion and edema, lung density values ranged from 0.33 to 0.93 g.cm-3. The lung density measurement correlated well with the findings in chest radiographs...

  12. Buoyant Cable Antenna System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-02

    comprise a mechanical jacket surrounding a hollow core enclosing the seismic sensor and signal transfer means. Elongated axial stress elements for...to S. H. Bittleston, discloses a semi-dry marine seismic streamer cable that consists of a number of connected streamer cable sections which each...transmitting axial loads and a radial reinforcement member for relieving radial loads are provided in the jacket . The core is filled with a fluid or fluid

  13. Ontogeny of body density and the swimbladder in yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, L D; Qin, J G

    2013-02-01

    The ontogeny of larval body density and the morphological and histological events during swimbladder development were investigated in two cohorts of yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi larvae to understand the relationship between larval morphology and body density. Larvae inflation occurred on 3 dph, and the inflation window was 3-5 dph when the pneumatic duct was still connected to the gut. The swimbladder volume increased with larval age and the epithelial lining on the swimbladder became flattened squamous cells after initial inflation. Seriola lalandi developed into a physoclist with the formation of the rete mirabile and the gas-secreting gland comprised low-columnar epithelial cells. Larvae with successfully inflated swimbladders remained positively buoyant, whereas larvae without SB inflation became negatively buoyant and their body density gradually reached 1.030 ± 0.001 g cm(-3) by 10 dph. Diel density changes were observed after 5 dph, owing to day time deflation and night-time inflation of the swimbladder. These results show that SB inflation has a direct effect on body density in larval S. lalandi and environmental factors should be further investigated to enhance the rate of SB inflation to prevent the sinking death syndrome in the early life stage of the fish larvae.

  14. Simulation of 3D mesoscale structure formation in concentrated aqueous solution of the triblock polymer surfactants (ethylene oxide)(13)(propylene oxide)(30)(ethylene oxide)(13) and (propylene oxide)(19)(ethylene oxide)(33)(propylene oxide)(19). Application of dynamic mean-field density functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vlimmeren, BAC; Maurits, NM; Zvelindovsky, AV; Sevink, GJA; Fraaije, JGEM

    1999-01-01

    We simulate the microphase separation dynamics of aqueous solutions of the triblock polymer surfactants (ethylene oxide)(13)(propylene oxide)(30)(ethylene oxide)(13) and (propylene oxide)(19)(ethylene oxide)(33)(propylene oxide)(19) by a dynamic variant of mean-field density functional theory for Ga

  15. Determination of the semi-empiric relationship among the physical density, the concentration and rate between hydrogen and manganese atoms, and a manganese sulfate solution; Determinacao da relacao semi-empirica entre a densidade fisica, concentracao e razao entre atomos de hidrogenio e manganes em uma solucao de sulfato de manganes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bittencourt, Guilherme Rodrigues [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). PIBIC; Castro, Leonardo Curvello de; Pereira, Walsan W.; Patrao, Karla C. de Souza; Fonseca, Evaldo S. da; Dantas, Maria Leticia [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI). Lab. de Neutrons

    2009-07-01

    The bath of a manganese sulfate (BMS) is a system for absolute standardization of the neutron sources. This work establishes a functional relationship based on semi-empirical methods for the theoretical prediction of physical density values, concentration and rate between the hydrogen and manganese atoms presents in the solution of the BMS

  16. Time-dependent density functional theory/discrete reaction field spectra of open shell systems : The visual spectrum of [Fe-III(PyPepS)(2)](-) in aqueous solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duijnen, Piet Th.; Greene, Shannon N.; Richards, Nigel G. J.

    2007-01-01

    We report the calculated visible spectrum of [Fe-III(PyPepS)(2)](-) in aqueous solution. From all-classical molecular dynamics simulations on the solute and 200 water molecules with a polarizable force field, 25 solute/solvent configurations were chosen at random from a 50 ps production run and subj

  17. Reproducible isolation of type II pneumocytes from fetal and adult rat lung using nycodenz density gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viscardi, R M; Ullsperger, S; Resau, J H

    1992-01-01

    Isolating fresh, relatively pure type II pneumocytes from the lung, particularly of fetal origin, is a difficult process. Separation by buoyant density gradient centrifugation has been used successfully to isolate adult type II cells. There is concern, however, that Percoll, a gradient medium that is commonly used for type II cell isolation, may be toxic to cells. We evaluated a new gradient medium, Nycodenz, that is (1) a true solution, (2) transparent, (3) not metabolized by cells, and (4) nontoxic to cells. Type II pneumocytes were isolated from 19- and 21-day gestation fetal and adult rat lung by elastase digestion and separated on preformed isotonic Nycodenz gradients (2 mL each of 27.6, 20.7, 13.8, and 4.6 (w/v) solutions). Type II pneumocytes were recovered from the density range 1.057-1.061 and identified by binding of FITC-conjugated and gold-complexed Maclura pomifera lectin. Cells derived from 19-day fetal lung contained abundant glycogen and reacted with a monoclonal antibody to the cytokeratins 8 and 18, which are markers of the fetal type II cell. Adult type II cells reacted with antibodies to cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19. Type II cell purity was 79.7 +/- 2.4%, 83.8 +/- 2.8%, and 82.6 +/- 1.8% (means +/- SEM) for 19- and 21-day gestation fetal and adult lung preparations, respectively. Cell viability was greater than 95%. The final cell yield for adult preparations was 17.8 +/- 2.7 x 10(6)/rat (means +/- SEM). To determine if the freshly isolated type II pneumocytes were functionally active, the incorporation of [3H]choline into phosphatidylcholine was measured. The percent saturation of phosphatidylcholine was high for both populations of freshly isolated cells. However, adult type II pneumocytes incorporated [3H]choline into phosphatidylcholine more rapidly than 21-day gestation fetal cells (5.97 x 10(-3) dpm/10(6) cells/h vs. 0.32 x 10(-3) dpm/10(6) cells/h, P less than .005). We have demonstrated that, using the Nycodenz isolation method, it is

  18. Fermion N-representability for prescribed density and paramagnetic current density

    OpenAIRE

    Tellgren, Erik I; Kvaal, Simen; Helgaker, Trygve

    2014-01-01

    The $N$-representability problem is the problem of determining whether or not there exists $N$-particle states with some prescribed property. Here we report an affirmative solution to the fermion $N$-representability problem when both the density and paramagnetic current density are prescribed. This problem arises in current-density functional theory and is a generalization of the well-studied corresponding problem (only the density prescribed) in density functional theory. Given any density ...

  19. Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Caliò

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the state of the art in piezoelectric energy harvesting. It presents the basics of piezoelectricity and discusses materials choice. The work places emphasis on material operating modes and device configurations, from resonant to non-resonant devices and also to rotational solutions. The reviewed literature is compared based on power density and bandwidth. Lastly, the question of power conversion is addressed by reviewing various circuit solutions.

  20. Degenerate density perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2016-09-01

    Fractional occupation numbers can be used in density functional theory to create a symmetric Kohn-Sham potential, resulting in orbitals with degenerate eigenvalues. We develop the corresponding perturbation theory and apply it to a system of Nd degenerate electrons in a harmonic oscillator potential. The order-by-order expansions of both the fractional occupation numbers and unitary transformations within the degenerate subspace are determined by the requirement that a differentiable map exists connecting the initial and perturbed states. Using the X α exchange-correlation (XC) functional, we find an analytic solution for the first-order density and first- through third-order energies as a function of α , with and without a self-interaction correction. The fact that the XC Hessian is not positive definite plays an important role in the behavior of the occupation numbers.

  1. Degenerate Density Perturbation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Palenik, Mark C

    2016-01-01

    Fractional occupation numbers can be used in density functional theory to create a symmetric Kohn-Sham potential, resulting in orbitals with degenerate eigenvalues. We develop the corresponding perturbation theory and apply it to a system of $N_d$ degenerate electrons in a harmonic oscillator potential. The order-by-order expansions of both the fractional occupation numbers and unitary transformations within the degenerate subspace are determined by the requirement that a differentiable map exists connecting the initial and perturbed states. Using the X$\\alpha$ exchange-correlation (XC) functional, we find an analytic solution for the first-order density and first through third-order energies as a function of $\\alpha$, with and without a self-interaction correction. The fact that the XC Hessian is not positive definite plays an important role in the behavior of the occupation numbers.

  2. Calculation of Vertical Mixing in Plane TUrbulent Buoyant Jets on the Basis of the Algebraic Model of Turbulence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    O.G.Martynenko; V.N.Korovkin

    1992-01-01

    An algebraic model of turbulence,involving buyancy forces,is used for calculating velocity and temperature fields in plane turbulent vertical jets in a non-homogeneous stagnant medium,A new approach to the solution of the governing system of partial differential differental equations (Continuity ,Conservation of momentum,heat (buoyancy),turbulent kinetic energy,dissipation rate and mean quadratic temperature fluctuation)is suggested which is based on the intrduction of mathematical variables.Comparison is made between the results of the present calculations with experimental and numerical data of ther authors.

  3. Steady thermal——solutal capillary convection in a shallow annular pool with the radial temperature and concentration gradients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YouRong; GONG ZhenXing; WU ChunMei; WU ShuangYing

    2012-01-01

    Using asymptotical analysis,we investigate the characteristics of the coupled thermal and solutal capillary convection with the radial temperature and solute concentration gradients in a shallow annular pool with the free surface.The pool is heated from the outer cylinder with high solutal concentration and cooled at the inner cylinder with low solutal concentration.The asymptotic solution is obtained in the core region in the limit as the aspect ratio,which is defined as the ratio of the depth to the width of the pool,goes to zero.The comparison with the previous work certifies that the asymptotic solution is right and believable.The influences of the solutal capillary force,the buoyant force,the Soret effect and the geometric parameters on the fluid flow are analyzed.

  4. Low Bone Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information › Bone Density Exam/Testing › Low Bone Density Low Bone Density Low bone density is when your ... compared to people with normal bone density. Detecting Low Bone Density A bone density test will determine ...

  5. Structure and Charge Density Properties of (1 - x)(Na1-y K y NbO3)-xBaTiO3 Lead-Free Ceramic Solid Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasikumar, S.; Saravanan, R.

    2017-02-01

    (1 - x)(Na1-y K y )NbO3-xBaTiO3 (abbreviated as NKN-BT, x = 0.1, 0.2; y = 0.01, 0.05) ceramics were synthesized by the solid-state reaction method. Powder x-ray diffraction analysis in combination with the profile refinement method was employed for quantitative phase analysis and structural refinement. The x-ray diffraction study shows that phase transition occurs from tetragonal to distorted cubic with the compositions between x = 0.1 and x = 0.2. The spatial arrangements of the electron distribution and bonding nature of the samples have been analyzed through the maximum entropy method. The optical band gap energy of the prepared solid solutions has been determined using UV-visible spectrophotometry. The optical band gap energy of the solid solutions decreases with the increase in BaTiO3 content. The elemental composition of these ceramics has been studied using energy dispersive x-ray analysis and the microstructure has been examined by scanning electron microscopy. The piezoelectric coefficient (d 33 ) measurement of the ceramics shows the enhancement of piezoelectric properties in the tetragonal phase. The maximum value of the piezoelectric coefficient (d 33 ) obtained for the solid solution is 120 pC/N. With increasing BaTiO3 content in the solid solutions, the ferroelectric behavior weakens.

  6. Alginate gel-coated oil-entrapped alginate-tamarind gum-magnesium stearate buoyant beads of risperidone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Hriday; Boddupalli, Shashank; Nandikonda, Sridhar; Kumar, Sanoj; Nayak, Amit Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A novel alginate gel-coated oil-entrapped calcium-alginate-tamarind gum (TG)-magnesium stearate (MS) composite floating beads was developed for intragastric risperidone delivery with a view to improving its oral bioavailability. The TG-blended alginate core beads containing olive oil and MS as low-density materials were accomplished by ionotropic gelation technique. Effects of polymer-blend ratio (sodium alginate:TG) and crosslinker (CaCl2) concentration on drug entrapment efficiency (DEE, %) and cumulative drug release after 8 h (Q8h, %) were studied to optimize the core beads by a 3(2) factorial design. The optimized beads (F-O) exhibited DEE of 75.19±0.75% and Q8h of 78.04±0.38% with minimum errors in prediction. The alginate gel-coated optimized beads displayed superior buoyancy and sustained drug release property. The drug release profiles of the drug-loaded uncoated and coated beads were best fitted in Higuchi kinetic model with Fickian and anomalous diffusion driven mechanisms, respectively. The optimized beads yielded a notable sustained drug release profile as compared to marketed immediate release preparation. The uncoated and coated Ca-alginate-TG-MS beads were also characterized by SEM, FTIR and P-XRD analyses. Thus, the newly developed alginate-gel coated oil-entrapped alginate-TG-MS composite beads are suitable for intragastric delivery of risperidone over a prolonged period of time.

  7. Solute transport in a well under slow-purge and no-purge conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, M. A.; Britt, S. L.; Martin-Hayden, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Non-purge sampling techniques, such as diffusion bags and in-situ sealed samplers, offer reliable and cost-effective groundwater monitoring methods that are a step closer to the goal of real-time monitoring without pumping or sample collection. Non-purge methods are, however, not yet completely accepted because questions remain about how solute concentrations in an unpurged well relate to concentrations in the adjacent formation. To answer questions about how undisturbed well water samples compare to formation concentrations, and to provide the information necessary to interpret results from non-purge monitoring systems, we have conducted a variety of physical experiments and numerical simulations of flow and transport in and through monitoring wells under low-flow and ambient flow conditions. Previous studies of flow and transport in wells used a Darcy’s law - based continuity equation for flow, which is often justified under the strong, forced-convection flow caused by pumping or large vertical hydraulic potential gradients. In our study, we focus on systems with weakly forced convection, where density-driven free convection may be of similar strength. We therefore solved Darcy’s law for porous media domains and the Navier Stokes equations for flow in the well, and coupled solution of the flow equations to that of solute transport. To illustrate expected in-well transport behavior under low-flow conditions, we present results of three particular studies: (1) time-dependent effluent concentrations from a well purged at low-flow pumping rates, (2) solute-driven density effects in a well under ambient horizontal flow and (3) temperature-driven mixing in a shallow well subject to seasonal temperature variations. Results of the first study illustrate that assumptions about the nature of in-well flow have a significant impact on effluent concentration curves even during pumping, with Poiseuille-type flow producing more rapid removal of concentration differences

  8. 干斜压大气拉格朗日原始方程组的半解析解法和非线性密度流数值试验∗%Semi-analytical solution of the dry baro clinic Lagrange primitive equation and numerical exp eriment of a non-linear density current

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郝世峰; 楼茂园; 杨诗芳; 李超; 孔照林; 裘薇

    2015-01-01

    To solve atmospheric primitive equations, the finite difference approach would result in numerous problems, com-pared to the differential equations. Taking the semi-Lagrange model as an example, there exist two difficult prob-lems——the particle trajectory computation and the solutions of the Helmholtz equations. In this study, based on the substitution of atmosphere pressure, the atmospheric primitive equations are linearized within an integral time step, which are broadly seen as ordinary differential equations and can be derived as semi-analytical solutions (SASs). The variables of SASs are continuous functions of time and discretized in a special direction, so the gradient and divergence terms are solved by the difference method. Since the numerical solution of the SASs can be calculated via a highly pre-cise numerical computational method of exponential matrix——the precise integration method, the numerical solution of SASs at any time in the future can be obtained via step-by-step integration procedure. For the SAS methodology, the pressure, as well as the wind vector and displacement, can be obtained without solving the Helmholtz formulations. Compared to the extrapolated method, the SAS is more reasonable as the displacements of the particle are solved via time integration. In order to test the validity of the algorithms, the SAS model is constructed and the same experi-ment of a non-linear density current as reported by Straka in 1993 is implemented, which contains non-linear dynamics, transient features and fine-scale structures of the fluid flow. The results of the experiment with 50 m spatial resolution show that the SAS model can capture the characters of generation and development process of the Kelvin-Helmholtz shear instability vortex; the structures of the perturbation potential temperature field are very close to the benchmark solutions given by Straka, as well as the structures of the simulated atmosphere pressure and wind field. To further

  9. Affinity-mediated sorting order reversal of single-walled carbon nanotubes in density gradient ultracentrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Myungsu; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Haneul; Ju, Sang-Yong

    2016-10-01

    Sorted single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are of paramount importance for their utilization in high-end optoelectronic applications. Sodium cholate (SC)-based density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU) has been instrumental in isolating small diameter (d t) SWNTs. Here, we show that SWNTs wrapped by flavin mononucleotide (FMN) as a dispersing agent are sorted in DGU, and show sorting order reversal behavior, departing from prototypical SC-SWNT trends. Larger d t SWNTs are sorted in lower density (ρ), and buoyant ρ distribution of FMN-SWNT ranges from 1.15-1.25 g cm-3. Such a nanotube layering pattern originates from both the binding affinity between FMN and SWNT and the less-susceptible hydrated volume of remote phosphate sidechains of FMN according to nanotube d t change.

  10. Conditional Density Models for Asset Pricing

    OpenAIRE

    Filipovic, Damir; Hughston, Lane P.; Macrina, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We model the dynamics of asset prices and associated derivatives by consideration of the dynamics of the conditional probability density process for the value of an asset at some specified time in the future. In the case where the asset is driven by Brownian motion, an associated "master equation" for the dynamics of the conditional probability density is derived and expressed in integral form. By a "model" for the conditional density process we mean a solution to the master equation along wi...

  11. Molecular Density Functional Theory of Water

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Vuilleumier, Rodolphe; Borgis, Daniel; 10.1021/jz301956b

    2013-01-01

    Three dimensional implementations of liquid state theories offer an efficient alternative to computer simulations for the atomic-level description of aqueous solutions in complex environments. In this context, we present a (classical) molecular density functional theory (MDFT) of water that is derived from first principles and is based on two classical density fields, a scalar one, the particle density, and a vectorial one, the multipolar polarization density. Its implementation requires as input the partial charge distribution of a water molecule and three measurable bulk properties, namely the structure factor and the k-dependent longitudinal and transverse dielectric constants. It has to be complemented by a solute-solvent three-body term that reinforces tetrahedral order at short range. The approach is shown to provide the correct three-dimensional microscopic solvation profile around various molecular solutes, possibly possessing H-bonding sites, at a computer cost two-three orders of magnitude lower tha...

  12. The Hatteras Front: August 2004 velocity and density structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savidge, Dana K.; Austin, Jay A.

    2007-07-01

    The Hatteras Front is a persistent mesoscale cross-shelf oriented front off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. It is the boundary between relatively cool, fresh Mid-Atlantic Bight shelf waters and warmer, saltier shelf waters of the South Atlantic Bight, which both converge along-shelf upon Cape Hatteras year round. The Frontal Interaction Near Cape Hatteras (FINCH) project was conducted in 2004-2005 to intensively sample the Hatteras Front with shipboard ADCP and undulating towed CTD. This paper documents velocity and density structures associated with the cross-shelf oriented zone of Hatteras Front during the August 2004 field season. Property gradients across the Hatteras Front are large, with temperature (T) and salinity (S) differences of ˜4-6°C, 2-5 psu, respectively over distances of 1-2 km. The T and S are not completely compensating, and a strong density (ρ) gradient also exists, with Δρ of ˜2 kg/m3 across a gentler 10 km wide front. The density gradient results in a steric sea-level height gradient of ˜1-2 cm across the Front, which is in approximate geostrophic balance with a surface intensified jet, directed shoreward along the cross-shelf oriented Front. The velocity is sheared with depth at 3.0 × 10-2 to 5.0 × 10-2 s-1 in the upper 5 m of the jet; a rate consistent with the density gradient according to the thermal wind relationship. Shoreward transport of ˜4.8 × 104 m3/s results from the surface intensified jet. The structure of the velocity field associated with the Hatteras Front resembles that of a slope-controlled buoyant plume, as described by Lentz and Helfrich (2002). Velocity and density structures are similar during both advancing (southwestward) and retreating (northeastward) motion of the Front.

  13. Structure of Hydrated Zn2+ at the Rutile TiO2 (110)-Aqueous Solution Interface: Comparison of X-ray Standing Wave, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and Density Functional Theory Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Fenter, Paul [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kelly, Shelly D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Catalano, Jeffery G. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Bandura, Andrei V. [St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia; Kubicki, James D. [Pennsylvania State University; Sofo, Jorge O. [Pennsylvania State University; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Machesky, Michael L. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL; Sturchio, N. C. [University of Illinois, Chicago; Bedzyk, Michael J. [Northwestern University, Evanston

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption of Zn{sup 2+} at the rutile TiO{sub 2} (110)-aqueous interface was studied with Bragg-reflection X-ray standing waves (XSW), polarization-dependent surface extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to understand the interrelated issues of adsorption site, its occupancy, ion-oxygen coordination and hydrolysis. At pH 8, Zn{sup 2+} was found to adsorb as an inner-sphere complex at two different sites, i.e., monodentate above the bridging O site and bidentate between two neighboring terminal O sites. EXAFS results directly revealed a four or fivefold first shell coordination environment for adsorbed Zn{sup 2+} instead of the sixfold coordination found for aqueous species at this pH. DFT calculations confirmed the energetic stability of a lower coordination environment for the adsorbed species and revealed that the change to this coordination environment is correlated with the hydrolysis of adsorbed Zn{sup 2+}. In addition, the derived adsorption locations and the occupancy factors of both sites from three methods agree well, with some quantitative discrepancies in the minor site location among the XSW, EXAFS, and DFT methods. Additional XSW measurements showed that the adsorption sites of Zn{sup 2+} were unchanged at pH 6. However, the Zn{sup 2+} partitioning between the two sites changed substantially, with an almost equal distribution between the two types of sites at pH 6 compared to predominantly monodentate occupation at pH 8.

  14. Structure of Hydrated Zn2+ at the Rutile TiO2 (110)-Aqueous Solution Interface: Comparsion of X-ray Standing Wave, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and Density Functional Theory Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang,Z.; Fenter, P.; Kelly, S.; Catalano, J.; Bandura, A.; Kubicki, J.; Sofo, J.; Wesolowski, D.; Machesky, M.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption of Zn{sup 2+} at the rutile TiO2 (110)-aqueous interface was studied with Bragg-reflection X-ray standing waves (XSW), polarization-dependent surface extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to understand the interrelated issues of adsorption site, its occupancy, ion-oxygen coordination and hydrolysis. At pH 8, Zn{sup 2+} was found to adsorb as an inner-sphere complex at two different sites, i.e., monodentate above the bridging O site and bidentate between two neighboring terminal O sites. EXAFS results directly revealed a four or fivefold first shell coordination environment for adsorbed Zn{sup 2+} instead of the sixfold coordination found for aqueous species at this pH. DFT calculations confirmed the energetic stability of a lower coordination environment for the adsorbed species and revealed that the change to this coordination environment is correlated with the hydrolysis of adsorbed Zn{sup 2+}. In addition, the derived adsorption locations and the occupancy factors of both sites from three methods agree well, with some quantitative discrepancies in the minor site location among the XSW, EXAFS, and DFT methods. Additional XSW measurements showed that the adsorption sites of Zn{sup 2+} were unchanged at pH 6. However, the Zn{sup 2+} partitioning between the two sites changed substantially, with an almost equal distribution between the two types of sites at pH 6 compared to predominantly monodentate occupation at pH 8.

  15. A downward buoyant force experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, F. M. S.; Venceslau,G.M.; Brasil,G.T.

    2014-01-01

    In hydrostatics, the Archimedes principle predicts an upward force whenever a body is submerged in a liquid. In contrast to common sense, this physical law is not free of exceptions, as for example when the body touches the container. This is more evident when a rectangular block less dense than the liquid rests on the bottom, with no liquid underneath it, a case in which a downward force is expected, according to a recent work by the first author. In the present work, we describe a simple, l...

  16. Solution on Deformation of High Density Polyethylene Kayak/Canoe Prepared by Rotational Molding%高密度聚乙烯滚塑皮划艇变形的解决方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温原; 陈郭伟; 杜章外; 陆国峰; 邓正勇; 陈海垠

    2016-01-01

    According to the deformation problems of high density polyethylene kayak/canoe product prepared by rotational molding,the rotational molding process of the product was studied,it is found that the bad evenness of the product wall thickness, a large number of pores in the product wall and the nonuniform temperature in mould are the key factors which cause the product de-formation. Firstly,the evenness of the wall thickness is improved through adding the preheating procedure and extending the swing residence time. Then,the temperature in mould is adjusted by preheating and improving the heating chamber temperature for achiev-ing the purpose of eliminating the pores in wall. Lastly,the temperature in mould is balanced further with using natural cooling and heating once more in the cooling stage etc.. Through the adjustment and improvement of the rotational molding process mentioned above,the deformation problems of kayak/canoe were solvedfinally and the qualified kayak/canoe products were gained.%针对高密度聚乙烯滚塑皮划艇的变形问题,对皮划艇的滚塑工艺进行了研究,发现壁厚均匀度差、壁内存在大量气孔和模内温度不均匀是造成皮划艇变形的重要因素。首先通过增加预热程序以及延长摇摆停留时间来提高壁厚的均匀度;然后通过预热及提高加热室温度来调节模内温度,达到消除壁内气孔的目的;最后,通过采用自然冷却并在冷却阶段再次加热等手段,进一步平衡模内温度。经过上述工艺的调整和改进,最终解决了皮划艇的变形问题,获得了合格的皮划艇产品。

  17. Wave Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Christov, Ivan C

    2012-01-01

    In classical continuum physics, a wave is a mechanical disturbance. Whether the disturbance is stationary or traveling and whether it is caused by the motion of atoms and molecules or the vibration of a lattice structure, a wave can be understood as a specific type of solution of an appropriate mathematical equation modeling the underlying physics. Typical models consist of partial differential equations that exhibit certain general properties, e.g., hyperbolicity. This, in turn, leads to the possibility of wave solutions. Various analytical techniques (integral transforms, complex variables, reduction to ordinary differential equations, etc.) are available to find wave solutions of linear partial differential equations. Furthermore, linear hyperbolic equations with higher-order derivatives provide the mathematical underpinning of the phenomenon of dispersion, i.e., the dependence of a wave's phase speed on its wavenumber. For systems of nonlinear first-order hyperbolic equations, there also exists a general ...

  18. Laboratory Density Functionals

    OpenAIRE

    Giraud, B G

    2007-01-01

    We compare several definitions of the density of a self-bound system, such as a nucleus, in relation with its center-of-mass zero-point motion. A trivial deconvolution relates the internal density to the density defined in the laboratory frame. This result is useful for the practical definition of density functionals.

  19. Soil Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    The characteristics of the soil solution in the root environment in the greenhouse industry differ much from those for field grown crops. This is caused firstly by the growing conditions in the greenhouse, which strongly differ from those in the field and secondly the function attributed to the soil

  20. Plugging solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomashevskiy, L.P.; Boldin, V.M.; Borovikov, P.A.; Fedorova, G.G.; Koshelova, I.F.; Krivoshchekova, N.P.; Prokhorevich, L.D.; Prudnikova, N.N.; Vin, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    This solution is designed to quickly harden in a cool environment. Phenoformaldyhyde tar is used as a hardening agent along with a modified diethyleneglycol in the amounts of (part by weight): phenoformaldyhyde tar and diethyleneglycol=1oo; acidic hardener=8-16; water=2-4.

  1. Podcast solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Geoghegan, Michael W

    2005-01-01

    Podcasting is the art of recording radio show style audio tracks, then distributing them to listeners on the Web via podcasting software such as iPodder. From downloading podcasts to producing a track for fun or profit, ""Podcast Solutions"" covers the entire world of podcasting with insight, humor, and the unmatched wisdom of experience.

  2. PACSPLUS Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza A Zoroofi

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Medal Electronic (ME Engineering Company provides high quality systems, software and services in medical image management, processing and visualization. We assist health care professionals to improve and extend the efficiency of their practices with cost effective solutions. ME is the developer of several medical software including MEDAL-PACS, 3D-Sonosoft, Analytical-Electrophoresis, CBONE and Rhino-Plus. ME is also the exclusive distributor of PACSPLUS in Iran. PACSPLUS is an international, standard, scalable and enterprise PACS solution. PACSPLUS is of ISO, CE and FDA-510 approvals. It is now operational in more than 1000 clinical environment throughout the globe. We discuss about the key features of PACSPLUS system for dealing with real world challenge in PACS as well as the PACS solu-tions needed to fulfill the demands of the clinicians in Iran. Our experience in developing high-end medical software confirms our capability in providing the PACSPLUS as an ultimate PACS solution in Iran.

  3. Green Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU LING

    2010-01-01

    @@ World Expo's China Pavilion is a large crimson building,but it's green at heart.The pavilion,a magnificent symbol of Chinese culture,is also a "green landmark" on the world stage,thanks to German company Siemens' energy-saving solutions.

  4. Truncation scheme of time-dependent density-matrix approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tohyama, Mitsuru [Kyorin University School of Medicine, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan); Schuck, Peter [Universite Paris-Sud, Institut de Physique Nucleaire, IN2P3-CNRS, Orsay Cedex (France); Laboratoire de Physique et de Modelisation des Milieux Condenses et Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-04-15

    A truncation scheme of the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy for reduced density matrices, where a three-body density matrix is approximated by the antisymmetrized products of two-body density matrices, is proposed. This truncation scheme is tested for three model Hamiltonians. It is shown that the obtained results are in good agreement with the exact solutions. (orig.)

  5. Calculation of electromagnetic fields in electric machines by means of the finite element. Algorithms for the solution of problems with known total densities. Pt. 2; Calculo de campos electromagneticos en maquinas electricas mediante elemento finito. Algoritmos para la solucion de problemas con densidades totales conocidas. Pt. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosales, Mauricio F. [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1987-12-31

    This article is based in the electromagnetic modeling presented in the first part. Here are only considered the magnetic systems or electric systems in closed regions with moving or axial symmetry, whose total current density or total electric load density is known. The algorithms that have been implanted in the software CLIIE-2D of the Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) are developed in order to obtain numerical solutions for these problems. The basic systems of algebraic equations are obtained by means of the application of the Galerkin method in the discreteness of the finite element with first order triangular elements. [Espanol] Este articulo se basa en la modelacion electromagnetica presentada en la primera parte. Aqui solo se consideran sistemas magneticos o sistemas electricos en regiones cerradas con simetria translacional o axial, cuya densidad de corriente total o densidad de carga electrica total es conocida. Se desarrollan los algoritmos que se han implantado en el programa de computo CLIIE-2D, del Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) con el fin de obtener soluciones numericas para estos problemas. Los sistemas basicos de ecuaciones algebraicas se obtienen mediante la aplicacion del metodo de Galerkin en la discretizacion de elemento finito con elementos triangulares de primer orden.

  6. Future Road Density

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Road density is generally highly correlated with amount of developed land cover. High road densities usually indicate high levels of ecological disturbance. More...

  7. Probability densities and Lévy densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barndorff-Nielsen, Ole Eiler

    For positive Lévy processes (i.e. subordinators) formulae are derived that express the probability density or the distribution function in terms of power series in time t. The applicability of the results to finance and to turbulence is briefly indicated.......For positive Lévy processes (i.e. subordinators) formulae are derived that express the probability density or the distribution function in terms of power series in time t. The applicability of the results to finance and to turbulence is briefly indicated....

  8. Incompressible flows with piecewise constant density

    CERN Document Server

    Danchin, Raphaël

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with variable density. The aim is to prove existence and uniqueness results in the case of discontinuous ini- tial density. In dimension n = 2, 3, assuming only that the initial density is bounded and bounded away from zero, and that the initial velocity is smooth enough, we get the local-in-time existence of unique solutions. Uniqueness holds in any dimension and for a wider class of velocity fields. Let us emphasize that all those results are true for piecewise constant densities with arbitrarily large jumps. Global results are established in dimension two if the density is close enough to a positive constant, and in n-dimension if, in addition, the initial velocity is small. The Lagrangian formula- tion for describing the flow plays a key role in the analysis that is proposed in the present paper.

  9. Solution Prototype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efeoglu, Arkin; Møller, Charles; Serie, Michel

    2013-01-01

    environment. The solution prototype that is composed from blending product and service prototype has particular impacts on the dualism of DSR’s “Build” and “Evaluate”. Since the mix between product and service prototyping can be varied, there is a demand for a more agile and iterative framework. Van de Ven’s...... research framework seems to fit this purpose. Van de Ven allows for an iterative research approach to problem solving with flexible starting point. The research activity is the result between the iteration of two dimensions. This framework focuses on the natural evaluation, particularly on ex......-ante validation. A correlation between Hevner’s and Van de Vens framework is analyzed, and finally the proposal is presented....

  10. Lithium-Based High Energy Density Flow Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement a lithium-based high energy density flow battery. In one embodiment, a lithium-based high energy density flow battery includes a first anodic conductive solution that includes a lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex dissolved in a solvent, a second cathodic conductive solution that includes a cathodic complex dissolved in a solvent, a solid lithium ion conductor disposed so as to separate the first solution from the second solution, such that the first conductive solution, the second conductive solution, and the solid lithium ionic conductor define a circuit, where when the circuit is closed, lithium from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex in the first conductive solution dissociates from the lithium polyaromatic hydrocarbon complex, migrates through the solid lithium ionic conductor, and associates with the cathodic complex of the second conductive solution, and a current is generated.

  11. The role of adequate reference materials in density measurements in hemodialysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, A.; Moutinho, J.; Moura, S.; Oliveira, F.; Filipe, E.

    2015-02-01

    In hemodialysis, oscillation-type density meters are used to measure the density of the acid component of the dialysate solutions used in the treatment of kidney patients. An incorrect density determination of this solution used in hemodialysis treatments can cause several and adverse events to patients. Therefore, despite the Fresenius Medical Care (FME) tight control of the density meters calibration results, this study shows the benefits of mimic the matrix usually measured to produce suitable reference materials for the density meter calibrations.

  12. Population Density Modeling Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-05

    194 POPULATION DENSITY MODELING TOOL by Davy Andrew Michael Knott David Burke 26 June 2012 Distribution...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2012/194 26 June 2012 POPULATION DENSITY MODELING TOOL by Davy Andrew Michael Knott David Burke...Density Modeling Tool 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Davy Andrew Michael Knott David Burke 5d. PROJECT NUMBER

  13. Anisotropic dynamic mass density for fluidsolid composites

    KAUST Repository

    Wu, Ying

    2012-10-01

    By taking the low frequency limit of multiple-scattering theory, we obtain the dynamic effective mass density of fluidsolid composites with a two-dimensional rectangular lattice structure. The anisotropic mass density can be described by an angle-dependent dipole solution, to the leading-order of solid concentration. The angular dependence vanishes for the square lattice, but at high solid concentrations there is a structure-dependent factor that contributes to the leading-order solution. In all cases, Woods formula is found to be accurately valid for the effective bulk modulus, independent of the structures. Numerical evaluations from the solutions are shown to be in excellent agreement with finite-element simulations. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  14. Density dependent neurodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halnes, Geir; Liljenström, Hans; Arhem, Peter

    2007-01-01

    The dynamics of a neural network depends on density parameters at (at least) two different levels: the subcellular density of ion channels in single neurons, and the density of cells and synapses at a network level. For the Frankenhaeuser-Huxley (FH) neural model, the density of sodium (Na) and potassium (K) channels determines the behaviour of a single neuron when exposed to an external stimulus. The features of the onset of single neuron oscillations vary qualitatively among different regions in the channel density plane. At a network level, the density of neurons is reflected in the global connectivity. We study the relation between the two density levels in a network of oscillatory FH neurons, by qualitatively distinguishing between three regions, where the mean network activity is (1) spiking, (2) oscillating with enveloped frequencies, and (3) bursting, respectively. We demonstrate that the global activity can be shifted between regions by changing either the density of ion channels at the subcellular level, or the connectivity at the network level, suggesting that different underlying mechanisms can explain similar global phenomena. Finally, we model a possible effect of anaesthesia by blocking specific inhibitory ion channels.

  15. MEASUREMENT OF WHEAT DENSITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯跟胜; 党金春; 等

    1995-01-01

    A method used for on line determining the change of wheat density with a automatic watering machine in a lqarge flour mill has been studied.The results show that the higher distinguishing ability is obtained when using 241Am as a γ-ray source for measuring the wheat density than using 137Cs.

  16. Symmetry energy and density

    CERN Document Server

    Trautmann, Wolfgang; Russotto, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The nuclear equation-of-state is a topic of highest current interest in nuclear structure and reactions as well as in astrophysics. In particular, the equation-of-state of asymmetric matter and the symmetry energy representing the difference between the energy densities of neutron matter and of symmetric nuclear matter are not sufficiently well constrained at present. The density dependence of the symmetry energy is conventionally expressed in the form of the slope parameter L describing the derivative with respect to density of the symmetry energy at saturation. Results deduced from nuclear structure and heavy-ion reaction data are distributed around a mean value L=60 MeV. Recent studies have more thoroughly investigated the density range that a particular observable is predominantly sensitive to. Two thirds of the saturation density is a value typical for the information contained in nuclear-structure data. Higher values exceeding saturation have been shown to be probed with meson production and collective ...

  17. Learning Grasp Affordance Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Detry, Renaud; Kraft, Dirk; Kroemer, Oliver;

    2011-01-01

    We address the issue of learning and representing object grasp affordance models. We model grasp affordances with continuous probability density functions (grasp densities) which link object-relative grasp poses to their success probability. The underlying function representation is nonparametric...... these and records their outcomes. When a satisfactory number of grasp data is available, an importance-sampling algorithm turns these into a grasp density. We evaluate our method in a largely autonomous learning experiment run on three objects of distinct shapes. The experiment shows how learning increases success...... and relies on kernel density estimation to provide a continuous model. Grasp densities are learned and refined from exploration, by letting a robot “play” with an object in a sequence of graspand-drop actions: The robot uses visual cues to generate a set of grasp hypotheses; it then executes...

  18. Magnetic Half-Monopole Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Rosy; Lim, Kok-Geng; Koh, Pin-Wai

    2009-07-01

    We present exact SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs monopole solutions of one half topological charge. These non-Abelian solutions possess gauge potentials which are singular along either the positive or the negative z-axis and common magnetic fields that are singular only at the origin where the half-monopole is located. These half-monopoles are actually a half Wu-Yang monopole and they can possess a finite point electric charge and become half-dyons. They do not necessarily satisfy the first order Bogomol'nyi equations and they possess infinite energy density at r = 0.

  19. Singular solutions in Casoratian form for two differential-difference equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Dajun [Department of Mathematics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200436 (China)]. E-mail: djzhang@mail.shu.edu.cn

    2005-02-01

    Negatons, positons, rational solutions and mixed solutions in Casoratian form for the Toda lattice and the differential-difference KdV equation are obtained. Some characteristics of the obtained singular solutions are investigated through density graphics.

  20. Purification of white spot syndrome virus by iodixanol density gradient centrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas-Lima, J J; Corteel, M; Cornelissen, M; Bossier, P; Sorgeloos, P; Nauwynck, H J

    2013-10-01

    Up to now, only a few brief procedures for purifying white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) have been described. They were mainly based on sucrose, NaBr and CsCl density gradient centrifugation. This work describes for the first time the purification of WSSV through iodixanol density gradients, using virus isolated from infected tissues and haemolymph of Penaeus vannamei (Boone). The purification from tissues included a concentration step by centrifugation (2.5 h at 60,000 g) onto a 50% iodixanol cushion and a purification step by centrifugation (3 h at 80,000 g) through a discontinuous iodixanol gradient (phosphate-buffered saline, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20%). The purification from infected haemolymph enclosed a dialysis step with a membrane of 1,000 kDa (18 h) and a purification step through the earlier iodixanol gradient. The gradients were collected in fractions and analysed. The number of particles, infectivity titre (in vivo), total protein and viral protein content were evaluated. The purification from infected tissues gave WSSV suspensions with a very high infectivity and an acceptable purity, while virus purified from haemolymph had a high infectivity and a very high purity. Additionally, it was observed that WSSV has an unusually low buoyant density and that it is very sensitive to high external pressures.

  1. Isolation of bacterial plasmids by density gradient centrifugation in cesium trifluoroacetate (CsTFA) without the use of ethidium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, K; Hjorth, R

    1985-01-01

    Plasmids extracted from bacterial cells by alkaline extraction can easily be isolated from linear DNA by isopycnic centrifugation in CsTFA. This is a fast and simple method which circumvents the use of the intercalating dye, ethidium bromide, and consequently the problems associated with its removal. The buoyant densities for covalently closed circular DNA and linear DNA in CsTFA are 1.60 g/ml and 1.65 g/ml, respectively. The isolation is achieved regardless of plasmid size and can be accomplished at temperatures of between 4 and 30 degrees C. Plasmid DNA isolated in gradients of CsTFA are of a high purity and have been found to be intact when cleaved with restriction enzymes and ligated with T4 DNA ligase.

  2. A cloudy Vlasov solution

    CERN Document Server

    Alard, C

    2004-01-01

    We propose to integrate the Vlasov-Poisson equations giving the evolution of a dynamical system in phase-space using a continuous set of local basis functions. In practice, the method decomposes the density in phase-space into small smooth units having compact support. We call these small units ``clouds'' and choose them to be Gaussians of elliptical support. Fortunately, the evolution of these clouds in the local potential has an analytical solution, that can be used to evolve the whole system during a significant fraction of dynamical time. In the process, the clouds, initially round, change shape and get elongated. At some point, the system needs to be remapped on round clouds once again. This remapping can be performed optimally using a small number of Lucy iterations. The remapped solution can be evolved again with the cloud method, and the process can be iterated a large number of times without showing significant diffusion. Our numerical experiments show that it is possible to follow the 2 dimensional ...

  3. Intrinsic-Density Functionals

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, J

    2006-01-01

    The Hohenberg-Kohn theorem and Kohn-Sham procedure are extended to functionals of the localized intrinsic density of a self-bound system such as a nucleus. After defining the intrinsic-density functional, we modify the usual Kohn-Sham procedure slightly to evaluate the mean-field approximation to the functional, and carefully describe the construction of the leading corrections for a system of fermions in one dimension with a spin-degeneracy equal to the number of particles N. Despite the fact that the corrections are complicated and nonlocal, we are able to construct a local Skyrme-like intrinsic-density functional that, while different from the exact functional, shares with it a minimum value equal to the exact ground-state energy at the exact ground-state intrinsic density, to next-to-leading order in 1/N. We briefly discuss implications for real Skyrme functionals.

  4. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMD test; Bone density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis-BMD ... need to undress. This scan is the best test to predict your risk of fractures. Peripheral DEXA ( ...

  5. The local mass density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeder, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    An improved mass-luminosity relation for faint main-sequence stars derived from recently revised masses for some faint double stars is presented. The total local mass density is increased to nearly 0.2 solar masses per cu pc. This estimate is as large as the mass density required by Oort's (1965) dynamical analysis of stellar motions perpendicular to the galactic plane if the mass is concentrated in a narrow layer.

  6. Anisotropic static solutions in modelling highly compact bodies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Chaisi; S D Maharaj

    2006-03-01

    Einstein field equations for static anisotropic spheres are solved and exact interior solutions obtained. This paper extends earlier treatments to include anisotropic models which accommodate a wider variety of physically viable energy densities. Two classes of solutions are possible. The first class contains the limiting case ∝ -2 for the energy density which arises in many astrophysical applications. In the second class the singularity at the centre of the star is not present in the energy density

  7. Density Waves in the Flows of Granular Media

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    We study density waves in the flows of granular particles through vertical tubes and hoppers using both analytic methods and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We construct equations of motion for quasi one-dimensional systems. The equations, combined with the Bagnold's law for friction, are used to describe the time evolutions of the density and the velocity fields for narrow tubes and hoppers. The solutions of the equations can have two types of density waves, kinetic and dynamic. For tub...

  8. High Density Matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stone J.R.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The microscopic composition and properties of matter at super-saturation densities have been the subject of intense investigation for decades. The scarcity of experimental and observational data has led to the necessary reliance on theoretical models. There remains great uncertainty in these models which, of necessity, have to go beyond the over-simple assumption that high density matter consists only of nucleons and leptons. Heavy strange baryons, mesons and quark matter in different forms and phases have to be included to fulfil basic requirements of fundamental laws of physics. In this contribution latest developments in construction of the Equation of State (EoS of high-density matter at zero and finite temperature assuming different composition of matter will be discussed. Critical comparison of model EoS with available experimental data from heavy ion collisions and observations on neutron stars, including gravitational mass, radii and cooling patterns and data on X-ray burst sources and low mass X-ray binaries are made. Fundamental differences between the EoS of low-density, high temperature matter, such as is created in heavy ion collisions and of high-density, low temperature compact objects is discussed.

  9. Solution behavior of metoclopramide in aqueous-alcoholic solutions at 30°C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deosarkar, S. D.; Sawale, R. T.; Tawde, P. D.; Kalyankar, T. M.

    2016-07-01

    Densities (ρ) and refractive indices ( n D) of solutions of antiemetic drug metoclopramide (4-amino-5-chloro- N-(2-(diethylamino)ethyl)-2-methoxybenzamide hydrochloride hydrate) in methanolwater and ethanol-water mixtures of different compositions were measured at 30°C. Apparent molar volume (φv) of the drug was calculated from density data and partial molar volumes (φ v 0 ) were determined from Massons relation. Concentration dependence of nD has been studied to determine refractive indices of solution at infinite dilution ( n D 0 ). Results have been interpreted in terms of solute-solvent interactions.

  10. Holographic charge density waves

    CERN Document Server

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2013-01-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with non-zero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  11. Holographic charge density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2013-06-01

    We show that strongly coupled holographic matter at finite charge density can exhibit charge density wave phases which spontaneously break translation invariance while preserving time-reversal and parity invariance. We show that such phases are possible within Einstein-Maxwell-dilaton theory in general spacetime dimensions. We also discuss related spatially modulated phases when there is an additional coupling to a second vector field, possibly with nonzero mass. We discuss how these constructions, and others, should be associated with novel spatially modulated ground states.

  12. Density matrix perturbation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Challacombe, Matt

    2004-05-14

    An orbital-free quantum perturbation theory is proposed. It gives the response of the density matrix upon variation of the Hamiltonian by quadratically convergent recursions based on perturbed projections. The technique allows treatment of embedded quantum subsystems with a computational cost scaling linearly with the size of the perturbed region, O(N(pert.)), and as O(1) with the total system size. The method allows efficient high order perturbation expansions, as demonstrated with an example involving a 10th order expansion. Density matrix analogs of Wigner's 2n+1 rule are also presented.

  13. Density Distribution Sunflower Plots

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, William D; W. Dale Plummer Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Density distribution sunflower plots are used to display high-density bivariate data. They are useful for data where a conventional scatter plot is difficult to read due to overstriking of the plot symbol. The x-y plane is subdivided into a lattice of regular hexagonal bins of width w specified by the user. The user also specifies the values of l, d, and k that affect the plot as follows. Individual observations are plotted when there are less than l observations per bin as in a conventio...

  14. Nuclear level density predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bucurescu Dorel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple formulas depending only on nuclear masses were previously proposed for the parameters of the Back-Shifted Fermi Gas (BSFG model and of the Constant Temperature (CT model of the nuclear level density, respectively. They are now applied for the prediction of the level density parameters of all nuclei with available masses. Both masses from the new 2012 mass table and from different models are considered and the predictions are discussed in connection with nuclear regions most affected by shell corrections and nuclear structure effects and relevant for the nucleosynthesis.

  15. Force Density Balance inside the Hydrogen Atom

    CERN Document Server

    Himpsel, F J

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the long-debated question about the internal stability of the electron, the force densities acting on the charge density of the 1s electron in the H atom are investigated. The problem is mapped onto the canonical formalism for a classical Dirac field coupled to the electric field of an external point charge. An explicit calculation shows that the attractive Coulomb force density is balanced exactly at every point in space by the repulsive confinement force density. The latter requires evaluating the divergence of the stress tensor for the 1s solution of the Dirac equation. Such a local force balance goes beyond the global stability criteria that are usually given for the H atom. This concept is extended to the internal stability of any charged particle by investigating the force densities acting on its surrounding vacuum polarization. At large distances one has to consider only the charge density of virtual electrons and positrons, induced by a point charge in the vacuum of quantum electrodynamic...

  16. Energy in density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vranjes, J., E-mail: jvranjes@yahoo.com [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Departamento de Astrofísica, Universidad de La Laguna, 38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Kono, M., E-mail: kono@fps.chuo-u.ac.jp [Faculty of Policy Studies, Chuo University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    Inhomogeneous plasmas and fluids contain energy stored in inhomogeneity and they naturally tend to relax into lower energy states by developing instabilities or by diffusion. But the actual amount of energy in such inhomogeneities has remained unknown. In the present work, the amount of energy stored in a density gradient is calculated for several specific density profiles in a cylindrical configuration. This is of practical importance for drift wave instability in various plasmas, and, in particular, in its application in models dealing with the heating of solar corona because the instability is accompanied with stochastic heating, so the energy contained in inhomogeneity is effectively transformed into heat. It is shown that even for a rather moderate increase of the density at the axis in magnetic structures in the corona by a factor 1.5 or 3, the amount of excess energy per unit volume stored in such a density gradient becomes several orders of magnitude greater than the amount of total energy losses per unit volume (per second) in quiet regions in the corona. Consequently, within the life-time of a magnetic structure such energy losses can easily be compensated by the stochastic drift wave heating.

  17. Density of Gabor Frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ole; Heil, Christopher; Deng, Baiqiao

    1999-01-01

    Beurling densities of Lambda = boolean ORk=1r Lambda(k) satisfy D- (Lambda) greater than or equal to 1 and D+(Lambda) Ramanathan and Steger. Additionally, we prove the conjecture that no collection boolean ORk=1r {g(k)(x - a)}(a is an element of Gamma k) of pure...

  18. Friedmann cosmology with decaying vacuum density

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, H A

    2005-01-01

    Among the several proposals to solve the incompatibility between the observed small value of the cosmological constant and the huge value obtained by quantum field theories, we can find the idea of a decaying vacuum energy density, leading from high values at early times of universe evolution to the small value observed nowadays. In this paper we consider a variation law for the vacuum density recently proposed by Schutzhold on the basis of quantum field estimations in the curved, expanding background, characterized by a vacuum density proportional to the Hubble parameter. We show that, in the context of an isotropic and homogeneous, spatially flat model, the corresponding solutions retain the well established features of the standard cosmology, and, in addition, are in accordance with the observed cosmological parameters. Our scenario presents an initial phase dominated by radiation, followed by a dust era long enough to permit structure formation, and by an epoch dominated by the cosmological term, which te...

  19. Partition density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafziger, Jonathan

    Partition density functional theory (PDFT) is a method for dividing a molecular electronic structure calculation into fragment calculations. The molecular density and energy corresponding to Kohn Sham density-functional theory (KS-DFT) may be exactly recovered from these fragments. Each fragment acts as an isolated system except for the influence of a global one-body 'partition' potential which deforms the fragment densities. In this work, the developments of PDFT are put into the context of other fragment-based density functional methods. We developed three numerical implementations of PDFT: One within the NWChem computational chemistry package using basis sets, and the other two developed from scratch using real-space grids. It is shown that all three of these programs can exactly reproduce a KS-DFT calculation via fragment calculations. The first of our in-house codes handles non-interacting electrons in arbitrary one-dimensional potentials with any number of fragments. This code is used to explore how the exact partition potential changes for different partitionings of the same system and also to study features which determine which systems yield non-integer PDFT occupations and which systems are locked into integer PDFT occupations. The second in-house code, CADMium, performs real-space calculations of diatomic molecules. Features of the exact partition potential are studied for a variety of cases and an analytical formula determining singularities in the partition potential is derived. We introduce an approximation for the non-additive kinetic energy and show how this quantity can be computed exactly. Finally a PDFT functional is developed to address the issues of static correlation and delocalization errors in approximations within DFT. The functional is applied to the dissociation of H2 + and H2.

  20. Nonuniform Braneworld Stars: AN Exact Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, J.

    In this paper the first exact interior solution to Einstein's field equations for a static and nonuniform braneworld star with local and nonlocal bulk terms is presented. It is shown that the bulk Weyl scalar U(r) is always negative inside the stellar distribution, and in consequence it reduces both the effective density and the effective pressure. It is found that the anisotropy generated by bulk gravity effect has an acceptable physical behavior inside the distribution. Using a Reissner-Nördstrom-like exterior solution, the effects of bulk gravity on pressure and density are found through matching conditions.

  1. Spatial Density Maps from a Debris Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, L.; Kindl, S.; Binz, C.

    2016-09-01

    A debris cloud from a fragmentation on orbit may be modeled by transformation of variables from the instantaneous velocity distribution at the fragmentation time to the spatial distribution at some elapsed time later. There are no Gaussian distributions assumed and the evolution map is quite nonlinear, being derived from the solution of the Lambert, two-point boundary value, problem and the state transition matrix for unperturbed propagation, so the traditional tools of analysis that assume these qualities fail dramatically. The transformation of variables technique does not suffer from any such assumptions, and unlike the Monte Carlo method, is not subject to sampling errors or approximations. Structures and features are evident in the density maps, and these structures show promise for simplified approximation of the density map. Most prominent of the structures is the well-known pinch point at the fragmentation location in inertial space. The anti-pinch line, or wedge, is also observed. Bands on the opposite side of the fragmentation are very noticeable, and their existence may be motivated from simple orbit dynamics. These bands make the anti-pinch line actually more of a set of anti-pinch line segments. By computing these density maps over time, the evolution may be studied. There is a density generator, a density band at roughly the same altitude as the pinch point, that cycles around the earth and appears a source of the bands, with newly created bands moving radially outward and diminishing in density. Although the initial velocity distribution affects the final spatial distribution, the Lambert solutions, which are the most time consuming to compute, need only be computed once. Therefore, different initial distributions may be changed and the results recomputed with relative speed. A comparison of the effects of initial distributions is shown in this paper.

  2. Potential migration of buoyant LNAPL from Intermediate Level Waste (ILW) emplaced in a geological disposal facility (GDF) for UK radioactive waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbow, Steven J.; Rivett, Michael O.; Chittenden, Neil; Herbert, Alan W.; Watson, Sarah; Williams, Steve J.; Norris, Simon

    2014-10-01

    A safety case for the disposal of Intermediate Level (radioactive) Waste (ILW) in a deep geological disposal facility (GDF) requires consideration of the potential for waste-derived light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) to migrate under positive buoyancy from disposed waste packages. Were entrainment of waste-derived radionuclides in LNAPL to occur, such migration could result in a shorter overall travel time to environmental or human receptors than radionuclide migration solely associated with the movement of groundwater. This paper provides a contribution to the assessment of this issue through multiphase-flow numerical modelling underpinned by a review of the UK's ILW inventory and literature to define the nature of the associated ILW LNAPL source term. Examination has been at the waste package-local GDF environment scale to determine whether proposed disposal of ILW would lead to significant likelihood of LNAPL migration, both from waste packages and from a GDF vault into the local host rock. Our review and numerical modelling support the proposition that the release of a discrete free phase LNAPL from ILW would not present a significant challenge to the safety case even with conservative approximations. 'As-disposed' LNAPL emplaced with the waste is not expected to pose a significant issue. 'Secondary LNAPL' generated in situ within the disposed ILW, arising from the decomposition of plastics, in particular PVC (polyvinyl chloride), could form the predominant LNAPL source term. Released high molecular weight phthalate plasticizers are judged to be the primary LNAPL potentially generated. These are expected to have low buoyancy-based mobility due to their very low density contrast with water and high viscosity. Due to the inherent uncertainties, significant conservatisms were adopted within the numerical modelling approach, including: the simulation of a deliberately high organic material - PVC content wastestream (2D03) within an annular grouted waste package

  3. Spherically-symmetric, cold collapse: the exact solutions and a comparison with self-similar solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Coughlin, Eric R

    2016-01-01

    We present the exact solutions for the collapse of a spherically-symmetric, cold (i.e., pressureless) cloud under its own self-gravity, valid for arbitrary initial density profiles and not restricted to the realm of self-similarity. These solutions exhibit a number of remarkable features, including the self-consistent formation of and subsequent accretion onto a central point mass. A number of specific examples are provided, and we show that Penston's solution of pressureless, self-similar collapse is recovered for polytropic density profiles; importantly, however, we demonstrate that the time over which this solution holds is fleetingly narrow, implying that much of the collapse proceeds non-self-similarly. We show that our solutions can naturally incorporate turbulent pressure support, and we investigate the evolution of overdensities -- potentially generated by such turbulence -- as the collapse proceeds. Finally, we analyze the evolution of the angular velocity and magnetic fields in the limit that their ...

  4. On Gauge Equivalence of Tachyon Solutions in Cubic Neveu-Schwarz String Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aref'eva, I Ya

    2010-01-01

    Simple analytic solution to cubic Neveu-Schwarz String Field Theory including the $GSO(-)$ sector is presented. This solution is an analog of the Erler-Schnabl solution for bosonic case and one of the authors solution for the pure $GSO(+)$ case. Gauge transformations of the new solution to others known solutions for the $NS$ string tachyon condensation are constructed explicitly. This gauge equivalence manifestly supports the early observed fact that these solutions have the same value of the action density.

  5. Density-of-states

    CERN Document Server

    Langfeld, Kurt

    2016-01-01

    Although Monte Carlo calculations using Importance Sampling have matured into the most widely employed method for determining first principle results in QCD, they spectacularly fail for theories with a sign problem or for which certain rare configurations play an important role. Non-Markovian Random walks, based upon iterative refinements of the density-of-states, overcome such overlap problems. I will review the Linear Logarithmic Relaxation (LLR) method and, in particular, focus onto ergodicity and exponential error suppression. Applications include the high-state Potts model, SU(2) and SU(3) Yang-Mills theories as well as a quantum field theory with a strong sign problem: QCD at finite densities of heavy quarks.

  6. Gluon density in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Ayala, A P; Levin, E M

    1996-01-01

    In this talk we present our detail study ( theory and numbers) [1] on the shadowing corrections to the gluon structure functions for nuclei. Starting from rather contraversial information on the nucleon structure function which is originated by the recent HERA data, we develop the Glauber approach for the gluon density in a nucleus based on Mueller formula [2] and estimate the value of the shadowing corrections in this case. Than we calculate the first corrections to the Glauber approach and show that these corrections are big. Based on this practical observation we suggest the new evolution equation which takes into account the shadowing corrections and solve it. We hope to convince you that the new evolution equation gives a good theoretical tool to treat the shadowing corrections for the gluons density in a nucleus and, therefore, it is able to provide the theoretically reliable initial conditions for the time evolution of the nucleus - nucleus cascade.

  7. Quantal density functional theory

    CERN Document Server

    Sahni, Viraht

    2016-01-01

    This book deals with quantal density functional theory (QDFT) which is a time-dependent local effective potential theory of the electronic structure of matter. The treated time-independent QDFT constitutes a special case. In the 2nd edition, the theory is extended to include the presence of external magnetostatic fields. The theory is a description of matter based on the ‘quantal Newtonian’ first and second laws which is in terms of “classical” fields that pervade all space, and their quantal sources. The fields, which are explicitly defined, are separately representative of electron correlations due to the Pauli exclusion principle, Coulomb repulsion, correlation-kinetic, correlation-current-density, and correlation-magnetic effects. The book further describes Schrödinger theory from the new physical perspective of fields and quantal sources. It also describes traditional Hohenberg-Kohn-Sham DFT, and explains via QDFT the physics underlying the various energy functionals and functional derivatives o...

  8. Contingent kernel density estimation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Fortmann-Roe

    Full Text Available Kernel density estimation is a widely used method for estimating a distribution based on a sample of points drawn from that distribution. Generally, in practice some form of error contaminates the sample of observed points. Such error can be the result of imprecise measurements or observation bias. Often this error is negligible and may be disregarded in analysis. In cases where the error is non-negligible, estimation methods should be adjusted to reduce resulting bias. Several modifications of kernel density estimation have been developed to address specific forms of errors. One form of error that has not yet been addressed is the case where observations are nominally placed at the centers of areas from which the points are assumed to have been drawn, where these areas are of varying sizes. In this scenario, the bias arises because the size of the error can vary among points and some subset of points can be known to have smaller error than another subset or the form of the error may change among points. This paper proposes a "contingent kernel density estimation" technique to address this form of error. This new technique adjusts the standard kernel on a point-by-point basis in an adaptive response to changing structure and magnitude of error. In this paper, equations for our contingent kernel technique are derived, the technique is validated using numerical simulations, and an example using the geographic locations of social networking users is worked to demonstrate the utility of the method.

  9. Density measures and additive property

    OpenAIRE

    Kunisada, Ryoichi

    2015-01-01

    We deal with finitely additive measures defined on all subsets of natural numbers which extend the asymptotic density (density measures). We consider a class of density measures which are constructed from free ultrafilters on natural numbers and study a certain additivity property of such density measures.

  10. Positive solutions of quasilinear parabolic systems with nonlinear boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pao, C. V.; Ruan, W. H.

    2007-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the existence, uniqueness, and asymptotic behavior of solutions for a coupled system of quasilinear parabolic equations under nonlinear boundary conditions, including a system of quasilinear parabolic and ordinary differential equations. Also investigated is the existence of positive maximal and minimal solutions of the corresponding quasilinear elliptic system as well as the uniqueness of a positive steady-state solution. The elliptic operators in both systems are allowed to be degenerate in the sense that the density-dependent diffusion coefficients Di(ui) may have the property Di(0)=0 for some or all i. Our approach to the problem is by the method of upper and lower solutions and its associated monotone iterations. It is shown that the time-dependent solution converges to the maximal solution for one class of initial functions and it converges to the minimal solution for another class of initial functions; and if the maximal and minimal solutions coincide then the steady-state solution is unique and the time-dependent solution converges to the unique solution. Applications of these results are given to three model problems, including a porous medium type of problem, a heat-transfer problem, and a two-component competition model in ecology. These applications illustrate some very interesting distinctive behavior of the time-dependent solutions between density-independent and density-dependent diffusions.

  11. Water Density Fluctuations Relevant to Hydrophobic Hydration are Unaltered by Attractions

    CERN Document Server

    Remsing, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of density fluctuations in bulk water has made significant contributions to our understanding of the hydration and interactions of idealized, purely repulsive hydrophobic solutes. To similarly inform the hydration of realistic hydrophobic solutes that have dispersive interactions with water, here we characterize water density fluctuations in the presence of attractive fields that correspond to solute-water attractions. We find that when the attractive field acts only in the solute hydration shell, but not in the solute core, it does not significantly alter water density fluctuations in the solute core region. We further find that for a wide range of solute sizes and attraction strengths, the free energetics of turning on the attractive fields in bulk water are accurately captured by linear response theory. Our results also suggest strategies for more efficiently estimating hydration free energies of realistic solutes in bulk water and at interfaces.

  12. Simulation of nanoscale density fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiss, Howard; Bowles, Richard K.

    2000-11-01

    Problems associated with the simulation of density fluctuations of limited breadth in a small cell are exposed and studied. The fluctuations are viewed as "physical clusters" of the type that might appear in nucleation processes and related phenomena. One of the most important features of the study stems from the fact that the simulation of a small heterogeneity in a macroscopic system presents problems that do not occur in the simulation of a bulk homogeneous property of the system. For example, once having simulated the probability of appearance of the fluctuation in a small cell, how is that result to be "mapped" onto the macrosystem in order to specify the equilibrium number of such fluctuations in that system? This problem is closely associated with the proper separation of the translational and internal degrees of freedom of the system, and has arisen in a number of fields, including the theory of nucleation. There are other problems associated with exponential dependence of cluster probability on the work of formation of the cluster, and also with rareness of some important clusters. In the latter case, simulative "umbrella sampling" does not always solve the entire problem. The present study is confined to clusters that appear in rarefied gases. Such systems are important in a number of scenarios, including nucleation processes. Several cluster models are considered including those consisting of molecules confined to a "container" of fixed volume and those constructed on the center of mass of the cluster. Connections between them are derived and rigorous solutions to the mapping problem are derived. Quantitative measures for the accuracy of approximate solutions, applied to cases in which the cluster is compact, are provided and exact solutions are provided even for the noncompact case. Some surprising results emerge from the study, among which is the fact that a cluster whose location is determined by one of its molecules, does not always have a

  13. High energy density in multisoliton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadatmand, Danial; Dmitriev, Sergey V.; Kevrekidis, Panayotis G.

    2015-09-01

    Solitons are very effective in transporting energy over great distances and collisions between them can produce high energy density spots of relevance to phase transformations, energy localization and defect formation among others. It is then important to study how energy density accumulation scales in multisoliton collisions. In this study, we demonstrate that the maximal energy density that can be achieved in collision of N slowly moving kinks and antikinks in the integrable sine-Gordon field, remarkably, is proportional to N2, while the total energy of the system is proportional to N . This maximal energy density can be achieved only if the difference between the number of colliding kinks and antikinks is minimal, i.e., is equal to 0 for even N and 1 for odd N and if the pattern involves an alternating array of kinks and antikinks. Interestingly, for odd (even) N the maximal energy density appears in the form of potential (kinetic) energy, while kinetic (potential) energy is equal to zero. The results of the present study rely on the analysis of the exact multisoliton solutions for N =1 ,2 , and 3 and on the numerical simulation results for N =4 ,5 ,6 , and 7. The effect of weak Hamiltonian and non-Hamiltonian perturbations on the maximal energy density in multikink collisions is also discussed as well as that of the collision relative phase. Based on these results one can speculate that the soliton collisions in the sine-Gordon field can, in principle, controllably produce very high energy density. This can have important consequences for many physical phenomena described by the Klein-Gordon equations.

  14. Density Distribution Sunflower Plots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William D. Dupont

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Density distribution sunflower plots are used to display high-density bivariate data. They are useful for data where a conventional scatter plot is difficult to read due to overstriking of the plot symbol. The x-y plane is subdivided into a lattice of regular hexagonal bins of width w specified by the user. The user also specifies the values of l, d, and k that affect the plot as follows. Individual observations are plotted when there are less than l observations per bin as in a conventional scatter plot. Each bin with from l to d observations contains a light sunflower. Other bins contain a dark sunflower. In a light sunflower each petal represents one observation. In a dark sunflower, each petal represents k observations. (A dark sunflower with p petals represents between /2-pk k and /2+pk k observations. The user can control the sizes and colors of the sunflowers. By selecting appropriate colors and sizes for the light and dark sunflowers, plots can be obtained that give both the overall sense of the data density distribution as well as the number of data points in any given region. The use of this graphic is illustrated with data from the Framingham Heart Study. A documented Stata program, called sunflower, is available to draw these graphs. It can be downloaded from the Statistical Software Components archive at http://ideas.repec.org/c/boc/bocode/s430201.html . (Journal of Statistical Software 2003; 8 (3: 1-5. Posted at http://www.jstatsoft.org/index.php?vol=8 .

  15. Discrete density of states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Alhun; Sisman, Altug

    2016-03-01

    By considering the quantum-mechanically minimum allowable energy interval, we exactly count number of states (NOS) and introduce discrete density of states (DOS) concept for a particle in a box for various dimensions. Expressions for bounded and unbounded continua are analytically recovered from discrete ones. Even though substantial fluctuations prevail in discrete DOS, they're almost completely flattened out after summation or integration operation. It's seen that relative errors of analytical expressions of bounded/unbounded continua rapidly decrease for high NOS values (weak confinement or high energy conditions), while the proposed analytical expressions based on Weyl's conjecture always preserve their lower error characteristic.

  16. Finite Density Fat QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Aloisio, R; Di Carlo, G; Galante, A; Grillo, A F

    2000-01-01

    Lattice formulation of Finite Baryon Density QCD is problematic from computer simulation point of view; it is well known that for light quark masses the reconstructed partition function fails to be positive in a wide region of parameter space. For large bare quark masses, instead, it is possible to obtain more sensible results; problems are still present but restricted to a small region. We present evidence for a saturation transition independent from the gauge coupling $\\beta$ and for a transition line that, starting from the temperature critical point at $\\mu=0$, moves towards smaller $\\beta$ with increasing $\\mu$ as expected from simplified phenomenological arguments.

  17. Generalized Solutions of Functional Differential Inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Machina

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the initial value problem for a functional differential inclusion with a Volterra multivalued mapping that is not necessarily decomposable in L1n[a,b]. The concept of the decomposable hull of a set is introduced. Using this concept, we define a generalized solution of such a problem and study its properties. We have proven that standard results on local existence and continuation of a generalized solution remain true. The question on the estimation of a generalized solution with respect to a given absolutely continuous function is studied. The density principle is proven for the generalized solutions. Asymptotic properties of the set of generalized approximate solutions are studied.

  18. On Shearing Fluids with Homogeneous Densities

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, D C; Kumar, Rajesh

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study shearing spherically symmetric homogeneous density fluids in comoving coordinates. It is found that the expansion of the four-velocity of a perfect fluid is homogeneous, whereas its shear is generated by an arbitrary function of time M(t), related to the mass function of the distribution. This function is found to bear a functional relationship with density. The field equations are reduced to two coupled first order ordinary differential equations for the metric coefficients, g 11 and g 22. We have explored a class of solutions assuming that M is a linear function of the density. This class embodies, as a subcase, the complete class of shear-free solutions. We have discussed the off quoted work of Kustaanheimo (1947) and have noted that it deals with shear-free fluids having anisotropic pressure. It is shown that the anisotropy of the fluid is characterized by an arbitrary function of time. We have discussed some issues of historical priorities and credentials related to shear-free sol...

  19. Density functional theory: Foundations reviewed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kryachko, Eugene S., E-mail: eugene.kryachko@ulg.ac.be [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine); Ludeña, Eduardo V., E-mail: popluabe@yahoo.es [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, IVIC, Apartado 21827, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Prometheus Program, Senescyt (Ecuador); Grupo Ecuatoriano para el Estudio Experimental y Teórico de Nanosistemas, GETNano, USFQ, N104-E, Quito (Ecuador); Escuela Politécnica Superior del Litoral, ESPOL, Guayaquil (Ecuador)

    2014-11-10

    Guided by the above motto (quotation), we review a broad range of issues lying at the foundations of Density Functional Theory, DFT, a theory which is currently omnipresent in our everyday computational study of atoms and molecules, solids and nano-materials, and which lies at the heart of modern many-body computational technologies. The key goal is to demonstrate that there are definitely the ways to improve DFT. We start by considering DFT in the larger context provided by reduced density matrix theory (RDMT) and natural orbital functional theory (NOFT), and examine the implications that N-representability conditions on the second-order reduced density matrix (2-RDM) have not only on RDMT and NOFT but, also, by extension, on the functionals of DFT. This examination is timely in view of the fact that necessary and sufficient N-representability conditions on the 2-RDM have recently been attained. In the second place, we review some problems appearing in the original formulation of the first Hohenberg–Kohn theorem which is still a subject of some controversy. In this vein we recall Lieb’s comment on this proof and the extension to this proof given by Pino et al. (2009), and in this context examine the conditions that must be met in order that the one-to-one correspondence between ground-state densities and external potentials remains valid for finite subspaces (namely, the subspaces where all Kohn–Sham solutions are obtained in practical applications). We also consider the issue of whether the Kohn–Sham equations can be derived from basic principles or whether they are postulated. We examine this problem in relation to ab initio DFT. The possibility of postulating arbitrary Kohn–Sham-type equations, where the effective potential is by definition some arbitrary mixture of local and non-local terms, is discussed. We also deal with the issue of whether there exists a universal functional, or whether one should advocate instead the construction of problem

  20. Gluon density in nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, A.L. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica][Pelotas Univ., RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica e Matematica; Ducati, M.B.G. [Rio Grande do Sul Univ., Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Levin, E.M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States)][Nuclear Physics Inst., St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    In this talk we present our detailed study (theory and numbers) on the shadowing corrections to the gluon structure functions for nuclei. Starting from rather controversial information on the nucleon structure function which is originated by the recent HERA data, we develop the Glauber approach for the gluon density in a nucleus based on Mueller formula and estimate the value of the shadowing corrections in this case. Then we calculate the first corrections to the Glauber approach and show that these corrections are big. Based on this practical observation we suggest the new evolution equation which takes into account the shadowing corrections and solve it. We hope to convince you that the new evolution equation gives a good theoretical tool to treat the shadowing corrections for the gluons density in a nucleus and, therefore, it is able to provide the theoretically reliable initial conditions for the time evolution of the nucleus-nucleus cascade. The initial conditions should be fixed both theoretically and phenomenologically before to attack such complicated problems as the mixture of hard and soft processes in nucleus-nucleus interactions at high energy or the theoretically reliable approach to hadron or/and parton cascades for high energy nucleus-nucleus interaction. 35 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Oblique dust density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Arp, Oliver; Menzel, Kristoffer; Klindworth, Markus

    2007-11-01

    We report on experimental observations of dust density waves in a complex (dusty) plasma under microgravity. The plasma is produced in a radio-frequency parallel-plate discharge (argon, p=15Pa, U=65Vpp). Different sizes of dust particles were used (3.4 μm and 6.4μm diameter). The low-frequency (f 11Hz) dust density waves are naturally unstable modes, which are driven by the ion flow in the plasma. Surprisingly, the wave propagation direction is aligned with the ion flow direction in the bulk plasma but becomes oblique at the boundary of the dust cloud with an inclination of 60^o with respect to the plasma boundary. The experimental results are compared with a kinetic model in the electrostatic approximation [1] and a fluid model [2]. Moreover, the role of dust surface waves is discussed. [1] M. Rosenberg, J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 14, 631 (1996) [2] A. Piel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 205009 (2006)

  2. New exact perfect fluid solutions of Einstein's equations. II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uggla, Claes; Rosquist, Kjell

    1990-12-01

    A family of new spatially homogeneous Bianchi type VIh perfect fluid solutions of the Einstein equations is presented. The fluid flow is orthogonal to the spatially homogeneous hypersurfaces, and the pressure is proportional to the energy density.

  3. Instability of aqueous solutions of polyacrylamide in a hydrodynamic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makogon, B. P.; Bykova, E. N.; Bezrukova, M. A.; Klenin, S. I.; Ivanyuta, Yu. F.; Povkh, I. L.; Toryanik, A. I.

    1985-09-01

    This article discusses findings obtained regarding the effect of a hydrodynamic field on the reduced viscosity, effect of turbulent friction reduction, light scattering, double refraction, and optical density of aqueous solutions of hydrolyzed polyacrylamide.

  4. Gedanken Densities and Exact Constraints in Density Functional Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Perdew, John P; Sun, Jianwei; Burke, Kieron

    2014-01-01

    Approximations to the exact density functional for the exchange-correlation energy of a many-electron ground state can be constructed by satisfying constraints that are universal, i.e., valid for all electron densities. Gedanken densities are designed for the purpose of this construction, but need not be realistic. The uniform electron gas is an old gedanken density. Here, we propose a spherical two-electron gedanken density in which the dimensionless density gradient can be an arbitrary positive constant wherever the density is non-zero. The Lieb-Oxford lower bound on the exchange energy can be satisfied within a generalized gradient approximation (GGA) by bounding its enhancement factor or simplest GGA exchange-energy density. This enhancement-factor bound is well known to be sufficient, but our gedanken density shows that it is also necessary. The conventional exact exchange-energy density satisfies no such local bound, but energy densities are not unique, and the simplest GGA exchange-energy density is no...

  5. Density constrained TDHF

    CERN Document Server

    Oberacker, V E

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript we provide an outline of the numerical methods used in implementing the density constrained time-dependent Hartree-Fock (DC-TDHF) method and provide a few examples of its application to nuclear fusion. In this approach, dynamic microscopic calculations are carried out on a three-dimensional lattice and there are no adjustable parameters, the only input is the Skyrme effective NN interaction. After a review of the DC-TDHF theory and the numerical methods, we present results for heavy-ion potentials $V(R)$, coordinate-dependent mass parameters $M(R)$, and precompound excitation energies $E^{*}(R)$ for a variety of heavy-ion reactions. Using fusion barrier penetrabilities, we calculate total fusion cross sections $\\sigma(E_\\mathrm{c.m.})$ for reactions between both stable and neutron-rich nuclei. We also determine capture cross sections for hot fusion reactions leading to the formation of superheavy elements.

  6. Density Sensitive Hashing

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Yue; Li, Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Nearest neighbors search is a fundamental problem in various research fields like machine learning, data mining and pattern recognition. Recently, hashing-based approaches, e.g., Locality Sensitive Hashing (LSH), are proved to be effective for scalable high dimensional nearest neighbors search. Many hashing algorithms found their theoretic root in random projection. Since these algorithms generate the hash tables (projections) randomly, a large number of hash tables (i.e., long codewords) are required in order to achieve both high precision and recall. To address this limitation, we propose a novel hashing algorithm called {\\em Density Sensitive Hashing} (DSH) in this paper. DSH can be regarded as an extension of LSH. By exploring the geometric structure of the data, DSH avoids the purely random projections selection and uses those projective functions which best agree with the distribution of the data. Extensive experimental results on real-world data sets have shown that the proposed method achieves better ...

  7. High Density QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Ducati, M B G

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of high partonic density QCD is presented considering, in the double logarithm approximation, the parton recombination mechanism built in the AGL formalism, developed including unitarity corrections for the nucleon as well for nucleus. It is shown that these corrections are under theoretical control. The resulting non linear evolution equation is solved in the asymptotic regime, and a comprehensive phenomenology concerning Deep Inelastic Scattering like $F_2$, $F_L$, $F_2^c$. $\\partial F_2/ \\partial \\ln Q^2$, $\\partial F^A_2/ \\partial \\ln Q^2$, etc, is presented. The connection of our formalism with the DGLAP and BFKL dynamics, and with other perturbative (K) and non-perturbative (MV-JKLW) approaches is analised in detail. The phenomena of saturation due to shadowing corrections and the relevance of this effect in ion physics and heavy quark production is emphasized. The implications to e-RHIC, HERA-A, and LHC physics and some open questions are mentioned.

  8. Radially Symmetric Solutions of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Troy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate solutions of and focus on the regime and . Our advance is to develop a technique to efficiently classify the behavior of solutions on , their maximal positive interval of existence. Our approach is to transform the nonautonomous equation into an autonomous ODE. This reduces the problem to analyzing the phase plane of the autonomous equation. We prove the existence of new families of solutions of the equation and describe their asymptotic behavior. In the subcritical case there is a well-known closed-form singular solution, , such that as and as . Our advance is to prove the existence of a family of solutions of the subcritical case which satisfies for infinitely many values . At the critical value there is a continuum of positive singular solutions, and a continuum of sign changing singular solutions. In the supercritical regime we prove the existence of a family of “super singular” sign changing singular solutions.

  9. Higgs- and Skyrme-Chern-Simons densities in all dimensions

    CERN Document Server

    Tchrakian, D H

    2015-01-01

    Two types of new Chern-Simons (CS) densities, both defined in all odd and even dimensions, are proposed. These new CS densities feature a scalar field interacting with a scalar. In one case this is a Higgs scalar while in the other it is a Skyrme scalar. The motivation is to study the effects of adding these new CS terms to a Lagrangian which supports static soliton solutions prior to their introduction.

  10. Density Tracking by Quadrature for Stochastic Differential Equations

    OpenAIRE

    Bhat, Harish S.; Madushani, R. W. M. A.

    2016-01-01

    We develop and analyze a method, density tracking by quadrature (DTQ), to compute the probability density function of the solution of a stochastic differential equation. The derivation of the method begins with the discretization in time of the stochastic differential equation, resulting in a discrete-time Markov chain with continuous state space. At each time step, the DTQ method applies quadrature to solve the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation for this Markov chain. In this paper, we focus on a p...

  11. Hadronic density of states from string theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pando Zayas, Leopoldo A; Vaman, Diana

    2003-09-12

    We present an exact calculation of the finite temperature partition function for the hadronic states corresponding to a Penrose-Güven limit of the Maldacena-Nùñez embedding of the N=1 super Yang-Mills (SYM) into string theory. It is established that the theory exhibits a Hagedorn density of states. We propose a semiclassical string approximation to the finite temperature partition function for confining gauge theories admitting a supergravity dual, by performing an expansion around classical solutions characterized by temporal windings. This semiclassical approximation reveals a hadronic energy density of states of a Hagedorn type, with the coefficient determined by the gauge theory string tension as expected for confining theories. We argue that our proposal captures primarily information about states of pure N=1 SYM theory, given that this semiclassical approximation does not entail a projection onto states of large U(1) charge.

  12. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Bone Densitometry (DEXA) Bone densitometry, also called dual-energy ... limitations of DEXA Bone Densitometry? What is a Bone Density Scan (DEXA)? Bone density scanning, also called ...

  13. PFP solution stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aftanas, B.L.

    1996-04-30

    This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) addresses remediation of the plutonium-bearing solutions currently in inventory at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). The recommendation from the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is that the solutions be treated thermally and stabilized as a solid for long term storage. For solutions which are not discardable, the baseline plan is to utilize a denitration process to stabilize the solutions prior to packaging for storage.

  14. An experimental charge density of HEPES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledź, Paweł; Kamiński, Radosław; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Zimmerman, Matthew D; Minor, Wladek; Woźniak, Krzysztof

    2010-08-01

    We report the experimental charge density of HEPES [4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazineethanesulfonic acid], which is a common buffering agent. The structure was refined using the Hansen-Coppens formalism. The ability of the HEPES molecule to form stable intermolecular interactions and intermolecular hydrogen bonds in the crystal structure is discussed in terms of its buffering properties. The protonation mode observed in the crystal structure is different from that expected in solution, suggesting that additional factors must be taken into consideration in order to explain the solution properties of the compound. As ordered HEPES molecules are found in the active sites of proteins in several protein crystal structures, our results will allow for quantitative analysis of the electrostatic potential of the interacting surfaces of those proteins.

  15. Surface current density K: an introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAllister, Iain Wilson

    1991-01-01

    The author discusses the vector surface of current density K used in electrical insulation studies. K is related to the vector tangential electric field Kt at the surface of a body by the vector equation K=ΓE t where Γ represents the surface conductivity. The author derives a surface continuity...... equation that represents the boundary condition which the potential distributions in the adjoining media must fulfill. The volume current may be small in comparison to the surface current, and consequently in deriving the potential solutions the first term in this equation can sometimes be neglected....

  16. Multicapillary mixer of solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, G W; Bowman, R L

    1966-07-22

    A mixer made from a bundle of glass tubules can mix two solutions within 30 microseconds, with a total-solution flow rate of 1.33 milliliters per second. One solution passes through the interstices of the bundle; the other moves through the lumens of the tubes.

  17. Holographic quark-gluon plasmas at finite quark density

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigazzi, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Universita di Firenze, Sesto Fiorentino (Firenze), Pisa (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Torino (Italy); Cotrone, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Torino (Italy); Mas, J. [Departamento de Fisica de Particulas, Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Instituto Galego de Fisica de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Tarrio, J. [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Universiteit Utrecht, 3584 CE, Utrecht (Netherlands); Mayerson, D. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2012-07-15

    Gravity solutions holographically dual to strongly coupled quark-gluon plasmas with non-zero quark density are reviewed. They are motivated by the urgency of finding novel tools to explore the phase diagram of QCD-like theories at finite chemical potential. After presenting the solutions and their regime of validity, some of their physical properties are discussed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Earth's density flattening and hypothesis of latitudinal normal density

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, the definition of latitudinal density and density flattening of the level ellipsoid is given, and integral formulas of latitudinal density for pole gravity and equator gravity are derived. According to the pole gravity condition and equator gravity condition for the level ellipsoid, latitudinal density distribution function of the level ellipsoid is obtained. It is proved mathematically that latitudinal density of the earth's equator is larger than that of the pole, the earth's density flat-tening calculated preliminarily is 1/322, and hypothesis of the earth's latitudinal normal density is further proposed, so that theoretical preparation for studying the forming cause of the earth gravity in problems such as continent drift, mantle convection, and submarine extension is made well.

  19. Bone Densitometry (Bone Density Scan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of DXA Bone Densitometry? What is a Bone Density Scan (DXA)? Bone density scanning, also called dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry ( ... is today's established standard for measuring bone mineral density (BMD). An x-ray (radiograph) is a noninvasive ...

  20. Generating random density matrices

    CERN Document Server

    Zyczkowski, Karol; Nechita, Ion; Collins, Benoit

    2010-01-01

    We study various methods to generate ensembles of quantum density matrices of a fixed size N and analyze the corresponding probability distributions P(x), where x denotes the rescaled eigenvalue, x=N\\lambda. Taking a random pure state of a two-partite system and performing the partial trace over one subsystem one obtains a mixed state represented by a Wishart--like matrix W=GG^{\\dagger}, distributed according to the induced measure and characterized asymptotically, as N -> \\infty, by the Marchenko-Pastur distribution. Superposition of k random maximally entangled states leads to another family of explicitly derived distributions, describing singular values of the sum of k independent random unitaries. Taking a larger system composed of 2s particles, constructing $s$ random bi-partite states, performing the measurement into a product of s-1 maximally entangled states and performing the partial trace over the remaining subsystem we arrive at a random state characterized by the Fuss-Catalan distribution of order...

  1. Density sensitive hashing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zhongming; Li, Cheng; Lin, Yue; Cai, Deng

    2014-08-01

    Nearest neighbor search is a fundamental problem in various research fields like machine learning, data mining and pattern recognition. Recently, hashing-based approaches, for example, locality sensitive hashing (LSH), are proved to be effective for scalable high dimensional nearest neighbor search. Many hashing algorithms found their theoretic root in random projection. Since these algorithms generate the hash tables (projections) randomly, a large number of hash tables (i.e., long codewords) are required in order to achieve both high precision and recall. To address this limitation, we propose a novel hashing algorithm called density sensitive hashing (DSH) in this paper. DSH can be regarded as an extension of LSH. By exploring the geometric structure of the data, DSH avoids the purely random projections selection and uses those projective functions which best agree with the distribution of the data. Extensive experimental results on real-world data sets have shown that the proposed method achieves better performance compared to the state-of-the-art hashing approaches.

  2. Carbon nanotube growth density control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor); Schipper, John F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Method and system for combined coarse scale control and fine scale control of growth density of a carbon nanotube (CNT) array on a substrate, using a selected electrical field adjacent to a substrate surface for coarse scale density control (by one or more orders of magnitude) and a selected CNT growth temperature range for fine scale density control (by multiplicative factors of less than an order of magnitude) of CNT growth density. Two spaced apart regions on a substrate may have different CNT growth densities and/or may use different feed gases for CNT growth.

  3. Accurate ab initio spin densities

    CERN Document Server

    Boguslawski, Katharina; Legeza, Örs; Reiher, Markus

    2012-01-01

    We present an approach for the calculation of spin density distributions for molecules that require very large active spaces for a qualitatively correct description of their electronic structure. Our approach is based on the density-matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm to calculate the spin density matrix elements as basic quantity for the spatially resolved spin density distribution. The spin density matrix elements are directly determined from the second-quantized elementary operators optimized by the DMRG algorithm. As an analytic convergence criterion for the spin density distribution, we employ our recently developed sampling-reconstruction scheme [J. Chem. Phys. 2011, 134, 224101] to build an accurate complete-active-space configuration-interaction (CASCI) wave function from the optimized matrix product states. The spin density matrix elements can then also be determined as an expectation value employing the reconstructed wave function expansion. Furthermore, the explicit reconstruction of a CA...

  4. Reconfigurable Buoyant Cable Antenna with Improved Gain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    consists of a number of connected streamer cable sections, which each comprise a mechanical jacket surrounding a hollow core enclosing seismic sensor and...of insulation. A buoyancy layer/ jacket is either injection molded or extruded in place onto the core to make the final structure a solid object...systems: [0008] U.S. Patent No. 5,745,436, issued April 28, 1998, to Bittleston, discloses a semi-dry marine seismic streamer cable that

  5. Buoyant Rover for Under-Ice Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berisford, D. F.; Leichty, J. M.; Klesh, A. T.; Matthews, J. B.; Hand, K. P.

    2012-12-01

    We have designed, constructed and tested a prototype robotic mobility platform for exploring the underside of ice sheets in frozen lake or ocean environments. The ice-water interface often provides some of the most interesting and dynamic chemistry in partially frozen systems, as dissolved impurities are rejected from the advancing freezing front. Higher concentrations of microorganisms can be found in this region, and the topography of the ice underside can help reveal the history of its formation. Furthermore, in lake environments ice cover can serve to trap gases released from biological and geological processes in the subsurface. The rover uses a two-wheeled design with a flexible dragging tail, enabling it to fit into a 10-inch diameter ice borehole. The sealed air-filled cylindrical body, along with closed-cell foam inside of cone-shaped wheels, provides buoyancy force to enable roving along the underside of the ice. The prototype contains two cameras that stream live video via a tethered connection to a ground station and uses semi-autonomous control via a PC. Preliminary testing of the prototype in a cold lab and in northern Alaskan thermokarst lakes demonstrates the utility and simplicity of this type of robotic platform for exploring the ice-water interface. This technology has potential future use in landed missions to icy ocean worlds in the solar system.

  6. Density of organic thin films in organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cindy X.; Xiao, Steven; Xu, Gu

    2015-07-01

    A practical parameter, the volume density of organic thin films, found to affect the electronic properties and in turn the performance of organic photovoltaics (OPVs), is investigated in order to benefit the polymer synthesis and thin film preparation in OPVs. To establish the correlation between film density and device performance, the density of organic thin films with various treatments was obtained, by two-dimensional X-ray diffraction measurement using the density mapping with respect to the crystallinity of thin films. Our results suggest that the OPV of higher performance has a denser photoactive layer, which may hopefully provide a solution to the question of whether the film density matters in organic electronics, and help to benefit the OPV industry in terms of better polymer design, standardized production, and quality control with less expenditure.

  7. The associating lattice gas in the presence of interacting solutes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, Mauricio; Szortyka, Marcia M.; Henriques, Vera B.; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the phase diagram of a statistical model for hydrogen-bonding solutions for polar solutes. The structured solvent is represented by an associating lattice gas, which presents anomalous density and liquid-liquid coexistence. Polar solute particles and solvent particles interact attractively, while the solvent-solvent interaction is made directional through bonding arms, which mimic hydrogen bonds. The model behavior is obtained via Monte Carlo simulations in the grand-canonical ensemble, for different sets of parameters. For small solute chemical potential and weak attraction between solute and solvent particles, addition of solute yields a shift in the transition lines of the pure solvent. This is the scenario explored by different authors, in the pursuit of stabilizing the water liquid-liquid coexistence line. However, as we show, in the case of larger solute chemical potentials, or of stronger solute-solvent attractions, new phases may arise.

  8. Relativistic Solutions of Anisotropic Compact Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Bikash Chandra

    2016-01-01

    We present a class of new relativistic solutions with anisotropic fluid for compact stars in hydrostatic equilibrium. The interior space-time geometry considered here for compact objects are described by parameters namely, $\\lambda$, $k$, $A$, $R$ and $n$. The values of the geometrical parameters are determined here for obtaining a class of physically viable stellar models. The energy-density, radial pressure and tangential pressure are finite and positive inside the anisotropic stars. Considering some stars of known mass we present stellar models which describe compact astrophysical objects with nuclear density.

  9. Solutions to Organizational Paradox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xin; Worm, Verner; Peihong, Xie

    Organizations face all kinds of paradoxical problems. There exist various solutions to organizational paradoxes. We develop a typology that lists nine possible logical approaches to understanding the relationship between paradoxical opposites, out of which we identify five types of solutions...... to organizational paradox. Four of the five solutions are explicitly associated with four prominent philosophies. We show the relevance of the five solutions to the real world by applying our scheme to understand different solutions to the generic strategy paradox. Finally, we address the question whether...... there is a superior solution and point out the paradox of paradox resolving, namely, paradoxes cannot be resolved once for all and we have to live with them....

  10. Calcite precipitation from aqueous solution: transformation from vaterite and role of solution stoichiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nehrke, G.

    2007-01-01

    The morphology of vaterite precipitated by bubbling CO2 through a CaCl2 solution is framboidal aggregates. It is not possible, even when using the identical experimental setup and conditions, to reproduce aggregates having identical morphology. The density of the aggregates and crystallite size can

  11. Electrochemical oxidation of pyrrhotute in aqueous solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Wen-qing; LI Quan; QIU Guan-zhou; XU Ben-jun

    2005-01-01

    The anodic surface oxidation of natural pyrrhotite in 0.3 mol/L KCl and HCl solution (pH 4. 0) and 0.1 mol/L Na2 B4O7 solution (pH 9.18) respectively was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry, Tafel plot, and chronoamperometry. In 0.3 mol/L KCl and HCl solution (pH 4.0), at potential less than 0.5 V(vs SHE), the production of anodic oxidation on pyrrhotite surface can not maintain a stable phase to form a passive film. In 0. 1 mol/L Na2B4 O7 solution (pH 9.18), when the electrode potential increases to more than 0.5 V (vs SHE), part of S is oxidized to sulfate, making the passive film somewhat porous, but elemental S and metal oxidates Fe(OH)3 still remain on the electrode surface, and the passive film can not be broken down totally. According to PARCalc Tafel analysis,the corresponding corrosion current density (J0) is 5.34 μA/cm2 , which is also the exchange current density of the oxidation reaction on pyrrhotite electrode surface in 0. 1 mol/L Na2B4O7 solution (pH 9.18). The electrochemical dynamics equation of the oxidation was determined.

  12. Patterned magnetic thin films for ultra high density recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lodder, J.C.; Haast, M.A.M.; Abelmann, L.; Hadjipanayis, G.C.

    2001-01-01

    The areal bit density of magnetic disk recording has increased since 1990 60% per year and even in the last years 100%. Extrapolation of these rates leads to recording parameters not likely to be achieved without changes in the present way of storing hard disk data. One of the possible solutions is

  13. The Schwarzschild's Braneworld Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Ovalle, J

    2010-01-01

    In the context of the Randall-Sundrum braneworld, the minimal geometric deformation approach, which has been successfully used to generate exact interior solutions to Einstein's field equations for static braneworld stars with local and non-local bulk terms, is used to obtain the braneworld version of the Schwarzschild's interior solution. Using this new solution, the behaviour of the Weyl functions is elucidated in terms of the compactness for different stellar distributions.

  14. The Schwarzschild's Braneworld Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, J.

    In the context of the Randall-Sundrum braneworld, the minimal geometric deformation approach, which has been successfully used to generate exact interior solutions to Einstein's field equations for static braneworld stars with local and nonlocal bulk terms, is used to obtain the braneworld version of the Schwarzschild's interior solution. Using this new solution, the behavior of the Weyl functions is elucidated in terms of the compactness for different stellar distributions.

  15. Evaluation of centrifugation parameters for density gradient experiments by means of a programmable pocket calculator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzfeldt, C

    1980-10-01

    A calculation program is proposed suitable for programmable pocket calculators (e.g. HP series) to estimate s20,w f omega2 dt values from density gradient centrifugation data. The program can be applied to linear or exponential density gradients prepared from sucrose or glycerol solutions spun in zonal rotors or swinging bucket rotors. A wide solute concentration range and temperature range is accounted for. Constants for empirical density calculation of glycerol and sucrose solutions concentrated in % (w/v) are estimated. Experimental verification of the program was carried out.

  16. Synthesis of solid solutions of perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dambekalne, M.Y.; Antonova, M.K.; Perro, I.T.; Plaude, A.V.

    1986-03-01

    The authors carry out thermographic studies, using a derivatograph, in order to understand the nature of the processes taking place during the synthesis of solid solutions of perovskites. Based on the detailed studies on the phase transformations occurring in the charges of the PSN-PMN solid solutions and on the selection of the optimum conditions for carrying out their synthesis, the authors obtained a powder containing a minimum quantity of the undesirable pyrochlore phase and by sintering it using the hot pressing method, they produced single phase ceramic specimens containing the perovskite phase alone with a density close to the theoretical value and showing zero apparent porosity and water absorption.

  17. Generating Solutions to the Einstein - Maxwell Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Contopoulos, I G; Kleidis, K; Papadopoulos, D B; Witten, L

    2015-01-01

    The Einstein-Maxwell (E-M) equations in a curved spacetime that admits at least one Killing vector are derived, from a Lagrangian density adapted to symmetries. In this context, an auxiliary space of potentials is introduced, in which, the set of potentials associated to an original (seed) solution of the E-M equations are transformed to a new set, either by continuous transformations or by discrete transformations. In this article, continuous transformations are considered. Accordingly, originating from the so-called $\\gamma_A$-metric, other exact solutions to the E-M equations are recovered and discussed.

  18. Thermodynamics of black plane solution

    CERN Document Server

    Rodrigues, Manuel E; Houndjo, Stéphane J M

    2012-01-01

    We obtain a new phantom black plane solution in 4D of the Einstein-Maxwell theory coupled with a cosmological constant. We analyse their basic properties and obtain the extensive and intensive thermodynamic variables, as well as the specific heat and the first law. Through the specific heat and the so-called geometric methods, we analyse in detail their thermodynamic properties, the extreme and phase transition limits, as well as the local and global stabilities of the system. The normal case is shown with an extreme limit and the phantom one with a phase transition only for null mass. The systems present local and global stabilities for certain values of the entropy density with respect to the electric charge, for the canonical and grand canonical ensembles.

  19. Thermodynamics of black plane solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Manuel E.; Jardim, Deborah F.; Houndjo, Stéphane J. M.; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2013-11-01

    We obtain a new phantom black plane solution in D of the Einstein-Maxwell theory coupled with a cosmological constant. We analyse their basic properties, as well as its causal structure, and obtain the extensive and intensive thermodynamic variables, as well as the specific heat and the first law. Through the specific heat and the so-called geometric methods, we analyse in detail their thermodynamic properties, the extreme and phase transition limits, as well as the local and global stabilities of the system. The normal case is shown with an extreme limit and the phantom one with a phase transition only for null mass, which is physically inaccessible. The systems present local and global stabilities for certain values of the entropy density with respect to the electric charge, for the canonical and grand canonical ensembles.

  20. Density limits investigation and high density operation in EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xingwei; Li, Jiangang; Hu, Jiansheng; Liu, Haiqing; Jie, Yinxian; Wang, Shouxin; Li, Jiahong; Duan, Yanming; Li, Miaohui; Li, Yongchun; Zhang, Ling; Ye, Yang; Yang, Qingquan; Zhang, Tao; Cheng, Yingjie; Xu, Jichan; Wang, Liang; Xu, Liqing; Zhao, Hailin; Wang, Fudi; Lin, Shiyao; Wu, Bin; Lyu, Bo; Xu, Guosheng; Gao, Xiang; Shi, Tonghui; He, Kaiyang; Lan, Heng; Chu, Nan; Cao, Bin; Sun, Zhen; Zuo, Guizhong; Ren, Jun; Zhuang, Huidong; Li, Changzheng; Yuan, Xiaolin; Yu, Yaowei; Wang, Houyin; Chen, Yue; Wu, Jinhua; EAST Team

    2016-05-01

    Increasing the density in a tokamak is limited by the so-called density limit, which is generally performed as an appearance of disruption causing loss of plasma confinement, or a degradation of high confinement mode which could further lead to a H  →  L transition. The L-mode and H-mode density limit has been investigated in EAST tokamak. Experimental results suggest that density limits could be triggered by either edge cooling or excessive central radiation. The L-mode density limit disruption is generally triggered by edge cooling, which leads to the current profile shrinkage and then destabilizes a 2/1 tearing mode, ultimately resulting in a disruption. The L-mode density limit scaling agrees well with the Greenwald limit in EAST. The observed H-mode density limit in EAST is an operational-space limit with a value of 0.8∼ 0.9{{n}\\text{GW}} . High density H-mode heated by neutral beam injection (NBI) and lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) are analyzed, respectively. The constancy of the edge density gradients in H-mode indicates a critical limit caused perhaps by e.g. ballooning induced transport. The maximum density is accessed at the H  →  L transition which is generally caused by the excessive core radiation due to high Z impurities (Fe, Cu). Operating at a high density (>2.8× {{10}19} {{\\text{m}}-3} ) is favorable for suppressing the beam shine through NBI. High density H-mode up to 5.3× {{10}19}{{\\text{m}}-3}~≤ft(∼ 0.8{{n}\\text{GW}}\\right) could be sustained by 2 MW 4.6 GHz LHCD alone, and its current drive efficiency is studied. Statistics show that good control of impurities and recycling facilitate high density operation. With careful control of these factors, high density up to 0.93{{n}\\text{GW}} stable H-mode operation was carried out heated by 1.7 MW LHCD and 1.9 MW ion cyclotron resonance heating with supersonic molecular beam injection fueling.

  1. High density operation for reactor-relevant power exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmeier, M.

    2015-08-01

    With increasing size of a tokamak device and associated fusion power gain an increasing power flux density towards the divertor needs to be handled. A solution for handling this power flux is crucial for a safe and economic operation. Using purely geometric arguments in an ITER-like divertor this power flux can be reduced by approximately a factor 100. Based on a conservative extrapolation of current technology for an integrated engineering approach to remove power deposited on plasma facing components a further reduction of the power flux density via volumetric processes in the plasma by up to a factor of 50 is required. Our current ability to interpret existing power exhaust scenarios using numerical transport codes is analyzed and an operational scenario as a potential solution for ITER like divertors under high density and highly radiating reactor-relevant conditions is presented. Alternative concepts for risk mitigation as well as strategies for moving forward are outlined.

  2. Regularized Regression and Density Estimation based on Optimal Transport

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, M.

    2012-03-11

    The aim of this paper is to investigate a novel nonparametric approach for estimating and smoothing density functions as well as probability densities from discrete samples based on a variational regularization method with the Wasserstein metric as a data fidelity. The approach allows a unified treatment of discrete and continuous probability measures and is hence attractive for various tasks. In particular, the variational model for special regularization functionals yields a natural method for estimating densities and for preserving edges in the case of total variation regularization. In order to compute solutions of the variational problems, a regularized optimal transport problem needs to be solved, for which we discuss several formulations and provide a detailed analysis. Moreover, we compute special self-similar solutions for standard regularization functionals and we discuss several computational approaches and results. © 2012 The Author(s).

  3. Mammography density estimation with automated volumetic breast density measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Su Yeon; Kim, Eun Kyung; Kim, Min Jung; Moon, Hee Jung [Dept. of Radiology, Severance Hospital, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To compare automated volumetric breast density measurement (VBDM) with radiologists' evaluations based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS), and to identify the factors associated with technical failure of VBDM. In this study, 1129 women aged 19-82 years who underwent mammography from December 2011 to January 2012 were included. Breast density evaluations by radiologists based on BI-RADS and by VBDM (Volpara Version 1.5.1) were compared. The agreement in interpreting breast density between radiologists and VBDM was determined based on four density grades (D1, D2, D3, and D4) and a binary classification of fatty (D1-2) vs. dense (D3-4) breast using kappa statistics. The association between technical failure of VBDM and patient age, total breast volume, fibroglandular tissue volume, history of partial mastectomy, the frequency of mass > 3 cm, and breast density was analyzed. The agreement between breast density evaluations by radiologists and VBDM was fair (k value = 0.26) when the four density grades (D1/D2/D3/D4) were used and moderate (k value = 0.47) for the binary classification (D1-2/D3-4). Twenty-seven women (2.4%) showed failure of VBDM. Small total breast volume, history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density were significantly associated with technical failure of VBDM (p 0.001 to 0.015). There is fair or moderate agreement in breast density evaluation between radiologists and VBDM. Technical failure of VBDM may be related to small total breast volume, a history of partial mastectomy, and high breast density.

  4. A molecular density functional theory to study solvation in water

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanmairet, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    A classical density functional theory is applied to study solvation of solutes in water. An approx- imate form of the excess functional is proposed for water. This functional requires the knowledge of pure solvent direct correlation functions. Those functions can be computed by using molecular simulations such as molecular dynamic or Monte Carlo. It is also possible to use functions that have been determined experimentally. The functional minimization gives access to the solvation free energy and to the equilibrium solvent density. Some correction to the functional are also proposed to get the proper tetrahedral order of solvent molecules around a charged solute and to reproduce the correct long range hydrophobic behavior of big apolar solutes. To proceed the numerical minimization of the functional, the theory has been discretized on two tridimensional grids, one for the space coordinates, the other for the angular coordinates, in a functional minimization code written in modern Fortran, mdft. This program i...

  5. Probabilistic solution of relative entropy weighted control

    CERN Document Server

    Bierkens, Joris

    2012-01-01

    We show that stochastic control problems with a particular cost structure involving a relative entropy term admit a purely probabilistic solution, without the necessity of applying the dynamic programming principle. The argument is as follows. Minimization of the expectation of a random variable with respect to the underlying probability measure, penalized by relative entropy, may be solved exactly. In the case where the randomness is generated by a standard Brownian motion, this exact solution can be written as a Girsanov density. The stochastic process appearing in the Girsanov exponent has the role of control process, and the relative entropy of the change of probability measure is equal to the integral of the square of this process. An explicit expression for the control process may be obtained in terms of the Malliavin derivative of the density process. The theory is applied to the problem of minimizing the maximum of a Brownian motion (penalized by the relative entropy), leading to an explicit expressio...

  6. Gauge equivalence of Tachyon solutions in the cubic Neveu—Schwarz string field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref'eva, I. Ya.; Gorbachev, R. V.

    2010-11-01

    We construct a simple analytic solution of the cubic Neveu—Schwarz (NS) string field theory including the GSO(-) sector. This solution is analogous to the Erler—Schnabl solution in the bosonic case and to the solution in the pure GSO(+) case previously proposed by one of us. We construct exact gauge transformations of the new solution to other known solutions for the NS string tachyon condensation. This gauge equivalence manifestly supports the previous observation that the Erler solution for the pure GSO(+) sector and our solution containing both the GSO(+) and the GSO(-) sectors have the same value of the action density.

  7. On Solutions of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaefer Philip W

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotationally symmetric solutions are derived for some nonlinear equations of the form in the title in terms of elementary functions. Under suitable assumptions, the nonexistence of entire solutions is also proved for the inequality in the title as well as some radial upper bounds are obtained. These results are the consequence of an appropriate differential inequality.

  8. Solution structure of (+)-discodermolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A B; LaMarche, M J; Falcone-Hindley, M

    2001-03-01

    [structure: see text]. The solution structure of (+)-discodermolide (1) has been determined via 1- and 2-D NMR techniques in conjunction with Monte Carlo conformational analysis. Taken together, the results demonstrate that in solution (+)-discodermolide occupies a helical conformation remarkably similar to the solid state conformation.

  9. Mobile Backhaul Solutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Mo; Fei Yuan; Jian Yang

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we give an overview of mobile backhaul solutions and propose an MPLS-centered solution that takes intoaccount timing synchronization, OAM, and protection: We also propose an evolved protection bandwidth allocation mechanism that makes the transport network as efficient as possible.

  10. SIPPI: A Matlab toolbox for sampling the solution to inverse problems with complex prior information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Mejer; Cordua, Knud Skou; Caroline Looms, Majken

    2013-01-01

    on the solution. The combined states of information (i.e. the solution to the inverse problem) is a probability density function typically referred to as the a posteriori probability density function. We present a generic toolbox for Matlab and Gnu Octave called SIPPI that implements a number of methods...

  11. Bolting Multicenter Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Bena, Iosif; Katmadas, Stefanos; Turton, David

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a solvable system of equations that describes non-extremal multicenter solutions to six-dimensional ungauged supergravity coupled to tensor multiplets. The system involves a set of functions on a three-dimensional base metric. We obtain a family of non-extremal axisymmetric solutions that generalize the known multicenter extremal solutions, using a particular base metric that introduces a bolt. We analyze the conditions for regularity, and in doing so we show that this family does not include solutions that contain an extremal black hole and a smooth bolt. We determine the constraints that are necessary to obtain smooth horizonless solutions involving a bolt and an arbitrary number of Gibbons-Hawking centers.

  12. Bolting multicenter solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bena, Iosif; Bossard, Guillaume; Katmadas, Stefanos; Turton, David

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a solvable system of equations that describes non-extremal multicenter solutions to six-dimensional ungauged supergravity coupled to tensor multiplets. The system involves a set of functions on a three-dimensional base metric. We obtain a family of non-extremal axisymmetric solutions that generalize the known multicenter extremal solutions, using a particular base metric that introduces a bolt. We analyze the conditions for regularity, and in doing so we show that this family does not include solutions that contain an extremal black hole and a smooth bolt. We determine the constraints that are necessary to obtain smooth horizonless solutions involving a bolt and an arbitrary number of Gibbons-Hawking centers.

  13. Continuous Dependence on the Density for Stratified Steady Water Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Robin Ming; Walsh, Samuel

    2016-02-01

    There are two distinct regimes commonly used to model traveling waves in stratified water: continuous stratification, where the density is smooth throughout the fluid, and layer-wise continuous stratification, where the fluid consists of multiple immiscible strata. The former is the more physically accurate description, but the latter is frequently more amenable to analysis and computation. By the conservation of mass, the density is constant along the streamlines of the flow; the stratification can therefore be specified by prescribing the value of the density on each streamline. We call this the streamline density function. Our main result states that, for every smoothly stratified periodic traveling wave in a certain small-amplitude regime, there is an L ∞ neighborhood of its streamline density function such that, for any piecewise smooth streamline density function in that neighborhood, there is a corresponding traveling wave solution. Moreover, the mapping from streamline density function to wave is Lipschitz continuous in a certain function space framework. As this neighborhood includes piecewise smooth densities with arbitrarily many jump discontinues, this theorem provides a rigorous justification for the ubiquitous practice of approximating a smoothly stratified wave by a layered one. We also discuss some applications of this result to the study of the qualitative features of such waves.

  14. All Road Density (18km)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Density (km / km^2) of all roads in the western United States. Dataset was developed to generalize the 2000 US Census TIGER/Line Roads layer to a density within 18km...

  15. Space, Density and Urban Form

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghauser Pont, M.Y.; Haupt, P.A.

    2009-01-01

    The concentration of humans – in some cases judged as too high, in others not high enough – and the problems connected to this, have resulted in discussions on density. Prior to the 20th century, density in European cities was merely an outcome of complex circumstances. During the second half of the

  16. The Density of Sustainable Settlements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Michael; Silva, Victor; Jensen, Ole B.;

    2010-01-01

    This paper is the initial result of a cross-disciplinary attempt to encircle an answer to the question of optimal densities of sustainable settlements. Urban density is an important component in the framework of sustainable development and influences not only the character and design of cities...

  17. Growth of Solid Solution Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Holland, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    The major objective of this program is to determine the conditions under which single crystals of solid solutions can be grown from the melt in a Bridgman configuration with a high degree of chemical homogeneity. The central aim is to assess the role of gravity in the growth process and to explore the possible advantages for growth in the absence of gravity. The alloy system being investigated is the solid solution semiconductor with x-values appropriate for infrared detector applications in Hg sub (1-x) Cd sub x Te the 8 to 14 micro m wavelength region. Both melt and Te-solvent growth are being considered. The study consists of an extensive ground-based experimental and theoretical research effort followed by flight experimentation where appropriate. Experimental facilities have been established for the purification, casting, and crystal growth of the alloy system. Facilities have been also established for the metallurgical, compositional, electric and optical characterization of the alloys. Crystals are being grown by the Bridgman-Stockbarger method and are analyzed by various experimental techniques to evaluate the effects of growth conditions on the longitudinal and radial compositional variations and defect densities in the crystals.

  18. Aspects of unconventional density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Kazumi; Dóra, Balázs; Virosztek, Attila

    2003-12-01

    Recently many people discuss unconventional density waves (i.e. unconventional charge density waves (UCDW) and unconventional spin density waves (USDW)). Unlike in conventional density waves, the quasiparticle spectrum in these systems is gapless. Also these systems remain metallic. Indeed it appears that there are many candidates for UDW. The low temperature phase of α-(BEDT-TTF)2KHg(SCN)4, the antiferromagnetic phase in URu2Si2, the CDW in transition metal dichalcogenite NbSe2, the pseudogap phase in high Tc cuprate superconductors, the glassy phase in organic superconductor κ-(BEDT-TTF)2Cu[N(CN)2]Br. After a brief introduction on UCDW and USDW, we shall discuss some of the above systems, where we believe we have evidence for unconventional density waves.

  19. Slightly Two or Three Dimensional Self-Similar Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Sari, Re'em; Yalinewich, Almog; MacFadyen, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Self similarity allows for analytic or semi-analytic solutions to many hydrodynamics problems. Most of these solutions are one dimensional. Using linear perturbation theory, expanded around such a one-dimensional solution, we find self-similar hydrodynamic solutions that are two- or three-dimensional. Since the deviation from a one-dimensional solution is small, we call these slightly two-dimensional and slightly three-dimensional self-similar solutions, respectively. As an example, we treat strong spherical explosions of the second type. A strong explosion propagates into an ideal gas with negligible temperature and density profile of the form rho(r,theta,phi)=r^{-omega}[1+sigma*F(theta,phi)], where omega>3 and sigma << 1. Analytical solutions are obtained by expanding the arbitrary function F(theta,phi) in spherical harmonics. We compare our results with two dimensional numerical simulations, and find good agreement.

  20. Searching Exact Solutions for Compact Stars in Braneworld: a conjecture

    CERN Document Server

    Ovalle, J

    2007-01-01

    In the context of the braneworld, a spherically symmetric, static and nonhomogeneous stellar distribution with local and non-local bulk terms is studied. Using a toy solution, it is shown how the general relativistic limit could be lost while a solution is being generated on the brane. The source of this problem is clearly identified and solved by a general solution where a constraint can be identified. This constraint is physically interpreted as a necessary condition to regain general relativity, and a particular solution for it is used to find an exact analytical internal solution to no-uniform stellar distributions on the brane. It is shown that such an exact solution is possible due to the fact that bulk corrections to pressure, density and a metric component are a null source of anisotropic effects on the brane. A conjecture is proposed about the possibility of finding physically relevant exact solutions to non-uniform stellar distributions on the brane.

  1. Professional Hadoop solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Lublinsky, Boris; Yakubovich, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    The go-to guidebook for deploying Big Data solutions with Hadoop Today's enterprise architects need to understand how the Hadoop frameworks and APIs fit together, and how they can be integrated to deliver real-world solutions. This book is a practical, detailed guide to building and implementing those solutions, with code-level instruction in the popular Wrox tradition. It covers storing data with HDFS and Hbase, processing data with MapReduce, and automating data processing with Oozie. Hadoop security, running Hadoop with Amazon Web Services, best practices, and automating Hadoop processes i

  2. 海上浮动核电站温排水浮升扩散规律数值模拟%Numerical simulation of buoyant and diffusion rules of thermal discharge from floating nuclear power plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴天奇; 姚世卫; 魏志国

    2015-01-01

    海上浮动核电站温排水会导致停泊水域温度升高,研究其稀释扩散规律并适当控制排放水域温度对于防止环境水体热污染具有重要意义。本文将温排水排放过程简化为横流环境中的热射流过程进行数值模拟。在有限体积法的基础上,采用 SIMPLE 算法和 Realizable k-ε湍流模型建立了热射流浮升过程的三维数学模型,并基于已有文献实验数据,验证了该模型的准确性。分析了环境流速和排放口角度对温排水热影响范围和程度的作用规律。结果显示:环境流速较大时,对流换热剧烈,排放角度对温排水影响范围较小;环境流速较小时,来流的冲刷作用减弱,排放角度对温排水的影响范围较大;相同工况下,在垂直流向平面上排放角度的变化对中心温度沿流向分布影响较小,而在平行流向平面上排放角度的变化对中心温度分布的影响较大,且环境流速对于中心温度沿流向分布影响较小。%The waste heat emissions of thermal discharge from floating nuclear power plants may have a negative thermal effect on the environment.Investigation on the buoyant and diffusion rules of thermal dis-charge from floating nuclear power plants and properly controlling the discharging temperature have great significance for seat water thermal pollution prevention.This paper simplified the thermal discharge process as thermal jet in cross flow to establish the 3D mathematic model for thermal jets floating process, on the basis of finite volume method and using the SIMPLE algorithm and Realizable k-εturbulence model. Then this model was verified by using the experimental data from reference[5 ].The thermal effect range and degree of environmental velocity and discharge angle on thermal discharge were investigated.The re-sults show that,at high ambient velocities,the convection heat transfer was intense so that the heat-affect-ed zone was influenced

  3. Energy density and spatial curvature in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankel, T.; Galloway, G.J.

    1981-04-01

    Positive energy density tends to limit the size of space. This effect is studied within several contexts. We obtain sufficient conditions (which involve the energy density in a crucial way) for the compactness of spatial hypersurfaces in space-time. We then obtain some results concerning static or, more generally, stationary space-times. The Schwarzchild solution puts an upper bound on the size of a static spherically symmetric fluid with density bounded from below. We derive a result of roughly the same nature which, however, requires no symmetry and allows for rotation. Also, we show that static or rotating universes with L = 0 require that the density along some spatial geodesic must fall off rapidly with distance from a point.

  4. Determining the Limiting Current Density of Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Yu Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available All-vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs are used as energy storage systems for intermittent renewable power sources. The performance of VRFBs depends on materials of key components and operating conditions, such as current density, electrolyte flow rate and electrolyte composition. Mass transfer overpotential is affected by the electrolyte flow rate and electrolyte composition, which is related to the limiting current density. In order to investigate the effect of operating conditions on mass transport overpotential, this study established a relationship between the limiting current density and operating conditions. First, electrolyte solutions with different states of charge were prepared and used for a single cell to obtain discharging polarization curves under various operating conditions. The experimental results were then analyzed and are discussed in this paper. Finally, this paper proposes a limiting current density as a function of operating conditions. The result helps predict the effect of operating condition on the cell performance in a mathematical model.

  5. Solution to enterprise resource planning; ERP solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.; Okajima, E. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-05-10

    The environment around enterprises has greatly changed in sluggish Japanese economy since the bubble burst. To make the total enterprise activity efficient and speedy and to flexibly meet changes in enterprise environments and diversified customer needs, enterprises are planning to shift the existing methods to enterprise resource planning (ERP) as the infrastructure of strategic enterprise management. This paper describes the solution to ERP which is package software for the key system, the core of enterprise basic business, and also an application example, giving guideline for restructuring the basic business. (author)

  6. Soliton-like solution in quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Skoromnik, O D; Keitel, C H

    2016-01-01

    A novel soliton-like solution in quantum electrodynamics is obtained via a self-consistent field method. By writing the Hamiltonian of quantum electrodynamics in the Coulomb gauge, we separate out a classical component in the density operator of the electron-positron field. Then, by modeling the state vector in analogy with the theory of superconductivity, we minimize the functional for the energy of the system. This results in the equations of the self-consistent field, where the solutions are associated with the collective excitation of the electron-positron field---the soliton-like solution. In addition, the canonical transformation of the variables allowed us to separate out the total momentum of the system and, consequently, to find the relativistic energy dispersion relation for the moving soliton.

  7. New solutions with accelerated expansion in string theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodelson, Matthew; Dong, Xi; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2014-12-01

    We present concrete solutions with accelerated expansion in string theory, requiring a small, tractable list of stress energy sources. We explain how this construction (and others in progress) evades previous no go theorems for simple accelerating solutions. Our solutions respect an approximate scaling symmetry and realize discrete sequences of values for the equation of state, including one with an accumulation point at w = -1 and another accumulating near w = -1 /3 from below. In another class of models, a density of defects generates scaling solutions with accelerated expansion. We briefly discuss potential applications to dark energy phenomenology, and to holography for cosmology.

  8. Fluctuations around Periodic BPS-Density Waves in the Calogero Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bardek, V; Meljanac, S

    2010-01-01

    The collective field formulation of the Calogero model supports periodic density waves. An important set of such density waves is a two-parameter family of BPS solutions of the equations of motion of the collective field theory. One of these parameters is essentially the average particle density, which determines the period, while the other parameter determines the amplitude. These BPS solutions are sometimes referred to as "small amplitude waves" since they undulate around their mean density, but never vanish. We present complete analysis of quadratic fluctuations around these BPS solutions. The corresponding fluctuation hamiltonian (i.e., the stability operator) is diagonalized in terms of bosonic creation and annihilation operators which correspond to the complete orthogonal set of Bloch-Floquet eigenstates of a related periodic Schr\\"odinger hamiltonian, which we derive explicitly. Remarkably, the fluctuation spectrum is independent of the parameter which determines the density wave's amplitude. As a cons...

  9. Density perturbations with relativistic thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Maartens, R

    1997-01-01

    We investigate cosmological density perturbations in a covariant and gauge- invariant formalism, incorporating relativistic causal thermodynamics to give a self-consistent description. The gradient of density inhomogeneities splits covariantly into a scalar part, a rotational vector part that is determined by the vorticity, and a tensor part that describes the shape. We give the evolution equations for these parts in the general dissipative case. Causal thermodynamics gives evolution equations for viswcous stress and heat flux, which are coupled to the density perturbation equation and to the entropy and temperature perturbation equations. We give the full coupled system in the general dissipative case, and simplify the system in certain cases.

  10. Charge density waves in solids

    CERN Document Server

    Gor'kov, LP

    2012-01-01

    The latest addition to this series covers a field which is commonly referred to as charge density wave dynamics.The most thoroughly investigated materials are inorganic linear chain compounds with highly anisotropic electronic properties. The volume opens with an examination of their structural properties and the essential features which allow charge density waves to develop.The behaviour of the charge density waves, where interesting phenomena are observed, is treated both from a theoretical and an experimental standpoint. The role of impurities in statics and dynamics is considered and an

  11. Breakup Densities of Hot Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, Vic

    2006-04-01

    Breakup densities of hot ^197Au-like residues have been deduced from the systematic trends of Coulomb parameters required to fit intermediate-mass-fragment kinetic-energy spectra. The results indicate emission from nuclei near normal nuclear density below an excitation energy E*/A .3ex˜x 5 MeV. Temperatures derived from these data with a density-dependent Fermi-gas model yield a nuclear caloric curve that is generally consistent with those derived from isotope ratios.

  12. Density of very small meteoroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikwaya Eluo, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-08-01

    Knowing the density of meteoroids helps to determine the physical structure and gives insight into the composition of their parent bodies. The density of meteoroids can provide clues to their origins, whether cometary or asteroidal. Density helps also to characterize the risk meteoroids may pose to artificial satellites.Ceplecha (1968) calculated the density of small meteoroids based on a parameter KB (meteoroid beginning height) and classified them in four categories (A,B,C,D) with densities going from 2700 to 180 kgm-3.Babadzhanov(2002) applied a model based on quasi-continuous fragmentation (QCF) on 413 photographic Super-Schmidt meteors by solely fitting their light curves. Their densities range from 400 to 7800 kgm-3. Bellot Rubio et al. (2002) analyzed the same 413 photographic meteors assuming the single body theory based on meteoroid dynamical properties and found densities ranging from 400 to 4800 kgm-3. A thermal erosion model was used by Borovicka et al. (2007) to analyze, simultaneously, the observed decelerations and light curves of six Draconid meteors. The density was found to be 300 kgm-3, consistent with the fact that the Draconid meteors are porous aggregates of grains associated with the Jupiter-family-comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner (Jacchia, L.G., 1950).We used the Campbell-Brown and Koschny (2004) model of meteoroid ablation to determine the density of faint meteoroids from the analysis of both observed decelerations and light curves of meteoroids (Kikwaya et al., 2009; Kikwaya et al., 2011). Our work was based on a collection of six and ninety-two sporadic meteors. The grain masses used in the modeling ranged from 10-12 Kg to 10-9 Kg. We computed the orbit of each meteoroid and determined its Tisserand parameter. We found that meteoroids with asteroidal orbits have bulk densities ranging from 3000-5000 kgm-3. Meteoroids consistent with HTC/NIC parents have bulk densities from 400 kgm-3 to 1600 kg m-3. JFC meteoroids were found to have surprisingly

  13. 井下高密度电法在矿井防治水的应用--以解决运煤通道底板下沉为例%Application of Underground High Density Electric Method in Mine Water Control-A Case Study of Coal Haulage Road Floor Subsidence Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    费明泽

    2014-01-01

    根据高密度电阻率法的工作原理、装置形式和异常特点,利用井下高密度电法技术对西山煤电运煤通道东曲段底板下沉区域进行探测。探测采用高密度直流电法温纳装置,布置电极总数64路,电极距5m,剖面总长度320m。对采集的数据通过基于圆滑约束最小二乘法反演,获得电阻率成像断面色谱图,结合已知异常地质体的电性特征,对矿井含水层富水性进行评价。解释结果表明运煤通道东曲段底板存在一个低阻异常区,且上下连通,应作为底板水防治的重点区域。该结论已得到钻孔验证。%Based on high density resistivity method operational principles, installation configuration and anomaly characteristics, using underground high density electric method technology carried out prospecting in Xishan Coal Electricity Group coal haulage road Dongqu sector floor subsidence area. Prospecting used high density DC electric method Wenner installation, deployed electrodes total 64way with electrode spacing 5m, total section length 320m. Acquired data using smooth constrained least squares method inversion, obtained resistivity imaging section chromatogram, combined with known anomalous geologic body electric characteristics, carried out evaluation of mine aquifer water yield property. Interpreted result has shown that a low resistivity anomalous zone existed, then again connected from top to bottom, and thus should be the key area in floor water control. The conclusion is already verified by drilling.

  14. Derivation of the Fick's Law for the Lorentz Model in a low density regime

    OpenAIRE

    Basile, Giada; Nota, Alessia; Pezzotti, Federica; Pulvirenti, Mario

    2014-01-01

    We consider the Lorentz model in a slab with two mass reservoirs at the boundaries. We show that, in a low density regime, there exists a unique stationary solution for the microscopic dynamics which converges to the stationary solution of the heat equation, namely to the linear profile of the density. In the same regime the macroscopic current in the stationary state is given by the Fick's law, with the diffusion coefficient determined by the Green-Kubo formula.

  15. The Conductivity of Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayner-Canham, Geoff

    1993-01-01

    Presents historical background and modern explanations for the popular demonstration of showing conductivity of solutions through the insertion of a light-bulb conductivity tester into deionized water and water with salt in it. (PR)

  16. Convergent Aeronautics Solutions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Convergent Aeronautics Solutions (CAS) Project uses short-duration activities to establish early-stage concept and technology feasibility for high-potential...

  17. Brainmining emotive lateral solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Scaltsas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available BrainMining is a theory of creative thinking that shows how we should exploit the mind’s spontaneous natural disposition to use old solutions to address new problems – our Anchoring Cognitive Bias. BrainMining develops a simple and straightforward method to transform recalcitrant problems into types of problems which we have solved before, and then apply an old type of solution to them. The transformation makes the thinking lateral by matching up disparate types of problem and solution. It emphasises the role of emotive judgements that the agent makes, when she discerns whether a change of the values or the emotions and feelings in a situation, which would expand the space of solutions available for the problem at hand, would be acceptable or appropriate in the situation. A lateral solution for an intractable problem is thus spontaneously brainmined from the agent’s old solutions, to solve a transformed version of the intractable problem, possibly involving changes in the value system or the emotional profile of the situation, which the agent judges, emotively, will be acceptable, and even appropriate in the circumstances.

  18. Towards finite density QCD with Taylor expansions

    CERN Document Server

    Karsch, Frithjof; Wagner, Mathias; Wambach, Jochen

    2010-01-01

    Convergence properties of Taylor expansions of observables, which are also used in lattice QCD calculations at non-zero chemical potential, are analyzed in an effective N_f = 2+1 flavor Polyakov-quark-meson model. A recently developed algorithmic technique allows the calculation of higher-order Taylor expansion coefficients in functional approaches. This novel technique is for the first time applied to an effective N_f = 2+1 flavor Polyakov-quark-meson model and the findings are compared with the full model solution at finite densities. The results are used to discuss prospects for locating the QCD phase boundary and a possible critical endpoint in the phase diagram.

  19. High Energy Density Capacitors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA?s future space science missions cannot be realized without the state of the art energy storage devices which require high energy density, high reliability, and...

  20. Density functionals from deep learning

    CERN Document Server

    McMahon, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Density-functional theory is a formally exact description of a many-body quantum system in terms of its density; in practice, however, approximations to the universal density functional are required. In this work, a model based on deep learning is developed to approximate this functional. Deep learning allows computational models that are capable of naturally discovering intricate structure in large and/or high-dimensional data sets, with multiple levels of abstraction. As no assumptions are made as to the form of this structure, this approach is much more powerful and flexible than traditional approaches. As an example application, the model is shown to perform well on approximating the kinetic-energy density functional for noninteracting electrons. The model is analyzed in detail, and its advantages over conventional machine learning are discussed.

  1. Operator Semi-group of Density Evolution Equation for a Repairable Redundnt System with Two Same Components

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史定华; 徐洪; 等

    2002-01-01

    For a repairable redundant system consisting of two same components with exponential lifetime and general repair time distribution,the probability densities of the system in some state at time t were determined by a group of ordinary and partial differential equations,called density evolution equations.It was proved that the time-dependent solution of the density evolution equations uniquely exists and strongly converges to its steady state density solution by a semi-group method.In this proof,it is not necessary to suppose that the repair rate function is bounded.The technique of the proof is valuable for many density evolution equatons.

  2. Primordial density and BAO reconstruction

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Chen, Xuelei

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method to reconstruct the primordial (linear) density field using the estimated nonlinear displacement field. The divergence of the displacement field gives the reconstructed density field. We solve the nonlinear displacement field in the 1D cosmology and show the reconstruction results. The new reconstruction algorithm recovers a lot of linear modes and reduces the nonlinear damping scale significantly. The successful 1D reconstruction results imply the new algorithm should also be a promising technique in the 3D case.

  3. Parallel Multiscale Autoregressive Density Estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Reed, Scott; Oord, Aäron van den; Kalchbrenner, Nal; Colmenarejo, Sergio Gómez; Wang, Ziyu; Belov, Dan; de Freitas, Nando

    2017-01-01

    PixelCNN achieves state-of-the-art results in density estimation for natural images. Although training is fast, inference is costly, requiring one network evaluation per pixel; O(N) for N pixels. This can be sped up by caching activations, but still involves generating each pixel sequentially. In this work, we propose a parallelized PixelCNN that allows more efficient inference by modeling certain pixel groups as conditionally independent. Our new PixelCNN model achieves competitive density e...

  4. Ultra high energy density and fast discharge nanocomposite capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Haixiong; Sodano, Henry A.

    2013-04-01

    Nanocomposites containing high dielectric permittivity ceramics embedded in high breakdown strength polymers are currently of considerable interest as a solution for the development of high energy density capacitors. However, the improvement of dielectric permittivity comes at expense of the breakdown strength leading to limit the final energy density. Here, an ultra-high energy density nanocomposite was fabricated based on high aspect ratio barium strontium titanate nanowires. The pyroelectric phase Ba0.2Sr0.8TiO3 was chosen for the nanowires combined with quenched PVDF to fabricate high energy density nanocomposite. The energy density with 7.5% Ba0.2Sr0.8TiO3 nanowires reached 14.86 J/cc at 450 MV/m, which represented a 42.9% increase in comparison to the PVDF with an energy density of 10.4 J/cc at the same electric field. The capacitors have 1138% greater than higher energy density than commercial biaxial oriented polypropylene capacitors (1.2 J/cc at 640). These results demonstrate that the high aspect ratio nanowires can be used to produce nanocomposite capacitors with greater performance than the neat polymers thus providing a novel process for the development of future pulsed-power capacitors.

  5. Density of point clouds in mobile laser scanning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Warchoł

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging technology is becoming a more and more popular method to collect spatial information. The acquisition of 3D data by means of one or several laser scanners mounted on a mobile platform (car could quickly provide large volumes of dense data with centimeter-level accuracy. This is, therefore, the ideal solution to obtain information about objects with elongated shapes (corridors, and their surroundings. Point clouds used by specific applications must fulfill certain quality criteria, such as quantitative and qualitative indicators (i.e. precision, accuracy, density, completeness.Usually, the client fixes some parameter values that must be achieved. In terms of the precision, this parameter is well described, whereas in the case of density point clouds the discussion is still open. Due to the specificities of the MLS (Mobile Laser Scanning, the solution from ALS (Airborne Laser Scanning cannot be directly applied. Hence, the density of the final point clouds, calculated as the number of points divided by "flat" surface area, is inappropriate. We present in this article three different ways of determining and interpreting point cloud density on three different test fields. The first method divides the number of points by the "flat" area, the second by the "three-dimensional" area, and the last one refers to a voxel approach. The most reliable method seems to be the voxel method, which in addition to the local density values also presents their spatial distribution.

  6. Density Sorting During the Evolution of Continental Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Behn, M. D.; Hacker, B. R.

    2015-12-01

    We consider two settings - in addition to "delamination" of arc lower crust - in which dense, mafic eclogites founder into the convecting mantle while buoyant, felsic lithologies accumulate at the base of evolving continental crust. Arc processes play a central role in generating continental crust, but it remains uncertain how basaltic arc crust is transformed to andesitic continental crust. Dense, SiO2-poor products of fractionation may founder from the base of arc crust by "delamination", but lower arc crust after delamination has significantly different trace elements compared to lower continental crust (LCC). In an alternative model, buoyant magmatic rocks generated at arcs are first subducted, mainly via subduction erosion. Upon heating, these buoyant lithologies ascend through the mantle wedge or along a subduction channel, and are "relaminated" at
the base of overlying crust (e.g., Hacker et al EPSL 11, AREPS 15). Average buoyant lavas and plutons
for the Aleutians, Izu-Bonin-Marianas, Kohistan and Talkeetna arcs fall within the range of estimated LCC major and trace elements. Relamination is more efficient in generating continental crust than delamination. Himalayan cross-sections show Indian crust thrust beneath Tibetan crust, with no intervening mantle. There is a horizontal Moho at ca 80 km depth, extending from thickened Indian crust, across the region where Tibetan crust overlies Indian crust, into thickened Tibetan crust. About half the subducted Indian crust is present, whereas the other half is missing. Data (Vp/Vs; Miocene lavas formed by interaction of continental crust with mantle; xenolith thermometry) indicate 1000°C or more from ca 50 km depth to the Moho since the Miocene. We build on earlier studies (LePichon et al Tectonics 92, T'phys 97; Schulte-Pelkum et al Nature 05; Monsalve et al JGR 08) to advance the hypothesis that rapid growth of garnet occurs at 70-80 km and 1000°C within subducting Indian crust. Dense eclogites founder

  7. Passive House Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strom, I.; Joosten, L.; Boonstra, C. [DHV Sustainability Consultants, Eindhoiven (Netherlands)

    2006-05-15

    PEP stands for 'Promotion of European Passive Houses' and is a consortium of European partners, supported by the European Commission, Directorate General for Energy and Transport. In this working paper an overview is given of Passive House solutions. An inventory has been made of Passive House solutions for new build residences applied in each country. Based on this, the most common basic solutions have been identified and described in further detail, including the extent to which solutions are applied in common and best practice and expected barriers for the implementation in each country. An inventory per country is included in the appendix. The analysis of Passive House solutions in partner countries shows high priority with regard to the performance of the thermal envelope, such as high insulation of walls, roofs, floors and windows/ doors, thermal bridge-free construction and air tightness. Due to the required air tightness, special attention must be paid to indoor air quality through proper ventilation. Finally, efficient ((semi-)solar) heating systems for combined space and DHW heating still require a significant amount of attention in most partner countries. Other basic Passive House solutions show a smaller discrepancy with common practice and fewer barriers have been encountered in partner countries. In the next section, the general barriers in partner countries have been inventoried. For each type of barrier a suggested approach has been given. Most frequently encountered barriers in partner countries are: limited know-how; limited contractor skills; and acceptation of Passive Houses in the market. Based on the suggested approaches to overcoming barriers, this means that a great deal of attention must be paid to providing practical information and solutions to building professionals, providing practical training to installers and contractors and communication about the Passive House concept to the market.

  8. On axisymmetric and stationary solutions of the self-gravitating Vlasov system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Ellery; Andréasson, Håkan; Logg, Anders

    2016-08-01

    Axisymmetric and stationary solutions are constructed to the Einstein-Vlasov and Vlasov-Poisson systems. These solutions are constructed numerically, using finite element methods and a fixed-point iteration in which the total mass is fixed at each step. A variety of axisymmetric stationary solutions are exhibited, including solutions with toroidal, disk-like, spindle-like, and composite spatial density configurations, as are solutions with non-vanishing net angular momentum. In the case of toroidal solutions, we show for the first time, solutions of the Einstein-Vlasov system which contain ergoregions.

  9. On Axisymmetric and Stationary Solutions of the Self-Gravitating Vlasov System

    CERN Document Server

    Ames, Ellery; Logg, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Axisymmetric and stationary solutions are constructed to the Einstein--Vlasov and Vlasov--Poisson systems. These solutions are constructed numerically, using finite element methods and a fixed-point iteration in which the total mass is fixed at each step. A variety of axisymmetric stationary solutions are exhibited, including solutions with toroidal, disk-like, spindle-like, and composite spatial density configurations, as are solutions with non-vanishing net angular momentum. In the case of toroidal solutions, we show for the first time, solutions of the Einstein--Vlasov system which contain ergoregions.

  10. Analytical solutions for Tokamak equilibria with reversed toroidal current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Caroline G. L.; Roberto, M.; Braga, F. L. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo 12228-900 (Brazil); Caldas, I. L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    In tokamaks, an advanced plasma confinement regime has been investigated with a central hollow electric current with negative density which gives rise to non-nested magnetic surfaces. We present analytical solutions for the magnetohydrodynamic equilibria of this regime in terms of non-orthogonal toroidal polar coordinates. These solutions are obtained for large aspect ratio tokamaks and they are valid for any kind of reversed hollow current density profiles. The zero order solution of the poloidal magnetic flux function describes nested toroidal magnetic surfaces with a magnetic axis displaced due to the toroidal geometry. The first order correction introduces a poloidal field asymmetry and, consequently, magnetic islands arise around the zero order surface with null poloidal magnetic flux gradient. An analytic expression for the magnetic island width is deduced in terms of the equilibrium parameters. We give examples of the equilibrium plasma profiles and islands obtained for a class of current density profile.

  11. Statistical Gauge Theory for Relativistic Finite Density Problems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YING Shu-Qian

    2001-01-01

    A relativistic quantum field theory is presented for finite density problems based on the principle of locality. It is shown that, in addition to the conventional ones, a local approach to the relativistic quantum field theories at both zero and finite densities consistent with the violation of Bell-like inequalities should contain and provide solutions to at least three additional problems, namely, i) the statistical gauge invariance; ii) the dark components of the local observables; and iii) the fermion statistical blocking effects, based upon an asymptotic nonthermal ensemble. An application to models is presented to show the importance of the discussions.

  12. Dependence of Reaction Rate Constants on Density in Supercritical Fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGTao; SHENZhongyao

    2002-01-01

    A new method,which correlates rate constants of chemical reactions and density or pressure in supercritical fluids,was developed.Based on the transition state theory and thermodynamic principles, the rate constant can be reasonably correlated with the density of the supercritical fluid,and a correlation equation was obtained. Coupled with the equation of state (EOS) of a supercritical solvent,the effect of pressure on reaction rate constant could be represented.Two typical systems were used to test this method.The result indicates that this method is suitable for dilute supercritical fluid solutions.

  13. Investigation of microalgae with photon density waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankovitch, Christine; Reich, Oliver; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd

    2007-09-01

    Phototropic microalgae have a large potential for producing valuable substances for the feed, food, cosmetics, pigment, bioremediation, and pharmacy industries as well as for biotechnological processes. Today it is estimated that the microalgal aquaculture worldwide production is 5000 tons of dry matter per year (not taking into account processed products) making it an approximately $1.25 billion U.S. per year industry. For effective observation of the photosynthetic growth processes, fast on-line sensor systems that analyze the relevant biological and technical process parameters are preferred. The optical properties of the microalgae culture influence the transport of light in the photobioreactor and can be used to extract relevant information for efficient cultivation practices. Microalgae cultivation media show a combination of light absorption and scattering, which are influenced by the concentrations and the physical and chemical properties of the different absorbing and scattering species (e.g. pigments, cell components, etc.). Investigations with frequency domain photon density waves (PDW) allow for the examination of absorption and scattering properties of turbid media, namely the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient. The reduced scattering coefficient can be used to characterize physical and morphological properties of the medium, including the cell concentration, whereas the absorption coefficient correlates with the pigment content. Nannochloropsis oculata, a single-cell species of microalgae, were examined in a nutrient solution with photon density waves. The absorption and reduced scattering coefficients were experimentally determined throughout the cultivation process, and applied to gain information about the cell concentration and average cell radius.

  14. Covariant density functional theory for nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badarch, U.

    2007-07-01

    The present thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 2 we study the Nucleon-Nucleon (NN) interaction in Dirac-Brueckner (DB) approach. We start by considering the NN interaction in free-space in terms of the Bethe-Salpeter (BS) equation to the meson exchange potential model. Then we present the DB approach for nuclear matter by extending the BS equation for the in-medium NN interaction. From the solution of the three-dimensional in-medium BS equation, we derive the DB self-energies and total binding energy which are the main results of the DB approach, which we later incorporate in the field theoretical calculation of the nuclear equation of state. In Chapter 3, we introduce the basic concepts of density functional theory in the context of Quantum Hadrodynamics (QHD-I). We reach the main point of this work in Chapter 4 where we introduce the DDRH approach. In the DDRH theory, the medium dependence of the meson-nucleon vertices is expressed as functionals of the baryon field operators. Because of the complexities of the operator-valued functionals we decide to use the mean-field approximation. In Chapter 5, we contrast microscopic and phenomenological approaches to extracting density dependent meson-baryon vertices. Chapter 6 gives the results of our studies of the EOS of infinite nuclear matter in detail. Using formulas derived in Chapters 4 and 5 we calculate the properties of symmetric and asymmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter. (orig.)

  15. Duple-EDA and sample density balancing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI YunPeng; XU Hua; SUN XiaoMin; JIA PeiFa; LIU ZeHua

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,a new method is proposed to overcome the problem of local optima traps in a class of evolutionary algorithms,called estimation of distribution algorithms (EDAs),in real-valued function optimization.The Duple-EDA framework is proposed in which not only the current best solutions but also the search history are modeled,so that long-term feedback can be taken into account.Sample Density Balancing (SDB) is proposed under the framework to alleviate the drift phenomenon in EDA.A selection scheme based on Pareto ranking considering both the fitness and the historical sample density is adopted,which prevents the algorithm from repeatedly sampling in a small region and directs it to explore potentially optimal regions,thus helps it avoid being stuck into local optima.An MBOA (mixed Bayesian optimization algorithm) version of the framework is implemented and tested on several benchmark problems.Experimental results show that the proposed method outperforms a standard niching method in these benchmark problems.

  16. From the Highly Compressible Navier-Stokes Equations to Fast Diffusion and Porous Media Equations, Existence of Global Weak Solution for the Quasi-Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haspot, Boris

    2016-06-01

    We consider the compressible Navier-Stokes equations for viscous and barotropic fluids with density dependent viscosity. The aim is to investigate mathematical properties of solutions of the Navier-Stokes equations using solutions of the pressureless Navier-Stokes equations, that we call quasi solutions. This regime corresponds to the limit of highly compressible flows. In this paper we are interested in proving the announced result in Haspot (Proceedings of the 14th international conference on hyperbolic problems held in Padova, pp 667-674, 2014) concerning the existence of global weak solution for the quasi-solutions, we also observe that for some choice of initial data (irrotationnal) the quasi solutions verify the porous media, the heat equation or the fast diffusion equations in function of the structure of the viscosity coefficients. In particular it implies that it exists classical quasi-solutions in the sense that they are {C^{∞}} on {(0,T)× {R}N} for any {T > 0}. Finally we show the convergence of the global weak solution of compressible Navier-Stokes equations to the quasi solutions in the case of a vanishing pressure limit process. In particular for highly compressible equations the speed of propagation of the density is quasi finite when the viscosity corresponds to {μ(ρ)=ρ^{α}} with {α > 1}. Furthermore the density is not far from converging asymptotically in time to the Barrenblatt solution of mass the initial density {ρ0}.

  17. Remark on compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity and discontinuous initial data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Fang, Daoyuan

    2008-03-01

    In this paper, we study the free boundary problem for 1D compressible Navier-Stokes equations with density-dependent viscosity. We focus on the case where the viscosity coefficient vanishes on vacuum. We prove the global existence and uniqueness for discontinuous solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations when the initial density is a bounded variation function, and give a decay result for the density as t-->+[infinity].

  18. Accurate and robust methods for variable density incompressible flows with discontinuities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rider, W.J.; Kothe, D.B.; Puckett, E.G.

    1996-09-01

    We are interested in the solution of incompressible flows which are characterized by large density variations, interfacial physics, arbitrary material topologies and strong vortical content. The issues present in constant density incompressible flow are exacerbated by the presence of density discontinuities. A much greater premium requirement is placed the positivity of computed quantities The mechanism of baroclinc vorticity generation exists ({gradient}p x {gradient}p) to further complicate the physics.

  19. Density Of The Copper-Rich Cu-Pb-Fe Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sak T.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Density of the copper-rich corner of the ternary Cu-Pb-Fe alloys was determined with the dilatometric method. Investigated alloys had constant copper content equal to 0.9, 0.8 and 0.7 mole fraction, and varied iron concentration up to 0.1 mole fraction. A model predicting the density of ternary solution from knowledge of density of pure component and the excess of molar volume for limiting binaries is proposed.

  20. Comparison of density estimators. [Estimation of probability density functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kao, S.; Monahan, J.F.

    1977-09-01

    Recent work in the field of probability density estimation has included the introduction of some new methods, such as the polynomial and spline methods and the nearest neighbor method, and the study of asymptotic properties in depth. This earlier work is summarized here. In addition, the computational complexity of the various algorithms is analyzed, as are some simulations. The object is to compare the performance of the various methods in small samples and their sensitivity to change in their parameters, and to attempt to discover at what point a sample is so small that density estimation can no longer be worthwhile. (RWR)

  1. The synthesis and determination of the octacoordinated structure of Pr(III) and Nd(III) complexes with β-diketones and diols in non aqueous solutions: evidence of some participation of π-electron density of diols with Pr(III) and Nd(III) in complexation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sudhindra N.; Devi, M. Indira

    1997-10-01

    The synthesized complexes are of the general structure Ln(β-diketonate) 3 diol (where β-diketonate = benzoyl acetonate (bzac), dibenzoyl methanoate (dbm) and thionyl trifluoroacetonate (ttfa) and (diols) (= butane-1,4- and cis-butene-1,4-diols). The absorption intensity data in non aqueous solvents has been analysed in terms of Judd Ofelt intensity Tλ(λ = 2, 4, 6) parameters for electric dipole 4f-4f transitions. β-diketones are bidentate and function as monofunctional ligands coordinating through oxygen donor atoms forming substantially stable chelate rings, while diols behave as neutral biodentate ligands coordinating through oxygen. β-diketone ligands differ only in the substituents R 1 and R 2 (Fig. 1) while diols differ in the nature of the bond formed between second and third carbon atoms of the molecules. These small chemical and structural differences have been shown to produce significant variation of oscillator strength of certain absorption bands. Again, their relative perturbations of 4f-4f transition intensities are quite evident in Tλ-parameters estimated for different complexes. Attempts have been made to correlate between the intensity parameter Tλ and oscillator strengths determined from observed spectra of these complexes. The intensity analysis of absorption spectral bands have given sufficient evidence of some sort of interaction between Pr(III) and Nd(III) with π-electron density of the double bond found in butene-1,4-diol.

  2. SOME UNUSUAL SOLUTIONS FOR EUROPEAN NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernescu V

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Authors present several non-conventional solutions unused in Europe which are, however, frequently adopted in some medium (M and low (L voltages (V networks from North-American and Australian countries, especially in low density areas of consumption in rural and urban distribution. The proposed solutions may assure diversified supply possibilities in our middle and South–Eastern regions, as regards modernizing and upgrading the distribution networks. The solutions try to propose to adapt our European practice to the North-American experience, aiming at developing more flexible, cheaper and safer supply of the consumers, both at MV and at LV networks. Several original solutions promoted in Romanian networks and their peculiarities are also described. The paper presents distribution schemes at medium voltage in connection with low voltage supply in different condition of neutral treatment at MV or LV. It also shows the measures to be adopted in order to diminish the investment expenses in low voltage at the supplied consumers. The technical condition of co-existence of OHEL at MV and LV on the same poles, without jeopardizing the LV equipment, is necessary. Among the solutions proposed, the authors also describe the unconventional one, consisting in the supply of isolated monophase consumer at MV by ground return and also the conditions necessary for sure and safe operation of this particularly connection. Finally, there are shown some conclusions about the necessity to assure imposed environmental conditions.

  3. Analytic solution of an oscillatory migratory alpha^2 stellar dynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, Axel

    2016-01-01

    Analytic solutions of the mean-field induction equation predict a nonoscillatory dynamo for uniform helical turbulence or constant alpha effect in unbounded or periodic domains. Oscillatory dynamos are generally thought impossible for constant alpha. We present an analytic solution for a one-dimensional bounded domain resulting in oscillatory solutions for constant alpha, but different (Dirichlet and von Neumann or perfect conductor and vacuum) boundary conditions on the two ends. We solve a second order complex equation and superimpose two independent solutions to obey both boundary conditions. The solution has time-independent energy density. On one end where the function value vanishes, the second derivative is finite, which would not be correctly reproduced with sine-like expansion functions where a node coincides with an inflection point. The obtained solution may serve as a benchmark for numerical dynamo experiments and as a pedagogical illustration that oscillatory dynamos are possible for dynamos with...

  4. Lateral migration of a foundering high-density root: Insights from numerical modeling applied to the southern Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valera, J. L.; Negredo, A. M.; Billen, M. I.; Jiménez-Munt, I.

    2014-02-01

    The southern Sierra Nevada is a geodynamically complex region where several models have been proposed to explain the rapid removal of lithospheric mantle occurring sometime between 8.0 and 3.5 Ma. Tomographic studies show the presence of an east-dipping slab-shaped fast seismic anomaly reaching to about 300 km depth below the western Sierras and Great Valley, and receiver function studies indicate a broad region of lithosphere removal. This work presents thermo-mechanical modeling of asymmetric foundering of a high-density batholithic root with lateral intrusion of asthenospheric material. The predicted evolution is controlled by: a) the upwelling of buoyant asthenosphere facilitated by the presence of a weakened lithospheric mantle adjacent to a dense batholitic root, b) the westward inflow enabled by a low viscosity lower crust, and c) negative buoyancy of a batholithic dense root. The dynamics of these models can be characterized as a slowly migrating lithosphere foundering process driven by the density anomaly of the ultramafic root, but controlled by the magnitude of the lower crustal viscosity, which determines the rate at which asthenospheric material can flow into the opening lower crustal gap. Final model-predicted upper-mantle structure is compatible with existing tomographic images and the observed V-shape geometry of the Moho below the western margin of the southern Sierra Nevada. Model-predicted topography is also generally consistent with observations, and shows a monotonous uplift of the high region since 7 Ma and presently ongoing, and an area of maximum subsidence west of the area of the V-shaped Moho, due to the pull exerted by the sinking of the high-density root.

  5. Lithospheric density structure beneath the Tarim basin and surroundings, northwestern China, from the joint inversion of gravity and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yangfan; Levandowski, Will; Kusky, Tim

    2017-02-01

    Intraplate strain generally focuses in discrete zones, but despite the profound impact of this partitioning on global tectonics, geodynamics, and seismic hazard, the processes by which deformation becomes localized are not well understood. Such heterogeneous intraplate strain is exemplified in central Asia, where the Indo-Eurasian collision has caused widespread deformation while the Tarim block has experienced minimal Cenozoic shortening. The apparent stability of Tarim may arise either because strain is dominantly accommodated by pre-existing faults in the continental suture zones that bound it-essentially discretizing Eurasia into microplates-or because the lithospheric-scale strength (i.e., viscosity) of the Tarim block is greater than its surroundings. Here, we jointly analyze seismic velocity, gravity, topography, and temperature to develop a 3-D density model of the crust and upper mantle in this region. The Tarim crust is characterized by high density, vs, vp, and vp /vs, consistent with a dominantly mafic composition and with the presence of an oceanic plateau beneath Tarim. Low-density but high-velocity mantle lithosphere beneath southern (southwestern) Tarim underlies a suite of Permian plume-related mafic intrusions and A-type granites sourced in previously depleted mantle lithosphere; we posit that this region was further depleted, dehydrated, and strengthened by Permian plume magmatism. The actively deforming western and southern margins of Tarim-the Tien Shan, Kunlun Shan, and Altyn Tagh fault-are underlain by buoyant upper mantle with low velocity; we hypothesize that this material has been hydrated by mantle-derived fluids that have preferentially migrated along Paleozoic continental sutures. Such hydrous material should be weak, and herein strain focuses there because of lithospheric-scale variations in rheology rather than the pre-existence of faults in the brittle crust. Thus this world-class example of strain partitioning arises not simply from

  6. XML problem, design, solution

    CERN Document Server

    Amiano, Mitch; Ethier, Kay; Thomas, Michael D

    2006-01-01

    Offering a unique approach to learning XML, this book walks readers through the process of building a complete, functional, end-to-end XML solutionFeatured case study is an online business product catalog that includes reports, data input/output, workflow, stylesheet formatting, RSS feeds, and integration with external services like Google, eBay, and AmazonThe format of presenting a problem and working through the design to come up with a solution enables readers to understand how XML markup allows a business to share data across applications internally or with partners or customers even thoug

  7. Microsoft big data solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, Adam; Welch, John; Clark, Dan; Price, Christopher; Mitchell, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Tap the power of Big Data with Microsoft technologies Big Data is here, and Microsoft's new Big Data platform is a valuable tool to help your company get the very most out of it. This timely book shows you how to use HDInsight along with HortonWorks Data Platform for Windows to store, manage, analyze, and share Big Data throughout the enterprise. Focusing primarily on Microsoft and HortonWorks technologies but also covering open source tools, Microsoft Big Data Solutions explains best practices, covers on-premises and cloud-based solutions, and features valuable case studies. Best of all,

  8. Calculus problems and solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Ginzburg, A

    2011-01-01

    Ideal for self-instruction as well as for classroom use, this text helps students improve their understanding and problem-solving skills in analysis, analytic geometry, and higher algebra. More than 1,200 problems appear in the text, with concise explanations of the basic notions and theorems to be used in their solution. Many are followed by complete answers; solutions for the others appear at the end of the book. Topics include sequences, functions of a single variable, limit of a function, differential calculus for functions of a single variable, fundamental theorems and applications of dif

  9. Buoyancy Effects on Flow Structure and Instability of Low-Density Gas Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasumarthi, Kasyap Sriramachandra

    2004-01-01

    A low-density gas jet injected into a high-density ambient gas is known to exhibit self-excited global oscillations accompanied by large vortical structures interacting with the flow field. The primary objective of the proposed research is to study buoyancy effects on the origin and nature of the flow instability and structure in the near-field of low-density gas jets. Quantitative rainbow schlieren deflectometry, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and Linear stability analysis were the techniques employed to scale the buoyancy effects. The formation and evolution of vortices and scalar structure of the flow field are investigated in buoyant helium jets discharged from a vertical tube into quiescent air. Oscillations at identical frequency were observed throughout the flow field. The evolving flow structure is described by helium mole percentage contours during an oscillation cycle. Instantaneous, mean, and RMS concentration profiles are presented to describe interactions of the vortex with the jet flow. Oscillations in a narrow wake region near the jet exit are shown to spread through the jet core near the downstream location of the vortex formation. The effects of jet Richardson number on characteristics of vortex and flow field are investigated and discussed. The laminar, axisymmetric, unsteady jet flow of helium injected into air was simulated using CFD. Global oscillations were observed in the flow field. The computed oscillation frequency agreed qualitatively with the experimentally measured frequency. Contours of helium concentration, vorticity and velocity provided information about the evolution and propagation of vortices in the oscillating flow field. Buoyancy effects on the instability mode were evaluated by rainbow schlieren flow visualization and concentration measurements in the near-field of self-excited helium jets undergoing gravitational change in the microgravity environment of 2.2s drop tower at NASA John H. Glenn Research Center. The jet

  10. Higher dimensional strange quark matter solutions in self creation cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Şen, R.; Aygün, S.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, we have generalized the higher dimensional flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) universe solutions for a cloud of string with perfect fluid attached strange quark matter (SQM) in Self Creation Cosmology (SCC). We have obtained that the cloud of string with perfect fluid does not survive and the string tension density vanishes for this model. However, we get dark energy model for strange quark matter with positive density and negative pressure in self creation cosmology.

  11. Non-uniform Braneworld Stars: an Exact Solution

    CERN Document Server

    Ovalle, J

    2008-01-01

    The first exact interior solution to Einstein's field equations for a static and non-uniform braneworld star with local and non-local bulk terms is presented. It is shown that the bulk Weyl scalar ${\\cal U}(r)$ is always negative inside the stellar distribution, in consequence it reduces both the effective density and the effective pressure. It is found that the anisotropy generated by bulk gravity effect has an acceptable physical behaviour inside the distribution. Using a Reissner-N\\"{o}rdstrom-like exterior solution, the effects of bulk gravity on pressure and density are found through matching conditions.

  12. Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling of Fluctuation Solution Theory Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O’Connell, John P.; Abildskov, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Fluctuation Solution Theory provides relationships between integrals of the molecular pair total and direct correlation functions and the pressure derivative of solution density, partial molar volumes, and composition derivatives of activity coefficients. For dense fluids, the integrals follow...... for densities and gas solubilities, including ionic liquids and complex mixtures such as coal liquids. The approach is especially useful in systems with strong nonidealities. This chapter describes successful application of such modeling to a wide variety of systems treated over several decades and suggests how...

  13. Solution structure of the complex of VEK-30 and plasminogen kringle 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Zajicek, Jaroslav; Geiger, James H; Prorok, Mary; Castellino, Francis J

    2010-03-01

    The solution structure of the complex containing the isolated kringle 2 domain of human plasminogen (K2(Pg)) and VEK-30, a 30-amino acid residue internal peptide from a streptococcal M-like plasminogen (Pg) binding protein (PAM), has been determined by multinuclear high-resolution NMR. Complete backbone and side-chain assignments were obtained from triple-resonance experiments, after which structure calculations were performed and ultimately refined by restrained molecular simulation in water. We find that, in contrast with the dimer of complexes observed in the asymmetric unit of the crystal, global correlation times and buoyant molecular weight determinations of the complex and its individual components showed the monomeric nature of all species in solution. The NMR-derived structure of K2(Pg) in complex with VEK-30 presents a folding pattern typical of other kringle domains, while bound VEK-30 forms an end-to-end alpha-helix (residues 6-27) in the complex. Most of the VEK-30/K2(Pg) interactions in solution occur between a single face of the alpha-helix of VEK-30 and the lysine binding site (LBS) of K2(Pg). The canonical LBS of K2(Pg), consisting of Asp54, Asp56, Trp60, Arg69, and Trp70 (kringle numbering), interacts with an internal pseudo-lysine of VEK-30, comprising side-chains of Arg17, His18, and Glu20. Site-specific mutagenesis analysis confirmed that the electrostatic field formed by the N-terminal anionic residues of the VEK-30 alpha-helix, viz., Asp7, and the non-conserved cationic residues of K2(Pg), viz., Lys43 and Arg55, play additional important roles in the docking of VEK-30 to K2(Pg). Structural analysis and kringle sequence alignments revealed several important features related to exosite binding that provide a structural rationale for the high specificity and affinity of VEK-30 for K2(Pg).

  14. Polymer solution phase separation: Microgravity simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Lawrence C.; Sutter, James K.

    1989-01-01

    In many multicomponent systems, a transition from a single phase of uniform composition to a multiphase state with separated regions of different composition can be induced by changes in temperature and shear. The density difference between the phase and thermal and/or shear gradients within the system results in buoyancy driven convection. These differences affect kinetics of the phase separation if the system has a sufficiently low viscosity. This investigation presents more preliminary developments of a theoretical model in order to describe effects of the buoyancy driven convection in phase separation kinetics. Polymer solutions were employed as model systems because of the ease with which density differences can be systematically varied and because of the importance of phase separation in the processing and properties of polymeric materials. The results indicate that the kinetics of the phase separation can be performed viscometrically using laser light scattering as a principle means of following the process quantitatively. Isopycnic polymer solutions were used to determine the viscosity and density difference limits for polymer phase separation.

  15. High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Lebedev, Sergey V

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, research teams around the world have developed astrophysics-relevant research utilizing high energy-density facilities such as intense lasers and z-pinches. Every two years, at the International conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics, scientists interested in this emerging field discuss the progress in topics covering: - Stellar evolution, stellar envelopes, opacities, radiation transport - Planetary Interiors, high-pressure EOS, dense plasma atomic physics - Supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, exploding systems, strong shocks, turbulent mixing - Supernova remnants, shock processing, radiative shocks - Astrophysical jets, high-Mach-number flows, magnetized radiative jets, magnetic reconnection - Compact object accretion disks, x-ray photoionized plasmas - Ultrastrong fields, particle acceleration, collisionless shocks. These proceedings cover many of the invited and contributed papers presented at the 6th International Conference on High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophys...

  16. Union Density and Hospital Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koys, Daniel J; Martin, Wm Marty; LaVan, Helen; Katz, Marsha

    2015-01-01

    The authors address the hospital outcomes of patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income per bed. They define union density as the percentage of a hospital's employees who are in unions, healthcare quality as its 30-day acute myocardial infraction (AMI; heart attack) mortality rate, and patient satisfaction as its overall Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems score. Using a random sample of 84 union and 84 nonunion hospitals from across the United States, multiple regression analyses show that union density is negatively related to patient satisfaction. Union density is not related to healthcare quality as measured by the AMI mortality rate or to net income per bed. This implies that unions per se are not good or bad for hospitals. The authors suggest that it is better for hospital administrators to take a Balanced Scorecard approach and be concerned about employee satisfaction, patient satisfaction, healthcare quality, and net income.

  17. Density matrix quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Blunt, N S; Spencer, J S; Foulkes, W M C

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a quantum Monte Carlo method capable of sampling the full density matrix of a many-particle system, thus granting access to arbitrary reduced density matrices and allowing expectation values of complicated non-local operators to be evaluated easily. The direct sampling of the density matrix also raises the possibility of calculating previously inaccessible entanglement measures. The algorithm closely resembles the recently introduced full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo method, but works all the way from infinite to zero temperature. We explain the theory underlying the method, describe the algorithm, and introduce an importance-sampling procedure to improve the stochastic efficiency. To demonstrate the potential of our approach, the energy and staggered magnetization of the isotropic antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on small lattices and the concurrence of one-dimensional spin rings are compared to exact or well-established results. Finally, the nature of the sign problem...

  18. Effects of water transportation on subduction dynamics: Roles of viscosity and density reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Atsushi; Iwamori, Hikaru; Nakakuki, Tomoeki

    2016-11-01

    The effects of water on subduction dynamics, e.g., plate migration rate, slab geometry, stress field, and back-arc spreading, are investigated by using a 2-D self-consistent model for lithosphere subduction and whole mantle convection. We solve water transportation coupled with hydrous mineral phase changes. Mantle flows and water transportation are interactive through constitutive and state equations for hydrous rocks. Our model has successfully reproduced the water distribution in a mantle wedge and along the slab with sufficient resolution comparable to that of previous models that focus on the mantle wedge structure. As a result, low density owing to hydration reduces subduction rates, back-arc spreading, and slab stagnation on the phase boundary at 660-km depth, whereas low viscosity owing to hydration enhances rapid subduction, trench migration, and slab stagnation. We attribute these results to mechanisms that cause the hydrous buoyancy of subducting plates to reduce the slab pull force and the accompanying tensile stress on overlying lithosphere. In addition, hydrous weakening diminishes the mechanical coupling of the subducted slab with the wedge mantle and overriding lithosphere. Thus, water is capable of generating two opposite situations in the stress field of the overlying lithosphere and the subduction rate. Water is therefore expected to be an important mechanism for generating broad styles of the subduction structure and kinematics, as observed in actual subduction zones such as Tonga and Mariana. Such observed variation in the subduction mode can be caused by variation in buoyancy corresponding to the water content from relatively dry to several thousands of parts per million for the wedge mantle and slab surface, whereas the extremely buoyant case does not appear to occur in nature. Water in the mantle is thus key to better understand the whole-mantle-scale slab dynamics as well as island arc volcanic processes.

  19. Forecasting Thermosphere Density: an Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruinsma, S.

    2015-12-01

    Our knowledge of the thermosphere has improved considerably since 2000 thanks to the availability of high-resolution accelerometer inferred densities. Consequently, precision and shortcomings of thermosphere models are better known. Thermosphere density forecast accuracy is limited by: 1) the accuracy of the thermosphere model 2) the solar and geomagnetic activity forecast 3) the quality of the data assimilation system. The precision of semi-empirical thermosphere models is 10-25%. Solar activity forecasts can be accurate up to 5 days. They become less accurate with time, but some proxies are more forecastable than others. Geomagnetic activity forecasting is more problematic, since in most cases storm events cannot be predicted on any time scale. The forecast accuracy is ultimately bounded by the thermosphere model precision and the (varying) degree to which mainly the solar proxy represents EUV heating of the atmosphere. Both errors can be corrected for by means of near real time (nrt) assimilation of satellite drag data, provided that the data is of high quality. At present, only the classified High Accuracy Satellite Drag Model of the Air Force has that capability operationally, even if other prototype nrt models have been developed. Data assimilation significantly improves density forecasts up to 72-hours out; there is no gain for longer periods due to the short memory of the thermosphere system. Only physical models, e.g. TIMEGCM and CTIPe, can in principle reproduce the dynamic changes in density for example during geomagnetic storms. However, accurate information on atmospheric heating is often missing, or not used. When it is, observed and modeled Traveling Atmospheric Disturbances are very similar. Nonmigrating tides and waves propagating from the lower atmosphere cause longitudinal density variations; sources of geophysical noise for semi-empirical models, they can be predicted qualitatively and sometimes quantitatively with physical models. This

  20. Ion Pairing in Alkali Nitrate Electrolyte Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wen Jun; Zhang, Zhen; Gao, Yi Qin

    2016-03-10

    In this study, we investigate the thermodynamics of alkali nitrate salt solutions, especially the formation of contact ion pairs between alkali cation and nitrate anion. The ion-pairing propensity shows an order of LiNO3 activity coefficients and suggest that the empirical "law of matching water affinity" is followed by these alkali nitrate salt solutions. The spatial patterns of contact ion pairs are different in the three salt solutions studied here: Li(+) forms the contact ion pair with only one oxygen of the nitrate while Na(+) and K(+) can also be shared by two oxygens of the nitrate. In reproducing the salt activity coefficient using Kirkwood-Buff theory, we find that it is essential to include electronic polarization for Li(+) which has a high charge density. The electronic continuum correction for nonpolarizable force field significantly improves the agreement between the calculated activity coefficients and their experimental values. This approach also improves the performance of the force field on salt solubility. From these two aspects, this study suggests that electronic continuum correction can be a promising approach to force-field development for ions with high charge densities.

  1. Probabilistic Representations of Solutions to the Heat Equation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B Rajeev; S Thangavelu

    2003-08-01

    In this paper we provide a new (probabilistic) proof of a classical result in partial differential equations, viz. if is a tempered distribution, then the solution of the heat equation for the Laplacian, with initial condition , is given by the convolution of with the heat kernel (Gaussian density). Our results also extend the probabilistic representation of solutions of the heat equation to initial conditions that are arbitrary tempered distributions.

  2. Critical density of urban traffic

    CERN Document Server

    da Silva, Adilton Jose

    2010-01-01

    A modified version of the Intelligent Driver Model was used to simulate traffic in the district of Afogados, in the city of Recife, Brazil, with the objective to verify whether the complexity of the underlying street grid, with multiple lane streets, crossings, and semaphores, is capable of exhibiting the effect of critical density: appearance of a maximum in the vehicle flux versus density curve. Numerical simulations demonstrate that this effect indeed is observed on individual avenues, while the phase offset among the avenues results in damping of this effect for the region as a whole.

  3. An Inexpensive Solution Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Emma; Mindel, Sam; Robertson, Giles; Hughes, D. E. Peter

    2008-01-01

    We describe the construction of a simple solution calorimeter, using a miniature bead thermistor as a temperature-sensing element. This has a response time of a few seconds and made it possible to carry out a thermometric reaction in under a minute, which led to minimal heat losses. Small temperature changes of 1 K associated with enthalpies of…

  4. Treatment of Aqueous Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Spronsen, J.; Witkamp, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    The invention is directed to a process for the recovery or removal of one or more crystallizable compounds from an aqueous solution containing, apart from the said crystallizable compounds, one or more organic or inorganic scale- forming or scale-inducing materials having a lower solubility in water

  5. Intestinal solute carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffansen, Bente; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger

    2004-01-01

    A large amount of absorptive intestinal membrane transporters play an important part in absorption and distribution of several nutrients, drugs and prodrugs. The present paper gives a general overview on intestinal solute carriers as well as on trends and strategies for targeting drugs and/or pro...

  6. School Solutions for Cyberbullying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Susan

    2009-01-01

    This article offers solutions and steps to prevent cyberbullying. Schools can improve their ability to handle cyberbullying by educating staff members, students, and parents and by implementing rules and procedures for how to handle possible incidents. Among the steps is to include a section about cyberbullying and expectations in the student…

  7. Existence of noncontinuable solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Bartusek

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents necessary and sufficient conditions for an n-th order differential equation to have a non-continuable solution with finite limits of its derivatives up to the orders n-2 at the right-hand end point of the definition interval.

  8. McMillan-Mayer Theory of Solutions Revisited: Simplifications and Extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Vafaei, Shaghayegh; Gray, C G

    2014-01-01

    McMillan and Mayer (MM) proved two remarkable theorems in their paper on the equilibrium statistical mechanics of liquid solutions. They first showed that the grand canonical partition function for a solution can be reduced to a one with an effectively solute-only form, by integrating out the solvent degrees of freedom. The total effective solute potential in the effective solute grand partition function can be decomposed into components which are potentials of mean force for isolated groups of one, two, three, etc, solute molecules. Secondly, from the first result, now assuming low solute concentration, MM derived an expansion for the osmotic pressure in powers of the solute concentration, in complete analogy with the virial expansion of gas pressure in powers of the density at low density. The molecular expressions found for the osmotic virial coefficients have exactly the same form as the corresponding gas virial coefficients, with potentials of mean force replacing vacuum potentials. In this paper we rest...

  9. Oral rehydration solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-18

    In the US oral glucose electrolyte solutions have been marketed for over 30 years for the treatment of infantile diarrhea. Recently, oral solutions have been widely used instead of intravenous fluids for treatment of dehydration from diarrhea, especially in developing countries, where diarrhea is a major cause of death in infants and young children and facilities for intravenous fluid replacement are limited or unavailable. The high concentrations of glucose and other carbohydrates in older preparations may make the diarrhea worse. The use of 2-2 1/2% glucose, as in "Infalyte, Pedialyte R.S." and the World Health Organization (WHO) solution avoids the osmotic effect of unabsorbed glucose, makes the taste tolerable, and promotes coupled absorption of sodium from the intestine. Replacement solutions for fluid loss due to diarrhea should also contain about 20 mEq/L of potassium because diarrhea invariably results in a substantial loss of potassium. Although homemade mixtures of glucose electrolyte solutions and commercial powders that require dilution are less costly than ready to use commercial solutions, errors in mixing or diluting occur often and can have serious consequences. For rehydration after volume depletion, the sodium concentration of the replacement fluid should be between 50-90 mEq/L, regardless of the cause of the diarrhea, patient's age, or the serum sodium concentration. For early treatment of diarrhea to prevent dehydration or for maintenance of hydration after parenteral fluid replacement, 90 mEq/L of sodium is acceptable for adults and children, but may not be appropriate for infants who have a higher insensible water loss. When diarrhea in infants is not caused by cholera, some consultants prefer to use more dilute fluids that contain 50-60 mEq/L of sodium. When circulatory insufficiency (10-15% weight loss), severe vomiting, inability to drink, or severe gastric distention is present, parenteral fluid replacement is indicated. With 5-8% acute

  10. A density-division embedding potential inversion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roncero, O.; Zanchet, A.; Villarreal, P.; Aguado, A.

    2009-12-01

    A new method is proposed to partition the density of a system in two portions. The density on each subsystem is the solution of a Fock equation modified by the addition of an embedding potential. This embedding potential is obtained iteratively by minimizing the difference between the electronic densities of the total system and the sum of the subsystems. Thus, the electronic density partition and the embedding potential are obtained at the same time within the procedure, guarantying the v-representability of the densities partitioned. This fact is a considerable improvement of a recently proposed embedding potential inversion technique, [O. Roncero, M. P. de Lara-Castells, P. Villarreal, F. Flores, J. Ortega, M. Paniagua, and A. Aguado, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 184104 (2008)], in which the embedding potential is obtained once the electronic density is previously partitioned. The method is first applied to a linear H10 chain to illustrate how it works. The orbitals obtained are localized on each subsystem, and can be used to include local electronic correlation with currently available ab initio programs. Finally, the method is applied to include the electronic correlation needed to describe the van der Waals interaction between H10 chains and H2 molecules, of ≈12 meV, giving very accurate results.

  11. A new and facile method for measurement of apparent density of monodisperse polymer beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Srinivasan, Balasubramanian; Li, Yuanpeng; Jing, Ying; Xing, Chengguo; Chang, Jin; Wang, Jian-Ping

    2010-03-15

    The apparent density, an intrinsic physical property of polymer beads, plays an important role in the application of beads in micro-total analysis systems and separation. Here we have developed a new, facile and milligram-scale method to describe the motion of beads in aqueous solution and further detect the apparent density of beads. The motion of beads in solutions is determined by the viscosity of solutions and the density difference between beads and solutions. In this study, using various glycerol aqueous solutions with certain viscosities and densities, the motion time (i.e. floating or sedimentation time) of hybrid polymer beads was experimentally measured and theoretically deduced, and consequently, the apparent density of monodisperse beads can be quickly and easily calculated. The results indicated that the present method provided a more precise way to predict the movement of hybrid beads in aqueous solution compared with the approach for commercial use. This new method can be potentially employed in flow cytometry, suspension stability, and particle analysis systems.

  12. The Friedberg-Lee model at finite temperature and density

    CERN Document Server

    Mao, Hong; Zhao, Wei-Qin

    2007-01-01

    The Friedberg-Lee model is studied at finite temperature and density. By using the finite temperature field theory, the effective potential of the Friedberg-Lee model and the bag constant $B(T)$ and $B(T,\\mu)$ have been calculated at different temperatures and densities. It is shown that there is a critical temperature $T_{C}\\simeq 106.6 \\mathrm{MeV}$ when $\\mu=0 \\mathrm{MeV}$ and a critical chemical potential $\\mu \\simeq 223.1 \\mathrm{MeV}$ for fixing the temperature at $T=50 \\mathrm{MeV}$. We also calculate the soliton solutions of the Friedberg-Lee model at finite temperature and density. It turns out that when $T\\leq T_{C}$ (or $\\mu \\leq \\mu_C$), there is a bag constant $B(T)$ (or $B(T,\\mu)$) and the soliton solutions are stable. However, when $T>T_{C}$ (or $\\mu>\\mu_C$) the bag constant $B(T)=0 \\mathrm{MeV}$ (or $B(T,\\mu)=0 \\mathrm{MeV}$) and there is no soliton solution anymore, therefore, the confinement of quarks disappears quickly.

  13. Friedberg-Lee model at finite temperature and density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hong; Yao, Minjie; Zhao, Wei-Qin

    2008-06-01

    The Friedberg-Lee model is studied at finite temperature and density. By using the finite temperature field theory, the effective potential of the Friedberg-Lee model and the bag constant B(T) and B(T,μ) have been calculated at different temperatures and densities. It is shown that there is a critical temperature TC≃106.6 MeV when μ=0 MeV and a critical chemical potential μ≃223.1 MeV for fixing the temperature at T=50 MeV. We also calculate the soliton solutions of the Friedberg-Lee model at finite temperature and density. It turns out that when T⩽TC (or μ⩽μC), there is a bag constant B(T) [or B(T,μ)] and the soliton solutions are stable. However, when T>TC (or μ>μC) the bag constant B(T)=0 MeV [or B(T,μ)=0 MeV] and there is no soliton solution anymore, therefore, the confinement of quarks disappears quickly.

  14. Density Functionals of Chemical Bonding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of electrons in general many-electronic systems throughout the density functionals of energy is reviewed. The basic physico-chemical concepts of density functional theory are employed to highlight the energy role in chemical structure while its extended influence in electronic localization function helps in chemical bonding understanding. In this context the energy functionals accompanied by electronic localization functions may provide a comprehensive description of the global-local levels electronic structures in general and of chemical bonds in special. Becke-Edgecombe and author’s Markovian electronic localization functions are discussed at atomic, molecular and solid state levels. Then, the analytical survey of the main workable kinetic, exchange, and correlation density functionals within local and gradient density approximations is undertaken. The hierarchy of various energy functionals is formulated by employing both the parabolic and statistical correlation degree of them with the electronegativity and chemical hardness indices by means of quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR analysis for basic atomic and molecular systems.

  15. Information Density and Syntactic Repetition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temperley, David; Gildea, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    In noun phrase (NP) coordinate constructions (e.g., NP and NP), there is a strong tendency for the syntactic structure of the second conjunct to match that of the first; the second conjunct in such constructions is therefore low in syntactic information. The theory of uniform information density predicts that low-information syntactic…

  16. Quantal Density Functional Theory II

    CERN Document Server

    Sahni, Viraht

    2009-01-01

    Discusses approximation methods and applications of Quantal Density Functional Theory (QDFT), a local effective-potential-energy theory of electronic structure. This book describes approximations methods based on the incorporation of different electron correlations, as well as a many-body perturbation theory within the context of QDFT

  17. Density profiles of LCDM clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tasitsiomi, A; Gottlöber, S; Klypin, A A; Tasitsiomi, Argyro; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Gottloeber, Stefan; Klypin, Anatoly A.

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the mass accretion histories (MAHs) and density profiles of cluster- size halos with virial masses of 0.6-2.5x10^14/h Msun in a flat LCDM cosmology. In agreement with previous studies,we find that the concentration of the density distribution is tightly correlated with the halo's MAH and its formation redshift.During the period of fast mass growth the concentration remains approximately constant and low c_v~3-4,while during the slow accretion stages it increases with decreasing redshift as c_v~(1+z)^-1.We consider fits of three widely discussed analytic density profiles to the simulated clusters focusing on the most relaxed inner regions.We find that there is no unique best fit analytic profile for all the systems.If,however,a cluster is best fit by a particular analytic profile at z=0,the same is usually true at earlier epochs out to z~1-2.The local logarithmic slope of the density profiles at 3% of the virial radius ranges from -1.2 to -2.0,a remarkable diversity for the relatively narrow mass ra...

  18. High-density multicore fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Takenaga, K.; Matsuo, S.; Saitoh, K.;

    2016-01-01

    High-density single-mode multicore fibers were designed and fabricated. A heterogeneous 30-core fiber realized a low crosstalk of −55 dB. A quasi-single-mode homogeneous 31-core fiber attained the highest core count as a single-mode multicore fiber....

  19. PWM Converter Power Density Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolar, Johann W.; Drofenik, Uwe; Biela, Juergen; Heldwein, Marcelo; Ertl, Hans; Friedli, Thomas; Round, Simon

    Power density of power electronic converters has roughly doubled every 10 years since 1970. Behind this trajectory is the continuous advancement of power semiconductor devices, which has increased the converter switching frequencies by a factor of 10 every decade. However, today's cooling concepts and passive components are major barriers for a continuation of this trend. To identify such technological barriers, this paper investigates the volume of the cooling system and passive components as a function of the switching frequency for power electronic converters and determines the switching frequency that minimizes the total volume. A power density limit of 28kW/dm3 at 300kHz is calculated for an isolated DC-DC converter, 44kW/dm3 at 820kHz for a three-phase unity power factor PWM rectifier, and 26kW/dm3 at 21kHz for a sparse matrix converter. For single-phase AC-DC conversion a general limit of 35kW/dm3 results from the DC link capacitor. These power density limits highlight the need to broaden the scope of power electronics research to include cooling systems, high frequency electromagnetics, interconnection and packaging technology, and multi-domain modelling and simulation to ensure further advancement along the power density trajectory.

  20. Active Free Surface Density Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelen, S.

    2016-10-01

    Percolation problems were occupied to many physical problems after their establishment in 1957 by Broadbent and Hammersley. They can be used to solve complex systems such as bone remodeling. Volume fraction method was adopted to set some algorithms in the literature. However, different rate of osteoporosis could be observed for different microstructures which have the same mass density, mechanical stimuli, hormonal stimuli and nutrition. Thus it was emphasized that the bone might have identical porosity with different specific surfaces. Active free surface density of bone refers the used total area for its effective free surface. The purpose of this manuscript is to consolidate a mathematical approach which can be called as “active free surface density maps” for different surface patterns and derive their formulations. Active free surface density ratios were calculated for different Archimedean lattice models according to Helmholtz free energy and they were compared with their site and bond percolation thresholds from the background studies to derive their potential probability for bone remodeling.